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Sample records for bobtail squid euprymna

  1. Characterizing the host and symbiont proteomes in the association between the Bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler R Schleicher

    Full Text Available The beneficial symbiosis between the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, provides a unique opportunity to study host/microbe interactions within a natural microenvironment. Colonization of the squid light organ by V. fischeri begins a lifelong association with a regulated daily rhythm. Each morning the host expels an exudate from the light organ consisting of 95% of the symbiont population in addition to host hemocytes and shed epithelial cells. We analyzed the host and symbiont proteomes of adult squid exudate and surrounding light organ epithelial tissue using 1D- and 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT in an effort to understand the contribution of both partners to the maintenance of this association. These proteomic analyses putatively identified 1581 unique proteins, 870 proteins originating from the symbiont and 711 from the host. Identified host proteins indicate a role of the innate immune system and reactive oxygen species (ROS in regulating the symbiosis. Symbiont proteins detected enhance our understanding of the role of quorum sensing, two-component signaling, motility, and detoxification of ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS inside the light organ. This study offers the first proteomic analysis of the symbiotic microenvironment of the adult light organ and provides the identification of proteins important to the regulation of this beneficial association.

  2. HOX genes in the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes: Implications for the evolution of complex body plans

    OpenAIRE

    Callaerts, Patrick; Lee, Patricia N.; Hartmann, Britta; Farfan, Claudia; Choy, Darrett W. Y.; Ikeo, Kazuho; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich; Gehring, Walter J.; de Couet, H. Gert

    2002-01-01

    Molluscs display a rich diversity of body plans ranging from the wormlike appearance of aplacophorans to the complex body plan of the cephalopods with highly developed sensory organs, a complex central nervous system, and cognitive abilities unrivaled among the invertebrates. The aim of the current study is to define molecular parameters relevant to the developmental evolution of cephalopods by using the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes as a model system. Using PCR-based approaches, we identi...

  3. Does predation risk affect mating behavior? An experimental test in dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M Franklin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: One of the most important trade-offs for many animals is that between survival and reproduction. This is particularly apparent when mating increases the risk of predation, either by increasing conspicuousness, reducing mobility or inhibiting an individual's ability to detect predators. Individuals may mitigate the risk of predation by altering their reproductive behavior (e.g. increasing anti-predator responses to reduce conspicuousness. The degree to which individuals modulate their reproductive behavior in relation to predation risk is difficult to predict because both the optimal investment in current and future reproduction (due to life-history strategies and level of predation risk may differ between the sexes and among species. Here, we investigate the effect of increased predation risk on the reproductive behavior of dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica. RESULTS: Females, but not males, showed a substantial increase in the number of inks (an anti-predator behavior before mating commenced in the presence of a predator (sand flathead Platycephalus bassensis. However, predation risk did not affect copulation duration, the likelihood of mating, female anti-predator behavior during or after mating or male anti-predator behavior at any time. CONCLUSIONS: Inking is a common anti-predator defense in cephalopods, thought to act like a smokescreen, decoy or distraction. Female dumpling squid are probably using this form of defense in response to the increase in predation risk prior to mating. Conversely, males were undeterred by the increase in predation risk. A lack of change in these variables may occur if the benefit of completing mating outweighs the risk of predation. Prioritizing current reproduction, even under predation risk, can occur when the chance of future reproduction is low, there is substantial energetic investment into mating, or the potential fitness payoffs of mating are high.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of the white body of the squid Euprymna tasmanica with emphasis on immune and hematopoietic gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A Salazar

    Full Text Available In the mutualistic relationship between the squid Euprymna tasmanica and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, several host factors, including immune-related proteins, are known to interact and respond specifically and exclusively to the presence of the symbiont. In squid and octopus, the white body is considered to be an immune organ mainly due to the fact that blood cells, or hemocytes, are known to be present in high numbers and in different developmental stages. Hence, the white body has been described as the site of hematopoiesis in cephalopods. However, to our knowledge, there are no studies showing any molecular evidence of such functions. In this study, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of white body tissue of the Southern dumpling squid, E. tasmanica. Our primary goal was to gain insights into the functions of this tissue and to test for the presence of gene transcripts associated with hematopoietic and immune processes. Several hematopoiesis genes including CPSF1, GATA 2, TFIID, and FGFR2 were found to be expressed in the white body. In addition, transcripts associated with immune-related signal transduction pathways, such as the toll-like receptor/NF-κβ, and MAPK pathways were also found, as well as other immune genes previously identified in E. tasmanica's sister species, E. scolopes. This study is the first to analyze an immune organ within cephalopods, and to provide gene expression data supporting the white body as a hematopoietic tissue.

  5. Developmental expression of apterous/Lhx2/9 in the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes supports an ancestral role in neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán, Claudia; Shigeno, Shuichi; Nödl, Marie-Therese; de Couet, H Gert

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factors Apterous/Lhx2/9 play many pivotal roles in the development of protostomes and deuterostomes, most notably limb patterning, eye morphogenesis, and brain development. Full-length apterous/lhx2/9 homologs have been isolated from several invertebrate species, but hitherto not from a lophotrochozoan. Here, we report the isolation, characterization, and spatio-temporal expression of apterous in the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes. The isolated composite cDNA encodes a hypothetical protein of 448 amino acid residues with a typical LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) structure and the greatest overall sequence similarity to vertebrate Lhx2/9 proteins. The Euprymna scolopes apterous (Es-ap) expression patterns provided no indication of a role in the early dorso/ventral patterning or growth of the arm crown that showed expression only in two ventral cords running in parallel inside the arms and tentacles and at the base of the suckers, a region rich in nerve endings and chemosensory neurons. The Es-ap hybridization signal was also conspicuous in the eyes, olfactory organs, optic lobes, and in several lobes of the supraesophageal mass, among these the olfactory and vertical lobes, and paravertical bodies. The observed expression patterns suggest gene involvement in eye morphogenesis and neural wiring of sensory structures, including those for olfaction and vision.

  6. Photoreceptor fine structure in the bobtail goanna (Tiliqua rugosa)

    OpenAIRE

    Braekevelt, Charlie R.

    1989-01-01

    The fine structure of the retinal photoreceptors has been studied by light and electron microscopy in the bobtail goanna (Tiliqua rugosa) an Australian diurna1 lizard. The photoreceptors in this species are readily divisible into rods or cones based on morphological criteria. Single cones are the dominate cell type with a cone:rod ratio of about 80: 1. No multiple photoreceptors were present nor was a photoreceptor mosiac observed. Cones are large cells with a ...

  7. An annotated cDNA library of juvenile Euprymna scolopes with and without colonization by the symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Deyan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologists are becoming increasingly aware that the interaction of animals, including humans, with their coevolved bacterial partners is essential for health. This growing awareness has been a driving force for the development of models for the study of beneficial animal-bacterial interactions. In the squid-vibrio model, symbiotic Vibrio fischeri induce dramatic developmental changes in the light organ of host Euprymna scolopes over the first hours to days of their partnership. We report here the creation of a juvenile light-organ specific EST database. Results We generated eleven cDNA libraries from the light organ of E. scolopes at developmentally significant time points with and without colonization by V. fischeri. Single pass 3' sequencing efforts generated 42,564 expressed sequence tags (ESTs of which 35,421 passed our quality criteria and were then clustered via the UIcluster program into 13,962 nonredundant sequences. The cDNA clones representing these nonredundant sequences were sequenced from the 5' end of the vector and 58% of these resulting sequences overlapped significantly with the associated 3' sequence to generate 8,067 contigs with an average sequence length of 1,065 bp. All sequences were annotated with BLASTX (E-value Conclusion Both the number of ESTs generated from each library and GO categorizations are reflective of the activity state of the light organ during these early stages of symbiosis. Future analyses of the sequences identified in these libraries promise to provide valuable information not only about pathways involved in colonization and early development of the squid light organ, but also about pathways conserved in response to bacterial colonization across the animal kingdom.

  8. Japanese Bobtail: vertebral morphology and genetic characterization of an established cat breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Rachel E; Koehne, Amanda L; Peterson, Carlyn B; Lyons, Leslie A

    2015-08-01

    Several cat breeds are defined by morphological variation of the tail. The Japanese Bobtail is a breed that has been accepted for registration only within the past 50 years; however, the congenital kinked tail variants defining this breed were documented in the Far East centuries ago and the cats are considered 'good luck' in several Asian cultures. The recent discovery of the mutation for the tailless Manx phenotype has demonstrated that the Japanese Bobtail does not have a causative mutation in the same gene (T-Box). Here, a simple segregation analysis of cats bred from a pedigreed Japanese Bobtail demonstrated a simple autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with variable expression of the tail length and kink placement. Unexpectedly, radiological examinations of the entire vertebral column of kink-tailed cats indicated variation from the normal vertebral feline formula (C7, T13, L7, S3, Cd20-24), including cats with mostly one reduction of thoracic vertebrae (C7, T12, L7, S3), and an average of 15.8 caudal vertebrae. A few cats had variation in the number of cervical vertebrae. Several transitional vertebrae and anomalous ribs were noted. One cat had a bifid vertebra in the tail. Most cats had hemivertebrae that were usually included in the tail kink, one of which was demonstrated by gross pathology and histopathology. The abnormal vertebral formula or the placement of the kink in the tail did not coincide with morbidity or mortality. PMID:25488973

  9. Japanese Bobtail: vertebral morphology and genetic characterization of an established cat breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Rachel E; Koehne, Amanda L; Peterson, Carlyn B; Lyons, Leslie A

    2015-08-01

    Several cat breeds are defined by morphological variation of the tail. The Japanese Bobtail is a breed that has been accepted for registration only within the past 50 years; however, the congenital kinked tail variants defining this breed were documented in the Far East centuries ago and the cats are considered 'good luck' in several Asian cultures. The recent discovery of the mutation for the tailless Manx phenotype has demonstrated that the Japanese Bobtail does not have a causative mutation in the same gene (T-Box). Here, a simple segregation analysis of cats bred from a pedigreed Japanese Bobtail demonstrated a simple autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with variable expression of the tail length and kink placement. Unexpectedly, radiological examinations of the entire vertebral column of kink-tailed cats indicated variation from the normal vertebral feline formula (C7, T13, L7, S3, Cd20-24), including cats with mostly one reduction of thoracic vertebrae (C7, T12, L7, S3), and an average of 15.8 caudal vertebrae. A few cats had variation in the number of cervical vertebrae. Several transitional vertebrae and anomalous ribs were noted. One cat had a bifid vertebra in the tail. Most cats had hemivertebrae that were usually included in the tail kink, one of which was demonstrated by gross pathology and histopathology. The abnormal vertebral formula or the placement of the kink in the tail did not coincide with morbidity or mortality.

  10. Squid Rolls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Ingredients: 250 grams of squid, 100 grams of broccoli. a pinch of green tea, 50 grams of bamboo shoots, 100 grams of various kinds of mushroom, 50 grams of chicken broth, chopped green union, ginger, cooking wine, salt, pep per and MSG.

  11. Holographic SQUID

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    We propose a holographic model of the SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) composed of two Josephson junctions connected each other in a circle with the magnetic flux penetrating the circuit of the SQUID and the supercurrents flowing in both Josephson junction. The gravity in this paper is the Einstein-Maxwell-complex scalar field model on the four-dimensional Anti-de Sitter Schwarzschild black brane geometry in which one space direction is compactified into a circle, and we arrange the profile of the coefficient of the time component of the gauge field having the role for the chemical potential of the cooper pair. The magnetic flux is involved by the rewriting of the surface integral of the magnetic field to the contour integral of the gauge field.

  12. Squid The Definitive Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Wessels, Duane

    2009-01-01

    Squid is the most popular Web caching software in use today, and it works on a variety of platforms including Linux, FreeBSD, and Windows. Written by Duane Wessels, the creator of Squid, Squid: The Definitive Guide will help you configure and tune Squid for your particular situation. Newcomers to Squid will learn how to download, compile, and install code. Seasoned users of Squid will be interested in the later chapters, which tackle advanced topics such as high-performance storage options, rewriting requests, HTTP server acceleration, monitoring, debugging, and troubleshooting Squid.

  13. The SQUID Handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Braginski, Alex I

    2006-01-01

    This two-volume handbook offers a comprehensive and well coordinated presentation of SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices), including device fundamentals, design, technology, system construction and multiple applications. It is intended to bridge the gap between fundamentals and applications, and will be a valuable textbook reference for graduate students and for professionals engaged in SQUID research and engineering. It will also be of use to specialists in multiple fields of practical SQUID applications, from human brain research and heart diagnostics to airplane and nuclear

  14. Market Squid Ecology Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains ecological information collected on the major adult spawning and juvenile habitats of market squid off California and the US Pacific...

  15. Market Squid Population Dynamics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains population dynamics data on paralarvae, juvenile and adult market squid collected off California and the US Pacific Northwest. These data were...

  16. Vortex electronis and squids

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the nature of vortices in high-Tc superconductors is a crucial subject for research on superconductive electronics, especially for superconducting interference devices (SQUIDs), it is also a fundamental problem in condensed-matter physics. Recent technological progress in methods for both direct and indirect observation of vortices, e.g. scanning SQUID, terahertz imaging, and microwave excitation, has led to new insights into vortex physics, the dynamic behavior of vortices in junctions and related questions of noise. This book presents the current status of research activity and provides new information on the applications of SQUIDs, including magnetocardiography, immunoassays, and laser-SQUID microscopes, all of which are close to being commercially available.

  17. SQUIDs - quo vadis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: hans.koch@ptb.de

    2008-09-15

    For many decades R and D on superconducting quantum infererence devices (SQUIDs) has resulted in numerous and very diverse applications. However the commercial success of these applications is still marginal. This contribution analyses the reasons and discusses possible measures to improve this situation particularly for the application of multichannel SQUID systems for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiograpphy (MCG). The possible impact of combining low field magnetresonance imaging (lfMRI) with MEG and/or MCG is considered as well.

  18. Dispersive nanoSQUID magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Antler, N.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-11-01

    We describe the theory and implementation of a dispersive magnetometer based on an aluminum nanoSQUID. The nanoSQUID consists of a superconducting loop interrupted by two variable-thickness weak-link nanobridge Josephson junctions. When the nanoSQUID is placed in parallel with a lumped-element capacitor, it acts as the inductive element in a resonant tank circuit. By performing microwave reflectometry on the circuit, the SQUID inductance can be measured, providing a sensitive meter of the flux threading the SQUID loop. In this review we provide the theoretical basis for the device, describe design and operation considerations, and present characterization results on several devices.

  19. SQUIDs - ultimate magnetic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) have extreme electromagnetic energy sensitivity, which can be applied in a wide variety of ways. Some of these are covered in the papers representing the rest of this symposium: in this brief introductory paper we indicate the wide extent of the full range of applications to which they have been put, from bioscience to tests of General Relativity. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Cryostats for SQUID magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non metallic and non magnetic cryostat, with a very low thermal budget and a container type autonomy was developed, to condition S.Q.U.I.D. magnetometers which maximum sensitivity reaches 10-14 Tesla Hertzsup(-1/2). This instrumentation puts in hand new concepts of composite materials, thermal shock and vibration resistant, multilayer thermal radiative insulation also to the prouve of vibrations with thermal equivalent emissivity lower than 10-3

  1. SQUIDs: microscopes and nondestructive evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mück, Michael

    2005-03-01

    SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) are magnetic field sensores with unsurpassed sensitivity. They are amazingly versatile, being able to measure all physical quantities which can be converted to magnetic flux. They are routinely fabricated in thin film technology from two classes of superconducting materials: high-temperature superconductors (HTS) which are usually cooled to 77 K, and low-temperature superconductors (LTS), which have to be cooled to 4.2 K. SQUIDs have many applications, two of which shall be discussed in this paper. In SQUID microscopy, a SQUID scans a sample, which preferrably is at room temperature, and measures the two-dimensional magnetic field distribution at the surface of the sample. In order to achieve a relatively high spatial resolution, the stand-off distance between the sample and the SQUID is made as small as possible. SQUIDs show also promising results in the field of nondestructive testing of various materials. For example, ferromagnetic impurities in stainless steel formed by aging processes in the material can be detected with high probability, and cracks in conducting materials, for example aircraft parts, can be located using eddy current methods. Especially for the case of thick, highly conductive, or ferromagnetic materials, as well as sintered materials, it can be shown that a SQUID-based NDE system exhibits a much higher sensitivity compared to conventional eddy current NDE and ultrasonic testing.

  2. Principles and applications of SQUIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) combine flux quantization and Josephson tunneling to produce an output voltage that is periodic in the applied magnetic flux with a period of one flux quantum Phio. SQUIDs are thus flux-to-voltage transducers, and are able to detect changes in flux much smaller that Phio. Using Nb-based thin-film technology, a number of groups can now routinely fabricate dc SQUIDs with input circuits integrated on the same chip. At 4.2 Κ the dc SQUID, which operates with a constant bias current, can detect signals with an equivalent energy per unit bandwidth of a few hundred h-bar. At low frequencies, the SQUID exhibits l/f noise that originates in fluctuations in the critical current of the junctions and in the motion of magnetic flux trapped in the thin films. RF SQUIDs, which operate with an RF flux bias, are usually machined from bulk Nb, and have a typical energy sensitivity per unit bandwidth of 105 to 106 h-bar. Both types of SQUID can be used in a wide variety of applications, including magnetometers, gradiometers, susceptometers, voltmeters, RF amplifiers, gravity wave antennas, and gravity gradiometers

  3. SQUID technology for geophysical exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, H.G.; Stolz, R.; Chwala, A.; Linzen, S.; Schultze, V. [Inst. for Physical High Technology, Jena (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Magnetic measurements are widely used for geophysical exploration. The fields of applications are ranging from mineral exploration, environmental and military monitoring to archaeometry. During the past few years several SQUID systems for geomagnetic measurements have been developed and successfully tested. Compared to conventional systems their outstanding performance was demonstrated. The latest of such systems are mainly based on LTS SQUIDs and shall be summarized here. Airborne geophysics is extremely interesting in prospecting, since they allow effectively covering large areas with sufficiently high spatial resolution in a short period of time. Geomagnetics detects basically anomalies of the Earth's magnetic field. In order to use sensitive SQUID gradiometers in airborne applications a high common mode rejection is necessary, since the parasitic areas of the SQUID gradiometer lead to motion noise if the gradiometer is tilted in the Earth's magnetic field. The recently developed planar LTS SQUID gradiometers with a base length of 3.5 cm show an intrinsic balance of about 10{sup 4}. In this way a noise limited gradient field resolution better than 100 fT/[m.{radical}(Hz)] down to 0.1 Hz is achieved. By means of the airborne SQUID system the complete gradient tensor of the Earth's magnetic field was measured with superior accuracy never reached so far. (orig.)

  4. SQUID-based measuring systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P Janawadkar; R Baskaran; R Nagendran; K Gireesan; N Harishkumar; Rita Saha; L S Vaidhyanathan; J Jayapandian; Y Hariharan; T S Radhakrishnan

    2002-05-01

    A program has been developed and initiated at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) for the utilization of SQUID sensors in various application areas. DC SQUID sensors based on Nb–AlO–Nb Josephson junctions have been designed and developed inhouse along with associated flux-locked loop (FLL) electronics. A compact low field SQUID magnetometer insertible in a liquid helium storage dewar has also been developed inhouse and is in use. Efforts to build a high field SQUID magnetometer, SQUID-DAC system, are in progress. A planar gradiometric DC SQUID sensor for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) application to be used in relatively unshielded environment has been designed and developed. An easily portable NDE cryostat with a small lift-off distance, to be used in external locations has been designed and tested. The magnetic field produced by a given two-dimensional current density distribution is inverted using the Fourier transform technique.

  5. Understanding the Role of Host Hemocytes in a Squid/Vibrio Symbiosis Using Transcriptomics and Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Collins

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosis between the squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, serves as a model for understanding interactions between beneficial bacteria and animal hosts. The establishment and maintenance of the association is highly specific and depends on the selection of V. fischeri and exclusion of non-symbiotic bacteria from the environment. Current evidence suggests that the host’s cellular innate immune system, in the form of macrophage-like hemocytes, helps to mediate host tolerance of V. fischeri. To begin to understand the role of hemocytes in this association, we analyzed these cells by high-throughput 454 transcriptomic and liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses. 454 high-throughput sequencing produced 650,686 reads totaling 279.9 Mb while LC-MS/MS analyses of circulating hemocytes putatively identified 702 unique proteins. Several receptors involved with the recognition of microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs were identified. Among these was a complete open reading frame (ORF to a putative peptidoglycan recognition protein (EsPGRP5 that has conserved residues for amidase activity. Assembly of the hemocyte transcriptome showed EsPGRP5 had high coverage, suggesting it is among the 5% most abundant transcripts in circulating hemocytes. Other transcripts and proteins identified included members of the conserved NFκB signaling pathway, putative members of the complement pathway, the carbohydrate binding protein galectin, and cephalotoxin. Quantitative PCR of complement-related genes, cephalotoxin, EsPGRP5, and a nitric oxide synthase showed differential expression in circulating hemocytes isolated from adult squid with colonized light organs compared to those for which the symbionts were removed. These data suggest that the presence of the symbiont influences gene expression of the cellular innate immune system of the host.

  6. Squid rocket science: How squid launch into air

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dor, Ron; Stewart, Julia; Gilly, William; Payne, John; Borges, Teresa Cerveira; Thys, Tierney

    2013-10-01

    Squid not only swim, they can also fly like rockets, accelerating through the air by forcefully expelling water out of their mantles. Using available lab and field data from four squid species, Sthenoteuthis pteropus, Dosidicus gigas, Illex illecebrosus and Loligo opalescens, including sixteen remarkable photographs of flying S. pteropus off the coast of Brazil, we compared the cost of transport in both water and air and discussed methods of maximizing power output through funnel and mantle constriction. Additionally we found that fin flaps develop at approximately the same size range as flight behaviors in these squids, consistent with previous hypotheses that flaps could function as ailerons whilst aloft. S. pteropus acceleration in air (265 body lengths [BL]/s2; 24.5m/s2) was found to exceed that in water (79BL/s2) three-fold based on estimated mantle length from still photos. Velocities in air (37BL/s; 3.4m/s) exceed those in water (11BL/s) almost four-fold. Given the obvious advantages of this extreme mode of transport, squid flight may in fact be more common than previously thought and potentially employed to reduce migration cost in addition to predation avoidance. Clearly squid flight, the role of fin flaps and funnel, and the energetic benefits are worthy of extended investigation.

  7. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley national Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1997-05-01

    Low transition temperature (low-{Tc}) and high-{Tc} Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-{Tc} superconductors using two low-{Tc} SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-{Tc} SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity.

