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Sample records for boidinii formate dehydrogenase

  1. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Formate Dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi; Gakhar, Lokesh; Wickersham, Kyle; Francis, Kevin; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Major, Dan T; Cheatum, Christopher M; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-05-17

    The structure of formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) is of both academic and practical interests. First, this enzyme represents a unique model system for studies on the role of protein dynamics in catalysis, but so far these studies have been limited by the availability of structural information. Second, CbFDH and its mutants can be used in various industrial applications (e.g., CO2 fixation or nicotinamide recycling systems), and the lack of structural information has been a limiting factor in commercial development. Here, we report the crystallization and structural determination of both holo- and apo-CbFDH. The free-energy barrier for the catalyzed reaction was computed and indicates that this structure indeed represents a catalytically competent form of the enzyme. Complementing kinetic examinations demonstrate that the recombinant CbFDH has a well-organized reactive state. Finally, a fortuitous observation has been made: the apoenzyme crystal was obtained under cocrystallization conditions with a saturating concentration of both the cofactor (NAD(+)) and inhibitor (azide), which has a nanomolar dissociation constant. It was found that the fraction of the apoenzyme present in the solution is less than 1.7 × 10(-7) (i.e., the solution is 99.9999% holoenzyme). This is an extreme case where the crystal structure represents an insignificant fraction of the enzyme in solution, and a mechanism rationalizing this phenomenon is presented. PMID:27100912

  2. Whole-cell bioreduction of aromatic α-keto esters using Candida tenuis xylose reductase and Candida boidinii formate dehydrogenase co-expressed in Escherichia coli

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    Egger Sigrid

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole cell-catalyzed biotransformation is a clear process option for the production of chiral alcohols via enantioselective reduction of precursor ketones. A wide variety of synthetically useful reductases are expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli to a high level of activity. Therefore, this microbe has become a prime system for carrying out whole-cell bioreductions at different scales. The limited capacity of central metabolic pathways in E. coli usually requires that reductase coenzyme in the form of NADPH or NADH be regenerated through a suitable oxidation reaction catalyzed by a second NADP+ or NAD+ dependent dehydrogenase that is co-expressed. Candida tenuis xylose reductase (CtXR was previously shown to promote NADH dependent reduction of aromatic α-keto esters with high Prelog-type stereoselectivity. We describe here the development of a new whole-cell biocatalyst that is based on an E. coli strain co-expressing CtXR and formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH. The bacterial system was evaluated for the synthesis of ethyl R-4-cyanomandelate under different process conditions and benchmarked against a previously described catalyst derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing CtXR. Results Gene co-expression from a pETDuet-1 vector yielded about 260 and 90 units of intracellular CtXR and CbFDH activity per gram of dry E. coli cell mass (gCDW. The maximum conversion rate (rS for ethyl 4-cyanobenzoylformate by intact or polymyxin B sulphate-permeabilized cells was similar (2 mmol/gCDWh, suggesting that the activity of CbFDH was partly rate-limiting overall. Uncatalyzed ester hydrolysis in substrate as well as inactivation of CtXR and CbFDH in the presence of the α-keto ester constituted major restrictions to the yield of alcohol product. Using optimized reaction conditions (100 mM substrate; 40 gCDW/L, we obtained ethyl R-4-cyanomandelate with an enantiomeric excess (e.e. of 97.2% in a yield of 82

  3. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  4. Production of Formaldehyde by Detergent-Treated Cells of a Methanol Yeast, Candida boidinii S2 Mutant Strain AOU-1

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Tani, Yoshiki

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of cells of a methanol yeast, Candida boidinii, with the cationic detergent cetyldimethylbenzyl-ammonium chloride (Cation M2) improved the production of formaldehyde. Formaldehyde production was improved twofold with respect to the initial amount of formaldehyde and 1.61-fold with respect to the final amount of formaldehyde after a 12-h reaction under optimized detergent treatment conditions. The treatment caused formaldehyde and formate dehydrogenases to leak out of the cells more ...

  5. Characterization of a flavinogenic mutant of methanol yeast Candida boidinii and its extracellular secretion of riboflavin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadi, H; Yoshida, N; Yamada-Onodera, K; Katsuragi, T; Tani, Y

    2000-01-01

    A flavinogenic mutant was derived from Candida boidinii by mutagenesis. The mutant was smaller than the wild type, did not grow on a minimal medium, and required l-tryptophan, l-leucine, inositol, and nicotinate for growth. The mutant was defective in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, lacking glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. The specific activities of the transaldolase and transketolase of the mutant were higher than those of the wild type. These high activities might direct the flux of the carbon source to the nonoxidative pathway with formation of a large amount of pentose phosphates, increasing riboflavin synthesis. Under microaerobic conditions at 25 degrees C, 90 mg/l riboflavin was obtained. PMID:16232817

  6. Microbial surface displaying formate dehydrogenase and its application in optical detection of formate.

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    Liu, Aihua; Feng, Ruirui; Liang, Bo

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, NAD(+)-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH), encoded by fdh gene from Candida boidinii was successfully displayed on Escherichia coli cell surface using ice nucleation protein (INP) from Pseudomonas borealis DL7 as an anchoring protein. Localization of matlose binding protein (MBP)-INP-FDH fusion protein on the E. coli cell surface was characterized by SDS-PAGE and enzymatic activity assay. FDH activity was monitored through the oxidation of formate catalyzed by cell-surface-displayed FDH with its cofactor NAD(+), and the production of NADH can be detected spectrometrically at 340nm. After induction for 24h in Luria-Bertani medium containing isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside, over 80% of MBP-INP-FDH fusion protein present on the surface of E. coli cells. The cell-surface-displayed FDH showed optimal temperature of 50°C and optimal pH of 9.0. Additionally, the cell-surface-displayed FDH retained its original enzymatic activity after incubation at 4°C for one month with the half-life of 17days at 40°C and 38h at 50°C. The FDH activity could be inhibited to different extents by some transition metal ions and anions. Moreover, the E. coli cells expressing FDH showed different tolerance to solvents. The recombinant whole cell exhibited high formate specificity. Finally, the E. coli cell expressing FDH was used to assay formate with a wide linear range of 5-700μM and a low limit of detection of 2μM. It is anticipated that the genetically engineered cells may have a broad application in biosensors, biofuels and cofactor regeneration system. PMID:27444330

  7. Host cell and expression engineering for development of an E. coli ketoreductase catalyst: Enhancement of formate dehydrogenase activity for regeneration of NADH

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    Mädje Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymatic NADH or NADPH-dependent reduction is a widely applied approach for the synthesis of optically active organic compounds. The overall biocatalytic conversion usually involves in situ regeneration of the expensive NAD(PH. Oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide, catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.2; FDH, presents an almost ideal process solution for coenzyme regeneration that has been well established for NADH. Because isolated FDH is relatively unstable under a range of process conditions, whole cells often constitute the preferred form of the biocatalyst, combining the advantage of enzyme protection in the cellular environment with ease of enzyme production. However, the most prominent FDH used in biotransformations, the enzyme from the yeast Candida boidinii, is usually expressed in limiting amounts of activity in the prime host for whole cell biocatalysis, Escherichia coli. We therefore performed expression engineering with the aim of enhancing FDH activity in an E. coli ketoreductase catalyst. The benefit resulting from improved NADH regeneration capacity is demonstrated in two transformations of technological relevance: xylose conversion into xylitol, and synthesis of (S-1-(2-chlorophenylethanol from o-chloroacetophenone. Results As compared to individual expression of C. boidinii FDH in E. coli BL21 (DE3 that gave an intracellular enzyme activity of 400 units/gCDW, co-expression of the FDH with the ketoreductase (Candida tenuis xylose reductase; XR resulted in a substantial decline in FDH activity. The remaining FDH activity of only 85 U/gCDW was strongly limiting the overall catalytic activity of the whole cell system. Combined effects from increase in FDH gene copy number, supply of rare tRNAs in a Rosetta strain of E. coli, dampened expression of the ketoreductase, and induction at low temperature (18°C brought up the FDH activity threefold to a level of 250 U/gCDW while reducing the XR activity by

  8. Phosphorylation of formate dehydrogenase in potato tuber mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykova, N.V.; Stensballe, A.; Egsgaard, H.;

    2003-01-01

    Two highly phosphorylated proteins were detected after two-dimensional (blue native/SDS-PAGE) gel electrophoretic separation of the matrix fraction isolated from potato tuber mitochondria. These two phosphoproteins were identified by mass spectrometry as formate dehydrogenase (FDH) and the E1alpha...... extent of phosphorylation of both FDH and PDH was strongly decreased by NAD+, formate, and pyruvate, indicating that reversible phosphorylation of FDH and PDHs was regulated in a similar fashion. At low oxygen concentrations inside the intact potato tubers, FDH activity was strongly increased relative to...... cytochrome c oxidase activity pointing to a possible involvement of FDH in hypoxic metabolism. Computational sequence analysis indicated that a conserved local sequence motif of pyruvate formate-lyase is found in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, and this enzyme might be the source of formate for FDH in...

  9. A Methylotrophic Pathway Participates in Pectin Utilization by Candida boidinii

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Tomoyuki; Miyaji, Tatsuro; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Kato, Nobuo; Tomizuka, Noboru

    2000-01-01

    The methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii S2 was found to be able to grow on pectin or polygalacturonate as a carbon source. When cells were grown on 1% (wt/vol) pectin, C. boidinii exhibited induced levels of the pectin-depolymerizing enzymes pectin methylesterase (208 mU/mg of protein), pectin lyase (673 mU/mg), pectate lyase (673 mU/mg), and polygalacturonase (3.45 U/mg) and two methanol-metabolizing peroxisomal enzymes, alcohol oxidase (0.26 U/mg) and dihydroxyacetone synthase (94 mU/mg)....

  10. Interconversion between formate and hydrogen carbonate by tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase-catalyzed mediated bioelectrocatalysis

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    Kento Sakai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have focused on the catalytic properties of tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase (FoDH1 from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 to construct a bioelectrochemical interconversion system between formate (HCOO− and hydrogen carbonate (HCO3−. FoDH1 catalyzes both of the HCOO oxidation and the HCO3− reduction with several artificial dyes. The bi-molecular reaction rate constants between FoDH1 and the artificial electron acceptors and NAD+ (as the natural electron acceptor show the property called a linear free energy relationship (LFER, indicating that FoDH1 would have no specificity to NAD+. Similar LFER is also observed for the catalytic reduction of HCO3−. The reversible reaction between HCOO− and HCO3− through FoDH1 has been realized on cyclic voltammetry by using methyl viologen (MV as a mediator and by adjusting pH from the thermodynamic viewpoint. Potentiometric measurements have revealed that the three redox couples, MV2+/MV·−+, HCOO−/HCO3−, FoDH1 (ox/red, reach an equilibrium in the bulk solution when the two-way bioelectrocatalysis proceeds in the presence of FoDH1 and MV. The steady-state voltammograms with two-way bioelectrocatalytic properties are interpreted on a simple model by considering the solution equilibrium.

  11. Lactate dehydrogenase has no control on lactate production but has a strong negative control on formate production in Lactococcus lactis

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    Andersen, H.W.; Pedersen, M.B.; Hammer, Karin;

    2001-01-01

    enhanced in the strain deleted for lactate dehydrogenase. What is more surprising is that the enzyme had a strong negative control (C- LDH(F1)J=-1.3) on the flux to formate at the wild-type level of lactate dehydrogenase. Furthermore, we showed that L. lactis has limited excess of capacity of lactate...

  12. Corynebacterium glutamicum harbours a molybdenum cofactor-dependent formate dehydrogenase which alleviates growth inhibition in the presence of formate.

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    Witthoff, Sabrina; Eggeling, Lothar; Bott, Michael; Polen, Tino

    2012-09-01

    Here, we show that Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 co-metabolizes formate when it is grown with glucose as the carbon and energy source. CO(2) measurements during bioreactor cultivation and use of (13)C-labelled formate demonstrated that formate is almost completely oxidized to CO(2). The deletion of fdhF (cg0618), annotated as formate dehydrogenase (FDH) and located in a cluster of genes conserved in the family Corynebacteriaceae, prevented formate utilization. Similarly, deletion of fdhD (cg0616) resulted in the inability to metabolize formate and deletion of cg0617 markedly reduced formate utilization. These results illustrated that all three gene products are required for FDH activity. Growth studies with molybdate and tungstate indicated that the FDH from C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 is a molybdenum-dependent enzyme. The presence of 100 mM formate caused a 25 % lowered growth rate during cultivation of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 wild-type in glucose minimal medium. This inhibitory effect was increased in the strains lacking FDH activity. Our data demonstrate that C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 possesses an FDH with a currently unknown electron acceptor. The presence of the FDH might help the soil bacterium C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 to alleviate growth retardation caused by formate, which is ubiquitously present in the environment. PMID:22767548

  13. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI2 with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD+-azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state

  14. High-frequency transformation of a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii, with autonomously replicating plasmids which are also functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Y.; Goh, T K; Tani, Y

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a transformation system which uses autonomous replicating plasmids for a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii. Two autonomous replication sequences, CARS1 and CARS2, were newly cloned from the genome of C. boidinii. Plasmids having both a CARS fragment and the C. boidinii URA3 gene transformed C. boidinii ura3 cells to Ura+ phenotype at frequencies of up to 10(4) CFU/micrograms of DNA. From Southern blot analysis, CARS plasmids seemed to exist in polymeric forms as well as...

  15. Peroxisomal Catalase in the Methylotrophic Yeast Candida boidinii: Transport Efficiency and Metabolic Significance

    OpenAIRE

    Horiguchi, Hirofumi; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Goh, Toh-Kheng; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    In this study we cloned CTA1, the gene encoding peroxisomal catalase, from the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii and studied targeting of the gene product, Cta1p, into peroxisomes by using green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins. A strain from which CTA1 was deleted (cta1Δ strain) showed marked growth inhibition when it was grown on the peroxisome-inducing carbon sources methanol, oleate, and d-alanine, indicating that peroxisomal catalase plays an important nonspecific role in pe...

  16. Integrated Process of Arabinose Biopurification and Xylitol Fermentation Based on the Diverse Action of Candida boidinii

    OpenAIRE

    Fehér, C.; Gazsó, Z.; Gál, B.; Kontra, A.; Barta, Z.; Réczey, K.

    2016-01-01

    Hemicellulosic hydrolysates of agro-residues are promising raw materials for xylitol and arabinose production through biotechnological methods. Two-step acidic fractionation of corn fibre was developed to produce a glucose- and arabinose-rich hydrolysate and a xylose-rich hydrolysate. An integrated process of arabinose biopurification on the glucose- and arabinose-rich hydrolysate and xylitol fermentation on the xylose-rich hydrolysate using Candida boidinii NCAIM Y.01308 was introduced, i...

  17. Periplasmic nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase: similar molecular architectures with very different enzymatic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Gonzalez, Pablo J; Fernandes, Pedro A; Moura, José J G; Ramos, Maria João

    2015-11-17

    It is remarkable how nature has been able to construct enzymes that, despite sharing many similarities, have simple but key differences that tune them for completely different functions in living cells. Periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) from the DMSOr family are representative examples of this. Both enzymes share almost identical three-dimensional protein foldings and active sites, in terms of coordination number, geometry and nature of the ligands. The substrates of both enzymes (nitrate and formate) are polyatomic anions that also share similar charge and stereochemistry. In terms of the catalytic mechanism, both enzymes have a common activation mechanism (the sulfur-shift mechanism) that ensures a constant coordination number around the metal ion during the catalytic cycle. In spite of these similarities, they catalyze very different reactions: Nap abstracts an oxygen atom from nitrate releasing nitrite, whereas FdH catalyzes a hydrogen atom transfer from formate and releases carbon dioxide. In this Account, a critical analysis of structure, function, and catalytic mechanism of the molybdenum enzymes periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) is presented. We conclude that the main structural driving force that dictates the type of reaction, catalyzed by each enzyme, is a key difference on one active site residue that is located in the top region of the active sites of both enzymes. In both enzymes, the active site is centered on the metal ion of the cofactor (Mo in Nap and Mo or W in Fdh) that is coordinated by four sulfur atoms from two pyranopterin guanosine dinucleotide (PGD) molecules and by a sulfido. However, while in Nap there is a Cys directly coordinated to the Mo ion, in FdH there is a SeCys instead. In Fdh there is also an important His that interacts very closely with the SeCys, whereas in Nap the same position is occupied by a Met. The role of Cys in Nap and SeCys in FdH is similar in both

  18. Efficient production of (R-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutyric acid by using a coupled reconstructed D-lactate dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase system.

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    Binbin Sheng

    Full Text Available (R-2-hydroxy-4-phenylbutyric acid [(R-HPBA] is a key precursor for the production of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. However, the product yield and concentration of reported (R-HPBA synthetic processes remain unsatisfactory.The Y52L/F299Y mutant of NAD-dependent D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-nLDH in Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC 11842 was found to have high bio-reduction activity toward 2-oxo-4-phenylbutyric acid (OPBA. The mutant D-nLDHY52L/F299Y was then coexpressed with formate dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 to construct a novel biocatalyst E. coli DF. Thus, a novel bio-reduction process utilizing whole cells of E. coli DF as the biocatalyst and formate as the co-substrate for cofactor regeneration was developed for the production of (R-HPBA from OPBA. The biocatalysis conditions were then optimized.Under the optimum conditions, 73.4 mM OPBA was reduced to 71.8 mM (R-HPBA in 90 min. Given its high product enantiomeric excess (>99% and productivity (47.9 mM h(-1, the constructed coupling biocatalysis system is a promising alternative for (R-HPBA production.

  19. Dimerization interface of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase tunes the formation of its catalytic intermediate.

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    Yingzhi Xu

    Full Text Available 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD, EC 1.1.1.35 is a homodimeric enzyme localized in the mitochondrial matrix, which catalyzes the third step in fatty acid β-oxidation. The crystal structures of human HAD and subsequent complexes with cofactor/substrate enabled better understanding of HAD catalytic mechanism. However, numerous human diseases were found related to mutations at HAD dimerization interface that is away from the catalytic pocket. The role of HAD dimerization in its catalytic activity needs to be elucidated. Here, we solved the crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans HAD (cHAD that is highly conserved to human HAD. Even though the cHAD mutants (R204A, Y209A and R204A/Y209A with attenuated interactions on the dimerization interface still maintain a dimerization form, their enzymatic activities significantly decrease compared to that of the wild type. Such reduced activities are in consistency with the reduced ratios of the catalytic intermediate formation. Further molecular dynamics simulations results reveal that the alteration of the dimerization interface will increase the fluctuation of a distal region (a.a. 60-80 that plays an important role in the substrate binding. The increased fluctuation decreases the stability of the catalytic intermediate formation, and therefore the enzymatic activity is attenuated. Our study reveals the molecular mechanism about the essential role of the HAD dimerization interface in its catalytic activity via allosteric effects.

  20. Reduction of Carbon Dioxide by a Molybdenum-Containing Formate Dehydrogenase: A Kinetic and Mechanistic Study.

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    Maia, Luisa B; Fonseca, Luis; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2016-07-20

    Carbon dioxide accumulation is a major concern for the ecosystems, but its abundance and low cost make it an interesting source for the production of chemical feedstocks and fuels. However, the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the carbon dioxide molecule makes its activation a challenging task. Studying the chemistry used by nature to functionalize carbon dioxide should be helpful for the development of new efficient (bio)catalysts for atmospheric carbon dioxide utilization. In this work, the ability of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans formate dehydrogenase (Dd FDH) to reduce carbon dioxide was kinetically and mechanistically characterized. The Dd FDH is suggested to be purified in an inactive form that has to be activated through a reduction-dependent mechanism. A kinetic model of a hysteretic enzyme is proposed to interpret and predict the progress curves of the Dd FDH-catalyzed reactions (initial lag phase and subsequent faster phase). Once activated, Dd FDH is able to efficiently catalyze, not only the formate oxidation (kcat of 543 s(-1), Km of 57.1 μM), but also the carbon dioxide reduction (kcat of 46.6 s(-1), Km of 15.7 μM), in an overall reaction that is thermodynamically and kinetically reversible. Noteworthy, both Dd FDH-catalyzed formate oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction are completely inactivated by cyanide. Current FDH reaction mechanistic proposals are discussed and a different mechanism is here suggested: formate oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction are proposed to proceed through hydride transfer and the sulfo group of the oxidized and reduced molybdenum center, Mo(6+)═S and Mo(4+)-SH, are suggested to be the direct hydride acceptor and donor, respectively. PMID:27348246

  1. Characterization of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase from Staphylococcus aureus ATCC12600 and its involvement in biofilm formation

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    S. Yeswanth

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Staphylococcus aureus purine metabolism plays a crucial role in the formation of biofilm which is a key pathogenic factor. The present study is aimed in the characterization of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH from Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600. Methods: IMPDH gene was amplified using primers designed from IMPDH gene sequence of S. aureus reported in the database. Then polymerase chain reaction (PCR product was cloned in the Sma I site of M13mp18 and expressed in Escherichia coli JM109. The recombinant IMPDH (rIMPDH was overexpressed with 1 mM isopropyl beta-D-1- thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG; Michaelis constant (Km, maximum enzyme velocity (Vmax and catalytic constant (Kcat of expressed IMPDH were determined. Results: The enzyme kinetics of IMPDH grown under aerobic conditions showed a Km of 43.71±1.56 µM, Vmax of 0.247±0.84/µM/mg/min and Kcat of 2.74±0.015/min while in anaerobic conditions the kinetics showed Km of 42.81±3.154/ µM, Vmax of 0.378±0.036 µM/mg/min and Kcat of 4.78±0.021 /min, indicating elevated levels of IMPDH activity under anaerobic conditions. Three-folds increased activity in the presence of 1 mM adenosine triphosphate (ATP correlated with biofilm formation. The kinetics of pure rIMPDH were close to the native IMPDH of S. aureus ATCC12600 and the enzyme showed single band in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 53 KDa. Conclusions: Elevated activity of IMPDH was observed in S. aureus grown under anaerobic conditions and this was correlated with the biofilm formation indicating the linkage between purine metabolism and pathogenesis.

  2. Highly stable and reusable immobilized formate dehydrogenases: Promising biocatalysts for in situ regeneration of NADH

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    Yildirim, Deniz; Çelik, Ayhan; Tükel, S Seyhan

    2016-01-01

    Summary This study aimed to prepare robust immobilized formate dehydrogenase (FDH) preparations which can be used as effective biocatalysts along with functional oxidoreductases, in which in situ regeneration of NADH is required. For this purpose, Candida methylica FDH was covalently immobilized onto Immobead 150 support (FDHI150), Immobead 150 support modified with ethylenediamine and then activated with glutaraldehyde (FDHIGLU), and Immobead 150 support functionalized with aldehyde groups (FDHIALD). The highest immobilization yield and activity yield were obtained as 90% and 132%, respectively when Immobead 150 functionalized with aldehyde groups was used as support. The half-life times (t 1/2) of free FDH, FDHI150, FDHIGLU and FDHIALD were calculated as 10.6, 28.9, 22.4 and 38.5 h, respectively at 35 °C. FDHI150, FDHIGLU and FDHIALD retained 69, 38 and 51% of their initial activities, respectively after 10 reuses. The results show that the FDHI150, FDHIGLU and FDHIALD offer feasible potentials for in situ regeneration of NADH. PMID:26977186

  3. OsHSD1, a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, is involved in cuticle formation and lipid homeostasis in rice.

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    Zhang, Zhe; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Gan, Lu; Zhang, Huan; Wu, Fu-Qing; Lin, Qi-Bing; Wang, Jiu-Lin; Wang, Jie; Guo, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Zhi-Chao; Lei, Cai-Lin; Zhu, Shan-Shan; Wang, Chun-Ming; Wan, Jian-Min

    2016-08-01

    Cuticular wax, a hydrophobic layer on the surface of all aerial plant organs, has essential roles in plant growth and survival under various environments. Here we report a wax-deficient rice mutant oshsd1 with reduced epicuticular wax crystals and thicker cuticle membrane. Quantification of the wax components and fatty acids showed elevated levels of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) and accumulation of soluble fatty acids in the leaves of the oshsd1 mutant. We determined the causative gene OsHSD1, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase reductase family, through map-based cloning. It was ubiquitously expressed and responded to cold stress and exogenous treatments with NaCl or brassinosteroid analogs. Transient expression of OsHSD1-tagged green fluorescent protein revealed that OsHSD1 localized to both oil bodies and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Dehydrogenase activity assays demonstrated that OsHSD1 was an NAD(+)/NADP(+)-dependent sterol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, OsHSD1 mutation resulted in faster protein degradation, but had no effect on the dehydrogenase activity. Together, our data indicated that OsHSD1 plays a specialized role in cuticle formation and lipid homeostasis, probably by mediating sterol signaling. This work provides new insights into oil-body associated proteins involved in wax and lipid metabolism. PMID:27297988

  4. Peroxisomal assembly: membrane proliferation precedes the induction of the abundant matrix proteins in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii

    OpenAIRE

    Veenhuis, Marten; Goodman, Joel M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxisomes are massively induced when methylotrophic yeasts are cultured in medium containing methanol. These organelles contain enzymes that catalyze the initial steps of methanol assimilation. In Candida boidinii, a methylotrophic yeast, the peroxisomal matrix (internal compartment) is composed almost exclusively of two proteins, alcohol oxidase and dihydroxyacetone synthase; catalase is present in much lower abundance. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are available against peroxisomal...

  5. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase/xylulokinase ratio affects product formation in recombinant xylose-utilising Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Anna; Hofmeyr, J.H.S.; Pedler, S.;

    2001-01-01

    Data simulations based on a kinetic model implied that under simplified simulation conditions a 1:greater than or equal to 10:greater than or equal to4 relation of the xylose reductase (XR)/xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH)/xylulokinase (XK) ratio was optimal in minimising xylitol formation during xylose...... utilisation in yeast. The steady-state level of the intermediary xylitol depended also, to a great extent, on the NADH and NAD(+) concentrations. Anaerobic xylose utilisation was investigated for three different recombinant. XR-, XDH- and XK-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, TMB 3002, TMB 3003 and...... TMB 3004, to verify the model predictions. Overexpression of XK was found to be necessary for ethanol formation from xylose. Furthermore, the xylitol formation decreased with decreasing XR/XDH ratio, while the ethanol formation increased. Of the three strains, TMB 3004, which was the strain with a XR...

  6. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase/xylulokinase ratio affects product formation in recombinant xylose-utilising Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Anna; Hofmeyr, J.H.S.; Pedler, S.; Hahn-Hagerdal, B.

    Data simulations based on a kinetic model implied that under simplified simulation conditions a 1:greater than or equal to 10:greater than or equal to4 relation of the xylose reductase (XR)/xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH)/xylulokinase (XK) ratio was optimal in minimising xylitol formation during xylose...... utilisation in yeast. The steady-state level of the intermediary xylitol depended also, to a great extent, on the NADH and NAD(+) concentrations. Anaerobic xylose utilisation was investigated for three different recombinant. XR-, XDH- and XK-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, TMB 3002, TMB 3003 and...... TMB 3004, to verify the model predictions. Overexpression of XK was found to be necessary for ethanol formation from xylose. Furthermore, the xylitol formation decreased with decreasing XR/XDH ratio, while the ethanol formation increased. Of the three strains, TMB 3004, which was the strain with a XR...

  7. Glutamate Dehydrogenase Is Not Essential for Glutamate Formation by Corynebacterium glutamicum

    OpenAIRE

    Kholy, Elke R. Börmann-El; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Gutmann, Marcella; Sahm, Hermann

    1993-01-01

    Two Corynebacterium glutamicum strains, one being glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) negative and the other possessing 11-fold-higher specific GDH activity than the parental wild type, were constructed and used to analyze the role of GDH in C. glutamicum. The results indicate (i) that GDH is dispensable for glutamate synthesis required for growth and (ii) that although a high level of GDH increases the intracellular glutamate pool, the level of GDH has no influence on glutamate secretion.

  8. Construction and evaluation of a novel bifunctional phenylalanine-formate dehydrogenase fusion protein for bienzyme system with cofactor regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Fang, Bai-Shan

    2016-05-01

    Phenylalanine dehydrogenase (PheDH) plays an important role in enzymatic synthesis of L-phenylalanine for aspartame (sweetener) and detection of phenylketonuria (PKU), suggesting that it is important to obtain a PheDH with excellent characteristics. Gene fusion of PheDH and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) was constructed to form bifunctional multi-enzymes for bioconversion of L-phenylalanine coupled with coenzyme regeneration. Comparing with the PheDH monomer from Microbacterium sp., the bifunctional PheDH-FDH showed noteworthy stability under weakly acidic and alkaline conditions (pH 6.5-9.0). The bifunctional enzyme can produce 153.9 mM L-phenylalanine with remarkable performance of enantiomers choice by enzymatic conversion with high molecular conversion rate (99.87 %) in catalyzing phenylpyruvic acid to L-phenylalanine being 1.50-fold higher than that of the separate expression system. The results indicated the potential application of the PheDH and PheDH-FDH with coenzyme regeneration for phenylpyruvic acid analysis and L-phenylalanine biosynthesis in medical diagnosis and pharmaceutical field. PMID:26819086

  9. Recombinant formate dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana: Preparation, crystal growth in microgravity, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystals of high-purity recombinant NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AraFDH) were grown in microgravity in the Modul'-1 protein crystallization apparatus on the International Space Station. The space-grown crystals have larger sizes than those grown on Earth. X-ray diffraction data suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure were collected from the space-grown crystals to a resolution of 1.22 A using an X-ray synchrotron source. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P43212; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 107.865 A, c = 71.180 A, α = β = γ = 90 deg.

  10. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalanotti, C.; Dubini, A.; Subramanian, V.; Yang, W. Q.; Magneschi, L.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Posewitz, M. C.; Grossman, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  11. De Novo Assembly of Candida sojae and Candida boidinii Genomes, Unexplored Xylose-Consuming Yeasts with Potential for Renewable Biochemical Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, Guilherme; José, Juliana; Teixeira, Paulo José Pereira Lima; Dos Santos, Leandro Vieira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Candida boidinii and Candida sojae yeasts were isolated from energy cane bagasse and plague-insects. Both have fast xylose uptake rate and produce great amounts of xylitol, which are interesting features for food and 2G ethanol industries. Because they lack published genomes, we have sequenced and assembled them, offering new possibilities for gene prospection. PMID:26769937

  12. Kinetics of allopregnanolone formation catalyzed by human 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type III (AKR1C2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauger, John W; Jiang, Alice; Stearns, Brian A; LoGrasso, Philip V

    2002-11-12

    Allopregnanolone is a neurosteroid which exhibits anxiolytic and anticonvulsant activities through potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor. The reduction of 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone (5alpha-DHP), the last step in allopregnanolone biosynthesis, is catalyzed by 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3alpha-HSDs). While the mechanism of action of allopregnanolone and the physiological and pharmacological modulation of allopregnanolone concentrations in vivo have been extensively studied, there has been little characterization of the kinetics of human 3alpha-HSD catalyzed allopregnanolone formation. We report here determination of the kinetic mechanism for 5alpha-DHP reduction catalyzed by human 3alpha-HSD type III by using steady-state kinetics studies and assessment of the ability of fluoxetine and various other small molecules to activate 3alpha-HSD type III catalyzed allopregnanolone formation. Enzyme-catalyzed 5alpha-DHP reduction yielded two products, allopregnanolone and 5alpha,20alpha-tetrahydroprogesterone, as measured by using a radiometric thin-layer chromatography assay, while 5beta-DHP reduction yielded the neurosteroid pregnanolone as the only product. 5Beta-DHP reduction proceeded with a catalytic efficiency 10 times higher than that of 5alpha-DHP reduction. Two-substrate kinetic analysis and dead-end inhibition studies for 5alpha-DHP reduction and allopregnanolone oxidation indicated that 3alpha-HSD type III utilized a ternary complex (sequential) kinetic mechanism, with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactor binding before steroid substrate and leaving after steroid product. Since previous reports suggested that fluoxetine and certain other small molecules increased allopregnanolone concentrations in vivo by activating 3alpha-HSD type III, we investigated whether these small molecules were able to activate human 3alpha-HSD type III. Our results showed that, at concentrations up to 50 microM, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, norfluoxetine

  13. Mixed disulfide formation at Cys141 leads to apparent unidirectional attenuation of Aspergillus niger NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhish S Walvekar

    Full Text Available NADP-Glutamate dehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger (AnGDH exhibits sigmoid 2-oxoglutarate saturation. Incubation with 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide (2-HED, the disulfide of 2-mercaptoethanol resulted in preferential attenuation of AnGDH reductive amination (forward activity but with a negligible effect on oxidative deamination (reverse activity, when monitored in the described standard assay. Such a disulfide modified AnGDH displaying less than 1.0% forward reaction rate could be isolated after 2-HED treatment. This unique forward inhibited GDH form (FIGDH, resembling a hypothetical 'one-way' active enzyme, was characterized. Kinetics of 2-HED mediated inhibition and protein thiol titrations suggested that a single thiol group is modified in FIGDH. Two site-directed cysteine mutants, C141S and C415S, were constructed to identify the relevant thiol in FIGDH. The forward activity of C141S alone was insensitive to 2-HED, implicating Cys141 in FIGDH formation. It was observed that FIGDH displayed maximal reaction rate only after a pre-incubation with 2-oxoglutarate and NADPH. In addition, compared to the native enzyme, FIGDH showed a four fold increase in K0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate and a two fold increase in the Michaelis constants for ammonium and NADPH. With no change in the GDH reaction equilibrium constant, the FIGDH catalyzed rate of approach to equilibrium from reductive amination side was sluggish. Altered kinetic properties of FIGDH at least partly account for the observed apparent loss of forward activity when monitored under defined assay conditions. In sum, although Cys141 is catalytically not essential, its covalent modification provides a striking example of converting the biosynthetic AnGDH into a catabolic enzyme.

  14. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase. PMID:27054466

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  16. Examining the anti-candidal activity of 10 selected Indian herbs and investigating the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on germ tube formation, protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Sripathy; Muthuraman, Sundararaman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study is to identify potential anti-candidal agents from natural resources and elucidate the effect of Lawsonia inermis extract on major virulent factors of Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Plants, the most abundant and readily available resource of diverse bioactives, were chosen for the anti-candidal screening study. Ten different plants that were proven to have antimicrobial activity but not explored much for anti-candidal activity were chosen for this study. Ethyl acetate extract of these plant leaves were tested for the anti-candidal activity. Extracts with good anti-candidal activity were further screened for its effect in C. albicans germ tube formation and enzyme (protease, phospholipase, and aspartate dehydrogenase) activity. Results: Among 10 plants screened, L. inermis extract showed complete inhibition of C. albicans. On further evaluation, this extract completely inhibited C. albicans germ tube formation in serum until the end of incubation period (3 h). This extract also exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against two major virulent enzymes of C. albicans, proteases (27–33%) and phospholipases (44.5%). In addition to it, this extract completely inhibited both the isoforms of constitutive candidal enzyme aspartate dehydrogenase, thereby affecting amino acid biosynthesis. Conclusion: Thus, this study confirms the anti-candidal potential of L. inermis and hence can be considered further for development of anti-candidal drug. PMID:26997722

  17. Efficient reduction of the formation of by-products and improvement of production yield of 2,3-butanediol by a combined deletion of alcohol dehydrogenase, acetate kinase-phosphotransacetylase, and lactate dehydrogenase genes in metabolically engineered Klebsiella oxytoca in mineral salts medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantama, Kaemwich; Polyiam, Pattharasedthi; Khunnonkwao, Panwana; Chan, Sitha; Sangproo, Maytawadee; Khor, Kirin; Jantama, Sirima Suvarnakuta; Kanchanatawee, Sunthorn

    2015-07-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca KMS005 (∆adhE∆ackA-pta∆ldhA) was metabolically engineered to improve 2,3-butanediol (BDO) yield. Elimination of alcohol dehydrogenase E (adhE), acetate kinase A-phosphotransacetylase (ackA-pta), and lactate dehydrogenase A (ldhA) enzymes allowed BDO production as a primary pathway for NADH re-oxidation, and significantly reduced by-products. KMS005 was screened for the efficient glucose utilization by metabolic evolution. KMS005-73T improved BDO production at a concentration of 23.5±0.5 g/L with yield of 0.46±0.02 g/g in mineral salts medium containing 50 g/L glucose in a shake flask. KMS005-73T also exhibited BDO yields of about 0.40-0.42 g/g from sugarcane molasses, cassava starch, and maltodextrin. During fed-batch fermentation, KMS005-73T produced BDO at a concentration, yield, and overall and specific productivities of 117.4±4.5 g/L, 0.49±0.02 g/g, 1.20±0.05 g/Lh, and 27.2±1.1 g/gCDW, respectively. No acetoin, lactate, and formate were detected, and only trace amounts of acetate and ethanol were formed. The strain also produced the least by-products and the highest BDO yield among other Klebsiella strains previously developed. PMID:25895450

  18. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition ...

  19. A role for tungsten in the biology of Campylobacter jejuni: tungstate stimulates formate dehydrogenase activity and is transported via an ultra-high affinity ABC system distinct from the molybdate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Jonathan P; Cliff, Matthew J; Kelly, David J

    2009-11-01

    The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni possesses no known tungstoenzymes, yet encodes two ABC transporters (Cj0300-0303 and Cj1538-1540) homologous to bacterial molybdate (ModABC) uptake systems and the tungstate transporter (TupABC) of Eubacterium acidaminophilum respectively. The actual substrates and physiological role of these transporters were investigated. Tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry of the purified periplasmic binding proteins of each system revealed that while Cj0303 is unable to discriminate between molybdate and tungstate (K(D) values for both ligands of 4-8 nM), Cj1540 binds tungstate with a K(D) of 1.0 +/- 0.2 pM; 50 000-fold more tightly than molybdate. Induction-coupled plasma mass spectroscopy of single and double mutants showed that this large difference in affinity is reflected in a lower cellular tungsten content in a cj1540 (tupA) mutant compared with a cj0303c (modA) mutant. Surprisingly, formate dehydrogenase (FDH) activity was decreased approximately 50% in the tupA strain, and supplementation of the growth medium with tungstate significantly increased FDH activity in the wild type, while inhibiting known molybdoenzymes. Our data suggest that C. jejuni possesses a specific, ultra-high affinity tungstate transporter that supplies tungsten for incorporation into FDH. Furthermore, possession of two MoeA paralogues may explain the formation of both molybdopterin and tungstopterin in this bacterium. PMID:19818021

  20. Molybdenum center of xanthine dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyanolysis of native, oxidized xanthine dehydrogenase is known to inactivate the enzyme by removing a unique sulfur as thiocyanate. Chemical, genetic, and spectroscopic evidence indicates that this sulfur is a terminal ligand of Mo and is present in native xanthine dehydrogenase, but not in cyanolyzed xanthine dehydrogenase or native sulfite oxidase. A procedure for rapid, reproducible, and quantitative reconstitution of desulfo Mo hydroxylases with sulfide was developed. The cyanolyzable sulfur of xanthine dehydrogenase was specifically radiolabeled with 35sulfide using this procedure. Various chemical properties of the cyanolyzable sulfur could be determined with the radiolabelled enzyme. The data support the conclusion that the cyanolyzable sulfur is a terminal sulfur ligand of the Mo atoms, and is not part of an organic moiety. Application of the resulfuration procedure to crude extracts of Drosophila melanogaster ma-1 flies, which are pleiotropically deficient in xanthine dehydrogenase and aldehyde oxidase, led to the emergence of these enzyme activities. Evidence for the identity of in vitro reconstituted xanthine dehydrogenase from ma-1 mutants with wild type enzyme is presented. A system for efficient reconstitution of the apo-subunits of the molybdoenzyme nitrate reductase from the Neurospora crassa mutant nit-1 with molybdenum cofactor from denatured purified molybdoenzymes in the absence of exogenous molybdate was developed

  1. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs GARD Information Navigator FAQs About Rare Diseases Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Title Other Names: G6PD ... G6PD deficiency Categories: Newborn Screening Summary Summary Listen Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a hereditary ...

  2. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Center (GARD) Print friendly version Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Table of Contents Overview Symptoms Cause ... National Institutes of Health. Overview Listen Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a hereditary condition in ...

  3. Sorbitol dehydrogenase is a zinc enzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, J; Chesters, J; C. Mills; P.J. Sadler; Jörnvall, H

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is given that tetrameric sorbitol dehydrogenase from sheep liver contains one zinc atom per subunit, most probably located at the active site, and no other specifically bound zinc or iron atom. In alcohol dehydrogenases that are structurally related to sorbitol dehydrogenase, more than one zinc atom per subunit can complicate investigations of zinc atom function. Therefore, sorbitol dehydrogenase will be particularly valuable for defining the precise roles of zinc in alcohol and poly...

  4. Specific biotinylation of IMP dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Hoefler, B. Christopher; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes a critical step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. IMPDH also has biological roles that are distinct from its enzymatic function. We report a biotin-linked reagent that selectively labels IMPDH and is released by dithiothreitol. This reagent will be invaluable in elucidating the moonlighting functions of IMPDH.

  5. Modifications chimiques et évolution dirigée de la formiate déshydrogénase de Candida boidinii : vers une compréhension de la relation structure/fonction d’une déshydrogénase en liquide ionique

    OpenAIRE

    Bekhouche, Mourad

    2011-01-01

    Les déshydrogénases sont faiblement actives en présence de fortes concentrations (> 50 % (v/v)) de liquides ioniques (LIs) miscible à l’eau et les raisons précises de cette inactivation ne sont pas connues. La structure de la formiate déshydrogénase de Candida boidinii (FDH) en présence de ces LIs miscibles à l’eau a été étudiée par atténuation de fluorescence par de l’iode ou de l’acrylamide. Une concentration critique, la CILc ("Critical Ionic Liquid concentration"), au dessus de laquelle l...

  6. A glycolate dehydrogenase in the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Rafijul; Kebeish, Rashad; Kalamajka, Rainer; Rademacher, Thomas; Peterhänsel, Christoph

    2004-03-01

    The fixation of molecular O2 by the oxygenase activity of Rubisco leads to the formation of phosphoglycolate in the chloroplast that is further metabolized in the process of photorespiration. The initial step of this pathway is the oxidation of glycolate to glyoxylate. Whereas in higher plants this reaction takes place in peroxisomes and is dependent on oxygen as a co-factor, most algae oxidize glycolate in the mitochondria using organic co-factors. The identification and characterization of a novel glycolate dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis thaliana is reported here. The enzyme is dependent on organic co-factors and resembles algal glycolate dehydrogenases in its enzymatic properties. Mutants of E. coli incapable of glycolate oxidation can be complemented by overexpression of the Arabidopsis open reading frame. The corresponding RNA accumulates preferentially in illuminated leaves, but was also found in other tissues investigated. A fusion of the N-terminal part of the Arabidopsis glycolate dehydrogenase to red fluorescent protein accumulates in mitochondria when overexpressed in the homologous system. Based on these results it is proposed that the basic photorespiratory system of algae is conserved in higher plants. PMID:14966218

  7. Studies on 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of Azotobacter vinelandii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, some studies on the pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of Azotobacter vinelandii are described; the emphasis strongly lies on the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.A survey of the literature on 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes is given in chap

  8. Microbial alcohol dehydrogenases: identification, characterization and engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords: alcohol dehydrogenase, laboratory evolution, rational protein engineering, Pyrococcus furiosus, biocatalysis, characterization, computational design, thermostability.   Alcohol dehydrogeases (ADHs) catalyze the interconversion of alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. They display a wide variety

  9. Screening of aspartate dehydrogenase of bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Shoko; Okamura, Tokumitsu; Yasumasa, Izumi; Takeno, Tomomi; Ohsugi, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    Fifty-two strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 12 strains of bacteria cultured under anaerobic conditions demonstrated high activity staining of aspartate dehydrogenase with NAD^+. Four strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 7 strains of bacteria cultured under anaerobic conditions demonstrated high activity staining of aspartate dehydrogenase with NADP^+. Seven strains of bacteria cultured under aerobic conditions and 4 strains of bacteria cultured und...

  10. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the 32P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation

  11. A New Biochemical Way for Conversion of CO2 to Methanol via Dehydrogenases Encapsulated in SiO2 Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    CO2 is converted to methanol through an enzymatic approach using formate dehydro- genase (FateDH), formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FaldDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) co- encapsulated in silica gel prepared by modified sol-gel process as catalysts, TEOS as precursor, NADH as an electron donor. The highest yield of methanol was up to 92.1% under 37℃, pH7.0 and 0.3Mpa.

  12. An autosomal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) polymorphism in human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S G; Ashton, G C

    1976-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) from human saliva has been demonstrated by the zymogram technique. Three phenotypes were found. Family and population studies suggested that these phenotypes are the products of an autosomal locus with two alleles Sgd-1 and Sgd-2. PMID:950237

  13. Cloning and expression of bacterial genes coding amino acid dehydrogenases (oxidoreductases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The synthesis of 15N-labeled amino acids from the corresponding α-ketoacids can be accomplished in vitro using bacterial NAD-dependent amino acid dehydrogenases. The example of alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) and leucine dehydrogenase (LeuDH) will be presented here. Both enzymes belong to NAD dependent oxidoreductase family. AlaDH or L-alanine NAD-oxidoreductase (EC 1.4.1.1) promotes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-alanine to pyruvate (pyruvic acid). LeuDH or L-leucine NAD-oxidoreductase (EC 1.4.1.9) catalyses the reversible oxidative deamination of many related L-amino acids to corresponding α-ketoacids. The bacterial genes encoding AlaDH from Bacillus subtilis and LeuDH from Bacillus stearothermophilus were cloned separately in pET21b vector, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain. The [15N]L-alanine was synthesized by reductive amination of pyruvate, in the presence of 15NH4Cl, NADH, AlaDH and glucose dehydrogenase. The [15N]L-leucine, [15N]L-isoleucine, [15N]L-norleucine, [15N]L-valine and [15N]L-norvaline were produced in the same conditions using LeuDH, as a catalyst, and α- ketoisocaproate, DL-α-keto-β-methyl-n-valerate, α-ketocaproate, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketovalerate, respectively, as substrates. In all cases, the reaction mixtures included glucose dehydrogenase for NADH regeneration with glucose as electron donor. The NADH renewal is more convenient with glucose dehydrogenase than other methods described before using formate dehydrogenase or alcohol dehydrogenase. The glucose dehydrogenase is very active and do not inhibit 15N-labeled amino acid synthesis. As determined by mass spectroscopy, the 15N-labeled amino acids were synthesized with yields between 60% and 95%. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of recombinant amino acid dehydrogenases for in vitro synthesis of 15N-labeled amino acids. (author)

  14. Structural and catalytic properties of L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porumb, H; Vancea, D; Mureşan, L; Presecan, E; Lascu, I; Petrescu, I; Porumb, T; Pop, R; Bârzu, O

    1987-04-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus, a non-allosteric enzyme composed of six identical subunits, was purified to homogeneity by chromatography on blue-Sepharose and Sepharose 6B-CL. Like other pyridine-linked dehydrogenases, alanine dehydrogenase is inhibited by Cibacron blue, competitively with respect to NADH and noncompetitively with respect to pyruvate. The enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M glycine/HCl (pH 2) and reactivated by 0.1 M phosphate (pH 8) supplemented with NAD+ or NADH. The reactivation was characterized by sigmoidal kinetics indicating a complex mechanism involving rate-limiting folding and association steps. Cibacron blue interfered with renaturation, presumably by competition with NADH. Chromatography on Sepharose 6B-CL of the partially renatured alanine dehydrogenase led to the separation of several intermediates, but only the hexamer was characterized by enzymatic activity. By immobilization on Sepharose 4B, alanine dehydrogenase from B. cereus retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. After denaturation of immobilized alanine dehydrogenase with 7 M urea, 37% of the initial protein was still bound to Sepharose, indicating that on the average the hexamer was attached to the matrix via, at most, two subunits. The ability of the denatured, immobilized subunits to pick up subunits from solution shows their capacity to fold back to the native conformation after urea treatment. The formation of "hybrids" between subunits of enzyme from B. cereus and Bacillus subtilis demonstrates the close resemblance of the tertiary and quaternary structures of alanine dehydrogenases from these species. PMID:3104322

  15. Inducible xylitol dehydrogenases in enteric bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Doten, R C; Mortlock, R P

    1985-01-01

    Morganella morganii ATCC 25829, Providencia stuartii ATCC 25827, Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880, and Erwinia sp. strain 4D2P were found to induce a xylitol dehydrogenase when grown on a xylitol-containing medium. The xylitol dehydrogenases were partially purified from the four strains, and those from M. morganii ATCC 25829, P. stuartii ATCC 25827, and S. marcescens ATCC 13880 were all found to oxidize xylitol to D-xylulose. These three enzymes had KmS for xylitol of 7.1 to 16.4 mM and molecul...

  16. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:27459246

  17. Coenzyme- and His-tag-induced crystallization of octopine dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of octopine dehydrogenase revealed a specific role of the His5 tag in inducing the crystal contacts required for successful crystallization. Over the last decade, protein purification has become more efficient and standardized through the introduction of affinity tags. The choice and position of the tag, however, can directly influence the process of protein crystallization. Octopine dehydrogenase (OcDH) without a His tag and tagged protein constructs such as OcDH-His5 and OcDH-LEHis6 have been investigated for their crystallizability. Only OcDH-His5 yielded crystals; however, they were multiple. To improve crystal quality, the cofactor NADH was added, resulting in single crystals that were suitable for structure determination. As shown by the structure, the His5 tag protrudes into the cleft between the NADH and l-arginine-binding domains and is mainly fixed in place by water molecules. The protein is thereby stabilized to such an extent that the formation of crystal contacts can proceed. Together with NADH, the His5 tag obviously locks the enzyme into a specific conformation which induces crystal growth

  18. Microbial alcohol dehydrogenases: identification, characterization and engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Machielsen, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords: alcohol dehydrogenase, laboratory evolution, rational protein engineering, Pyrococcus furiosus, biocatalysis, characterization, computational design, thermostability.   Alcohol dehydrogeases (ADHs) catalyze the interconversion of alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. They display a wide variety of substrate specificities and are involved in an astonishingly wide range of metabolic processes, in all living organisms. Besides the scientific interest in ADHs, they are also attractive biocat...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most common cause of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency , accounting for approximately 80 percent of cases. These mutations ... deficiency ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (5 links) ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... throughout the body and is important for creating energy for cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four ... and lactate dehydrogenase-B subunits make up the different forms of the ... large amounts of energy during high-intensity physical activity when the body's ...