  8. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low transition temperature (low-Tc) and high-Tc Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-Tc superconductors using two low-Tc SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-Tc SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity

  9. Paleomagnetism with the SQUID Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, B. P.; Baudenbacher, F. J.; Wikswo, J. P.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2002-05-01

    Rocks should preserve stable remanent magnetizations with useful directional and intensity information at levels down to ~10-15 Am2, about 1000 times below that of the noise level on today's best superconducting moment magnetometers. As a result, a more sensitive magnetometer could dramatically expand the range and variety of rock types amenable to paleomagnetic analysis. Just such an instrument is now on the horizon: the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) Microscope, designed by F. Baudenbacher and J. Wikswo of Vanderbilt University. The SQUID Microscope makes a map of the vertical component of the magnetic field above the surface of a sample held at room temperature and pressure. It achieves this with a spatial resolution of 250 μ m and a moment sensitivity 10,000 times that of the most recent 2G Enterprises Superconducting Rock Magnetometer (2G SRM). It can therefore provide data with a resolution comparable with that of other common petrographic techniques such as optical and electron microscopy. A major reason that the SQUID Microscope has such high sensitivity and resolution compared to the 2G SRM is that it has a much smaller pickup coil. Smaller coils are more sensitive to dipoles because they encompass less of the sample's fringing fields oriented in the opposite sense to its magnetization. Smaller coils also encompass a smaller area above the sample and so also provide higher spatial resolution. Our initial collaborative work on 30-μ m thin sections of Martian meteorite ALH84001 has already demonstrated that SQUID Microscopy will enable a whole a new class of paleomagnetic analyses. Conglomerate, baked contact, and fold tests can be performed on extremely small spatial scales, vastly expanding the utility of these critical geological field tests of magnetic stability. A suite of rock-magnetic and paleomagnetic experiments can be done on individual grains in standard petrographic thin sections at very high rates, allowing the observed

  10. Analytical derivation of DC SQUID response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, I. I.; Klenov, N. V.; Schegolev, A. E.; Bakurskiy, S. V.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu

    2016-09-01

    We consider voltage and current response formation in DC superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with overdamped Josephson junctions in resistive and superconducting state in the context of a resistively shunted junction (RSJ) model. For simplicity we neglect the junction capacitance and the noise effect. Explicit expressions for the responses in resistive state were obtained for a SQUID which is symmetrical with respect to bias current injection point. Normalized SQUID inductance l=2{{eI}}{{c}}L/{\\hslash } (where I c is the critical current of Josephson junction, L is the SQUID inductance, e is the electron charge and ℏ is the Planck constant) was assumed to be within the range l ≤ 1, subsequently expanded up to l≈ 7 using two fitting parameters. SQUID current response in the superconducting state was considered for arbitrary value of the inductance. The impact of small technological spread of parameters relevant to low-temperature superconductor (LTS) technology was studied, using a generalization of the developed analytical approach, for the case of a small difference of critical currents and shunt resistances of the Josephson junctions, and inequality of SQUID inductive shoulders for both resistive and superconducting states. Comparison with numerical calculation results shows that developed analytical expressions can be used in practical LTS SQUIDs and SQUID-based circuits design, e.g. large serial SQIF, drastically decreasing the time of simulation.

  11. Dc SQUIDs with asymmetric shunt resistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Matthias; Nagel, Joachim; Kemmler, Matthias; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [Physikalisches Institut - Experimentalphysik II and Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena in LISAplus, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Meckbach, Johannes Maximilian; Ilin, Konstantin; Siegel, Michael [Institut fuer Mikro- und Nanoelektronische Systeme, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We have investigated asymmetrically shunted Nb/Al-AlO{sub x}/Nb dc SQUIDs. Simulations based on the coupled Langevin equations predict that the optimum energy resolution ε, and thus also the noise performance of such an asymmetric SQUID, can be 3-4 times better than that of its symmetric counterpart. While keeping the total resistance R identical to a comparable symmetric SQUID with R{sup -1} = R{sub 1}{sup -1} + R{sub 2}{sup -1}, we shunted only one of the two Josephson junctions with R = R{sub 1,2}/2. Both types of SQUIDs were characterized with respect to their transport and noise properties at temperature T = 4.2 K, and we compared the experimental results with numerical simulations. Experiments yielded ε ∼ 32 ℎ for an asymmetric SQUID with an inductance L = 22 pH, whereas a comparable symmetric device achieved ε = 110 ℎ.

  12. Biofunctional Properties of Enzymatic Squid Meat Hydrolysate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 μg/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 μg/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  13. Low field electron paramagnetic resonance imaging with SQUID detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor); Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Cohen, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    In one embodiment, a flux transformer with a gradiometer pickup coil is magnetically coupled to a SQUID, and a SQUID array amplifier comprising a plurality of SQUIDs, connected in series, is magnetically coupled to the output of the SQUID. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  14. Aperture effects in squid jet propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staaf, Danna J; Gilly, William F; Denny, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Squid are the largest jet propellers in nature as adults, but as paralarvae they are some of the smallest, faced with the inherent inefficiency of jet propulsion at a low Reynolds number. In this study we describe the behavior and kinematics of locomotion in 1 mm paralarvae of Dosidicus gigas, the smallest squid yet studied. They swim with hop-and-sink behavior and can engage in fast jets by reducing the size of the mantle aperture during the contraction phase of a jetting cycle. We go on to explore the general effects of a variable mantle and funnel aperture in a theoretical model of jet propulsion scaled from the smallest (1 mm mantle length) to the largest (3 m) squid. Aperture reduction during mantle contraction increases propulsive efficiency at all squid sizes, although 1 mm squid still suffer from low efficiency (20%) because of a limited speed of contraction. Efficiency increases to a peak of 40% for 1 cm squid, then slowly declines. Squid larger than 6 cm must either reduce contraction speed or increase aperture size to maintain stress within maximal muscle tolerance. Ecological pressure to maintain maximum velocity may lead them to increase aperture size, which reduces efficiency. This effect might be ameliorated by nonaxial flow during the refill phase of the cycle. Our model's predictions highlight areas for future empirical work, and emphasize the existence of complex behavioral options for maximizing efficiency at both very small and large sizes. PMID:24501132

  15. Review of SQUID Sensors for Measuring Magnetocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. H.; Kim, J. M.; Yu, K. K.; Kim, K.; Kwon, H. [Brain and Cognition Measurement Lab, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Measurement of magnetic signals generated from electric activity of myocardium provides useful information for the functional diagnosis of heart diseases. Key technical component of the magnetocardiography (MCG) technology is SQUID. To measure MCG signals with high signal-to-noise ratio, sensitive SQUID magnetic field sensors are needed. Present magnetic field sensors based on Nb SQUIDs have field sensitivity good enough to measure most of MCG signals. However, for accurate measurement of fine signal pattern or detection of local atrial fibrillation signals, we may need higher field sensitivity. In addition to field sensitivity, economic aspect of the SQUID system is also important. To simplify the SQUID readout electronics, the output voltage or flux-to-voltage transfer of SQUID should be large enough so that direct measurement of SQUID output can be done using room-temperature preamplifiers. Double relaxation oscillation SQUID (DROS), having about 10 times larger flux-to-voltage transfers than those of DC-SQUIDs, was shown to be a good choice to make the electronics compact. For effective cancellation of external noise inside a thin economic shielded room, first-order axial gradiometer with high balance, simple structure and long-baseline is needed. We developed a technology to make the axial gradiometer compact using direct bonding of superconductive wires between pickup coil and input coil. Conventional insert has mechanical support to hold the gradiometer array, and the dewar neck has equal diameter with the dewar bottom. Boiling of the liquid He can generate mechanical vibrations in the gradiometer array due to mechanical connection structure. Elimination of the mechanical support, and direct mounting of the gradiometer array into the dewar bottom can reduce the dewar neck diameter, resulting in the reduction of liquid He consumption.

  16. Biofunctional Properties of Enzymatic Squid Meat Hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 μg/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I...

  17. Development of Biomimetic Squid-Inspired Suckers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinping Hou; Edward Wright; Richard H. C. Bonser; George Jeronimidis

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanical properties of squid suckers were studied to provide inspiration for the development of sucker artefacts for a robotic octopus.Mechanical support of the rings found inside squid suckers was studied by bending tests.Tensile tests were carried out to study the maximum possible sucking force produced by squid suckers based on the strength of sucker stalks,normalized by the sucking areas.The squid suckers were also directly tested to obtain sucking forces by a special testing arrangement.Inspired by the squid suckers,three types of sucker artefacts were developed for the arm skin of an octopus inspired robot.The first sucker artefact made of knitted nylon sheet reinforced silicone rubber has the same shape as the squid suckers.Like real squid suckers,this type of artefact also has a stalk that is connected to the arm skin and a ring to give radial support.The second design is a straight cylindrical structure with uniform wall thickness made of silicone rubber.One end of the cylinder is directly connected to the arm skin and the other end is open.The final design of the sucker has a cylindrical base and a concave meniscus top.The meniscus was formed naturally using the surface tension of silicone gel,which leads to a higher level of the liquid around the edge of a container.The wall thickness decreases towards the tip of the sucker opening.Sucking forces of all three types of sucker artefacts were measured.Advantages and disadvantages of each sucker type were discussed.The final design of suckers has been implemented to the arm skin prototypes.

  18. Squid – a simple bioinformatics grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Miranda Antonio B

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BLAST is a widely used genetic research tool for analysis of similarity between nucleotide and protein sequences. This paper presents a software application entitled "Squid" that makes use of grid technology. The current version, as an example, is configured for BLAST applications, but adaptation for other computing intensive repetitive tasks can be easily accomplished in the open source version. This enables the allocation of remote resources to perform distributed computing, making large BLAST queries viable without the need of high-end computers. Results Most distributed computing / grid solutions have complex installation procedures requiring a computer specialist, or have limitations regarding operating systems. Squid is a multi-platform, open-source program designed to "keep things simple" while offering high-end computing power for large scale applications. Squid also has an efficient fault tolerance and crash recovery system against data loss, being able to re-route jobs upon node failure and recover even if the master machine fails. Our results show that a Squid application, working with N nodes and proper network resources, can process BLAST queries almost N times faster than if working with only one computer. Conclusion Squid offers high-end computing, even for the non-specialist, and is freely available at the project web site. Its open-source and binary Windows distributions contain detailed instructions and a "plug-n-play" instalation containing a pre-configured example.

  19. Microstrip SQUID amplifiers for quantum information science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defeo, M. P.; Plourde, B. L. T.

    2012-02-01

    Recent progress in SQUID amplifiers suggests that these devices might approach quantum-limited sensitivity in the microwave range, thus making them a viable option for measurement of superconducting quantum systems. In the microstrip SQUID amplifier configuration, gains of around 20dB are possible at frequencies of several hundred MHz, and the gain is limited by the maximum voltage modulation available from the SQUID. One route for increasing the voltage modulation involves using larger resistive shunts, however maintaining non-hysteretic device operation requires smaller junction capacitances than is possible with conventional photolithographically patterned junctions. Operating at higher frequencies requires a shorter input coil which reduces mutual inductance between the coil and washer and therefore gain. We have fabricated microstrip SQUID amplifiers using submicron Al-AlOx-Al junctions and large shunts. The input coil and SQUID washer are optimized for producing high gain at frequencies in the gigahertz range. Recent measurements of gain and noise temperature will be discussed as well as demonstrations of these devices as a first stage of amplification for a superconducting system

  20. Flux modulation scheme for direct current SQUID readout revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Tao; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I.; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2016-02-01

    The flux modulation scheme (FMS) is the standard readout technique of dc SQUIDs, where a step-up transformer links the SQUID to the preamplifier. The transformer's primary winding shunts the SQUID via a large capacitor while the secondary winding connects it to the preamplifier. A modulation flux having a frequency of typically 100 kHz generates an ac voltage across the SQUID, stepped up by the transformer. The SQUID with FMS is customarily operated in the current bias mode, because a constant dc bias current flows only through the SQUID due to the capacitor isolation. With FMS, however, the transformer ac shunts the SQUID so that in reality the operating mode is neither purely current-biased nor voltage-biased but rather nominal current-biased or "mixed biased." Our objective is to experimentally investigate the consequences of ac shunting of the dc SQUID in FMS and the transformer's transfer characteristics. For different shunt values we measure the change in the SQUID bias current due to the ac shunt using another SQUID in the two-stage readout scheme, and simultaneously monitor the SQUID output voltage signal. We then explain our measurements by a simplified graphic analysis of SQUID intrinsic current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Since the total current flowing through the SQUID is not constant due to the shunting effect of the transformer, the amplitude of SQUID flux-to-voltage characteristics V(Φ) is less as compared to the direct readout scheme (DRS). Furthermore, we analyze and compare V(Φ) obtained by DRS and FMS. We show that in FMS, the transfer characteristics of the SQUID circuit also depend on the isolation capacitance and the dynamic resistance of the SQUID.

  1. The use of (double) relaxation oscillation SQUIDs as a sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duuren, van M.J.; Brons, G.C.S.; Kattouw, H.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.

    1997-01-01

    Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs (ROSs) and Double Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) are based on relaxation oscillations that are induced in hysteretic dc SQUIDs by an external L-R shunt. The relaxation frequency of a ROS varies with the applied flux Φ, whereas the output of a DROS is a dc voltage

  2. SQUID method of lung contamination testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinická, F.; Šimáček, I.; Jurdák, P.; Cigáň, A.; Maňka, J.

    2006-03-01

    We are reporting on the development of a SQUID magnetometric method of ferromagnetic dust quantification in the human lungs. In order to solve this problem we utilize a forward method of magnetized ferromagnetic particle (dipole) distribution 3D modeling in human lung torso and in an arc welder's lungs. We also solve the inverse problem, by which the amount of dust in the lungs is estimated using the results of the remanent magnetic induction Br measurement upon the human chest. We state the formula for SQUID measured output voltage U to Br conversion for the second order gradiometer, which is in a highly dipole position and density dependent. We utilize a low-Tc second order rf SQUID gradiometer with the sensitivity of 10-14 T in the unit frequency range.

  3. SQUID method of lung contamination testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are reporting on the development of a SQUID magnetometric method of ferromagnetic dust quantification in the human lungs. In order to solve this problem we utilize a forward method of magnetized ferromagnetic particle (dipole) distribution 3D modeling in human lung torso and in an arc welder's lungs. We also solve the inverse problem, by which the amount of dust in the lungs is estimated using the results of the remanent magnetic induction B r measurement upon the human chest. We state the formula for SQUID measured output voltage U to B r conversion for the second order gradiometer, which is in a highly dipole position and density dependent. We utilize a low-T c second order rf SQUID gradiometer with the sensitivity of 10-14 T in the unit frequency range

  4. DC SQUIDS with planar input coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B.; Hutson, D.; Tugwell, A.

    1985-03-01

    We describe the key parts of our recent work to develop a planar thin-film DC SQUID with a closely-coupled spiral input coil. Our aim has been to make a device that is superior to present RF SQUID sensors in terms of sensitivity and long-term reliability. To be compatible with an RF SQUID the inductance of the input coils must be relatively large, typically 2..mu..H, and the input noise current in the white noise region should be below 10pA Hz /SUP -1/2/ . A low level of 1/f noise is also necessary for many applications and should be achieved without the use of complex noisecancelling circuitry. Our devices meet these criteria. We include a description of work on window and edge junction fabrication using ion beam cleaning, thermal oxidation and RF plasma processing.

  5. High Tc Josephson Junctions, SQUIDs and magnetometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has recently been considerable progress in the state-of-the-art of high-Tc magnetometers based on dc SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices). This progress is due partly to the development of more manufacturable Josephson junctions, making SQUIDs easier to fabricate, and partly to the development of multiturn flux transformers that convert the high sensitivity of SQUIDs to magnetic flux to a correspondingly high sensitivity to magnetic field. Needless to say, today's high-Tc SQUIDs are still considerably less sensitive than their low-Tc counterparts, particularly at low frequencies (f) where their level of 1/f noise remains high. Nonetheless, the performance of the high-Tc devices has now reached the point where they are adequate for a number of the less demanding applications; furthermore, as we shall see, at least modest improvements in performance are expected in the near future. In this article, the author outlines these various developments. This is far from a comprehensive review of the field, however, and, apart from Sec. 2, he describes largely his own work. He begins in Sec. 2 with an overview of the various types of Josephson junctions that have been investigated, and in Sec. 3, he describes some of the SQUIDs that have been tested, and assess their performance. Section 4 discuss the development of the multilayer structures essential for an interconnect technology, and, in particular, for crossovers and vias. Section 5 shows how this technology enables one to fabricate multiturn flux transformers which, in turn, can be coupled to SQUIDs to make magnetometers. The performance and possible future improvements in these magnetometers are assessed, and some applications mentioned

  6. A Three-Channel DC SQUID System Using Time-Domain Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Matthias; Mueck, Michael; Mugford, Chas; Kycia, Jan

    2004-03-01

    Conventional multichannel SQUID systems require SQUID readout electronics for each channel, as well as many wires connecting the individual SQUIDs and feedback coils to the room temperature electronics. We have studied a time domain multiplexed readout scheme which requires only a single SQUID readout which is successively switched between all SQUIDs. By connecting all SQUIDs and all feedback coils in series, the system requires only a few wires between SQUIDs and room temperature readout.

  7. Crystallization and crystal properties of squid rhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Midori; Kitahara, Rei; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2007-01-01

    Truncated rhodopsin from the retina of the squid Todarodes pacificus was extracted and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Hexagonal crystals grown in the presence of octylglucoside and ammonium sulfate diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution.

  8. Experiments with double-SQUID qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerling, Bernhard; Poletto, Stefano; Ustinov, Alexey V. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio [Instituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Roma (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    A double-SQUID qubit (flash-qubit) allows the manipulation of quantum states by very short pulses of magnetic flux, without using microwaves. It consists of an rf-SQUID with a dc-SQUID replacing the single Josephson junction. The energy potential profile is controllable by dc bias fluxes threading the two loops. The initial qubit state in a double well is prepared by applying a dc flux pulse to one loop, thereby tilting the double well so that only one of the two states remains stable. To manipulate the state of the qubit a dc flux pulse is applied to the other loop to change the potential into a single well, where coherent Larmor oscillations between the two lowest eigenstates take place. Reading out the state is once again performed in the double well situation, where our readout dc-SQUID is able to discriminate between the two computational states due to their flux difference. We hope to present measurements done on a new sample, fabricated using shadow evaporation of aluminium and silicon nitride as the dielectric.

  9. An automatic frequency-sweeping SQUID susceptometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overweg, J.A.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Flokstra, J.; Gerritsma, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    A new, SQUID-based, measuring system has been developed for the investigation of the dynamic properties of magnetic materials. Its main advantages, compared to conventional mutual inductance systems, are its high sensitivity and its nearly frequency independent response, down to extremely low freque

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: SQUID systems for biomagnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzella, Vittorio; Della Penna, Stefania; DelGratta, Cosimo; Luca Romani, Gian

    2001-07-01

    This review paper illustrates the different SQUID based systems used for biomagnetic imaging. The review is divided into nine sections. The first three sections are introductory: section 1 is a short overview of the topic; section 2 summarizes how the biomagnetic fields are generated and what are the basic mathematical models for the field sources; section 3 illustrates the principles of operation of the SQUID device. Sections 4-8 are specifically devoted to the description of the different systems used for biomagnetic measurements: section 4 discusses the different types of detection coils; section 5 illustrates the SQUID sensors specifically designed for biomagnetic applications together with the necessary driving electronics, with special emphasis on high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) SQUIDs, since HTS devices are still in a developing stage; section 6 illustrates the different noise reduction techniques; section 7 describes the different multichannel sensors presently operating; and, finally, section 8 gives a hint of what kind of physiological and/or clinical information may be gathered by the biomagnetic technique. Section 9 suggests some future trends for the biomagnetic technique.

  11. Squid Dissection: From Pen to Ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cindy; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Introduces students to dissection, which is an important part of scientific discovery. Students not only gain an understanding of the anatomy of a squid, but also develop a sense of responsibility and respect for the animal that they are using as a learning tool. (Author/SOE)

  12. One Period of Exploration with the Squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, James V.; Ng, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lab that can be offered after students have learned the basic anatomy and physiology of the various phyla, the primary objective of which is to explore and apply their acquired knowledge to a new situation. Involves exploring the anatomy and life-style of the squid. (JRH)

  13. Digital SQUIDs based on Smart DROS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podt, M.; Keizer, D.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.

    1999-01-01

    A Double Relaxation Oscillation SQUID (DROS) with the complete flux locked loop (FLL) circuitry on one single chip, a Smart DROS, has been realized. A superconducting storage loop interrupted by two write gates to add or extract flux quanta acts as an integrator that supplies the feedback flux to th

  14. SQUID systems for bio magnetic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review paper illustrates the different SQUID based systems used for bio magnetic imaging. The review is divided into nine sections. The first three sections are introductory: section 1 is a short overview of the topic; section 2 summarizes how the bio magnetic fields are generated and what are the basic mathematical models for the field sources; section 3 illustrates the principles of operation of the SQUID device. Sections 4-8 are specifically devoted to the description of the different systems used for bio magnetic measurements: section 4 discusses the different types of detection coils; section 5 illustrates the SQUID sensors specifically designed for bio magnetic applications together with the necessary driving electronics, with special emphasis on high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) SQUIDs, since HTS devices are still in a developing stage; section 6 illustrates the different noise reduction techniques; section 7 describes the different multichannel sensors presently operating; and, finally, section 8 gives a hint of what kind of physiological and/or clinical information may be gathered by the bio magnetic technique. Section 9 suggests some future trends for the bio magnetic technique. (author)

  15. Laser-SQUID microscope for noncontact evaluation of solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Y., E-mail: nakatani@sup.ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Hayashi, T. [Sendai National College of Technology, 4-16-1, Ayashityuou, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 989-3128 (Japan); Itozaki, H. [Osaka University, 1-3, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    A polycrystalline solar cell was investigated by the laser-SQUID microscope without contact to the surface of the solar cell. The laser-SQUID microscope image of the solar cell was similar to the laser-beam-induced current image. The laser-SQUID microscope images varied when the needle and the SQUID were shifted in the x- and y-directions from the center of a laser spot. The laser-SQUID microscopy has the possibility of estimation of the photocurrent direction. A polycrystalline solar cell with several grains was investigated by the laser-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) microscope. The laser-SQUID microscopy detects the magnetic field generated by a photo-induced current. This technique enables nondestructive and noncontact evaluation of semiconductor samples. A needle made of high permeability material was used to transmit the magnetic field near the sample to the SQUID. The needle and the SQUID were shifted in the x- and y-directions from the center of a laser spot. The laser-SQUID microscope images varied with needle position. This indicated the possibility of current estimation using a laser-SQUID microscope. In this study the sample was also evaluated using Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) which is widely used for evaluation of the conversion efficiency distribution of solar cells. The laser-SQUID microscope image was compared with the LBIC image and was found to be similar. This result showed that laser-SQUID microscopy can be used for the electrical evaluation of solar cells without contact, and furthermore has the possibility of estimation of the photocurrent direction.

  16. SQUIDs for the characterization of magnetic nanoparticles; SQUIDs fuer die Charakterisierung magnetischer Nanoteilchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaume, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) are superparamagnetic particles with a core diameter in the nm-range. The MNPs have manifold properties which make them an interesting tool for various applications. Certain parameters, such as size or size distribution and structural properties, must be well known for these applications. In this work, the dynamic behavior of MNPs was investigated by magnetorelaxometry (MRX) at a temperature of 77 K. MRX is based on the alignment of the moment of individual MNPs in parallel to a large enough magnetization field. After switching of the field, the magnetization decays with a characteristic time constant. The measurement of the relaxation can e.g. be used to calculate the size distribution of a given MNP sample. Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) based on the high-T{sub c} superconductor yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) were employed in this work as sensors for the magnetic field. The fabrication of the superconducting and isolating thin films was carried out by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and optimized by methods of experimental design. Several types of directly coupled SQUIDs were fabricated from the thin films by optical lithography and argon ion etching. An existing MRX setup with fluxgates was modified to allow measurements with the directly coupled SQUIDs at 77 K. After the characterization of the system, MRX measurements were performed. The relaxation of an amount of approximately 100 billion MNPs was detected at a distance of 5 mm to the SQUID. In order to reduce the minimum detectable amount of MNPs and to minimize disturbances, a novel type of SQUID was developed, fabricated and characterized. A compensation factor of up to 195 was experimentally demonstrated with this self-compensating SQUID. MNP samples were prepared directly on the SQUID by electron beam lithography. Thereby, an amount of 167 MNPs could be detected. The limit for the measurement setup was evaluated as 58 MNPs. Finite element method (FEM

  17. Quantum logic gates operation using SQUID qubits in bimodal cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Ke-Hui

    2006-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize the basic two-qubit logic gates such as the quantum phase gate and SWAP gate using a detuned microwave cavity interacting with three-level superconducting-quantum-interference-device (SQUID) qubit(s), by placing SQUID(s) in a two-mode microwave cavity and using adiabatic passage methods. In this scheme, the two logical states of the qubit are represented by the two lowest levels of the SQUID, and the cavity fields are treated as quantized. Compared with the previous method, the complex procedures of adjusting the level spacing of the SQUID and applying the resonant microwave pulse to the SQUID to create transformation are not required. Based on superconducting device with relatively long decoherence time and simplified operation procedure, the gates operate at a high speed, which is important in view of decoherence.

  18. A sensor configuration for a 304 SQUID vector magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, A; Burghoff, M; Hartwig, S; Petsche, F; Steinhoff, U; Drung, D; Koch, H

    2004-01-01

    A novel SQUID vector magnetometer system is introduced which has been specially designed for the use inside the strongly magnetically shielded room BMSR-2 of PTB. The system is housed in a dewar with a flat bottom and an inner diameter of Ø 250 mm. The SQUIDs are arranged so that in addition to the usually measured Z-component of the field the horizontal magnetic fields are measured too. A total of 304 DC-SQUID magnetometers are divided up into 19 identical modules. The 16 low-Tc SQUIDs of each module are located in such a way that an estimation of the magnetic field in all three dimensions is possible at three points inside the module. The 57 SQUIDs of the lowest Z plane of all modules form a hexagonal grid with a base length of 29 mm. The design criteria and the physical principle behind the complex SQUID arrangement are explained. PMID:16012698

  19. Multichannel applications of double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Ho; Kwon, Hyukchan; Kim, Jin-Mok; Park, Yong-Ki

    2001-12-01

    Double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) provided high flux-to-voltage transfers of larger than 1 mV Φ0-1 and simple flux-locked loop circuits were used for SQUID operation. We constructed two multichannel systems based on DROSs. The first system is a 40-channel planar gradiometer system consisting of integrated first-order pickup coils. average noise level of the 40 channels is 1 fT cm-1 Hz-1/2 at 100 Hz, corresponding to a field noise of 4 fT Hz-1/2, operating inside a magnetically shielded room. The second one is a 37-channel magnetometer system with 37 integrated magnetometers distributed on a spherical surface and measures field component normal to the head surface. The average noise of the magnetometers is 3 fT Hz-1/2 at 100 Hz. The two systems were applied to measure neuromagnetic fields.

  20. Biomagnetism using SQUIDs: status and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternickel, Karsten [CardioMag Imaging, Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Braginski, Alex I [Research Center Juelich, ISG-2, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Biomagnetism involves the measurement and analysis of very weak local magnetic fields of living organisms and various organs in humans. Such fields can be of physiological origin or due to magnetic impurities or markers. This paper reviews existing and prospective applications of biomagnetism in clinical research and medical diagnostics. Currently, such applications require sensitive magnetic SQUID sensors and amplifiers. The practicality of biomagnetic methods depends especially on techniques for suppressing the dominant environmental electromagnetic noise, and on suitable nearly real-time data processing and interpretation methods. Of the many biomagnetic methods and applications, only the functional studies of the human brain (magnetoencephalography) and liver susceptometry are in clinical use, while functional diagnostics of the human heart (magnetocardiography) approaches the threshold of clinical acceptance. Particularly promising for the future is the ongoing research into low-field magnetic resonance anatomical imaging using SQUIDs.

  1. SQUID-based multichannel system for Magnetoencephalography

    CERN Document Server

    Rombetto, S; Vettoliere, A; Trebeschi, A; Rossi, R; Russo, M

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a multichannel system based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements, developed and installed at Istituto di Cibernetica (ICIB) in Naples. This MEG system, consists of 163 full integrated SQUID magnetometers, 154 channels and 9 references, and has been designed to meet specifications concerning noise, dynamic range, slew rate and linearity through optimized design. The control electronics is located at room temperature and all the operations are performed inside a Magnetically Shielded Room (MSR). The system exhibits a magnetic white noise level of approximatively 5 fT/Hz1=2. This MEG system will be employed for both clinical and routine use. PACS numbers: 74.81.Fa, 85.25.Hv, 07.20.Mc, 85.25.Dq, 87.19.le, 87.85.Ng

  2. In-focal-plane SQUID multiplexer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of microcalorimeters and bolometers based on superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) with a manageable number of readout channels. Previous to this work, TES arrays were multiplexed by extracting leads from each pixel to multiplexer filter and switching elements outside of the focal plane. As the number of pixels is increased in a close-packed array, it becomes difficult to route the leads to the multiplexer. We report on the development of an in-focal-plane SQUID multiplexer to solve this problem. In this circuit, the filter and switching elements associated with each pixel fit within the pixel area so that signals are multiplexed before being extracted from the focal plane. This in-focal-plane architecture will first be used in the SCUBA-2 instrument at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in 2006

  3. Multichannel applications of double relaxation oscillation Squids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) provided high flux-to-voltage transfers of larger than 1 mV Φ0-1 and simple flux-locked loop circuits were used for SQUID operation. We constructed two multichannel systems based on DROSs. The first system is a 40-channel planar gradiometer system consisting of integrated first-order pickup coils. average noise level of the 40 channels is 1 fT cm-1 Hz-1/2 at 100 Hz, corresponding to a field noise of 4 fT Hz-1/2, operating inside a magnetically shielded room. The second one is a 37-channel magnetometer system with 37 integrated magnetometers distributed on a spherical surface and measures field component normal to the head surface. The average noise of the magnetometers is 3 fT Hz-1/2 at 100 Hz. The two systems were applied to measure neuromagnetic fields. (author)

  4. Arbitrary rotation and entanglement of flux SQUID qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Kis, Z

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new approach for the arbitrary rotation of a three-level SQUID qubit and describe a new strategy for the creation of coherence transfer and entangled states between two three-level SQUID qubits. The former is succeeded by exploring the coupled-uncoupled states of the system when irradiated with two microwave pulses, and the latter is succeeded by placing the SQUID qubits into a microwave cavity and used adiabatic passage methods for their manipulation.

  5. Performance of multiplexed SQUID readout for Cryogenic Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Grossman, E. N.; Irwin, K. D.; Martinis, John M.; Reintsema, C. D.; Allen, C. A.; Bergman, D. I.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R.

    2000-04-01

    We report on the implementation of a multiplexer that uses superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) to read out low-impedance cryogenic detectors. Using prototype chips, a circuit was built which interfaces eight input SQUID channels with a close-packed array of eight transition-edge sensor (TES) infrared bolometers. Circuit elements were measured and crosstalk specifications are reported. Digital feedback is employed to flux-lock a single element in the array of SQUIDs.

  6. Multimodal Optimization by Sparkling Squid Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Seksaria, Videh

    2014-01-01

    The swarm intelligence of animals is a natural paradigm to apply to optimization problems. Ant colony, bee colony, firefly and bat algorithms are amongst those that have been demonstrated to efficiently to optimize complex constraints. This paper proposes the new Sparkling Squid Algorithm (SSA) for multimodal optimization, inspired by the intelligent swarm behavior of its namesake. After an introduction, formulation and discussion of its implementation, it will be compared to other popular me...

  7. Superconducting Nanobridge SQUID Magnetometer for Spin Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Antler, Natania

    2014-01-01

    As the cutting edge of science and technology pushes towards smaller length scales, sensing technologies with nanoscale precision become increasingly important. In this thesis I will discuss the optimization and application of a 3D nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for studying solid state spin systems, in particular for sensing impurity spins in diamond. Solid state spins have proposed applications in memory and computation for both classical and quantum computing. Isolated spins typically have ...

  8. Cross-linking Chemistry of Squid Beak*

    OpenAIRE

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J. Herbert

    2010-01-01

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of th...

  9. DC SQUID amplifier for NMR experiments on small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low noise preamplifiers are required for the detection of the magnetic resonance of small size samples or at low magnetic fields. According to calculations based on the en, in model. SQUID based amplifiers are more suitable to NMR experiments on small samples than semiconductor amplifiers. We propose an amplification method by frequency transposition using a DC SQUID. Such a system can be run over a broad range of frequency as the noise impedance of the stages subsequent to the SQUID is continually optimised. The measurements are in good agreement with our theoretical model, based on a simplified voltage to flux SQUID characteristic. (orig.)

  10. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied.

  11. Directly coupled slotted high-Tc dc SQUIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansman, A.B.M.; Izquierdo, M.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.

    1999-01-01

    A flux quantization model gives estimates for the effective area and washer inductance of slotted high-Tc dc SQUIDs. The inductance prediction has not been verified yet. Here, the theoretical dependence of washer inductance and effective area for four slotted SQUID types on the London penetration de

  12. Reproductive biology in two species of deep-sea squids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laptikhovsky, V. V.; Arkhipkin, A. I.; Hoving, H. J. T.

    2007-01-01

    Deep-sea squids, Moroteuthis ingens and Gonatus antarcticus, were collected in the slope waters off the Falkland Islands and their reproductive systems preserved and investigated onshore. Changes in oocyte length-frequencies at maturation and spawning, and their fecundity were studied. These squids,

  13. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatridge, Michael J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  14. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  15. SQUID magnetometry from nanometer to centimeter length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatridge, Michael J.

    2010-06-28

    The development of Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based magnetometer for two applications, in vivo prepolarized, ultra-low field MRI of humans and dispersive readout of SQUIDs for micro- and nano-scale magnetometery, are the focus of this thesis.

  16. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  17. Development and applications of the tunnel junction dc SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a cylindrical dc SQUID made with shunted Nb-NbOx-Pb Josephson tunnel junctions is described. The SQUID is current biased at a non-zero voltage, and modulated with a 100 KHz flux. The 100 KHz signal across the SQUID drives a cooled tank circuit that optimally matches the SQUID impedance to the input of a room-temperature FET preamplifier. The SQUID is operated in a flux-locked loop with a dynamic range of +- 3 x 106 (in a 1-Hz bandwidth), a bandwidth of 0 to 2 KHz, and a slewing rate of 2 x 104 phi/sub o/sec-1. A flux noise power spectrum for a SQUID in a superconducting shield at 4.2 K is shown. Above 2 x 10-2 Hz the spectrum is white with an rms value of 10-5 phi/sub o/Hz/sup -1/2/. At lower frequencies the spectrum is approximately 10-10 (1 Hz/f) phi/sub o/2Hz-1, where f is the frequency. Factors contributing to the long term drift of the SQUID are discussed. A drift rate of 2 x 10-5 phi/sub o/h-1 over a 20-h period is achieved by regulating the temperature of the helium bath. A detailed description is given of the coupling of various input coils to the SQUID. The energy resolution of the SQUID with respect to a current in a 24-turn input coil is 7 x 10-30 J Hz-1 in the white noise region. The energy resolution in the l/f noise region and the long term drift performance are better than for any other SQUID

  18. Moderately shielded high-Tc SQUID system for rat MCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechstein, S.; Kim, I.-S.; Drung, D.; Novikov, I.; Schurig, Th

    2010-06-01

    Recently, we have developed a 5-channel high-Tc SQUID system with one signal channel intended for rat magnetocardiography (MCG) in moderately shielded or "quiet" real environment. This system is an adapted version of a human MCG system which has been improved with respect to user-friendliness and stability. A dewar with a cold-warm distance of 7 mm and a refill cycle time of up to one week is utilized. The implemented high-Tc SQUIDs are single-layer devices with grain boundary junctions fabricated at KRISS with laser ablation on 10 mm × 10 mm STO substrates. In order to cancel environmental magnetic noise, three of the five SQUIDs are arranged to build an axial software first-order or second-order gradiometer with a base line of 35 mm. The other two SQUIDs are used for balancing. To overcome previous system instabilities, we have implemented an Earth field compensation for each SQUID. For this, the SQUIDs were mounted in capsules containing integrated field compensation coils. The three Earth field components are measured with an additional triaxial fluxgate, and compensated at the SQUID locations using the low-noise current source of the SQUID readout electronics. This way, the SQUIDs can be cooled and operated in a low residual field that improves system stability and reduces low-frequency SQUID noise. It is even possible to slowly move the dewar in the Earth field (dynamic field compensation). Different noise cancellation procedures were optimized and compared employing a periodic signal source.

  19. Multichannel SQUID systems for particle physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, S. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.henryl@physics.ox.ac.uk; Divakar, U. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Majorovits, B. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    We have developed multichannel SQUID systems for two particle physics experiments: a 66-channel system for detector readout in the CRESST dark matter search, and a 12-channel magnetometry system for the CryoEDM neutron electric dipole moment experiment. These different applications have different requirements, for example in the CRESST system it is important to minimise crosstalk, while the CryoEDM system must be shielded from magnetic noise. Future experiments such as the EURECA dark matter project may require systems with a much higher number of channels.

  20. Temperature dependence of DC SQUID magnetometer performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, C. E-mail: c.granata@cib.na.cnr.it; Monaco, A.; Di Russo, C.; Lissitski, M.P.; Russo, M

    2004-05-01

    We report experimental results on temperature dependence of the main characteristics of fully integrated DC SQUID magnetometers realized on niobium technology. At T=4.2 K the sensor shown a white magnetic field noise spectral density of 2.9 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. A slow increase of the field noise (about 20%) was observed with increasing temperature up to 5 K, giving a considerable tolerance of the working temperature of niobium magnetometers in some innovative multichannel systems for magnetoencephalography.

  1. A simple three-channel dc SQUID system using time domain multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mück, M.; Korn, M.; Mugford, C. G. A.; Kycia, J. B.

    2004-08-01

    Conventional multichannel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) systems require a SQUID read-out circuit for each channel, as well as many wires connecting each individual SQUID and feedback coil to the room temperature electronics. We present a simple time domain multiplexed read-out scheme which requires only a single SQUID read-out circuit that is successively switched between all the SQUIDs. By connecting all the SQUIDs and all the feedback coils in series, this time domain multiplexed system requires many fewer wires between the SQUIDs and the room temperature read-out circuit than other multichannel systems.

  2. Cross-linking chemistry of squid beak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J Herbert

    2010-12-01

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of the sclerotization chemistry and describe additional cross-links from D. gigas beak. All cross-links presented in this report share common building blocks, a family of di-, tri-, and tetra-histidine-catecholic adducts, that were separated by affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by tandem mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The data provide additional insights into the unusually high cross-link density found in mature beaks. Furthermore, we propose both a low molecular weight catechol, and peptidyl-dopa, to be sclerotization agents of squid beak. This appears to represent a new strategy for forming hard tissue in animals. The interplay between covalent cross-linking and dehydration on the graded properties of the beaks is discussed. PMID:20870720

  3. Cross-linking Chemistry of Squid Beak*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserez, Ali; Rubin, Daniel; Waite, J. Herbert

    2010-01-01

    In stark contrast to most aggressive predators, Dosidicus gigas (jumbo squids) do not use minerals in their powerful mouthparts known as beaks. Their beaks instead consist of a highly sclerotized chitinous composite with incremental hydration from the tip to the base. We previously reported l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-histidine (dopa-His) as an important covalent cross-link providing mechanical strengthening to the beak material. Here, we present a more complete characterization of the sclerotization chemistry and describe additional cross-links from D. gigas beak. All cross-links presented in this report share common building blocks, a family of di-, tri-, and tetra-histidine-catecholic adducts, that were separated by affinity chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and identified by tandem mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). The data provide additional insights into the unusually high cross-link density found in mature beaks. Furthermore, we propose both a low molecular weight catechol, and peptidyl-dopa, to be sclerotization agents of squid beak. This appears to represent a new strategy for forming hard tissue in animals. The interplay between covalent cross-linking and dehydration on the graded properties of the beaks is discussed. PMID:20870720

  4. Feasibility of a stationary micro-SQUID

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The standard operation of a dc SQUID leads to oscillatory electric fields that emit electromagnetic radiation and can change the state of the measured sample. A stationary SQUID could be advantageous when back action on the measured sample has to be avoided. We study a superconducting loop that encloses a magnetic flux, connected to a superconducting and to a normal electrode, when a fixed electric current between the electrodes flows through the loop. The considered circuit does not contain Josephson junctions. We find that in a very broad range of parameters the current flow converges to a stationary regime. The potential difference between the electrodes depends on the magnetic flux, so that measuring this voltage would provide information on the enclosed flux. The influence of thermal noise was estimated. The sizes of the voltage and of the power dissipation could be appropriate for the design of a practical fluxmeter. We found narrow ranges of flux at which the voltage varies sharply with the flux.

  5. Complex inductance, excess noise, and surface magnetism in dc SQUIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendelbach, S; Hover, D; Mück, M; McDermott, R

    2009-09-11

    We have characterized the complex inductance of dc SQUIDs cooled to millikelvin temperatures. The SQUID inductance displays a rich, history-dependent structure as a function of temperature, with fluctuations of order 1 fH. At a fixed temperature, the SQUID inductance fluctuates with a 1/f power spectrum; the inductance noise is highly correlated with the conventional 1/f flux noise. The data are interpreted in terms of the reconfiguration of clusters of surface spins, with correlated fluctuations of effective magnetic moments and relaxation times.

  6. Dynamics of a SQUID with topologically nontrivial barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Dawood, R.

    2016-03-01

    The phase dynamics of a SQUID consisting of Josephson junctions with topologically nontrivial barriers has been studied. Its comparative analysis with the dynamics of a conventional SQUID has been performed. The current-voltage characteristics have been calculated. The dependence of the return current on the magnetic field has been found. It has been shown that the branch of the current-voltage characteristic corresponding to the resonance frequency in the case of the SQUID with nontrivial barriers is displaced by √ 2 over voltage. This effect can be used for the detection of Majorana fermions.

  7. An automated and versatile ultra-low temperature SQUID magnetometer

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, A.; Angenent, W. G. J.; Frossati, G.; de Jongh, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and construction of a SQUID-based magnetometer for operation down to temperatures T = 10 mK, while retaining the compatibility with the sample holders typically used in commercial SQUID magnetometers. The system is based on a dc-SQUID coupled to a second-order gradiometer. The sample is placed inside the plastic mixing chamber of a dilution refrigerator and is thermalized directly by the 3He flow. The movement though the pickup coils is obtained by lifting the whole dilu...

  8. An automated and versatile ultra-low temperature SQUID magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Morello, A; Frossati, G; De Jongh, L J

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and construction of a SQUID-based magnetometer for operation down to temperatures T = 10 mK, while retaining the compatibility with the sample holders typically used in commercial SQUID magnetometers. The system is based on a dc-SQUID coupled to a second-order gradiometer. The sample is placed inside the plastic mixing chamber of a dilution refrigerator and is thermalized directly by the 3He flow. The movement though the pickup coils is obtained by lifting the whole dilution refrigerator insert. A home-developed software provides full automation and an easy user interface.

  9. SQUID-based instrumentation for ultra-low-field MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Zotev, V. S.; Matlashov, A. N.; Volegov, P. L.; Urbaitis, A. V.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus Jr, R. H.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-low fields (ULF MRI) is a promising new imaging method that uses SQUID sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations at a microtesla-range measurement field. In this work, a seven-channel SQUID system designed for simultaneous 3D ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG) is described. The system includes seven second-order SQUID gradiometers, characterized by magnetic field resolutions of 1.2 - 2.8 fT/rtHz. It ...

  10. rf SQUID system as tunable flux qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a fully integrated rf SQUID-based system as flux qubit with a high control of the flux transfer function of the superconducting transformer modulating the coupling between the flux qubit and the readout system. The control of the system is possible by including into the superconducting flux transformer a vertical two-Josephson-junctions interferometer (VJI) in which the Josephson current is precisely modulated from a maximum to zero by a transversal magnetic field parallel to the flux transformer plane. The proposed system can be also used in a more general configuration to control the off-diagonal terms in the Hamiltonian of the flux qubit and to turn on and off the coupling between two or more qubits

  11. Realizing and optimizing an atomtronic SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathey, Amy C.; Mathey, L.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate how a toroidal Bose–Einstein condensate with a movable barrier can be used to realize an atomtronic SQUID. The magnitude of the barrier height, which creates the analogue of an SNS junction, is of crucial importance, as well as its ramp-up and -down protocol. For too low of a barrier, the relaxation of the system is dynamically suppressed, due to the small rate of phase slips at the barrier. For a higher barrier, the phase coherence across the barrier is suppressed due to thermal fluctuations, which are included in our Truncated Wigner approach. Furthermore, we show that the ramp-up protocol of the barrier can be improved by ramping up its height first, and its velocity after that. This protocol can be further improved by optimizing the ramp-up and ramp-down time scales, which is of direct practical relevance for on-going experimental realizations.

  12. Vortices in superconducting bulk, films and SQUIDs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ernst Helmut Brandt

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the ideal periodic vortex lattice in bulk superconductors and in films of any thickness can be calculated from Ginzburg-Landau theory by an iteration method using Fourier series. The London theory yields general analytic expressions for the magnetic field and energy of arbitrary arrangements of straight or curved vortex lines. The elasticity of the vortex lattice is highly nonlocal. The magnetic response of superconductors of realistic shapes like thin and thick strips and disks or thin rectangular plates or films, containing pinned vortices, can be computed within continuum theory by solving an integral equation. A useful example is a thin square with a central hole and a radial slit, used as superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID).