  1. The Genetics of Alcohol Metabolism: Role of Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Edenberg, Howard J

    2007-01-01

    The primary enzymes involved in alcohol metabolism are alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Both enzymes occur in several forms that are encoded by different genes; moreover, there are variants (i.e., alleles) of some of these genes that encode enzymes with different characteristics and which have different ethnic distributions. Which ADH or ALDH alleles a person carries influence his or her level of alcohol consumption and risk of alcoholism. Researchers to date pri...

  2. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T. [INETI, Lisboa (Portugal); Pelica, F. [ITQB, Oeiras (Portugal)

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). No pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase activity was detected at any stage of the purification. However, the purified PDC was phosphorylated and inactivated by purified PDH kinase from bovine kidney mitochondria, Mg2+, and [γ-32P]ATP. The protein-bound radioactivity was localized in the PDH α subunit. The phosphorylated, inactivated PDC was dephosphorylated and reactivated with purified bovine PDH phosphatase, Mg2+, and Ca2+. From a tryptic digest of phosphorylated yeast PDC a radioactive peptide was isolated by anion and reverse phase HPLC. The sequence of this tetradecapeptide is Tyr-Gly-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Thr-Thr-Tyr-Arg. This sequence is very similar to the sequence of a tryptic phosphopeptide derived from the α subunit of bovine kidney and heart PDH: Tyr-His-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Val-Ser-Tyr-Arg

  4. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in immobilized yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed and the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase of the immobilized cells was determined. The treatment of the yeast cells with 1 % toluene followed by irradiation with acrylamide and bisacrylamide resulted in a high activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in the immobilized cells. The enzyme of the immobilized cells was stable in the pH range of 7.5 - 8.0 and the optimum pH opposed to be 8.5. Although the immobilized cells showed a rather low level of thermostability, it is suggested that they could be used for a long period of time at a temperature of 27 deg C. The immobilized cells did not exhibit any loss in the enzyme activity when stored at 4 deg C or -20 deg C. (author)

  5. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Review

    OpenAIRE

    Şaşmaz, İlgen

    2009-01-01

    Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase G6PD is the first enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway providing reducing power to all cells in the form of reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect being present in more than 400 million people worldwide G6PD deficiency is an X linked hereditary genetic defect caused by mutations in the G6PD gene Clinical presentations include acute hemolytic anemia chronic hemolytic anemia neonatal...

  6. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  7. Characterization of 10-Hydroxygeraniol Dehydrogenase from Catharanthus roseus Reveals Cascaded Enzymatic Activity in Iridoid Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnan Krithika; Prabhakar Lal Srivastava; Bajaj Rani; Kolet, Swati P.; Manojkumar Chopade; Mantri Soniya; Hirekodathakallu V. Thulasiram

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus [L.] is a major source of the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), which are of significant interest due to their therapeutic value. These molecules are formed through an intermediate, cis-trans-nepetalactol, a cyclized product of 10-oxogeranial. One of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of MIAs is an NAD(P)+ dependent oxidoreductase system, 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase (Cr10HGO), which catalyses the formation of 10-oxogeranial from 10-hydroxygeraniol via 10-...

  8. Lactate dehydrogenase X, malate dehydrogenase and total protein in rat spermatozoa during epididymal transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermouth, N T; Carriazo, C S; Ponce, R H; Blanco, A

    1986-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase isozyme X (LDH X), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and total soluble protein have been determined in lysates of spermatozoa isolated from caput, corpus and cauda of rat epididymis. Transit of spermatozoa through epididymis is accompanied by a reduction of LDH X, MDH and total protein per cell in sexually rested animals. The profiles of reduction along epididymal segments are different for the three variables studied. Mating with receptive females during the 5 days prior to determinations increases significantly the levels of MDH in spermatozoa from all sections of epididymis and produces increase of total soluble protein in the cells contained in cauda. PMID:3956158

  9. Evaluation of Serum Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity in a Virtual Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M.T. Trindade

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lactate dehydrogenase is a citosolic enzyme involved in reversible transformation of pyruvate to lactate. It participates in anaerobic glycolysis of skeletal muscle and red blood cells, in liver gluconeogenesis and in aerobic metabolism of heart muscle. The determination of its activity helps in the diagnosis of various diseases, because it is increased in serum of patients suffering from myocardial infarction, acute hepatitis, muscular dystrophy and cancer. This paper presents a learning object, mediated by computer, which contains the simulation of the laboratory determination serum lactate dehydrogenase activity measured by the spectrophotometric method, based in the decrease of absorbance at 340 nm. Materials and Methods: Initially, pictures and videos were obtained recording the procedure of the methodology. The most representative images were selected, edited and inserted into an animation developed with the aid of the tool Adobe ® Flash ® CS3. The validation of the object was performed by the students of Biochemistry I (Pharmacy-UFRGS from the second semester of 2009 and both of 2010. Results and Discussion: The analysis of students' answers revealed that 80% attributed the excellence of the navigation program, the display format and to aid in learning. Conclusion: Therefore, this software can be considered an adequate teaching resource as well as an innovative support in the construction of theoretical and practical knowledge of Biochemistry. Available at: http://www6.ufrgs.br/gcoeb/LDH

  10. Molecular cloning of gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003 xylitol dehydrogenase gene

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi, H. Mir Mohammad; Ahmadi, R; Aghaabdollahian, S.; Mofid, M.R.; Ghaemi, Y.; Abedi, D

    2011-01-01

    Due to the widespread applications of xylitol dehydrogenase, an enzyme used for the production of xylitol, the present study was designed for the cloning of xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Glcunobacter oxydans DSM 2003. After extraction of genomic DNA from this bacterium, xylitol dehydrogenase gene was replicated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified product was entered into pTZ57R cloning vector by T/A cloning method and transformation was performed by heat shocking of the E. ...

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of human alcohol dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Duester, G; Wesley Hatfield, G.; Smith, M.

    1985-01-01

    Human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) consists of a complex group of isozymes encoded by at least five non-identical genes, two of which have previously been shown through enzymatic analysis to possess polymorphic variants. Using a cDNA probe the ADH2gene encoding the β subunit of human ADH was mapped to human chromosome 4. The cDNA probe for ADH2 was also used to detect a restriction fragment length polymorphism present in human populations. This polymorphism may help establish whether certain A...

  12. Lactate dehydrogenase in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic Stojanovic, Katia; Lionnet, François

    2016-07-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity is elevated in many pathological states. Interest in LDH activity in sickle cell disease (SCD) has developed out of an increased comprehension of the pathophysiological process and the clinical course of the disease. Elevated LDH activity in SCD comes from various mechanisms, especially intravascular hemolysis, as well as ischemia-reperfusion damage and tissular necrosis. Intravascular hemolysis is associated with vasoconstriction, platelet activation, endothelial damage, and vascular complications. LDH has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic factor of acute and chronic complications. In this review we have evaluated the literature where LDH activity was examined during steady-state or acute conditions in SCD. PMID:27138446

  13. NAD(H recycling activity of an engineered bifunctional enzyme galactose dehydrogenase/lactate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A chimeric bifunctional enzyme composing of galactose dehydrogenase (galDH; from Pseudomonas fluorescens and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; from Bacillus stearothermophilus was successfully constructed. The chimeric galDH/LDH possessed dual characteristics of both galactose dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities while exhibiting hexameric rearrangement with a molecular weight of approximately 400 kDa. In vitro observations showed that the chimeric enzyme was able to recycle NAD with a continuous production of lactate without any externally added NADH. Two fold higher recycling rate (0.3 mM/h than that of the native enzyme was observed at pH values above 8.5. Proximity effects became especially pronounced during the recycling assay when diffusion hindrance was induced by polyethylene glycol. All these findings open up a high feasibility to apply the NAD(H recycling system for metabolic engineering purposes e.g. as a model to gain a better understanding on the molecular proximity process and as the routes for synthesizing of numerous high-value-added compounds.

  14. Dehydrogenase genes in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma vaccinum: A role for Ald1 in mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Catarina; Jung, Elke-Martina; Voit, Annekatrin; Kothe, Erika; Krause, Katrin

    2016-02-01

    Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis is important for forest ecosystem functioning with tree-fungal cooperation increasing performance and countering stress conditions. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are key enzymes for detoxification and thus may play a role in stress response of the symbiotic association. With this focus, eight dehydrogenases, Ald1 through Ald7 and TyrA, of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Tricholoma vaccinum were characterized and phylogenetically investigated. Functional analysis was performed through differential expression analysis by feeding different, environmentally important substances. A strong effect of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was identified, linking mycorrhiza formation and auxin signaling between the symbiosis partners. We investigated ald1 overexpressing strains for performance in mycorrhiza with the host tree spruce (Picea abies) and observed an increased width of the apoplast, accommodating the Hartig' net hyphae of the T. vaccinum over-expressing transformants. The results support a role for Ald1 in ectomycorrhiza formation and underline functional differentiation within fungal aldehyde dehydrogenases in the family 1 of ALDHs. PMID:26344933

  15. Aldehyde dehydrogenase protein superfamily in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mei-Liang; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Ming; Qi, Lei-Peng; Yang, Xiong-Bang; Zhang, Kai-Xuan; Pang, Jun-Feng; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Shao, Ji-Rong; Tang, Yi-Xiong; Wu, Yan-Min

    2012-11-01

    Maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.) is an important model organism for fundamental research in the agro-biotechnology field. Aldehydes were generated in response to a suite of environmental stresses that perturb metabolism including salinity, dehydration, desiccation, and cold and heat shock. Many biologically important aldehydes are metabolized by the superfamily of NAD(P)(+)-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here, starting from the database of Z. mays, we identified 28 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes and 48 transcripts by the in silico cloning method using the ALDH-conserved domain amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis and rice as a probe. Phylogenetic analysis shows that all 28 members of the ALDH gene families were classified to ten distinct subfamilies. Microarray data and quantitative real-time PCR analysis reveal that ZmALDH9, ZmALDH13, and ZmALDH17 genes involve the function of drought stress, acid tolerance, and pathogens infection. These results suggested that these three ZmALDH genes might be potentially useful in maize genetic improvement. PMID:22983498

  16. HISTIDINE MUTAGENESIS OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE KINASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) is the primary regulator of flux through the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Analysis of the primary amino acid sequences of PDK from various sources reveals that these enzymes include the five domains characteristic of prokaryotic two-compone...

  17. Studies on the structure and function of pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, de R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to obtain more information of the structure and function of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes from Azotobacter vinelandii and Escherichia coli.In chapter 2 a survey is given of the recent literature on pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes.In chapter 3 results

  18. INFLUENCE OF SELECTED PHARMACEUTICALS ON ACTIVATED SLUDGE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Tomska

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of selected antibiotics - sulfanilamide and erythromycin on activated sludge dehydrogenase activity with use of trifenyltetrazolinum chloride (TTC test. Dehydrogenases activity is an indicator of biochemical activity of microorganisms present in activated sludge or the ability to degrade organic compounds in waste water. TTC test is particularly useful for the regularity of the course of treatment, in which the presence of inhibitors of biochemical reactions and toxic compounds are present. It was observed that the dehydrogenase activity decreases with the increase of a antibiotics concentration. The lowest value of the dehydrogenase activity equal to 32.4 μmol TF / gMLSS obtained at sulfanilamide concentration 150mg / l. For this sample, an inhibition of dehydrogenase activity was 31%.

  19. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Winkler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S-selectivity and together with a highly (R-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases.

  20. Enantioselective Synthesis of Vicinal (R,R)-Diols by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Butanediol Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calam, Eduard; González-Roca, Eva; Fernández, M Rosario; Dequin, Sylvie; Parés, Xavier; Virgili, Albert; Biosca, Josep A

    2016-01-01

    Butanediol dehydrogenase (Bdh1p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the superfamily of the medium-chain dehydrogenases and reductases and converts reversibly R-acetoin and S-acetoin to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol and meso-2,3-butanediol, respectively. It is specific for NAD(H) as a coenzyme, and it is the main enzyme involved in the last metabolic step leading to (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol in yeast. In this study, we have used the activity of Bdh1p in different forms-purified enzyme, yeast extracts, permeabilized yeast cells, and as a fusion protein (with yeast formate dehydrogenase, Fdh1p)-to transform several vicinal diketones to the corresponding diols. We have also developed a new variant of the delitto perfetto methodology to place BDH1 under the control of the GAL1 promoter, resulting in a yeast strain that overexpresses butanediol dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase activities in the presence of galactose and regenerates NADH in the presence of formate. While the use of purified Bdh1p allows the synthesis of enantiopure (2R,3R)-2,3-butanediol, (2R,3R)-2,3-pentanediol, (2R,3R)-2,3-hexanediol, and (3R,4R)-3,4-hexanediol, the use of the engineered strain (as an extract or as permeabilized cells) yields mixtures of the diols. The production of pure diol stereoisomers has also been achieved by means of a chimeric fusion protein combining Fdh1p and Bdh1p. Finally, we have determined the selectivity of Bdh1p toward the oxidation/reduction of the hydroxyl/ketone groups from (2R,3R)-2,3-pentanediol/2,3-pentanedione and (2R,3R)-2,3-hexanediol/2,3-hexanedione. In conclusion, Bdh1p is an enzyme with biotechnological interest that can be used to synthesize chiral building blocks. A scheme of the favored pathway with the corresponding intermediates is proposed for the Bdh1p reaction. PMID:26729717

  1. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains

  2. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Margit Winkler; Manuela Avi; Karen Robins; Strohmeier, Gernot A; Sonavane, Manoj N.; Kamila Napora-Wijata

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisia...

  3. Pyruvate dehydrogenase and 3-fluoropyruvate: chemical competence of 2-acetylthiamin pyrophosphate as an acetyl group donor to dihydrolipoamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase component (E1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the decomposition of 3-fluoropyruvate to CO2, fluoride anion, and acetate. Acetylthiamin pyrophosphate (acetyl-TPP) is an intermediate in this reaction. Incubation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex with 3-fluoro[1,2-14]pyruvate, TPP, coenzyme A (CoASH), and either NADH or pyruvate as reducing systems leads to the formation of [14]acetyl-CoA. In this reaction the acetyl group of acetyl-TPP is partitioned by transfer to both CoASH (87 +/- 2%) and water (13 +/- 2%). When the E1 component is incubated with 3-fluoro[1,2-14]pyruvate, TPP, and dihydrolipoamide, [14]acetyldihydrolipoamide is produced. The formation of [14C]acetyldihydrolipoamide was examined as a function of dihydrolipoamide concentration (0.25-16 mM). A plot of the extent of acetyl group partitioning to dihydrolipoamide as a function of 1/[dihydrolipoamide] showed 95 +/- 2% acetyl group transfer to dihydrolipoamide when dihydrolipoamide concentration was extrapolated to infinity. It is concluded that acetyl-TPP is chemically competent as an intermediate for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex catalyzed oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate

  4. Detailed kinetics and regulation of mammalian 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Ranjan K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC, a key regulatory point of tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, plays vital roles in multiple pathways of energy metabolism and biosynthesis. The catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of this large enzyme complex are not fully understood. Here computer simulation is used to test possible catalytic mechanisms and mechanisms of allosteric regulation of the enzyme by nucleotides (ATP, ADP, pH, and metal ion cofactors (Ca2+ and Mg2+. Results A model was developed based on an ordered ter-ter enzyme kinetic mechanism combined with con-formational changes that involve rotation of one lipoic acid between three catalytic sites inside the enzyme complex. The model was parameterized using a large number of kinetic data sets on the activity of OGDHC, and validated by comparison of model predictions to independent data. Conclusions The developed model suggests a hybrid rapid-equilibrium ping-pong random mechanism for the kinetics of OGDHC, consistent with previously reported mechanisms, and accurately describes the experimentally observed regulatory effects of cofactors on the OGDHC activity. This analysis provides a single consistent theoretical explanation for a number of apparently contradictory results on the roles of phosphorylation potential, NAD (H oxidation-reduction state ratio, as well as the regulatory effects of metal ions on ODGHC function.

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition as a pathogenic mechanism in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G; Rhodes, Shannon L; Lulla, Aaron; Murphy, Niall P; Lam, Hoa A; O'Donnell, Kelley C; Barnhill, Lisa; Casida, John E; Cockburn, Myles; Sagasti, Alvaro; Stahl, Mark C; Maidment, Nigel T; Ritz, Beate; Bronstein, Jeff M

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder particularly characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Pesticide exposure has been associated with PD occurrence, and we previously reported that the fungicide benomyl interferes with several cellular processes potentially relevant to PD pathogenesis. Here we propose that benomyl, via its bioactivated thiocarbamate sulfoxide metabolite, inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), leading to accumulation of the reactive dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), preferential degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, and development of PD. This hypothesis is supported by multiple lines of evidence. (i) We previously showed in mice the metabolism of benomyl to S-methyl N-butylthiocarbamate sulfoxide, which inhibits ALDH at nanomolar levels. We report here that benomyl exposure in primary mesencephalic neurons (ii) inhibits ALDH and (iii) alters dopamine homeostasis. It induces selective dopaminergic neuronal damage (iv) in vitro in primary mesencephalic cultures and (v) in vivo in a zebrafish system. (vi) In vitro cell loss was attenuated by reducing DOPAL formation. (vii) In our epidemiology study, higher exposure to benomyl was associated with increased PD risk. This ALDH model for PD etiology may help explain the selective vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD and provide a potential mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis. PMID:23267077

  6. Inhibiting sperm pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its E3 subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase affects fertilization in Syrian hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana B Siva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: The importance of sperm capacitation for mammalian fertilization has been confirmed in the present study via sperm metabolism. Involvement of the metabolic enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc and its E3 subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD in hamster in vitro fertilization (IVF via in vitro sperm capacitation is being proposed through regulation of sperm intracellular lactate, pH and calcium. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Capacitated hamster spermatozoa were allowed to fertilize hamster oocytes in vitro which were then assessed for fertilization, microscopically. PDHc/DLD was inhibited by the use of the specific DLD-inhibitor, MICA (5-methoxyindole-2-carboxylic acid. Oocytes fertilized with MICA-treated (MT [and thus PDHc/DLD-inhibited] spermatozoa showed defective fertilization where 2nd polar body release and pronuclei formation were not observed. Defective fertilization was attributable to capacitation failure owing to high lactate and low intracellular pH and calcium in MT-spermatozoa during capacitation. Moreover, this defect could be overcome by alkalinizing spermatozoa, before fertilization. Increasing intracellular calcium in spermatozoa pre-IVF and in defectively-fertilized oocytes, post-fertilization rescued the arrest seen, suggesting the role of intracellular calcium from either of the gametes in fertilization. Parallel experiments carried out with control spermatozoa capacitated in medium with low extracellular pH or high lactate substantiated the necessity of optimal sperm intracellular lactate levels, intracellular pH and calcium during sperm capacitation, for proper fertilization. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the importance of pyruvate/lactate metabolism in capacitating spermatozoa for successful fertilization, besides revealing for the first time the importance of sperm PDHc/ DLD in fertilization, via the modulation of sperm intracellular lactate, pH and calcium during capacitation. In

  7. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettiga, Maurizio; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F

    2008-01-01

    /xylitol dehydrogenase strain and the xylose isomerase strain, respectively. Conclusion The combination of the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase pathway and the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway resulted in both higher pentose sugar uptake and higher overall ethanol production than the combination of the xylose isomerase pathway and the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway. Moreover, the flux through the bacterial arabinose pathway did not increase when combined with the xylose isomerase pathway. This suggests that the low activity of the bacterial arabinose pathway cannot be ascribed to arabitol formation via the xylose reductase enzyme. PMID:18947407

  8. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2008-10-01

    for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain and the xylose isomerase strain, respectively. Conclusion The combination of the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase pathway and the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway resulted in both higher pentose sugar uptake and higher overall ethanol production than the combination of the xylose isomerase pathway and the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway. Moreover, the flux through the bacterial arabinose pathway did not increase when combined with the xylose isomerase pathway. This suggests that the low activity of the bacterial arabinose pathway cannot be ascribed to arabitol formation via the xylose reductase enzyme.

  9. Immunochemical properties of NAD+-linked glycerol dehydrogenases from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, J. C.; Forage, R G; Lin, E C

    1982-01-01

    An NAD+-linked glycerol dehydrogenase hyperproduced by a mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 was found to be immunochemically homologous to a minor glycerol dehydrogenase of unknown physiological function in Klebsiella pneumoniae 1033, but not to the glycerol dehydrogenase of the dha system responsible for anaerobic dissimilation of glycerol or to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase of K. pneumoniae.

  10. Malate dehydrogenases from actinomycetes: structural comparison of Thermoactinomyces enzyme with other actinomycete and Bacillus enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, K.; Sundaram, T K; Kernick, M

    1984-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenases from bacteria belonging to the genus Thermoactinomyces are tetrameric, like those from Bacillus spp., and exhibit a high degree of structural homology to Bacillus malate dehydrogenase as judged by immunological cross-reactivity. Malate dehydrogenases from other actinomycetes are dimers and do not cross-react with antibodies to Bacillus malate dehydrogenase.

  11. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase System in the Xylose-Fermenting Yeast Candida maltosa

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yuping; He, Peng; Wang, Qinhong; Lu, Dajun; Li, Zilong; Wu, Changsheng; Jiang, Ning

    2010-01-01

    Background The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) system plays a critical role in sugar metabolism involving in not only ethanol formation and consumption but also the general “cofactor balance” mechanism. Candida maltosa is able to ferment glucose as well as xylose to produce a significant amount of ethanol. Here we report the ADH system in C. maltosa composed of three microbial group I ADH genes (CmADH1, CmADH2A and CmADH2B), mainly focusing on its metabolic regulation and physiological function. ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as seizures, life-threatening heart and breathing problems, coma, and sudden death. This condition may explain some ... hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation: Treatments & Therapies These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ...

  13. Crystallization behaviour of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase from Thermoplasma acidophilum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lermark, L.; Degtjarik, Oksana; Steffler, F.; Sieber, V.; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 12 (2015), s. 1475-1480. ISSN 2053-230X Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : TaAlDH * Thermoplasma acidophilum * bioproduction * cell-free enzyme cascade * glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  14. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in adults presented with anemia. Subjects and Methods: Eighteen months admission data was reviewed for G6PD deficiency as a cause of anemia. Anemia was defined by world health organization (WHO) criteria as haemoglobin less than 11.3 gm%. G6PD activity was measured by Sigma dye decolorisation method. All patients were screened for complications of hemolysis and its possible cause. Patients with more than 13 years of age were included in the study. Results: Out of 3600 patients admitted, 1440 were found anaemic and 49 as G6PD deficient. So the frequency of G6PD deficiency in anaemic patients was 3.4% and the overall frequency is 1.36%. G6PD deficiency among males and females was three and six percent respectively. Antimalarials and antibiotics containing sulphonamide group were the most common precipitating factors for hemolysis. Anemia and jaundice were the most common presentations while malaria was the most common associated disease. Acute renal failure was the most severe complication occurring in five patients with two deaths. Conclusion: G6PD deficiency is a fairly common cause of anemia with medicine as common precipitating factor for hemolysis. Such complications can be avoided with early recognition of the disease and avoiding indiscriminate use of medicine. (author)

  15. Soluble aldehyde dehydrogenase and metabolism of aldehydes by soybean bacteroids.

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, J. B.; LaRue, T A

    1982-01-01

    A soluble aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3) was partially purified from Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids and from free-living R. japonicum 61A76. The enzyme was activated by NAD+, NADH, and dithiothreitol, and it reduced NAD(P)+. Acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, benzaldehyde, and succinic semialdehyde were substrates. The Km for straight-chain aldehydes decreased with increasing carbon chain length. The aldehyde dehydrogenase was inhibited by 6-cyanopurine, but not by metronidazo...

  16. Malate dehydrogenase activity in human seminal plasma and spermatozoa homogenates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Leventerler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Malate Dehydrogenase is an important enzyme of the Krebs cycle, most cells require this enzyme for their metabolic activity. We evaluated the Malate Dehydrogenase (NAD/NADP activity in human seminal plasma and sperm homogenates in normozoospermic, fertile and infertile males. Also glucose and fructose concentrations were determined in the seminal plasma samples. Material and Methods: Malate Dehydrogenase (NAD/NADP activity in human seminal plasma and sperm homogenates of normozoospermic and infertile males was determined by spectrophotometric method. Semen analysis was considered according to the WHO Criteria. Results: Malat Dehydrogenase-NAD value in seminal plasma (the mean ± SD, mU/ml of asthenoteratospermic (40.0±25.7 and azospermic (38.0±43.6 groups were significantly lower than normozoospermic, (93.9±52.1 males. Malat Dehydrogenase-NAD value in sperm homogenates (the mean ± SD, mU/ 20x106 sperm of teratospermic group (136.8±61.8 was significantly higher compared to the normozoospermic (87.3±26.5 males. Glucose concentration (mg/dl in asthenoteratospermic (4.0±1.4 and azospermic (15.4±6.4 groups were significantly higher than fertile (2.0±2.1 males. Also fructose concentration (mg/dl in asthenoteratospermic (706.6±143.3 and azospermic (338.1±228.2 groups were significantly high compared to the normozoospermic (184.7±124.8 group. Conclusion: Sperm may be some part of the source of Malat Dehydrogenase activity in semen. Malat Dehydrogenase activity in seminal plasma has an important role on energy metabolism of sperm. Intermediate substrates of Krebs cycle might have been produced under the control of Malat Dehydrogenase and these substrates may be important for sperm motility and male infertility. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 648-658

  17. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozic, P; Lanisnik Risner, T; Gobec, S

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis of hormone-related cancers involves hormone-stimulated cell proliferation, which increases the number of cell divisions and the opportunity for random genetic errors. In target tissues, steroid hormones are interconverted between their potent, high affinity forms for their respective receptors and their inactive, low affinity forms. One group of enzymes responsible for these interconversions are the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, which regulate ligand access to steroid receptors and thus act at a pre-receptor level. As part of this group, the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze either oxidation of hydroxyl groups or reduction of keto groups at steroid position C17. The thoroughly characterized 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activates the less active estrone to estradiol, a potent ligand for estrogen receptors. This isoform is expressed in gonads, where it affects circulating levels of estradiol, and in peripheral tissue, where it regulates ligand occupancy of estrogen receptors. Inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 are thus highly interesting potential therapeutic agents for the control of estrogen-dependent diseases such as endometriosis, as well as breast and ovarian cancers. Here, we present the review on the recent development of inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 published and patented since the previous review of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibitors of Poirier (Curr. Med. Chem., 2003, 10, 453). These inhibitors are divided into two separate groups according to their chemical structures: steroidal and non-steroidal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors. Their estrogenic/ proliferative activities and selectivities over other 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that are involved in local regulation of estrogen action (types 2, 7 and 12) are also presented. PMID:18220769

  18. Aromatic amine dehydrogenase, a second tryptophan tryptophylquinone enzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    Govindaraj, S; Eisenstein, E.; Jones, L. H.; Sanders-Loehr, J; Chistoserdov, A Y; Davidson, V L; Edwards, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic amine dehydrogenase (AADH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of aromatic amines including tyramine and dopamine. AADH is structurally similar to methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH) and possesses the same tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) prosthetic group. AADH exhibits an alpha 2 beta 2 structure with subunit molecular weights of 39,000 and 18,000 and with a quinone covalently attached to each beta subunit. Neither subunit cross-reacted immunologically with antibodies to the correspo...

  19. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hallberg, B Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled vi...

  20. In vitro inhibition of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase activity by acetaldehyde

    OpenAIRE

    Mun, Ju-Ae; Doh, Eunjin; Min, Hyesun

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholism has been associated with folate deficiency in humans and laboratory animals. Previous study showed that ethanol feeding reduces the dehydrogenase and hydrolase activity of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH) in rat liver. Hepatic ethanol metabolism generates acetaldehyde and acetate. The mechanisms by which ethanol and its metabolites produce toxicity within the liver cells are unknown. We purified FDH from rat liver and investigated the effect of ethanol, acetaldehyde an...

  1. Molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ribitol dehydrogenase, a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha;

    2012-01-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmRDH) catalyzes the conversion of ribitol to d-ribulose and concomitantly reduces NAD(P)(+) to NAD(P)H. A systematic approach involving an initial sequence alignment-based residue screening, followed by a homology model-based screening and site-direc...... insights into the function of the Ser156 residue were obtained by substituting it with other hydrophobic nonpolar or polar amino acids. Substituting Ser156 with the negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) altered the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH toward NAD(+) (S156D, [k...

  2. Acetate catabolism by Methanosarcina barkeri: evidence for involvement of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, methyl coenzyme M, and methylreductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathway of acetate catabolism in Methanosarcina barkeri strain MS was studied by using a recently developed assay for methanogenesis from acetate by soluble enzymes in cell extracts. Extracts incubated with [2-14C]acetate, hydrogen, and ATP formed 14CH4 and [14C]methyl coenzyme M as products. The apparent Km for acetate conversion to methane was 5 mM. In the presence of excess acetate, both the rate and duration of methane production was dependent on ATP. Acetyl phosphate replaced the cell extract methanogenic requirement for both acetate and ATP (the Km for ATP was 2 mM). Low concentrations of bromoethanesulfonic acid and cyanide, inhibitors of methylreductase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, respectively, greatly reduced the rate of methanogenesis. Precipitation of CO dehydrogenase in cell extracts by antibodies raised to 95% purified enzyme inhibited both CO dehydrogenase and acetate-to-methane conversion activity. The data are consistent with a model of acetate catabolism in which methylreductase, methyl coenzyme M, CO dehydrogenase, and acetate-activating enzymes are components. These results are discussed in relation to acetate uptake and rate-limiting transformation mechanisms in methane formation

  3. Expression of a Heterologous Glutamate Dehydrogenase Gene in Lactococcus lactis Highly Improves the Conversion of Amino Acids to Aroma Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Rijnen, Liesbeth; Courtin, Pascal; Gripon, Jean-Claude; Yvon, Mireille

    2000-01-01

    The first step of amino acid degradation in lactococci is a transamination, which requires an α-keto acid as the amino group acceptor. We have previously shown that the level of available α-keto acid in semihard cheese is the first limiting factor for conversion of amino acids to aroma compounds, since aroma formation is greatly enhanced by adding α-ketoglutarate to cheese curd. In this study we introduced a heterologous catabolic glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) gene into Lactococcus lactis so ...

  4. Structural studies on dihydrolipoyl transacetylase : the core component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanemaaijer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The studies described in this thesis deal with the structure of the Azotobactervinelandii dihydrolipoyl transacetylase, the core component (E 2 ) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. in all organisms the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is closely related to the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and, if present, the branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex. These enzyme complexes are large multimeric structures. The smallest known is the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from A.vineland...

  5. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Type 2 Activation by Adenosine and Histamine Inhibits Ischemic Norepinephrine Release in Cardiac Sympathetic Neurons: Mediation by Protein Kinase Cε

    OpenAIRE

    Robador, Pablo A.; Seyedi, Nahid; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Koda, Kenichiro; Levi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    During myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, lipid peroxidation leads to the formation of toxic aldehydes that contribute to ischemic dysfunction. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) alleviates ischemic heart damage and reperfusion arrhythmias via aldehyde detoxification. Because excessive norepinephrine release in the heart is a pivotal arrhythmogenic mechanism, we hypothesized that neuronal ALDH2 activation might diminish ischemic norepinephrine release. Incubation of cardiac sym...

  6. 2-Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase is a more significant source of O2(·-)/H2O2 than pyruvate dehydrogenase in cardiac and liver tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Gardiner, Danielle; O'Brien, Marisa

    2016-08-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Ogdh) are vital for Krebs cycle metabolism and sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). O2(·-)/H2O2 formation by Pdh and Ogdh from porcine heart were compared when operating under forward or reverse electron transfer conditions. Comparisons were also conducted with liver and cardiac mitochondria. During reverse electron transfer (RET) from NADH, purified Ogdh generated ~3-3.5× more O2(·-)/H2O2 in comparison to Pdh when metabolizing 0.5-10µM NADH. Under forward electron transfer (FET) conditions Ogdh generated ~2-4× more O2(·-)/H2O2 than Pdh. In both liver and cardiac mitochondria, Ogdh displayed significantly higher rates of ROS formation when compared to Pdh. Ogdh was also a significant source of ROS in liver mitochondria metabolizing 50µM and 500µM pyruvate or succinate. Finally, we also observed that DTT directly stimulated O2(·-)/H2O2 formation by purified Pdh and Ogdh and in cardiac or liver mitochondria in the absence of substrates and cofactors. Taken together, Ogdh is a more potent source of ROS than Pdh in liver and cardiac tissue. Ogdh is also an important ROS generator regardless of whether pyruvate or succinate serve as the sole source of carbon. Our observations provide insight into the ROS generating capacity of either complex in cardiac and liver tissue. The evidence presented herein also indicates DTT, a reductant that is routinely added to biological samples, should be avoided when assessing mitochondrial O2(·-)/H2O2 production. PMID:27394173

  7. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Serine is a part of chemical messengers called neurotransmitters that transmit signals in the nervous system . Proteins ... serine likely prevents the production of proteins and neurotransmitters in the brain and impairs the formation of ...

  8. Characterization and purification of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Methanosarcina barkeri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon monoxide-dependent production of H2, CO2, and CH4 was detected in crude cell extracts of acetate-grown Methanosarcina barkeri. This metabolic transformation was associated with an active methyl viologen-linked CO dehydrogenase activity (5 to 10 U/mg of protein). Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity was inhibited 85% by 10 μM KCN and was rapidly inactivated by O2. The enzyme was nearly homogenous after 20-fold purification, indicating that a significant proportion of soluble cell protein was CO dehydrogenase (ca. 5%). The native purified enzyme displayed a molecular weight of 232,000 and a two-subunit composition of 92,000 and 18,000 daltons. The enzyme was shown to contain nickel by isolation of radioactive CO dehydrogenase from cells grown in 63Ni. Analysis of enzyme kinetic properties revealed an apparent K/sub m/ of 5 mM for CO and a V/sub max/ of 1300 U/mg of protein. The spectral properties of the enzyme were similar to those published for CO dehydrogenase from acetogenic anaerobes. The physiological functions of the enzyme are discussed

  9. Assessment of toxicity using dehydrogenases activity and mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyja, Konrad; Małachowska-Jutsz, Anna; Mazur, Anna K; Grabas, Kazimierz

    2016-07-01

    Dehydrogenase activity is frequently used to assess the general condition of microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. Many studies have investigated the inhibition of dehydrogenase activity by various compounds, including heavy metal ions. However, the time after which the measurements are carried out is often chosen arbitrarily. Thus, it can be difficult to estimate how the toxic effects of compounds vary during the reaction and when the maximum of the effect would be reached. Hence, the aim of this study was to create simple and useful mathematical model describing changes in dehydrogenase activity during exposure to substances that inactivate enzymes. Our model is based on the Lagergrens pseudo-first-order equation, the rate of chemical reactions, enzyme activity, and inactivation and was created to describe short-term changes in dehydrogenase activity. The main assumption of our model is that toxic substances cause irreversible inactivation of enzyme units. The model is able to predict the maximum direct toxic effect (MDTE) and the time to reach this maximum (TMDTE). In order to validate our model, we present two examples: inactivation of dehydrogenase in microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. The model was applied successfully for cadmium and copper ions. Our results indicate that the predicted MDTE and TMDTE are more appropriate than EC50 and IC50 for toxicity assessments, except for long exposure times. PMID:27021434

  10. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor. PMID:27266631

  11. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C. (Michigan); (UCSF)

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  12. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H2-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H2O → CO2 + 2e− + 2H+) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding Ki-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([MoVI(=O)OH(2)SCuI(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in the assembly of the bimetallic cluster might proceed

  13. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreß, Oliver [Department of Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Gnida, Manuel [Department of Chemistry, University of Paderborn, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Pelzmann, Astrid M. [Department of Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Marx, Christian [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, 07745 Jena (Germany); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [Department of Chemistry, University of Paderborn, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Meyer, Ortwin, E-mail: Ortwin.Meyer@uni-bayreuth.de [Department of Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  14. Properties of Lactate Dehydrogenase in a Psychrophilic Marine Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, P; Yen, H. C.; Mathemeier, P. F.

    1985-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) from Vibrio marinus MP-1 was purified 15-fold and ammonium activated. The optimum pH for pyruvate reduction was 7.4. Maximum lactate dehydrogenase activity occurred at 10 to 15 degrees C, and none occurred at 40 degrees C. The crude-extract enzyme was stable between 15 and 20 degrees C and lost 50% of its activity after 60 min at 45 degrees C. The partially purified enzyme was stable between 8 and 15 degrees C and lost 50% of its activity after 60 min at 30...

  15. Prostaglandin dehydrogenase and the initiation of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, J R; Patel, F A; Pomini, F

    1999-01-01

    In summary, these studies have suggested that prostaglandin dehydrogenase may have a central role to play in the mechanisms which determine biologically active prostaglandin concentrations within human fetal membranes and placenta at the time of labor, at term or preterm. Moreover, our studies indicate that the regulation of PGDH may by multifactorial (figure 3). In certain regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH expression may be influenced by levels of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In other regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH may be regulated at a transcriptional level by competing activities of progesterone and cortisol. The action of progesterone could be effected through systemically-derived steroid, or by locally synthesized steroid, acting in a paracrine and/or autocrine fashion. The effects of cortisol in placenta must be due to glucocorticoid derived from the maternal or fetal compartment, since the placenta lacks the hydroxylases required for endogenous cortisol production. However, metabolism of cortisol by 11 beta-HSD-2 reduces the potency of this glucocorticoid in placental tissue. In chorion however, cortisol may be formed locally, from cortisone, in addition to its being derived from the maternal circulation and/or from the amniotic fluid. Our current studies do not allow us to delineate whether the effects of progesterone and cortisol on PGDH are exerted through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or progesterone receptor (PR) or both. It is possible that through pregnancy, PGDH activity is maintained by progesterone acting either through low levels of PR in membranes, or, more likely, acting through GR. At term, elevated levels of cortisol compete with and displace progesterone from GR, resulting in inhibition of PGDH transcription and activity. In this way, local withdrawal of progesterone action would be effected within human intrauterine tissues, without requiring changes in systemic, circulating progesterone

  16. Enhanced clearance of lactic dehydrogenase-5 in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice: effect of lactic dehydrogenase virus on enzyme clearance.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, T.; Ozaki, M.; Mori, I; Saito, M; Itoh, T.; Yamamoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    The lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level in plasma and the clearance of LDH in C.B-17 scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mice were compared with those in C.B-17 or BALB/cCrSlc mice with or without lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) infection. The resting enzyme level in SCID mice showed little difference from that in C.B-17 or BALB/cCrSlc mice. The degree of increased plasma LDH level in SCID mice was lower than that in C.B-17 and BALB/cCrSlc mice after LDV infection. To assess the mecha...

  17. Preparation of 15N-labeled L-alanine by coupling the alanine dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple enzymatic procedure for the preparation of L-[15N]alanine, one of the metabolically most active amino acids in all types of cells, is reported. The procedure is based on the coupling of two reactions, one catalyzed by bacterial alanine dehydrogenase, the second catalyzed by yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. An impediment in the use of this procedure could be the high cost of commercial AlaDH. However, the enzyme is widespread in the Bacillus species and partially purified samples, adequate preparative purposes, could be obtained relatively easily by chromatography on blue-Sepharose. (Auth.)

  18. Polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase 2 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and colorectal cancer risk in Chinese males

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Ming Gao; Keitaro Matsuo; Nobuyuki Hamajima; Kazuo Tajima; Toshiro Takezaki; Jian-Zhong Wu; Xiao-Mei Zhang; Hai-Xia Cao; Jian-Hua Ding; Yan-Ting Liu; Su-Ping Li; Jia Cao

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relationship between drinking and polymorphisms of alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) and/or aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) for risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in Chinese males.METHODS: A case-control study was conducted in 190 cases and 223 population-based controls.ADH2 Arg47His (G-A) and ALDH2 Glu487Lys (G-A) genotypes were identified by PCR and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC).Information on smoking and drinking was collected and odds ratio (OR) was estimated.RESULTS: The ADH2 A/A and ALDH2 G/G genotypes showed moderately increased CRC risk. The age- and smoking-adjusted OR for ADH2 A/A relative to G/A and G/G was 1.60 (95% CI=1.08-2.36), and the adjusted OR for ALDH2 G/G relative to G/A and A/A was 1.79 (95% CI=1.19-2.69). Significant interactions between ADH2,ALDH2 and drinking were observed. As compared to the subjects with ADH2 G and ALDH2 A alleles, those with ADH2 A/A and ALDH2 G/G genotypes had a significantly increased OR (3.05, 95% CI= 1.67-5.57). The OR for CRC among drinkers with the ,4DH2 A/A genotype was increased to 3.44 (95% CI= 1.84-6.42) compared with non-drinkers with the ADH2 G allele. The OR for CRC among drinkers with theALDH2 G/G genotype was also increased to 2.70 (95% CI= 1.57-4.66) compared with non-drinkers with the ALDH2 A allele.CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms of the ADH2 and ALDH2 genes are significantly associated with CRC risk. There are also significant gene-gene and geneenvironment interactions between drinking and ADH2 and ALDH2 polymorphisms regarding CRC risk in Chinese males.

  19. The Crystal Structure of Aquifex aeolicus Prephenate Dehydrogenase Reveals the Mode of Tyrosine Inhibition*

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Warren; Shahinas, Dea; Bonvin, Julie; Hou, Wenjuan; Kimber, Matthew S.; Turnbull, Joanne; Christendat, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    TyrA proteins belong to a family of dehydrogenases that are dedicated to l-tyrosine biosynthesis. The three TyrA subclasses are distinguished by their substrate specificities, namely the prephenate dehydrogenases, the arogenate dehydrogenases, and the cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenases, which utilize prephenate, l-arogenate, or both substrates, respectively. The molecular mechanism responsible for TyrA substrate selectivity and regulation is unknown. To further our underst...

  20. Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenases: Retinoid Metabolic Effects in Mouse Knockout Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sandeep; Sandell, Lisa L.; Trainor, Paul A; Koentgen, Frank; Duester, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A (retinol) that controls growth and development. The first step of RA synthesis is controlled by enzymes of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinol dehydrogenase (RDH) families that catalyze oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde. The second step of RA synthesis is controlled by members of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family also known as retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH) that further oxidize retinaldehyde to produce RA. RA fun...

  1. Interaction of glutaric aciduria type 1-related glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase with mitochondrial matrix proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Schmiesing

    Full Text Available Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1 is an inherited neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GCDH gene encoding glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH, which forms homo- and heteromeric complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. GA1 patients are prone to the development of encephalopathic crises which lead to an irreversible disabling dystonic movement disorder. The clinical and biochemical manifestations of GA1 vary considerably and lack correlations to the genotype. Using an affinity chromatography approach we report here for the first time on the identification of mitochondrial proteins interacting directly with GCDH. Among others, dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (DLST involved in the formation of glutaryl-CoA, and the β-subunit of the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETFB serving as electron acceptor, were identified as GCDH binding partners. We have adapted the yellow fluorescent protein-based fragment complementation assay and visualized the oligomerization of GCDH as well as its direct interaction with DLST and ETFB in mitochondria of living cells. These data suggest that GCDH is a constituent of multimeric mitochondrial dehydrogenase complexes, and the characterization of their interrelated functions may provide new insights into the regulation of lysine oxidation and the pathophysiology of GA1.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a ribitol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Tiwari, Manish; Jeya, Marimuthu;

    2010-01-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH) catalyzes the conversion of ribitol to D-ribulose. A novel RDH gene was cloned from Zymomonas mobilis subsp. mobilis ZM4 and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 795 bp, capable of encoding a polypeptide...

  3. Molecular cloning of gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003 xylitol dehydrogenase gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, H. Mir Mohammad; Ahmadi, R.; Aghaabdollahian, S.; Mofid, M.R.; Ghaemi, Y.; Abedi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the widespread applications of xylitol dehydrogenase, an enzyme used for the production of xylitol, the present study was designed for the cloning of xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Glcunobacter oxydans DSM 2003. After extraction of genomic DNA from this bacterium, xylitol dehydrogenase gene was replicated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified product was entered into pTZ57R cloning vector by T/A cloning method and transformation was performed by heat shocking of the E. coli XL1-blue competent cells. Following plasmid preparation, the cloned gene was digested out and ligated into the expression vector pET-22b(+). Electrophoresis of PCR product showed a 789 bp band. Recombinant plasmid (rpTZ57R) was then constructed. This plasmid was double digested with XhoI and EcoRI resulting in 800 bp and 2900 bp bands. The obtained insert was ligated into pET-22b(+) vector and its orientation was confirmed with XhoI and BamHI restriction enzymes. In conclusion, in the present study the recombinant expression vector containing xylitol dehydrogenase gene has been constructed and can be used for the production of this enzyme in high quantities. PMID:22110522

  4. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Isocitric dehydrogenase test system. 862.1420 Section 862.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase test system. 862.1440 Section 862.1440 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system. 862.1380 Section 862.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  7. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waddell, Leigh; Wiley, Veronica; Carpenter, Kevin; Bennetts, Bruce; Angel, Lyn; Andresen, Brage S; Wilcken, Bridget

    2006-01-01

    The fatty acid oxidation disorder most commonly identified by tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening is the potentially fatal medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD). In clinically presenting cases, 80% are homozygous for the common mutation, c.985A > G and 18% heterozygous. We ...

  8. Cloning and expression of chicken 20-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bryndová, Jana; Klusoňová, Petra; Kučka, Marek; Vagnerová, Karla; Mikšík, Ivan; Pácha, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2006), s. 453-462. ISSN 0952-5041 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6011201 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) 216/2004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : 20-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase * SDR family Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.988, year: 2006

  9. Cloning and expression of chicken 20beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusoňová, Petra; Kučka, Marek; Bryndová, Jana; Vagnerová, Karla; Mikšík, Ivan; Pácha, Jiří

    Seefeld, 2006. [International Symposium of the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology /17./. 31.05.2006-03.06.2006, Seefeld] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6011201 Keywords : 20beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase * chicken Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  10. Two different dihydroorotate dehydrogenases from yeast Saccharomyees kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zameitat, E.; Knecht, Wolfgang; Piskur, Jure; Loffler, M.

    2004-01-01

    Genes for two structurally and functionally different dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs, EC 1.3.99.11), catalyzing the fourth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis, have been previously found in yeast Saccharomyces klujveri. One is closely related to the Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitochondrial family...

  11. Purification and characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Kekos, D.; Macris, B.J.;

    2002-01-01

    An NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) from Fusarium oxysporum, a key enzyme in the conversion of xylose to ethanol, was purified to homogeneity and characterised. It was homodimeric with a subunit of M-r 48 000, and pI 3.6. It was optimally active at 45degreesC and pH 9-10. It was fully...

  12. Cofactor engineering of Lactobacillus brevis alcohol dehydrogenase by computational design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.; Looger, L.L.; Raedts, J.G.J.; Dijkhuizen, S.; Hummel, W.; Henneman, H.G.; Daussmann, T.; Oost, van der J.