  13. The Unharmonic dc SQUID Energy Level Splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A DC SQUID with Josephson junctions characterized by nonsinusoidal current-phase relation is being considered as a basis for a phase qubit. It has been shown that the second and third harmonic components in the current-phase relation are able to provide a double-well potential and the energy level splitting. The threshold condition for the double-well formation has been determined taking into account the impact of both harmonics. The splitting of the ground state energy level has been calculated as a function of the harmonic amplitudes for different ratio s of characteristic Josephson energy EC to the Coulomb energy EQ0. It has been shown that the gap value comes to about 7EQ0 with increase of the ratio s. No external field needed, no bias current required and no circular currents are the major advantages of such a qubit

  14. HTS SQUIDs for the nondestructive evaluation of composite structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Chris; Graham, David; Macfarlane, John C; Donaldson, Gordon B [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-01

    While LTS and HTS SQUIDs have successfully been applied in the detection of flaws in aircraft grade aluminium structures for well over a decade, interest has recently spread to a type of new material, namely composites. One example, carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP), is increasingly being favoured by the aircraft industry because of its strength to weight ratio and the fact that it is corrosion-resistant. Material and defect characterization using SQUIDs is still at an early stage, but due to expected rapid expansion in the use of such materials, there is ample scope for the application of HTS SQUIDs. Here we have applied HTS SQUID single-layer gradiometers to investigate artificially created defects in CFRP samples.

  15. Development of a colorimetric sensor array for squid spoilage assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragozá, Patricia; Fuentes, Ana; Ruiz-Rico, María; Vivancos, José-Luis; Fernández-Segovia, Isabel; Ros-Lis, José V; Barat, José M; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a rapid, easy-to-use optoelectronic system for the shelf-life assessment of squid in cold storage. For this purpose, an optoelectronic nose was designed, which consisted of an array containing six sensing materials prepared by combining different dyes and two inorganic supports (aluminium oxide and silica gel). Samples were packaged with the colorimetric array and kept in cold storage for 12 days. Squid spoilage was monitored simultaneously by the colorimetric array and by the physico-chemical and microbial analyses during storage. Samples exceeded the acceptability limits for microbial counts on the third day. PCA analysis carried out with CIELab showed that the colorimetric array was able to discriminate between fresh squid fit for consumption and spoiled squid. The statistical models obtained by PLS, with the optoelectronic nose, successfully predicted CO2 and O2 content in the headspace as well as microbial growth. PMID:25577086

  16. Gear Selectivity of a Longfin Squid Bottom Trawl

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Loligo pealeii (longfin inshore squid) co-occurs with Atlantic butterfish (Peprilus triacanthus) throughout the year and discarding in the L. pealeii bottom trawl...

  17. Integrated SQUID sensors for low cross-talk multichannel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Luiso, M.; Russo, M.

    2006-06-01

    We present a fully integrated dc-SQUID magnetometer based on niobium technology including a new feedback coil design. In respect to a standard SQUID design, such a feedback-coil design was optimized in order to reduce the mutual inductance with the neighbours and to increase the coupling with the pick-up coil of the SQUID itself. In such a way, it is possible to reduce cross-talks due to both feedback coil and wires. Experimental results about the characterization of the device and the crosstalk measurements are reported. The measurements have been performed in liquid helium using a low noise readout electronics specifically designed for large multichannel SQUID based instrumentations. The experimental data have shown a substantial reduction of cross-talk between neighbouring sensors.

  18. Magnetoencephalography using a Multilayer hightc DC SQUID Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faley, M. I.; Poppe, U.; Borkowski, R. E. Dunin; Schiek, M.; Boers, F.; Chocholacs, H.; Dammers, J.; Eich, E.; Shah, N. J.; Ermakov, A. B.; Slobodchikov, V. Yu.; Maslennikov, Yu. V.; Koshelets, V. P.

    We describe tests of the use of a multilayer highTc DC SQUID magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and compare our measurements with results obtained using a lowTc SQUID sensor. The integration of bias reversal readout electronics for highTc DC SQUID magnetometry into a commercial MEG data acquisition system is demonstrated. Results of measurements performed on a salinefilled head phantom are shown and the detection of an auditory evoked magnetic response of the human cortex elicited by a stimulus is illustrated. Future modifications of highTc DC SQUID sensors for applications in MEG, in order to reach a resolution of 1 fT/√Hz at 77.5 K over a wide frequency band, are outlined.

  19. Chimera states and synchronization in magnetically driven SQUID metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizanidis, J.; Lazarides, N.; Neofotistos, G.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional arrays of Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) form magnetic metamaterials exhibiting extraordinary properties, including tunability, dynamic multistability, negative magnetic permeability, and broadband transparency. The SQUIDs in a metamaterial interact through non-local, magnetic dipole-dipole forces, that makes it possible for multiheaded chimera states and coexisting patterns, including solitary states, to appear. The spontaneous emergence of chimera states and the role of multistability is demonstrated numerically for a SQUID metamaterial driven by an alternating magnetic field. The spatial synchronization and temporal complexity are discussed and the parameter space for the global synchronization reveals the areas of coherence-incoherence transition. Given that both one- and two-dimensional SQUID metamaterials have been already fabricated and investigated in the lab, the presence of a chimera state could in principle be detected with presently available experimental set-ups.

  20. Integrated SQUID sensors for low cross-talk multichannel systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a fully integrated dc-SQUID magnetometer based on niobium technology including a new feedback coil design. In respect to a standard SQUID design, such a feedback-coil design was optimized in order to reduce the mutual inductance with the neighbours and to increase the coupling with the pick-up coil of the SQUID itself. In such a way, it is possible to reduce cross-talks due to both feedback coil and wires. Experimental results about the characterization of the device and the crosstalk measurements are reported. The measurements have been performed in liquid helium using a low noise readout electronics specifically designed for large multichannel SQUID based instrumentations. The experimental data have shown a substantial reduction of cross-talk between neighbouring sensors

  1. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantsker, E [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO{sub 3}-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  2. [Biochemistry and functional characterization of squid mantle meat (Dosidicus gigas)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abugoch, L; Guarda, A; María Pérez, L; Isabel Donghi, M

    2000-12-01

    A study for the characterization of frozen giant squid mantle (meat) protein stored at -25 degrees C for 8 month was started. In the present research, the following functional properties were investigate: emulsifying, water holding and gel forming capacities. Optimal conditions for the separation and differentiation of miofibrillar and sarcoplasmatic proteins were also studied. It was found that the unfrozen giant squid mantle meat es capable of emulifying 2.817,4 g of oil/g of protein and holding capacity was 3.64 g of water/g of protein. Related to the gel forming capacity, it was not obtain, probably due to excessive storage of the meat. With regard to miofibrilar protein obtention of the squid mantle meat, it was found that two low ionic strength washings (I = 0.05), the sarcoplasmic proteins were practically eliminated from the protein matrix. The differentiation of miofibrilar and sarcoplasmatic proteins was obtained by PAGE-SDS of the squid mantle meat extracted at two different ionic strength (I = 0.05 and I = 0.5). This work demonstrates that the giant squid mantle protein has a high emulsifying and water holding capacity, and it can be used, as a raw material, for the improvement of sausage products. About the gelling products, more studies will be necessary with fresh squid mantle meat to conclude about this functional property.

  3. An investigation of pinch welds using HTS SQUIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To contain high-pressure gases inside a pressure vessel a seal is often made in a thin-walled tube, known as the stem tube, that connects the gas reservoir and the vessel. This seal can be achieved through the use of a resistance pinch weld that forms with only a limited amount of melting occurring. The lack of melting makes applying traditional post-weld nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques extremely difficult. The welds of interest here are made from 304L stainless steel (typically 3.8 mm diameter and 38 mm long) and have a non-uniform geometry that does not inherently lend itself to either eddy current or static field SQUID-based measurement techniques. We perform these NDE measurements with both the sample and the SQUID located inside local electromagnetic shielding. SQUID data are presented as individual time series traces for a set of welds that were fabricated using a broad range of fabrication parameters, and a comparison is made between the SQUID-based results and the known parameters. With the limited spatial resolution offered by our present SQUID system, it is not clear if weld quality can be evaluated from purely SQUID-based results

  4. An investigation of pinch welds using HTS SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Chris; Espy, Michelle A.; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.

    2006-05-01

    To contain high-pressure gases inside a pressure vessel a seal is often made in a thin-walled tube, known as the stem tube, that connects the gas reservoir and the vessel. This seal can be achieved through the use of a resistance pinch weld that forms with only a limited amount of melting occurring. The lack of melting makes applying traditional post-weld nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques extremely difficult. The welds of interest here are made from 304L stainless steel (typically 3.8 mm diameter and 38 mm long) and have a non-uniform geometry that does not inherently lend itself to either eddy current or static field SQUID-based measurement techniques. We perform these NDE measurements with both the sample and the SQUID located inside local electromagnetic shielding. SQUID data are presented as individual time series traces for a set of welds that were fabricated using a broad range of fabrication parameters, and a comparison is made between the SQUID-based results and the known parameters. With the limited spatial resolution offered by our present SQUID system, it is not clear if weld quality can be evaluated from purely SQUID-based results.

  5. [Biochemistry and functional characterization of squid mantle meat (Dosidicus gigas)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abugoch, L; Guarda, A; María Pérez, L; Isabel Donghi, M

    2000-12-01

    A study for the characterization of frozen giant squid mantle (meat) protein stored at -25 degrees C for 8 month was started. In the present research, the following functional properties were investigate: emulsifying, water holding and gel forming capacities. Optimal conditions for the separation and differentiation of miofibrillar and sarcoplasmatic proteins were also studied. It was found that the unfrozen giant squid mantle meat es capable of emulifying 2.817,4 g of oil/g of protein and holding capacity was 3.64 g of water/g of protein. Related to the gel forming capacity, it was not obtain, probably due to excessive storage of the meat. With regard to miofibrilar protein obtention of the squid mantle meat, it was found that two low ionic strength washings (I = 0.05), the sarcoplasmic proteins were practically eliminated from the protein matrix. The differentiation of miofibrilar and sarcoplasmatic proteins was obtained by PAGE-SDS of the squid mantle meat extracted at two different ionic strength (I = 0.05 and I = 0.5). This work demonstrates that the giant squid mantle protein has a high emulsifying and water holding capacity, and it can be used, as a raw material, for the improvement of sausage products. About the gelling products, more studies will be necessary with fresh squid mantle meat to conclude about this functional property. PMID:11464670

  6. The low fault HTSL-SQUID cooling system. Final report; Stoerarmes HTSL-SQUID-Kuehlsystem. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binneberg, A.; Spoerl, G.; Buschmann, H.

    1997-03-01

    In the context of the research project, work was done for HTSL-SQUID on (1) the development of a thermo-siphon cooler (low fault and continuously working) and (2) the development of a latent storage cooler (low fault and discontinuously working). Two development versions of the latent storage cooler were followed up, the development of a spherical latent storage cooler and the development of an annular vessel latent storage cooler. A further precondition for the construction of the cooler was the use of split Stirling refrigerators as units producing the cold. The experimental sample was built up with refrigerators which could produce a nominal cooling output of 1.2 W at 80 K. Two samples of the thermo-siphon cooler were built, tested and improved. The second sample was developed further as a demonstration model, introduced at meetings and prepared for testing the cooling of HTSL-SQUIDs. The thermo-siphon cooler can be designed for cooling output up to about 2 W at 80 K and can be used controlled for a temperature range of 90 K to 66 K. (orig./MM) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen des Forschungsvorhabens wurde fuer HTSL-SQUID`s an der (1) Entwicklung eines Thermosiphon-Kuehlers (stoerarm und kontinuierlich arbeitend) und (2) Entwicklung eines Latentspeicher-Kuehlers (stoerfrei und diskontinuierlich arbeitend) gearbeitet. Bei dem Latentspeicher-Kuehler wurden zwei Entwicklungsversionen verfolgt, und zwar Entwicklung eines Kugel-Latentspeicher-Kuehlers und Entwicklung eines Ringgefaess-Latentspeicher-Kuehlers. Eine weitere Praemisse zum Aufbau der Kuehler war der Einsatz von Split-Stirling-Kaeltemaschinen als kaelteerzeugende Baugruppe. Die Versuchsmuster wurden mit Kaeltemaschinen aufgebaut, die eine Nennkuehlleistung von 1,2 W bei 80 K erzeugen konnten. Der Thermosiphon-Kuehler wurde in zwei Musterexemplaren aufgebaut, erprobt und verbessert. Das Zweitmuster wurde als Demonstrator weiterentwickelt, zu Fachtagungen vorgestellt und zur Testung der Kuehlung von HTSL-SQUIDs

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al2O3/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 x 1017 in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO3 crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies

  8. SQUID detected NMR in microtesla magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Espy, Michelle A.; George, John S.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2004-09-01

    We have built an NMR system that employs a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector and operates in measurement fields of 2-25 μT. The system uses a pre-polarizing field from 4 to 30 mT generated by simple room-temperature wire-wound coils that are turned off during measurements. The instrument has an open geometry with samples located outside the cryostat at room-temperature. This removes constraints on sample size and allows us to obtain signals from living tissue. We have obtained 1H NMR spectra from a variety of samples including water, mineral oil, and a live frog. We also acquired gradient encoded free induction decay (FID) data from a water-plastic phantom in the μT regime, from which simple projection images were reconstructed. NMR signals from samples inside metallic containers have also been acquired. This is possible because the penetration skin depth is much greater at the low operating frequencies of this system than for conventional systems. Advantages to ultra-low field NMR measurements include lower susceptibility artifacts caused by high strength polarizing and measurement fields, and negligible line width broadening due to measurement field inhomogeneity, reducing the burden of producing highly homogeneous fields.

  9. SQUID sensor array configurations for magnetoencephalography applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, J.; Robinson, S.E. [CTF Systems Inc., A subsidiary of VSM MedTech Ltd, Port Coquitlam, BC (Canada)

    2002-09-01

    Electrophysiological activity in the human brain generates a small magnetic field from the spatial superposition of individual neuronal source currents. At a distance of about 15 mm from the scalp, the observed field is of the order of 10{sub -13} to 10{sub -12} T peak-to-peak. This measurement process is termed magnetoencephalography (MEG). In order to minimize instrumental noise, the MEG is usually detected using superconducting flux transformers, coupled to SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors. Since MEG signals are also measured in the presence of significant environmental magnetic noise, flux transformers must be designed to strongly attenuate environmental noise, maintain low instrumental noise and maximize signals from the brain. Furthermore, the flux transformers must adequately sample spatial field variations if the brain activity is to be imaged. The flux transformer optimization for maximum brain signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requires analysis of the spatial and temporal properties of brain activity, the environmental noise and how these signals are coupled to the flux transformer. Flux transformers that maximize SNR can detect the smallest brain signals and have the best ability to spatially separate dipolar sources. An optimal flux transformer design is a synthetic higher-order gradiometer based on relatively short-baseline first-order radial gradiometer primary sensors. (author)

  10. SQUIDs De-fluxing Using a Decaying AC Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Semenov, Vasili Kirilovich [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Plattsburgh, NY (United States); Anderson, Bill [Senior Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Flux trapping is the Achilles’ heel of all superconductor electronics. The most direct way to avoid flux trapping is a prevention of superconductor circuits from exposure to magnetic fields. Unfortunately this is not feasible if the circuits must be exposed to a strong DC magnetic field even for a short period of time. For example, such unavoidable exposures take place in superparamagnetic relaxation measurements (SPMR) and ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI) using unshielded thin-film SQUID-based gradiometers. Unshielded SQUIDs stop working after being exposed to DC magnetic fields of only a few Gauss in strength. In this paper we present experimental results with de-fluxing of planar thin-film LTS SQUID-based gradiometers using a strong decaying AC magnetic field. We used four commercial G136 gradiometers for SPMR measurements with up to a 10 mT magnetizing field. Strong 12.9 kHz decaying magnetic field pulses reliably return SQUIDs to normal operation 50 ms after zeroing the DC magnetizing field. This new AC de-fluxing method was also successfully tested with seven other different types of LTS SQUID sensors and has been shown to dissipate extremely low energy.

  11. Calibration of SQUID vector magnetometers in full tensor gradiometry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffler, M.; Queitsch, M.; Stolz, R.; Chwala, A.; Krech, W.; Meyer, H.-G.; Kukowski, N.

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of magnetic vector or tensor quantities, namely of field or field gradient, delivers more details of the underlying geological setting in geomagnetic prospection than a scalar measurement of a single component or of the scalar total magnetic intensity. Currently, highest measurement resolutions are achievable with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based systems. Due to technological limitations, it is necessary to suppress the parasitic magnetic field response from the SQUID gradiometer signals, which are a superposition of one tensor component and all three orthogonal magnetic field components. This in turn requires an accurate estimation of the local magnetic field. Such a measurement can itself be achieved via three additional orthogonal SQUID reference magnetometers. It is the calibration of such a SQUID reference vector magnetometer system that is the subject of this paper. A number of vector magnetometer calibration methods are described in the literature. We present two methods that we have implemented and compared, for their suitability of rapid data processing and integration into a full tensor magnetic gradiometry, SQUID-based, system. We conclude that the calibration routines must necessarily model fabrication misalignments, field offset and scale factors, and include comparison with a reference magnetic field. In order to enable fast processing on site, the software must be able to function as a stand-alone toolbox.

  12. Chimeras in locally coupled SQUIDs: Lions, goats and snakes

    CERN Document Server

    Hizanidis, J; Tsironis, G P

    2016-01-01

    We report on the emergence of robust multi-clustered chimera states in a dissipative-driven system of symmetrically and locally coupled identical SQUID oscillators. The "snake-like" resonance curve of the single SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is the key to the formation of the chimera states and is responsible for the extreme multistability exhibited by the coupled system that leads to attractor crowding at the geometrical resonance frequency. Until now, chimera states were mostly believed to exist for nonlocal coupling. Our findings provide theoretical evidence that nearest neighbor interactions is indeed capable of supporting such states in a wide parameter range. SQUID metamaterials are the subject of intense experimental investigations and we are highly confident that the complex dynamics demonstrated in this manuscript can be confirmed in the laboratory.

  13. Application of SQUIDs for registration of biomagnetic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitovych, I. D.; Primin, M. A.; Sosnytskyy, V. N.

    2012-04-01

    Supersensitive magnetometric systems based on low-temperature SQUIDs have been designed to conduct research in cardiology (magnetocardiography) and to examine distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in biologic objects. Such SQUID magnetometric systems are distinguished by their noise immunity enabling research in nonscreened rooms. High repeatability of research outcomes has been confirmed. The use of magnetocardiographic systems has permitted a new screening information technology to be developed to diagnose heart diseases at early stages. Magnetic imaging of heart's action currents is an ideal way to test local electrical heterogeneity of myocardium. It is shown that magnetocardiography has a significant potential for both basic science of analysis of heart's biosignals and clinical cardiologic practice. A SQUID magnetometric system measuring magnetic signals radiated by the organs of laboratory animals is described. Information technology for automatic recording and transforming magnetometric data has been developed; the measurement of signals over rats' livers while injecting intravenously the nanoparticles of iron oxides and lead solutions are presented.

  14. Robust chimera states in SQUID metamaterials with local interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizanidis, J.; Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the emergence of robust multiclustered chimera states in a dissipative-driven system of symmetrically and locally coupled identical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) oscillators. The "snakelike" resonance curve of the single SQUID is the key to the formation of the chimera states and is responsible for the extreme multistability exhibited by the coupled system that leads to attractor crowding at the geometrical resonance (inductive-capacitive) frequency. Until now, chimera states were mostly believed to exist for nonlocal coupling. Our findings provide theoretical evidence that nearest-neighbor interactions are indeed capable of supporting such states in a wide parameter range. SQUID metamaterials are the subject of intense experimental investigations, and we are highly confident that the complex dynamics demonstrated in this paper can be confirmed in the laboratory.

  15. DC-SQUID with enhanced magnetic field sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When designing a thinfilm DC-SQUID for insertion into a multichannel sensor circuit for biomagnetic applications, a minimum number of fabrication steps (e.g. mask layers) and simple thinfilm patterns are desirable. For measurements in a well shielded environment like the Berlin magnetically shielded room /1/ this requirement is met advantageously when flux transformers are omitted and the SQUID-loops themselves serve as magnetometer pick-up coils. In this case the DC-SQUIDs are designed for optimized magnetic field sensitivity instead of flux response. In this paper a single layer all-Nb thinfilm design that displays I-V- characteristics without resonant structures and the merits of a resistively shunted double loop circuit are presented

  16. Polarization rotation by an rf-SQUID metasurface

    CERN Document Server

    Caputo, J -G; Maimistov, A I

    2015-01-01

    We study the transmission and reflection of a plane electromagnetic wave through a two dimensional array of rf-SQUIDs. The basic equations describing the amplitudes of the magnetic field and current in the split-ring resonators are developed. These yield in the linear approximation the reflection and transmission coefficients. The polarization of the reflected wave is independent of the frequency of the incident wave and of its polarization; it is defined only by the orientation of the split-ring. The reflection and transmission coefficients have a strong resonance that is determined by the parameters of the rf-SQUID; its strength depends essentially on the incident angle.

  17. High-T{sub c} SQUID microscope with sample chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Yamazaki, Osamu; Shimizu, Ryoji; Saito, Yusuke [Ecological Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho Toyohashi Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    We have designed and constructed a high-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope with a sample chamber isolated by a shutter. It can image magnetic distributions of samples at both room temperature and 77 K. According to our scheme, the separation of the sample from the SQUID can be less than a few micrometres, in principle. We have successfully imaged a trapped flux in a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-y} thin-film ring at 77 K and a printout of a laser printer at room temperature. (author)

  18. Investigation of 1/f noise in tunnel junction dc SQUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, R.; Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.; Harlingen; Martinis, J.; Pegrum, C.

    1983-05-01

    The authors describe two methods of measuring the 1/f noise in a dc SQUID. One is sensitive only to 1/f noise in the critical currents of the junctions, and the other is sensitive only to 1/f flux noise that is not associated with critical current fluctuations. From measurements on a planar thin-film dc SQUID incorporating Josephson tunnel junctions the authors conclude that the predominant source of 1/f noise is not noise in the critical currents, but rather an apparent flux noise of unknown origin.

  19. Low-noise FET amplifier for dc SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the design, characterization, and operation of a low-noise FET-input differential amplifier, which is used as second stage for a dc SQUID in the electronic instrumentation of the gravitational wave detector of the Rome group at CERN. The 3-dB bandwidth of the amplifier is from 10 kHz to 1.5 MHz. At the SQUID modulation frequency of 70 kHz the voltage noise is 0.5 nV/(Hz)1/2, the current noise is 35 fA/(Hz)1/2

  20. An Economical Magnetocardiogram System Based on High-Tc SQUIDs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhuo; ZHU Xue-Min; ZHANG Li-Hua; HUANG Xu-Guang; REN Yu-Feng; CHEN Geng-Hua; YANG Qian-Sheng; FENG Ji

    2006-01-01

    @@ An economical magnetocardiogram (MCG) system is built in our laboratory. It mainly consists of a MCG data acquisition stage equipped with two high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers,a data processing stage with digital filtering and a one-layer μ-metal magnetically shielded room in conjunction with a high-Tc SQUID based active compensation. Experimental results show that a noise level of pico-tesla in MCG profiles, which is necessary for clinical applications, may be achieved with the system. Moreover, stable and convenient operations of the system are demonstrated with simulating MCG measurements.

  1. Development of a Two-Dimensional Micro-SQUID Array for Investigation of Magnetization Spatial Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Tomoya; Nago, Yusuke; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nomura, Shintaro; Kono, Kimitoshi; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2016-05-01

    We developed a two-dimensional array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for investigation of fine spatial distribution of magnetization in superconducting Sr2RuO4. Micrometer-sized SQUIDs based on homogeneously formed Al/AlOx/Al tunnel-type Josephson junctions were fabricated using shadow evaporation technique. Unnecessary electrodes formed by the shadow evaporation were removed by inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching, in order to realize a dense array of SQUIDs. We measured the magnetic modulation of the maximum Josephson current of each SQUID in the array and evaluated the interaction among the SQUIDs.

  2. Quantum behavior of a SQUID qubit manipulated with fast pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilla, Samuele; Messina, Antonino; Napoli, Anna [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Castellano, Maria Gabriella; Chiarello, Fabio [Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie - CNR, Roma (Italy); Migliore, Rosanna [Institute of Biophysics, National Research Council, via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    A SQUID qubit manipulated with fast variation of the energy potential is analyzed. Varying the potential shape from a single to a double-well configuration, quantum behaviors are brought into light and discussed. We show that the presence of quantum coherences in the initial state of the system plays a central role in the appearance of these quantum effects.

  3. 73m in ocean-going squid angling boat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Yue

    2004-01-01

    @@ Dalian Fishing Vessel Co., Dalian, China Liaoning Province Sea Fishery Group entrusted Dalian Fishing Vessel Company with working design and technical design of squid angling boat whose model is 8356, and Dalian Fishing Vessel Company is in charge of construction. The summary of this paper is about the characteristics of overall system design of this ship.

  4. SQUID-based instrumentation for ultra-low-field MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Zotev, V S; Matlashov, A N; Urbaitis, A V; Kraus, R H

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-low fields (ULF MRI) is a promising new imaging method that uses SQUID sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations at a microtesla-range measurement field. In this work, design and performance of a seven-channel SQUID system for simultaneous 3D ULF MRI and MEG are described. The system consists of seven axial second-order SQUID gradiometers, characterized by magnetic field resolutions of 1.2 - 2.8 fT/rtHz. It also includes five sets of coils for 3D Fourier imaging with pre-polarization. Design components used for rapid switching of the pre-polarizing field and for protecting the SQUIDs from the pre-polarizing pulses are discussed. The system's performance is demonstrated by multi-channel 3D images of a preserved sheep brain acquired at 46 microtesla measurement field with 2.5 mm x 2.5 mm x 5 mm imaging resolution. The ULF MRI images exhibit greater contrast than images of the same brain obtained using conventional high-field...

  5. Vampire squid: detritivores in the oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, Hendrik J T; Robison, Bruce H

    2012-11-22

    Vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis) are considered phylogenetic relics with cephalopod features of both octopods and squids. They lack feeding tentacles, but in addition to their eight arms, they have two retractile filaments, the exact functions of which have puzzled scientists for years. We present the results of investigations on the feeding ecology and behaviour of Vampyroteuthis, which include extensive in situ, deep-sea video recordings from MBARI's remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), laboratory feeding experiments, diet studies and morphological examinations of the retractile filaments, the arm suckers and cirri. Vampire squid were found to feed on detrital matter of various sizes, from small particles to larger marine aggregates. Ingested items included the remains of gelatinous zooplankton, discarded larvacean houses, crustacean remains, diatoms and faecal pellets. Both ROV observations and laboratory experiments led to the conclusion that vampire squid use their retractile filaments for the capture of food, supporting the hypothesis that the filaments are homologous to cephalopod arms. Vampyroteuthis' feeding behaviour is unlike any other cephalopod, and reveals a unique adaptation that allows these animals to spend most of their life at depths where oxygen concentrations are very low, but where predators are few and typical cephalopod food is scarce. PMID:23015627

  6. High-Tc SQUID magnetometer system with active cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, S.; Oyama, H.; Hayashi, A.; Washio, T.; Fujita, M.; Hirata, Y.

    2002-05-01

    Recent developments of high-Tc SQUIDs have enabled high sensitivity magnetometers to be used in wide range of places, such as laboratory and outdoor fields. At the early stage of developing multichannel system for measurement of magnetocardiogram (MCG) in clinical application, we have fabricated a single channel high-Tc SQUID magnetometer system. The system includes a direct-coupled SQUID with slot structure, a simple magnetically shielded room (MSR), and some active compensation electronics for the purpose of reducing various environmental field noises. A novel active noise cancellation was made by using a combination of a normal conducting detection coil that was horizontally wound in the middle height of the MSR, and two compensation coils that were wound at the top and bottom of the MSR. In addition, adaptive noise cancellation was supplemented by means of adaptive digital filter that was implemented in a digital signal processor. A total noise field attenuation of 50-60 dB was attained at 0.5-100 Hz. Low noise signals from the human heart were measured with a high-Tc SQUID in the noise reduced space in the MSR.

  7. A YBCO RF-SQUID magnetometer and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luwei, Zhou; Jingwu, Qiu; Xienfeng, Zhang; Zhiming, Tank; Yongjia, Qian

    1990-01-01

    An applicable RF-superconducting quantum interference detector (SQUID) magnetometer was made using a bulk sintered yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO). The temperature range of the magnetometer is 77 to 300 K and the field range 0 to 0.1T. At 77 K, the equivalent flux noise of the SQUID is 5 x 10 to minus 4 power theta sub o/square root of Hz at the frequency range of 20 to 200 Hz. The experiments show that the SQUID noise at low-frequency end is mainly from 1/f noise. A coil test shows that the magnetic moment sensitivity delta m is 10 to the minus 6th power emu. The RF-SQUID is shielded in a YBCO cylinder with a shielding ability B sub in/B sub ex of about 10 to the minus 6th power when external dc magnetic field is about a few Oe. The magnetometer is successfully used in characterizing superconducting thin films.

  8. A high-resolution, SQUID-based vibrating coil susceptometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) plays an important role in the development of ultrasensitive electric and magnetic measurement systems. SQUID instrumentation offers diversified applications with its ability to make measurements where other methodologies could not be applied. A high sensitivity magnetic measurement technique to measure the magnetic susceptibility of extremely small volume samples using a SQUID vibrating coil magnetometer (SVCM) has been developed. In this setup, position differentiating detection (PDD) of magnetic flux from the sample has been coupled with the SQUID magnetometer. The sensitivity of the setup depends on the vibrating amplitude of the pick-up coil. The pick-up coil of the SVCM has been steadily vibrated with a maximum amplitude of 75 µm close to the sample at the resonant frequency using bimorph piezoelectric bender type actuators. An equivalent circuit model for the piezoelectric actuator has been constructed, and its resonance frequency has also been cross-checked by simulation software. The vibration of actuators for a wide range of temperatures (4.2 K–300 K) has been controlled by a negative feedback circuit. The detailed design, construction and performance of the SVCM have been described

  9. SQUID and magneto-optic investigations of flux turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblischka, M.R.; Johansen, T.H.; Baziljevich, M.;

    2000-01-01

    Instabilities of the critical state ("turbulence") are observed in various high-T-c, single crystals by means of magneto-optic (MO) imaging. Using the same samples as in the MO investigations, we observe for the first time characteristic steps in the magnetic moment measured by means of a SQUID s...

  10. HTS dc SQUID based rf amplifier: development concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokopenko, G.V.; Shitov, S.V.; Borisenko, I.V.;

    2002-01-01

    We present a concept of a rf amplifier based on a directly coupled dc SQUID with bicrystal junctions, which have high saturation power and can be used with SIS mixers or possibly for satellite and cellular phone communications. A novel input resonant circuit is proposed using single layer of HTS...

  11. Flicker (1/f) noise in tunnel junction DC SQUIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, R.H.; Clarke, J.; Goubau, W.M.; Martinis, J.M.; Pegrum, C.M.; Van Harlingen, D.J.

    1983-04-01

    We have measured the spectral density of the 1/f voltage noise in current-biased resistively shunted Josephson tunnel junctions and dc SQUIDs. A theory in which fluctuations in the temperature give rise to fluctuations in the critical current and hence in the voltage predicts the magnitude of the noise quite accurately for junctions with areas of about 2 x 10/sup 4/ ..mu..m/sup 2/, but significantly overestimates the noise for junctions with areas of about 6 ..mu..m/sup 2/. DC SQUIDs fabricated from these two types of junctions exhibit substantially more 1/f voltage noise than would be predicted from a model in which the noise arises from critical current fluctuations in the junctions. This result was confirmed by an experiment involving two different bias current and flux modulation schemes, which demonstrated that the predominant 1/f voltage noise arises not from critical current fluctuations, but from some unknown source that can be regarded as an apparent 1/f flux noise. Measurements on five different configurations of dc SQUIDs fabricated with thin-film tunnel junctions and with widely varying areas, inductances, and junction capacitances show that the spectral density of the 1/f equivalent flux noise is roughtly constant, within a factor of three of (10/sup -10//f)phi/sup 2//sub 0/Hz/sup -1/. It is emphasized that 1/f flux noise may not be the predominant source of 1/f noise in SQUIDS fabricated with other technologies.

  12. MgB2 tunnel junctions and SQUIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.; Rowell, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the realization and understanding of MgB2 tunnel junctions and SQUIDs are surveyed. High quality MgB2 junctions with suitable tunnel barriers have been realized based on both oriented and epitaxial thin MgB2 films. Multiband transport properties, such as the existence of two energ

  13. Nanosquid magnetometers and high resolution scanning squid microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troeman, Aico Giardano Paul

    2007-01-01

    Recent interest in the development of small sized superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) has been motivated by the applicability of these sensors for the investigation of small, local, magnetic signals, such as the magnetization reversal of small magnetic clusters and the observation

  14. SQUIDs in biomagnetism: a roadmap towards improved healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Rainer; Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Seton, Hugh; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.; Paetau, Ritva; Parkkonen, Lauri; Pfeiffer, Christoph; Riaz, Bushra; Schneiderman, Justin F.; Dong, Hui; Hwang, Seong-min; You, Lixing; Inglis, Ben; Clarke, John; Espy, Michelle A.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Magnelind, Per E.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Volegov, Petr L.; Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Höfner, Nora; Burghoff, Martin; Enpuku, Keiji; Yang, S. Y.; Chieh, Jen-Jei; Knuutila, Jukka; Laine, Petteri; Nenonen, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    Globally, the demand for improved health care delivery while managing escalating costs is a major challenge. Measuring the biomagnetic fields that emanate from the human brain already impacts the treatment of epilepsy, brain tumours and other brain disorders. This roadmap explores how superconducting technologies are poised to impact health care. Biomagnetism is the study of magnetic fields of biological origin. Biomagnetic fields are typically very weak, often in the femtotesla range, making their measurement challenging. The earliest in vivo human measurements were made with room-temperature coils. In 1963, Baule and McFee (1963 Am. Heart J. 55 95‑6) reported the magnetic field produced by electric currents in the heart (‘magnetocardiography’), and in 1968, Cohen (1968 Science 161 784‑6) described the magnetic field generated by alpha-rhythm currents in the brain (‘magnetoencephalography’). Subsequently, in 1970, Cohen et al (1970 Appl. Phys. Lett. 16 278–80) reported the recording of a magnetocardiogram using a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). Just two years later, in 1972, Cohen (1972 Science 175 664–6) described the use of a SQUID in magnetoencephalography. These last two papers set the scene for applications of SQUIDs in biomagnetism, the subject of this roadmap. The SQUID is a combination of two fundamental properties of superconductors. The first is flux quantization—the fact that the magnetic flux Φ in a closed superconducting loop is quantized in units of the magnetic flux quantum, Φ0 ≡ h/2e, ≈ 2.07 × 10‑15 Tm2 (Deaver and Fairbank 1961 Phys. Rev. Lett. 7 43–6, Doll R and Näbauer M 1961 Phys. Rev. Lett. 7 51–2). Here, h is the Planck constant and e the elementary charge. The second property is the Josephson effect, predicted in 1962 by Josephson (1962 Phys. Lett. 1 251–3) and observed by Anderson and Rowell (1963 Phys. Rev. Lett. 10 230–2) in 1963. The Josephson junction consists of two weakly

  15. A SQUID gradiometer module with wire-wound pickup antenna and integrated voltage feedback circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Guofeng [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shanghai 200050 (China); Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-8), Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Joint Research Laboratory on Superconductivity and Bioelectronics, Collaboration between CAS-Shanghai and FZJ, Shanghai 200050 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yi, E-mail: y.zhang@fz-juelich.de [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-8), Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Joint Research Laboratory on Superconductivity and Bioelectronics, Collaboration between CAS-Shanghai and FZJ, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang Shulin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Shanghai 200050 (China); Joint Research Laboratory on Superconductivity and Bioelectronics, Collaboration between CAS-Shanghai and FZJ, Shanghai 200050 (China); Krause, Hans-Joachim [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-8), Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Joint Research Laboratory on Superconductivity and Bioelectronics, Collaboration between CAS-Shanghai and FZJ, Shanghai 200050 (China); and others

    2012-10-15

    The performance of the direct readout schemes for dc SQUID, Additional Positive Feedback (APF), noise cancellation (NC) and SQUID bootstrap circuit (SBC), have been studied in conjunction with planar SQUID magnetometers. In this paper, we examine the NC technique applied to a niobium SQUID gradiometer module with an Nb wire-wound antenna connecting to a dual-loop SQUID chip with an integrated voltage feedback circuit for suppression of the preamplifier noise contribution. The sensitivity of the SQUID gradiometer module is measured to be about 1 fT/(cm {radical}Hz) in the white noise range in a magnetically shielded room. Using such gradiometer, both MCG and MEG signals are recorded.

  16. nanoSQUID operation using kinetic rather than magnetic induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughan, Adam N; Zhao, Qingyuan; Berggren, Karl K

    2016-06-14

    We report on a method of nanoSQUID modulation which uses kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance to manip-ulate the internal fluxoid state. We produced modulation using injected current rather than an applied magnetic field. Using this injected current, we were able to observe the triangle-wave shaped modulation of the device critical current which was periodic according to the London fluxoid quantization condition. The measurement results also confirmed that the fluxoid state inside a superconducting loop can be manipulated using primarily kinetic inductance. By using primarily kinetic inductance rather than magnetic inductance, the size of the coupling inductor was reduced by a factor of 10. As a result, this approach may provide a means to reduce the size of SQUID-based superconducting electronics. Additionally, this method provides a convenient way to perform kinetic inductance characterizations of superconducting thin films.

  17. Scanning SQUID microscopy in a cryogen-free refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Brian T.; Low, David; Prawiroatmodjo, Guenevere E. D. K.; Nangoi, J. Kevin; Kim, Jihoon; Nowack, Katja C.

    With helium prices rising and supply becoming increasingly uncertain, it has become attractive to use dry cryostats with cryocoolers rather than liquid helium to reach low temperatures. However, a cryocooler introduces vibrations at the sample stage, making scanning probe experiments more challenging. Here, we report our progress on a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope implemented for the first time in a compact, cryogen-free 5 K system. Our microscope is designed to reach submicron spatial resolution and a flux sensitivity of approximately 1 μΦ0 /√{ Hz} , where Φ0 is the magnetic flux quantum. To enable height feedback while approaching and scanning samples, we mount the SQUID on a quartz tuning fork. Our system promises to meet the capabilities of similar systems implemented in helium cryostats.

  18. SQUID Magnetometry for Cancer Screening a Feasibility Study

    CERN Document Server

    Kenning, G G; Zotev, V S; Moslemi, A; Wilson, S; Hawel, L; Byus, C; Kovach, J S

    2003-01-01

    The recent demonstration that nanoparticles associated with various biological molecules and pharmacological agents can be administered systemically to humans, without toxicity from the particles, has opened a new era in the targeting of such particles to specific tissues in the body for the imaging and therapy of disease. The majority of particles used for this purpose contain iron and are detected in the body by magnetic resonance imaging. We believe a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) could provide quantitative and spatial information relevant to localization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles directed to a specific cell target in vivo. We envision a scanning system consisting of a DC induction field, a transport device, and an array of planar first order gradiometer coils coupled to DC SQUID amplifiers. We performed a set of computer simulations using experimentally determined values for concentrations of paramagnetic particles achievable in specific tissues of the mouse in vivo and conc...

  19. Medical applications of SQUIDs in neuro- and cardiomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounasmaa, Olli V.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) are two completely non-invasive imaging techniques, suitable for basic and clinical studies of human subjects. Large SQUID arrays, operating at liquid helium temperatures, are employed for detecting and localizing magnetically the active regions, modelled by current dipoles, in the working brain or heart. The measurements must be performed in magnetically shielded rooms. Time resolution of both methods is 0.5 ms and spatial accuracy 5-6mm. Commercial multi-SQUID instruments are now available from several manufacturers. An adequate account of the theory and practice of both techniques is given. Three examples of brain studies and two investigations of the heart are described. The advantages and drawbacks of modern imaging techniques, including MRI and PET, are compared and the future of MEG and MCG is discussed.

  20. Magnetic evaluation of a solar panel using HTS-SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The magnetic evaluation system of a solar panel using HTS-SQUID has been developed. •The electric circuits made by the discrete devices on the circuit board were visualized. •The electric properties of the commercial solar panels were demonstrated. -- Abstract: The magnetic evaluation system of a solar panel using HTS-SQUID has been proposed and developed. A normal pick-up coil was applied to detect the tangential magnetic field to the panel surface. Since the detected field could be related to the currents of the solar panels, the electric properties of the solar panels could be evaluated. In this work, the evaluation of the electric properties of the commercial solar panels as well as the electric circuits made by the discrete devices on the circuit board was visualized

  1. Squid rhodopsin and GTP-binding protein crossreact with vertebrate photoreceptor enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Saibil, H R; Michel-Villaz, M

    1984-01-01

    The activation of photoreceptor GTP-binding protein by rhodopsin was studied in squid photoreceptors and in crossreactions between the squid and bovine proteins. Turbidity changes were observed in the far-red after photoexcitation of rhodopsin with brief flashes and were used to probe interactions between photoreceptor membrane suspensions and soluble protein extracts. Our findings are squid photoreceptors contain a GTP-binding protein detectable by light- and GTP-sensitive turbidity changes ...

  2. Measurement of forward and reverse signal transfer coefficients for an rf-biased SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive measurements of the parameters characterizing an rf-biased SQUID as a linear twoport are described. The behavior of the device corresponds in detail to the predictions of a recently published model of SQUID operation and is unexpectedly similar to that of a conventional reactive parametric amplifier. The measurements have been used to make the first reliable predictions of the noise temperature and optimum source impedance of an rf-biased SQUID

  3. In vitro antioxidant, antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities of collagen hydrolysates of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) byproducts

    OpenAIRE

    Guadalupe Miroslava Suárez-Jiménez; Rosario Maribel Robles-Sánches; Glória Yépiz-Plascencia; Armando Burgos-Hernández; Josafat Marina Ezquerra-Brauer

    2015-01-01

    AbstractHydrolysates from two different jumbo squid byproducts (fins and arms), produced by trypsin and protease type XIV were compared on the basis of their antioxidant (DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assays), antimutagenic (Ames test) and antiproliferative (Transformation cell proliferation in M12.C3F6 murine cells) activities. Jumbo squid arms had higher content of collagen than fins, and their hydrolysates had the highest antioxidant activity. Also, jumbo squid arm-derived collagen hydr...

  4. Size increment of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas mature females in Peruvian waters, 1989-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Juan; Tafur, Ricardo; Taipe, Anatolio; Villegas, Piero; Keyl, Friedeman; Dominguez, Noel; Salazar, Martín

    2008-10-01

    Changes in population structure of the jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas in Peruvian waters were studied based on size-at-maturity from 1989 to 2004. From 1989 to 1999, mature squid belonging to the medium-sized group prevailed, but from 2001 on, mature squids were larger. This change is not related to the changes in sea surface temperature and we hypothesized that it was caused by the population increase of mesopelagic fishes as prey.

  5. Comprehensive Model of Jumbo Squid Dosidicus gigas Trophic Ecology in the Northern Humboldt Current System

    OpenAIRE

    Alegre, Ana; Ménard, Frédéric; Tafur, Ricardo; Espinoza, Pepe; Argüelles, Juan; Maehara, Víctor; Flores, Oswaldo; Simier, Monique; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    The jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas plays an important role in marine food webs both as predator and prey. We investigated the ontogenetic and spatiotemporal variability of the diet composition of jumbo squid in the northern Humboldt Current system. For that purpose we applied several statistical methods to an extensive dataset of 3,618 jumbo squid non empty stomachs collected off Peru from 2004 to 2011. A total of 55 prey taxa was identified that we aggregated into eleven groups. Our results evi...

  6. Polarization rotation by an rf-SQUID metasurface

    OpenAIRE

    Caputo, J. -G.; Gabitov, I.; Maimistov, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    We study the transmission and reflection of a plane electromagnetic wave through a two dimensional array of rf-SQUIDs. The basic equations describing the amplitudes of the magnetic field and current in the split-ring resonators are developed. These yield in the linear approximation the reflection and transmission coefficients. The polarization of the reflected wave is independent of the frequency of the incident wave and of its polarization; it is defined only by the orientation of the split-...

  7. Frontiers in Squid Reproduction: Prospecting for New Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Epel, David

    2002-01-01

    Many strains of disease-causing bacteria have become resistant to antibiotics, leading those in the medical profession to search for new sources of drugs. Although most antibiotics have been derived from terrestrial life, it is the marine world that may provide the pharmaceutical industry with the next generation of medicines. The biochemistries of seemingly simple marine organisms such as blue-green algae, sponges and squid are inspiring new ideas for drug development.

  8. Elimination of flux-transformer crosstalk in multichannel SQUID magnetometers

    OpenAIRE

    Brake, ter, O.; Fleuren, F.H.; Ulfman, J.A.; Flokstra, J.

    1986-01-01

    Multichannel SQUID magnetometers are being developed for signal-field mapping in biomagnetic experiments. A problem that becomes more serious as the number of channels is increased is the crosstalk caused by the mutual inductances between the individual sensing coils. A simple and effective method for eliminating this crosstalk is presented in this Paper. The method is based on a rearrangement of the feedback loops which causes the flux-transformer circuits to become currentless. The feasibil...

  9. Elimination of flux-transformer crosstalk in multichannel SQUID magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Brake, H. J. M.; Fleuren, F. H.; Ulfrnan, J. A.; Flokstra, J.