    2009-01-01

    The R-specific alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (Lb-ADH) catalyzes the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones to the corresponding secondary alcohols. It is stable and has broad substrate specificity. These features make this enzyme an attractive candidate for biotechnologica

  13. Microbial and xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitory activity of some flavones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khobragade, C N; Bodade, Ragini G; Shinde, M S; Jaju, Deepa R; Bhosle, R B; Dawane, B S

    2008-06-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is responsible for the pathological condition called Gout. In the present study different flavones synthesized from chalcone were evaluated in vitro for their inhibitory activity. Inhibitory activity of flavones on XDH was determined in terms of inhibition of uric acid synthesis from Xanthine. The enzymatic activity was found maximum at pH 7.5 and temperature 40 degrees C. The flavones 6-chloro-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(1)) and 6-chloro-7methyl-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one(F(2)),were noncompetitive and competitive inhibitor with Ki values 1.1 and 0.22 respectively. The flavones (F(1)), (F(2)), 6-chloro-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one(F(3)), 8-bromo-6-chloro-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(4)), 2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(5)) and 6-methyl-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(6)) were also screened for their antimicrobial activity, measured in terms of zone of inhibition. A broad spectrum antifungal activity was obtained against Trichoderma viridae, Candida albicans, Microsporum cannis, Penicillium chrysogenum and Fusarium moniliformae. In case of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavous only spore formation was affected, while antibacterial activity was observed against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Serratia marsecens only. The flavones were further analyzed for quantitative structural activity relationship study (QSAR) by using PASS, online software to determine their Pa value. Toxicity and drug relevant properties were revealed by PALLAS software in terms of their molecular weight. Log P values were also studied. The result showed both the F(1) and F(2) flavones as antigout and therefore supports the development of novel drugs for the treatment of gout. PMID:18569337

  14. Biochemical characterization of a bifunctional acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase purified from a facultative anaerobic bacterium Citrobacter sp. S-77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Kohsei; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHE) is a bifunctional enzyme consisting of two domains of an N-terminal acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and a C-terminal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The enzyme is known to be important in the cellular alcohol metabolism. However, the role of coenzyme A-acylating ADHE responsible for ethanol production from acetyl-CoA remains uncertain. Here, we present the purification and biochemical characterization of an ADHE from Citrobacter sp. S-77 (ADHES77). Interestingly, the ADHES77 was unable to be solubilized from membrane with detergents either 1% Triton X-100 or 1% Sulfobetaine 3-12. However, the enzyme was easily dissociated from membrane by high-salt buffers containing either 1.0 M NaCl or (NH4)2SO4 without detergents. The molecular weight of a native protein was estimated as approximately 400 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 96.3 kDa. Based on the specific activity and kinetic analysis, the ADHES77 tended to have catalytic reaction towards acetaldehyde elimination rather than acetaldehyde formation. Our experimental observation suggests that the ADHES77 may play a pivotal role in modulating intracellular acetaldehyde concentration. PMID:26216639

  15. Non-thermal effect of a ceramics radiation on a yeast glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-thermal effect of a ceramics radiation on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase has been investigated using the enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate and NADP+ separately irradiated at 10 degrees C by a ceracompo R plate and a ceramics un-sewed cloth (sheet). The Km for glucose-6-phosphate was increased 20% after 6 h of irradiation by the plate, but the Vmax/Km was decreased 24. After 3 h of irradiation by the sheet, the Km was increased 17%, but after 6 h of irradiation it was decreased 11%. The 3 h of irradiation by the sheet slightly increased both enthalpy and entropy changes of the reaction, but the 6 h of irradiation significantly decreased them. Both thermodynamic parameters in the activated state were increased by the sheet irradiation. The promotion energy for both formations of the enzyme-substrate and their activated complex depended on enthalpy. The different effects of two ceramics radiators on G6PDH activity were discussed

  16. Inhibition effects of some metal ions on the rat liver 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adem, Şevki; Kayhan, Naciye

    2016-04-01

    6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is an enzyme in the pentose phosphate path. The main functions of the pathway are the manufacture of the reduced coenzyme NADPH and the formation of ribose 5-phosphate for nucleic acid synthesis and nucleotide. Both NADPH and ribose 5-phosphate involve a critical biochemical process. Metals have been recognized as important toxic agents for living for a long time. It has been considered that they lead to in the emergence of many diseases. To evaluate whether metals is effect towards rat liver 6PGD, we apply various concentrations of metals and enzyme inhibition was analyzed using enzyme activity assays. The IC50 values of Pb+2, Cr+3, Co+2, Ni+2, Cd+2, and Va+2, metals on rat liver 6PGD were calculated as 138,138, 169, 214, 280, and 350 µM, respectively.

  17. Succinate dehydrogenase subunit D and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B mutation analysis in canine phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, D E; Henthorn, P; Howell, V M; Robinson, B G; Benn, D E

    2014-07-01

    Phaeochromocytomas (PCs) are tumours of the adrenal medulla chromaffin cells. Paragangliomas (PGLs) arise in sympathetic ganglia (previously called extra-adrenal PCs) or in non-chromaffin parasympathetic ganglia cells that are usually non-secretory. Parenchymal cells from these tumours have a common embryological origin from neural crest ectoderm. Several case series of canine PCs and PGLs have been published and a link between the increased incidence of chemoreceptor neoplasia in brachycephalic dog breeds and chronic hypoxia has been postulated. A similar link to hypoxia in man led to the identification of germline heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) and subsequently SDHA, SDHB and SDHC in similar tumours. We investigated canine PCs (n = 6) and PGLs (n = 2) for SDHD and SDHB mutations and in one PGL found a somatic SDHD mutation c.365A>G (p.Lys122Arg) in exon 4, which was not present in normal tissue from this brachycephalic dog. Two PCs were heterozygous for both c.365A>G (p.Lys122Arg) mutation and an exon 3 silent variant c.291G>A. We also identified the heterozygous SDHB exon 2 mutation c.113G>A (p.Arg38Gln) in a PC. These results illustrate that genetic mutations may underlie tumourigenesis in canine PCs and PGLs. The spontaneous nature of these canine diseases and possible association of PGLs with hypoxia in brachycephalic breeds may make them an attractive model for studying the corresponding human tumours. PMID:24813157

  18. [Cooperative properties of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagradova, N K

    1977-03-01

    The structure of the active center of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and the arrangement of subunits in the tetrameric molecule is delineated. The mechanism of cooperative effects in the oligomer is considered, and the involvement of various regions of the active center and of different-subunit contact area in the realization of the cooperative phenomena is discussed. A special attention is paid to the effect of NAD+ bound to one of the subunits of the tetramer on the structure of an adjacent subunit and to the problem of the participation of the coenzyme in the creation of anion-binding sites of the enzyme. The conditions of reversible dissociation of the tetrameric apoenzyme molecule into dimers are depicted, and the role of NAD+ in the organization of the quaternary structure of the dehydrogenase is discussed. The problem of catalytic activity of the dimeric form of the enzyme is argued. PMID:193581

  19. Direct Observation of Correlated Interdomain Motion in Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Biehl, R.; Hoffmann, B.; Monkenbusch, M.; Falus, P.; Préost, S.; Merkel, R.; Richter, D.

    2008-01-01

    Interdomain motions in proteins are essential to enable or promote biochemical function. Neutron spinecho spectroscopy is used to directly observe the domain dynamics of the protein alcohol dehydrogenase. The collective motion of domains as revealed by their coherent form factor relates to the cleft opening dynamics between the binding and the catalytic domains enabling binding and release of the functional important cofactor. The cleft opening mode hardens as a result of an overall stiffenin...

  20. Prognostic values of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 isoenzymes in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ma YM; Zhao S

    2016-01-01

    Yu-mei Ma,1 Shan Zhao2 1Department of Pathology, 2Department of Cancer Second Division, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang City, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity has been used as a functional stem cell marker to isolate cancer stem cells in different cancer types, including ovarian cancer. However, which ALDH1’s isoenzymes are contributing to ALDH1 activity in ovarian cancer remains elusive. In addition, th...

  1. Detailed kinetics and regulation of mammalian 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Dash Ranjan K; Pradhan Ranjan K; Qi Feng; Beard Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC), a key regulatory point of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, plays vital roles in multiple pathways of energy metabolism and biosynthesis. The catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of this large enzyme complex are not fully understood. Here computer simulation is used to test possible catalytic mechanisms and mechanisms of allosteric regulation of the enzyme by nucleotides (ATP, ADP), pH, an...

  2. Neonatal screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: sex distribution.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, M.; Hammerman, C; Kvit, R; Rudensky, B; Abramov, A.

    1994-01-01

    Eight hundred and six newborn infants at high risk for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency were screened; 30.2% of the boys and 10.4% of the girls had severe G-6-PD deficiency. Surprisingly, 14% of the enzyme deficient girls had a father from a low risk ethnic group. Girls of high risk mothers should be screened for G-6-PD deficiency regardless of paternal origin.

  3. Characterization of the rat Class 3 aldehyde dehydrogenase gene promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Y Q; Takimoto, K; Pitot, H. C.; Miskimins, W K; Lindahl, R

    1996-01-01

    The Class 3 aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ALDH-3) is differentially expressed. Expression is either constitutive or xenobiotic inducible via an aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-mediated pathway, depending upon the tissue. A series of studies were performed to examine the regulation of rat ALDH-3 basal expression. DNase I footprint analysis identified four DNA regions within the proximal 1 kb of the 5' flanking region of rat ALDH-3 which interact with regulatory proteins. Reporter gene and ge...

  4. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids

    OpenAIRE

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Rodríguez, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver . Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and ...

  5. Optic neuropathy in a patient with pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Juan E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gonzalez, Guido E. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Departmento de Imagenes, Santiago (Chile); Nagao, Karina E.; Walton, David S. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Ophthalmology, Boston, MA (United States); Caruso, Paul A. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a genetic disorder of mitochondrial metabolism. The clinical manifestations range from severe neonatal lactic acidosis to chronic neurodegeneration. Optic neuropathy is an uncommon clinical sequela and the imaging findings of optic neuropathy in these patients have not previously been described. We present a patient with PDH deficiency with bilateral decreased vision in whom MRI demonstrated bilateral optic neuropathy and chiasmopathy. (orig.)

  6. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) in bacteria: a bioinformatic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiela, Michael; Skarka, Adam; Ebert, Bettina; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    Steroidal compounds including cholesterol, bile acids and steroid hormones play a central role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, growth, reproduction, and energy homeostasis. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), which belong to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) or aldo-keto reductases (AKR), are important enzymes involved in the steroid hormone metabolism. HSDs function as an enzymatic switch that controls the access of receptor-active steroids to nuclear hormone receptors and thereby mediate a fine-tuning of the steroid response. The aim of this study was the identification of classified functional HSDs and the bioinformatic annotation of these proteins in all complete sequenced bacterial genomes followed by a phylogenetic analysis. For the bioinformatic annotation we constructed specific hidden Markov models in an iterative approach to provide a reliable identification for the specific catalytic groups of HSDs. Here, we show a detailed phylogenetic analysis of 3α-, 7α-, 12α-HSDs and two further functional related enzymes (3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase, 3-ketosteroid-Δ(4)(5α)-dehydrogenase) from the superfamily of SDRs. For some bacteria that have been previously reported to posses a specific HSD activity, we could annotate the corresponding HSD protein. The dominating phyla that were identified to express HSDs were that of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Moreover, some evolutionarily more ancient microorganisms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Euryachaeota) were found as well. A large number of HSD-expressing bacteria constitute the normal human gastro-intestinal flora. Another group of bacteria were originally isolated from natural habitats like seawater, soil, marine and permafrost sediments. These bacteria include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus. In conclusion, HSDs are found in a wide variety of microorganisms including

  7. Retinol dehydrogenase 10 is indispensible for spermatogenesis in juvenile males

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Ming-Han; Yang, Qi-En; Davis, Jeffrey C.; Griswold, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active vitamin A derivative, is essential for mammalian spermatogenesis. Genetic studies have revealed that oxidation of vitamin A to retinal by retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) is critical for embryonic RA biosynthesis. However, physiological roles of RDH10 in postnatal RA synthesis remain unclear, given that Rdh10 loss-of-function mutations lead to early embryonic lethality. We conducted in vivo genetic studies of Rdh10 in postnatal mouse testes and found that an RDH1...

  8. Fatty acids and the regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase interconversion

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Melanie Ann.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis presents evidence for a novel mechanism of regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase by fatty acids and also results of a study of muscle triacylglycerol concentration. In animals regulation of PDH complex activity is central to the selection of respiratory fuels and to the conservation of glucose during carbohydrate deprivation. The principal means of regulation of PDH complex is interconversion of phosphorylated (inactive) and dephosphorylated (active) fo...

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition as a pathogenic mechanism in Parkinson disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Lulla, Aaron; Murphy, Niall P.; Lam, Hoa A.; O’Donnell, Kelley C.; Barnhill, Lisa; Casida, John E.; Cockburn, Myles; Sagasti, Alvaro; Stahl, Mark C.; Maidment, Nigel T; Ritz, Beate; Bronstein, Jeff. M.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder particularly characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Pesticide exposure has been associated with PD occurrence, and we previously reported that the fungicide benomyl interferes with several cellular processes potentially relevant to PD pathogenesis. Here we propose that benomyl, via its bioactivated thiocarbamate sulfoxide metabolite, inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), leading to accumulation of the...

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. WHO Working Group.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the commonest enzyme disorder of human beings and a globally important cause of neonatal jaundice, which can lead to kernicterus and death or spastic cerebral palsy. It can also lead to life-threatening haemolytic crises in childhood and at later ages, by interacting with specific drugs and with fava beans in the diet. The complications of G6PD deficiency can largely be prevented by education and information, and neonatal jaundice can be ...

  11. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Cellular Responses to Oxidative/electrophilic Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Ying, Chen; Jackson, Brian; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophili...

  12. Encapsulation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Mannitol by Spray Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Hirokazu Shiga; Hiromi Joreau; Tze Loon Neoh; Takeshi Furuta; Hidefumi Yoshii

    2014-01-01

    The retention of the enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) has been studied in various drying processes such as spray drying. The aim of this study is to encapsulate ADH in mannitol, either with or without additive in order to limit the thermal denaturation of the enzyme during the drying process. The retention of ADH activity was investigated at different drying temperatures. When mannitol was used, the encapsulated ADH was found inactive in all the dried powders. This is presumably...

  13. Retinal Dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) Mutations in Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    OpenAIRE

    Perrault, Isabelle; Hanein, Sylvain; Gerber, Sylvie; Barbet, Fabienne; Ducroq, Dominique; Dollfus, Helene; Hamel, Christian,; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2004-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), the most early-onset and severe form of all inherited retinal dystrophies, is responsible for congenital blindness. Ten LCA genes have been mapped, and seven of these have been identified. Because some of these genes are involved in the visual cycle, we regarded the retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor-specific retinal dehydrogenase (RDH) genes as candidate genes in LCA. Studying a series of 110 unrelated patients with LCA, we found mutations in the p...

  14. Molecular properties of succinate dehydrogenase isolated from Micrococcus luteus (lysodeikticus).

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, B A; Owen, P.(Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom)

    1983-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1) of Micrococcus luteus was selectively precipitated from Triton X-100-solubilized membranes by using specific antiserum. The precipitated enzyme contained equimolar amounts of four polypeptides with apparent molecular weights of 72,000, 30,000, 17,000, and 15,000. The 72,000 polypeptide possessed a covalently bound flavin prosthetic group and appeared to be strongly antigenic as judged by immunoprinting experiments. Low-temperature absorption spectroscopy ...

  15. Visual evoked potentials in succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Di Rosa, G.; Malaspina, P; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Dionisi-Vici, C.; Rizzo, C; Tortorella, G; Crutchfield, S. R.; Gibson, K. M.

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, increased GABA in the central nervous system has been associated with abnormalities of visual evoked potentials (VEPs), predominantly manifested as increased latency of the major positive component P100. Accordingly, we hypothesized that patients with a defect in GABA metabolism, succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency (in whom supraphysiological levels of GABA accumulate), would manifest VEP anomalies. We evaluated VEPs on two patients with confirmed SSADH deficie...

  16. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in Nigerian Children

    OpenAIRE

    Olatundun Williams; Daniel Gbadero; Grace Edowhorhu; Ann Brearley; Tina Slusher; Lund, Troy C.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (...

  17. A guide to 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamski, J; Jakob, F J

    2001-01-22

    17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17beta-HSD) are pivotal in controlling the biological potency of steroid hormones by catalyzing oxidation or reduction at position 17. Several 17beta-HSDs may as well metabolize further substrates including alcohols, bile acids, fatty acids and retinols. This review summarizes recent progress in the field of 17beta-HSD research provides an update of nomenclature. PMID:11165003

  18. Novel yeast cell dehydrogenase activity assay in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berłowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Klimek, Leszek; Orzeszyna, Bartosz; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a suitable method of succinate dehydrogenase activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. For this purpose different compounds: EDTA, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, digitonin, nystatin and beta-mercaptoethanol were used. The permeabilization process was controlled microscopically by primuline staining. Enzyme assay was conducted in whole yeast cells with Na-succinate as substrate, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as electron carrier and in the presence one of two different tetrazolium salts: tetrazolium blue chloride (BT) or cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) reduced during the assay. In comparabile studies of yeast vitality the amount of intracellular ATP was determined according to luciferin/luciferase method. During the succinate dehydrogenase assay in intact yeast cells without permeabilization, BT formazans were partially visualized in the cells, but CTC formazans appeared to be totally extracellular or associated with the plasma membrane. Under these conditions there was no linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell density. From all chemical compounds tested, only digitonin was effective in membrane permeabilization without negative influence on cell morphology. Furthermore, with digitonin-treated cells a linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell number was noticed. Significant decreasing of succinate dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were observed during aging of the tested yeast strains. PMID:17419290

  19. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases: Therapeutic Targets for Diabetes and Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Ho Jeoung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Impaired glucose homeostasis is one of the risk factors for causing metabolic diseases including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. In glucose metabolism, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC mediates a major regulatory step, an irreversible reaction of oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Tight control of PDC is critical because it plays a key role in glucose disposal. PDC activity is tightly regulated using phosphorylation by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK1 to 4 and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatases (PDP1 and 2. PDKs and PDPs exhibit unique tissue expression patterns, kinetic properties, and sensitivities to regulatory molecules. During the last decades, the up-regulation of PDKs has been observed in the tissues of patients and mammals with metabolic diseases, which suggests that the inhibition of these kinases may have beneficial effects for treating metabolic diseases. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of specific PDK isoenzymes on the induction of metabolic diseases and describes the effects of PDK inhibition on the prevention of metabolic diseases using pharmacological inhibitors. Based on these reports, PDK isoenzymes are strong therapeutic targets for preventing and treating metabolic diseases.

  20. Cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloning, purification and crystallization of T. thermophilus proline dehydrogenase is reported. The detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside was used to reduce polydispersity, which enabled crystallization. Nature recycles l-proline by converting it to l-glutamate. This four-electron oxidation process is catalyzed by the two enzymes: proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. This note reports the cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus PRODH, which is the prototype of a newly discovered superfamily of bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. The results presented here include production of a monodisperse protein solution through use of the detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside and the growth of native crystals that diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. The space group is P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.2, b = 89.6, c = 94.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two protein molecules and 46% solvent. Molecular-replacement trials using a fragment of the PRODH domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli PutA protein as the search model (24% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of T. thermophilus PRODH will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative

  1. Genetic improvement of Escherichia coli for ethanol production: chromosomal integration of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, K.; Beall, D S; Mejia, J P; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L O

    1991-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis genes for pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) were integrated into the Escherichia coli chromosome within or near the pyruvate formate-lyase gene (pfl). Integration improved the stability of the Z. mobilis genes in E. coli, but further selection was required to increase expression. Spontaneous mutants were selected for resistance to high level of chloramphenicol that also expressed high levels of the Z. mobilis genes. Analogous mutants were selec...

  2. Genome-wide analysis of the UDP-glucose dehydrogenase gene family in Arabidopsis, a key enzyme for matrix polysaccharides in cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    Klinghammer, Michaela; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2008-01-01

    Arabidopsis cell walls contain large amounts of pectins and hemicelluloses, which are predominantly synthesized via the common precursor UDP-glucuronic acid. The major enzyme for the formation of this nucleotide-sugar is UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, catalysing the irreversible oxidation of UDP-glucose into UDP-glucuronic acid. Four functional gene family members and one pseudogene are present in the Arabidopsis genome, and they show distinct tissue-specific expression patterns during plant deve...

  3. Immunological study of lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus mutans and evidence of common antigenic domains with lactate dehydrogenases from lactic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, P.; Klein, J P; Ogier, J. A.; Frank, R M

    1986-01-01

    Rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against purified Streptococcus mutans L-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase reacted with the purified enzyme, giving a marked deviation of its kinetic parameters. The enzyme affinity for pyruvate or NADH decreased in the presence of antibody, the affinity for fructose 1,6-diphosphate (FDP) appeared to be slightly affected, and the cooperativity of the ligand binding was lowered. A partial protective effect was observed when the enzyme was preincubated with FDP prio...

  4. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase and Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Expression in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer and Tumor-Associated Stroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Koukourakis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A, which enters into the Krebs cycle, providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP to the cell. PDH activity is under the control of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs. Under hypoxic conditions, conversion of pyruvate to lactate occurs, a reaction catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase 5 (LDH5. In cancer cells, however, pyruvate is transformed to lactate occurs, regardless of the presence of oxygen (aerobic glycolysis/Warburg effect. Although hypoxic intratumoral conditions account for HIFia stabilization and induction of anaerobic metabolism, recent data suggest that high pyruvate concentrations also result in HIFia stabilization independently of hypoxia. In the present immunohistochemical study, we provide evidence that the PDH/PDK pathway is repressed in 73% of non small cell lung carcinomas, which may be a key reason for HIFia stabilization and “aerobic glycolysis.” However, about half of PDHdeficient carcinomas are not able to switch on the HIF pathway, and patients harboring these tumors have an excellent postoperative outcome. A small subgroup of clinically aggressive tumors maintains a coherent PDH and HIF/LDH5 expression. In contrast to cancer cells, fibroblasts in the tumor-supporting stroma exhibit an intense PDH but reduced PDK1 expression favoring maximum PDH activity. This means that stroma may use lactic acid produced by tumor cells, preventing the creation of an intolerable intratumoral acidic environment at the same time.

  5. Evidence for distinct dehydrogenase and isomerase sites within a single 3. beta. -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luu-The, V.; Takahashi, Masakazu; de Launoit, Y.; Dumont, M.; Lachance, Y.; Labrie, F. (Laval Univ., Quebec City, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-09-10

    Complementary DNA encoding human 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase (3-{beta}-HSD) has been expressed in transfected GH{sub 4}C{sub 1} with use of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The activity of the expressed protein clearly shows that both dehydrogenase and isomerase enzymatic activities are present within a single protein. However, such findings do not indicate whether the two activities reside within one or two closely related catalytic sites. With use of ({sup 3}H)-5-androstenedione, the intermediate compound in dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) transformation into 4-androstenedione by 3{beta}-HSD, the present study shows that 4MA (N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5{alpha}-androstane-17{beta}-carboxamide) and its analogues of 5-androstenedione to 4-androstenedione with an approximately 1,000-fold higher K{sub i} value. The present results thus strongly suggest that dehydrogenase and isomerase activities are present at separate sites on the 3-{beta}-HSD protein. Such data suggest that the irreversible step in the transformation of DHEA to 4-androstenedione is due to a separate site possessing isomerase activity that converts the 5-ene-3-keto to a much more stable 4-ene-3-keto configuration.

  6. Reduction of 3-mercaptopyruvate in rat liver is catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta,Jun; Ubuka,Toshihiko

    1989-01-01

    It has been assumed that the in vivo reduction of 3-mercaptopyruvate, an intermediate of cysteine metabolism, to 3-mercaptolactate is catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) though no definitive evidence has been presented. In order to examine this assumption, reduction of 3-mercaptopyruvate and its inhibition were studied using rat liver homogenate, lactate dehydrogenase purified from rat liver and anti-lactate dehydrogenase antiserum. Reduction of 3-mercaptopyruvate was actively ca...

  7. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    DD Farhud"; L Yazdanpanah

    2008-01-01

    "nGlucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency is the most prevalent enzymopathy in mankind. It has sex-linked in­heritance. This enzyme exists in all cells.  G6PD deficiency increases the sensitivity of red blood cells to oxidative dam­age. G6PD deficiency was discovered in 1950 when some people suffered hemolytic anemia as a result of taking antimalar­ial drugs (primaquin). Most people with G6PD deficiency do not have any symptoms, till they are ...

  8. Evaluation of predictive tests for screening for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staveren, M C; Guchelaar, H Jan; van Kuilenburg, A B P; Gelderblom, H; Maring, J G

    2013-10-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is rapidly degraded by dihyropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). Therefore, DPD deficiency can lead to severe toxicity or even death following treatment with 5-FU or capecitabine. Different tests based on assessing DPD enzyme activity, genetic variants in DPYD and mRNA variants have been studied for screening for DPD deficiency, but none of these are implemented broadly into clinical practice. We give an overview of the tests that can be used to detect DPD deficiency and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these tests. PMID:23856855

  9. Functional characterization of a vanillin dehydrogenase in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Wei; Si, Meiru; Zhang, Weipeng; Zhang, Yaoling; Chen, Can; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Shaolin; Shen, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Vanillin dehydrogenase (VDH) is a crucial enzyme involved in the degradation of lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Herein, the VDH from Corynebacterium glutamicum was characterized. The relative molecular mass (Mr) determined by SDS-PAGE was ~51kDa, whereas the apparent native Mr values revealed by gel filtration chromatography were 49.5, 92.3, 159.0 and 199.2kDa, indicating the presence of dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric forms. Moreover, the enzyme showed its highest level of activity towar...

  10. [Genetic variations in alcohol dehydrogenase, drinking habits and alcoholism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, J.S.; Rasmussen, S.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.;

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. By genotyping 9,080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow versus fast alcohol...... degradation drank approximately 30% more alcohol per week and had a higher risk of everyday and heavy drinking, and of alcoholism. Individuals with ADH1C slow versus fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy drinking Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  11. 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Mechanism: EVIDENCE FOR ALLOSTERIC MODULATION BY SUBSTRATE

    OpenAIRE

    Hanau, Stefania; Montin, Katy; Cervellati, Carlo; Magnani, Morena; Dallocchio, Franco

    2010-01-01

    The reductive carboxylation of ribulose-5-phosphate (Ru5P) by 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from Candida utilis was investigated using kinetic isotope effects. The intrinsic isotope effect for proton abstraction from Ru5P was found at 4.9 from deuterium isotope effects on V and V/K and from tritium isotope effects on V/K. The presence of 6-phosphogluconate (6PG) in the assay mixture changes the magnitude of the observed isotope effects. In the absence of 6PG D(V/K) and D(V) are 1.6...

  12. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  13. Genetic Control of Malate Dehydrogenase Isozymes in Maize

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, M. M.; Stuber, C. W.; Lee, C N; Johnson, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    At least six nuclear loci are responsible for the genetic control of malate dehydrogenase (L-malate: NAD oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.37; MDH) in coleoptiles of maize. Three independently segregating loci (Mdh1, Mdh2, Mdh3) govern the production of MDH isozymes resistant to inactivation by ascorbic acid and found largely or solely in the mitochondria. A rare recessive allele found at a fourth nuclear locus (mmm) causes increased electrophoretic mobility of the MDH isozymes governed by the Mdh1, M...

  14. On the interaction between glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and airborne particles: Evidence for electrophilic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinyashiki, Masaru; Rodriguez, Chester E.; Di Stefano, Emma W.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.; Kumagai, Yoshito; Froines, John R.; Cho, Arthur K.

    Many of the adverse health effects of airborne particulate matter (PM) have been attributed to the chemical properties of some of the large number of chemical species present in PM. Some PM component chemicals are capable of generating reactive oxygen species and eliciting a state of oxidative stress. In addition, however, PM can contain chemical species that elicit their effects through covalent bond formation with nucleophilic functions in the cell. In this manuscript, we report the presence of constituents with electrophilic properties in ambient and diesel exhaust particles, demonstrated by their ability to inhibit the thiol enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). GAPDH is irreversibly inactivated by electrophiles under anaerobic conditions by covalent bond formation. This inactivation can be blocked by the prior addition of a high concentration of dithiothreitol (DTT) as an alternate nucleophile. Addition of DTT after the reaction between the electrophile and GAPDH, however, does not reverse the inactivation. This property has been utilized to develop a procedure that provides a quantitative measure of electrophiles present in samples of ambient particles collected in the Los Angeles Basin and in diesel exhaust particles. The toxicity of electrophiles is the result of irreversible changes in biological molecules; recovery is dependent on resynthesis. If the resynthesis is slow, the irreversible effects can be cumulative and manifest themselves after chronic exposure to low levels of electrophiles.

  15. Inactivation of Lactate Dehydrogenase from Pig Heart by o-Phthalaldehyde

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑延斌; 王政; 陈宝玉; 王希成

    2003-01-01

    Treatment of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) with o-phthalaldehyde resulted in a time-dependent loss of enzyme activity.The inactivation followed pseudo first-order kinetics over a wide range of the inhibitor.The second-order rate constant for the inactivation of LDH was estimated to be 1.52 (mol/L)-1·s-1.The modified enzyme showed a characteristic fluorescence emission spectrum with a maximum at 405 nm upon excitation at 337 nm, consistent with the formation of isoindole derivatives by the cross-linking of proximal cysteine and lysine residues.The loss of enzyme activity was concomitant with the increase in absorbance at 337 nm.Stoichiometric study of the reaction showed that complete loss of activity was accompanied by formation of approximately four moles of isoindole derivatives per mole of LDH subunits.One of the substrates, NADH, partially prevented the enzyme from reacting with o-phthalaldehyde, whereas the other substrate, pyruvate, did not provide any protection.Protection experiments suggest that one of the cysteine-lysine pairs modified by o-phthalaldehyde is near the NADH binding site of LDH.

  16. Succinate-dependent energy generation and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in isolated Ascaris suum mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Body wall muscle from the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, contain unique anaerobic mitochondria that preferentially utilize fumarate and branched-chain enoyl CoA's as terminal electron acceptors instead of oxygen. While electron transport in these organelles is well characterized, the role of oxygen in succinate-dependent phosphorylation is still not clearly defined. Therefore, the present study was designed to more fully characterize succinate metabolism in these organelles as well as the in vitro regulation of a key mitochondrial enzyme, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). In the absence of added adenine nucleotides, incubations in succinate resulted in substantial elevations in intramitochrondrial ATP levels, but ATP/ADP ratios were considerably higher in incubations with malate. The stimulation of phosphorylation in aerobic incubations with succinate was rotenone sensitive and appears to be Site I dependent. Increase substrate level phosphorylation, coupled to propionate formation, or additional sites of electron-transport associated ATP synthesis were not significant. Under aerobic conditions, 14CO2 evolution from 1,4-[14C]succinate was stimulated and NADH/NAD+ ratios were elevated, but the formation of 14C propionate was unchanged

  17. Succinate-dependent energy generation and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in isolated Ascaris suum mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Body wall muscle from the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, contain unique anaerobic mitochondria that preferentially utilize fumarate and branched-chain enoyl CoA's as terminal electron acceptors instead of oxygen. While electron transport in these organelles is well characterized, the role of oxygen in succinate-dependent phosphorylation is still not clearly defined. Therefore, the present study was designed to more fully characterize succinate metabolism in these organelles as well as the in vitro regulation of a key mitochondrial enzyme, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). In the absence of added adenine nucleotides, incubations in succinate resulted in substantial elevations in intramitochrondrial ATP levels, but ATP/ADP ratios were considerably higher in incubations with malate. The stimulation of phosphorylation in aerobic incubations with succinate was rotenone sensitive and appears to be Site I dependent. Increase substrate level phosphorylation, coupled to propionate formation, or additional sites of electron-transport associated ATP synthesis were not significant. Under aerobic conditions, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution from 1,4-({sup 14}C)succinate was stimulated and NADH/NAD{sup +} ratios were elevated, but the formation of {sup 14}C propionate was unchanged.

  18. Characterization of 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase from Catharanthus roseus reveals cascaded enzymatic activity in iridoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krithika, Ramakrishnan; Srivastava, Prabhakar Lal; Rani, Bajaj; Kolet, Swati P; Chopade, Manojkumar; Soniya, Mantri; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus [L.] is a major source of the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), which are of significant interest due to their therapeutic value. These molecules are formed through an intermediate, cis-trans-nepetalactol, a cyclized product of 10-oxogeranial. One of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of MIAs is an NAD(P)(+) dependent oxidoreductase system, 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase (Cr10HGO), which catalyses the formation of 10-oxogeranial from 10-hydroxygeraniol via 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial. This work describes the cloning and functional characterization of Cr10HGO from C. roseus and its role in the iridoid biosynthesis. Substrate specificity studies indicated that, Cr10HGO has good activity on substrates such as 10-hydroxygeraniol, 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial over monohydroxy linear terpene derivatives. Further it was observed that incubation of 10-hydroxygeraniol with Cr10HGO and iridoid synthase (CrIDS) in the presence of NADP(+) yielded a major metabolite, which was characterized as (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol by comparing its retention time, mass fragmentation pattern, and co-injection studies with that of the synthesized compound. These results indicate that there is concerted activity of Cr10HGO with iridoid synthase in the formation of (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol, an important intermediate in iridoid biosynthesis. PMID:25651761

  19. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  20. A straightforward radiometric technique for measuring IMP dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, D A; Wilson, Y; McGee, E

    1983-04-15

    [2-3H]Inosinic acid ([2-3H]IMP) has been biosynthesized in good yield from [2-3H]hypoxanthine and PRPP via the action of a partially purified preparation of hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyl transferase from mouse brain. The product was purified in one step by ascending paper chromatography, and used to assess the activity of IMP dehydrogenase. To conduct the assay, tritiated substrate is admixed with enzyme in a final volume of 10 microliters; NAD is present to serve as cofactor for the reaction, and allopurinol to inhibit the oxidation of any hypoxanthine generated as a consequence of side reactions. After an appropriate period of incubation, the 3H2O arising from the oxidation of tritiated IMP via [3H]NAD is isolated by quantitative microdistillation. Performed as described, the assay is facile, sensitive, and accurate, with the capability of detecting the dehydrogenation of as little as 1 pmol of [3H]IMP. Using it, measurements have been made of IMP dehydrogenase in a comprehensive array of mouse organs. Of these, pancreas contained the enzyme at the highest specific activity. PMID:6135372

  1. Orthodontic Force Application in Correlation with Salivary Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Husin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement generate mechanical forces to periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The forces correlate with initial responses of periodontal tissues and involving many metabolic changes. One of the metabolic changes detected in saliva is lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity. Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between orthodontic interrupted force application, lactate dehydrogenase activity and the distance of tooth movement. Methods: upper premolar, pre-retraction of upper canine and 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-retraction of upper canine with 100g interrupted orthodontic force. Results: duration of force (F=11.926 p 14 and 28 days post-retraction of canine. The region of retraction correlated with the distance of tooth movement (F=7.377 p=0.007. The duration of force correlated with the distance of tooth movement (F=66.554 p=0.000. retraction of canine. Conclusion: This study concluded that orthodontic interrupted force application on canine could increase the distance of tooth movement and LDH activity in saliva.

  2. Engineering of pyranose dehydrogenase for increased oxygen reactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Krondorfer

    Full Text Available Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH, a member of the GMC family of flavoproteins, shows a very broad sugar substrate specificity but is limited to a narrow range of electron acceptors and reacts extremely slowly with dioxygen as acceptor. The use of substituted quinones or (organometals as electron acceptors is undesirable for many production processes, especially of food ingredients. To improve the oxygen reactivity, site-saturation mutagenesis libraries of twelve amino acids around the active site of Agaricus meleagris PDH were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We established high-throughput screening assays for oxygen reactivity and standard dehydrogenase activity using an indirect Amplex Red/horseradish peroxidase and a DCIP/D-glucose based approach. The low number of active clones confirmed the catalytic role of H512 and H556. Only one position was found to display increased oxygen reactivity. Histidine 103, carrying the covalently linked FAD cofactor in the wild-type, was substituted by tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and methionine. Variant H103Y was produced in Pichia pastoris and characterized and revealed a five-fold increase of the oxygen reactivity.

  3. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  4. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization. PMID:26151670

  5. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization. PMID:26151670

  6. Toxicity of Nitrification Inhibitors on Dehydrogenase Activity in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferisman Tindaon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the effects of nitrification inhibitors (NIs such as 3,4-dimethylpyrazolephosphate=DMPP, 4-Chlor-methylpyrazole phosphate=ClMPP and dicyandiamide,DCD which might be expected to inhibit microbial activity, on dehydrogenase activity (DRA,in three different soils in laboratory conditions. Dehydrogenase activity were assessed via reduction of 2-p-Iodophenyl-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyltetrazoliumchloride (INT. The toxicity and dose response curve of three NIs were quantified under laboratory conditions using a loamy clay, a sandy loam and a sandy soil. The quantitative determination of DHA was carried out spectrophotometrically. In all experiments, the influence of 5-1000 times the base concentration were examined. To evaluate the rate of inhibition with the increasing NI concentrations, dose reponse curves were presented and no observable effect level =NOEL, as well as effective dose ED10 and ED 50(10% and 50% inhibition were calculated. The NOEL for common microbial activity such as DHA was about 30–70 times higher than base concentration in all investigated soils. ClMPP exhibited the strongest influence on the non target microbial processes in the three soils if it compare to DMPP and DCD. The NOEL,ED10 and ED50 values higher in clay than in loamy or sandy soil. The NIs were generally most effective in sandy soils. The three NIs considered at the present state of knowledge as environmentally safe in use.

  7. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase were determined at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa. Comparison of these structures gives a detailed picture of the swelling of a cavity at the dimer interface and the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface, which are accompanied by water penetration. Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH

  8. High-pressure-induced water penetration into 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagae, Takayuki; Kawamura, Takashi [Nagoya University, (Japan); Chavas, Leonard M. G. [High Energy Research Organization (KEK), (Japan); Niwa, Ken; Hasegawa, Masashi [Nagoya University, (Japan); Kato, Chiaki [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), (Japan); Watanabe, Nobuhisa, E-mail: nobuhisa@nagoya-u.jp [Nagoya University, (Japan); Nagoya University, (Japan)

    2012-03-01

    Structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase were determined at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa. Comparison of these structures gives a detailed picture of the swelling of a cavity at the dimer interface and the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface, which are accompanied by water penetration. Hydrostatic pressure induces structural changes in proteins, including denaturation, the mechanism of which has been attributed to water penetration into the protein interior. In this study, structures of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were determined at about 2 Å resolution under pressures ranging from 0.1 to 650 MPa using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Although most of the protein cavities are monotonically compressed as the pressure increases, the volume of one particular cavity at the dimer interface increases at pressures over 340 MPa. In parallel with this volume increase, water penetration into the cavity could be observed at pressures over 410 MPa. In addition, the generation of a new cleft on the molecular surface accompanied by water penetration could also be observed at pressures over 580 MPa. These water-penetration phenomena are considered to be initial steps in the pressure-denaturation process of IPMDH.

  9. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A; Engel, Paul C; Khan, Amir R

    2016-06-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2-4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)(+) as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD(+) versus NADP(+), but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia coli enzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP(+) cofactor from the parent E. coli domain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity. PMID:27303899

  10. Inhibition of Horse Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase by Methyltin Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Bychkov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of inorganic tin (SnCl2, SnCl4 and methyltin compounds (MeSnCl3, Me2SnCI2, Me3SnCl effects on the enzymatic activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH in the reaction of ethanol oxidation has been carried out. The experimental results of the study show that inorganic tin and methyltin substances induce slight inhibition of the catalytic activity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH, unable to be improved during pre-incubation with the enzyme. The conditions for carrying out the kinetic investigation of the mentioned phenomenon were optimized and as it turned out the mechanism of methyltin trichloride action, as the most effective methyltin inhibitor, is more complex than the proposed interaction of the metal atom with SH-groups of the enzyme protein. It was demonstrated that the tin compounds act in the same manner as methylmercury compounds and might serve as oxidative agents towards the co-enzyme NADH. Kinetic data on MeSnCl3 were calculated. Data acquired on NAD-dependent ADH from horse liver and those regarding NAD-dependent LDH from sturgeon liver were compared.

  11. New recombinant bacterium comprises a heterologous gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and/or an up-regulated native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase, useful for producing ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY FOCUS - BIOTECHNOLOGY - Preparation (claimed): Producing recombinant bacterium having enhanced ethanol production characteristics when cultivated in growth medium comprising glycerol comprises: (a) transforming a parental bacterium by (i) the insertion of a heterologous gene encoding...... glycerol dehydrogenase; and/or (ii) up-regulating a native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase; and (b) obtaining the recombinant bacterium. Preferred Bacterium: In the recombinant bacterium above, the inserted heterologous gene and/or the up-regulated native gene is encoding a glycerol dehydrogenase...... dehydrogenase encoding region of the bacterium, or is inserted into a phosphotransacetylase encoding region of the bacterium, or is inserted into an acetate kinase encoding region of the bacterium. It is operably linked to an inducible, a regulated or a constitutive promoter. The up-regulated glycerol...

  12. The oxyanion hole of Pseudomonas fluorescens mannitol 2-dehydrogenase: a novel structural motif for electrostatic stabilisation in alcohol dehydrogenase active sites

    OpenAIRE

    Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, B

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The side chains of Asn-191 and Asn-300 constitute a characteristic structural motif of the active site of Pseudomonas fluorescens mannitol 2-dehydrogenase that lacks precedent in known alcohol dehydrogenases and resembles the canonical oxyanion binding pocket of serine proteases. We have used steady-state and transient kinetic studies of the effects of varied pH and deuterium isotopic substitutions in substrates and solvent on the enzymatic rates to delineate catalytic con...

  13. Effect of the allelic variants of aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2*2 and alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B*2 on blood acetaldehyde concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Giia-Sheun; Yin Shih-Jiun

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Alcoholism is a complex behavioural disorder. Molecular genetics studies have identified numerous candidate genes associated with alcoholism. It is crucial to verify the disease susceptibility genes by correlating the pinpointed allelic variations to the causal phenotypes. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are the principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. Both ADH and ALDH exhibit functional polymorphisms among racial populations; the...

  14. Evidence for a nickel-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in Methanobrevibacter arboriphilicus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hammel, K E; Cornwell, K L; Diekert, G B; Thauer, R K

    1984-01-01

    In growing cultures of Methanobrevibacter arboriphilicus (Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus), the synthesis of active carbon monoxide dehydrogenase required nickel. The 21-fold-purified enzyme from 63Ni-labeled cells of M. arboriphilicus comigrated with 63Ni during gel filtration. These results provide evidence that the carbon monoxide dehydrogenase of methanogens is a nickel protein.

  15. Role and structural characterization of plant aldehyde dehydrogenases from family 2 and family 7

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Končitíková, R.; Vigouroux, A.; Kopečná, M.; Andree, T.; Bartoš, Jan; Šebela, M.; Moréra, S.; Kopečný, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 468, Part: 1 (2015), s. 109-123. ISSN 0264-6021 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-22322S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) * aldehyde dehydrogenase 7 (ALDH7) * benzaldehyde Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.396, year: 2014

  16. Soil dehydrogenase activity in the presence of chromium (III) and (VI)

    OpenAIRE

    Wolińska A.; Stępniewska Z.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the influence of chromium forms (III) and (VI) on the soil dehydrogenase activity. Enzyme activities can be considered effective indicators of soil quality changes resulting from environmental stress or management practices. It was found that chromium compounds have detrimental effects on soil dehydrogenase activity. After the addition of chromium, a rapid and significant decrease in enzymatic activities was observed.

  17. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... assay. 864.7360 Section 864.7360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme...

  18. Cloning and mRNA Expression of NADH Dehydrogenase during Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus Development and Pesticide Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    NADH dehydrogenase, the largest of the respiratory complexes, is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have cloned and sequenced cDNA of NADH dehydrogenase gene from Ochlerotatus (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) adult (GeneBank Accession number: FJ458415). The ...

  19. Evaluation of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes as bi-enzymatic anodes in a membraneless ethanol microfluidic fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Arjona, N.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AldH) enzymes were immobilized by covalent binding and used as the anode in a bi-enzymatic membraneless ethanol hybrid microfluidic fuel cell. The purpose of using both enzymes was to optimize the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction (EOR) by using ADH toward its direct oxidation and AldH for the oxidation of aldehydes as by-products of the EOR. For this reason, three enzymatic bioanode configurations were evaluated according with the location of enzymes: combined, vertical and horizontally separated. In the combined configuration, a current density of 16.3 mA cm-2, a voltage of 1.14 V and a power density of 7.02 mW cm-2 were obtained. When enzymes were separately placed in a horizontal and vertical position the ocp drops to 0.94 V and to 0.68 V, respectively. The current density also falls to values of 13.63 and 5.05 mA cm-2. The decrease of cell performance of bioanodes with separated enzymes compared with the combined bioanode was of 31.7% and 86.87% for the horizontal and the vertical array.

  20. A 'random steady-state' model for the pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase enzyme complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multienzyme complexes, pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, involved in the central metabolism of Escherichia coli consist of multiple copies of three different enzymes, E1, E2 and E3, that cooperate to channel substrate intermediates between their active sites. The E2 components form the core of the complex, while a mixture of E1 and E3 components binds to the core. We present a random steady-state model to describe catalysis by such multienzyme complexes. At a fast time scale, the model describes the enzyme catalytic mechanisms of substrate channeling at a steady state, by polynomially approximating the analytic solution of a biochemical master equation. At a slower time scale, the structural organization of the different enzymes in the complex and their random binding/unbinding to the core is modeled using methods from equilibrium statistical mechanics. Biologically, the model describes the optimization of catalytic activity by substrate sharing over the entire enzyme complex. The resulting enzymatic models illustrate the random steady state (RSS) for modeling multienzyme complexes in metabolic pathways

  1. Identification and Overexpression of a Bifunctional Aldehyde/Alcohol Dehydrogenase Responsible for Ethanol Production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Shuo; Just Mikkelsen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    ethanol as a fermentation product, while other adh knockout strains showed no significant difference from the wild type. Further analysis revealed that the ΔadhE strain was defective in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, but still maintained alcohol dehydrogenase activity. This showed that AdhE is the major......Thermoanaerobacter mathranii contains four genes, adhA, adhB, bdhA and adhE, predicted to code for alcohol dehydrogenases involved in ethanol metabolism. These alcohol dehydrogenases were characterized as NADP(H)-dependent primary alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA), secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh......B), butanol dehydrogenase (BdhA) and NAD(H)-dependent bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE), respectively. Here we observed that AdhE is an important enzyme responsible for ethanol production in T. mathranii based on the constructed adh knockout strains. An adhE knockout strain fails to produce...

  2. Structural studies on metal-containing enzymes. T4 endonuclease VII and D. gigas formate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, H.C.A.

    2001-01-01

    Many biological processes require metal ions, and many of these metal-ion functions involve metalloproteins. The metal ions in metalloproteins are often critical to the protein's function, structure, or stability. This thesis focuses on two of these proteins, bacteriophage T4 endonuclease VII (EndoV

  3. Identification of the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 mRNA and protein in human mononuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, C; Nardi, A; Dalla Valle, L; Pellati, D; Krozowski, Z; Colombo, L; Armanini, D

    2009-10-01

    The enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) catalyzes the interconversion between inactive 11-ketoglucocorticoids and their active 11beta-hydroxy derivatives, such as cortisol and corticosterone. We have investigated the expression of 11beta-HSD1 in freshly isolated human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes (MNL). The presence of 11beta-HSD1 mRNA was demonstrated in total RNA by RT-PCR using specific primers designed on the 4th and 5th exons of the human 11beta-HSD1 gene. Fragments of the expected size were consistently detected on agarose gels, and sequencing showed complete identity with the corresponding sequence deposited in GenBank. The occurrence of 11beta-HSD1 protein was established by Western immunoblot analysis with a specific polyclonal antibody. Enzyme oxo-reductase activity was investigated by incubating 12 samples of MNL isolated from from 8 subjects with [3H]cortisone and formation of cortisol was established only in 4 subjects (yield range: 0.15-1.3%) after acetylation and TLC, blank subtraction and correction for losses. 18beta-Glycyrrhetinic acid, an inhibitor of 11 beta-HSD1, reduced cortisol production below detection limit. Dehydrogenase activity could not be demonstrated. It is suggested that, although enzyme activity of 11beta-HSD1 in circulating MNL is low, it is apparently ready for enhancement after MNL migration to sites of inflammation. PMID:19235128

  4. Fusarium graminearum pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (FgPDK1) Is Critical for Conidiation, Mycelium Growth, and Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tao; Chen, Jian; Shi, Zhiqi

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) is an important mitochondrial enzyme that blocks the production of acetyl-CoA by selectively inhibiting the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) through phosphorylation. PDK is an effectively therapeutic target in cancer cells, but the physiological roles of PDK in phytopathogens are largely unknown. To address these gaps, a PDK gene (FgPDK1) was isolated from Fusarium graminearum that is an economically important pathogen infecting cereals. The deletion of FgPDK1 in F. graminearum resulted in the increase in PDH activity, coinciding with several phenotypic defects, such as growth retardation, failure in perithecia and conidia production, and increase in pigment formation. The ΔFgPDK1 mutants showed enhanced sensitivity to osmotic stress and cell membrane-damaging agent. Physiological detection indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and plasma membrane damage (indicated by PI staining, lipid peroxidation, and electrolyte leakage) occurred in ΔFgPDK1 mutants. The deletion of FgPDK1 also prohibited the production of deoxynivalenol (DON) and pathogenicity of F. graminearum, which may resulted from the decrease in the expression of Tri6. Taken together, this study firstly identified the vital roles of FgPDK1 in the development of phytopathogen F. graminearum, which may provide a potentially novel clue for target-directed development of agricultural fungicides. PMID:27341107

  5. L-arabonate and D-galactonate production by expressing a versatile sugar dehydrogenase in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaiwei; Valdehuesa, Kris Niño G; Ramos, Kristine Rose M; Nisola, Grace M; Lee, Won-Keun; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2014-05-01

    The production of L-arabonate and D-galactonate employing a versatile l-arabinose dehydrogenase (AraDH) from Azospirillum brasilense is presented. The promiscuity of AraDH is manifested by its appreciable activity towards L-arabinose and D-galactose as substrates, and NAD(+) and NADP(+) as cofactors. The AraDH was introduced into an engineered Escherichia coli with inactive L-arabinose or D-galactose metabolism, resulting in strains EMA2 and EWG4, respectively. EMA2 produced 43.9 g L(-1)L-arabonate with a productivity of 1.22 g L(-1)h(-1) and 99.1% (mol/mol) yield. After methanol precipitation, 92.6% of L-arabonate potassium salt was recovered with a purity of 88.8%. Meanwhile, EWG4 produced 24.0 g L(-1)D-galactonate, which is 36% higher than that of the strain carrying the specific d-galactose dehydrogenase. Overall results reveal that the versatility of AraDH to efficiently catalyze the formation of L-arabonate and D-galactonate could be a useful tool in advancing industrial viability for sugar acids production. PMID:24713235

  6. Frostbite: A Novel Presentation of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Justin M; Joas, Chris; Head, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia (AHA) due to glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has rarely been recognized as a contributor to the development of frostbite. We discuss a case of frostbite in a 32-year-old male Marine with G6PD deficiency during military training on Mount McKinley in Alaska, which eventually led to a permanent disability. In this report, the pathophysiology of G6PD deficiency, the effects of hemolytic anemia, and factors that contribute to frostbite will be discussed, as well as the clinical findings, treatment course, and the outcome of this case. The patient was evacuated and admitted to Alaska Regional Hospital. He was treated for fourth-degree frostbite, ultimately resulting in the complete or partial amputation of all toes. Although it cannot be proved that AHA occurred in this patient, this case potentially adds frostbite to the list of rare but possible clinical presentations of G6PD deficiency. PMID:26360347

  7. Kawasaki disease with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency, case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Hesham Radi; Al-Dossary, Sahar; Asseri, Abdulsalam

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown etiology that occurs predominantly in infants and children younger than 5 years of age. Coronary artery abnormalities are the most serious complication. Based on the literatures infusion of Intravenous Immunoglobulin of 2 g/kg and a high dose of oral aspirin up to 100 mg/kg/day are the standard treatment for Kawasaki disease in the acute stage, and should be followed by antiplatelet dose of aspirin for thrombocytosis. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an inherited X-linked hereditary disorder, and aspirin can induce hemolysis in patients with G6PD deficiency. We report a case of a 5 year and 8 month old male with KD and G6PD deficiency. PMID:27134550

  8. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  9. Engineered PQQ-Glucose Dehydrogenase as a Universal Biosensor Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhong; Murphy, Lindy; Stein, Viktor; Johnston, Wayne A; Alcala-Perez, Siro; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2016-08-17

    Biosensors with direct electron output hold promise for nearly seamless integration with portable electronic devices. However, so far, they have been based on naturally occurring enzymes that significantly limit the spectrum of detectable analytes. Here, we present a novel biosensor architecture based on analyte-driven intermolecular recombination and activity reconstitution of a re-engineered component of glucometers: PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase. We demonstrate that this sensor architecture can be rapidly adopted for the detection of immunosuppressant drugs, α-amylase protein, or protease activity of thrombin and Factor Xa. The biosensors could be stored in dried form without appreciable loss of activity. We further show that ligand-induced activity of the developed biosensors could be directly monitored by chronoamperometry, enabling construction of disposable sensory electrodes. We expect that this architecture could be expanded to the detection of other biochemical activities, post-translational modifications, nucleic acids, and inorganic molecules. PMID:27463000

  10. Alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism in barrel cactus populations of Drosophila mojavensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, S; Hocutt, G D; Breitmeyer, C M; Markow, T A; Pfeiler, E

    1996-07-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis revealed that the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-2) locus was polymorphic in two populations (from Agua Caliente, California and the Grand Canyon, Arizona) of cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that utilize barrel cactus (Ferocactus acanthodes) as a host plant. Electromorphs representing products of a slow (S) and a fast (F) allele were found in adult flies. The frequency of the slow allele was 0.448 in flies from Agua Caliente and 0.659 in flies from the Grand Canyon. These frequencies were intermediate to those of the low (Baja California peninsula, Mexico) and high (Sonora, Mexico and southern Arizona) frequency Adh-2S populations of D. mojavensis that utilize different species of host cacti. PMID:8765684

  11. Lactate dehydrogenase assay for assessment of polycation cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Moghimi, Seyed Moien

    2013-01-01

    Cellular toxicity and/or cell death entail complex mechanisms that require detailed evaluation for proper characterization. A detailed mechanistic assessment of cytotoxicity is essential for design and construction of more effective polycations for nucleic acid delivery. A single toxicity assay...... cannot stand alone in determining the type and extent of damage or cell death mechanism. In this chapter we describe a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for high-throughput screening that can be used as a starting point for further detailed cytotoxicity determination. LDH release is considered an early...... event in necrosis but a late event in apoptosis. An accurate temporal assessment of the toxic responses is crucial as late apoptosis may convert into necrosis as well as in situations where cell death is initiated without any visible cell morphological changes or responses in assays measuring late...

  12. Circadian rhythm of lactate dehydrogenase in rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermouth, N T; Ponce, R H; Carriazo, C S; Blanco, A

    1984-01-01

    Activity of total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and of the isozyme X (LDH X or C4) have been determined at 2 hr intervals during 24 hr cycles in testis of adult rats maintained since birth in a photoperiod of 14 hr light: 10 hr dark. LDH X activity of epididymal sections (caput, corpus and cauda) from the same animals was also determined. Total LDH and LDH X activities in testis exhibited circadian rhythms with different timing. LDH X in the three portions of epididymis showed diurnal variations similar to those in testis. Rats subjected to constant light or constant dark presented marked modifications of LDH X profiles, indicating that the photoperiod plays a synchronizer role. While total soluble proteins did not show variations in testis of rats exposed to the photoperiod, a circadian rhythm was demonstrated in animals maintained in constant light or dark. PMID:6467917

  13. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah; Cato, Liam D; Miah, Mohammed A L; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Jensen, Rigmor H; Gonzalez, Ana M; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provides an overview of pathogenic factors that could result in IIH with particular focus on hormones and the impact of obesity, including its role in neuroendocrine signaling and driving inflammation. Despite occurring almost exclusively in obese women, there have been a few studies evaluating the mechanisms by which hormones and adipokines exert their effects on ICP regulation in IIH. Research involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, a modulator of glucocorticoids, suggests a potential role in IIH. Improved understanding of the complex interplay between adipose signaling factors such as adipokines, steroid hormones, and ICP regulation may be key to the understanding and future management of IIH.

  14. Mellemkaedet acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD)-mangel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Winter, V; Andresen, B S;

    1992-01-01

    today considered more common than previously anticipated, since the incidence of patients with MCAD enzyme deficiency in Denmark is estimated to 1/27,000 newborns, or two new cases annually. The relationship between the enzyme defect (gene defect) and the clinical expression of the disease is a main......Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a potentially fatal metabolic disease, which is characterized by non-ketotic hypoglycemia and lethargy. The disease manifests itself by periodic attacks in connection with infections and periods of fasting, or suddenly as unexpected child......-card constitute today a certain and specific diagnosis for the disease in 75% of all cases. In the remaining 25% the mutation analysis is supplemented with urine metabolite studies by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and with measurements of enzyme activities in cultured skin fibroblasts. The disease is...

  15. IMP Dehydrogenase: Structural Schizophrenia and an Unusual Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedstrom,L.; Gan, L.

    2006-01-01

    Textbooks describe enzymes as relatively rigid templates for the transition state of a chemical reaction, and indeed an enzyme such as chymotrypsin, which catalyzes a relatively simple hydrolysis reaction, is reasonably well described by this model. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) undergoes a remarkable array of conformational transitions in the course of a complicated catalytic cycle, offering a dramatic counterexample to this view. IMPDH displays several other unusual mechanistic features, including an Arg residue that may act as a general base catalyst and a dynamic monovalent cation site. Further, IMPDH appears to be involved in 'moon-lighting' functions that may require additional conformational states. How the balance between conformational states is maintained and how the various conformational states interconvert is only beginning to be understood.

  16. Glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and psychotic illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijender Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mr. T, a 28-year-old unmarried male, a diagnosed case of Glucose-6 Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency since childhood, presented with 13 years of psychotic illness and disturbed biological functions. He showed poor response to antipsychotics and mood stabilizers and had three prior admissions to Psychiatry. There was a family history of psychotic illness. The General Physical Examination and Systemic Examination were unremarkable. Mental Status Examination revealed increased psychomotor activity, pressure of speech, euphoric affect, prolixity, delusion of persecution, delusion of grandiosity, delusion of control, thought withdrawal and thought insertion, and second and third person auditory hallucinations, with impaired judgment and insight. A diagnosis of schizophrenia paranoid type, with a differential diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder manic subtype, was made. This case is being reported for its rarity and atypicality of clinical presentation, as well as a course of psychotic illness in the G6PD Deficiency state,with its implications on management.

  17. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH isoenzymes patterns in ocular tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rajendra

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH isoenzymes in the serum and aqueous humor was carried out in 15 cases of benign ocular tumour, 15 cases of malignant tumor and 15 normal cases. Cases of both sexes aged between 1 year and 75 years were included. LDH, isoenzymes specially LDH4 and LDH5 are higher and LDH1 and LDH2 lower in sera of patients with malignant tumor specially retinoblastoma as compared to benign tumor cases and control cases. LDH isoenzymes in aqueous humor are significantly higher and show a characteristic pattern in retinoblastoma cases, the concentration was presumably too low in the control, malignant tumor other than retinoblastoma and benign tumor cases as its fractionation was not possible.

  18. Over-Expression, Purification and Crystallization of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y. S.; Ciszak, Ewa; Patel, Mulchand

    2000-01-01

    Dehydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3; dihydrolipoan-tide:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.8.1.4) is a common catalytic component found in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain cc-keto acid dehydrogenase complex. E3 is also a component (referred to as L protein) of the glycine cleavage system in bacterial metabolism (2). Active E3 forms a homodimer with four distinctive subdomain structures (FAD binding, NAD+ binding, central and interface domains) with non-covalently but tightly bound FAD in the holoenzyme. Deduced amino acids from cloned full-length human E3 gene showed a total of 509 amino acids with a leader sequence (N-terminal 35 amino acids) that is excised (mature form) during transportation of expressed E3 into mitochondria membrane. So far, three-dimensional structure of human E3 has not been reported. Our effort to achieve the elucidation of the X-ray crystal structure of human E3 will be presented. Recombinant pPROEX-1 expression vector (from GIBCO BRL Life Technologies) having the human E3 gene without leader sequence was constructed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and subsequent ligation, and cloned in E.coli XL1-Blue by transformation. Since pPROEX-1 vector has an internal His-tag (six histidine peptide) located at the upstream region of a multicloning site, one-step affinity purification of E3 using nickelnitriloacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin, which has a strong affinity to His-tag, was feasible. Also a seven-amino-acid spacer peptide and a recombinant tobacco etch virus protease recognition site (seven amino acids peptide) found between His-tag and first amino acid of expressed E3 facilitated the cleavage of His-tag from E3 after the affinity purification. By IPTG induction, ca. 15 mg of human E3 (mature form) was obtained from 1L LB culture with overnight incubation at 25C. Over 98% of purity of E3 from one-step Ni-NTA agarose affinity purification was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. For

  19. Cardiac-specific succinate dehydrogenase deficiency in Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Jan; Cheng, I-Fen; Chowdhury, Arpita; Wozny, Katharina; Balleininger, Martina; Reinhold, Robert; Grunau, Silke; Callegari, Sylvie; Toischer, Karl; Wanders, Ronald Ja; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Brügger, Britta; Guan, Kaomei; Rehling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a cardiomyopathy caused by the loss of tafazzin, a mitochondrial acyltransferase involved in the maturation of the glycerophospholipid cardiolipin. It has remained enigmatic as to why a systemic loss of cardiolipin leads to cardiomyopathy. Using a genetic ablation of tafazzin function in the BTHS mouse model, we identified severe structural changes in respiratory chain supercomplexes at a pre-onset stage of the disease. This reorganization of supercomplexes was specific to cardiac tissue and could be recapitulated in cardiomyocytes derived from BTHS patients. Moreover, our analyses demonstrate a cardiac-specific loss of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), an enzyme linking the respiratory chain with the tricarboxylic acid cycle. As a similar defect of SDH is apparent in patient cell-derived cardiomyocytes, we conclude that these defects represent a molecular basis for the cardiac pathology in Barth syndrome. PMID:26697888

  20. 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in canine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mitochondrial fraction of the dog pancreas showed NAD(H)-dependent enzyme activity of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The enzyme catalyzes oxidoreduction between androstenedione and testosterone. The apparent Km value of the enzyme for androstenedione was 9.5 +/- 0.9 microM, the apparent Vmax was determined as 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1, and the optimal pH was 6.5. In phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, maximal rate of androstenedione reduction was observed at 37 degrees C. The oxidation of testosterone by the enzyme proceeded at the same rate as the reduction of the androstenedione at a pH of 6.8-7.0. The apparent Km value and the optimal pH of the enzyme for testosterone were 3.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 7.5, respectively

  1. A Case of Hyperammonemia Associated with High Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaharu, Keiki; Ikemura, Kenji; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Oda, Hiroyasu; Ishihara, Mikiya; Sugawara, Yumiko; Tamaru, Satoshi; Mizuno, Toshiro; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has been widely used to treat several types of carcinoma, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In addition to its common side effects, including diarrhea, mucositis, neutropenia, and anemia, 5-FU treatment has also been reported to cause hyperammonemia. However, the exact mechanism responsible for 5-FU-induced hyperammonemia remains unknown. We encountered an esophageal carcinoma patient who developed hyperammonemia when receiving 5-FU-containing chemotherapy but did not exhibit any of the other common adverse effects of 5-FU treatment. At the onset of hyperammonemia, laboratory tests revealed high dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity and rapid 5-FU clearance. Our findings suggested that 5-FU hypermetabolism may be one of the key mechanisms responsible for hyperammonemia during 5-FU treatment. PMID:27195162

  2. Recommended nomenclature for the vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duester, G; Farrés, J; Felder, M R; Holmes, R S; Höög, J O; Parés, X; Plapp, B V; Yin, S J; Jörnvall, H

    1999-08-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family encodes enzymes that metabolize a wide variety of substrates, including ethanol, retinol, other aliphatic alcohols, hydroxysteroids, and lipid peroxidation products. Studies on 19 vertebrate animals have identified ADH orthologs across several species, and this has now led to questions of how best to name ADH proteins and genes. Seven distinct classes of vertebrate ADH encoded by non-orthologous genes have been defined based upon sequence homology as well as unique catalytic properties or gene expression patterns. Each class of vertebrate ADH shares 80% sequence identity such as the case for class I ADH where humans have three class I ADH genes, horses have two, and mice have only one. Presented here is a nomenclature that uses the widely accepted vertebrate ADH class system as its basis. It follows the guidelines of human and mouse gene nomenclature committees, which recommend coordinating names across species boundaries and eliminating Roman numerals and Greek symbols. We recommend that enzyme subunits be referred to by the symbol "ADH" (alcohol dehydrogenase) followed by an Arabic number denoting the class; i.e. ADH1 for class I ADH. For genes we recommend the italicized root symbol "ADH" for human and "Adh" for mouse, followed by the appropriate Arabic number for the class; i.e. ADH1 or Adh1 for class I ADH genes. For organisms where multiple species-specific isoenzymes exist within a class, we recommend adding a capital letter after the Arabic number; i.e. ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C for human alpha, beta, and gamma class I ADHs, respectively. This nomenclature will accommodate newly discovered members of the vertebrate ADH family, and will facilitate functional and evolutionary studies. PMID:10424757

  3. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinath eSutendra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Current drug development in oncology is non-selective as it typically focuses on pathways essential for the survival of all dividing cells. The unique metabolic profile of cancer, which is characterized by increased glycolysis and suppressed mitochondrial glucose oxidation provides cancer cells with a proliferative advantage, conducive with apoptosis resistance and even increased angiogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that targeting the cancer-specific metabolic and mitochondrial remodeling may offer selectivity in cancer treatment. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK is a mitochondrial enzyme that is activated in a variety of cancers and results in the selective inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH, a complex of enzymes that converts cytosolic pyruvate to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, the substrate for the Krebs’ cycle. Inhibition of PDK with either small interfering RNAs or the orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA shifts the metabolism of cancer cells from glycolysis to glucose oxidation and reverses the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. In addition, this therapeutic strategy increases the production of diffusible Krebs’ cycle intermediates and mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (mROS, activating p53 or inhibiting pro-proliferative and pro-angiogenic transcription factors like nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α. These effects result in decreased tumor growth and angiogenesis in a variety of cancers with high selectivity. In a small but mechanistic clinical trial in patients with glioblastoma, a highly aggressive and vascular form of brain cancer, DCA decreased tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth, suggesting that metabolic targeting therapies can be translated directly to patients. Therefore, reversing the mitochondrial suppression with metabolic-modulating drugs, like PDK inhibitors holds promise in the rapidly expanding field of metabolic oncology.

  4. Bioinspired Immobilization of Glycerol Dehydrogenase by Metal Ion-Chelated Polyethyleneimines as Artificial Polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghui; Ren, Hong; Wang, Yali; Chen, Kainan; Fang, Baishan; Wang, Shizhen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel, simple and generally applicable strategy for multimeric oxidoreductase immobilization with multi-levels interactions was developed and involved activity and stability enhancements. Linear polyethyleneimines (PEIs) are flexible cationic polymers with molecular weights that span a wide range and are suitable biomimic polypeptides for biocompatible frameworks for enzyme immobilization. Metal ion-chelated linear PEIs were applied as a heterofunctional framework for glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) immobilization by hydrogen bonds, electrostatic forces and coordination bonds interactions. Nanoparticles with diameters from 250–650 nm were prepared that exhibited a 1.4-fold enhancement catalytic efficiency. Importantly, the half-life of the immobilized GDH was enhanced by 5.6-folds in aqueous phase at 85 °C. A mechanistic illustration of the formation of multi-level interactions in the PEI-metal-GDH complex was proposed based on morphological and functional studies of the immobilized enzyme. This generally applicable strategy offers a potential technique for multimeric enzyme immobilization with the advantages of low cost, easy operation, high activity reservation and high stability. PMID:27053034

  5. Heterologous expression of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus cellobiose dehydrogenase in Pichia pastoris and involvement in saccharification processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bey Mathieu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH is an extracellular hemoflavoenzyme produced by lignocellulose-degrading fungi including Pycnoporus cinnabarinus. We investigated the cellulolytic system of P. cinnabarinus, focusing on the involvement of CDH in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. Results First, P. cinnabarinus growth conditions were optimized for CDH production. Following growth under cellulolytic conditions, the main components secreted were cellulases, xylanases and CDH. To investigate the contribution of P. cinnabarinus secretome in saccharification processes, the Trichoderma reesei enzymatic cocktail was supplemented with the P. cinnabarinus secretome. A significant enhancement of the degradation of wheat straw was observed with (i the production of a large amount of gluconic acid, (ii increased hemicellulose degradation, and (iii increased overall degradation of the lignocellulosic material. P. cinnabarinus CDH was heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris to obtain large amounts of pure enzyme. In a bioreactor, the recombinant CDH (rCDH expression level reached 7800 U/L. rCDH exhibited values of biochemical parameters similar to those of the natural enzyme, and was able to bind cellulose despite the absence of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM. Following supplementation of purified rCDH to T. reesei enzymatic cocktail, formation of gluconic acid and increased hemicellulose degradation were observed, thus confirming the previous results observed with P. cinnabarinus secretome. Conclusions We demonstrate that CDH offers an attractive tool for saccharification process enhancement due to gluconic acid production from raw lignocellulosic material.

  6. Structural Plasticity of Malaria Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Allows Selective Binding of Diverse Chemical Scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaria remains a major global health burden and current drug therapies are compromised by resistance. Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH) was validated as a new drug target through the identification of potent and selective triazolopyrimidine-based DHODH inhibitors with anti-malarial activity in vivo. Here we report x-ray structure determination of PfDHODH bound to three inhibitors from this series, representing the first of the enzyme bound to malaria specific inhibitors. We demonstrate that conformational flexibility results in an unexpected binding mode identifying a new hydrophobic pocket on the enzyme. Importantly this plasticity allows PfDHODH to bind inhibitors from different chemical classes and to accommodate inhibitor modifications during lead optimization, increasing the value of PfDHODH as a drug target. A second discovery, based on small molecule crystallography, is that the triazolopyrimidines populate a resonance form that promotes charge separation. These intrinsic dipoles allow formation of energetically favorable H-bond interactions with the enzyme. The importance of delocalization to binding affinity was supported by site-directed mutagenesis and the demonstration that triazolopyrimidine analogs that lack this intrinsic dipole are inactive. Finally, the PfDHODH-triazolopyrimidine bound structures provide considerable new insight into species-selective inhibitor binding in this enzyme family. Together, these studies will directly impact efforts to exploit PfDHODH for the development of anti-malarial chemotherapy.

  7. Silencing of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene enhances glioma radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Youl [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Hyun [Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeen-Woo, E-mail: parkjw@knu.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •Silencing of the IDPm gene enhances IR-induced autophagy in glioma cells. •Autophagy inhibition augmented apoptosis of irradiated glioma cells. •Results offer a redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels are elevated in organisms that have been exposed to ionizing radiation and are protagonists in the induction of cell death. Recently, we demonstrated that the control of mitochondrial redox balance and the cellular defense against oxidative damage are primary functions of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDPm) via the supply of NADPH for antioxidant systems. In the present study, we report an autophagic response to ionizing radiation in A172 glioma cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the IDPm gene. Autophagy in A172 transfectant cells was associated with enhanced autophagolysosome formation and GFP–LC3 punctuation/aggregation. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine augmented apoptotic cell death of irradiated A172 cells transfected with IDPm siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that autophagy functions as a survival mechanism in A172 cells against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis and the sensitizing effect of IDPm siRNA and autophagy inhibitor on the ionizing radiation-induced apoptotic cell death of glioma cells offers a novel redox-active therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer.

  8. Rational design of allosteric regulation of homoserine dehydrogenase by a nonnatural inhibitor L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-02-20

    Allosteric proteins, which can sense different signals, are interesting biological parts for synthetic biology. In particular, the design of an artificial allosteric enzyme to sense an unnatural signal is both challenging and highly desired, for example, for a precise and dynamical control of fluxes of growth-essential but byproduct pathways in metabolic engineering of industrial microorganisms. In this work, we used homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH) of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is naturally allosterically regulated by threonine and isoleucine, as an example to demonstrate the feasibility of reengineering an allosteric enzyme to respond to an unnatural inhibitor L-lysine. For this purpose, the natural threonine binding sites of HSD were first predicted and verified by mutagenesis experiments. The threonine binding sites were then engineered to a lysine binding pocket. The reengineered HSD only responds to lysine inhibition but not to threonine. This is a significant step toward the construction of artificial molecular circuits for dynamic control of growth-essential byproduct formation pathway for lysine biosynthesis. PMID:24344690

  9. Novel protein-protein interactions between Entamoeba histolyticad-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and phosphoserine aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vibhor; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Zhang, Kam Y J; Bhakuni, Vinod

    2012-08-01

    Physical interactions between d-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (EhPGDH) and phosphoserine aminotransferase (EhPSAT) from an enteric human parasite Entamoeba histolytica was observed by pull-down assay, gel filtration chromatography, chemical cross-linking, emission anisotropy, molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations. The protein-protein complex had a 1:1 stochiometry with a dissociation constant of 3.453 × 10(-7) M. Ionic interactions play a significant role in complex formation and stability. Analysis of the energy minimized average simulated model of the protein complex show that the nucleotide binding domain of EhPGDH specifically interacts with EhPSAT. Denaturation studies suggest that the nucleotide binding domain (Nbd) and substrate binding domain (Sbd) of EhPGDH are independent folding/unfolding units. Thus the Nbd-EhPGDH was separately cloned over-expressed and purified to homogeneity. Fluorescence anisotropy study show that the purified Nbd interacts with EhPSAT. Forward enzyme catalyzed reaction for the EhPGDH-PSAT complex showed efficient Km values for 3-phosphoglyceric acid as compared to only EhPGDH suggesting a possibility of substrate channelling in the protein complex. PMID:22386871

  10. Mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase is inactivated upon oxidation and reactivated by thioredoxin-dependent reduction in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ToruHisabori

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of mitochondrial metabolism is essential for ensuring cellular growth and maintenance in plants. Based on redox-proteomics analysis, several proteins involved in diverse mitochondrial reactions have been identified as potential redox-regulated proteins. NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, is one such candidate. In this study, we investigated the redox regulation mechanisms of IDH by biochemical procedures. In contrast to mammalian and yeast counterparts reported to date, recombinant IDH in Arabidopsis mitochondria did not show adenylate-dependent changes in enzymatic activity. Instead, IDH was inactivated by oxidation treatment and partially reactivated by subsequent reduction. Functional IDH forms a heterodimer comprising regulatory (IDH-r and catalytic (IDH-c subunits. IDH-r was determined to be the target of oxidative modifications forming an oligomer via intermolecular disulfide bonds. Mass spectrometric analysis combined with tryptic digestion of IDH-r indicated that Cys128 and Cys216 are involved in intermolecular disulfide bond formation. Furthermore, we showed that mitochondria-localized o-type thioredoxin (Trx-o promotes the reduction of oxidized IDH-r. These results suggest that IDH-r is susceptible to oxidative stress, and Trx-o serves to convert oxidized IDH-r to the reduced form that is necessary for active IDH complex.

  11. CvADH1, a member of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, is inducible by gibberellin and sucrose in developing watermelon seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonyul; Kang, Hong-Gyu; Jun, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Jinwon; Yim, Jieun; An, Gynheung

    2003-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that control seed formation, we selected a seed-preferential gene (CvADH1) from the ESTs of developing watermelon seeds. RNA blot analysis and in situ localization showed that CvADH1 was preferentially expressed in the nucellar tissue. The CvADH1 protein shared about 50% homology with short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase including ABA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana, stem secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase in Forsythia intermedia, and 3beta-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase in Digitalis lanata. We investigated gene-expression levels in seeds from both normally pollinated fruits and those made parthenocarpic via N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N'-phenylurea treatment, the latter of which lack zygotic tissues. Whereas the transcripts of CvADH1 rapidly started to accumulate from about the pre-heart stage in normal seeds, they were not detectable in the parthenocarpic seeds. Treating the parthenogenic fruit with GA(3) strongly induced gene expression, up to the level accumulated in pollinated seeds. These results suggest that the CvADH1 gene is induced in maternal tissues by signals made in the zygotic tissues, and that gibberellin might be one of those signals. We also observed that CvADH1 expression was induced by sucrose in the parthenocarpic seeds. Therefore, we propose that the CvADH1 gene is inducible by gibberellin, and that sucrose plays an important role in the maternal tissues of watermelon during early seed development. PMID:12552151

  12. Catalytic properties of Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureşan, L; Vancea, D; Presecan, E; Porumb, H; Lascu, I; Oargă, M; Matinca, D; Abrudan, I; Bârzu, O

    1983-02-15

    (1) L-Alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus cereus was purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure involving Cibacron-Blue 3G-A Sepharose 4B-CL, and Sepharose 6B-CL, and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. (2) Following immobilization via two of the six subunits, L-alanine dehydrogenase retained 66% of the specific activity of the soluble enzyme. The affinity of the immobilized enzyme for NH4+, pyruvate and L-alanine, was not different to that of the soluble form. The Km of the Sepharose-bound L-alanine dehydrogenase for pyridine coenzymes was 6-8-times higher than in the soluble case. (3) The stability of L-alanine dehydrogenase towards urea or thermal denaturation was increased by immobilization. (4) The incubation at 37 degrees C for 24 h of the immobilized L-alanine dehydrogenase with 3 M NH4Cl/NH4OH buffer (pH 9) released 70% of the enzyme. The specific activity and the affinity of the 'solubilized' L-alanine dehydrogenase for the pyridine coenzymes was the same as that obtained with the original, soluble L-alanine dehydrogenase. PMID:6404304

  13. Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase contributes to skeletal muscle homeostasis independent of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semjonous, Nina M

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) metabolism by the enzyme hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH) within the sarcoplasmic reticulum lumen generates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) to provide the redox potential for the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) to activate glucocorticoid (GC). H6PDH knockout (KO) mice have a switch in 11β-HSD1 activity, resulting in GC inactivation and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation. Importantly, H6PDHKO mice develop a type II fiber myopathy with abnormalities in glucose metabolism and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). GCs play important roles in muscle physiology, and therefore, we have examined the importance of 11β-HSD1 and GC metabolism in mediating aspects of the H6PDHKO myopathy. To achieve this, we examined 11β-HSD1\\/H6PDH double-KO (DKO) mice, in which 11β-HSD1 mediated GC inactivation is negated. In contrast to H6PDHKO mice, DKO mice GC metabolism and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis set point is similar to that observed in 11β-HSD1KO mice. Critically, in contrast to 11β-HSD1KO mice, DKO mice phenocopy the salient features of the H6PDHKO, displaying reduced body mass, muscle atrophy, and vacuolation of type II fiber-rich muscle, fasting hypoglycemia, increased muscle glycogen deposition, and elevated expression of UPR genes. We propose that muscle G6P metabolism through H6PDH may be as important as changes in the redox environment when considering the mechanism underlying the activation of the UPR and the ensuing myopathy in H6PDHKO and DKO mice. These data are consistent with an 11β-HSD1-independent function for H6PDH in which sarcoplasmic reticulum G6P metabolism and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-(oxidized)\\/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) redox status are important for maintaining muscle homeostasis.

  14. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristan Katja

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor.

  15. Burst of succinate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activity in concert with the expression of genes coding for respiratory chain proteins underlies short-term beneficial physiological stress in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, Marina V; Zakharchenko, A V; Khunderyakova, N V; Tutukina, M N; Simonova, M A; Vasilieva, A A; Romanova, O I; Fedotcheva, N I; Litvinova, E G; Maevsky, E I; Zinchenko, V P; Berezhnov, A V; Morgunov, I G; Gulayev, A A; Kondrashova, M N

    2013-01-01

    Conditions for the realization in rats of moderate physiological stress (PHS) (30-120 min) were selected, which preferentially increase adaptive restorative processes without adverse responses typical of harmful stress (HST). The succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KDH) activity and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria were measured in lymphocytes by the cytobiochemical method, which detects the regulation of mitochondria in the organism with high sensitivity. These mitochondrial markers undergo an initial 10-20-fold burst of activity followed by a decrease to a level exceeding the quiescent state 2-3-fold by 120 min of PHS. By 30-60 min, the rise in SDH activity was greater than in KDH activity, while the activity of KDH prevailed over that of SDH by 120 min. The attenuation of SDH hyperactivity during PHS occurs by a mechanism other than oxaloacetate inhibition developed under HST. The dynamics of SDH and KDH activity corresponds to the known physiological replacement of adrenergic regulation by cholinergic during PHS, which is confirmed here by mitochondrial markers because their activity reflects these two types of nerve regulation, respectively. The domination of cholinergic regulation provides the overrestoration of expenditures for activity. In essence, this phenomenon corresponds to the training of the organism. It was first revealed in mitochondria after a single short-time stress episode. The burst of ROS formation was congruous with changes in SDH and KDH activity, as well as in ucp2 and cox3 expression, while the activity of SDH was inversely dependent on the expression of the gene of its catalytic subunit in the spleen. As the SDH activity enhanced, the expression of the succinate receptor decreased with subsequent dramatic rise when the activity was becoming lower. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction, adaption and therapy. PMID:22814171

  16. Purification of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase by using immobilized metal affinity cryogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akduman, Begüm [Chemistry Department, Adnan Menderes University, Aydın (Turkey); Uygun, Murat [Koçarlı Vocational and Training School, Adnan Menderes University, Aydın (Turkey); Uygun, Deniz Aktaş, E-mail: daktas@adu.edu.tr [Chemistry Department, Adnan Menderes University, Aydın (Turkey); Akgöl, Sinan [Biochemistry Department, Ege University, İzmir (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Chemistry Department, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-12-01

    In this study, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate–glycidylmethacrylate) [poly(HEMA–GMA)] cryogels were prepared by radical cryocopolymerization of HEMA with GMA as a functional comonomer and N,N′-methylene-bisacrylamide (MBAAm) as a crosslinker. Iminodiacetic acid (IDA) functional groups were attached via ring opening of the epoxy group on the poly(HEMA–GMA) cryogels and then Zn(II) ions were chelated with these structures. Characterization of cryogels was performed by FTIR, SEM, EDX and swelling studies. These cryogels have interconnected pores of 30–50 μm size. The equilibrium swelling degree of Zn(II) chelated poly(HEMA–GMA)-IDA cryogels was approximately 600%. Zn(II) chelated poly(HEMA–GMA)-IDA cryogels were used in the adsorption of alcohol dehydrogenase from aqueous solutions and adsorption was performed in continuous system. The effects of pH, alcohol dehydrogenase concentration, temperature, and flow rate on adsorption were investigated. The maximum amount of alcohol dehydrogenase adsorption was determined to be 9.94 mg/g cryogel at 1.0 mg/mL alcohol dehydrogenase concentration and in acetate buffer at pH 5.0 with a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Desorption of adsorbed alcohol dehydrogenase was carried out by using 1.0 M NaCI at pH 8.0 phosphate buffer and desorption yield was found to be 93.5%. Additionally, these cryogels were used for purification of alcohol dehydrogenase from yeast with a single-step. The purity of desorbed alcohol dehydrogenase was shown by silver-stained SDS–PAGE. This purification process can successfully be used for the purification of alcohol dehydrogenase from unclarified yeast homogenates and this work is the first report about the usage of the cryogels for purification of alcohol dehydrogenase. - Highlights: • Poly(HEMA–GMA) cryogels were synthesized by radical cryocopolymerization technique. • Prepared cryogels were functionalized with IDA, then Zn(II) ions were chelated to the cryogel. • Zn(II) chelated poly

  17. Purification of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase by using immobilized metal affinity cryogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate–glycidylmethacrylate) [poly(HEMA–GMA)] cryogels were prepared by radical cryocopolymerization of HEMA with GMA as a functional comonomer and N,N′-methylene-bisacrylamide (MBAAm) as a crosslinker. Iminodiacetic acid (IDA) functional groups were attached via ring opening of the epoxy group on the poly(HEMA–GMA) cryogels and then Zn(II) ions were chelated with these structures. Characterization of cryogels was performed by FTIR, SEM, EDX and swelling studies. These cryogels have interconnected pores of 30–50 μm size. The equilibrium swelling degree of Zn(II) chelated poly(HEMA–GMA)-IDA cryogels was approximately 600%. Zn(II) chelated poly(HEMA–GMA)-IDA cryogels were used in the adsorption of alcohol dehydrogenase from aqueous solutions and adsorption was performed in continuous system. The effects of pH, alcohol dehydrogenase concentration, temperature, and flow rate on adsorption were investigated. The maximum amount of alcohol dehydrogenase adsorption was determined to be 9.94 mg/g cryogel at 1.0 mg/mL alcohol dehydrogenase concentration and in acetate buffer at pH 5.0 with a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Desorption of adsorbed alcohol dehydrogenase was carried out by using 1.0 M NaCI at pH 8.0 phosphate buffer and desorption yield was found to be 93.5%. Additionally, these cryogels were used for purification of alcohol dehydrogenase from yeast with a single-step. The purity of desorbed alcohol dehydrogenase was shown by silver-stained SDS–PAGE. This purification process can successfully be used for the purification of alcohol dehydrogenase from unclarified yeast homogenates and this work is the first report about the usage of the cryogels for purification of alcohol dehydrogenase. - Highlights: • Poly(HEMA–GMA) cryogels were synthesized by radical cryocopolymerization technique. • Prepared cryogels were functionalized with IDA, then Zn(II) ions were chelated to the cryogel. • Zn(II) chelated poly

  18. A new dawn for plant mitochondrial NAD(P)H dehydrogenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    The expression of complex I and two homologues of bacterial and yeast NADH dehydrogenases, NDA and NDB, have been studied in potato leaf mitochondria. The mRNA level of NDA is completely light dependent and shows a diurnal rhythm with a sharp maximum just after dawn. NDA protein quantity and inte...... internal rotenone-insensitive NADH dehydrogenase activity are also light dependent. These findings suggest that NDA has a role in photorespiration and might be identical to the previously unidentified internal rotenone-insensitive NADH dehydrogenase....

  19. Autocrine function of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 as a determinant of diet- and sex-specific differences in visceral adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmeen, Rumana; Reichert, Barbara; Deiuliis, Jeffrey; Yang, Fangping; Lynch, Alisha; Meyers, Joseph; Sharlach, Molly; Shin, Sangsu; Volz, Katharina S; Green, Kari B; Lee, Kichoon; Alder, Hansjuerg; Duester, Gregg; Zechner, Rudolf; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms for sex- and depot-specific fat formation are unclear. We investigated the role of retinoic acid (RA) production by aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Aldh1a1, -a2, and -a3), the major RA-producing enzymes, on sex-specific fat depot formation. Female Aldh1a1(-/-) mice, but not males, were resistant to high-fat (HF) diet-induced visceral adipose formation, whereas subcutaneous fat was reduced similarly in both groups. Sexual dimorphism in visceral fat (VF) was attributable to elevated adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) protein expression localized in clusters of multilocular uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1)-positive cells in female Aldh1a1(-/-) mice compared with males. Estrogen decreased Aldh1a3 expression, limiting conversion of retinaldehyde (Rald) to RA. Rald effectively induced Atgl levels via nongenomic mechanisms, demonstrating indirect regulation by estrogen. Experiments in transgenic mice expressing an RA receptor response element (RARE-lacZ) revealed HF diet-induced RARE activation in VF of females but not males. In humans, stromal cells isolated from VF of obese subjects also expressed higher levels of Aldh1 enzymes compared with lean subjects. Our data suggest that an HF diet mediates VF formation through a sex-specific autocrine Aldh1 switch, in which Rald-mediated lipolysis in Ucp1-positive visceral adipocytes is replaced by RA-mediated lipid accumulation. Our data suggest that Aldh1 is a potential target for sex-specific antiobesity therapy. PMID:22933113

  20. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity selects for the holoclone phenotype in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Isolated ALDHHi PC3 cells preferentially form primitive holoclone-type colonies. ► Primitive holoclone colonies are predominantly ALDHLo but contain rare ALDHHi cells. ► Holoclone-forming cells are not restricted to the ALDHHi population. ► ALDH phenotypic plasticity occurs in PC3 cells (ALDHLo to ALDHHi and vice versa). ► ALDHHi cells are observed but very rare in PC3 spheroids grown in stem cell medium. -- Abstract: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH) activity is considered to be a marker of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in many tumour models, since these cells are more proliferative and tumourigenic than ALDHLo cells in experimental models. However it is unclear whether all CSC-like cells are within the ALDHHi population, or whether all ALDHHi cells are highly proliferative and tumourigenic. The ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in vitro, whereby sub-populations of cells have differing proliferative and differentiation capacities, is an alternate indication of the presence of stem cell-like populations within cell lines. In this study, we have examined the interaction between ALDH status and the ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in PC3 prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate that PC3 cells contain a stem cell hierarchy, and isolation of ALDHHi cells enriches for the most primitive holoclone population, however holoclone formation is not restricted to ALDHHi cells. In addition, we show that ALDH activity undergoes phenotypic plasticity, since the ALDHLo population can develop ALDHHi populations comparable to parental cells within 2 weeks in culture. Furthermore, we show that the majority of ALDHHi cells are found within the least primitive paraclone population, which is circumvented by culturing PC3 cells as spheroids in defined medium favouring stem cell characteristics. Although ALDHHi status enriches for holoclone formation, this activity may be mediated by a minority of ALDHHi cells.

  1. Gimeracil, an inhibitor of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, inhibits the early step in homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeracil (5-chloro-2, 4-dihydroxypyridine) is an inhibitor of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD), which degrades pyrimidine including 5-fluorouracil in the blood. Gimeracil was originally added to an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative S-1 to yield prolonged 5-fluorouracil concentrations in serum and tumor tissues. We have already reported that gimeracil had radiosensitizing effects by partially inhibiting homologous recombination (HR) in the repair of DNA double strand breaks. We investigated the mechanisms of gimeracil radiosensitization. Comet assay and radiation-induced focus formation of various kinds of proteins involved in HR was carried out. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for DPYD were transfected to HeLa cells to investigate the target protein for radiosensitization with gimeracil. SCneo assay was carried out to examine whether DPYD depletion by siRNA inhibited HR repair of DNA double strand breaks. Tail moments in neutral comet assay increased in gimeracil-treated cells. Gimeracil restrained the formation of foci of Rad51 and replication protein A (RPA), whereas it increased the number of foci of Nbs1, Mre11, Rad50, and FancD2. When HeLa cells were transfected with the DPYD siRNA before irradiation, the cells became more radiosensitive. The degree of radiosensitization by transfection of DPYD siRNA was similar to that of gimeracil. Gimeracil did not sensitize DPYD-depleted cells. Depletion of DPYD by siRNA significantly reduced the frequency of neopositive clones in SCneo assay. Gimeracil partially inhibits the early step in HR. It was found that DPYD is the target protein for radiosensitization by gimeracil. The inhibitors of DPYD, such as gimeracil, could enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy through partial suppression of HR-mediated DNA repair. (author)

  2. Induction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production by GSH mediated S-glutathionylation of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Craig Ayre, D; Christian, Sherri L

    2016-08-01

    2-Oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (Ogdh) is an important mitochondria redox sensor that can undergo S-glutathionylation following an increase in H2O2 levels. Although S-glutathionylation is required to protect Ogdh from irreversible oxidation while simultaneously modulating its activity it remains unknown if glutathione can also modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by the complex. We report that reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione control O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation by Ogdh through protein S-glutathionylation reactions. GSSG (1mM) induced a modest decrease in Ogdh activity which was associated with a significant decrease in O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation. GSH had the opposite effect, amplifying O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation by Ogdh. Incubation of purified Ogdh in 2.5mM GSH led to significant increase in O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation which also lowered NADH production. Inclusion of enzymatically active glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) in reaction mixtures reversed the GSH-mediated amplification of O2(∙-)/H2O2 formation. Similarly pre-incubation of permeabilized liver mitochondria from mouse depleted of GSH showed an approximately ~3.5-fold increase in Ogdh-mediated O2(∙-)/H2O2 production that was matched by a significant decrease in NADH formation which could be reversed by Grx2. Taken together, our results demonstrate GSH and GSSG modulate ROS production by Ogdh through S-glutathionylation of different subunits. This is also the first demonstration that GSH can work in the opposite direction in mitochondria-amplifying ROS formation instead of quenching it. We propose that this regulatory mechanism is required to modulate ROS emission from Ogdh in response to variations in glutathione redox buffering capacity. PMID:26928132

  3. Crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase Gnd1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Cong-Zhao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the third enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH is the main generator of cellular NADPH. Both thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase require NADPH as the electron donor to reduce oxidized thioredoxin or glutathione (GSSG. Since thioredoxin and GSH are important antioxidants, it is not surprising that 6PGDH plays a critical role in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Furthermore the activity of 6PGDH is associated with several human disorders including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. The 3D structural investigation would be very valuable in designing small molecules that target this enzyme for potential therapeutic applications. Results The crystal structure of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH/Gnd1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been determined at 2.37 Å resolution by molecular replacement. The overall structure of Gnd1 is a homodimer with three domains for each monomer, a Rossmann fold NADP+ binding domain, an all-α helical domain contributing the majority to hydrophobic interaction between the two subunits and a small C-terminal domain penetrating the other subunit. In addition, two citrate molecules occupied the 6PG binding pocket of each monomer. The intact Gnd1 had a Km of 50 ± 9 μM for 6-phosphogluconate and of 35 ± 6 μM for NADP+ at pH 7.5. But the truncated mutants without the C-terminal 35, 39 or 53 residues of Gnd1 completely lost their 6PGDH activity, despite remaining the homodimer in solution. Conclusion The overall tertiary structure of Gnd1 is similar to those of 6PGDH from other species. The substrate and coenzyme binding sites are well conserved, either from the primary sequence alignment, or from the 3D structural superposition. Enzymatic activity assays suggest a sequential mechanism of catalysis, which is in agreement with previous studies. The C-terminal domain of Gnd1 functions as a hook to further tighten the dimer, but it is not

  4. A simple method for the rapid determination of the stereospecificity of NAD-dependent dehydrogenases applied to mammalian IMP dehydrogenase and bacterial NADH peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, D; Hamel, E; Cohen, M; Kang, G J; Dalal, M; Marquez, V

    1987-11-01

    The stereospecificity of IMP dehydrogenase (IMP:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.205) from two different sources was determined. The enzyme preparations were obtained from murine lymphoblasts and from Escherichia coli. Both enzymes transferred the 2-3H of IMP to the pro-S position of carbon atom C-4 of the nicotinamide ring in NAD. Thus, B-sided stereospecificity is common to the enzyme from two very different species. In addition, the studies described here demonstrate that alcohol dehydrogenase and NADH peroxidase, used as auxiliary enzymes, in combination with a microdistillation procedure, should permit rapid determination of the stereospecificity of any NAD-dependent dehydrogenase for which the appropriate tritiated substrate is available. PMID:2889473

  5. Formate hydrogenlyase in the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus litoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rákhely Gábor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermococcus litoralis is a heterotrophic facultative sulfur dependent hyperthermophilic Archaeon, which was isolated from a shallow submarine thermal spring. It has been successfully used in a two-stage fermentation system, where various keratinaceous wastes of animal origin were converted to biohydrogen. In this system T. litoralis performed better than its close relative, P. furiosus. Therefore, new alternative enzymes involved in peptide and hydrogen metabolism were assumed in T. litoralis. Results An about 10.5 kb long genomic region was isolated and sequenced from Thermococcus litoralis. In silico analysis revealed that the region contained a putative operon consisting of eight genes: the fdhAB genes coding for a formate dehydrogenase and the mhyCDEFGH genes encoding a [NiFe] hydrogenase belonging to the group of the H2-evolving, energy-conserving, membrane-bound hydrogenases. Reverse transcription linked quantitative Real-Time PCR and Western blotting experiments showed that the expression of the fdh-mhy operon was up-regulated during fermentative growth on peptides and down-regulated in cells cultivated in the presence of sulfur. Immunoblotting and protein separation experiments performed on cell fractions indicated that the formate dehydrogenase part of the complex is associated to the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase. Conclusion The formate dehydrogenase together with the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase formed a formate hydrogenlyase (formate dehydrogenase coupled hydrogenase, FDH-MHY complex. The expression data suggested that its physiological role is linked to the removal of formate likely generated during anaerobic peptide fermentation.

  6. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency presented with convulsion: a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alparslan Merdin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cells carry oxygen in the body and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase protects these cells from oxidative chemicals. If there is a lack of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, red blood cells can go acute hemolysis. Convulsion is a rare presentation for acute hemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. Herein, we report a case report of a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency diagnosed patient after presentation with convulsion. A 70 year-old woman patient had been hospitalized because of convulsion and fatigue. She has not had similar symptoms before. She had ingested fava beans in the last two days. Her hypophyseal and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Blood transfusion was performed and the patient recovered.

  7. Kernicterus by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cossio de Gurrola Gladys

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease that causes acute or chronic hemolytic anemia and potentially leads to severe jaundice in response to oxidative agents. This deficiency is the most common human innate error of metabolism, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. Case presentation Here, we present the first documented case of kernicterus in Panama, in a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient newborn clothed in naphthalene-impregnated garments, resulting in reduced psychomotor development, neurosensory hypoacousia, absence of speech and poor reflex of the pupil to light. Conclusion Mutational analysis revealed the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase Mediterranean polymorphic variant, which explained the development of kernicterus after exposition of naphthalene. As the use of naphthalene in stored clothes is a common practice, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase testing in neonatal screening could prevent severe clinical consequences.

  8. Induction of glutamate dehydrogenase in the ovine fetal liver by dexamethasone infusion during late gestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Timmerman (Michelle); R.B. Wilkening; T.R. Regnault

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids near term are known to upregulate many important enzyme systems prior to birth. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes both the reversible conversion of ammonium nitrogen into organic nitrogen (glutamate production) and th

  9. Redesigning alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases for more efficient biosynthesis of enantiopure isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases predominantly catalyze the asymmetric biosynthesis of optically pure stereoisomers because of their unique chiral constitutions. The enantioselectivities of alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases are substrate- and cofactor-dependent, and therefore they usually catalyze specific reactions with high enantioselectivity under physiological conditions; this may not be suitable for asymmetric biosynthesis with non-natural substrates or non-natural cofactors, and under nonphysiological conditions. It is therefore necessary to modify alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases using various redesigning tools such as directed evolution and rational design, and their combinations, as well as engineering enzyme modules for more efficient production of "non-natural" products. In this article, progress in these aspects of alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase design is reviewed, and future challenges are discussed. PMID:26320091

  10. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  11. Asp295 Stabilizes the Active-Site Loop Structure of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase, Facilitating Phosphorylation of Ser292 by Pyruvate Dehydrogenase-Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Hirani, Tripty A.; Alejandro Tovar-Méndez; Miernyk, Ján A.; Randall, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thalianaα2β2-heterotetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A. thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP, Ser292, which is located within the active-site loop structure of E1α, is phosphorylated. In addition to Ser292, Asp295 and Gly297 are highly conserved in the E1α active-site loop sequences. Mutat...

  12. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH. PMID:26126931

  13. Cloning and Polymorphisms of Yak Lactate Dehydrogenase b Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaou Xu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to study the unique polymorphisms of the lactate dehydrogenase-1 (LDH1 gene in yak (Bos grunniens. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed three phenotypes of LDH1 (a tetramer of H subunit in yak heart and longissimus muscle extracts. The corresponding gene, ldhb, encoding H subunits of three LDH1 phenotypes was obtained by RT-PCR. A total of six nucleotide differences were detected in yak ldhb compared with that of cattle, of which five mutations cause amino acid substitutions. Sequence analysis shows that the G896A and C689A, mutations of ldhb gene, result in alterations of differently charged amino acids, and create the three phenotypes (F, M, and S of yak LDH1. Molecular modeling of the H subunit of LDH indicates that the substituted amino acids are not located within NAD+ or substrate binding sites. PCR-RFLP examination of G896A mutation demonstrated that most LDH1-F samples are actually heterozygote at this site. These results help to elucidate the molecular basis and genetic characteristic of the three unique LDH1 phenotypes in yak.