    Multichannel SQUID magnetometers are being developed for signal-field mapping in biomagnetic experiments. A problem that becomes more serious as the number of channels is increased is the crosstalk caused by the mutual inductances between the individual sensing coils. A simple and effective method for eliminating this crosstalk is presented in this Paper. The method is based on a rearrangement of the feedback loops which causes the flux-transformer circuits to become currentless. The feasibility of the method is verified experimentally.

  10. Superconducting bolometer array with SQUID readout for submillimetre wavelength detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, T [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Astronomisches Institut, Universitaetsstr. 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Zakosarenko, V [Institute for Physical High Technology (IPHT), Winzerlaer Str. 10, D-07752 Jena (Germany); Boucher, R [Institute for Physical High Technology (IPHT), Winzerlaer Str. 10, D-07752 Jena (Germany); Kreysa, E [Max-Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, Bonn (Germany); Meyer, H-G [Institute for Physical High Technology (IPHT), Winzerlaer Str. 10, D-07752 Jena (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    We have tested a fully microfabricated superconducting bolometer array for astrophysical observations at submillimetre wavelengths. The system is cooled by a {sup 3}He sorption refrigerator operating in a pumped {sup 4}He cryostat. The transition edge bolometer uses a bilayer of molybdenum and a gold-palladium alloy with a transition temperature of around 500 mK as the thermometer. The bolometer is voltage biased, and the current is measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) ammeter.

  11. The Transition from Stiff to Compliant Materials in Squid Beaks

    OpenAIRE

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involv...

  12. Superconducting bolometer array with SQUID readout for submillimetre wavelength detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tested a fully microfabricated superconducting bolometer array for astrophysical observations at submillimetre wavelengths. The system is cooled by a 3He sorption refrigerator operating in a pumped 4He cryostat. The transition edge bolometer uses a bilayer of molybdenum and a gold-palladium alloy with a transition temperature of around 500 mK as the thermometer. The bolometer is voltage biased, and the current is measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) ammeter

  13. A survey of calibration procedures for SQUID gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Ornelas, P H; Barbosa, C H; Lima, E A; Ribeiro, P C

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of three distinct experimental procedures for calibrating axial SQUID gradiometers has been compared, for the same gradiometer design and experimental setup. Each procedure employs a different field source, and a nonlinear least-squares optimization is used to fit the measured voltage to the theoretical field, thus determining Tesla/Volt calibration factors. We also studied the effect of noise and gradiometer imbalance on the accuracy of each procedure.

  14. Magnetic flux in a mesoscopic SQUID controlled by nonclassical electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2009-11-01

    We analyze SQUID coupled to a nonclassical electromagnetic field (NEM) and show that properties of the SQUID can be manipulated by a choice of a state of NEM. In particular, energy or fluctuations of magnetic flux threading the loop of the SQUID can be resolved into separate lines for each photon number state of one-mode NEM. The impact of two-mode NEM prepared in entangled Bell states is discussed. The findings suggest an experimental method of detection of photon states: the SQUID response is dependent on the number of photons in one-mode NEM and on the Bell states of a two-mode NEM.

  15. Analysis of the ac SQUID with low inductance and low critical current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. H.

    1976-01-01

    The properties of the ac SQUID magnetometer has been analyzed. The results are valid in the low-inductance low-critical-current regime, where the Lri0 producted is belowthe value at which the relation between the enclosed and externally applied magnetic dc flux becomes reentrant. The effects...... of the screening current circulating in the SQUID ring as well as of the SQUID-ring time constant, tau-Lr/R9 are taken into account. Here LR IS THE SQUID-ring inductance, and R is the shunt resistance in the shunted junction model assumed to describe the weak link. It is shown that for finite values of omegatau...

  16. Tuning an rf-SQUID flux qubit system's potential with magnetic flux bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Tao; Xu Wei-Wei; Shi Jian-Xin; An De-Yue; Sun Guo-Zhu; Yu Yang; Wu Pei-Heng

    2012-01-01

    At an extremely low temperature of 20 mK,we measured the loop current in a tunable rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a dc-SQUID.By adjusting the magnetic flux applied to the rf-SQUID loop (φf) and the small dc-SQUID (φcjjf),respectively,the potential shape of the system can be fully controlled in situ.Variation in the transition step and overlap size in the switching current with a barrier flux bias are analyzed,from which we can obtain some relevant device parameters and build a model to explain the experimental phenomenon.

  17. Trophic niche of squids: Insights from isotopic data in marine systems worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Joan; Coll, Marta; Somes, Christoper J.; Olson, Robert J.

    2013-10-01

    Cephalopods are an important prey resource for fishes, seabirds, and marine mammals, and are also voracious predators on crustaceans, fishes, squid and zooplankton. Because of their high feeding rates and abundance, squids have the potential to exert control on the recruitment of commercially important fishes. In this review, we synthesize the available information for two intrinsic markers (δ15N and δ13C isotopic values) in squids for all oceans and several types of ecosystems to obtain a global view of the trophic niches of squids in marine ecosystems. In particular, we aimed to examine whether the trophic positions and trophic widths of squid species vary among oceans and ecosystem types. To correctly compare across systems, we adjusted squid δ15N values for the isotopic variability of phytoplankton at the base of the food web provided by an ocean circulation-biogeochemistry-isotope model. Studies that focused on the trophic ecology of squids using isotopic techniques were few, and most of the information on squids was from studies on their predators. Our results showed that squids occupy a large range of trophic positions and exploit a large range of trophic resources, reflecting the versatility of their feeding behavior and confirming conclusions from food-web models. Clear differences in both trophic position and trophic width were found among oceans and ecosystem types. The study also reinforces the importance of considering the natural variation in isotopic values when comparing the isotopic values of consumers inhabiting different ecosystems.

  18. Tagging studies on the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Markaida, Unai; Rosenthal, Joshua J. C.; Gilly, William F

    2005-01-01

    Dosidicus gigas, the only species in the genus Dosidicus, is commonly known as the jumbo squid, jumbo flying squid (FAO, see Roper et al., 1984), or Humboldt squid. It is the largest ommastrephid squid and is endemic to the Eastern Pacific, ranging from northern California to southern Chile and to 140oW at the equator (Nesis, 1983; Nigmatullin, et al., 2001). During the last two decades it has become an extremely important fisheries resource in the Gulf of California (Ehrhardt et al., 1983; M...

  19. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  20. Transfer of 60Co from midwater squid to sperm whales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperm whales are notable squid-eaters. They feed mainly on medium to large-sized cephalopods at midwater levels and defecate near the surface. This suggests the existence of an upward transport of 60Co by sperm whales from the mesopelagic zone (150-1,200m). To elucidate this squid-whale route for this artificial radionuclide, 60Co content was determined in squid and in predator whales captured by commercial whaling. In the Cephalopoda livers 60Co levels of 30-500 mBq kg-1 wet were found and in the viscera of Odontoceti (toothed whales) 15-40 mBq kg-1 wet. About 0.3% of 60Co ingested was estimated to be retained in a 23-year-old male sperm whale. In the livers of Bryde's whales, 60Co levels of 40-80 mBq kg-1 wet were detected, but not in euphausiids and sardines, their possible prey. The level of Co in sperm whales was nearly the same as in Bryde's whales. Specific radioactivity 60Co/59Co in mBq μg-1 was several times higher in sperm whale (1.1-1.6) than in cephalopods (0.19-0.77). Eating prey with a high content of 60Co in the 1960's may have contributed to the present body burden in sperm whales with a long-life span. However, the origin of 60Co in Bryde's whales is unknown. (author)

  1. SQUID-based instrumentation for ultralow-field MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotev, Vadim S; Matlashov, Andrei N; Volegov, Petr L; Urbaitis, Algis V; Espy, Michelle A; Jr, Robert H Kraus [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Group of Applied Modern Physics, MS D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultralow fields (ULF MRI) is a promising new imaging method that uses SQUID sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations at a microtesla-range measurement field. In this work, a seven-channel SQUID system designed for simultaneous 3D ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG) is described. The system includes seven second-order SQUID gradiometers characterized by magnetic field resolutions of 1.2-2.8 fT Hz{sup -1/2}. It is also equipped with five sets of coils for 3D Fourier imaging with pre-polarization. Essential technical details of the design are discussed. The system's ULF MRI performance is demonstrated by multi-channel 3D images of a preserved sheep brain acquired at 46 {mu}T measurement field with pre-polarization at 40 mT. The imaging resolution is 2.5 mm x 2.5 mm x 5 mm. The ULF MRI images are compared to images of the same brain acquired using conventional high-field MRI. Different ways to improve imaging SNR are discussed.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of shunted μ-SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Fournier, T.; Courtois, H.; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2014-04-01

    In order to eliminate hysteresis, we have fabricated and characterized niobium based shunted micron size superconducting quantum interference devices (μ-SQUIDs). We find a wide temperature range where these μ-SQUIDs are non-hysteretic in nature and show a very good Ic vs. B oscillations in hysteretic regime and V vs. B oscillations in non-hysteretic regime. Here we report the characteristics of a shunted- μ-SQUID (Wf38LS72D5). In this device we have achieved a large voltage modulation, in non-hysteretic regime, at various temperatures including such as 1.1 mV at 6.62 K with a transfer function VΦ = 7.2mV/Φ0. The figures within the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, the article re-flowed and pagination increased from 3 to 4 pages. This article was updated on 14 May 2014 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged. Readers are advised that the replacement article PDF file contains an additional blank page to preserve the original pagination.

  3. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of shunted μ-SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nikhil, E-mail: knikhil@iitk.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur - 208016 (India); Fournier, T.; Courtois, H.; Gupta, Anjan K. [Institute Neel, CNRS and Université Joseph Fourier, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042, Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-24

    In order to eliminate hysteresis, we have fabricated and characterized niobium based shunted micron size superconducting quantum interference devices (μ-SQUIDs). We find a wide temperature range where these μ-SQUIDs are non-hysteretic in nature and show a very good I{sub c} vs. B oscillations in hysteretic regime and V vs. B oscillations in non-hysteretic regime. Here we report the characteristics of a shunted- μ-SQUID (Wf38LS72D5). In this device we have achieved a large voltage modulation, in non-hysteretic regime, at various temperatures including such as 1.1 mV at 6.62 K with a transfer function V{sub Φ} = 7.2mV/Φ{sub 0}. The figures within the original article PDF file, as supplied to AIP Publishing, were affected by a PDF-processing error. Consequently, the article re-flowed and pagination increased from 3 to 4 pages. This article was updated on 14 May 2014 to correct the PDF-processing error, with the scientific content remaining unchanged. Readers are advised that the replacement article PDF file contains an additional blank page to preserve the original pagination.

  5. A planar second-order DC SQUID gradiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, P; Chiaventi, L; Leoni, R; Pullano, M; Schirripa Spagnolo, G

    1991-01-01

    In this work we describe a DC SQUID gradiometer, sensitive to the second spatial derivative of the magnetic field. The sensitive area of the gradiometer is the inductive body of the DC SQUID itself. The isoflux line distribution generated by a dipolar source, obtained by performing magnetic measurements with an array of such detectors, is relatively complicated, but its localisation capability is similar to that one usually achieves with axial detector arrays. Planar gradiometers also show a better resolution for near sources and a stronger rejection of far disturbances. The final device is expected to have an inductance of a few hundreds of pH in order to obtain performances typical of a low noise DC SQUID. The pick-up coils will be the combination of four square holes of 500 microns side with a 1.05 cm baseline. Due to the magnetic field concentration (in the final device it can be a factor 10) the gradiometer will have a sensitivity of 10(-11) T m-2 Hz-1/2 and a field sensitivity of about 2 fT Hz-1/2. Some preliminary results, obtained on detectors with an intermediate area between the prototype and final device, are reported here. The process used to fabricate this second-order gradiometer is based on Nb-NbO chi-PbAuIn Josephson tunnel junctions. Some possible improvements will also be described. PMID:1807874

  6. Construction and test of a cryocooler-cooled low-Tc SQUID gradiometer system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, A.P.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Lefevere, M.W.; Leeuwen, van E.P.; Holland, H.J.; Haken, ten B.; Brake, ter H.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A cryocooler-cooled low-Tc SQUID gradiometer system was designed and constructed. It is based on a 4 K GM-cooler that is positioned several meters from the measuring head containing the SQUID sensors. The cooling power is transported by means of a circulating helium flow. Thus, there are three main

  7. Multi-terminal multi-junction dc SQUID for nanoscale magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Alexander Y.; Uri, Aviram; Zeldov, Eli

    2016-11-01

    Miniaturization of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is of major importance for the development of sensitive scanning nanoscale magnetometry tools. The high sensitivity of nanoSQUIDs is restricted, however, to only particular periodic values of the applied magnetic field, making accurate measurements at intermediate values of the field impossible. We present a theoretical investigation of a multi-terminal, multi-junction SQUID (mSQUID) that lifts this limitation by providing electrical means for a continuous shift of the quantum interference pattern with respect to the applied field. Analysis of 4-terminal, 4-junction and 3-terminal, 3-junction mSQUIDs shows that operation at maximum sensitivity can be obtained at any value of the magnetic field by applying control current to the extra terminals. The model describes the variation and the shift of the interference pattern as a function of the control currents, junction asymmetries, and the mSQUID inductance. The mSQUID is also shown to provide a direct measurement of the current-phase relations of superconducting junctions. The derived model provides a quantitative description of the recently developed multi-terminal nanoSQUID-on-tip.

  8. The computer-aided system for the high resolution SQUID-magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The described computer-aided system for the high resolution SQUID-magnetometer permits one to regulate the thermostat temperature, vary the working magnetic field, change the sample position and allow acquisition and processing of signal from a SQUID. A brief description of electronics and the principal program algorithms is proposed. 7 refs.; 6 figs

  9. Quantum Entanglement of Two Flux Qubits Induced by an Auxiliary SQUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We revisit a theoretical scheme to create quantum entanglement of two three-level superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with the help of an auxiliary SQUID. In this scenario, two three-level systems are coupled to a quantized cavity field and a classical external field and thus form dark states. The quantum entanglement can be produced by a quantum measurement on the auxiliary SQUID. Our investigation emphasizes the quantum effect of the auxiliary SQUID. For the experimental feasibility and accessibility of the scheme, we calculate the time evolution of the whole system including the auxiliary SQUID. To ensure the efficiency of generating quantum entanglement, relations between the measurement time and dominate parameters of the system are analyzed according to detailed calculations.

  10. Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters with On-Chip dc-SQUID Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, S.; Ferring, A.; Fleischmann, A.; Wegner, M.; Enss, C.

    2016-07-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are low-temperature particle detectors that are typically read out by using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). But since MMCs are sensitive to the input circuitry and the noise performance of the SQUID, the energy resolution of MMCs have not yet reached their fundamental limit. A possible solution to overcome present limits is to maximize the flux coupling by minimizing parasitic inductance in the input circuit. To show the suitability of this approach, we realized a 64 pixel MMC detector array with integrated dc-SQUID readout, i.e., detector and SQUID are on the same chip. We observed an influence of the power dissipation of the SQUID on the detector temperature. We achieved a baseline energy resolution of Δ E_mathrm {FWHM} = 25 mathrm {eV} and Δ E_mathrm {FWHM} = 30 mathrm {eV} for X-rays with energies up to 6 mathrm {keV}.

  11. Multiplexing of Hot-Electron Nanobolometers Using Microwave SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Boris S.; Day, Peter K.; Kawamura, Jonathan H.; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry G.

    2009-12-01

    We have obtained the first data on the multiplexed operation of titanium hot-electron bolometers (HEB). Because of their low thermal conductance and small electron heat capacity nanobolometers are particularly interesting as sensors for far-infrared spectroscopy and mid- and near-IR calorimetry. However, the short time constant of these devices (˜μs at 300-400 mK) makes time domain or audio-frequency domain multiplexing impractical. The Microwave SQUID (MSQUID) approach pursued in this work uses dc SQUIDs coupled to X-band microresonators which are, in turn, coupled to a transmission line. We used a 4-element array of Ti HEBs operated at 415 mK in a He3 dewar with an optical fiber access. The microwave signal exhibited 10-MHz wide resonances at individual MSQUD frequencies between 9 GHz and 10 GHz. The resonance depth is modulated by the current through the bolometer via a change of the SQUID flux state. The transmitted signal was amplified by a cryogenic amplifier and downconverted to baseband using an IQ mixer. A 1-dB per Ω0/2 responsivity was sufficient for keeping the system noise at the level of ˜2 pA/Hz1/2. This is more than an order of magnitude smaller than phonon noise in the HEB. The devices were able to detect single near-IR photons (1550 nm) with a time constant of 3.5 μs. Follow-on work will scale the array to larger size and will address the microwave frequency signal generation and processing using a digital transceiver.

  12. Issues relating to airborne applications of HTS SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, C P; Binks, R A; Lam, S H K; Du, J; Tilbrook, D L; Mitchell, E E; MacFarlane, J C; Lee, J B; Turner, R; Downey, M; Maddever, A

    2002-01-01

    Airborne application of HTS SQUIDs is the most difficult environment for their successful deployment. In order to operate with the sensitivity required for a particular application, there are many issues to be addressed such as the need for very wide dynamic range electronics, motion noise elimination, immunity to large changing magnetic fields and cultural noise sources. This paper reviews what is necessary to achieve an airborne system giving examples in geophysical mineral exploration. It will consider issues relating to device design and fabrication, electronics, dewar design, suspension system requirements and noise elimination methods.

  13. Observation of sine modulated Bessel behavior in microwave biased SQUIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amplitudes of the signal lobes (Bessel Maxima) observed in several types of thin film SQUIDs excited at 9.2 GHz exhibit pronounced periodic intensity modulation. This behavior is consistent with the simplified flux entry model proposed by Mercereau in the limit of tau approximately T, where T is the shortest time between successive flux entry into loop and tau is the flux passage time. From the results, tau was deduced to be approximately 1012 seconds for both proximity effect and narrow constriction devices

  14. SQUID-Detected In Vivo MRI at Microtesla Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moble, Michael; Myers, Whittier R; Lee, SeungKyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2005-06-01

    We use a low transition temperature (T{sub c}) Super-conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to perform in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at magnetic fields around 100 microtesla, corresponding to proton Larmor frequencies of about 5 kHz. In such low fields, broadening of the nuclear magnetic resonance lines due to inhomogeneous magnetic fields and susceptibility variations of the sample are minimized, enabling us to obtain high quality images. To reduce environmental noise the signal is detected by a second-order gradiometer, coupled to the SQUID, and the experiment is surrounded by a 3-mm thick Al shield. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we prepolarize the samples in a field up to 100 mT. Three-dimensional images are acquired in less than 6 minutes with a standard spin-echo phase-encoding sequence. Using encoding gradients of {approx}100 {micro}T/m we obtain three-dimensional images of bell peppers with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 8 mm{sup 3}. Our system is ideally suited to acquiring images of small, peripheral parts of the human body such as hands and arms. In vivo images of an arm, acquired at 132 {micro}T, show 24-mm sections of the forearm with a resolution of 3 x 3 mm{sup 2} and a SNR of 10. We discuss possible applications of MRI at these low magnetic fields.

  15. An analysis of conductance changes in squid axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MULLINS, L J

    1959-05-20

    The membrane of the squid axon is considered on the basis of a pore model in which the distribution of the pore sizes strongly favors K(+) transfer when there is no potential. Electrical asymmetry causes non-penetrating ions on the membrane capacitor to exert a mechanical force on both membrane surfaces and this force results in a deformation of the membrane pore system such that it assumes a distribution of sizes favoring the ions exerting mechanical force. The ions involved appear to be Ca(++) on the outside of the membrane and isethionate(-), (i(-)) on the inside; as Ca(++) is equivalent in size to Na(+), the charged membrane is potentially able to transfer Na(+), when the ions deforming the membrane pore distribution are removed. A depolarization of the membrane leads to an opening of pores that will allow Na(+) penetration and a release of the membrane from deformation. The pores revert to the zero-potential pore size distribution hence the Na permeability change is a transient. Calculation shows that the potassium conductance vs. displacement of membrane potential curve for the squid axon and the "inactivation" function, h, can be obtained directly from the assumed membrane distortion without the introduction of arbitrary parameters. The sodium conductance, because it is a transient, requires assumptions about the time constants with which ions unblock pores at the outside and the inside of the membrane.

  16. Impact of SQUIDs on functional imaging in neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Penna, Stefania; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides an overview on the basic principles and applications of magnetoencephalography (MEG), a technique that requires the use of many SQUIDs and thus represents one of the most important applications of superconducting electronics. Since the development of the first SQUID magnetometers, it was clear that these devices could be used to measure the ultra-low magnetic signals associated with the bioelectric activity of the neurons of the human brain. Forty years on from the first measurement of magnetic alpha rhythm by David Cohen, MEG has become a fundamental tool for the investigation of brain functions. The simple localization of cerebral sources activated by sensory stimulation performed in the early years has been successively expanded to the identification of the sequence of neuronal pool activations, thus decrypting information of the hierarchy underlying cerebral processing. This goal has been achieved thanks to the development of complex instrumentation, namely whole head MEG systems, allowing simultaneous measurement of magnetic fields all over the scalp with an exquisite time resolution. The latest trends in MEG, such as the study of brain networks, i.e. how the brain organizes itself in a coherent and stable way, are discussed. These sound applications together with the latest technological developments aimed at implementing systems able to record MEG signals and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head with the same set-up pave the way to high performance systems for brain functional investigation in the healthy and the sick population.

  17. SQUID-based beam position monitoring for proton EDM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haciomeroglu, Selcuk

    2014-09-01

    One of the major systematic errors in the proton EDM experiment is the radial B-field, since it couples the magnetic dipole moment and causes a vertical spin precession. For a proton with EDM at the level of 10-29 e.cm, 0.22 pG of B-field and 10.5 MV/m of E-field cause same vertical spin precession. On the other hand, the radial B-field splits the counter-rotating beams depending on the vertical focusing strength in the ring The magnetic field due to this split modulated at a few kHz can be measured by a SQUID-magnetometer. This measurement requires the B-field to be kept less than 1 nT everywhere around the ring using shields of mu-metal and aluminum layers. Then, the SQUID measurements involve noise from three sources: outside the shields, the shields themselves and the beam. We study these three sources of noise using an electric circuit (mimicking the beam) inside a magnetic shielding room which consists two-layers of mu-metal and an aluminum layer.

  18. Development of an image processing system in splendid squid quality classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunee, Niyada; Chaiprapat, Supapan; Waiyagan, Kriangkrai

    2013-07-01

    Agricultural products typically exhibit high variance in quality characteristics. To assure customer satisfaction and control manufacturing productivity, quality classification is necessary to screen off defective items and to grade the products. This article presents an application of image processing techniques on squid grading and defect discrimination. A preliminary study indicated that surface color was an efficient determinant to justify quality of splendid squids. In this study, a computer vision system (CVS) was developed to examine the characteristics of splendid squids. Using image processing techniques, squids could be classified into three different quality grades as in accordance with an industry standard. The developed system first sifted through squid images to reject ones with black marks. Qualified squids were graded on a proportion of white, pink, and red regions appearing on their bodies by using fuzzy logic. The system was evaluated on 100 images of squids at different quality levels. It was found that accuracy obtained by the proposed technique was 95% compared with sensory evaluation of an expert.

  19. The fabrication and characterization of nano-SQUIDs based on Nb thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xixi; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Hao; Chen, Lei, E-mail: leichen@mail.sim.ac.cn; Wang, Zhen

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We developed a nano-SQUID fabrication process starting from a high-quality thin film. • The fabricated nano-SQUIDs exhibited flux modulation depth up to 10.3% at 4.6 K. • The measured data agreed with the Ginzburg–Landau simulation. • We found that a small critical current <50 μA is important for a deep flux modulation. • The suggestions in improving the nano-SQUID’s performance were discussed. - Abstract: SQUIDs with nano-junctions (or nano-SQUIDs) are able to be miniaturized into nanoscale to measure a single Bohr magneton. Here, we reported the development of a fabrication process for Nb (niobium) nano-SQUIDs using the thin film deposition and the electron-beam lithography technology. The developed process started from a high-quality superconducting thin film so that it is compatible with a variety of film growing techniques. The as-fabricated nano-SQUIDs exhibited functional flux modulation depth up to 10.3% at 4.6 K, in agreement with the numerical simulation based on the Ginzburg–Landau equation. By further comparing the results from both experiments and simulations, we found that a small critical current below ∼50 μA played a leading role in order to obtain a decent flux-modulation depth for Nb nano-SQUIDs.

  20. Characteristics of an HTS-SQUID gradiometer with ramp-edge Josephson junctions and its application on robot-based 3D-mobile compact SQUID NDE system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated behavior of HTS-dc-SQUID gradiometers with ramp-edge Josephson junctions (JJs) in ac and dc magnetic fields. In the both fields, the gradiometers show higher durability against entry of flux vortices than SQUIDs with bicrystal JJs. A robot-based SQUID NDE system utilizing the gradiometer was developed in an unshielded environment. Detectability of the system to detect non-through cracks in double-layer structures was demonstrated. A new excitation coil was applied to detect cracks that oriented vertical and parallel to the baseline of the gradiometer. In this paper, we investigated detailed behavior of novel HTS-dc-SQUID gradiometers with ramp-edge Josephson junctions (JJs) in both an ac magnetic field and a dc magnetic field. In the both fields, the novel gradiometers shows the superior performance to the conventional YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) HTS-dc-SQUID gradiometer and a bare HTS-dc-SQUID ring with bicrystal JJs concerning durability against entry and hopping of flux vortices, probably due to their differential pickup coils without a grain boundary and multilayer structure of the ramp-edge JJs. A robot-based compact HTS-SQUID NDE system utilizing the novel gradiometer was reviewed, and detectability of the system to detect non-through cracks in a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP)/Al double-layer structure was demonstrated. A new excitation coil in which the supplied currents flowed in the orthogonal directions was applied to detect cracks that oriented vertical and parallel to the baseline of the gradiometer.

  1. Hysteretic behaviour of nanoSQUIDs-prospective application as trapped-vortex memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the critical current-magnetic field dependence, Ic(B), of nanoSQUIDs. The vortex penetration field of a Nb/Au bilayer film was determined from the hysteretic behaviour of the nanoSQUID's Ic(B) pattern. The current-voltage characteristics of Nb/Au bilayer microbridges were also studied. The vortex penetration field was found to be much lower than the Nb single-layer counterpart. These properties suggest that a nanoSQUID may be a potential trapped-vortex memory device, which is discussed.

  2. Radio frequency interference noise reduction using a field programmable gate array for SQUID applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurement without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is one of the effective methods to reduce environmental noise. Recently, SQUIDs have been used in various applications at high frequencies, such as nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The NQR frequency from explosives is in the range 0.5-5 MHz. In this case, an NQR sensor is exposed to AM radio frequency interference (RFI). The feasibility of the ANC system for RFI that used digital signal processing was studied. Our investigation showed that this digital ANC system can be applied to SQUID measurements for RFI suppression

  3. In vitro antioxidant, antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities of collagen hydrolysates of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas byproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Miroslava Suárez-Jiménez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHydrolysates from two different jumbo squid byproducts (fins and arms, produced by trypsin and protease type XIV were compared on the basis of their antioxidant (DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assays, antimutagenic (Ames test and antiproliferative (Transformation cell proliferation in M12.C3F6 murine cells activities. Jumbo squid arms had higher content of collagen than fins, and their hydrolysates had the highest antioxidant activity. Also, jumbo squid arm-derived collagen hydrolyzed with protease XIV showed the highest antimutagenic activity. The four hydrolysates obtained showed low antiproliferative activity, however they are susceptible for further studies to be applied as food additives.

  4. Generation of N-qubit W state with rf-SQUID qubits by adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Z J; Gao, K L

    2006-01-01

    A simple scheme is presented to generate n-qubit W state with rf-superconducting quantum interference devices (rf-SQUIDs) in cavity QED through adiabatic passage. Because of the achievable strong coupling for rf-SQUID qubits embedded in cavity QED, we can get the desired state with high success probability. Furthermore, the scheme is insensitive to position inaccuracy of the rf-SQUIDs. The numerical simulation shows that, by using present experimental techniques, we can achieve our scheme with very high success probability, and the fidelity could be eventually unity with the help of dissipation.

  5. A SQUID-based microwave cavity search for dark-matter axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asztalos, S J; Carosi, G; Hagmann, C; Kinion, D; van Bibber, K; Hotz, M; Rosenberg, L; Rybka, G; Hoskins, J; Hwang, J; Sikivie, P; Tanner, D B; Bradley, R; Clarke, J

    2009-10-21

    Axions in the {mu}eV mass range are a plausible cold dark matter candidate and may be detected by their conversion into microwave photons in a resonant cavity immersed in a static magnetic field. The first result from such an axion search using a superconducting first-stage amplifier (SQUID) is reported. The SQUID amplifier, replacing a conventional GaAs field-effect transistor amplifier, successfully reached axion-photon coupling sensitivity in the band set by present axion models and sets the stage for a definitive axion search utilizing near quantum-limited SQUID amplifiers.

  6. The transition from stiff to compliant materials in squid beaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W; Waite, J Herbert

    2008-03-28

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications. PMID:18369144

  7. SQUID-Detected Microtesla MRI in the presence of Metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessle, Michael; Han, Song-I.; Myers, Whittier; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Kelso, Nathan; Hatridge, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2006-09-06

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at fields of 1 T and above, the presence of a metal insert can distort the image because of susceptibility differences within the sample and modification of the radiofrequency fields by screening currents. Furthermore, it is not feasible to perform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or acquire a magnetic resonance image if the sample is enclosed in a metal container. Both problems can be overcome by substantially lowering the NMR frequency. Using a microtesla imaging system operating at 2.8 kHz, with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the signal detector, we have obtained distortion-free images of a phantom containing a titanium bar and three-dimensional images of an object enclosed in an aluminum can; in both cases high-field images are inaccessible.

  8. Braking Performance of a Biomimetic Squid-Like Underwater Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md.Mahbubar Rahman; Sinpei Sugimori; Hiroshi Miki; Risa Yamamoto; Yugo Sanada; Yasuyuki Toda

    2013-01-01

    In this study,the braking performance of the undulating fin propulsion system ofa biomimetic squid-like underwater robot was investigated through free run experiment and simulation of the quasi-steady mathematical model.The quasi-steady equations of motion were solved using the measured and calculated hydrodynamic forces and compared with free-run test results.Various braking strategies were tested and discussed in terms of stopping ability and the forces acting on the stopping stage.The stopping performance of the undulating fin propulsion system tured out to be excellent considering the short stopping time and short stopping distance.This is because of the large negative thrust produced by progressive wave in opposite direction.It was confirmed that the undulating fin propulsion system can effectively perform braking even in complex underwater explorations.

  9. Multimodal transition and stochastic antiresonance in squid giant axons

    CERN Document Server

    Borkowski, L S

    2010-01-01

    The experimental data of N. Takahashi, Y. Hanyu, T. Musha, R. Kubo, and G. Matsumoto, Physica D \\textbf{43}, 318 (1990), on the response of squid giant axons stimulated by periodic sequence of short current pulses is interpreted within the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The minimum of the firing rate as a function of the stimulus amplitude $I_0$ in the high-frequency regime is due to the multimodal transition. Below this singular point only odd multiples of the driving period remain and the system is highly sensitive to noise. The coefficient of variation has a maximum and the firing rate has a minimum as a function of the noise intensity which is an indication of the stochastic coherence antiresonance. The model calculations reproduce the frequency of occurrence of the most common modes in the vicinity of the transition. A linear relation of output frequency vs. $I_0$ for above the transition is also confirmed.

  10. The Transition from Stiff to Compliant Materials in Squid Beaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2008-03-01

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications.

  11. Synchronization of networked Jahn-Teller systems in SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    We consider the nonlinear effects in a Jahn-Teller (JT) system of two coupled resonators interacting simultaneously with a flux qubit using coupled SQUIDs. A two-frequency description of JT system that inherits the networked structure of both nonlinear Josephson junctions and harmonic oscillators is employed to describe the synchronous structures in a multifrequency scheme. Eigenvalue spectrum is used to show the switch between the effective single mode and two mode configuration in terms of frequency difference. The Rabi supersplitting is investigated by the spectral response of JT systems in different coupling regimes. Second-order coherence functions are employed to investigate antibunching effects in resonator mode. Synchronous structure between correlations of privileged mode and qubit is obtained in localization-delocalization and photon blockade regime controlled by the population imbalance.

  12. Detection of Rapid Atrial Arrhythmias in SQUID Magnetocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Woong; Kwon, Hyuk Chan; Kim, Ki Dam; Lee, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Mok; Kim, In Seon; Lim, Hyun Kyoon; Park, Yong Ki [Biomagnetism Research, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Doo Sang [Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Seung Pyung [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-10-15

    We propose a method to measure atrial arrhythmias (AA) such as atrial fibrillation (Afb) and atrial flutter (Afl) with a SQUID magnetocardiograph (MCG) system. To detect AA is one of challenging topics in MCG. As the AA generally have irregular rhythm and atrio-ventricular conduction, the MCG signal cannot be improved by QRS averaging; therefore a SQUID MCG system having a high SNR is required to measure informative atrial excitation with a single scan. In the case of Afb, diminished f waves are much smaller than normal P waves because the sources are usually located on the posterior wall of the heart. In this study, we utilize an MCG system measuring tangential field components, which is known to be more sensitive to a deeper current source. The average noise spectral density of the whole system in a magnetic shielded room was 10 fT/Hz(a) 1 Hz and 5 fT/Hz(a) 100 Hz. We measured the MCG signals of patients with chronic Afb and Afl. Before the AA measurement, the comparison between the measurements in supine and prone positions for P waves has been conducted and the experiment gave a result that the supine position is more suitable to measure the atrial excitation. Therefore, the AA was measured in subject's supine position. Clinical potential of AA measurement in MCG is to find an aspect of a reentry circuit and to localize the abnormal stimulation noninvasively. To give useful information about the abnormal excitation, we have developed a method, separative synthetic aperture magnetometry (sSAM). The basic idea of sSAM is to visualize current source distribution corresponding to the atrial excitation, which are separated from the ventricular excitation and the Gaussian sensor noises. By using sSAM, we localized the source of an Afl successfully.

  13. Growth of juvenile shrimp Metapenaeus monoceros fed with squid and mussel

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.; Krishnakumari, L.

    Small juveniles of both sexes and females of large juveniles of Metapenaeus monoceros attained faster growth with squid diet. Males of large juveniles registered better growth with mussel diet. No significant difference was observed in moult weights...

  14. Enhanced Dynamic Range in N-SQUID Lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddins, A.; Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Toyli, D. M.; Vijay, R.; Minev, Z.; Siddiqi, I.

    2014-03-01

    Simultaneously providing high gain and nearly quantum-limited noise performance, superconducting parametric amplifiers (paramps) have been used successfully for high fidelity qubit readout, quantum feedback, and microwave quantum optics experiments. The Lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifier (LJPA) consists of a capacitively shunted SQUID coupled to a transmission line to form a nonlinear resonator. Like other paramps employing a resonant circuit, the LJPA's dynamic range-a potentially key ingredient for multiplexing-is limited. Simple theory predicts that the dynamic range can be increased without any reduction in bandwidth or gain by distributing the resonator nonlinearity over a series array of SQUIDs. We fabricated such array devices with up to 5 SQUIDs and observed a clear increase in the critical power for bifurcation about which parametric gain occurs. We discuss in detail amplifier performance as a function of the number of SQUIDs in the array. This research was supported by the Army Research Office under a QCT grant.

  15. Multichannel SQUID system detecting tangential components of the cardiac magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Keiji; Haruta, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Akira; Ogata, Hisanao; Komuro, Takanori; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Youichi; Kandori, Akihiko; Noda, Yasunaga; Terada, Yasushi; Mitsui, Toshio

    1995-10-01

    The 32-channel SQUID system described here is used for diagnosing heart disease by measuring the x and y components of the cardiac magnetic field. To detect a magnetic field parallel to the body surface, it uses a compact hybrid superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometer consisting of a planar pickup coil (fabricated using thin-film techniques) and a square double-washer dc-SQUID having large voltage-flux transfer function. The SQUIDs are operated in a flux-locked mode using simple readout circuits connected directly to the preamplifier without additional positive feedback. The system is installed in a magnetically shielded room in a hospital. A low noise characteristics lower than 10 ft/√ Hz in a white noise is obtained in the hospital. Examples of tangential magnetocardiogram (MCG) measurements presented here show that the MCG obtained using this gradiometer makes it easy to visually estimate the electrophysiological behavior of the heart.

  16. Multiplexed readout of MMC detector arrays using non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Kempf, S; Gastaldo, L; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C

    2013-01-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are widely used for various experiments in fields ranging from atomic and nuclear physics to x-ray spectroscopy, laboratory astrophysics or material science. Whereas in previous experiments single pixel detectors or small arrays have been used, for future applications large arrays are needed. Therefore, suitable multiplexing techniques for MMC arrays are currently under development. A promising approach for the readout of large arrays is the microwave SQUID multiplexer that operates in the frequency domain and that employs non-hysteretic rf-SQUIDs to transduce the detector signals into a frequency shift of high $Q$ resonators which can be monitored by using standard microwave measurement techniques. In this paper we discuss the design and the expected performance of a recently developed and fabricated 64 pixel detector array with integrated microwave SQUID multiplexer. First experimental data were obtained characterizing dc-SQUIDs with virtually identical washer design.

  17. SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MicroteslaFields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

    2006-08-14

    amplitude in MRI using laser polarized noble gases such as {sup 3}He or {sup 129}Xe (10-12). Hyperpolarized gases were used successfully to image the human lung in fields on the order of several mT (13-15). To overcome the sensitivity loss of Faraday detection at low frequencies, ultrasensitive magnetometers based on the Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) (16) are used to detect NMR and MRI signals (17-24). Recently, SQUID-based MRI systems capable of acquiring in vivo images have appeared. For example, in the 10-mT system of Seton et al. (18) signals are coupled to a SQUID via a superconducting tuned circuit, while Clarke and coworkers (22, 25, 26) developed a system at 132 {micro}T with an untuned input circuit coupled to a SQUID. In a quite different approach, atomic magnetometers have been used recently to detect the magnetization (27) and NMR signal (28) of hyperpolarized gases. This technique could potentially be used for low-field MRI in the future. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state-of-the-art of MRI in microtesla fields detected with SQUIDs. The principles of SQUIDs and NMR are briefly reviewed. We show that very narrow NMR linewidths can be achieved in low magnetic fields that are quite inhomogeneous, with illustrative examples from spectroscopy. After describing our ultralow-field MRI system, we present a variety of images. We demonstrate that in microtesla fields the longitudinal relaxation T{sub 1} is much more material dependent than is the case in high fields; this results in a substantial improvement in 'T{sub 1}-weighted contrast imaging'. After outlining the first attempts to combine microtesla NMR with magnetoencephalography (MEG) (29), we conclude with a discussion of future directions.

  18. Molecular identification of anisakid nematodes third stage larvae isolated from common squid ( Todarodes pacificus) in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyobudi, Eko; Jeon, Chan-Hyeok; Choi, Kwangho; Lee, Sung Il; Lee, Chung Il; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence of Genus Anisakis nematode larvae in marine fishes and cephalopods is epidemiologically important because Anisakis simplex larval stage can cause a clinical disease in humans when infected hosts are consumed raw. Common squid ( Todarodes pacificus) from Korean waters were investigated for anisakid nematodes infection during 2009˜2011. In total, 1,556 larvae were collected from 615 common squids and 732 of them were subsequently identified by PCR-RFLP analysis of ITS rDNA. Depending on the sampling locations, the nematode larvae from common squid showed different prevalence, intensity and species distribution. A high prevalence (P) and mean intensity (MI) of infection were observed in the Yellow Sea (n = 250, P = 86.0%, MI = 5.99 larvae/host) and the southern sea of Korea (n = 126, P = 57.1%, MI = 3.36 larvae/host). Anisakis pegreffii was dominantly found in common squid from the southern sea (127/ 140, 90.7%) and the Yellow Sea (561/565, 98.9%). In contrast, the P and MI of infection were relatively low in the East Sea (n = 239, P = 8.37%, MI = 1.25 larvae/host). A. pegreffii was not found from the East Sea and 52.0% (13/25) of the nematodes were identified as A. simplex. Most of them were found in the body cavity or digestive tract of common squid, which are rarely consumed raw by humans. Considering the differenences in anisakid nematode species distribution and their microhabitat in common squid, it remains unclear whether common squid plays an important role in the epidemiology of human anisakis infection in Korea. Further extensive identification of anisakid nematodes in common squid, with geographical and seasonal information will be necessary.

  19. Full noise characterization of a low-noise two-stage SQUID amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falferi, P [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38100 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R [INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Sezione di Padova, 38100 Povo, Trento (Italy); Vinante, A [INFN, Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: falferi@science.unitn.it

    2009-07-15

    From measurements performed on a low-noise two-stage SQUID amplifier coupled to a high- Q electrical resonator we give a complete noise characterization of the SQUID amplifier around the resonator frequency of 11 kHz in terms of additive, back action and cross-correlation noise spectral densities. The minimum noise temperature evaluated at 135 mK is 10 {mu}K and corresponds to an energy resolution of 18{Dirac_h}.

  20. Noise characterization of highly sensitive SQUID magnetometer systems in unshielded environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the noise performance of highly sensitive SQUID magnetometer systems directly is nearly impossible due to superimposed external noise. In magnetically unshielded environments in particular one needs sophisticated methods in order to get an estimate of the intrinsic noise. We compare different approaches to estimate the noise of our latest SQUID magnetometer systems in the Earth’s magnetic field and compare the results with measurements in magnetic (and superconductive) shielding. (paper)

  1. A SQUID biomagnetometer system for measurement of spinal cord evoked magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Y.; Uehara, G.; Kawai, J.; Kawabata, S.; Okubo, H.; Komori, H.; Kado, H.

    2001-12-01

    We developed a 24-channel superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) biomagnetometer system for the measurement of the evoked magnetic field from stimulated spinal cords. The system uses composite LTc SQUID gradiometers and can observe the three-dimensional components of the magnetic field. With the system, we could successfully record the evoked magnetic fields corresponding to neuronal signals transmitting in the spinal cord of a cat.

  2. SQUIDs vs. Induction Coils for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Experimental and Simulation Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Matlashov, Andrei N.; Schultz, Larry J.; Espy, Michelle A.; Kraus, Robert H.; Savukov, Igor M.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wurden, Caroline J.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime requiring measurement field strengths of the order of only 1 Gauss. This technique exploits the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives d...

  3. Redistribution and Transformation in the South African Fishing Industry: The Case of the Squid Fishery

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, W.; Britz, P.; Mather, D

    2000-01-01

    Political normalisation in South Africa during 1994, and the drafting of the Marine Living Resources Act 1998, led to the imperative to transform the fishing sector to more equitably reflect the racial demographics of the country. The squid fishery, like most other South African fisheries, has historically been dominated by white ownership of access rights and vessels. The squid fishery is an effort limited hand-jig fishery with each operator possessing permits for a certain numbe...

  4. Trophic relationships between sperm whales and the jumbo squid using stable isotopes of C and N

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Cooley, R.I.; Gendron, Diane; Aguíñiga García, Sergio; Mesnick, S.L.; Carriquiry, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    The trophic position and the predator–prey relationship between the sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus and the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas were examined by measuring stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. Skin samples of sperm whales and muscle samples of small and large jumbo squid were collected between 1996 and 1999 in the Gulf of California. Gender determination through molecular analysis and field identification of size were used to identify adult male, female and immature male sp...

  5. The biology and ecology of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas (Cephalopoda) in Chilean waters: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Christian M Ibáñez; Roger D Sepúlveda; Patricio Ulloa; Friedemann Keyl; M. CECILIA PARDO-GANDARILLAS

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas is the most abundant cephalopod species in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, which supports the biggest cephalopod fishery in the world. Due to its growing economic importance, the population growth and distributional expansion of this squid is being increasingly studied. Nevertheless, some basic features of the biology of D. gigas are still unknown or have been poorly investigated. In this review we summarize the known information regarding the biology...

  6. Revealing the potential of squid chitosan-based structures for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Reys, L. L.; S.S. Silva; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Caridade, S. G.; Mano, J. F.; Silva, Tiago H.; Reis, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to different marine organisms, namely as potential sources of valuable materials with a vast range of properties and characteristics. In this work, β-chitin was isolated from the endoskeleton of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas and further deacetylated to produce chitosan. Then, the squid chitosan was processed into membranes and scaffolds using solvent casting and freeze-drying, respectively, to assess their potential biomedical application. The ...

  7. High-temperature single-layer SQUID gradiometers with long baseline and parasitic effective area compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegrum, C.M.; Eulenburg, A.; Romans, E.J.; Carr, C.; Millar, A.J.; Donaldson, G.B. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    1999-11-01

    First-order HTS SQUID gradiometers were fabricated on 30x10 mm{sup 2} bicrystal substrates. These devices have a baseline of 13 mm, intrinsic balance levels of {approx}1/700 and a typical gradient sensitivity at 1 kHz of 79 fT cm{sup -1}Hz{sup -1/2}. A two-SQUID coupling scheme is discussed that further enhances the device's ability to reject uniform fields. (author)

  8. Foraging ecology and movement patterns of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the California Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, John C.; Elliger, Carl; Baltz, Ken; Gillespie, Graham E.; Gilly, William F.; Ruiz-Cooley, R. I.; Pearse, Devon; Stewart, Julia S.; Matsubu, William; Walker, William A.