  14. Undetected Toxicity Risk in Pharmacogenetic Testing for Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Stefania Falvella

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluoropyrimidines, the mainstay agents for the treatment of colorectal cancer, alone or as a part of combination therapies, cause severe adverse reactions in about 10%–30% of patients. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD, a key enzyme in the catabolism of 5-fluorouracil, has been intensively investigated in relation to fluoropyrimidine toxicity, and several DPD gene (DPYD polymorphisms are associated with decreased enzyme activity and increased risk of fluoropyrimidine-related toxicity. In patients carrying non-functional DPYD variants (c.1905+1G>A, c.1679T>G, c.2846A>T, fluoropyrimidines should be avoided or reduced according to the patients’ homozygous or heterozygous status, respectively. For other common DPYD variants (c.496A>G, c.1129-5923C>G, c.1896T>C, conflicting data are reported and their use in clinical practice still needs to be validated. The high frequency of DPYD polymorphism and the lack of large prospective trials may explain differences in studies’ results. The epigenetic regulation of DPD expression has been recently investigated to explain the variable activity of the enzyme. DPYD promoter methylation and its regulation by microRNAs may affect the toxicity risk of fluoropyrimidines. The studies we reviewed indicate that pharmacogenetic testing is promising to direct personalised dosing of fluoropyrimidines, although further investigations are needed to establish the role of DPD in severe toxicity in patients treated for colorectal cancer.

  15. Lactate Dehydrogenase in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Something Old, Something New

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Memeo, Riccardo; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Giampieri, Riccardo; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Del Prete, Michela; Cascinu, Stefano; Scartozzi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver tumour (80–90%) and represents more than 5.7% of all cancers. Although in recent years the therapeutic options for these patients have increased, clinical results are yet unsatisfactory and the prognosis remains dismal. Clinical or molecular criteria allowing a more accurate selection of patients are in fact largely lacking. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) is a glycolytic key enzyme in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate under anaerobic conditions. In preclinical models, upregulation of LDH has been suggested to ensure both an efficient anaerobic/glycolytic metabolism and a reduced dependence on oxygen under hypoxic conditions in tumour cells. Data from several analyses on different tumour types seem to suggest that LDH levels may be a significant prognostic factor. The role of LDH in HCC has been investigated by different authors in heterogeneous populations of patients. It has been tested as a potential biomarker in retrospective, small, and nonfocused studies in patients undergoing surgery, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and systemic therapy. In the major part of these studies, high LDH serum levels seem to predict a poorer outcome. We have reviewed literature in this setting trying to resume basis for future studies validating the role of LDH in this disease. PMID:27314036

  16. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzik, D J; Fox, B A; Gonyer, K

    1993-05-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum gene is described which encodes lactate dehydrogenase activity (P. falciparum LDH). The P. falciparum LDH gene contains no introns and is present in a single copy on chromosome 13. P. falciparum LDH was expressed in all asexual blood stages as a 1.6-kb mRNA. The predicted 316 amino acid protein coding region of P. falciparum LDH was inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pKK223-3 and a 33-kDa protein having LDH activity was synthesized in Escherichia coli. P. falciparum LDH primary structure displays high amino acid similarity (50-57%) to vertebrate and bacterial LDH, but lacks the amino terminal extension observed in all vertebrate LDH. The majority of amino acid residues implicated in substrate and coenzyme binding and catalysis of other LDH are well conserved in P. falciparum LDH. However, several notable differences in amino acid composition were observed. P. falciparum LDH contained several distinctive single amino acid insertions and deletions compared to other LDH enzymes, and most remarkably, it contained a novel insertion of 5 amino acids within the conserved mobile loop region near arginine residue 109, a residue which is known to make contact with pyruvate in the ternary complex of other LDH. These results suggest that novel features of P. falciparum LDH primary structure may be correlated with previously characterized and distinctive kinetic, biochemical, immunochemical, and electrophoretic properties of P. falciparum LDH. PMID:8515777

  17. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D., E-mail: vappanna@laurentian.ca

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  18. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren;

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may...... be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking...... and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men...

  19. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, J.S.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Rasmussen, S.;

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white...... men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence......, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1...

  20. SERUM VALUES OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE AND LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZUMÁRRAGA, JUAN PABLO; BAPTISTA, ANDRÉ MATHIAS; ROSA, LUIS PABLO DE LA; CAIERO, MARCELO TADEU; CAMARGO, OLAVO PIRES DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the relationship between the pre and post chemotherapy (CT) serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and the percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) found in specimens after the pre surgical CT in patients with osteosarcoma. Methods: Series of cases with retrospective evaluation of patients diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Participants were divided into two groups according to serum values of both enzymes. The values of AP and LDH were obtained before and after preoperative CT. The percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) of surgical specimens of each patient was also included. Results: One hundred and thirty seven medical records were included from 1990 to 2013. Both the AP as LDH decreased in the patients studied, being the higher in pre CT than post CT. The average LHD decrease was 795.12U/L and AP decrease was 437.40 U/L. The average TN was 34.10 %. There was no statistically significant correlation between the serums values and the percentage of tumoral necrosis. Conclusion: The serum levels values of AP and LDH are not good predictors for the chemotherapy-induced necrosis in patients with osteosarcoma. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:27217815

  1. Novel inhibitors of mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Orr

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH is a ubiquinone-linked enzyme in the mitochondrial inner membrane best characterized as part of the glycerol phosphate shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents from cytosolic NADH into the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Despite the widespread expression of mGPDH and the availability of mGPDH-null mice, the physiological role of this enzyme remains poorly defined in many tissues, likely because of compensatory pathways for cytosolic regeneration of NAD⁺ and mechanisms for glycerol phosphate metabolism. Here we describe a novel class of cell-permeant small-molecule inhibitors of mGPDH (iGP discovered through small-molecule screening. Structure-activity analysis identified a core benzimidazole-phenyl-succinamide structure as being essential to inhibition of mGPDH while modifications to the benzimidazole ring system modulated both potency and off-target effects. Live-cell imaging provided evidence that iGPs penetrate cellular membranes. Two compounds (iGP-1 and iGP-5 were characterized further to determine potency and selectivity and found to be mixed inhibitors with IC₅₀ and K(i values between ∼1-15 µM. These novel mGPDH inhibitors are unique tools to investigate the role of glycerol 3-phosphate metabolism in both isolated and intact systems.

  2. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from Ascaris suum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thissen, J.; Komuniecki, R.

    1987-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) from body wall muscle of the porcine nematode, Ascaris suum, plays a pivotal role in anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism. As in mammalian mitochondria, PDC activity is inhibited by the phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit, catalyzed by an associated PDH/sub a/ kinase. However, in contrast to PDC's isolated from all other eukaryotic sources, phosphorylation decreases the mobility of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit on SDS-PAGE and permits the separation of the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH's. Phosphorylation and the inactivation of the Ascaris PDC correspond directly, and the additional phosphorylation that occurs after complete inactivation in mammalian PDC's is not observed. The purified ascarid PDC incorporates 10 nmoles /sup 32/P/mg P. Autoradiography of the radiolabeled PDC separated by SDS-PAGE yields a band which corresponds to the phosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH and a second, faint band which is present only during the first three minutes of PDC inactivation, intermediate between the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH subunit. Tryptic digests of the /sup 32/P-PDC yields one major phosphopeptide, when separated by HPLC, and its amino acid sequence currently is being determined.

  3. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from Ascaris suum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) from body wall muscle of the porcine nematode, Ascaris suum, plays a pivotal role in anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism. As in mammalian mitochondria, PDC activity is inhibited by the phosphorylation of the αPDH subunit, catalyzed by an associated PDH/sub a/ kinase. However, in contrast to PDC's isolated from all other eukaryotic sources, phosphorylation decreases the mobility of the αPDH subunit on SDS-PAGE and permits the separation of the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated αPDH's. Phosphorylation and the inactivation of the Ascaris PDC correspond directly, and the additional phosphorylation that occurs after complete inactivation in mammalian PDC's is not observed. The purified ascarid PDC incorporates 10 nmoles 32P/mg P. Autoradiography of the radiolabeled PDC separated by SDS-PAGE yields a band which corresponds to the phosphorylated αPDH and a second, faint band which is present only during the first three minutes of PDC inactivation, intermediate between the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated αPDH subunit. Tryptic digests of the 32P-PDC yields one major phosphopeptide, when separated by HPLC, and its amino acid sequence currently is being determined

  4. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD+ generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD+ reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information

  5. Cloning and Expression of a Xylitol-4-Dehydrogenase Gene from Pantoea ananatis

    OpenAIRE

    Aarnikunnas, J. S.; Pihlajaniemi, A.; Palva, A; Leisola, M.; Nyyssölä, A.

    2006-01-01

    The Pantoea ananatis ATCC 43072 mutant strain is capable of growing with xylitol as the sole carbon source. The xylitol-4-dehydrogenase (XDH) catalyzing the oxidation of xylitol to l-xylulose was isolated from the cell extract of this strain. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein was determined, and an oligonucleotide deduced from this peptide sequence was used to isolate the xylitol-4-dehydrogenase gene (xdh) from a P. ananatis gene library. Nucleotide sequence analysis ...

  6. Optimization of production, purification and lyophilisation of cellobiose dehydrogenase by Sclerotium rolfsii

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Christin; Krause, Annett; Kleinschmidt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background The enzyme cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) can be used to oxidize lactose to lactobionic acid. As Sclerotium rolfsii is known to be a good producer of CDH, the aim of this paper was to simplify its production and secondly to systematically study its purification aiming for a high yield. Two preservation methods (freezing and freeze-drying) and the influence of several protectants were investigated. Results Production of cellobiose dehydrogenase was optimized leading to a more simpli...

  7. Kernicterus by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Cossio de Gurrola Gladys; Araúz Juan; Durán Elfilda; Aguilar-Medina Maribel; Ramos-Payán Rosalío; García-Magallanes Noemí; Pacheco Gerardo; Arámbula Meraz Eliakym

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is an X-linked recessive disease that causes acute or chronic hemolytic anemia and potentially leads to severe jaundice in response to oxidative agents. This deficiency is the most common human innate error of metabolism, affecting more than 400 million people worldwide. Case presentation Here, we present the first documented case of kernicterus in Panama, in a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient newborn clothed in nap...

  8. Identification and functional characterization of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations in thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Bojdani, Ermal; Xing, Mingzhao

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the genes for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) have been recently identified in glioblastoma. In the present study, we investigated IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), with the latter, like glioblastoma, having a rapidly aggressive and lethal clinical course. By direct genomic DNA sequencing, we analyzed exon 4 of the IDH1 and IDH2 genes that harbored the mutation hot spots codon 13...

  9. Search for Human Lactate Dehydrogenase A Inhibitors Using Structure-Based Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Nilov, D.; Prokhorova, E.; Švedas, V.

    2015-01-01

    The human lactate dehydrogenase isoform A plays an important role in the anaerobic metabolism of tumour cells and therefore constitutes an attractive target in the oncology field. Full-atom models of lactate dehydrogenase A (in complex with NADH and in the apo form) have been generated to enable structure-based design of novel inhibitors competing with pyruvate and NADH. The structural criteria for the selection of potential inhibitors were established, and virtual screening of a library of l...

  10. Soil Dehydrogenases as an Indicator of Contamination of the Environment with Petroleum Products

    OpenAIRE

    Kaczyńska, Grażyna; Borowik, Agata; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research was to compare the effects of various petroleum products, biodiesel, diesel oil, fuel oil and unleaded petrol on soil dehydrogenases, and to evaluate biostimulation with compost and urea in the restoration of homeostasis of the soil contaminated with these products. The obtained results allowed for defining the weight of dehydrogenases in monitoring of the environment subjected to pressure from petroleum hydrocarbons. The studies were carried out under laboratory condi...

  11. Group X Aldehyde Dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Degrade Hydrazones

    OpenAIRE

    Taniyama, Kosuke; Itoh, Hideomi; Takuwa, Atsushi; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Shunsuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Takaya, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Hydrazones are natural and synthetic compounds containing a C=N-N moiety. Here we found that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 produced NAD+- or NADP+-dependent hydrazone dehydrogenase (HDH), which converts hydrazones to the corresponding hydrazides and acids rather than to the simple hydrolytic product aldehydes. Gene cloning indicated that the HDH is part of the group X aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family, which is distributed among bacteria, although the physiological...

  12. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4 Promotes Vascular Calcification via SMAD1/5/8 Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Joo Lee; Ji Yun Jeong; Chang Joo Oh; Sungmi Park; Joon-Young Kim; Han-Jong Kim; Nam Doo Kim; Young-Keun Choi; Ji-Yeon Do; Younghoon Go; Chae-Myung Ha; Je-Yong Choi; Seung Huh; Nam Ho Jeoung; Ki-Up Lee

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification, a pathologic response to defective calcium and phosphate homeostasis, is strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. In this study, we have observed that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) is upregulated and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex phosphorylation is increased in calcifying vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and in calcified vessels of patients with atherosclerosis, suggesting that PDK4 plays an important role in vascular calcification...

  13. The Crystal Structure of Aquifex aeolicus Prephenate Dehydrogenase Reveals the Mode of Tyrosine Inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Warren; Shahinas, Dea; Bonvin, Julie; Hou, Wenjuan; Kimber, Matthew S.; Turnbull, Joanne; Christendat, Dinesh; (Guelph); (Toronto); (ConU)

    2009-08-14

    TyrA proteins belong to a family of dehydrogenases that are dedicated to l-tyrosine biosynthesis. The three TyrA subclasses are distinguished by their substrate specificities, namely the prephenate dehydrogenases, the arogenate dehydrogenases, and the cyclohexadienyl dehydrogenases, which utilize prephenate, l-arogenate, or both substrates, respectively. The molecular mechanism responsible for TyrA substrate selectivity and regulation is unknown. To further our understanding of TyrA-catalyzed reactions, we have determined the crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus prephenate dehydrogenase bound with NAD(+) plus either 4-hydroxyphenylpyuvate, 4-hydroxyphenylpropionate, or l-tyrosine and have used these structures as guides to target active site residues for site-directed mutagenesis. From a combination of mutational and structural analyses, we have demonstrated that His-147 and Arg-250 are key catalytic and binding groups, respectively, and Ser-126 participates in both catalysis and substrate binding through the ligand 4-hydroxyl group. The crystal structure revealed that tyrosine, a known inhibitor, binds directly to the active site of the enzyme and not to an allosteric site. The most interesting finding though, is that mutating His-217 relieved the inhibitory effect of tyrosine on A. aeolicus prephenate dehydrogenase. The identification of a tyrosine-insensitive mutant provides a novel avenue for designing an unregulated enzyme for application in metabolic engineering.

  14. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibition: Reversing the Warburg effect in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Bell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The poor efficacy of many cancer chemotherapeutics, which are often non-selective and highly toxic, is attributable to the remarkable heterogeneity and adaptability of cancer cells. The Warburg effect describes the up regulation of glycolysis as the main source of adenosine 5’-triphosphate in cancer cells, even under normoxic conditions, and is a unique metabolic phenotype of cancer cells. Mitochondrial suppression is also observed which may be implicated in apoptotic suppression and increased funneling of respiratory substrates to anabolic processes, conferring a survival advantage. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is subject to meticulous regulation, chiefly by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. At the interface between glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex functions as a metabolic gatekeeper in determining the fate of glucose, making pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase an attractive candidate in a bid to reverse the Warburg effect in cancer cells. The small pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor dichloroacetate has, historically, been used in conditions associated with lactic acidosis but has since gained substantial interest as a potential cancer chemotherapeutic. This review considers the Warburg effect as a unique phenotype of cancer cells in-line with the history of and current approaches to cancer therapies based on pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibition with particular reference to dichloroacetate and its derivatives.

  15. Role of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in traumatic brain injury and Measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme by dipstick test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Pushpa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was designed to investigate the role of a mitochondrial enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH on the severity of brain injury, and the effects of pyruvate treatment in rats with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Materials and Methods: We examined rats subjected to closed head injury using a fluid percussion device, and treated with sodium pyruvate (antioxidant and substrate for PDH enzyme. At 72 h post injury, blood was analyzed for blood gases, acid-base status, total PDH enzyme using a dipstick test and malondialdehyde (MDA levels as a marker of oxidative stress. Brain homogenates from right hippocampus (injured area were analyzed for PDH content, and immunostained hippocampus sections were used to determine the severity of gliosis and PDH E1-∞ subunit. Results: Our data demonstrate that TBI causes a significant reduction in PDH enzyme, disrupt-acid-base balance and increase oxidative stress in blood. Also, lower PDH enzyme in blood is related to the increased gliosis and loss of its PDH E1-∞ subunit PDH in brain tissue, and these effects of TBI were prevented by pyruvate treatment. Conclusion: Lower PDH enzyme levels in blood are related to the global oxidative stress, increased gliosis in brain, and severity of brain injury following TBI. These effects can be prevented by pyruvate through the protection of PDH enzyme and its subunit E-1.

  16. The alcohol dehydrogenase system in the xylose-fermenting yeast Candida maltosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH system plays a critical role in sugar metabolism involving in not only ethanol formation and consumption but also the general "cofactor balance" mechanism. Candida maltosa is able to ferment glucose as well as xylose to produce a significant amount of ethanol. Here we report the ADH system in C. maltosa composed of three microbial group I ADH genes (CmADH1, CmADH2A and CmADH2B, mainly focusing on its metabolic regulation and physiological function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic analysis indicated that CmADH2A and CmADH2B tandemly located on the chromosome could be derived from tandem gene duplication. In vitro characterization of enzymatic properties revealed that all the three CmADHs had broad substrate specificities. Homo- and heterotetramers of CmADH1 and CmADH2A were demonstrated by zymogram analysis, and their expression profiles and physiological functions were different with respect to carbon sources and growth phases. Fermentation studies of ADH2A-deficient mutant showed that CmADH2A was directly related to NAD regeneration during xylose metabolism since CmADH2A deficiency resulted in a significant accumulation of glycerol. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results revealed that CmADH1 was responsible for ethanol formation during glucose metabolism, whereas CmADH2A was glucose-repressed and functioned to convert the accumulated ethanol to acetaldehyde. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of function separation and glucose repression of ADH genes in xylose-fermenting yeasts. On the other hand, CmADH1 and CmADH2A were both involved in ethanol formation with NAD regeneration to maintain NADH/NAD ratio in favor of producing xylitol from xylose. In contrast, CmADH2B was expressed at a much lower level than the other two CmADH genes, and its function is to be further confirmed.

  17. Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms, alcohol intake and the risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, P.; McKay, J. D.; Jenab, M.;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC), but little is known on the effect of polymorphisms in the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) on the alcohol-related risk of CRC in Caucasian populati......BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC), but little is known on the effect of polymorphisms in the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) on the alcohol-related risk of CRC in Caucasian...... populations.SUBJECTS/METHODS: A nested case-control study (1269 cases matched to 2107controls by sex, age, study centre and date of blood collection) was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) to evaluate the impact of rs1229984 (ADH1B), rs1573496 (ADH7......) and rs441 (ALDH2) polymorphisms on CRC risk. Using the wild-type variant of each polymorphism as reference category, CRC risk estimates were calculated using conditional logistic regression, with adjustment for matching factors.RESULTS: Individuals carrying one copy of the rs1229984(A) (ADH1B) allele...

  18. 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in hypothalamic obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiosano, Dov; Eisentein, Israel; Militianu, Daniela; Chrousos, George P; Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2003-01-01

    After extensive suprasellar operations for hypothalamic tumor removal, some patients develop Cushing-like morbid obesity while they receive replacement doses of glucocorticoids. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that target tissue conversion of inactive 11-ketosteroids to active 11 beta-OH glucocorticoids might explain the obesity of some patients with hypothalamic lesions. Toward this aim, we studied 10 patients with hypothalamic obesity and secondary adrenal insufficiency and 6 control Addisonian patients while they were on glucocorticoid replacement therapy. Pituitary hormone deficiencies were replaced when medically indicated. Twenty-four-hour urine was collected after a single oral dose of 12 mg/m(2) hydrocortisone acetate. The ratios of free and conjugated cortisol (F) to cortisone (E) and their metabolites, [tetrahydrocortisol (THF)+5 alpha THF]/tetrahyrdocortisone (THE), dihydrocortisols/dihydrocortisones, cortols/cortolones, and (F+E)/(THF+THE+5 alpha THF), were considered to represent 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) activity. The 11-OH/11-oxo ratios were significantly higher in the urine of patients with hypothalamic obesity. The 11-OH/11-oxo ratios, however, did not correlate with the degree of obesity, yet a significant correlation was found between conjugated F/E and the ratio of visceral fat to sc fat measured by computerized tomography at the umbilical level. The consequence of increased 11 beta-HSD1 activity and the shift of the interconversion toward cortisol may contribute to the effects of the latter in adipose tissue. We propose that deficiency of hypothalamic messengers after surgical injury induces a paracrine/autocrine effect of enhanced glucocorticoid activity due to up-regulated 11 beta-HSD1 activity. PMID:12519880

  19. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids. PMID:26221781

  20. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramm, Anneke; Kisiela, Michael; Schulz, Rüdiger; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) represent a large superfamily of enzymes, most of which are NAD(H)-dependent or NADP(H)-dependent oxidoreductases. They display a wide substrate spectrum, including steroids, alcohols, sugars, aromatic compounds, and xenobiotics. On the basis of characteristic sequence motifs, the SDRs are subdivided into two main (classical and extended) and three smaller (divergent, intermediate, and complex) families. Despite low residue identities in pairwise comparisons, the three-dimensional structure among the SDRs is conserved and shows a typical Rossmann fold. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach to determine whether and which SDRs are present in cyanobacteria, microorganisms that played an important role in our ecosystem as the first oxygen producers. Cyanobacterial SDRs could indeed be identified, and were clustered according to the SDR classification system. Furthermore, because of the early availability of its genome sequence and the easy application of transformation methods, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, one of the most important cyanobacterial strains, was chosen as the model organism for this phylum. Synechocystis sp. SDRs were further analysed with bioinformatics tools, such as hidden Markov models (HMMs). It became evident that several cyanobacterial SDRs show remarkable sequence identities with SDRs in other organisms. These so-called 'homologous' proteins exist in plants, model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis  elegans, and even in humans. As sequence identities of up to 60% were found between Synechocystis and humans, it was concluded that SDRs seemed to have been well conserved during evolution, even after dramatic terrestrial changes such as the conversion of the early reducing atmosphere to an oxidizing one by cyanobacteria. PMID:22251568

  1. Furosemide and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity, in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, M; Armanini, D; Shackleton, C H L; Sorba, G; Cossu, M; Roitman, E; Scaroni, C; Delitala, G

    2002-09-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors possess the same affinity for aldosterone and for cortisol and preferential binding of aldosterone is modulated by the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-OHSD) enzyme, which converts cortisol to its inactive metabolite cortisone. Several endogenous or exogenous compounds able to inhibit the enzyme have been described and, as a consequence, produce the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) characterized by hypertension, hypokalemia, volume repletion and suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. High doses of furosemide, a diuretic that works in the luminal surface of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, have been reported to inhibit 11 beta-OHSD activity to the same extent as licorice in vivo and in vitro, in rat. The aim of our study was to verify the effect of the drug on 11 beta-OHSD activity in man at the doses currently used in clinical practice. We tested the activity of 11 beta-OHSD following both acute and protracted administration of furosemide. In the acute study, the drug was administered at low (40 mg i.v. in bolo) and high doses (infusion of 10 mg/kg bw i.v for six hours); the protracted furosemide administration consisted in 50 mg/day for 20 days, by mouth. The ratios between the cortisol metabolites tetrahydrocortisol plus allo-tetrahydrocortisol to tetra-hydrocortisone and urinary free cortisol to urinary free cortisone were used to measure the activity of 11 beta-OHSD. Urinary cortisol, cortisone and their metabolites were tested by a gas-chromatographic/mass spectrometric method. Neither acute nor prolonged administration of furosemide did affect the activity of 11 beta-OHSD although the drug was able to modify plasma aldosterone and PRA secretion and to determine hypokalemia. Our results suggest that furosemide does not play a significant role in 11 beta-OHSD modulation in humans, at least at the dosage used in clinical practice. PMID:12373630

  2. Function of C-terminal hydrophobic region in fructose dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) catalyzes oxidation of D-fructose into 2-keto-D-fructose and is one of the enzymes allowing a direct electron transfer (DET)-type bioelectrocatalysis. FDH is a heterotrimeric membrane-bound enzyme (subunit I, II, and III) and subunit II has a C terminal hydrophobic region (CHR), which was expected to play a role in anchoring to membranes from the amino acid sequence. We have constructed a mutated FDH lacking of CHR (ΔchrFDH). Contrary to the expected function of CHR, ΔchrFDH is expressed in the membrane fraction, and subunit I/III subcomplex (ΔcFDH) is also expressed in a similar activity level but in the soluble fraction. In addition, the enzyme activity of the purified ΔchrFDH is about one twentieth of the native FDH. These results indicate that CHR is concerned with the binding between subunit I(/III) and subunit II and then with the enzyme activity. ΔchrFDH has clear DET activity that is larger than that expected from the solution activity, and the characteristics of the catalytic wave of ΔchrFDH are very similar to those of FDH. The deletion of CHR seems to increase the amounts of the enzyme with the proper orientation for the DET reaction at electrode surfaces. Gel filtration chromatography coupled with urea treatment shows that the binding in ΔchrFDH is stronger than that in FDH. It can be considered that the rigid binding between subunit I(/III) and II without CHR results in a conformation different from the native one, which leads to the decrease in the enzyme activity in solution

  3. Screening and Characterization of Proline Dehydrogenase Flavoenzyme Producing Pseudomonas Entomophila

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    H Shahbaz- Mohammadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH; 1.5.99.8 plays an important role in specific determination of plasma proline level in biosensor and diagnostic kits. The goal of this research was to isolate and characterize ProDH enzyme from Iranian soil microorganisms.Materials and Methods: Screening of L-proline degradative enzymes from soil samples was carried out employing enrichment culture techniques. The isolate was characterized by biochemical reactions and specific PCR amplification. The target ProDH was purified and the effects of pH and temperature on the activity and stability were also tested.Results: Among the 250 isolates recovered from 40 soil samples, only one strain characterized as Pseudomonas entomophila displayed the highest enzyme activity toward L-proline (350 U/l than others. The enzyme of interest was identified as a ProDH and had Km value of 32 mM for L-proline. ProDH exhibited its best activity at temperature range of 25 to 35°C and its highest activity was achieved at 30°C. It was almost stable at temperatures between 25-30°C for 2 hours. The optimum pH activity of ProDH reaction was 8.5 and its activity was stable in pH range of 8.0-9.0 upto 24 hours. The enzyme was purified with a yield of 8.5% and a purification factor of 37.7. The molecular mass of the purified ProDH was about 40 kDa, and determined to be a monomeric protein."nConclusion: This is the first report concerning the ProDH production by a P. entomophila bacterium isolated from soil sample.

  4. Urinary Bladder Paragangliomas: Analysis of Succinate Dehydrogenase and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sounak; Zhang, Jun; Rivera, Michael; Erickson, Lori A

    2016-09-01

    Paragangliomas of the urinary bladder can arise sporadically or as a part of hereditary syndromes including those with underlying mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) genes, which serve as tumor suppressors. SDH deficiency can be screened for by absence of immunohistochemical detection of SDHB. In this study of 11 cases, clinical follow-up was available for 9/11 cases. The cases were reviewed and graded based on the grading system for adrenal pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (GAPP) criteria. Immunohistochemistry was performed for Ki67 and SDHB. Proliferative index was calculated by quantification of Ki67-positive cells at hot spots. The medical record was accessed for documentation of germline SDH mutations. Urinary bladder paragangliomas had a female predilection (8/11 cases), and 5/11 cases exhibited metastatic behavior. Patients with metastatic disease tended to be younger (mean age 43 vs 49 years), have larger lesions (5.8 vs 1.5 cm), and presented with catecholamine excess (4/4 vs 2/6 patients with non-metastatic lesions). Patients with metastatic disease had a higher mean Ki67 proliferation rate (4.9 vs 1.3 %) and GAPP score (mean of 5.8 vs 3.8) (p = 0.01). IHC for SDHB expression revealed loss of expression in 2/6 cases of non-metastatic paragangliomas compared to 4/5 patients with metastatic paragangliomas. Interestingly, of these four patients, two had a documented mutation of SDHB, one patient had a SDHC mutation, and another patient had a history of familial disease without mutation analysis being performed. Our study, suggests that SDH loss was suggestive of metastatic behavior in addition to younger age at diagnosis, larger tumor size, and higher Ki67 proliferation rate and catecholamine type. PMID:27262318

  5. Erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Brazilian opossum Didelphis marsupialis

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    Barretto O.C. de O.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a comparative study of erythrocyte metabolism of vertebrates, the specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD of the Brazilian opossum Didelphis marsupialis in a hemolysate was shown to be high, 207 ± 38 IU g-1 Hb-1 min-1 at 37ºC, compared to the human erythrocyte activity of 12 ± 2 IU g-1 Hb-1 min-1 at 37ºC. The apparent high specific activity of the mixture led us to investigate the physicochemical properties of the opossum enzyme. We report that reduced glutathione (GSH in the erythrocytes was only 50% higher than in human erythrocytes, a value lower than expected from the high G6PD activity since GSH is maintained in a reduced state by G6PD activity. The molecular mass, determined by G-200 Sephadex column chromatography at pH 8.0, was 265 kDa, which is essentially the same as that of human G6PD (260 kDa. The Michaelis-Menten constants (Km: 55 µM for glucose-6-phosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (Km: 3.3 µM were similar to those of the human enzyme (Km: 50-70 and Km: 2.9-4.4, respectively. A 450-fold purification of the opossum enzyme was achieved and the specific activity of the purified enzyme, 90 IU/mg protein, was actually lower than the 150 IU/mg protein observed for human G6PD. We conclude that G6PD after purification from the hemolysate of D. marsupialis does not have a high specific activity. Thus, it is quite probable that the red cell hyperactivity reported may be explained by increased synthesis of G6PD molecules per unit of hemoglobin or to reduced inactivation in the RBC hemolysate.

  6. Erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Brazilian opossum Didelphis marsupialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretto, O C de O; Oshiro, M; Oliveira, R A G; Fedullo, J D L; Nonoyama, K

    2006-05-01

    In a comparative study of erythrocyte metabolism of vertebrates, the specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) of the Brazilian opossum Didelphis marsupialis in a hemolysate was shown to be high, 207 +/- 38 IU g-1 Hb-1 min-1 at 37 degrees C, compared to the human erythrocyte activity of 12 +/- 2 IU g-1 Hb-1 min-1 at 37 degrees C. The apparent high specific activity of the mixture led us to investigate the physicochemical properties of the opossum enzyme. We report that reduced glutathione (GSH) in the erythrocytes was only 50% higher than in human erythrocytes, a value lower than expected from the high G6PD activity since GSH is maintained in a reduced state by G6PD activity. The molecular mass, determined by G-200 Sephadex column chromatography at pH 8.0, was 265 kDa, which is essentially the same as that of human G6PD (260 kDa). The Michaelis-Menten constants (Km: 55 microM) for glucose-6-phosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (Km: 3.3 microM) were similar to those of the human enzyme (Km: 50-70 and Km: 2.9-4.4, respectively). A 450-fold purification of the opossum enzyme was achieved and the specific activity of the purified enzyme, 90 IU/mg protein, was actually lower than the 150 IU/mg protein observed for human G6PD. We conclude that G6PD after purification from the hemolysate of D. marsupialis does not have a high specific activity. Thus, it is quite probable that the red cell hyperactivity reported may be explained by increased synthesis of G6PD molecules per unit of hemoglobin or to reduced inactivation in the RBC hemolysate. PMID:16648898

  7. Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)], E-mail: ganesan.v@duke.edu; Song, Haijing; Affleck, Donna; McDougald, Darryl L. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Storms, Robert W. [Division of Cellular Therapy, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Zalutsky, Michael R.; Chin, Bennett B. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Introduction: To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. Methods: We developed schemes for the synthesis of two radioiodinated aldehdyes - N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)-at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. Results: The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis of [{sup 125}I]FMIC and [{sup 125}I]DEIBA were 70{+-}5% and 47{+-}14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. Conclusion: To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells.

  8. Targeting aldehyde dehydrogenase: a potential approach for cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. Methods: We developed schemes for the synthesis of two radioiodinated aldehdyes - N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)-at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. Results: The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis of [125I]FMIC and [125I]DEIBA were 70±5% and 47±14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. Conclusion: To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells.

  9. Testis-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: origin and evolution

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    Frishman Dmitrij

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD catalyses one of the glycolytic reactions and is also involved in a number of non-glycolytic processes, such as endocytosis, DNA excision repair, and induction of apoptosis. Mammals are known to possess two homologous GAPD isoenzymes: GAPD-1, a well-studied protein found in all somatic cells, and GAPD-2, which is expressed solely in testis. GAPD-2 supplies energy required for the movement of spermatozoa and is tightly bound to the sperm tail cytoskeleton by the additional N-terminal proline-rich domain absent in GAPD-1. In this study we investigate the evolutionary history of GAPD and gain some insights into specialization of GAPD-2 as a testis-specific protein. Results A dataset of GAPD sequences was assembled from public databases and used for phylogeny reconstruction by means of the Bayesian method. Since resolution in some clades of the obtained tree was too low, syntenic analysis was carried out to define the evolutionary history of GAPD more precisely. The performed selection tests showed that selective pressure varies across lineages and isoenzymes, as well as across different regions of the same sequences. Conclusions The obtained results suggest that GAPD-1 and GAPD-2 emerged after duplication during the early evolution of chordates. GAPD-2 was subsequently lost by most lineages except lizards, mammals, as well as cartilaginous and bony fishes. In reptilians and mammals, GAPD-2 specialized to a testis-specific protein and acquired the novel N-terminal proline-rich domain anchoring the protein in the sperm tail cytoskeleton. This domain is likely to have originated by exonization of a microsatellite genomic region. Recognition of the proline-rich domain by cytoskeletal proteins seems to be unspecific. Besides testis, GAPD-2 of lizards was also found in some regenerating tissues, but it lacks the proline-rich domain due to tissue-specific alternative splicing.

  10. Triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as Selective Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Lipoamide Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryk, Ruslana; Arango, Nancy; Venugopal, Aditya; Warren, J. David; Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.; Lima, Christopher D.; Nathan, Carl (Weill-Med); (SKI); (SUNYB)

    2010-06-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains the leading single cause of death from bacterial infection. Here we explored the possibility of species-selective inhibition of lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), an enzyme central to Mtb's intermediary metabolism and antioxidant defense. High-throughput screening of combinatorial chemical libraries identified triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as high-nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb's Lpd that were noncompetitive versus NADH, NAD{sup +}, and lipoamide and >100-fold selective compared to human Lpd. Efficacy required the dimethoxy and dichlorophenyl groups. The structure of an Lpd-inhibitor complex was resolved to 2.42 {angstrom} by X-ray crystallography, revealing that the inhibitor occupied a pocket adjacent to the Lpd NADH/NAD{sup +} binding site. The inhibitor did not overlap with the adenosine moiety of NADH/NAD{sup +} but did overlap with positions predicted to bind the nicotinamide rings in NADH and NAD{sup +} complexes. The dimethoxy ring occupied a deep pocket adjacent to the FAD flavin ring where it would block coordination of the NADH nicotinamide ring, while the dichlorophenyl group occupied a more exposed pocket predicted to coordinate the NAD{sup +} nicotinamide. Several residues that are not conserved between the bacterial enzyme and its human homologue were predicted to contribute both to inhibitor binding and to species selectivity, as confirmed for three residues by analysis of the corresponding mutant Mtb Lpd proteins. Thus, nonconservation of residues lining the electron-transfer tunnel in Mtb Lpd can be exploited for development of species-selective Lpd inhibitors.

  11. Structural basis of cooperativity in human UDP-glucose dehydrogenase.

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    Venkatachalam Rajakannan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH is the sole enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronic acid. The product is used in xenobiotic glucuronidation in hepatocytes and in the production of proteoglycans that are involved in promoting normal cellular growth and migration. Overproduction of proteoglycans has been implicated in the progression of certain epithelial cancers, while inhibition of UGDH diminished tumor angiogenesis in vivo. A better understanding of the conformational changes occurring during the UGDH reaction cycle will pave the way for inhibitor design and potential cancer therapeutics. METHODOLOGY: Previously, the substrate-bound of UGDH was determined to be a symmetrical hexamer and this regular symmetry is disrupted on binding the inhibitor, UDP-α-D-xylose. Here, we have solved an alternate crystal structure of human UGDH (hUGDH in complex with UDP-glucose at 2.8 Å resolution. Surprisingly, the quaternary structure of this substrate-bound protein complex consists of the open homohexamer that was previously observed for inhibitor-bound hUGDH, indicating that this conformation is relevant for deciphering elements of the normal reaction cycle. CONCLUSION: In all subunits of the present open structure, Thr131 has translocated into the active site occupying the volume vacated by the absent active water and partially disordered NAD+ molecule. This conformation suggests a mechanism by which the enzyme may exchange NADH for NAD+ and repolarize the catalytic water bound to Asp280 while protecting the reaction intermediates. The structure also indicates how the subunits may communicate with each other through two reaction state sensors in this highly cooperative enzyme.

  12. Origin and evolution of medium chain alcohol dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörnvall, Hans; Hedlund, Joel; Bergman, Tomas; Kallberg, Yvonne; Cederlund, Ella; Persson, Bengt

    2013-02-25

    Different lines of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) have separate superfamily origins, already recognized but now extended and re-evaluated by re-screening of the latest databank update. The short-chain form (SDR) is still the superfamily with most abundant occurrence, most multiple divergence, most prokaryotic emphasis, and most non-complicated architecture. This pattern is compatible with an early appearance at the time of the emergence of prokaryotic cellular life. The medium-chain form (MDR) is also old but second in terms of all the parameters above, and therefore compatible with a second emergence. However, this step appears seemingly earlier than previously considered, and may indicate sub-stages of early emergences at the increased resolution available from the now greater number of data entries. The Zn-MDR origin constitutes a third stage, possibly compatible with the transition to oxidative conditions on earth. Within all these three lines, repeated enzymogeneses gave the present divergence. MDR-ADH origin(s), at a fourth stage, may also be further resolved in multiple or extended modes, but the classical liver MDR-ADH of the liver type can still be traced to a gene duplication ~550 MYA (million years ago), at the early vertebrate radiation, compatible with the post-eon-shift, "Cambrian explosion". Classes and isozymes correspond to subsequent and recent duplicatory events, respectively. They illustrate a peculiar pattern with functional and emerging evolutionary distinctions between parent and emerging lines, suggesting a parallelism between duplicatory and mutational events, now also visible at separate sub-stages. Combined, all forms show distinctive patterns at different levels and illustrate correlations with global events. They further show that simple molecular observations on patterns, multiplicities and occurrence give much information, suggesting common divergence rules not much disturbed by horizontal gene transfers after the initial origins. PMID

  13. Maize cytokinin dehydrogenase isozymes are localized predominantly to the vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalabák, David; Johnová, Patricie; Plíhal, Ondřej; Šenková, Karolina; Šamajová, Olga; Jiskrová, Eva; Novák, Ondřej; Jackson, David; Mohanty, Amitabh; Galuszka, Petr

    2016-07-01

    The maize genome encompasses 13 genes encoding for cytokinin dehydrogenase isozymes (CKXs). These enzymes are responsible for irreversible degradation of cytokinin plant hormones and thus, contribute regulating their levels. Here, we focus on the unique aspect of CKXs: their diverse subcellular distribution, important in regulating cytokinin homeostasis. Maize CKXs were tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and transiently expressed in maize protoplasts. Most of the isoforms, namely ZmCKX1, ZmCKX2, ZmCKX4a, ZmCKX5, ZmCKX6, ZmCKX8, ZmCKX9, and ZmCKX12, were associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) several hours after transformation. GFP-fused CKXs were observed to accumulate in putative prevacuolar compartments. To gain more information about the spatiotemporal localization of the above isoforms, we prepared stable expression lines of all ZmCKX-GFP fusions in Arabidopsis thaliana Ler suspension culture. All the ER-associated isoforms except ZmCKX1 and ZmCKX9 were found to be targeted primarily to vacuoles, suggesting that ER-localization is a transition point in the intracellular secretory pathway and vacuoles serve as these isoforms' final destination. ZmCKX9 showed an ER-like localization pattern similar to those observed in the transient maize assay. Apoplastic localization of ZmCKX1 was further confirmed and ZmCKX10 showed cytosolic/nuclear localization due to the absence of the signal peptide sequence as previously reported. Additionally, we prepared GFP-fused N-terminal signal deletion mutants of ZmCKX2 and ZmCKX9 and clearly demonstrated that the localization pattern of these mutant forms was cytosolic/nuclear. This study provides the first complex model for spatiotemporal localization of the key enzymes of the cytokinin degradation/catabolism in monocotyledonous plants. PMID:27031423

  14. Heterologous overexpression of Glomerella cingulata FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background FAD dependent glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) currently raises enormous interest in the field of glucose biosensors. Due to its superior properties such as high turnover rate, substrate specificity and oxygen independence, GDH makes its way into glucose biosensing. The recently discovered GDH from the ascomycete Glomerella cingulata is a novel candidate for such an electrochemical application, but also of interest to study the plant-pathogen interaction of a family of wide-spread, crop destroying fungi. Heterologous expression is a necessity to facilitate the production of GDH for biotechnological applications and to study its physiological role in the outbreak of anthracnose caused by Glomerella (anamorph Colletotrichum) spp. Results Heterologous expression of active G. cingulata GDH has been achieved in both Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris, however, the expressed volumetric activity was about 4800-fold higher in P. pastoris. Expression in E. coli resulted mainly in the formation of inclusion bodies and only after co-expression with molecular chaperones enzymatic activity was detected. The fed-batch cultivation of a P. pastoris transformant resulted in an expression of 48,000 U L-1 of GDH activity (57 mg L-1). Recombinant GDH was purified by a two-step purification procedure with a yield of 71%. Comparative characterization of molecular and catalytic properties shows identical features for the GDH expressed in P. pastoris and the wild-type enzyme from its natural fungal source. Conclusions The heterologous expression of active GDH was greatly favoured in the eukaryotic host. The efficient expression in P. pastoris facilitates the production of genetically engineered GDH variants for electrochemical-, physiological- and structural studies. PMID:22151971

  15. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH-) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH- and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH+) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was ∼ 1.5-fold greater in ADH- vs. ADH+ deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH- deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  16. [Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and level of dopamine in certain sections of the brain of rats preferring and refusing ethanol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, N K

    2000-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (KF 1.2.1.3) of cytosol fractions of brain structures (hypothalamus, midbrain and new cortex) as well as dophamine content in these structures were studied in comparative aspect in rats preferring and rejection ethanol. It has been shown that there were two isoforms of aldehyde dehydrogenases (aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2) in cytosol fractions of all investigated brain structures of animals preferring ethanol while only aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 has been found in the new cotex of rats rejecting ethanol. Thus, aldehyde-dehydrogenase activity is higher in the animals preferring ethanol than in those ones rejecting ethanol. Content of dophamine in the rats preferring ethanol is higher than in those ones rejecting ethanol both in the hypothalamus and new cortex. Differences between the studied groups of animals can underlie the pathologic attraction to alcohol. PMID:10979563

  17. The effect of fullerenol C60(OH)∼30 on the alcohol dehydrogenase activity irradiated with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study the effect of X-irradiation on the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity in the presence of nanoparticles of fullerenol C60(OH)∼30 under aerobic conditions was investigated in order to assess the potential radioprotective properties of fullerenol. Fullerenol at 75 mg/mL decreased the radiation yield of inactivation of ADH irradiated with fullerenol by 20% comparing to ADH irradiated without fullerenol. Under conditions used during irradiation, 50% of ·OH radicals could react with fullerenol and 50% could react with ADH. Thus, it can be assumed that protective effect of fullerenol on the radiation inactivation of ADH was mostly due to scavenging ·OH radicals by fullerenol. Moreover, fullerenol did not protect against post-irradiation damage as the Ginact for ADH irradiated with fullerenol was still 20% lower than for ADH irradiated without fullerenol after 24 h from irradiation. Additionally, fullerenol at 75 mg/L had no influence on the activity of unirradiated ADH up to 24 h. We concluded that fullerenol C60(OH)∼30 protected ADH against radiation inactivation due to simple competition for the ·OH radicals and did not modify its activity by association with the protein as it was proved in our previous papers for erythrocyte membrane proteins. - Highlights: • Fullerenol C60(OH)∼30 itself do not modify the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). • Fullerenol protects ADH against radiation inactivation due to simple competition for the ·OH radicals. • Fullerenol has the reduced ability to prevent the formation of protein peroxides. • Since the main role in radiosensitivity of ADH is played by –SH groups, fullerenol could prevent oxidation of –SH groups by electrostatic interactions

  18. Characterization of the major dehydrogenase related to d-lactic acid synthesis in Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Park, Jung-Mi; Seo, Eunyoung; Ahn, Ji Eun; Kim, Tae-Jip; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Han, Nam Soo

    2012-10-10

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 is a lactic acid bacterium that converts pyruvate mainly to d-(-)-lactic acid by using d-(-)-lactate dehydrogenase (ldhD). The aim of this study was to identify the gene responsible for d-lactic acid formation in this organism and to characterize the enzyme to facilitate the production of optically pure d-lactic acid. A genomic analysis of L. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 revealed that 7 genes encode lactate-related dehydrogenase. According to transcriptomic, proteomic, and phylogenetic analyses, LEUM_1756 was the major gene responsible for the production of d-lactic acid. The LEUM_1756 gene, of 996bp and encoding 332 amino acids (36.5kDa), was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Star from an inducible pET-21a(+) vector. The enzyme was purified by Ni-NTA column chromatography and showed a specific activity of 4450U/mg, significantly higher than those of other previously reported ldhDs. The gel permeation chromatography analysis showed that the purified enzyme exists as tetramers in solution and this was the first report among lactic acid bacteria. The pH and temperature optima were pH 8.0 and 30°C, respectively, for the pyruvate reduction reaction, and pH 11.0 and 20°C, respectively, for the lactate oxidation reaction. The K(m) kinetic parameters for pyruvate and lactate were 0.58mM and 260mM, respectively. In addition, the k(cat) values for pyruvate and lactate were 2900s(-1) and 2280s(-1), respectively. The enzyme was not inhibited by Ca(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Na(+), or urea, but was inhibited by 1mM Zn(2+) and 1mM SDS. PMID:22975125

  19. The conserved Lysine69 residue plays a catalytic role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Valnês

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shikimate pathway is an attractive target for the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, but absent in humans. M. tuberculosis aroE-encoded shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the forth reaction in the shikimate pathway. Structural and functional studies indicate that Lysine69 may be involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding in M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Investigation of the kinetic properties of mutant enzymes can bring important insights about the role of amino acid residues for M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Findings We have performed site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetics, equilibrium binding measurements and molecular modeling for both the wild-type M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase and the K69A mutant enzymes. The apparent steady-state kinetic parameters for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase were determined; the catalytic constant value for the wild-type enzyme (50 s-1 is 68-fold larger than that for the mutant K69A (0.73 s-1. There was a modest increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for DHS (K69A = 76 μM; wild-type = 29 μM and NADPH (K69A = 30 μM; wild-type = 11 μM. The equilibrium dissociation constants for wild-type and K69A mutant enzymes are 32 (± 4 μM and 134 (± 21, respectively. Conclusion Our results show that the residue Lysine69 plays a catalytic role and is not involved in substrate binding for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. These efforts on M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase catalytic mechanism determination should help the rational design of specific inhibitors, aiming at the development of antitubercular drugs.

  20. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  1. Cloning of the Arabidopsis and Rice Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Implications for the Origin of Plant Adh Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Dolferus, R; Osterman, J. C.; Peacock, W. J.; Dennis, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the cloning of the genes encoding the Arabidopsis and rice class III ADH enzymes, members of the alcohol dehydrogenase or medium chain reductase/dehydrogenase superfamily of proteins with glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity (GSH-FDH). Both genes contain eight introns in exactly the same positions, and these positions are conserved in plant ethanol-active Adh genes (class P). These data provide further evidence that plant class P genes have evolved fr...

  2. Solution structures of lipoyl domains of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Azotobacter vinelandii. Implications for molecular recognition.

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, A.

    1997-01-01

    The 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes are large multienzyme complexes that catalyse the irreversible oxidative decarboxylation of a specific 2-oxo acid to the corresponding acyl-CoA derivative. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) converts the product of the glycolysis, pyruvate, to acetyl-CoA, which enters the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC functions in the tricarboxylic acid cycle itself by converting 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl-CoA. The branc...

  3. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonam, D; Lehman, L.; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1989-01-01

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of [35S]methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo an...

  4. Purification and characterization of ribitol-5-phosphate and xylitol-5-phosphate dehydrogenases from strains of Lactobacillus casei.

    OpenAIRE

    Hausman, S Z; London, J

    1987-01-01

    A simple three-step procedure is described which yields electrophoretically homogeneous preparations of ribitol-5-phosphate dehydrogenase and xylitol-5-phosphate dehydrogenase. The former enzyme is a 115,000-molecular-weight protein composed of two subunits of identical size and is specific for its substrate, ribitol. The xylitol-5-phosphate dehydrogenase exists as a tetrameric protein with a molecular weight of 180,000; this enzyme oxidizes the phosphate esters of both xylitol and D-arabitol...

  5. Tear Malate Dehydrogenase,Lactate Dehydrogenase and Their Isoenzymes in Normal Chinese Subjects and Patients of Ocular Surface Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QingGuo; HanchengZhang

    1995-01-01

    Purose:To determine levels of malate dehydrogenase(MDH),lactate dehydroge-nase(LDH)and their isoenzymes in tears of normal Chinese subjects and patients with ocular surface disorders.Methods:The age range of normal subjects was10-88,with136mal and 128fe-male subjects.123patients suffered from ocular surface disorders.Tears were col-lected from lower fornix on Xinghua filter disc(0.1mm thick,5mm in diameter).The values of tearMDHand LDHwere determined by MONARCH-2000Ana-lyzer(U.S.A)Their isoenzymes were separated by acetate cellulose elec-trophoresis and were determined by Model CDS-200light densitometer.Results:The normal values of tear LDH and MDH were 45.51+23.00-81.35+37.84umol·s-1/Land11.00+5.33-19.50+9.17umol·s-1/Lrespectively,dis-regarding sex or eye distriction(P>0.05).The values of tear LDHandMDH in the group aged10-19were significantly lower than in another groups(P<0.05),95%normal ranges of tearMDHaged below19and above20were3.63-19.90umol·s-1/L.THe MDH isoenzymes comprised MDHs and MDHm,the former accounting for80.0-89.1%.The LDH isoenzymes comprised 5varieties.of which the ratioH/Mof subunit H tosubunit Mwas0.196+0.02.Levels of tear LDH,MDHand their isoenzymes in different diseases were various.Conclusions;Tear LDH/MDHratio reflected sensitively the matabolism of corneae and conjunetival epithelium.The changes in LDH isoenzymes were hel-ful to the differential diagnosis of external eye diseases,and the increase of MDHm reflected sensitively the degree of injury to the corneal epithelium.

  6. Galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  7. Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase and Related Molybdenum Enzymes Involved in Oxygen-Independent Alkyl Chain Hydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Johann; Szaleniec, Maciej; Sünwoldt, Katharina; Boll, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase initiates the anaerobic bacterial degradation of ethylbenzene and propylbenzene. Although the enzyme is currently only known from a few closely related denitrifying bacterial strains affiliated to the Rhodocyclaceae, it clearly marks a universally occurring mechanism used for attacking recalcitrant substrates in the absence of oxygen. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase belongs to subfamily 2 of the DMSO reductase-type molybdenum enzymes together with paralogous enzymes involved in the oxygen-independent hydroxylation of p-cymene, the isoprenoid side chains of sterols and even possibly n-alkanes; the subfamily also extends to dimethylsulfide dehydrogenases, selenite, chlorate and perchlorate reductases and, most significantly, dissimilatory nitrate reductases. The biochemical, spectroscopic and structural properties of the oxygen-independent hydroxylases among these enzymes are summarized and compared. All of them consist of three subunits, contain a molybdenum-bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide cofactor, five Fe-S clusters and a heme b cofactor of unusual ligation, and are localized in the periplasmic space as soluble enzymes. In the case of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, it has been determined that the heme b cofactor has a rather high redox potential, which may also be inferred for the paralogous hydroxylases. The known structure of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase allowed the calculation of detailed models of the reaction mechanism based on the density function theory as well as QM-MM (quantum mechanics - molecular mechanics) methods, which yield predictions of mechanistic properties such as kinetic isotope effects that appeared consistent with experimental data. PMID:26960184

  8. Construction of Mutant Glucose Oxidases with Increased Dye-Mediated Dehydrogenase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sode

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutagenesis studies on glucose oxidases (GOxs were conducted to construct GOxs with reduced oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity. We focused on two representative GOxs, of which crystal structures have already been reported—Penicillium amagasakiense GOx (PDB ID; 1gpe and Aspergillus niger GOx (PDB ID; 1cf3. We constructed oxygen-interacting structural models for GOxs, and predicted the residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen on the basis of the crystal structure of cholesterol oxidase as well as on the fact that both enzymes are members of the glucose/methanol/choline (GMC oxidoreductase family. Rational amino acid substitution resulted in the construction of an engineered GOx with drastically decreased oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity, which was higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. As a result, the dehydrogenase/oxidase ratio of the engineered enzyme was more than 11-fold greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. These results indicate that alteration of the dehydrogenase/oxidase activity ratio of GOxs is possible by introducing a mutation into the putative functional residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen of these enzymes, resulting in a further increased dehydrogenase activity. This is the first study reporting the alteration of GOx electron acceptor preference from oxygen to an artificial electron acceptor.

  9. Nickel-specific, slow-binding inhibition of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum by cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inhibition of purified carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum by cyanide was investigated in both the presence and absence of CO and electron acceptor. The inhibition was a time-dependent process exhibiting pseudo-first-order kinetics under both sets of conditions. The true second-order rate constants for inhibition were 72.2 M-1 s-1 with both substrates present and 48.9 and 79.5 M-1 s-1, respectively, for the reduced and oxidized enzymes incubated with cyanide. CO partially protected the enzyme against inhibition after 25-min incubation with 100 μM KCN. Dissociation constants of 8.46 μM (KCN) and 4.70 μM (CO) were calculated for the binding of cyanide and CO to the enzyme. Cyanide inhibition was fully reversible under an atmosphere of CO after removal of unbound cyanide. N2 was unable to reverse the inhibition. The competence of nickel-deficient (apo) CO dehydrogenase to undergo activation by NiCl2 was unaffected by prior incubation with cyanide. Cyanide inhibition of holo-CO dehydrogenase was not reversed by addition of NiCl2. 14CN- remained associated with holoenzyme but not with apoenzyme through gel filtration chromatography. These findings suggest that cyanide is a slow-binding, active-site-directed, nickel-specific, reversible inhibitor of CO dehydrogenase. The authors propose that cyanide inhibits CO dehydrogenase by being a analogue of CO and by binding through enzyme-bound nickel

  10. D- and L-lactate dehydrogenases during invertebrate evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stillman Jonathon H

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The L-lactate and D-lactate dehydrogenases, which are involved in the reduction of pyruvate to L(--lactate and D(+-lactate, belong to evolutionarily unrelated enzyme families. The genes encoding L-LDH have been used as a model for gene duplication due to the multiple paralogs found in eubacteria, archaebacteria, and eukaryotes. Phylogenetic studies have suggested that several gene duplication events led to the main isozymes of this gene family in chordates, but little is known about the evolution of L-Ldh in invertebrates. While most invertebrates preferentially oxidize L-lactic acid, several species of mollusks, a few arthropods and polychaetes were found to have exclusively D-LDH enzymatic activity. Therefore, it has been suggested that L-LDH and D-LDH are mutually exclusive. However, recent characterization of putative mammalian D-LDH with significant similarity to yeast proteins showing D-LDH activity suggests that at least mammals have the two naturally occurring forms of LDH specific to L- and D-lactate. This study describes the phylogenetic relationships of invertebrate L-LDH and D-LDH with special emphasis on crustaceans, and discusses gene duplication events during the evolution of L-Ldh. Results Our phylogenetic analyses of L-LDH in vertebrates are consistent with the general view that the main isozymes (LDH-A, LDH-B and LDH-C evolved through a series of gene duplications after the vertebrates diverged from tunicates. We report several gene duplication events in the crustacean, Daphnia pulex, and the leech, Helobdella robusta. Several amino acid sequences with strong similarity to putative mammalian D-LDH and to yeast DLD1 with D-LDH activity were found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Conclusion The presence of both L-Ldh and D-Ldh genes in several chordates and invertebrates suggests that the two enzymatic forms are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Although, the evolution of L-Ldh has been punctuated by

  11. Relationship Between Polymorphism of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase and Congenital Heart Defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUN CHENG; WEN-LI ZHU; JING-JING DAO; SHU-QING LI; YONG LI

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between G1958A gene polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) and occurrence of congenital heart disease (CHD) in North China. Methods One hundred and ninety-two CHD patients and their parents were included in this study as case group in Liaoning Province by birth defect registration cards, and 124 healthy subjects (age and gender matched) and their parents were simultaneously selected from the same geographic area as control. Their gene polymorphism of MTHFD G1958A locus was examined with PCR-RFLP, and serum folic acid and homocysteine (Hcy) levels were tested with radio-immunoassay and fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). Results There existed gene polymorphism at MTHFD G1958A locus in healthy subjects living in North China. The percentages of GG, GA, and AA genotype were 57.98%, 35.57%, and 6.45% respectively, and the A allele frequency was 24.23%, which was significantly different from Western population. No difference was observed when comparing genotype distribution and allele frequency between the case and control groups, so was the result from the comparison between genders. The A allele frequency of arterial septal defect patients' mothers (10.87%) was significantly lower than that of controls (28.15%) (P=0.014), with OR=0.31 (95% CI: 0.09-0.84), and no difference in the other subgroups. The percentage of at least one parent carrying A allele in arterial septal defect subgroup (43.48%) was significantly lower than that in controls (69.64%) (P=0.017), with OR=0.34 (95% CI: 0.12-0.92). The analysis of genetic transmission indicated that there was no transmission disequillibrium in CHD nuclear families. Their serum folic acid level was significantly higher than that of controls (P=0.000), and Hcy level of the former was higher than that of the latter with no statistical significance (P>0.05). Serum Hcy and folic acid levels of mothers with gene mutation were lower than those of mothers

  12. Structure of a highly NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Navdeep S; Delbaere, Louis T J; Sheldrick, George M

    2011-10-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase catalyzes the first oxidative and decarboxylation steps in the citric acid cycle. It also lies at a crucial bifurcation point between CO2-generating steps in the cycle and carbon-conserving steps in the glyoxylate bypass. Hence, the enzyme is a focus of regulation. The bacterial enzyme is typically dependent on the coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. The monomeric enzyme from Corynebacterium glutamicum is highly specific towards this coenzyme and the substrate isocitrate while retaining a high overall efficiency. Here, a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with its coenzyme and the cofactor Mg2+ is reported. Coenzyme specificity is mediated by interactions with the negatively charged 2'-phosphate group, which is surrounded by the side chains of two arginines, one histidine and, via a water, one lysine residue, forming ion pairs and hydrogen bonds. Comparison with a previous apoenzyme structure indicates that the binding site is essentially preconfigured for coenzyme binding. In a second enzyme molecule in the asymmetric unit negatively charged aspartate and glutamate residues from a symmetry-related enzyme molecule interact with the positively charged arginines, abolishing coenzyme binding. The holoenzyme from C. glutamicum displays a 36° interdomain hinge-opening movement relative to the only previous holoenzyme structure of the monomeric enzyme: that from Azotobacter vinelandii. As a result, the active site is not blocked by the bound coenzyme as in the closed conformation of the latter, but is accessible to the substrate isocitrate. However, the substrate-binding site is disrupted in the open conformation. Hinge points could be pinpointed for the two molecules in the same crystal, which show a 13° hinge-bending movement relative to each other. One of the two pairs of hinge residues is intimately flanked on both sides by the isocitrate-binding site. This suggests that binding of a relatively

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Nigerian children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatundun Williams

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (561 males and 561 females aged 1 month to 15 years. The mean age was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Children of Yoruba ethnicity made up the largest group (77.5% followed by those Igbo descent (10.6% and those of Igede (10.2% and Tiv (1.8% ethnicity. G6PD status was determined using the fluorescent spot method. We found that the overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency was 15.3% (24.1% in males, 6.6% in females. Yoruba children had a higher prevalence (16.9% than Igede (10.5%, Igbo (10.1% and Tiv (5.0% children. The odds of G6PD deficiency were 0.38 times as high in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children (p=0.0500. The odds for Igede and Tiv children were not significantly different from Yoruba children (p=0.7528 and 0.9789 respectively. Mean oxygen saturation, heart rate and hematocrit were not significantly different in G6PD deficient and G6PD sufficient children. The odds of being G6PD deficient were 2.1 times higher in children with scleral icterus than those without (p=0.0351. In conclusion, we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Nigerian sub-populations. The odds of G6PD deficiency were decreased in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children. There was no association between vital parameters or hematocrit and G6PD deficiency. We found that a history of scleral icterus may increase the odds of G6PD deficiency, but we did not exclude other common causes of icterus such as sickle cell disease or malarial infection.

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Nigerian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Olatundun; Gbadero, Daniel; Edowhorhu, Grace; Brearley, Ann; Slusher, Tina; Lund, Troy C

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and in Sub-Saharan Africa, is a significant cause of infection- and drug-induced hemolysis and neonatal jaundice. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency among Nigerian children of different ethnic backgrounds and to identify predictors of G6PD deficiency by analyzing vital signs and hematocrit and by asking screening questions about symptoms of hemolysis. We studied 1,122 children (561 males and 561 females) aged 1 month to 15 years. The mean age was 7.4 ± 3.2 years. Children of Yoruba ethnicity made up the largest group (77.5%) followed by those Igbo descent (10.6%) and those of Igede (10.2%) and Tiv (1.8%) ethnicity. G6PD status was determined using the fluorescent spot method. We found that the overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency was 15.3% (24.1% in males, 6.6% in females). Yoruba children had a higher prevalence (16.9%) than Igede (10.5%), Igbo (10.1%) and Tiv (5.0%) children. The odds of G6PD deficiency were 0.38 times as high in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children (p=0.0500). The odds for Igede and Tiv children were not significantly different from Yoruba children (p=0.7528 and 0.9789 respectively). Mean oxygen saturation, heart rate and hematocrit were not significantly different in G6PD deficient and G6PD sufficient children. The odds of being G6PD deficient were 2.1 times higher in children with scleral icterus than those without (p=0.0351). In conclusion, we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Nigerian sub-populations. The odds of G6PD deficiency were decreased in Igbo children compared to Yoruba children. There was no association between vital parameters or hematocrit and G6PD deficiency. We found that a history of scleral icterus may increase the odds of G6PD deficiency, but we did not exclude other common causes of icterus such as sickle cell disease or malarial infection. PMID:23874768

  15. Comparison of the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase and the xylose isomerase pathways for xylose fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhumaa, Kaisa; Sanchez, Rosa Garcia; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie-F

    2007-01-01

    Background Two heterologous pathways have been used to construct recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: i) the xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) pathway and ii) the xylose isomerase (XI) pathway. In the present study, the Pichia stipitis XR-XDH pathway and the Piromyces XI pathway were compared in an isogenic strain background, using a laboratory host strain with genetic modifications known to improve xylose fermentation (overexpressed xylulokinase, overexpressed non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and deletion of the aldose reductase gene GRE3). The two isogenic strains and the industrial xylose-fermenting strain TMB 3400 were studied regarding their xylose fermentation capacity in defined mineral medium and in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Results In defined mineral medium, the xylose consumption rate, the specific ethanol productivity, and the final ethanol concentration were significantly higher in the XR- and XDH-carrying strain, whereas the highest ethanol yield was achieved with the strain carrying XI. While the laboratory strains only fermented a minor fraction of glucose in the undetoxified lignocellulose hydrolysate, the industrial strain TMB 3400 fermented nearly all the sugar available. Xylitol was formed by the XR-XDH-carrying strains only in mineral medium, whereas in lignocellulose hydrolysate no xylitol formation was detected. Conclusion Despite by-product formation, the XR-XDH xylose utilization pathway resulted in faster ethanol production than using the best presently reported XI pathway in the strain background investigated. The need for robust industrial yeast strains for fermentation of undetoxified spruce hydrolysates was also confirmed. PMID:17280608

  16. Expression of Aeromonas caviae ST pyruvate dehydrogenase complex components mediate tellurite resistance in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potassium tellurite (K2TeO3) is harmful to most organisms and specific mechanisms explaining its toxicity are not well known to date. We previously reported that the lpdA gene product of the tellurite-resistant environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST is involved in the reduction of tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, we show that expression of A. caviae ST aceE, aceF, and lpdA genes, encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide transacetylase, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, respectively, results in tellurite resistance and decreased levels of tellurite-induced superoxide in Escherichia coli. In addition to oxidative damage resulting from tellurite exposure, a metabolic disorder would be simultaneously established in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex would represent an intracellular tellurite target. These results allow us to widen our vision regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial tellurite resistance by correlating tellurite toxicity and key enzymes of aerobic metabolism.

  17. Structural and biochemical insights into 7β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase stereoselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Simone; Ferrandi, Erica Elisa; Forneris, Federico; Rovida, Stefano; Riva, Sergio; Monti, Daniela; Mattevi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases are of great interest as biocatalysts for transformations involving steroid substrates. They feature a high degree of stereo- and regio-selectivity, acting on a defined atom with a specific configuration of the steroid nucleus. The crystal structure of 7β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Collinsella aerofaciens reveals a loop gating active-site accessibility, the bases of the specificity for NADP(+) , and the general architecture of the steroid binding site. Comparison with 7α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase provides a rationale for the opposite stereoselectivity. The presence of a C-terminal extension reshapes the substrate site of the β-selective enzyme, possibly leading to an inverted orientation of the bound substrate. Proteins 2016; 84:859-865. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27006087

  18. Cloning and expression of glucose 3-dehydrogenase from Halomonas sp. alpha-15 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, K; Tsugawa, W; Sode, K

    2001-03-23

    The gene encoding glucose 3-dehydrogenase (G3DH) from Halomonas sp. alpha-15 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. An open reading frame of 1686 nucleotides was shown to encode G3DH. The flavine adenine dinucleotide binding motif was found in the N-terminal region of G3DH. The deduced primary structure of G3DH showed about 30% identity to sorbitol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans and 2-keto-d-gluconate dehydrogenases from Erwinia herbicola and Pantoea citrea. The folding prediction of G3DH suggested that the 3D structure of G3DH was similar with cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sterolicum or glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger. PMID:11263965

  19. Global gene expression analysis of glucose overflow metabolism in Escherichia coli and reduction of aerobic acetate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Andrea; Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F

    2007-02-01

    During aerobic growth on glucose, Escherichia coli produces acetate in the so-called overflow metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was used to determine the global gene expression patterns of chemostat cultivations of E. coli MG1655 that were characterized by different acetate formation rates during aerobic growth on glucose. A correlation analysis identified that expression of ten genes (sdhCDAB, sucB, sucC, acnB, lpdA, fumC and mdh) encoding the TCA cycle enzymes succinate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinyl-CoA synthetase, aconitase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase, respectively, and of the acs-yjcH-actP operon for acetate utilization correlated negatively with acetate formation. Relieving transcriptional control of the sdhCDAB-b0725-sucABCD operon by chromosomal promoter exchange mutagenesis yielded a strain with increased specific activities of the TCA cycle enzymes succinate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase, which are encoded by this operon. The resulting strain produced less acetate and directed more carbon towards carbon dioxide formation than the parent strain MG1655 while maintaining high growth and glucose consumption rates. PMID:17273855

  20. Triiodothyronine (T3)-associated upregulation and downregulation of nuclear T3 binding in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5)--stimulation of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase, and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase by insulin, but not by T3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The specific nuclear binding of triiodothyronine (T3) (NBT3) and the activity of malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD), and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase (6PGD) were studied in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5). The overall apparent binding affinity (Ka) was 2.7 x 10(9) L...

  1. Effect of the allelic variants of aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH2*2 and alcohol dehydrogenase ADH1B*2 on blood acetaldehyde concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Giia-Sheun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alcoholism is a complex behavioural disorder. Molecular genetics studies have identified numerous candidate genes associated with alcoholism. It is crucial to verify the disease susceptibility genes by correlating the pinpointed allelic variations to the causal phenotypes. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH are the principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. Both ADH and ALDH exhibit functional polymorphisms among racial populations; these polymorphisms have been shown to be the important genetic determinants in ethanol metabolism and alcoholism. Here, we briefly review recent advances in genomic studies of human ADH/ALDH families and alcoholism, with an emphasis on the pharmacogenetic consequences of venous blood acetaldehyde in the different ALDH2 genotypes following the intake of various doses of ethanol. This paper illustrates a paradigmatic example of phenotypic verifications in a protective disease gene for substance abuse.

  2. Three-dimensional structures of the three human class I alcohol dehydrogenases

    OpenAIRE

    Niederhut, Monica S.; Gibbons, Brian J.; Perez-Miller, Samantha; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2001-01-01

    In contrast with other animal species, humans possess three distinct genes for class I alcohol dehydrogenase and show polymorphic variation in the ADH1B and ADH1C genes. The three class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes share ∼93% sequence identity but differ in their substrate specificity and their developmental expression. We report here the first three-dimensional structures for the ADH1A and ADH1C*2 gene products at 2.5 and 2.0 Å, respectively, and the structure of the ADH1B*1 gene produ...

  3. Coenzyme A-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592.

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, R T; Chen, J S

    1990-01-01

    Acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde are substrates for alcohol dehydrogenase in the production of ethanol and 1-butanol by solvent-producing clostridia. A coenzyme A (CoA)-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which also converts acyl-CoA to aldehyde and CoA, has been purified under anaerobic conditions from Clostridium beijerinckii NRRL B592. The ALDH showed a native molecular weight (Mr) of 100,000 and a subunit Mr of 55,000, suggesting that ALDH is dimeric. Purified ALDH contained no alcohol...

  4. Mutations in the medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanaka, K; Yokota, I; Coates, P M; Strauss, A W; Kelly, D P; Zhang, Z; Gregersen, N; Andresen, B S; Matsubara, Y; Curtis, D

    1992-01-01

    Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) catalyzes the first reaction of the beta-oxidation cycle for 4-10-carbon fatty acids. MCAD deficiency is one of the most frequent inborn metabolic disorders in populations of northwestern European origin. In the compilation of data from a worldwide study......, which causes impairment of tetramer assembly and instability of the protein. Three of 7 rarer mutations have been identified in a few unrelated patients, while the remaining 4 have each been found in only a single pedigree. In addition to tabulating the mutations, the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase gene family...

  5. NAD- and NADP-dependent 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases from bacteroides fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, I A; Williams, C N; Mahony, D E; Christie, W M

    1975-03-28

    Twenty strains of Bacteroides fragilis were screened for hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase activity in cell-free preparations. Eighteen strains were shown to contain NAD-dependent 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Sixteen of the strains containing the NAD-dependent enzyme also contained NADP-depedent 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, but invariably in lesser amounts. A strain particulary rich in both 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities was selected for further study. Measurement of activity as a function of pH revealed a fairly sharp optimal activity range of 9.5--10.0 for the NAD-dependent enzyme and a broad flat optimal range of 7.0--9.0 for the NADP-dependent enzyme. Michaelis constants for trihydroxy-bile acids for the NAD-dependent enzyme were in the range of 0.32--0.34 mM, whereas dihydroxy-bile acids gave a Km of 0.1 mM. Thin-layer chromatography studies on the oxidation product of 3alpha, 7alpha-dihydroxy-5beta-cholanoic acid (chenodeoxycholic acid) by the dehydrogenase revealed a band corresponding to that of synthetic 3alpha-hydroxy, 7-keto-5beta-cholanoic acid. Similarly the oxidation product of chenodeoxycholic acid by both 7alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and commercially available 3alpha-hy-droxysteroid dehydrogenase revealed a band corresponding to that of synthetic 3,7-diketo-5beta-cholanoic acid. Neither of these two oxidation products could be distinguished from those by the Escherichia coli dehydrogenase oxidation previously reported. Disc-gel electrophoresis of a cell-free lyophilized preparation indicated one active band for NAD-dependent activity of mobility similar to that for the NADP-dependent E. coli enzyme. The NADP-dependent dehydrogenase was unstable and rapidly lost activity after polyacylamide disc-gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, freezing on refrigeration at 4 degrees C. No 3 alpha- or 12alpha-oriented oxidoreductase activity was demonstrated in any of the strains examined. PMID:236764

  6. Affinity purifications of aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from the xylose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolen, P.L.; Roth, K.A.; Freer, S.N.

    1986-10-01

    Although xylose is a major product of hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, few yeasts are able to convert it to ethanol. In Pachysolen tannophilus, one of the few xylose-fermenting yeasts found, aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase were found to be key enzymes in the metabolic pathway for xylose fermentation. This paper presents a method for the rapid and simultaneous purification of both aldose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase from P. tannophilus. Preliminary studies indicate that this method may be easily adapted to purify similar enzymes from other xylose-fermenting yeasts.

  7. Alcohol dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, M E; Finnerty, W R

    1985-01-01

    Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. ADH-A and ADH-B were distinguished on the basis of electrophoretic mobility, pyridine nucleotide cofactor requirement, and substrate specificity. ADH-A is a soluble, NAD-linked, inducible ethanol dehydrogenase (EDH) exhibiting an apparent Km for ethanol of 512 microM and a Vmax of 138 nmol/min. An ethanol-negative mutant (Eth1) was isolated which contained 6.5% of wild-type EDH activity and was deficien...

  8. 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency associated with autism and mental retardation: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanavin, Øjvind; Woldseth, Berit; Jellum, Egil;

    2007-01-01

    changing the +3 position of intron 3 (c.303+3A > G) in the SBCAD gene. Psychometric testing showed moderate mental retardation and behavioral scores within the autistic spectrum. No beneficial effect was detected after 5 months with a low protein diet. CONCLUSION: This mutation was also found in two......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency or short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SBCADD) is caused by a defect in the degradation pathway of the amino acid L-isoleucine. METHODS: We report a four-year-old mentally retarded Somali boy with autism and a...

  9. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented. PMID:3593337

  10. Simulated ischaemia-reperfusion conditions increase xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Virgili, M; Abbondanza, A; Contestabile, A

    1998-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities increased by 87% in rat brain slices after 30 min in vitro ischaemia. A further 41% increase was induced by 30 min simulated reperfusion of ischaemic slices. No conversion from the dehydrogenase to the oxidase activity was observed. The increment of enzyme activity was not due to neosynthesis of the enzyme, since it was not affected by the addition of cycloheximide during the ischaemic incubation. The increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could aggravate the ischaemic brain injury by free radicals production, in particular after reperfusion. PMID:9460697

  11. Excitotoxic increase of xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase in the rat olfactory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Abbondanza, A; Virgili, M; Contestabile, A; Stirpe, F

    1995-05-26

    Excitotoxic lesions induced by systemic injection of kainic acid, resulted in 2-3-fold increase of xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase activities in the rat olfactory cortex 48-72 h after drug administration. A significant increase of the xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase ratio was also observed at 4 and 48 h post-injection. No similar changes were noticed in the hippocampus. The enhancement of enzyme activity seems to be primarily a consequence of the altered cell composition in damaged area. Free radicals produced by the increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could in turn aggravate the excitotoxic brain injury. PMID:7656426

  12. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of glucose dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) protein from T. thermophilus HB8 was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. GDH crystals belong to space group P21 and diffract to 1.9 Å resolution. Thermus thermophilus is an aerobic chemoorganotroph that has been found to grow anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. Crystals of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from T. thermophilus HB8 belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 36.90, b = 132.96, c = 60.78 Å, β = 97.2°. Preliminary studies and molecular-replacement calculations reveal that the asymmetric unit contains two monomers

  13. Non-redundant functions of two proline dehydrogenase isoforms in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Müller Gudrun; Eckard Sonja; Funck Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Proline (Pro) accumulation is a widespread response of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells subjected to osmotic stress or dehydration. When the cells are released from stress, Pro is degraded to glutamate by Pro-dehydrogenase (ProDH) and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH), which are both mitochondrial enzymes in eukaryotes. While P5CDH is a single copy gene in Arabidopsis, two ProDH genes have been identified in the genome. Until now, only ProDH1 (At3g30775) had be...

  14. Lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus mutans: purification, characterization, and crossed antigenicity with lactate dehydrogenases from Lactobacillus casei, Actinomyces viscosus, and Streptococcus sanguis.

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, P; Klein, J P; Schöller, M; Van Frank, R M

    1985-01-01

    A cytoplasmic fructose-1,6-diphosphate-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) from Streptococcus mutans OMZ175 was purified to homogeneity as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. The purification consisted of ammonium sulfate precipitation of the cytoplasmic fraction, DEAE-Sephacel and Blue-Sepharose CL.6B chromatography, and Sephacryl S200 gel permeation. The catalytic activity of the purified enzyme required the presence of fructose-1,6-diphosphate with a broad ...

  15. Two Zebrafish Alcohol Dehydrogenases Share Common Ancestry with Mammalian Class I, II, IV, and V Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genes but Have Distinct Functional Characteristics*

    OpenAIRE

    Reimers, Mark J.; Hahn, Mark E.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Ethanol is teratogenic to many vertebrates. We are utilizing zebrafish as a model system to determine whether there is an association between ethanol metabolism and ethanol-mediated developmental toxicity. Here we report the isolation and characterization of two cDNAs encoding zebrafish alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). Phylogenetic analysis of these zebrafish ADHs indicates that they share a common ancestor with mammalian class I, II, IV, and V ADHs. The genes encoding these zebrafish ADHs have...

  16. Function, kinetic properties, crystallization, and regulation of microbial malate dehydrogenase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tóshiko TAKAHASHI-ÍÑIGUEZ; Nelly ABURTO-RODRÍGUEZ; Ana Laura VILCHIS-GONZÁLEZ; María Elena FLORES

    2016-01-01

    题目:微生物苹果酸脱氢酶的功能、动力学特征、晶体结构以及调控概苹果酸脱氢酶(MDH)广泛存在于动物、植物以及微生物体内,是生物体进行糖代谢的关键酶之一。在辅酶I(NAD+)或辅酶II(NADP+)的作用下,能够催化草酰乙酸和苹果酸之间相互转化。虽然目前真核微生物中MDH已被广泛研究,但是对原核生物中的这种酶却鲜有报道。因此,有必要对MDH的相关研究信息进行综述,以期更好地了解这种酶的功能。本文综述了细菌相关研究的各种数据信息,进一步挖掘MDH的分子多样性,包括分子量、低聚态、辅因子与底物的结合力,以及酶反应方向的差异等。通过对不同细菌来源的MDH的晶体结构的分析,可鉴别底物与辅因子结合的部位以及形成二聚体的重要残基。对这些结构信息的了解将有利于指导研究人员对酶的结构进行修饰从而提高其催化能力,比如增加酶的活性、辅助因子的结合能力、底物特异性和热稳定性等。另外,本文通过分析比较MDH 系统发生树的重建,将其蛋白超家族分成两个主分支,同时在古生菌、细菌和真核微生物等不同细胞的MDH之间建立联系。%Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme widely distributed among living organisms and is a key protein in the central oxidative pathway. It catalyzes the interconversion between malate and oxaloacetate using NAD+ or NADP+ as a cofactor. Surprisingly, this enzyme has been extensively studied in eukaryotes but there are few reports about this enzyme in prokaryotes. It is necessary to review the relevant information to gain a better understanding of the function of this enzyme. Our review of the data generated from studies in bacteria shows much diversity in their molecular properties, including weight, oligomeric states, cofactor and substrate binding affinities, as wel as differ-ences in the direction

  17. Analysis of Quaternary Structure of a [LDH-like] Malate Dehydrogenase of Plasmodium falciparum with Oligomeric Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    L-Malate dehydrogenase (PfMDH) from Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent for the most severe form of malaria, has shown remarkable similarities to L-lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH). PfMDH is more closely related to [LDH-like] MDHs characterized in archea and other prokaryotes. Initial sequence a...

  18. X-ray crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yennawar, Hemant; Møller, Magda; Gillilan, Richard; Yennawar, Neela

    The X-ray crystal structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (slSDH) has been determined using the crystal structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (hSDH) as a molecular-replacement model. slSDH crystallized in space group I222 with one monomer in the asymmetric unit. A conserved tetramer...

  19. 2-Methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: functional and molecular studies on a defect in isoleucine catabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, Jörn Oliver; Ensenauer, Regina; Röschinger, Wulf; Reich, Horst; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Schirrmacher, Oliver; Engel, Katharina; Häberle, Johannes; Andresen, Brage Storstein; Mégarbané, André; Lehnert, Willy; Zschocke, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    2-Methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (MBD; coded by the ACADSB gene) catalyzes the step in isoleucine metabolism that corresponds to the isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase reaction in the degradation of leucine. Deficiencies of both enzymes may be detected by expanded neonatal screening with tandem-mass s...

  20. Catalytic mechanism of Zn2+-dependent polyol dehydrogenases: kinetic comparison of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase with wild-type and Glu154→Cys forms of yeast xylitol dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimacek, Mario; Hellmer, Heidemarie; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Co-ordination of catalytic Zn2+ in sorbitol/xylitol dehydrogenases of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily involves direct or water-mediated interactions from a glutamic acid residue, which substitutes a homologous cysteine ligand in alcohol dehydrogenases of the yeast and liver type. Glu154 of xylitol dehydrogenase from the yeast Galactocandida mastotermitis (termed GmXDH) was mutated to a cysteine residue (E154C) to revert this replacement. In spite of their variable Zn2+ content (0.10–0.40 atom/subunit), purified preparations of E154C exhibited a constant catalytic Zn2+ centre activity (kcat) of 1.19±0.03 s−1 and did not require exogenous Zn2+ for activity or stability. E154C retained 0.019±0.003% and 0.74±0.03% of wild-type catalytic efficiency (kcat/Ksorbitol=7800±700 M−1· s−1) and kcat (=161±4 s−1) for NAD+-dependent oxidation of sorbitol at 25 °C respectively. The pH profile of kcat/Ksorbitol for E154C decreased below an apparent pK of 9.1±0.3, reflecting a shift in pK by about +1.7–1.9 pH units compared with the corresponding pH profiles for GmXDH and sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (termed slSDH). The difference in pK for profiles determined in 1H2O and 2H2O solvent was similar and unusually small for all three enzymes (≈+0.2 log units), suggesting that the observed pK in the binary enzyme–NAD+ complexes could be due to Zn2+-bound water. Under conditions eliminating their different pH-dependences, wild-type and mutant GmXDH displayed similar primary and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects of 1.7±0.2 (E154C, 1.7±0.1) and 1.9±0.3 (E154C, 2.4±0.2) on kcat/Ksorbitol respectively. Transient kinetic studies of NAD+ reduction and proton release during sorbitol oxidation by slSDH at pH 8.2 show that two protons are lost with a rate constant of 687±12 s−1 in the pre-steady state, which features a turnover of 0.9±0.1 enzyme equivalents as NADH was produced with a rate constant of 409±3 s−1. The

  1. Correlation of viral RNA biosynthesis with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and host resistance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šindelář, Luděk; Šindelářová, Milada

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 215, - (2002), s. 862-869. ISSN 0032-0935 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/99/1264 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase * Nicotiana (viral infection) * Plant viruses Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.960, year: 2002

  2. Cloning and characterization of a thermostable xylitol dehydrogenase from Rhizobium etli CFN42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Moon, Hee-Jung; Jeya, Marimuthu;

    2010-01-01

    An NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase from Rhizobium etli CFN42 (ReXDH) was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 1,044 bp, capable of encoding a polypeptide of 347 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 35...

  3. Microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer and association with thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase expression

    OpenAIRE

    Kruhøffer Mogens; Vainer Ben; Jensen Søren A; Sørensen Jens B

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Microsatellite instability (MSI) refers to mutations in short motifs of tandemly repeated nucleotides resulting from replication errors and deficient mismatch repair (MMR). Colorectal cancer with MSI has characteristic biology and chemosensitivity, however the molecular basis remains unclarified. The association of MSI and MMR status with outcome and with thymidylate synthase (TS) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) expression in colorectal cancer were evaluated. Met...

  4. Modification of Rhizopus lactate dehydrogenase for improved resistance to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizopus oryzae is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid. We determined that one of the key enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), involved in synthesis of lactic acid by R. oryzae was significantly inhibited by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) at physiological concentrations. Thi...

  5. Alcohol dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecanse and hexadecanol metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. ADH-A and ADH-B were distinguished on the basis of electrophoretic mobility, pyridine nucleotide cofactor requirement, and substrate specificity. ADH-A is a soluble, NAD-linked, inducible ethanol dehydrogenase (EDH). An ethanol-negative mutant (Eth1) was isolated which contained 6.5% of wild-type EDH activity and was deficient in ADH-A. Eth1 exhibited normal growth on hexadecane and hexadecanol. A second ethanol-negative mutant (Eth3) was acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) deficient, having 12.5% of wild-type ALDH activity. Eth3 had threefold-higher EDH activity than the wild-type strain. ALDH is a soluble, NAD-linked, ethanol-inducible enzyme. Eth3 exhibited normal growth on hexadecane, hexadecanol, and fatty aldehyde. ADH-B is soluble, constitutive, NADP-linked ADH which was active with medium-chain-length alcohols. Hexadecanol dehydrogenase (HDH), a soluble and membrane-bound, NAD-linked ADH, was induced 5- to 11-fold by growth on hexadecane or hexadecanol. HDH was distinct from ADH-A and ADH-B. NAD-linked HDH appears to possess a functional role in hexadecane and hexadecanol dissimilation

  6. The intracellular localization of malate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in Pisum arvense roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genowefa Kubik-Dorosz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria and plastids were isolated from Pisum arvense root cells by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The individual subcellular fractions so obtained were subjected to isoelectric focusing on cellulose acetate strips. Mitochondria and plastids each contained one NAD -malate dehydrogenase, while three isoenzymes were associated with the supernatant.

  7. Inhibition of dehydrogenase activity in petroleum refinery wastewater bacteria by phenolic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon C. Okpokwasili

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of phenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 4-bromophenol and 3,5-dimethylphenol on Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Escherichia species isolated from petroleum refinery wastewater was assessed via inhibition of dehydrogenase enzyme activity. At low concentrations, 2-nitrophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol, 4-bromophenol and 3,5-dimethylphenol stimulated dehydrogenase activity and at sufficient concentrations, phenolic compounds inhibited dehydrogenase activities. Generally, phenol is less toxic than substituted phenols. Estimations of the degree of inhibition/stimulation of dehydrogenase activities showed significant dose-dependent responses that are describable by logistic functions. The toxicity thresholds varied significantly (P < 0.05 among the bacterial strains and phenolic compounds. The median inhibitory concentrations (IC50s ranged from 4.118 ± 0.097 mg.L-1 for 4-nitrophenol against Pseudomonas sp. DAF1 to 1407.997 ± 7.091 mg.L-1 for phenol against Bacillus sp. DISK1. This study suggested that the organisms have moderate sensitivity to phenols and have the potential to be used as indicators for assessment of chemical toxicity. They could also be used as catalysts for degradation of phenols in effluents.

  8. Immunolocalization of succinate dehydrogenase in the esophagus epithelium of domesticated mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, W.; Kacza, J.; I. N. Hornickel; Schoennagel, B.

    2013-01-01

    Using immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the esophagus epithelia of seven domesticated mammals (horse, cattle, goat, pig, dog, laboratory rat, cat) of three nutrition groups (herbivorous, omnivorous, carnivorous) were studied to get first information about energy generation, as demonstrated by succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities. Distinct reaction intensities could be observed in all esophageal cell layers of the different species studied reflecting moderate...

  9. High energy electron beam inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase suspended in different aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct and indirect effects of 5 MeV electron beam irradiation at various low temperatures, as well as the influence of the presence or absence of deuterium ions in the suspending medium of the enzyme, on the global enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase have been studied. Frozen lactate dehydrogenase suspensions at 0 degC, -3 degC and -196 degC temperatures have been irradiated with the 5 MeV electron beam of a linear accelerator in the dose range 0-400 Gy. Liquid lactate dehydrogenase suspensions in D2O (99.98 %) and ultrapure water (17 ppm) at 0 degC have been irradiated in the dose range 0 -15 Gy. An exponential decrease was found in the enzymatic activity of irradiated lactate dehydrogenase, at all irradiation temperatures. The drastic decrease in the activity for the enzyme irradiated at 0 degC (total inhibition for a final dose of 100 Gy) indicate that at this temperature the indirect effects of radiation (due to the water radicals induced by radiation in the samples) are predominant. At -3 degC irradiation temperature the indirect effects of radiation are smaller but still present (a total decrease in the enzymatic activity for a dose of 250 Gy), while at -196 degC they are orders of magnitude reduced and the decrease in the enzymatic activity is due almost to the direct interaction of electrons with the macromolecules (70 % for a dose of 400 Gy)

  10. Optimization, Application, and Interpretation of Lactate Dehydrogenase Measurements in Microwell Determination of Cell Number and Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, H.T.; Van der Meer, A.J.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay was addressed for its sensitivity, disturbances by foaming, and cell number and size. Cells were from a U-251 MG grade IV human glioblastoma brain tumor cell line used in 100-µl well volumes. Cells were counted by microscopy and Coulter counting; assays were LDH

  11. Determination of the Subunit Molecular Mass and Composition of Alcohol Dehydrogenase by SDS-PAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Barbara T.

    2007-01-01

    SDS-PAGE is a simple, rapid technique that has many uses in biochemistry and is readily adaptable to the undergraduate laboratory. It is, however, a technique prone to several types of procedural pitfalls. This article describes the use of SDS-PAGE to determine the subunit molecular mass and composition of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase employing…

  12. Corticosterone metabolism in chicken tissues: evidence for tissue-specific distribution of steroid dehydrogenases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučka, Marek; Vagnerová, Karla; Klusoňová, Petra; Mikšík, Ivan; Pácha, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 147, č. 3 (2006), s. 377-383. ISSN 0016-6480 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6011201; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases * corticosterone metabolism * aves Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.487, year: 2006

  13. Newborn screening for dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency: Citrulline as a useful analyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane C. Quinonez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency, also known as maple syrup urine disease (MSUD type III, is caused by the deficiency of the E3 subunit of branched chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (αKGDH, and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH. DLD deficiency variably presents with either a severe neonatal encephalopathic phenotype or a primarily hepatic phenotype. As a variant form of MSUD, it is considered a core condition recommended for newborn screening. The detection of variant MSUD forms has proven difficult in the past with no asymptomatic DLD deficiency patients identified by current newborn screening strategies. Citrulline has recently been identified as an elevated dried blood spot (DBS metabolite in symptomatic patients affected with DLD deficiency. Here we report the retrospective DBS analysis and second-tier allo-isoleucine testing of 2 DLD deficiency patients. We show that an elevated citrulline and an elevated allo-isoleucine on second-tier testing can be used to successfully detect DLD deficiency. We additionally recommend that DLD deficiency be included in the “citrullinemia/elevated citrulline” ACMG Act Sheet and Algorithm.

  14. Functional characterization of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignin is a significant recalcitrant in the conversion of plant biomass to bioethanol. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the pathway of lignin monomer biosynthesis. Brown midrib mutants in Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor with impaired...

  15. The Role of Mitochondrial NADPH-Dependent Isocitrate Dehydrogenase in Cancer Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolková, Katarína; Ježek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), ID273947. ISSN 1687-8876 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP301/12/P381; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 * Krebs cycle * cancer cells Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  16. Mechanism-Based Inhibitors of Cytokinin Oxidase/Dehydrogenase Attack FAD Cofactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, D.; Šebela, M.; Briozzo, P.; Spíchal, Lukáš; Houba-Hérin, N.; Mašek, V.; Joly, N.; Madzak, C.; Anzenbacher, P.; Laloue, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 380, č. 5 (2008), s. 886-899. ISSN 0022-2836 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP522/08/P113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase * cytokinin signaling * protein structure Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.146, year: 2008

  17. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase : preference for quinones as electron acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W.; Galuszka, Petr; Šebela, Marek; Peč, Pavel; Hrbáč, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Bilyeu, Kristin D.; English, James T.; Frébort, Ivo; Sebela, M.; Pec, P.; Hrbac, J.; Frebort, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that

  18. Expression of Cellobiose Dehydrogenase from Neurospora crassa in Pichia pastoris and its purification and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    A gene encoding cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) from Neurospora crassa strain FGSC 2489 has been cloned and expressed in the heterologous host Pichia pastoris, under the control of the AOX1 methanol inducible promoter. Recombinant CDH without the native signal sequence and fused with a his6-tag (rNC-...

  19. The role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the regulation of human skeletal muscle fuel metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Laithwaite, David

    2009-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is the rate limiting step in the entry of glucose derived pyruvate into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. As such it plays an important role in the control of the use of carbohydrate as the source of oxidative energy for skeletal muscle contraction. The first experimental chapter investigates the effect of dichloroacetate pre-treatment during low-intensity (

  20. Increasing the heme-dependent respiratory efficiency of Lactococcus lactis by inhibition of lactate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Daniele; Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Pedersen, Martin B; Pedersen, Per Dedenroth; Dal Bello, Fabio; Mora, Diego

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of heme-induced respiration in Lactococcus lactis has radically improved the industrial processes used for the biomass production of this species. Here, we show that inhibition of the lactate dehydrogenase activity of L. lactis during growth under respiration-permissive conditions can stimulate aerobic respiration, thereby increasing not only growth efficiency but also the robustness of this organism. PMID:23064338

  1. ISOZYME PROFILES OF LACTIC DEHYDROGENASE AND CREATINE PHOSPHOKINASE IN NEONATAL MOUSE HEARTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isozyme profiles of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were determined in cardiac tissue of mice during postnatal development. LDH isozymes 1 and 5 showed a definite developmental change, achieving the adult values by 20 days of age, while the other three...

  2. Growth hormone-induced insulin resistance in human subjects involves reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Birgitte; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Nielsen, Thomas S;

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance induced by growth hormone (GH) is linked to promotion of lipolysis by unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that suppression of the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the active form (PDHa) underlies GH-induced insulin resistance similar to what is observed during fasting....

  3. Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and fatal valproate toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Njolstad, PR; Skjeldal, OH; Agsteribbe, E; Huckriede, A; Wannag, E; Sovik, O; Waaler, PE

    1997-01-01

    A boy with delayed psychomotor development, attention deficit disorder, and therapy-resistant epilepsy was treated with valproate. The patient died of liver failure after 4 months of valproate treatment. Postmortem investigation of cultured fibroblasts suggested medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase d

  4. Kinetic and chemical analyses of the cytokinin dehydrogenase-catalysed reaction: correlations with the crystal structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popelková, H.; Fraaije, M. W.; Novák, Ondřej; Frébortová, Jitka; Bilyeu, K. D.; Frébort, I.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 398, č. 1 (2006), s. 113-124. ISSN 0264-6021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cytokinin * cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) * flavoprotein Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.100, year: 2006

  5. Sulfoacetate released during the assimilation of taurine-nitrogen by Neptuniibacter caesariensis: purification of sulfoacetaldehyde dehydrogenase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčík, Zdeněk; Denger, K.; Weinitschke, S.; Hollemeyer, K.; Pačes, Václav; Cook, A.M.; Smits, T.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 190, č. 2 (2008), s. 159-168. ISSN 0302-8933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : assimilation of taurine -nitrogen * sulfoacetaldehyde dehydrogenase * sulfoacetate exporter Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.975, year: 2008

  6. Myopathy in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholte, H R; Van Coster, R N; de Jonge, P C;

    1999-01-01

    A 30-year-old man suffered since the age of 13 years from exercise induced episodes of intense generalised muscle pain, weakness and myoglobinuria. Fasting ketogenesis was low, while blood glucose remained normal. Muscle mitochondria failed to oxidise palmitoylcarnitine. Palmitoyl-CoA dehydrogenase...

  7. Ultrastructure of Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Inosine-5 '-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase 2 "Rods and Rings" Inclusions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juda, P.; Šmigová, J.; Kováčik, L.; Bártová, Eva; Raška, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 10 (2014), s. 739-750. ISSN 0722-186X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Inosine-5-monophosphate dehydrogenase * inhibitors of IMPDH * Rods and Rings Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  8. Communication between L-galactono-¿-lactone dehydrogenase and cytochrome c.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hervas, M.; Bashir, Q.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Ferreira, P.; Moreno-Beltran, J.B.; Westphal, A.H.; Diaz Moreno, I.; Medina, M.; La Rosa, De M.A.; Ubbink, M.; Navarro, J.A.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GALDH) catalyzes the terminal step of vitamin C biosynthesis in plant mitochondria. Here we investigated the communication between Arabidopsis thaliana GALDH and its natural electron acceptor cytochrome c (Cc). Using laser-generated radicals we observed the for

  9. Biochemical characterization of recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from the opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zameitat, E.; Gojkovic, Zoran; Knecht, Wolfgang;

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent yeast pathogen in humans, and recently it has become increasingly resistant to the current antifungal agents. In this study we investigated C. albicans dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH, EC 1.3.99.11), which catalyzes the fourth step of de novo pyrimidine ...

  10. Structural and transcriptional analysis of plant genes encoding the bifunctional lysine ketoglutarate reductase saccharopine dehydrogenase enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    The analysis of a wheat lysine ketoglutarate reductase – saccharopine dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH) gene and comparative structural and functional analyses among available plant genes provides new information on this important gene. Both the structure of the LKR/SDH gene and the immediately adjacent genes...

  11. Increasing stability of water-soluble PQQ glucose dehydrogenase by increasing hydrophobic interaction at dimeric interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferri Stefano

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water-soluble quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (PQQGDH-B from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus has a great potential for application as a glucose sensor constituent. Because this enzyme shows no activity in its monomeric form, correct quaternary structure is essential for the formation of active enzyme. We have previously reported on the increasing of the stability of PQQGDH-B by preventing the subunit dissociation. Previous studies were based on decreasing the entropy of quaternary structure dissociation but not on increasing the interaction between the two subunits. We therefore attempted to introduce a hydrophobic interaction in the dimeric interface to increase the stability of PQQGDH-B. Results Amino acid residues Asn340 and Tyr418 face each other at the dimer interface of PQQGDH-B, however no interaction exists between their side chains. We simultaneously substituted Asn340 to Phe and Tyr418 to Phe or Ile, to create the two mutants Asn340Phe/Tyr418Phe and Asn340Phe/Tyr418Ile. Furthermore, residues Leu280, Val282 and Val342 form a hydrophobic region that faces, on the other subunit, residues Thr416 and Thr417, again without any specific interaction. We simultaneously substituted Thr416 and Thr417 to Val, to create the mutant Thr416Val/Thr417Val. The temperatures resulting in lose of half of the initial activity of the constructed mutants were increased by 3–4°C higher over wild type. All mutants showed 2-fold higher thermal stability at 55°C than the wild-type enzyme, without decreasing their catalytic activities. From the 3D models of all the mutant enzymes, the predicted binding energies were found to be significantly greater that in the wild-type enzyme, consistent with the increases in thermal stabilities. Conclusions We have achieved via site-directed mutagenesis the improvement of the thermal stability of PQQGDH-B by increasing the dimer interface interaction. Through rational design based on the quaternary

  12. Physiological covalent regulation of rat liver branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical assay was developed for measuring branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase activity of Triton X-100 extracts of freeze-clamped rat liver. The proportion of active (dephosphorylated) enzyme was determined by measuring enzyme activities before and after activation of the complex with a broad-specificity phosphoprotein phosphatase. Hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase activity in normal male Wistar rats was 97% active but decreased to 33% active after 2 days on low-protein (8%) diet and to 13% active after 4 days on the same diet. Restricting protein intake of lean and obese female Zucker rats also caused inactivation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. Essentially all of the enzyme was in the active state in rats maintained for 14 days on either 30 or 50% protein diets. This was also the case for rats maintained on a commercial chow diet (minimum 23% protein). However, maintaining rats on 20, 8, and 0% protein diets decreased the percentage of the active form of the enzyme to 58, 10, and 7% of the total, respectively. Fasting of chow-fed rats for 48 h had no effect on the activity state of hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase, i.e., 93% of the enzyme remained in the active state compared to 97% for chow-fed rats. However, hepatic enzyme of rats maintained on 8% protein diet was 10% active before starvation and 83% active after 2 days of starvation. Thus, dietary protein deficiency results in inactivation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex, presumably as a consequence of low hepatic levels of branched-chain alpha-ketoacids

  13. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the reaction catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo, Julia S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados - Unidad Merida, Carretera antigua a Progreso Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Patino, Rodrigo, E-mail: rtarkus@mda.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados - Unidad Merida, Carretera antigua a Progreso Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2011-04-20

    Research highlights: {yields} The reaction catalyzed by one enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway was studied. {yields} A spectrophotometric method is proposed for kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. {yields} The pH and the temperature influences are reported on physical chemical properties. {yields} Relative concentrations of substrates are also important in the catalytic process. - Abstract: The enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC 1.1.1.49) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides has a dual coenzyme specificity with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sub ox}) and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as electron acceptors. The G6PD coenzyme selection is determined by the metabolic cellular prevailing conditions. In this study a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis is presented for the reaction catalyzed by G6PD from L. mesenteroides with NAD{sub ox} as coenzyme in phosphate buffer. For this work, an in situ spectrophotometric technique was employed based on the detection of one product of the reaction. Substrate and coenzyme concentrations as well as temperature and pH effects were evaluated. The apparent equilibrium constant, the Michaelis constant, and the turnover number were determined as a function of each experimental condition. The standard transformed Gibbs energy of reaction was determined from equilibrium constants at different initial conditions. For the product 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone, a value of the standard Gibbs energy of formation is proposed, {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o} = -1784 {+-} 5 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Gre2p, an NADP+-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alcohol dehydrogenase Gre2p from S. cerevisiae catalyses the stereospecific reduction of a variety of different keto compounds and can therefore be applied as a valuable biocatalyst. The crystallization of the complex of Gre2p with NADP+ and its preliminary X-ray analysis are described. Gre2p [Genes de respuesta a estres (stress-response gene)] from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a monomeric enzyme of 342 amino acids with a molecular weight of 38.1 kDa. The enzyme catalyses both the stereospecific reduction of keto compounds and the oxidation of various hydroxy compounds and alcohols by the simultaneous consumption of the cofactor NADPH and formation of NADP+. Crystals of a Gre2p complex with NADP+ were grown using PEG 8000 as a precipitant. They belong to the monoclinic space group P21. The current diffraction resolution is 3.2 Å. In spite of the monomeric nature of Gre2p in solution, packing and self-rotation calculations revealed the existence of two Gre2p protomers per asymmetric unit related by a twofold noncrystallographic axis

  15. Substitution of valine for histidine 265 in carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum affects activity and spectroscopic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, N J; Meyers, M R; Gierke, K L; Kerby, R L; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1998-02-13

    In carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) from Rhodospirillum rubrum, histidine 265 was replaced with valine by site-directed mutagenesis of the cooS gene. The altered form of CODH (H265V) had a low nickel content and a dramatically reduced level of catalytic activity. Although treatment with NiCl2 and CoCl2 increased the activity of H265V CODH by severalfold, activity levels remained more than 1000-fold lower than that of wild-type CODH. Histidine 265 was not essential for the formation and stability of the Fe4S4 clusters. The Km and KD for CO as well as the KD for cyanide were relatively unchanged as a result of the amino acid substitution in CODH. The time-dependent reduction of the [Fe4S4]2+ clusters by CO occurred on a time scale of hours, suggesting that, as a consequence of the mutation, a rate-limiting step had been introduced prior to the transfer of electrons from CO to the cubanes in centers B and C. EPR spectra of H265V CODH lacked the gav = 1.86 and gav = 1.87 signals characteristic of reduced forms of the active site (center C) of wild-type CODH. This indicates that the electronic properties of center C have been modified possibly by the disruption or alteration of the ligand-mediated interaction between the nickel site and Fe4S4 chromophore. PMID:9461598

  16. NADP-malate Dehydrogenase Isoforms of Wheat Leaves under Drought: Their Localization, and Some physicochemical and Kinetic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.G. Babayev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in sub-cellular localization, isoenzyme spectrum and kinetic characteristics of NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH, EC 1.1.1.82 in Triticum durum Desf. genotypes with contrasting drought tolerance have been studied. In chloroplast and cytosol fractions of mesophyll cells of wheat flag leaves 70-75% and 25-30% of the total NADP-MDH activity were found to be localized, respectively. Three isoforms of NADP-MDH with molecular weights of 66, 74 and 86 kDa were revealed in the chloroplast fraction, whereas in the cytosolic fraction molecular weights of the isoenzymes were found to be 42, 66 and 74 kDa. Drought caused the formation of a new 90 kDa isoform of the enzyme in the chloroplast fraction in anthesis phase of ontogenesis. In the drought-tolerant genotype the appearance of the new isoform in the chloroplast fraction was accompanied by a more rapid increase in Km and Vmax contrary to the chloroplast fraction of the drought-sensitive genotype manifesting a slight decrease in these parameters, suggesting one of the adaptive traits in forming drought tolerance in C3 plants.

  17. Expression of protein engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production from xylose in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Katsuji; Takimura, Osamu; Sawayama, Shigeki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Hiroshima (Japan). Biomass Technology Research Center; Watanabe, Seiya; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Makino, Keisuke [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    2008-11-15

    A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain transformed with xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes from Pichia stipitis has the ability to convert xylose to ethanol together with the unfavorable excretion of xylitol, which may be due to cofactor imbalance between NADPH-preferring XR and NAD{sup +}-dependent XDH. To reduce xylitol formation, we have already generated several XDH mutants with a reversal of coenzyme specificity toward NADP{sup +}. In this study, we constructed a set of recombinant S. cerevisiae strains with xylose-fermenting ability, including protein-engineered NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH-expressing strains. The most positive effect on xylose-to-ethanol fermentation was found by using a strain named MA-N5, constructed by chromosomal integration of the gene for NADP{sup +}-dependent XDH along with XR and endogenous xylulokinase genes. The MA-N5 strain had an increase in ethanol production and decrease in xylitol excretion compared with the reference strain expressing wild-type XDH when fermenting not only xylose but also mixed sugars containing glucose and xylose. Furthermore, the MA-N5 strain produced ethanol with a high yield of 0.49 g of ethanol/g of total consumed sugars in the nonsulfuric acid hydrolysate of wood chips. The results demonstrate that glucose and xylose present in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be efficiently fermented by this redox-engineered strain. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of freshness and freeze-thawing of sea bream fillets (Sparus aurata) by a cytosolic enzyme: Lactate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Mamadou; Watier, Denis; Masson, Pierre-Yves; Diouf, Amadou; Amara, Rachid; Grard, Thierry; Lencel, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of freshness and freeze-thawing of fish fillets was carried out by assessment of autolysis of cells using a cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. Autolysis plays an important role in spoilage of fish and postmortem changes in fish tissue are due to the breakdown of the cellular structures and release of cytoplasmic contents. The outflow of a cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, was studied in sea bream fillets and the Sparus aurata fibroblasts (SAF-1) cell-line during an 8day storage period at +4°C. A significant increase of lactate dehydrogenase release was observed, especially after 5days of storage. The ratio between the free and the total lactate dehydrogenase activity is a promising predictive marker to measure the quality of fresh fish fillets. The effect of freeze-thawing on cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase and lysosomal α-d-glucosidase activities was also tested. Despite the protecting effect of the tissue compared to the cell-line, a loss of lactate dehydrogenase activity, but not of α-d-glucosidase, was observed. In conclusion, lactate dehydrogenase may be used as a marker to both assess freshness of fish and distinguish between fresh and frozen-thawed fish fillets. PMID:27211667

  19. Bulge Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    1999-01-01

    The currently discussed theories of bulge formation are reviewed, including the primordial scenario, where bulges form rapidly and then accrete disks, the secular scenario, where bulges are formed by dynamical evolution of disks through bars and galaxy interactions, and some combinations of both, where formation of bulges and disks are more continuous and interleaved. The various scenarios make specific predictions about the relative masses, angular momenta, colours, metallicities of bulges relative to disks, and the bulge-to-disk ratio as a function of time. Dynamical processes relevant to the formation of bulges (bar instabilities, mergers) are described and tested against observed statistics. Current data suggest a dynamical feedback from gravitational instabilities in bulge and disk formation. It is very difficult to discriminate between the various scenarios from surveys at z=0 only, and observations at high redshift are presently the best hope for large progress.

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity in methemoglobin reduction by methylene blue and cyst amine: study on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient individuals, on normal subjects and on riboflavin-treated subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Barraviera

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors have standardized methods for evaluation of the activity of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and of glutathione reductase. The general principle of the first method was based on methemoglobin formation by sodium nitrite followed by stimulation of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with methylene blue. Forty six adults (23 males and 23 females were studied. Subjects were not G6PD deficient and were aged 20 to 30 years. The results showed that methemoglobin reduction by methylene blue was 154.40 and 139.90 mg/min (p<0.05 for males and females, respectively, in whole blood, and 221.10 and 207.85 mg/min (n.s., respectively, in washed red cells. These data showed that using washed red cells and 0.7g% sodium nitrite concentration produced no differences between sexes and also shortened reading time for the residual amount of methemoglobin to 90 minutes. Glutathione reductase activity was evaluated on the basis of the fact that cystamine (a thiol agent binds to the SH groups of hemoglobin, forming complexes. These complexes are reversed by the action of glutathione reductase, with methemoglobin reduction occurring simultaneously with this reaction. Thirty two adults (16 males and 16 females were studied. Subjects were not G6PD deficient and were aged 20 to 30 years. Methemoglobin reduction by cystamine was 81.27 and 91.13 mg/min (p<0.01 for males and females, respectively. These data showed that using washed red cells and 0.1 M cystamine concentration permits a reading of the residual amount of methemoglobin at 180 minutes of incubation. Glutathione reductase activity was evaluated by methemoglobin reduction by cystamine in 14 females before and after treatment with 10 mg riboflavin per day for 8 days. The results were 73.69 and 94.26 jug/min (p<0.01 before and after treatment, showing that riboflavin treatment increase glutathione reductase activity even in normal individuals. Three Black G6PD-deficient individuals (2 males and 1

  1. Mutational Analyses of Glucose Dehydrogenase and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveal Their Effects on Growth and Alginate Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Susan; Mærk, Mali; Valla, Svein

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of alginate has been studied extensively due to the importance of this polymer in medicine and industry. Alginate is synthesized from fructose-6-phosphate and thus competes with the central carbon metabolism for this metabolite. The alginate-producing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens relies on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways for glucose metabolism, and these pathways are also important for the metabolism of fructose and glycerol. In the present study, the impact of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes on growth and alginate synthesis was investigated in P. fluorescens. Mutants defective in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (Zwf-1 and Zwf-2) or glucose dehydrogenase (Gcd) were evaluated using media containing glucose, fructose, or glycerol. Zwf-1 was shown to be the most important glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase for catabolism. Both Zwf enzymes preferred NADP as a coenzyme, although NAD was also accepted. Only Zwf-2 was active in the presence of 3 mM ATP, and then only with NADP as a coenzyme, indicating an anabolic role for this isoenzyme. Disruption of zwf-1 resulted in increased alginate production when glycerol was used as the carbon source, possibly due to decreased flux through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway rendering more fructose-6-phosphate available for alginate biosynthesis. In alginate-producing cells grown on glucose, disruption of gcd increased both cell numbers and alginate production levels, while this mutation had no positive effect on growth in a non-alginate-producing strain. A possible explanation is that alginate synthesis might function as a sink for surplus hexose phosphates that could otherwise be detrimental to the cell. PMID:25746989

  2. Gpd1 and Gpd2 fine-tuning for sustainable reduction of glycerol formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubmann, Georg; Guillouet, Stephane; Nevoigt, Elke

    2011-01-01

    Gpd1 and Gpd2 are the two isoforms of glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), which is the rate-controlling enzyme of glycerol formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The two isoenzymes play crucial roles in osmoregulation and redox balancing. Past approaches to increase ethanol yield at the cost

  3. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in cancer: An old metabolic gatekeeper regulated by new pathways and pharmacological agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, Elise; Benelli, Chantal; Bortoli, Sylvie

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cells exhibit an altered metabolism which is characterized by a preference for aerobic glycolysis more than mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate. This provides anabolic support and selective growth advantage for cancer cells. Recently, a new concept has arisen suggesting that these metabolic changes may be due, in part, to an attenuated mitochondrial function which results from the inhibition of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). This mitochondrial complex links glycolysis to the Krebs cycle and the current understanding of its regulation involves the cyclic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by specific pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatases (PDPs). PMID:25868605

  4. Cryopreservation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity inside red blood cells: developing a specimen repository in support of development and evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency tests

    OpenAIRE

    Kahn, Maria; LaRue, Nicole; Bansil, Pooja; Kalnoky, Michael; McGray, Sarah; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzyme deficiency. It is characterized by abnormally low levels of G6PD activity. Individuals with G6PD deficiency are at risk of undergoing acute haemolysis when exposed to 8‒aminoquinoline-based drugs, such as primaquine. For this reason it is imperative to identify individuals with G6PD deficiency prior to administering these anti-malarial drugs. There is a need for the development and evaluation of point-of-c...

  5. Structural and Thermodynamic Basis for Weak Interactions between Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase and Subunit-binding Domain of the Branched-chain [alpha]-Ketoacid Dehydrogenase Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Naik, Mandar T.; Young, Brittany B.; Huang, Tai-huang; Chuang, David T. (AS); (UTSMC)

    2012-02-27

    The purified mammalian branched-chain {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC), which catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain {alpha}-keto acids, is essentially devoid of the constituent dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component (E3). The absence of E3 is associated with the low affinity of the subunit-binding domain of human BCKDC (hSBDb) for hE3. In this work, sequence alignments of hSBDb with the E3-binding domain (E3BD) of the mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex show that hSBDb has an arginine at position 118, where E3BD features an asparagine. Substitution of Arg-118 with an asparagine increases the binding affinity of the R118N hSBDb variant (designated hSBDb*) for hE3 by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. The enthalpy of the binding reaction changes from endothermic with the wild-type hSBDb to exothermic with the hSBDb* variant. This higher affinity interaction allowed the determination of the crystal structure of the hE3/hSBDb* complex to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. The structure showed that the presence of Arg-118 poses a unique, possibly steric and/or electrostatic incompatibility that could impede E3 interactions with the wild-type hSBDb. Compared with the E3/E3BD structure, the hE3/hSBDb* structure has a smaller interfacial area. Solution NMR data corroborated the interactions of hE3 with Arg-118 and Asn-118 in wild-type hSBDb and mutant hSBDb*, respectively. The NMR results also showed that the interface between hSBDb and hE3 does not change significantly from hSBDb to hSBDb*. Taken together, our results represent a starting point for explaining the long standing enigma that the E2b core of the BCKDC binds E3 far more weakly relative to other {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes.

  6. Estimation of risk of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient red cells to ozone and nitrogen dioxide. Research report (Final) 1 June 1983-30 November 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoruso, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The African variant of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD, A variant) is a sex-linked inheritable enzyme deficiency which affects approximately 14% of black males and 2% of black females in the United States. Dr. E.J. Calabrese et al., working with extrapolations of data from published literature, has hypothesized that inhaled ozone might significantly decrease glutathione levels in G6PD-deficient erythrocytes, and therefore, that affected individuals might be at risk for significant hematologic effects due to inhalation of ambient levels of ozone or other oxidant species. The study tests the hypothesis that exposure of G6PD-deficient erythrocytes to ambient levels of ozone and nitrogen dioxide will result in a significant decrease in intracellular glutathione levels and/or the formation of Heinz bodies. Results suggest that there is small likelihood that ambient levels of ozone and nitrogen dioxide will produce significant oxidant stress in G6PD-deficient individuals.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the complex of NADH and 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas sp. B-0831

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex of NADH and 3α-HSD from Pseudomonas sp. B-0831 has been crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.8 Å resolution. The NAD(P)+-dependent enzyme 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) catalyzes the reversible interconversion of hydroxyl and oxo groups at position 3 of the steroid nucleus. The complex of NADH and 3α-HSD from Pseudomonas sp. B-0831 was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Refinement of crystallization conditions with microseeding improved the quality of the X-ray diffraction data to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 62.46, b = 82.25, c = 86.57 Å, and contained two molecules, reflecting dimer formation of 3α-HSD, in the asymmetric unit

  8. Comparison of the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase and the xylose isomerase pathways for xylose fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two heterologous pathways have been used to construct recombinant xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: i the xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH pathway and ii the xylose isomerase (XI pathway. In the present study, the Pichia stipitis XR-XDH pathway and the Piromyces XI pathway were compared in an isogenic strain background, using a laboratory host strain with genetic modifications known to improve xylose fermentation (overexpressed xylulokinase, overexpressed non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and deletion of the aldose reductase gene GRE3. The two isogenic strains and the industrial xylose-fermenting strain TMB 3400 were studied regarding their xylose fermentation capacity in defined mineral medium and in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysate. Results In defined mineral medium, the xylose consumption rate, the specific ethanol productivity, and the final ethanol concentration were significantly higher in the XR- and XDH-carrying strain, whereas the highest ethanol yield was achieved with the strain carrying XI. While the laboratory strains only fermented a minor fraction of glucose in the undetoxified lignocellulose hydrolysate, the industrial strain TMB 3400 fermented nearly all the sugar available. Xylitol was formed by the XR-XDH-carrying strains only in mineral medium, whereas in lignocellulose hydrolysate no xylitol formation was detected. Conclusion Despite by-product formation, the XR-XDH xylose utilization pathway resulted in faster ethanol production than using the best presently reported XI pathway in the strain background investigated. The need for robust industrial yeast strains for fermentation of undetoxified spruce hydrolysates was also confirmed.

  9. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  10. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof...... important, since it helps constraining chemical evolution models at high redshift. A new project studying how the population of galaxies hosting GRBs relate to other galaxy population is outlined in the conclusion of this thesis. The core of this project will be to quantify how the stellar mass function of...

  11. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase expression by the farnesoid X receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) functions as an important junction in intermediary metabolism by influencing the utilization of fat versus carbohydrate as a source of fuel. Activation of PDC is achieved by phosphatases, whereas, inactivation is catalyzed by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs). The expression of PDK4 is highly regulated by the glucocorticoid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. We demonstrate that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4), which regulates a variety of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism, also regulates the expression of PDK4. Treatment of rat hepatoma cells as well as human primary hepatocytes with FXR agonists stimulates the expression of PDK4 to levels comparable to those obtained with glucocorticoids. In addition, treatment of mice with an FXR agonist significantly increased hepatic PDK4 expression, while concomitantly decreasing plasma triglyceride levels. Thus, activation of FXR may suppress glycolysis and enhance oxidation of fatty acids via inactivation of the PDC by increasing PDK4 expression

  12. A α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase is present in Trypanosoma cruzi glycosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JL Concepcion

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (α-GPDH-EC.1.1.1.8 has been considered absent in Trypanosoma cruzi in contradiction with all other studied trypanosomatids. After observing that the sole malate dehydrogenase can not maintain the intraglycosomal redox balance, GPDH activity was looked for and found, although in very variable levels, in epimastigotes extracts. GPDH was shown to be exclusively located in the glycosome of T. cruzi by digitonin treatment and isopycnic centrifugation. Antibody against T. brucei GPDH showed that this enzyme seemed to be present in an essentially inactive form at the beginning of the epimastigotes growth. GPDH is apparently linked to a salicylhydroxmic-sensitive glycerophosphate reoxidizing system and plays an essential role in the glycosome redox balance.

  13. Post-irradiation repairing processes of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase from Hansenula Polymorpha yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The post-irradiation repairing mechanisms of two Hansenula Polymorpha yeast enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and catalase, were studied. The kinetic parameters of the selected enzymes were investigated over one month since the moment of γ-irradiation with different doses in the presence of oxygen. Dose dependent decrease of initial reaction rates was noticed for both enzymes. Small variation of initial reaction rate was recorded for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase over one month, with a decreasing tendency. No significant electrophoretic changes of molecular forms of this enzyme were observed after irradiation. Continuous strong decrease of catalase activity was evident for the first 20 days after irradiation. Partial recovery process of the catalytic activity was revealed by this study. (authors)

  14. Purification and characterization of methanol dehydrogenase of a serin-producing methylotroph, hyphomicrobium methylovorum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, S.S.; Toki, Shin' ichiro; Izumi, Yoshikazu; Yamada, Hideaki

    1987-08-25

    All methanol-utilizing bacteria except actinomycete contain dyelinked methanol dehydrogenase. Also methol dehydrogenase has been found to participate in the methanol oxidation to formaldehyde necessary for L-serine production by H. methylovorum. This paper describs the purification and characterization of the enzyme from this bacterium. The enzyme is a dimeric protein, both constituting subunits having a molecular mass of about 60,000Da respectively. Optical activity was observed at pH 9.0 and around 35/sup 0/C, and the presence of NH4 was essential for the enzyme activity. The enzyme possesses a broad substrate specificit for primary alcohols, secondary alcohols, substituted alcohols, some aldehyes and others. The enzyme also has such properties as relatively high stability against heat treatment and no inactivation by phenazine methosulfate, etc. (4 figs, 3 tabs, 14 refs)

  15. Covalent immobilization of recombinant Rhizobium etli CFN42 xylitol dehydrogenase onto modified silica nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ye-Wang; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Jeya, Marimuthu;

    2011-01-01

    Rare sugars have many applications in food industry, as well as pharmaceutical and nutrition industries. Xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) can be used to synthesize various rare sugars enzymatically. However, the immobilization of XDH has not been performed to improve the industrial production of rare...... sugars. In this study, silica nanoparticles which have high immobilization efficiency were selected from among several carriers for immobilization of recombinant Rhizobium etli CFN42 xylitol dehydrogenase (ReXDH) and subjected to characterization. Among four different chemical modification methods to......,410 min at 40 °C and from 30 min to 450 min at 50 °C. The K(m) of ReXDH was slightly altered from 17.9 to only 19.2 mM by immobilization. The immobilized ReXDH had significant reusability, as it retained 81% activity after eight cycles of batch conversion of xylitol into L-xylulose. A∼71% conversion and a...

  16. Cloning, expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic characterization of a shikimate dehydrogenase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a shikimate dehydrogenase from C. glutamicum is presented. The shikimate dehydrogenase from Corynebacterium glutamicum has been cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector, overexpressed and purified. Native crystals were obtained by the vapour-diffusion technique using 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as a precipitant. The crystals belong to the centred monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 118.77, b = 63.17, c = 35.67 Å, β = 92.26° (at 100 K), and diffract to 1.64 Å on a synchrotron X-ray source. The asymmetric unit is likely to contain one molecule, corresponding to a packing density of 2.08 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of about 41%

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Yukuhiko [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kuroishi, Chizu; Ukita, Yoko [SR System Biology Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Sumii, Rie; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Mitahora-higashi, Gifu 502-8585 (Japan); Kunishima, Naoki, E-mail: kunisima@spring8.or.jp [Advanced Protein Crystallography Research Group, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase is described. Rabbit l-gulonate 3-dehydrogenase was crystallized using the oil-microbatch method at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.70 Å resolution from a crystal at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the C-centred monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.81, b = 69.08, c = 65.64 Å, β = 102.7°. Assuming the presence of a monomeric protomer in the asymmetric unit gives a V{sub M} value of 2.21 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 44.4%. A cocrystal with NADH, which was isomorphous to the apo form, was also prepared and diffraction data were collected to 1.85 Å resolution using Cu Kα radiation at 100 K.

  18. Cloning, expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic characterization of a shikimate dehydrogenase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepe, Jan, E-mail: jschoepe@smail.uni-koeln.de; Niefind, Karsten; Chatterjee, Shivani; Schomburg, Dietmar [Institute for Biochemistry, University of Köln, Zülpicher Strasse 47, Köln, NRW 50974 (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a shikimate dehydrogenase from C. glutamicum is presented. The shikimate dehydrogenase from Corynebacterium glutamicum has been cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector, overexpressed and purified. Native crystals were obtained by the vapour-diffusion technique using 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as a precipitant. The crystals belong to the centred monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 118.77, b = 63.17, c = 35.67 Å, β = 92.26° (at 100 K), and diffract to 1.64 Å on a synchrotron X-ray source. The asymmetric unit is likely to contain one molecule, corresponding to a packing density of 2.08 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of about 41%.

  19. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) from Bacillus cereus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) catalyses the oxidation of aldehydes using NAD(P)+ as a cofactor. The aldh gene from B. cereus was cloned; the protein was expressed, purified and crystallized, and a preliminary X-ray crystallography analysis was performed. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) catalyses the oxidation of aldehydes using NAD(P)+ as a cofactor. Most aldehydes are toxic at low levels. ALDHs are used to regulate metabolic intermediate aldehydes. The aldh gene from Bacillus cereus was cloned and the ALDH protein was expressed, purified and crystallized. A crystal of the ALDH protein diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.5, b = 93.3, c = 145.5 Å, β = 98.05°. Four protomers were present in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding VM of 2.55 Å3 Da−1 and a solvent content of 51.8%

  20. Active oxygen species and a degree of UV-modification of structural and functional properties of lactate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrophotometry and photofluorescence techniques were used in the studies on photochemical transformations of lactate dehydrogenase exposed to UV-irradiation with a dose of 2.25 kJ/m2, in the native state and in the presence of exogenous modifiers: sodium azide, β-carotene, histidine, D-mannitol, and tret-butanol. It was shown that UV-irradiation of the mixtures of lactate dehydrogenase with sodium azide, β-carotene and histidine results in restoration (by 99, 65 and 63 %, respectively) of the level of catalytic activity of the enzyme as compared to that observed after irradiating in the absence of the protectors. The protective effect provided by mannitol during UV-irradiation of the lactate dehydrogenase was 23 %. Thus, it was shown that active oxygen species - singlet molecular oxygen and hydroxyl radical - make significant contributions to photomodification of lactate dehydrogenase. (author)

  1. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: Effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of [35S]methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to CO dehydrogenase, the CO-induced hydrogenase was 95% inactivated by heating at 70 degrees C for 5 min. Unlike other hydrogenases, this CO-induced hydrogenase was inhibited only 60% by a 100% CO gas phase

  2. Theoretical Calculations of the Catalytic Triad in Short-Chain Alcohol Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    OpenAIRE

    Gani, Osman A B S M; Adekoya, Olayiwola A; Giurato, Laura; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Guccione, Salvatore; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2007-01-01

    Three highly conserved active site residues (Ser, Tyr, and Lys) of the family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) were demonstrated to be essential for catalytic activity and have been denoted the catalytic triad of SDRs. In this study computational methods were adopted to study the ionization properties of these amino acids in SDRs from Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila lebanonensis. Three enzyme models, with different ionization scenarios of the catalytic triad that...

  3. Coordination environment of the active-site metal ion of liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Makinen, M W; Yim, M B

    1981-01-01

    The coordination environment of the catalytically active metal ion of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) has been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods with use of the active-site-specific Co2+-reconstituted enzyme. The EPR absorption spectrum of the metal-substituted enzyme is characteristic of a rhombically distorted environment. The spectrum of the enzyme--NAD+ complex shows approximate axial symmetry of the metal ion site, i...

  4. Lactate dehydrogenase is not a mitochondrial enzyme in human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hans N; van Hall, Gerrit; Rasmussen, Ulla F

    The presence of lactate dehydrogenase in skeletal muscle mitochondria was investigated to clarify whether lactate is a possible substrate for mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were prepared from 100 mg samples of human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle. All fractions from the preparation......, furthermore, showed high specific rates of state 3 respiration. This excluded artificial loss from the mitochondria of all activity of a possible LDH. It was concluded that skeletal muscle mitochondria are devoid of LDH and unable to metabolize lactate....

  5. Frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in relation to altitude: a malaria hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Tzoneva, M.; Bulanov, A. G.; Mavrudieva, M.; Lalchev, S.; Toncheva, D; Tanev, D.

    1980-01-01

    Genetic markers have recently been found to be much more polymorphic than expected. Such extensive human polymorphisms may be partly explained by a number of genetic and environmental factors, including infectious diseases. Malaria, which was very widespread in the past and still poses a problem in many countries today, is a good candidate for research. The association between malaria and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is well-known, but more should be done to determine t...

  6. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low ...

  7. Molecular characterization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Essam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based methods for the detection of known mutations has facilitated detecting specific red blood cell (RBC enzyme deficiencies. We carried out a study on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficient subjects in Jeddah to evaluate the molecular characteristics of this enzyme deficiency and the frequency of nucleotide1311 and IVS-XI-93 polymorphisms in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene. Results A total of 1584 unrelated Saudis (984 neonates and 600 adults were screened for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. The prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was 6.9% (n = 110. G6PD Mediterranean mutation was observed in 98 (89.1% cases, G6PD Aures in 11 (10.0% cases, and G6PD Chatham in 1 (0.9% case. None of the samples showed G6PD A‾ mutation. Samples from 29 deficient subjects (25 males and 4 females were examined for polymorphism. The association of two polymorphisms of exon/intron 11 (c.1311T/IVS-XI-93C was observed in 14 (42.4% of 33 chromosomes studied. This association was found in 9 (31.0% carriers of G6PD Mediterranean and in 4 (13.8% carriers of G6PD Aures. Conclusions The majority of mutations were G6PD Mediterranean, followed by G6PD Aures and G6PD Chatham. We conclude that 1311T is a frequent polymorphism in subjects with G6PD Mediterranean and Aures variants in Jeddah.

  8. Evaluation of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency without Hemolysis in Icteric Newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Eghbalian; Ali Reza Monsef

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Glucose-6- phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an inherited deficiency that may be the cause of neonatal jaundice. Our aim was to study the prevalence of G6PD deficiency without hemolysis in relation to neonatal jaundice. Material & Methods: This prospective descriptive study has been conducted on 272 icteric newborns admitted to the Ekbatan Hospital from October 2002 to September 2004. The dataset included: age, sex, total and direct bilirubin, hemoglobin, reticulocyte co...

  9. Subtle adjustments of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutation database and reference sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazières, Stéphane; Petit, Florence; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Iriart, Xavier; Berry, Antoine; Carme, Bernard; Nacher, Mathieu; Bailly, Pascal; Chiaroni, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Reference sequences and mutation databases are essential for the development of molecular-based methods in human genetics. Lately, Minucci et al. [1] revised the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) reference material from 131 bibliographic references, three previous databases, and the genomic reference sequence (GenBank accession number X55448.1). Deficiency in G6PD is the most common enzymatic insufficiency in human populations and clinical manifestations range from mild to severe: neon...

  10. A model of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Patrinostro, Xiaobai; Carter, Michelle L.; Kramer, Ashley C.; Lund, Troy C

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common genetic defect and enzymopathy worldwide, affecting approximately 400 million people and causing acute hemolysis in persons exposed to prooxidant compounds such as menthol, naphthalene, anti-malarial drugs, and fava beans. Mouse models have not been useful because of a lack of significant response to oxidative challenge. We turned to zebrafish (Danrio rerio) embryos, which develop ex utero and are transparent, allowing vis...

  11. Prevalence of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency in Newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Zamani, A.; Z Oloumi; E. Amini; M Ghasemi

    2006-01-01

    Background: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency can cause hemolytic anemia and neonatal jaundice. Screening of newborns by examining the cord blood for enzyme activity has been proposed for prevention of its complications. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of G6PD deficiency in newborns in Vali-e-Asr hospital, Tehran. The relation between G6PD deficiency and the variables of sex, gestational age, jaundice, hemolysis, and anemia was also examined. Meth...

  12. Impact of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hecker, Peter A.; Leopold, Jane A.; Gupte, Sachin A.; Recchia, Fabio A; Stanley, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the rate-determining step in the pentose phosphate pathway and produces NADPH to fuel glutathione recycling. G6PD deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans and affects over 400 million people worldwide; however, its impact on cardiovascular disease is poorly understood. The glutathione pathway is paramount to antioxidant defense, and G6PD-deficient cells do not cope well with oxidative damage. Limited clinical evidence indicat...

  13. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Deficiency in Transfusion Medicine: The Unknown Risks

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Richard O.; Jhang, Jeffrey S.; Pham, Huy P.; Hod, Eldad A.; Zimring, James C; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    The hallmark of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is red blood cell (RBC) destruction in response to oxidative stress. Patients requiring RBC transfusions may simultaneously receive oxidative medications or have concurrent infections, both of which can induce hemolysis in G6PD-deficient RBCs. Although it is not routine practice to screen healthy blood donors for G6PD deficiency, case reports identified transfusion of G6PD-deficient RBCs as causing hemolysis and other adverse...

  14. Biochemical characterization of prephenate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus

    OpenAIRE

    Bonvin, Julie; Aponte, Raphael A.; Marcantonio, Maria; Singh, Sasha; Christendat, Dinesh; Turnbull, Joanne L.

    2006-01-01

    A monofunctional prephenate dehydrogenase (PD) from Aquifex aeolicus was expressed as a His-tagged protein in Escherichia coli and was purified by nickel affinity chromatography allowing the first biochemical and biophysical characterization of a thermostable PD. A. aeolicus PD is susceptible to proteolysis. In this report, the properties of the full-length PD are compared with one of these products, an N-terminally truncated protein variant (Δ19PD) also expressed recombinantly in E. coli. Bo...

  15. High aldehyde dehydrogenase activity identifies cancer stem cells in human cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shu-Yan; Zheng, Peng-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity characterizes a subpopulation of cells with cancer stem cell (CSC) properties in several malignancies. To clarify whether ALDH can be used as a marker of cervical cancer stem cells (CCSCs), ALDHhigh and ALDHlow cells were sorted from 4 cervical cancer cell lines and 5 primary tumor xenografts and examined for CSC characteristics. Here, we demonstrate that cervical cancer cells with high ALDH activity fulfill the functional criteria for CSCs: (1) ALD...

  16. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Is a Tumor Stem Cell-Associated Marker in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Feng; Qiu, Qi; Khanna, Abha; Todd, Nevins W.; Deepak, Janaki; Xing, Lingxiao; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Zhenqiu; Su, Yun; Stass, Sanford A.; Katz, Ruth L

    2009-01-01

    Tumor contains small population of cancer stem cells (CSC) that are responsible for its maintenance and relapse. Analysis of these CSCs may lead to effective prognostic and therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer patients. We report here the identification of CSCs from human lung cancer cells using Aldefluor assay followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Isolated cancer cells with relatively high aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity display in vitro features o...

  17. Androgen-stimulated UDP-glucose dehydrogenase expression limits prostate androgen availability without impacting hyaluronan levels

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Qin; Galbenus, Robert; Raza, Ashraf; Ronald L. Cerny; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2009-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) oxidizes UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for production of hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycans, and xenobiotic glucuronides. High levels of HA turnover in prostate cancer are correlated with aggressive progression. UGDH expression is high in the normal prostate even though HA accumulation is virtually undetectable. Thus, its normal role in the prostate may be to provide precursors for glucuronosyltransferase enzymes, which inactivate and solu...

  18. Structure of quinoprotein methylamine dehydrogenase at 2.25 A resolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Vellieux, F. M.; Huitema, F; Groendijk, H; Kalk, K H; Jzn, J F; Jongejan, J.A.; Duine, J A; Petratos, K; DRENTH, J.; Hol, W. G.

    1989-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of quinoprotein methylamine dehydrogenase from Thiobacillus versutus has been determined at 2.25 A resolution by a combination of multiple isomorphous replacement, phase extension by solvent flattening and partial structure phasing using molecular dynamics refinement. In the resulting map, the polypeptide chain for both subunits could be followed and an X-ray sequence was established. The tetrameric enzyme, made up of two heavy (H) and two light (L) subunits, i...

  19. Mitochondrial Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 of Nosema bombycis: A Marker in Microsporidian evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Tian LI, Xiaoqun DANG, Jinshan XU, Handeng LIU, Guoqing PAN, Zeyang ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of intracelluar eukaryotic parasites, which can infected almost all animals, including human beings. Till now, no mitochodria but mitosome, a remnant of mitochondria was discovered in this phylum. We present here the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 (PDH, including PDHα and PDHβ) of the microsporidian Nosema bombycis, the pathogen of silkworm pébrine. Compared with PDH of microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi and Antonospora locustae, both subunits are conse...

  20. Phylogeny and structure of the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase gene family in Brachypodium distachyon

    OpenAIRE

    Bukh, Christian; Nord-Larsen, Pia Haugaard; Rasmussen, Søren K.

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyses the final step of the monolignol biosynthesis, the conversion of cinnamyl aldehydes to alcohols, using NADPH as a cofactor. Seven members of the CAD gene family were identified in the genome of Brachypodium distachyon and five of these were isolated and cloned from genomic DNA. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR revealed differential expression of the cloned genes, with BdCAD5 being expressed in all tissues and highest in root and stem w...

  1. Oxidoreductive Cellulose Depolymerization by the Enzymes Cellobiose Dehydrogenase and Glycoside Hydrolase 61▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Langston, James A.; Shaghasi, Tarana; Abbate, Eric; Feng XU; Vlasenko, Elena; Matt D. Sweeney

    2011-01-01

    Several members of the glycoside hydrolase 61 (GH61) family of proteins have recently been shown to dramatically increase the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass by microbial hydrolytic cellulases. However, purified GH61 proteins have neither demonstrable direct hydrolase activity on various polysaccharide or lignacious components of biomass nor an apparent hydrolase active site. Cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) is a secreted flavocytochrome produced by many cellulose-degrading fungi with no w...

  2. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: role in hexadecanol metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, M E; Finnerty, W R

    1985-01-01

    The role of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) in hexadecane and hexadecanol metabolism was studied in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N. Two distinct FALDHs were demonstrated in Acinetobacter sp. strain HO1-N: a membrane-bound, NADP-dependent FALDH activity induced 5-, 15-, and 9-fold by growth on hexadecanol, dodecyl aldehyde, and hexadecane, respectively, and a constitutive, NAD-dependent, membrane-localized FALDH. The NADP-dependent FALDH exhibited apparent Km and Vmax values for decyl a...

  3. The effect of pH and ADP on ammonia affinity for human glutamate dehydrogenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaganas, Ioannis; Pajecka, Kamilla; Nielsen, Camilla Wendel;

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) uses ammonia to reversibly convert α-ketoglutarate to glutamate using NADP(H) and NAD(H) as cofactors. While GDH in most mammals is encoded by a single GLUD1 gene, humans and other primates have acquired a GLUD2 gene with distinct tissue expression profile. The two h...... of the kidney during systemic acidosis. The reverse could apply for conditions of local or systemic hyperammonemia or alkalosis....

  4. Time-course of hormonal induction of mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase biogenesis in rat liver

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mráček, Tomáš; Ješina, Pavel; Křiváková, P.; Bolehovská, R.; Červinková, Z.; Drahota, Zdeněk; Houštěk, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 1726, č. 2 (2005), s. 217-223. ISSN 0304-4165 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/03/0799; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : thyroid hormones * mitochondrial protein turnover * glycerophosphate dehydrogenase Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.418, year: 2005

  5. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity by protein thiol-disulfide exchange.

    OpenAIRE

    Pettit, F H; Humphreys, J; Reed, L J

    1982-01-01

    Endogenous kinase activity of highly purified pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from bovine kidney is markedly inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and by certain disulfides. Inhibition by disulfides is highly specific and is reversed by thiols. 5,5'-Dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) is the most potent inhibitor, showing significant inhibition at a concentration as low as 1 microM. Cystamine, oxidized glutathione, pantethine, lipoic acid, lipoamide, ergothionine, insulin, oxytocin, and vasopressin were ineffe...

  6. Bradykinetic alcohol dehydrogenases make yeast fitter for growth in the presence of allyl alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    Plapp, Bryce V.; Lee, Ann Ting-I.; Khanna, Aditi; Pryor, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that fitter yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that can grow by fermenting glucose in the presence of allyl alcohol, which is oxidized by alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADH1) to toxic acrolein, had mutations in the ADH1 gene that led to decreased ADH activity. These yeast may grow more slowly due to slower reduction of acetaldehyde and a higher NADH/NAD+ ratio, which should decrease the oxidation of allyl alcohol. We determined steady-state kinetic constants for three yeast AD...

  7. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 regulates glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Stuart A

    2009-11-01

    Glucocorticoid excess is characterized by increased adiposity, skeletal myopathy, and insulin resistance, but the precise molecular mechanisms are unknown. Within skeletal muscle, 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) converts cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in rodents) to active cortisol (corticosterone in rodents). We aimed to determine the mechanisms underpinning glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and indentify how 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors improve insulin sensitivity.

  8. An atomic-resolution view of neofunctionalization in the evolution of apicomplexan lactate dehydrogenases

    OpenAIRE

    Boucher, Jeffrey I; Jacobowitz, Joseph R; Beckett, Brian C; Classen, Scott; Theobald, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest How are new genes created? Most of the mutations in the genome of an organism place the organism at some sort of disadvantage, but a small number confer an advantage. The beneficial changes are usually retained by subsequent generations and can ultimately lead to the creation of new genes. An example is the gene that encodes an enzyme called lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). This enzyme is involved in anaerobic respiration, the process that allows organisms to produce energy without u...

  9. Developmental expression of Xenopus short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase 3

    OpenAIRE

    Kam, Richard Kin Ting; Chen, Yonglong; Chan, Sun On; Chan, Wood Yee; Dawid, Igor B.; Hui ZHAO

    2010-01-01

    During early embryonic development, the retinoic acid signaling pathway coordinates with other signaling pathways to regulate body axis patterning and organogenesis. The production of retinoic acid requires two enzymatic reactions, the first of which is the oxidization of vitamin A (all-trans-retinol) to all-trans-retinal, mediated in part by the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Through DNA microarrays, we have identified a gene in Xenopus laevis, which shares a high sequence similarity t...

  10. Lactate Dehydrogenase A is a potential prognostic marker in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Girgis, Hala; Masui, Olena; White, Nicole MA; Scorilas, Andreas; Rotondo, Fabio; Seivwright, Annetta; Gabril, Manal; Filter, Emily R; Girgis, Andrew HA; Bjarnason, Georg A.; Jewett, Michael AS; Evans, Andrew; Al-Haddad, Sahar; Siu, KW Michael; Yousef, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 90% of cancer-related deaths in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are caused by tumor relapse and metastasis. Thus, there is an urgent need for new molecular markers that can potentiate the efficacy of the current clinical-based models of prognosis assessment. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential significance of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), assessed by immunohistochemical staining, as a prognostic marker in clear cell renal cell carcinoma in relation...

  11. Coimmobilization of L-asparaginase and glutamate dehydrogenase onto highly activated supports

    OpenAIRE

    Balcão, Victor M.; Mateo, Cesar; Fernández-Lafuente, R.; Malcata, F. Xavier; Guisán, José M.

    2001-01-01

    In the present research work, production of coimmobilized derivatives of L-asparaginase and glutamate dehydrogenase was attempted. Comparison of immobilization of each enzyme independently with coimmobilization of the two enzymes unfolded important advantages of the latter, namely a decrease in the induction period (time before the maximum reaction rate is virtually achieved) and an increase in the maximum reaction rate. The effectiveness of the independent enzyme derivatives was low; however...

  12. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the liver of hypertriglyceridemic rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusoňová, Petra; Vagnerová, Karla; Bryndová, Jana; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef; Pácha, Jiří

    Fyziologický ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. Roč. 55, č. 4 (2006), 27P-27P ISSN 0862-8408. [Physiological Days /82./. 07.02.2006-09.02.2006, Prague] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB5011402 Keywords : 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase * liver * hypertriglyceridemic rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  13. Involvement of AMPK in Alcohol Dehydrogenase Accentuated Myocardial Dysfunction Following Acute Ethanol Challenge in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Rui; Scott, Glenda I.; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Binge alcohol drinking often triggers myocardial contractile dysfunction although the underlying mechanism is not fully clear. This study was designed to examine the impact of cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) on ethanol-induced change in cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, insulin and AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) signaling. Methods ADH transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were acutely challenged with ethanol (3 g/kg/d, i.p.) for 3...

  14. The role of 11Ø-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the pathogenesis of hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Uum, Stanislaus Hendrikus Maria van

    2003-01-01

    Hypertension is an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Although knowledge about etiology and pathogenesis of high blood pressure has increased considerably over the last decades, in most patients the cause of high blood pressure remains unknown ('primary' hypertension). In the last few years several studies suggested a role for the 11 -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 -HSD) isozymes in the pathogenesis of primary hypertension. Two isozymes have been described: 11 ...

  15. Evolutionary origins of retinoid active short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases of SDR16C family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, Olga V; Chang, Chenbei; Berlett, Michael C; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2015-06-01

    Vertebrate enzymes that belong to the 16C family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR16C) were shown to play an essential role in the control of retinoic acid (RA) levels during development. To trace the evolution of enzymatic function of SDR16C family, and to examine the origins of the pathway for RA biosynthesis from vitamin A, we identified putative SDR16C enzymes through the extensive search of available genome sequencing data in a subset of species representing major metazoan phyla. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that enzymes from protostome, non-chordate deuterostome and invertebrate chordate species are found in three clades of SDR16C family containing retinoid active enzymes, which are retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10), retinol dehydrogenases E2 (RDHE2) and RDHE2-similar, and dehydrogenase reductase (SDR family) member 3 (DHRS3). For the initial functional analysis, we cloned RDH10- and RDHE2-related enzymes from the early developmental stages of a non-chordate deuterostome, green sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, and an invertebrate chordate, sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. In situ hybridization revealed that these proteins are expressed in a pattern relevant to development, while assays performed on proteins expressed in mammalian cell culture showed that they possess retinol-oxidizing activity as their vertebrate homologs. The existence of invertebrate homologs of DHRS3 was inferred from the analysis of phylogeny and cofactor-binding residues characteristic of preference for NADP(H). The presence of invertebrate homologs in the DHRS3 group of SDR16C is interesting in light of the complex mutually activating interaction, which we have recently described for human RDH10 and DHRS3 enzymes. Further functional analysis of these homologs will establish whether this interaction evolved to control retinoid homeostasis only in vertebrates, or is also conserved in pre-vertebrates. PMID:25451586

  16. Pyranose Dehydrogenase from Agaricus campestris and Agaricus xanthoderma: Characterization and Applications in Carbohydrate Conversions

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens K Peterbauer; Dietmar Haltrich; Petra Staudigl; Iris Krondorfer

    2013-01-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH) is a flavin-dependent sugar oxidoreductase that is limited to a rather small group of litter-degrading basidiomycetes. The enzyme is unable to utilize oxygen as an electron acceptor, using substituted benzoquinones and (organo) metal ions instead. PDH displays a broad substrate specificity and intriguing variations in regioselectivity, depending on substrate, enzyme source and reaction conditions. In contrast to the related enzyme pyranose 2-oxidase (POx), PDHs fr...

  17. Very long chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency with adult onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smelt, A H; Poorthuis, B J; Onkenhout, W; Scholte, H R; Andresen, B S; van Duinen, S G; Gregersen, N; Wintzen, A R

    1998-01-01

    Very long chain acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a severe disorder of mitochondrial beta-oxidation in infants. We report adult onset of attacks of painful rhabdomyolysis. Gas chromatography identified strongly elevated levels of tetradecenoic acid, 14:1(n-9), tetrade...... be due to residual enzyme activity as a consequence of the two missense mutations. Treatment with L-carnitine and medium chain triglycerides in the diet did not reduce the attacks of rhabdomyolysis....

  18. Phenyl- and benzylurea cytokinins as competitive inhibitors of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase: a structural study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, D.; Briozzo, P.; Popelková, H.; Šebela, M.; Končitíková, R.; Spíchal, Lukáš; Nisler, Jaroslav; Madzak, C.; Frébort, Ivo; Laloue, M.; Houba-Herin, N.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 8 (2010), s. 1052-1062. ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/08/0555; GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : benzylurea * crystal structure * cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.787, year: 2010

  19. Identification of some ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes by PCR amplification of their gpd (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuzinger, N; Podeu, R; Gruber, F; Göbl, F; Kubicek, C P

    1996-01-01

    Degenerated oligonucleotide primers designed to flank an approximately 1.2-kb fragment of the gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) from ascomycetes and basidiomycetes were used to amplify the corresponding gpd fragments from several species of the ectomycorrhizal fungal taxa Boletus, Amanita, and Lactarius. Those from B. edulis, A. muscaria, and L. deterrimus were cloned and sequenced. The respective nucleotide sequences of these gene fragments showed a moderate degree...

  20. Differential pulse voltammetric studies on the effects of Al(Ⅲ) on the lactate dehydrogenase activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was applied to study the effects of aluminum Al(Ⅲ) on the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Michaelis-Menten constant (KNADHm) and maximum velocity (vmax) in the enzyme promoting catalytic reaction of "pyruvate(Pyr) + NADH + H+ LDH(=) lactate + NAD+" under different conditions by monitoring DPV reduction current of NAD+ were reported.(C) 2007 Shu Ping Bi. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of the Two Neurospora crassa Cellobiose Dehydrogenases and Their Connection to Oxidative Cellulose Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Sygmund, Christoph; Kracher, Daniel; Scheiblbrandner, Stefan; Zahma, Kawah; Felice, Alfons K. G.; Harreither, Wolfgang; Kittl, Roman; Ludwig, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The genome of Neurospora crassa encodes two different cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs) with a sequence identity of only 53%. So far, only CDH IIA, which is induced during growth on cellulose and features a C-terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM), was detected in the secretome of N. crassa and preliminarily characterized. CDH IIB is not significantly upregulated during growth on cellulosic material and lacks a CBM. Since CDH IIB could not be identified in the secretome, both CDHs were rec...

  2. Simple and efficient expression of Agaricus meleagris pyranose dehydrogenase in Pichia pastoris

    OpenAIRE

    Sygmund, Christoph; Gutmann, Alexander; Krondorfer, Iris; Kujawa, Magdalena; Glieder, Anton; Pscheidt, Beate; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens; Kittl, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH) is a fungal flavin-dependent sugar oxidoreductase that is highly interesting for applications in organic synthesis or electrochemistry. The low expression levels of the filamentous fungus Agaricus meleagris as well as the demand for engineered PDH make heterologous expression necessary. Recently, Aspergillus species were described to efficiently secrete recombinant PDH. Here, we evaluate recombinant protein production with expression hosts more suitable for geneti...

  3. Structural insight into the calcium ion modulated interdomain electron transfer in cellobiose dehydrogenase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kádek, Alan; Kavan, Daniel; Felice, A.K.G.; Ludwig, R.; Halada, Petr; Man, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 589, č. 11 (2015), s. 1194-1199. ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0503; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Hydrogen/deuterium exchange * Cellobiose dehydrogenase * Calcium effect Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2014

  4. Lactate Dehydrogenase and Citrate Synthase activity in cardiac and skeletal muscle of lowland and highland tinamous

    OpenAIRE

    Aira, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Tinamous (Tinamidae) have the smallest heart in relation to body mass compared to any other flying bird today (Bishop 1997). This means that heart size is likely to restrict aerobic metabolism. Tinamous inhabit areas from sea level to 4800 m a.s.l., which means that the high altitude living species, Nothoprocta ornata (NO), is exposed to hypoxia. In this study the activity of the two metabolic enzymes Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) and Citrate Synthase (CS) was measured and the ratio between the...

  5. Structure-based drug design of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Adie, Jillian E.

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyses the intracellular biosynthesis of the active glucocorticoid cortisol. Tissue specific dysregulation of the enzyme has been implicated in the development of metabolic syndrome and other associated diseases. Experiments with transgenic mice and prototype inhibitors show that inhibition of 11β-HSD1 in visceral adipose tissue and liver leads to a resistance of diet-induced hyperglycemia and a favourable lipid and lipoprotein profi...

  6. Changes in short-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase during rat cardiac development and stress

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jinxian; Xu, Lipeng; Huang, Qiuju; Luo, Jiani; Liu, Peiqing; Chen, Shaorui; Yuan, Xi; Lu, Yao; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Sigui

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the expression of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), a key enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation, during rat heart development and the difference of SCAD between pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy. The expression of SCAD was lowest in the foetal and neonatal heart, which had time-dependent increase during normal heart development. In contrast, a significant decrease in SCAD expression was observed in different ages of spontaneously hyp...

  7. Targeted Disruption of the Inosine 5′-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase Type I Gene in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Jing Jin; Tolin, Amy K.; Jain, Jugnu; Huang, Hai; Santiago, Lalaine; Mitchell, Beverly S.

    2003-01-01

    Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is the critical, rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis pathway for guanine nucleotides. Two separate isoenzymes, designated IMPDH types I and II, contribute to IMPDH activity. An additional pathway salvages guanine through the activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) to supply the cell with guanine nucleotides. In order to better understand the relative contributions of IMPDH types I and II and HPRT to normal b...

  8. Functional Distinctions between IMP Dehydrogenase Genes in Providing Mycophenolate Resistance and Guanine Prototrophy to Yeast*

    OpenAIRE

    Hyle, Judith W.; Shaw, Randal J.; Reines, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of GTP. Yeast with mutations in the transcription elongation machinery are sensitive to inhibitors of this enzyme such as 6-azauracil and mycophenolic acid, at least partly because of their inability to transcriptionally induce IMPDH. To understand the molecular basis of this drug-sensitive phenotype, we have dissected the expression and function of a four-gene family in yeast called IMD1 through IMD4. We show...

  9. The CBS subdomain of inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase regulates purine nucleotide turnover†

    OpenAIRE

    Pimkin, Maxim; Markham, George D.

    2008-01-01

    Inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the rate limiting step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. IMPDH has an evolutionary conserved CBS subdomain of unknown function. The subdomain can be deleted without impairing the in vitro IMPDH catalytic activity and is the site for mutations associated with human retinitis pigmentosa. A guanine-prototrophic Escherichia coli strain, MP101, was constructed with the subdomain sequence deleted from the chromosomal gene for IMPDH. The ATP...

  10. Efficacy of Vigabatrin Intervention in a Mild Phenotypic Expression of Succinic Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Casarano, M.; Alessandrì, M G.; Salomons, G.S.; E. Moretti; Jakobs, C.; Gibson, K. M.; G. Cioni; Battini, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a patient with succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency who presented a mild phenotype including developmental language delay, in association with the typical elevations of 4-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in biological fluids and MRI alterations. Two pathogenic mutations were identified one transversion (c.278 G>T) in exon 1 and another (c.1557 T>G) in exon 10. Both parents are carriers of one of the mutations, confirming compound-heterozygosity in their affected child. To reduce ...

  11. The TyrA family of aromatic-pathway dehydrogenases in phylogenetic context

    OpenAIRE

    Wolinsky Murray; Bonner Carol A; Song Jian; Jensen Roy A

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The TyrA protein family includes members that catalyze two dehydrogenase reactions in distinct pathways leading to L-tyrosine and a third reaction that is not part of tyrosine biosynthesis. Family members share a catalytic core region of about 30 kDa, where inhibitors operate competitively by acting as substrate mimics. This protein family typifies many that are challenging for bioinformatic analysis because of relatively modest sequence conservation and small size. Result...

  12. Directed Evolution of a Thermostable Phosphite Dehydrogenase for NAD(P)H Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes, Tyler W.; Woodyer, Ryan D.; Zhao, Huimin

    2005-01-01

    NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases are valuable tools for synthesis of chiral compounds. The expense of the cofactors, however, requires in situ cofactor regeneration for preparative applications. We have attempted to develop an enzymatic system based on phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH) from Pseudomonas stutzeri to regenerate the reduced nicotinamide cofactors NADH and NADPH. Here we report the use of directed evolution to address one of the main limitations with the wild-type PTDH enzyme, its l...

  13. Placental 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in Dahl and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazancová, Karla; Mikšík, Ivan; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Pácha, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 16, 5, Pt 1 (2003), s. 401-406. ISSN 0895-7061 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA306/99/0210 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) 44/2002/C/2.LF Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase * placenta * rat hypertension Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.103, year: 2003

  14. Polymorphism of the parasite lactate dehydrogenase gene from Plasmodium vivax Korean isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Hyun-Il; KIM, Jung-Yeon; Lee, Won-Ja; Sohn, Youngjoo; Lee, Sang-wook; Kang, Yoon-Joong; Lee, Hyeong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background Assaying for the parasitic lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) is widely used as a rapid diagnostic test (RDT), but the efficacy of its serological effectiveness in diagnosis, that is antibody detection ability, is not known. The genetic variation of Korean isolates was analysed, and recombinant protein pLDH was evaluated as a serodiagnostic antigen for the detection of Plasmodium vivax malaria. Methods Genomic DNA was purified, and the pLDH gene of P. vivax was amplified from blood sampl...

  15. Role of apoptosis-inducing factor, proline dehydrogenase, and NADPH oxidase in apoptosis and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker DF

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sathish Kumar Natarajan, Donald F BeckerDepartment of Biochemistry and Redox Biology Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NEAbstract: Flavoproteins catalyze a variety of reactions utilizing flavin mononucleotide or flavin adenine dinucleotide as cofactors. The oxidoreductase properties of flavoenzymes implicate them in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress, and various cellular processes, including programmed cell death. Here we explore three critical flavoproteins involved in apoptosis and redox signaling, ie, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, proline dehydrogenase, and NADPH oxidase. These proteins have diverse biochemical functions and influence apoptotic signaling by unique mechanisms. The role of AIF in apoptotic signaling is two-fold, with AIF changing intracellular location from the inner mitochondrial membrane space to the nucleus upon exposure of cells to apoptotic stimuli. In the mitochondria, AIF enhances mitochondrial bioenergetics and complex I activity/assembly to help maintain proper cellular redox homeostasis. After translocating to the nucleus, AIF forms a chromatin degrading complex with other proteins, such as cyclophilin A. AIF translocation from the mitochondria to the nucleus is triggered by oxidative stress, implicating AIF as a mitochondrial redox sensor. Proline dehydrogenase is a membrane-associated flavoenzyme in the mitochondrion that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of proline oxidation. Upregulation of proline dehydrogenase by the tumor suppressor, p53, leads to enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species that induce the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. NADPH oxidases are a group of enzymes that generate reactive oxygen species for oxidative stress and signaling purposes. Upon activation, NADPH oxidase 2 generates a burst of superoxide in neutrophils that leads to killing of microbes during phagocytosis. NADPH oxidases also participate in redox signaling that involves hydrogen peroxide-mediated activation of

  16. Comparative characterization of two GDP-mannose dehydrogenase genes from Saccharina japonica (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Pengyan; Shao, Zhanru; Jin, Weihua; Duan, Delin

    2016-01-01

    Background Saccharina japonica is an important commercial brown seaweed, its main product is alginate, which is used in food, textile and by the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. GDP-mannose dehydrogenase (GMD) is the key enzyme involved in the synthesis of alginate. However, little is known about GMD in S. japonica. Here we report comparative biochemical analysis of two GMD genes in S. japonica. Results Two GMD genes from S. japonica (Sjgmd1, Sjgmd2) were cloned. The open reading frame...

  17. Bilateral recurrent auricular pseudocyst: Importance of fine-needle aspiration cytology and lactate dehydrogenase estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular pseudocyst or Idiopathic cystic chondromalacia is a rare, benign condition characterized by a focal noninflammatory cystic swelling on the pinna, occurring usually in young male patients. Bilaterality and recurrence have been reported rarely. We report a case of bilateral, recurrent auricular pseudocyst in a young male patient, where fine needle aspiration cytology coupled with fluid lactate dehydrogenase level estimation was diagnostic. Repeated surgery was avoided and conservative treatment was proved to be effective.

  18. Mutations in sdh (succinate dehydrogenase genes) alter the thiamine requirement of Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Enos-Berlage, J L; Downs, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    Mutants lacking the first enzyme in de novo purine synthesis (PurF) can synthesize thiamine if increased levels of pantothenate are present in the culture medium (J. L. Enos-Berlage and D. M. Downs, J. Bacteriol. 178:1476-1479, 1996). Derivatives of purF mutants that no longer required pantothenate for thiamine-independent growth were isolated. Analysis of these mutants demonstrated that they were defective in succinate dehydrogenase (Sdh), an enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Results o...

  19. Syringyl lignin is unaltered by severe sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase suppression in tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Barakate, Abdellah; Stephens, Jennifer; Goldie, Alison; Hunter, William N.; Marshall, David; Hancock, Robert D.; Lapierre, Catherine; Morreele, Kris; Boerjane, Wout

    2011-01-01

    The manipulation of lignin could, in principle, facilitate efficient biofuel production from plant biomass. Despite intensive study of the lignin pathway, uncertainty exists about the enzyme catalyzing the last step in syringyl (S) monolignol biosynthesis, the reduction of sinapaldehyde to sinapyl alcohol. Traditional schemes of the pathway suggested that both guaiacyl (G) and S monolignols are produced by a single substrate-versatile enzyme, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). This was cha...

  20. Analysis of alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitors from Desmodium styracifolium using centrifugal ultrafiltration coupled with HPLC-MS

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Liangliang; Chen Miao; Chen Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) inhibitors play an important role in the treatment of human methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning and the suppression of acetaldehyde accumulation in alcoholics. In this study, centrifugal ultrafiltration coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) was utilized to screen and identify ADH inhibitors from ethyl acetate extract of Desmosium styracifolium (Osb.) Merr. The experiment conditions of c...

  1. Increased riboflavin production by manipulation of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase in Ashbya gossypii

    OpenAIRE

    Buey, Ruben M.; Ledesma Amaro, Rodrigo; Balsera, Mónica; Revuelta Doval, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotides are the precursors of essential biomolecules including nucleic acids and vitamins such as riboflavin. The enzyme inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the ratelimiting step in the guanine nucleotide de novo biosynthetic pathway and plays a key role in controlling the cellular nucleotide pools. Thus, IMPDH is an important metabolic bottleneck in the guanine nucleotide synthesis, susceptible of manipulation by means of metabolic engineering approaches. Her...

  2. Roles of histamine on the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in endometrioid adenocarcinoma cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yang; IKEDA, JUN-ICHIRO; TIAN, TIAN; Sato, Atsushi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a limited number of cells that are essential for maintenance, recurrence, and metastasis of tumors. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) has been recognized as a marker of CICs. We previously reported that ALDH1-high cases of uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma showed poor prognosis, and that ALDH1 high population was more tumorigenic, invasive, and resistant to apoptosis than ALDH1 low population. Histamine plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation, mi...

  3. 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Reduction by Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shouqin; Lindahl, Paul A.; Wang, Chuanyue; Bennett, George N.; Rudolph, Frederick B.; Hughes, Joseph B.

    2000-01-01

    Purified CO dehydrogenase (CODH) from Clostridium thermoaceticum catalyzed the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). The intermediates and reduced products of TNT transformation were separated and appear to be identical to the compounds formed by C. acetobutylicum, namely, 2-hydroxylamino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2HA46DNT), 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4HA26DNT), 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotoluene (24DHANT), and the Bamberger rearrangement product of 2,4-dihydroxylamino-6-nitrotolu...

  4. Molecular docking and enzymatic evaluation to identify selective inhibitors of aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Luniwal, Amarjit; Wang, Lin; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Erhardt, Paul W.; Ronald E. Viola

    2012-01-01

    Microbes that have gained resistance against antibiotics pose a major emerging threat to human health. New targets must be identified that will guide the development of new classes of antibiotics. The selective inhibition of key microbial enzymes that are responsible for the biosynthesis of essential metabolites can be an effective way to counter this growing threat. Aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenases (ASADHs) produce an early branch point metabolite in a microbial biosynthetic pathway for...

  5. ROS generation and multiple forms of mammalian mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mráček, Tomáš; Holzerová, Eliška; Drahota, Zdeněk; Kovářová, Nikola; Vrbacký, Marek; Ješina, Pavel; Houštěk, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1837, č. 1 (2014), s. 98-111. ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP303/10/P227; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Grant ostatní: Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 750213 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase * ROS production * supercomplex * in-gel ROS detection Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.353, year: 2014

  6. XoxF-Type Methanol Dehydrogenase from the Anaerobic Methanotroph “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera”

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ming L.; Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Pol, Arjan; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Mike S.M. Jetten; van Niftrik, Laura; Keltjens, Jan T.

    2014-01-01

    “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” is a newly discovered anaerobic methanotroph that, surprisingly, oxidizes methane through an aerobic methane oxidation pathway. The second step in this aerobic pathway is the oxidation of methanol. In Gram-negative bacteria, the reaction is catalyzed by pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH). The genome of “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” putatively encodes three different MDHs that are localized in one large gene cluster: one...

  7. Structure and Protein–Protein Interactions of Methanol Dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    OpenAIRE

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    In the initial steps of their metabolic pathway, methanotrophic bacteria oxidize methane to methanol with methane monooxygenases (MMOs) and methanol to formaldehyde with methanol dehydrogenases (MDHs). Several lines of evidence suggest that the membrane-bound or particulate MMO (pMMO) and MDH interact to form a metabolic supercomplex. To further investigate the possible existence of such a supercomplex, native MDH from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has been purified and characterized by siz...

  8. Prolonged QTc Interval in Association With Medium-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Wiles, Jason R.; Leslie, Nancy; Knilans, Timothy K.; Akinbi, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is the most common disorder of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. We report a term male infant who presented at 3 days of age with hypoglycemia, compensated metabolic acidosis, hypocalcemia, and prolonged QTc interval. Pregnancy was complicated by maternal premature atrial contractions and premature ventricular contractions. Prolongation of the QTc interval resolved after correction of metabolic derangements. The newborn screen was...

  9. NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in Penicillium chrysogenum is involved in regulation of beta-lactam production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykær, Jette; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Noorman, H.; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between the ammonium assimilatory pathways and beta-lactam production were investigated by disruption of the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase gene (gdhA) in two industrial beta-lactam-producing strains of Penicillium chrysogenum. The strains used were an adipoyl-7-ADCA- an...... results indicate that the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase may be directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of beta-lactann production in industrial strains of P. chrysogenum....

  10. Ethanol utilization regulatory protein: profile alignments give no evidence of origin through aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase gene fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas, H B; Persson, B; Jörnvall, H; Hempel, J.

    1995-01-01

    The suggestion that the ethanol regulatory protein from Aspergillus has its evolutionary origin in a gene fusion between aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase genes (Hawkins AR, Lamb HK, Radford A, Moore JD, 1994, Gene 146:145-158) has been tested by profile analysis with aldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase family profiles. We show that the degree and kind of similarity observed between these profiles and the ethanol regulatory protein sequence is that expected from random sequences of the same c...

  11. Retinoic acid response element in the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH3: implications for regulation of retinoic acid synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Duester, G; Shean, M L; McBride, M S; Stewart, M J

    1991-01-01

    Retinoic acid regulation of one member of the human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family was demonstrated, suggesting that the retinol dehydrogenase function of ADH may play a regulatory role in the biosynthetic pathway for retinoic acid. Promoter activity of human ADH3, but not ADH1 or ADH2, was shown to be activated by retinoic acid in transient transfection assays of Hep3B human hepatoma cells. Deletion mapping experiments identified a region in the ADH3 promoter located between...

  12. The dual targeting ability of type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases arose early in land plant evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Lin; Law, Simon R.; Murcha, Monika W.; Whelan, James; Carrie, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Type II NAD(PH) dehydrogenases are located on the inner mitochondrial membrane of plants, fungi, protists and some primitive animals. However, recent observations have been made which identify several Arabidopsis type II dehydrogenases as dual targeted proteins. Targeting either mitochondria and peroxisomes or mitochondria and chloroplasts. Results: Members of the ND protein family were identified in various plant species. Phylogenetic analyses and subcellular targeting prediction...

  13. The methanol dehydrogenase structural gene mxaF and its use as a functional gene probe for methanotrophs and methylotrophs.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, I R; Murrell, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The methanol dehydrogenase gene mxaF, encoding the large subunit of the enzyme, was amplified from the DNA of a number of representative methanotrophs, methyletrophs, and environmental samples by PCR using primers designed from regions of conserved amino acid sequence identified by comparison of three known sequences of the large subunit of methanol dehydrogenase. The resulting 550-bp PCR products were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequences corresponding to these...

  14. Pentitol phosphate dehydrogenases: Discovery, characterization and use in D-arabitol and xylitol production by metabolically engineered Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Povelainen, Mira

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this study has been to construct metabolically engineered microbial strains capable of fermenting glucose into pentitols D-arabitol and, especially, xylitol. The path that was chosen to achieve this goal required discovery, isolation and sequencing of at least two pentitol phosphate dehydrogenases of different specificity, followed by cloning and expression of their genes and characterization of recombinant arabitol and xylitol phosphate dehydrogenases. An enzyme of ...

  15. Structural and functional characterization of plant aminoaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pisum sativum with a broad specificity for natural and synthetic aminoaldehydes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tylichová, M.; Kopečný, D.; Moréra, S.; Briozzo, P.; Lenobel, René; Snégaroff, J.; Šebela, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 396, č. 4 (2010), s. 870-882. ISSN 0022-2836 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/08/0555; GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : aminoaldehyde dehydrogenase * betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase * NAD+ complex Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.008, year: 2010

  16. Duplication of Locus Coding of Malate Dehydrogenase in Populus tomentosa Carr.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Horizontal starch-gel electrophoresis was used to study crude enzyme extraction from young leaves of 234 clones of Populus tomentosa Carr. selected from nine provenances in North China. Ten enzyme systems were resolved. One hundred and fifty-six clones showing unusual allozyme band patterns at locus Mdh-1 were found. Three allozyme bands at locus Mdh-1 were 9:6:1 in concentration. Further studies on the electrophoretic patterns of ground mixed pollen extraction of 30 male clones selected at random from the 156 clones were conducted and it was found that allozyme bands at locus Mdh-1 were composed of two dark-stained bands and a weak band. Only one group of the malate dehydrogenase (MDH) zymogram composed of two bands was obtained from the electrophoretic segregation of pollen leachate of the same clones. A comparison of the electrophoretic patterns one another suggested that the locus Mdh-1 coding malate dehydrogenase in diploid species of P. tomentosa was duplicated. The duplicate gene locus possessed three same alleles and was located in mitochondria. The locus duplication of alleles coding malate dehydrogenase in P. tomentosa was discovered and reported for the first time.

  17. Trichomonas hydrogenosomes contain the NADH dehydrogenase module of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdy, Ivan; Hirt, Robert P; Dolezal, Pavel; Bardonová, Lucie; Foster, Peter G; Tachezy, Jan; Embley, T Martin

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogenosomes are double-membraned ATP-producing and hydrogen-producing organelles of diverse anaerobic eukaryotes. In some versions of endosymbiotic theory they are suggested to be homologues of mitochondria, but alternative views suggest they arose from an anaerobic bacterium that was distinct from the mitochondrial endosymbiont. Here we show that the 51-kDa and 24-kDa subunits of the NADH dehydrogenase module in complex I, the first step in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, are active in hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis. Like mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase, the purified Trichomonas enzyme can reduce a variety of electron carriers including ubiquinone, but unlike the mitochondrial enzyme it can also reduce ferredoxin, the electron carrier used for hydrogen production. The presence of NADH dehydrogenase solves the long-standing conundrum of how hydrogenosomes regenerate NAD+ after malate oxidation. Phylogenetic analyses show that the Trichomonas 51-kDa homologue shares common ancestry with the mitochondrial enzyme. Recruitment of complex I subunits into a H2-producing pathway provides evidence that mitochondria and hydrogenosomes are aerobic and anaerobic homologues of the same endosymbiotically derived organelle. PMID:15577909

  18. [Possible ways of regulating detoxifying processes in the alcohol dehydrogenase reaction with pantothenic acid derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikevich, I P; Dorofeev, B F; Moĭseenok, A G

    1993-01-01

    Oxidation of derivatives and precursors of pantothenic acid was studied in alcohol dehydrogenase reactions. Despite the presence of free hydroxymethyl groups in a number of pantothenic acid derivatives only panthenol with Km = 8 x 10(-3) M was shown to serve as a substrate for alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver tissue (EC 1.1.1.1) Pantethine, sodium phosphopantothenate, CoA and acetyl-CoA decreased the rate of ethanol oxidation, where pantethine and sodium phosphopantothenate were competitive inhibitors, while CoA and acetyl-CoA inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively Ki = 1.2 x 10(-2) M, 2.1 x 10(-2) M, 4.4 x 10(-4) M and 5.1 x 10(-4) M, respectively. Metabolic precursors, which were different from pantothenic acid in their structure, were not involved in the alcohol dehydrogenase reaction. Possible regulation of alcohol intoxication using derivatives and precursors of vitamin B3 is discussed. PMID:8511887

  19. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of histamine dehydrogenase from Nocardioides simplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histamine dehydrogenase from Nocardioides simplex has been expressed, purified and crystallized with full incorporation of 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.7 Å resolution; the crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121. Histamine dehydrogenase (HADH) from Nocardioides simplex catalyzes the oxidative deamination of histamine to produce imidazole acetaldehyde and an ammonium ion. HADH is functionally related to trimethylamine dehydrogenase (TMADH), but HADH has strict substrate specificity towards histamine. HADH is a homodimer, with each 76 kDa subunit containing two redox cofactors: a [4Fe–4S] cluster and an unusual covalently bound flavin mononucleotide, 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN. In order to understand the substrate specificity of HADH, it was sought to determine its structure by X-ray crystallography. This enzyme has been expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and successfully crystallized in two forms. Diffraction data were collected to 2.7 Å resolution at the SSRL synchrotron with 99.7% completeness. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 101.14, b = 107.03, c = 153.35 Å

  20. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 1. The primary structure of the beta 1 beta 1 isoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, J; Bühler, R; Kaiser, R; Holmquist, B; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Vallee, B; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    Determination of the amino acid sequence of the beta 1 subunit from the class I (pyrazole-sensitive) human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme beta 1 beta 1 revealed a 373-residue structure differing at 48 positions (including a gap) from that of the subunit of the well studied horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase EE isoenzyme. The structure deduced is compatible with known differences in composition, ultraviolet absorbance, electrophoretic mobility and catalytic properties between the horse and human enzymes. All zinc-liganding residues of the horse E subunit are strictly conserved in the human beta 1 subunit, despite an earlier report of a mutation involving Cys-46. This residue therefore remains conserved in all known alcohol dehydrogenase structures. However, the total cysteine content of the beta 1 structure is raised from 14 in the subunit of the horse enzyme to 15 by a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most exchanges are on the surface of the molecule and of a well conserved nature. Substitutions close to the catalytic centre are of interest to explain the altered substrate specificity and different catalytic activity of the beta 1 homodimer. Functionally, a Ser----Thr exchange at position 48 appears to be of special importance, since Thr-48 in beta 1 instead of Ser-48 in the horse enzyme can restrict available space. Four other substitutions also line the active-site pocket, and appear to constitute partly compensated exchanges. PMID:6391920

  1. Modulation of ethanol stress tolerance by aldehyde dehydrogenase in the mycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma vaccinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiimwe, Theodore; Krause, Katrin; Schlunk, Ines; Kothe, Erika

    2012-08-01

    We report the first mycorrhizal fungal aldehyde dehydrogenase gene, ald1, which was isolated from the basidiomycete Tricholoma vaccinum. The gene, encoding a protein Ald1 of 502 amino acids, is up-regulated in ectomycorrhiza. Phylogenetic analyses using 53 specific fungal aldehyde dehydrogenases from all major phyla in the kingdom of fungi including Ald1 and two partial sequences of T. vaccinum were performed to get an insight in the evolution of the aldehyde dehydrogenase family. By using competitive and real-time RT-PCR, ald1 is up-regulated in response to alcohol and aldehyde-related stress. Furthermore, heterologous expression of ald1 in Escherichia coli and subsequent in vitro enzyme activity assay demonstrated the oxidation of propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde with different kinetics using either NAD(+) or NADP(+) as cofactors. In addition, overexpression of ald1 in T. vaccinum after Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation increased ethanol stress tolerance. These results demonstrate the ability of Ald1 to circumvent ethanol stress, a critical function in mycorrhizal habitats. PMID:22159964

  2. The suitability of saliva for detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamont, A H; Miguel, A; Goos, C M; Vermeesch-Markslag, A M; Hermans, A; Vermorken, A J

    1988-01-01

    Saliva was investigated for its suitability as a biopsy tissue for the determination of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency. It appears that there is a significant difference between the activity of the enzyme in patients and controls. However, some controls have very low values making discrimination between patients and controls using a qualitative method impossible. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a relevant clinical problem in many rural areas in developing countries. Existing methods for determination of the deficiency in blood and hair follicles do not meet the criteria necessary for their large scale introduction in the areas of the world that are concerned by the problem. The present study shows that saliva is not a suitable alternative. Between the three biopsy tissues compared: blood, hair follicles and saliva, hair follicles remain most attractive since their isolation hardly involves the risk of infection. A simplified method for the detection of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in hair follicles that would allow health service workers in the field to determine the carrier status of pregnant women might form the basis for a future kernicterus prevention programme. PMID:3221843

  3. Purification, characterization, and cDNA cloning of opine dehydrogenases from the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Noriyuki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Nagahisa, Eizoh

    2007-06-01

    Alanopine dehydrogenase (AlDH) and three isoforms of strombine/alanopine dehydrogenase (St/AlDH) were purified from muscle tissue of the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea. The four enzymes, which can be distinguished by the isoelectric point, are monomeric 42 kDa proteins, possess similar pH-activity profiles, and display specificity for pyruvate and NAD(H). The three isoforms of St/AlDH show equivalent Km and Vmax for glycine and L-alanine and for D-strombine and meso-alanopine. Free amino acid levels in the muscle and D-strombine accumulation in vivo during muscle activity suggest that St/AlDHs function physiologically as StDH. AlDH shows specificity for L-alanine and meso-alanopine, but not for glycine or D-strombine. The amino acid sequences of AlDH and one of the St/AlDH isoforms were determined by a combination of amino acid sequence analysis and cDNA cloning. St/AlDH cDNA consisted of 1586 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,346.70 Da), and AlDH cDNA consisted of 1587 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,886.68 Da). The two amino acid sequences deduced from the cDNA displayed 67% amino acid identity, with greatest similarity to that of tauropine dehydrogenase from the polychaete Arabella iricolor. PMID:17350870

  4. [Use of immobilization in the study of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Immobilized monomers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muronets, V I; Ashmarina, L I; Asriiants, R A; Nagradova, N K

    1982-06-01

    Active immobilized monomers of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase were prepared by means of dissociation of the tetrameric enzyme molecule covalently bound to Sepharose via a single subunit. The conditions were elaborated to achieve the inactivation and solubilization of the non-covalently bound subunits leaving the monomer coupled to the matrix intact. This procedure differs from the previously developed method of matrix-bound oligomeric enzymes dissociation in a detail which was found to be essentially important. The widely used method includes complete denaturation of all subunits during treatment with urea followed by reactivation of the immobilized one, whereas only the non-covalently bound subunits suffer denaturation under the conditions developed in the present work. The immobilized monomers of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase exhibit Vmax and Km (for NAD and substrate) values similar to those found for the immobilized tetramer. Reassociation of the immobilized monomers with soluble enzyme subunits obtained in the presence of urea produces matrix-bound tetrameric species. Immobilized trimers ae formed upon incubation of matrix-bound monomers in a diluted apoenzyme solution. The immobilized monomeric, trimeric and tetrameric enzyme species were used to study the role of subunit interactions in cooperative phenomena exhibited by the dehydrogenase. PMID:7115810

  5. Enzyme inhibition assay for pyruvate dehydrogenase complex: Clinical utility for the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katsuhisa Omagri; Hiroaki Hazama; Shigeru Kohno

    2005-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is usually diagnosed by the presence of characteristic histopathological features of the liver and/or antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) in the serum traditionally detected by immunofluorescence.Recently, new and more accurate serological assays for the detection of AMA, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoblotting, and enzyme inhibition assay, have been developed. Of these,the enzyme inhibition assay for the detection of antipyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) antibodies offers certain advantages such as objectivity, rapidity,simplicity, and low cost. Since this assay has almost 100% specificity, it may have particular applicability in screening the at-risk segment of the population in developing countries. Moreover, this assay could be also used for monitoring the disease course in PBC. Almost all sera of PBC-suspected patients can be confirmed for PBC or non-PBC by the combination results of immunoblotting and enzyme inhibition assay without histopathological examination. For the development of a "complete" or "gold standard" diagnostic assay for PBC, similar assays of the enzyme inhibition for anti2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDC) and anti-branched chain oxo-acid dehydrogenase complex (BCOADC) antibodies will be needed in future.

  6. Surviving environmental stress: the role of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in marine crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NA Stephens-Camacho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH belongs to the aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH family, an ancestral group of enzymes responsible for aldehyde detoxification in several organisms. The BADH enzyme catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine (GB an important osmoptrotector and osmoregulator accumulated in response to cellular osmotic stress. The BADH enzymes have been extensively described in terrestrial organisms, but information in marine crustaceans remains scarce. Research on crustacean stress-adaptive capacity to environmental stressors relates GB accumulation in response to salinity variations. Although GB de novo synthesis is confirmed on crustaceans, its metabolic pathways and regulation mechanism are unexplored. In this work, the state of the knowledge of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in marine crustaceans is summarized, as a mechanism to overcome the deleterious effects of changes in temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen concentration in seawater. The purpose of this review is to provide a more comprehensive overview to set the basis for exploring novel functions and properties of BADHs on the response of crustaceans to environmental stress.

  7. Mice deficient in 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 lack bone marrow adipocytes, but maintain normal bone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jeannette; Mosekilde, Lis; Holmes, Megan;

    2004-01-01

    marrow composition revealed a total absence of marrow adipocytes in HSD1(-/-) mice. Cells from Wt and HSD1(-/-) mice exhibited similar growth rates as well as similar levels of production of osteoblastic markers. The adipocyte-forming capacity of in vitro cultured bone marrow stromal cells and trabecular...

  8. Energy conservation by oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen via a sodium ion current in a hyperthermophilic archaeon

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Mayer, Florian; Kang, Sung Gyun; Müller, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We report here that oxidation of formate to CO2 and H2 that operates close to thermodynamic equilibrium is coupled to vectorial H+ and Na+ transport across the cytoplasmic membrane of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1. The ion gradient established then drives ATP synthesis via a Na+-ATP synthase. The energy-converting enzyme complex involves a formate dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound hydrogenase with similarity to complex I of the aerobic electron transport chain and a...

  9. Characterization of mannitol-2-dehydrogenase in Saccharina japonica: evidence for a new polyol-specific long-chain dehydrogenases/reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanru Shao

    Full Text Available Mannitol plays a crucial role in brown algae, acting as carbon storage, organic osmolytes and antioxidant. Transcriptomic analysis of Saccharina japonica revealed that the relative genes involved in the mannitol cycle are existent. Full-length sequence of mannitol-2-dehydrogenase (M2DH gene was obtained, with one open reading frame of 2,007 bp which encodes 668 amino acids. Cis-regulatory elements for response to methyl jasmonic acid, light and drought existed in the 5'-upstream region. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that SjM2DH has an ancient prokaryotic origin, and is probably acquired by horizontal gene transfer event. Multiple alignment and spatial structure prediction displayed a series of conserved functional residues, motifs and domains, which favored that SjM2DH belongs to the polyol-specific long-chain dehydrogenases/reductase (PSLDR family. Expressional profiles of SjM2DH in the juvenile sporophytes showed that it was influenced by saline, oxidative and desiccative factors. SjM2DH was over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the cell-free extracts with recombinant SjM2DH displayed high activity on D-fructose reduction reaction. The analysis on SjM2DH gene structure and biochemical parameters reached a consensus that activity of SjM2DH is NADH-dependent and metal ion-independent. The characterization of SjM2DH showed that M2DH is a new member of PSLDR family and play an important role in mannitol metabolism in S. japonica.

  10. Structure of NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli - reflections on the basis of coenzyme specificity in the family of glutamate dehydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, Michael A.; Oliveira, Tânia F.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R. [Trinity; (FCT/UNL); (UC-Dublin)

    2013-09-05

    Glutamate dehydrogenases catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, using NAD+ and/or NADP+ as a cofactor. Subunits of homo-hexameric bacterial enzymes comprise a substrate-binding domain I followed by a nucleotide-binding domain II. The reaction occurs in a catalytic cleft between the two domains. Although conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domains of various dehydrogenases have been linked to cofactor preferences, the structural basis for specificity in the GDH family remains poorly understood. Here, the refined crystal structure of Escherichia coli GDH in the absence of reactants is described at 2.5-Å resolution. Modelling of NADP+ in domain II reveals the potential contribution of positively charged residues from a neighbouring α-helical hairpin to phosphate recognition. In addition, a serine that follows the P7 aspartate is presumed to form a hydrogen bond with the 2'-phosphate. Mutagenesis and kinetic analysis confirms the importance of these residues in NADP+ recognition. Surprisingly, one of the positively charged residues is conserved in all sequences of NAD+-dependent enzymes, but the conformations adopted by the corresponding regions in proteins whose structure has been solved preclude their contribution to the coordination of the 2'-ribose phosphate of NADP+. These studies clarify the sequence–structure relationships in bacterial GDHs, revealing that identical residues may specify different coenzyme preferences, depending on the structural context. Primary sequence alone is therefore not a reliable guide for predicting coenzyme specificity. We also consider how it is possible for a single sequence to accommodate both coenzymes in the dual-specificity GDHs of animals.

  11. Comparative genomics of aldehyde dehydrogenase 5a1 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase and accumulation of gamma-hydroxybutyrate associated with its deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaspina Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH; aldehyde dehydrogenase 5A1 [ALDH5A1]; locus 6p22 occupies a central position in central nervous system (CNS neurotransmitter metabolism as one of two enzymes necessary for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA recycling from the synaptic cleft. Its importance is highlighted by the neurometabolic disease associated with its inherited deficiency in humans, as well as the severe epileptic phenotype observed in Aldh5a1-/- knockout mice. Expanding evidence now suggests, however, that even subtle decreases in human SSADH activity, associated with rare and common single nucleotide polymorphisms, may produce subclinical pathological effects. SSADH, in conjunction with aldo-keto reductase 7A2 (AKR7A2, represent two neural enzymes responsible for further catabolism of succinic semialdehyde, producing either succinate (SSADH or γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB; AKR7A2. A GABA analogue, GHB is a short-chain fatty alcohol with unusual properties in the CNS and a long pharmacological history. Moreover, SSADH occupies a further role in the CNS as the enzyme responsible for further metabolism of the lipid peroxidation aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, an intermediate known to induce oxidant stress. Accordingly, subtle decreases in SSADH activity may have the capacity to lead to regional accumulation of neurotoxic intermediates (GHB, 4-HNE. Polymorphisms in SSADH gene structure may also associate with quantitative traits, including intelligence quotient and life expectancy. Further population-based studies of human SSADH activity promise to reveal additional properties of its function and additional roles in CNS tissue.

  12. High-temperature crystallization of the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from the extreme thermophilic bacteria Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase-acetyl-CoA thio esterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. Ethanol fermentations from Saccharomyces sp. are used in industrial ethanol production and are performed at mesophilic temperatures where final ethanol concentrations must exceed 4% (v/v) to make the process industrially economic. In addition, distillation is required to recover ethanol. Thermophilic fermentations are very attractive since they enable separation of ethanol from continuous cultures at process temperature and reduced pressure. Two different ethanol-production pathways have been identified for thermophilic bacteria; type I from Clostridium thermocellum, which contains only NADH-linked primary-alcohol dehydrogeneases, and type II from Thermoanaerobacter brockii which in addition include NADPH-linked secondary-alcohol dehydrogenases. The thermophilic anaerobic bacterium T ethanolicus 39E produces ethanol as the major end product from starch, pentose and herose substrates. The 2 Adh has a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes and possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity. Large single crystals (0.7 x 0.3 x 0.3 mn) of this enzyme have been obtained at 400C and diffraction data to 2.7 A resolution has been collected (Rmerge = 10.44%). Attempts are currently underway to obtain higher resolution data and a search for heavy atom derivatives is currently underway. The crystals belong to the space group P21 21 2 with cell constants of a a= 170.0 A, b=125.7 A and c=80.5 A. The asymmetric unit contains a tetramer as in the case of the crystals of the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermoanaerobacter brockii with a VM of 2.85 A3/Da. (author)

  13. Overview of the role of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase and their variants in the genesis of alcohol-related pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, David W; Matsumoto, Michinaga; Chang, David; You, Min

    2004-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) are responsible for metabolizing the bulk of ethanol consumed as part of the diet and their activities contribute to the rate of ethanol elimination from the blood. They are expressed at highest levels in liver, but at lower levels in many tissues. This pathway probably evolved as a detoxification mechanism for environmental alcohols. However, with the consumption of large amounts of ethanol, the oxidation of ethanol can become a major energy source and, particularly in the liver, interferes with the metabolism of other nutrients. Polymorphic variants of the genes for these enzymes encode enzymes with altered kinetic properties. The pathophysiological effects of these variants may be mediated by accumulation of acetaldehyde; high-activity ADH variants are predicted to increase the rate of acetaldehyde generation, while the low-activity ALDH2 variant is associated with an inability to metabolize this compound. The effects of acetaldehyde may be expressed either in the cells generating it, or by delivery of acetaldehyde to various tissues by the bloodstream or even saliva. Inheritance of the high-activity ADH beta2, encoded by the ADH2*2 gene, and the inactive ALDH2*2 gene product have been conclusively associated with reduced risk of alcoholism. This association is influenced by gene-environment interactions, such as religion and national origin. The variants have also been studied for association with alcoholic liver disease, cancer, fetal alcohol syndrome, CVD, gout, asthma and clearance of xenobiotics. The strongest correlations found to date have been those between the ALDH2*2 allele and cancers of the oro-pharynx and oesophagus. It will be important to replicate other interesting associations between these variants and other cancers and heart disease, and to determine the biochemical mechanisms underlying the associations. PMID:15099407

  14. Using SANS to monitor the interaction of misfolding alcohol dehydrogenase with the molecular chaperone protein 14-3-3ζ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14-3-3 is a family of acidic, dimeric proteins which are highly conserved across many species. Each monomer is approximately 30kDa in mass and contains 9 α-helices. Dimer formation is initiated at the N-terminal region of the protein as a result of the interaction between several buried polar and hydrophobic residues in this region. 14-3-3 proteins interact with a wide range of proteins to regulate many cellular processes, e.g. apoptosis and mitosis, as well as protein misfolding associated with conformational diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease. A potential role of 14-3-3 in these diseases was discovered with the observation that 14-3-3ζ can act as a molecular chaperone, whereby it stabilises intermediately folded proteins to prevent their aggregation. The binding site and mechanism of the chaperone action of 14-3-3ζ are not known, despite being narrowed down in our NMR study. We produced deuterated 14-3-3ζ and used it in SANS experiments with a model misfolding protein, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Contrast variation allowed us to monitor changes in each component separately after the initiation of ADH misfolding. The Rg and Dmax values of ADH under stress show an increase in size with time, consistent with unfolding and aggregation. In the presence of 14-3-3ζ, the unfolding of ADH is reduced and the protein maintains a globular expanded conformation consistent with an adoption of an intermediately folded (molten globule) state. 14-3-3ζ whilst chaperoning showed a reduction in size, possibly due to dissociation. Ab initio models were also obtained. This is the first instance where conformational changes during chaperoning of either a partly folded target protein, or 14-3-3ζ, have been observed.

  15. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis implementing a Mendelian randomization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Stefania; Hashibe, Mia; Gallì, Paola; De Feo, Emma; Asakage, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Hiraki, Akio; Katoh, Takahiko; Nomura, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Akira; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ricciardi, Gualtiero; Boffetta, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol drinking at high doses is a risk factor for head and neck cancer, and exposure to acetaldehyde, the principle metabolite of alcohol, is supposed to account for the increased risk. Individuals homozygous for the 2 variant allele of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) are unable to metabolize acetaldehyde, which prevents them from alcohol drinking, whereas 1 2 have 6-fold higher blood acetaldehyde concentration postalcohol consumption with respect to 1 1. According to the concept of Mendelian randomization, because this polymorphism is distributed randomly during gamete formation, its association with head and neck cancer should be not confounded by smoking. We carried out a meta-analysis of ALDH2 and head and neck cancer searching for relevant studies on Medline and Embase up to January 31, 2008, and investigated the consistency between the expected odds ratio (OR) among drinkers from the largest pooled analysis among never smokers and the observed OR from this meta-analysis by an interaction test. Six studies were selected (945 cases, 2,917 controls). The OR of head and neck cancer among 2 2 was 0.53 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.28-1.00] relative to 1 1 and 1.83 (95% CI, 1.21-2.77) among 1 2. The expected OR for head and neck cancer due to alcohol intake among 1 1 was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.88-2.17) and the observed OR among 1 1 compared with 2*2 from this meta-analysis was 1.88 (95% CI, 1.00-3.57; P for interaction = 0.43). Besides showing the effectiveness of the Mendelian randomization approach, these findings support the theory that alcohol increases head and neck cancer risk through the carcinogenic action of acetaldehyde. PMID:19124505

  16. Role of Packing Defects in the Evolution of Allostery and Induced Fit in Human UDP-Glucose Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Sennett, Nicholas C.; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Weitzel, Stephen; Wood, Zachary A. (Oregon); (Georgia)

    2012-05-25

    Allosteric feedback inhibition is the mechanism by which metabolic end products regulate their own biosynthesis by binding to an upstream enzyme. Despite its importance in controlling metabolism, there are relatively few allosteric mechanisms understood in detail. This is because allostery does not have an identifiable structural motif, making the discovery of new allosteric enzymes a difficult process. The lack of a conserved motif implies that the evolution of each allosteric mechanism is unique. Here we describe an atypical allosteric mechanism in human UDP-{alpha}-D-glucose 6-dehydrogenase (hUGDH) based on an easily acquired and identifiable structural attribute: packing defects in the protein core. In contrast to classic allostery, the active and allosteric sites in hUGDH are present as a single, bifunctional site. Using two new crystal structures, we show that binding of the feedback inhibitor, UDP-{alpha}-D-xylose, elicits a distinct induced-fit response; a buried loop translates {approx}4 {angstrom} along and rotates {approx}180{sup o} about the main chain axis, requiring surrounding side chains to repack. This allosteric transition is facilitated by packing defects, which negate the steric conformational restraints normally imposed by the protein core. Sedimentation velocity studies show that this repacking favors the formation of an inactive hexameric complex with unusual symmetry. We present evidence that hUGDH and the unrelated enzyme dCTP deaminase have converged to very similar atypical allosteric mechanisms using the same adaptive strategy, the selection for packing defects. Thus, the selection for packing defects is a robust mechanism for the evolution of allostery and induced fit.

  17. The PduQ enzyme is an alcohol dehydrogenase used to recycle NAD+ internally within the Pdu microcompartment of Salmonella enterica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouqiang Cheng

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica uses a bacterial microcompartment (MCP for coenzyme B(12-dependent 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD utilization (Pdu. The Pdu MCP consists of a protein shell that encapsulates enzymes and cofactors required for metabolizing 1,2-PD as a carbon and energy source. Here we show that the PduQ protein of S. enterica is an iron-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase used for 1,2-PD catabolism. PduQ is also demonstrated to be a new component of the Pdu MCP. In addition, a series of in vivo and in vitro studies show that a primary function of PduQ is to recycle NADH to NAD(+ internally within the Pdu MCP in order to supply propionaldehyde dehydrogenase (PduP with its required cofactor (NAD(+. Genetic tests determined that a pduQ deletion mutant grew slower than wild-type Salmonella on 1,2-PD and that this phenotype was not complemented by a non-MCP associated Adh2 from Zymomonas that catalyzes the same reaction. This suggests that PduQ has a MCP-specific function. We also found that a pduQ deletion mutant had no growth defect in a genetic background having a second mutation that prevents MCP formation which further supports a MCP-specific role for PduQ. Moreover, studies with purified Pdu MCPs demonstrated that the PduQ enzyme can convert NADH to NAD(+ to supply the PduP reaction in vitro. Cumulatively, these studies show that the PduQ enzyme is used to recycle NADH to NAD(+ internally within the Pdu MCP. To our knowledge, this is the first report of internal recycling as a mechanism for cofactor homeostasis within a bacterial MCP.

  18. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including an...... overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  19. The three-dimensional structure of the ternary complex of Corynebacterium glutamicum diaminopimelate dehydrogenase-NADPH-L-2-amino-6-methylene-pimelate.

    OpenAIRE

    Cirilli, M.; Scapin, G.; Sutherland, A; Vederas, J. C.; Blanchard, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structure of Corynebacterium glutamicum diaminopimelate D-dehydrogenase in a ternary complex with NADPH and L-2-amino-6-methylene-pimelate has been solved and refined to a resolution of 2.1 A. L-2-Amino-6-methylene-pimelate was recently synthesized and shown to be a potent competitive inhibitor (5 microM) vs. meso-diaminopimelate of the Bacillus sphaericus dehydrogenase (Sutherland et al., 1999). Diaminopimelate dehydrogenase catalyzes the reversible NADP+ -dependen...

  20. Mutations in human lipoyltransferase gene LIPT1 cause a Leigh disease with secondary deficiency for pyruvate and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Soreze, Yohan; Boutron, Audrey; Habarou, Florence; Barnerias, Christine; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Delpech, Hélène; Mamoune, Asmaa; Chrétien, Dominique; Hubert, Laurence; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Correia, Isabelle; Sardet, Claude; Boddaert, Nathalie; Hamel, Yamina

    2013-01-01

    Background Synthesis and apoenzyme attachment of lipoic acid have emerged as a new complex metabolic pathway. Mutations in several genes involved in the lipoic acid de novo pathway have recently been described (i.e., LIAS, NFU1, BOLA3, IBA57), but no mutation was found so far in genes involved in the specific process of attachment of lipoic acid to apoenzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHc), α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (α-KGDHc) and branched chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDHc) complexes....