    2013-10-01

    From 2002 to 2010, the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) has been regularly encountered in large numbers throughout the California Current System (CCS). This species, usually found in subtropical waters, could affect coastal pelagic ecosystems and fisheries as both predator and prey. Neither the abundance of jumbo squid nor the optimal ocean conditions in which they flourish are well known. To understand better the potential impacts of this species on both commercial fisheries and on food-web structure we collected nearly 900 specimens from waters of the CCS, covering over 20° of latitude, over a range of depths and seasons. We used demographic information (size, sex, and maturity state) and analyzed stomach contents using morphological and molecular methods to best understand the foraging ecology of this species in different habitats of the CCS. Squid were found to consume a broad array of prey. Prey in offshore waters generally reflected the forage base reported in previous studies (mainly mesopelagic fishes and squids), whereas in more coastal waters (shelf, shelf break and slope habitats) squid foraged on a much broader mix that included substantial numbers of coastal pelagic fishes (Pacific herring and northern anchovy, as well as osmerids and salmonids in northern waters) and groundfish (Pacific hake, several species of rockfish and flatfish). We propose a seasonal movement pattern, based on size and maturity distributions along with qualitative patterns of presence or absence, and discuss the relevance of both the movement and distribution of jumbo squid over space and time. We find that jumbo squid are a generalist predator, which feeds primarily on small, pelagic or mesopelagic micronekton but also on larger fishes when they are available. We also conclude that interactions with and potential impacts on ecosystems likely vary over space and time, in response to both seasonal movement patterns and highly variable year-to-year abundance of the squid themselves.

  9. Gain, directionality and noise in microwave SQUID amplifiers: Input-output approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal, Archana; Clarke, John; Devoret, Michel

    2012-01-01

    We present a new theoretical framework to analyze microwave amplifiers based on the dc SQUID. Our analysis applies input-output theory generalized for Josephson junction devices biased in the running state. Using this approach we express the high frequency dynamics of the SQUID as a scattering between the participating modes. This enables us to elucidate the inherently nonreciprocal nature of gain as a function of bias current and input frequency. This method can, in principle, accommodate an...

  10. Quantum Down Conversion and Multipartite Entanglement via a Mesoscopic SQUID Ring

    OpenAIRE

    Stiffell, P. B.; Everitt, M. J.; Clark, T. D.; Harland, C J; Ralph, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study, by analogy with quantum optics, the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) ring mediated quantum mechanical interaction of an input electromagnetic field oscillator mode with two or more output oscillator modes at subintegers of the input frequency. We show that through the nonlinearity of the SQUID ring multiphoton downconversion can take place between the input and output modes with the resultant output photons being created in an entangled state. We als...

  11. A HTS dc SQUID-NMR: fabrication of the SQUID and application to low-field NMR for fruit quality detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isingizwe Nturambirwe, J. Frédéric; Perold, Willem J.; Opara, Linus U.

    2014-06-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have made the detection of low-field (LF) and ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF-NMR) a reality. The latter has been proven to be a potential tool for non-destructive quality testing of horticultural products, amongst many other applications. High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) dc SQUIDS are likely to allow for the development of not only low-cost NMR systems but also prototypes that are mobile and easily maintainable. A HTS dc SQUID was manufactured on an YBCO thin film, using a novel laser based lithography method. The lithography was implemented by a new laser system developed in-house, as a model of low-cost lithography systems. The junctions of the dc SQUID were tested and displayed normal I-V characteristics in the acceptable range for the application. In order to determine the viability of low-field NMR for non-destructive quality measurement of horticultural products, a commercial HTS dc SQUID-NMR system was used to measure quality parameters of banana during ripening. The trend of color change and sugar increase of the banana during ripening were the most highly correlated attributes to the SQUID-NMR measured parameter, average T1 (spin-lattice relaxation time). Further studies were done, that involved processing of the NMR signal into relaxation time resolved spectra. A spectral signature of banana was obtained, where each peak is a T1 value corresponding to a proton pool, and is reported here. These results will potentially lead to deeper understanding of the quality of the samples under study.

  12. Development of 2D Bi-SQUID Arrays with High Linearity

    CERN Document Server

    Berggren, S; Longhini, P; Palacios, A; Mukhanov, O A; de Escobar, A Leese; Taylor, B J; de Andrade, M C; Nisenoff, M; Fagaly, R L; Wong, T; Cho, E; Wong, E; In, V

    2013-01-01

    We develop a two-dimensional (2D) Superconducting Quantum Interference Filter (SQIF) array based on recently introduced high-linearity tri-junction bi-SQUIDs. Our bi-SQUID SQIF array design is based on a tight integration of individual bi- SQUID cells sharing inductances with adjacent cells. We provide extensive computer simulations, analysis and experimental measurements, in which we explore the phase dynamics and linearity of the array voltage response. The non-uniformity in inductances of the bi-SQUIDs produces a pronounced zero-field single antipeak in the voltage response. The anti-peak linearity and size can be optimized by varying the critical current of the additional junction of each bi-SQUID. The layout implementation of the tight 2D array integration leads to a distinct geometrical diamond shape formed by the merged dual bi-SQUID cells. Different size 2D arrays are fabricated using standard HYPRES niobium 4.5 kA/cm2 fabrication process. The measured linearity, power gain, and noise properties will ...

  13. Identification of four squid species by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Feng, Junli; Liu, Shasha; Zhang, Yanping; Jiang, Xiaona; Dai, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Squids are distributed worldwide, including many species of commercial importance, and they are often made into varieties of flavor foods. The rapid identification methods for squid species especially their processed products, however, have not been well developed. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) systems based on specific primers and TaqMan probes have been established for rapid and accurate identification of four common squid species (Ommastrephes bartramii, Dosidicus gigas, Illex argentinus, Todarodes pacificus) in Chinese domestic market. After analyzing mitochondrial genes reported in GenBank, the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) gene was selected for O. bartramii detection, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for D. gigas and T. Pacificus detection, ATPase subunit 6 (ATPase 6) gene for I. Argentinus detection, and 12S ribosomal RNA (12S rDNA) gene for designing Ommastrephidae-specific primers and probe. As a result, all the TaqMan systems are of good performance, and efficiency of each reaction was calculated by making standard curves. This method could detect target species either in single or mixed squid specimen, and it was applied to identify 12 squid processed products successfully. Thus, it would play an important role in fulfilling labeling regulations and squid fishery control. PMID:26772407

  14. Material properties of Pacific hake, Humboldt squid, and two species of myctophids in the California Current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kaylyn N; Warren, Joseph D

    2015-05-01

    Material properties of the flesh from three fish species (Merluccius productus, Symbolophorus californiensis, and Diaphus theta), and several body parts of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) collected from the California Current ecosystem were measured. The density contrast relative to seawater varied within and among taxa for fish flesh (0.9919-1.036), squid soft body parts (mantle, arms, tentacle, braincase, eyes; 1.009-1.057), and squid hard body parts (beak and pen; 1.085-1.459). Effects of animal length and environmental conditions on nekton density contrast were investigated. The sound speed contrast relative to seawater varied within and among taxa for fish flesh (0.986-1.027) and Humboldt squid mantle and braincase (0.937-1.028). Material properties in this study are similar to values from previous studies on species with similar life histories. In general, the sound speed and density of soft body parts of fish and squid were 1%-3% and 1%-6%, respectively, greater than the surrounding seawater. Hard parts of the squid were significantly more dense (6%-46%) than seawater. The material properties reported here can be used to improve target strength estimates from acoustic scattering models, which could increase the accuracy of biomass estimates from acoustic surveys for these nekton. PMID:25994685

  15. Valorization of chitosan from squid pens and further use on the development of scaffolds for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Reys, L. L.; S.S. Silva; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Frias, A. M.; Mano, J. F.; Silva, Tiago H.; Reis, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present work is the valorization of squid pens through the production of chitosan that can be used for the development of biomedical applications. The present work is focused on !-chitin extraction from squid pens of the species Dosidicus gigas and its further conversion into chitosan. The biomedical potential of the isolated squid chitosan was assessed by processing this polymer as scaffolds for tissue engineering strategies. Methods: Alkali solut...

  16. Controlled and in situ target strengths of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and identification of potential acoustic scattering sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Gilly, William F; Au, Whitlow W L; Mate, Bruce

    2008-03-01

    This study presents the first target strength measurements of Dosidicus gigas, a large squid that is a key predator, a significant prey, and the target of an important fishery. Target strength of live, tethered squid was related to mantle length with values standardized to the length squared of -62.0, -67.4, -67.9, and -67.6 dB at 38, 70, 120, and 200 kHz, respectively. There were relatively small differences in target strength between dorsal and anterior aspects and none between live and freshly dead squid. Potential scattering mechanisms in squid have been long debated. Here, the reproductive organs had little effect on squid target strength. These data support the hypothesis that the pen may be an important source of squid acoustic scattering. The beak, eyes, and arms, probably via the sucker rings, also play a role in acoustic scattering though their effects were small and frequency specific. An unexpected source of scattering was the cranium of the squid which provided a target strength nearly as high as that of the entire squid though the mechanism remains unclear. Our in situ measurements of the target strength of free-swimming squid support the use of the values presented here in D. gigas assessment studies. PMID:18345820

  17. Potential enhanced ability of giant squid to detect sperm whales is an exaptation tied to their large body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Lars; Motani, Ryosuke; Oufiero, Christopher E; Martin, Christopher H; McGee, Matthew D; Wainwright, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that sperm whale predation is the driver of eye size evolution in giant squid. Given that the eyes of giant squid have the size expected for a squid this big, it is likely that any enhanced ability of giant squid to detect whales is an exaptation tied to their body size. Future studies should target the mechanism behind the evolution of large body size, not eye size. Reconstructions of the evolutionary history of selective regime, eye size, optical performance, and body size will improve the understanding of the evolution of large eyes in large ocean animals.

  18. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene D Alabia

    Full Text Available We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF. The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999-2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid's putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37-40°N and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40-44°N in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180° were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ.

  19. Squid Pen Chitin Chitooligomers as Food Colorants Absorbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Wen Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most promising applications of chitosanase is the conversion of chitinous biowaste into bioactive chitooligomers (COS. TKU033 chitosanase was induced from squid pen powder (SPP-containing Bacillus cereus TKU033 medium and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatography. The enzyme was relatively more thermostable in the presence of the substrate and had an activity of 93% at 50 °C in a pH 5 buffer solution for 60 min. Furthermore, the enzyme used for the COS preparation was also studied. The enzyme products revealed various mixtures of COS that with different degrees of polymerization (DP, ranging from three to nine. In the culture medium, the fermented SPP was recovered, and it displayed a better adsorption rate (up to 96% for the disperse dyes than the water-soluble food colorants, Allura Red AC (R40 and Tartrazne (Y4. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopic (FT-IR analysis proved that the adsorption of the dyes onto fermented SPP was a physical adsorption. Results also showed that fermented SPP was a favorable adsorber and could be employed as low-cost alternative for dye removal in wastewater treatment.

  20. A tunable rf SQUID manipulated as flux and phase qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletto, S; Lisenfeld, J; Lukashenko, A; Ustinov, A V [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Thailand), D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Chiarello, F; Castellano, M G [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, 00156 Roma (Italy); Carelli, P [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Universita dell' Aquila, 67040 Monteluco di Roio (Italy)], E-mail: ustinov@physik.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2009-12-15

    We report on two different manipulation procedures of a tunable rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). First, we operate this system as a flux qubit, where the coherent evolution between the two flux states is induced by a rapid change of the energy potential, turning it from a double well into a single well. The measured coherent Larmor-like oscillation of the retrapping probability in one of the wells has a frequency ranging from 6 to 20 GHz, with a theoretically expected upper limit of 40 GHz. Furthermore, here we also report a manipulation of the same device as a phase qubit. In the phase regime, the manipulation of the energy states is realized by applying a resonant microwave drive. In spite of the conceptual difference between these two manipulation procedures, the measured decay times of Larmor oscillation and microwave-driven Rabi oscillation are rather similar. Due to the higher frequency of the Larmor oscillations, the microwave-free qubit manipulation allows for much faster coherent operations.

  1. Deep-well ultrafast manipulation of a SQUID flux qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellano, M G; Chiarello, F; Mattioli, F; Torrioli, G [Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-CNR, Roma (Italy); Carelli, P [Dip. Ingegneria Elettrica e dell' Informazione, Universita dell' Aquila, L' Aquila (Italy); Cosmelli, C, E-mail: mgcastellano@ifn.cnr.i [Dip. Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Superconducting devices based on the Josephson effect are effectively used for the implementation of qubits and quantum gates. The manipulation of superconducting qubits is generally performed by using microwave pulses with frequencies from 5 to 15 GHz, obtaining a typical operating frequency from 100 MHz to 1 GHz. A manipulation based on simple pulses in the absence of microwaves is also possible. In our system, a magnetic flux pulse modifies the potential of a double SQUID qubit from a symmetric double well to a single deep-well condition. By using this scheme with a Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb system, we obtained coherent oscillations with sub-nanosecond period (tunable from 50 to 200 ps), very fast with respect to other manipulating procedures, and with a coherence time up to 10 ns, of the order of that obtained with similar devices and technologies but using microwave manipulation. We introduce ultrafast manipulation, presenting experimental results, new issues related to this approach (such as the use of a compensation procedure for canceling the effect of 'slow' fluctuations) and open perspectives, such as the possible use of RSFQ logic for qubit control.

  2. SQUID biosusceptometry in the measurement of hepatic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, Sujit [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Harkness Pavilion, Room HP570, 180 Fort Washington Avenue, NY 10032, New York (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Individuals with primary or secondary abnormalities of iron metabolism, such as hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusional iron loading, may develop potentially lethal systemic iron overload. Over time, this excess iron is progressively deposited in the liver, heart, pancreas, and other organs, resulting in cirrhosis, heart disease, diabetes and other disorders. Unless treated, death usually results from cardiac failure. The amount of iron in the liver is the best indicator of the amount of iron in the whole body. At present, the only sure way to measure the amount of iron in the liver is to remove a sample of the liver by biopsy. Iron stored in the liver can be magnetized to a small degree when placed in a magnetic field. The amount of magnetization is measured by our instrument, called a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) susceptometer. In patients with iron overload, our previous studies have shown that magnetic measurements of liver iron in patients with iron overload are quantitatively equivalent to biochemical determinations on tissue obtained by biopsy. The safety, ease, rapidity, and comfort of magnetic measurements make frequent, serial studies technically feasible and practically acceptable to patients. (orig.)

  3. Investigation of dc-SQUID dynamics by multiple flux entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital Josephson circuits that do not switch into the voltage state provide an opportunity for high speed signal processing. Fast SFQ (Single Flux Quantum) logic devices must record and process small fast pulses generated by single fluxoid events. An useful application in cryoelectronics is an analog-to-digital converter using the intrinsic flux quantization of closed superconducting structures. The analog signal is quantized and converted into a pulse train resulting from fluxoid transitions. The dynamics of multiple flux entry from these transitions was analyzed for a dc-SQUID structure as quantizer proposed by Phillips in view of high-Tc applications(1,2). The device performance of a incremental quantizer depending on various circuit parameters was explored by numerical simulations based on the Stewart-McCumber model of the Josephson junction. We found several conditions which must be satisfied for an unambiguously pulse train, from which the analog signal can be faithfully reconstructed. The results of the simulations are presented illustrating the various ways in which the pulse trains are affected. (orig.)

  4. Six steps in quality intervention development (6SQuID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Daniel; Wimbush, Erica; Jepson, Ruth; Doi, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    Improving the effectiveness of public health interventions relies as much on the attention paid to their design and feasibility as to their evaluation. Yet, compared to the vast literature on how to evaluate interventions, there is little to guide researchers or practitioners on how best to develop such interventions in practical, logical, evidence based ways to maximise likely effectiveness. Existing models for the development of public health interventions tend to have a strong social-psychological, individual behaviour change orientation and some take years to implement. This paper presents a pragmatic guide to six essential Steps for Quality Intervention Development (6SQuID). The focus is on public health interventions but the model should have wider applicability. Once a problem has been identified as needing intervention, the process of designing an intervention can be broken down into six crucial steps: (1) defining and understanding the problem and its causes; (2) identifying which causal or contextual factors are modifiable: which have the greatest scope for change and who would benefit most; (3) deciding on the mechanisms of change; (4) clarifying how these will be delivered; (5) testing and adapting the intervention; and (6) collecting sufficient evidence of effectiveness to proceed to a rigorous evaluation. If each of these steps is carefully addressed, better use will be made of scarce public resources by avoiding the costly evaluation, or implementation, of unpromising interventions. PMID:26573236

  5. Sodium movements in perfused squid giant axons. Passive fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, E; Canessa-Fischer, M

    1968-08-01

    Sodium movements in internally perfused giant axons from the squid Dosidicus gigas were studied with varying internal sodium concentrations and with fluoride as the internal anion. It was found that as the internal concentration of sodium was increased from 2 to 200 mM the resting sodium efflux increased from 0.09 to 34.0 pmoles/cm(2)sec and the average resting sodium influx increased from 42.9 to 64.5 pmoles/cm(2)sec but this last change was not statistically significant. When perfusing with a mixture of 500 mM K glutamate and 100 mM Na glutamate the resting efflux was 10 +/- 3 pmoles/cm(2)sec and 41 +/- 10 pmoles/cm(2)sec for sodium influx. Increasing the internal sodium concentration also increased both the extra influx and the extra efflux of sodium due to impulse propagation. At any given internal sodium concentration the net extra influx was about 5 pmoles/cm(2)impulse. This finding supports the notion that the inward current generated in a propagated action potential can be completely accounted for by movements of sodium. PMID:5672003

  6. Jumbo squid beaks: inspiration for design of robust organic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserez, Ali; Li, Youli; Waite, J Herbert; Zok, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The hard tissues found in some invertebrate marine organisms represent intriguing paradigms for robust, lightweight materials. The present study focuses on one such tissue: that comprising the beak of the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas). Its main constituents are chitin fibers (15-20wt.%) and histidine- and glycine-rich proteins (40-45%). Notably absent are mineral phases, metals and halogens. Despite being fully organic, beak hardness and stiffness are at least twice those of the most competitive synthetic organic materials (notably engineering polymers) and comparable to those of Glycera and Nereis jaws. Furthermore, the combination of hardness and stiffness makes the beaks more resistant to plastic deformation when in contact with blunt abrasives than virtually all metals and polymers. The 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine and abundant histidine content in the beak proteins as well as the pigmented hydrolysis-resistant residue are suggestive of aromatic cross-linking. A high cross-linking density between the proteins and chitin may be the single most important determinant of hardness and stiffness in the beak. Beak microstructure is characterized by a lamellar arrangement of the constituents, with a weak interface that promotes crack deflection and endows the structure with high fracture toughness. The susceptibility of this microstructure to cracking along these interfaces from contact stresses at the external surface is mitigated by the presence of a protective coating. PMID:17113369

  7. Thermal instabilities in micro-SQUIDs with long leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Fournier, T.; Courtois, H.; Winkelmann, C. B.; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2015-03-01

    We report on Nb film based micron-size superconducting quantum interference devices (μ-SQUIDs) with long leads and with constrictions as weak-links (WLs). The current-voltage characteristics (IVCs) of these devices are hysteretic at low temperatures (T) with two re-trapping currents, Ir1 and Ir2, arising from thermal instabilities, and a critical-current (Ic) . We see oscillations with magnetic flux in Ic, but not in Ir1 and Ir2, in both the hysteretic and non-hysteretic regimes. We describe a one dimensional model for thermal instability in long-leads to understand re-trapping currents and its T-dependence. The critical-current shows a marked change in behaviour at the crossover temperature when it meets the lower re-trapping current and above this temperature the critical current subsists due to proximity superconductivity. The thermal stability with respect to phase-slips evolves with temperature and only above the crossover temperature the weak-link can cope with the heat generated by phase-slips giving a non-hysteretic behaviour. Keeping other device dimensions same the WLs' dimensions give a control on the hysteresis-free T-range. NK acknowledges the financial support from CSIR, India as well as CNRS-Institute Néel, Grenoble, France.

  8. Electronic gradiometry for NDE in an unshielded environment with stationary and moving HTS SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, C.; Cochran, A.; Kuznik, J.; McKirdy, D. McA.; Donaldson, G. B.

    Difficulties in the fabrication of multilayer high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices have led to recent interest in the use of simpler HTS SQUID magnetometers in electronic gradiometers. One application of such systems is electromagnetic non-destructive evaluation. We have developed a prototype two-SQUID system and we present recent results in this paper. We first demonstrate the level of interference suppression by comparing magnetometer and gradiometer signals. Then we present several results taken conventionally with the HTS SQUIDs stationary above moving specimens and, for the first time, with the SQUIDs unshielded in motion above stationary specimens. The specimens comprise a pair of wires in a return current loop as a calibration source, and an aircraft-grade aluminium plate with fine slits mimicking fatigue cracks, first exposed and then covered with an additional aluminium sheet to simulate internal flaws. These results are an important, though by no means final, step towards practical non-destructive evaluation of real test subjects with HTS SQUIDs.

  9. Behavioral ecology of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) in relation to oxygen minimum zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Julia S.; Field, John C.; Markaida, Unai; Gilly, William F.

    2013-10-01

    Habitat utilization, behavior and food habits of the jumbo or Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, were compared between an area recently inhabited in the northern California Current System (CCS) and a historically established area of residence in the Gulf of California (GOC). Low dissolved oxygen concentrations at midwater depths define the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), an important environmental feature in both areas. We analyzed vertical diving behavior and diet of D. gigas and hydrographic properties of the water column to ascertain the extent to which squid utilized the OMZ in the two areas. The upper boundary of the OMZ has been shoaling in recent decades in the CCS, and this phenomenon has been proposed to vertically compress the pelagic environment inhabited by aerobic predators. A shoaling OMZ will also bring mesopelagic communities into a depth range with more illumination during daytime, making these organisms more vulnerable to predation by visual predators (i.e. jumbo squid). Because the OMZ in the GOC is considerably shallower than in the CCS, our study provides insight into the behavioral plasticity of jumbo squid and how they may respond to a shoaling OMZ in the CCS. We propose that shoaling OMZs are likely to be favorable to jumbo squid and could be a key indirect factor behind the recent range expansion of this highly migratory predator.

  10. Partial characterization of an effluent produced by cooking of Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Romero, Zaidy G; Ramirez-Suarez, Juan C; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Lugo-Sánchez, Maria E; Carvallo-Ruiz, Gisela; García-Sánchez, Guillermina

    2010-01-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle was cooked simulating industrial procedures (95 degrees C x 25 min, 1.2:5 muscle:water ratio). The effluent produced was analyzed for chemical and biochemical oxygen demands (COD and BOD(5), respectively), proximate analysis, flavor-related compounds (free amino acids, nucleotides and carbohydrates) and SDS-PAGE. The COD and BOD(5) exhibited variation among samplings (N=3) (27.4-118.5 g O(2)/L for COD and 11.3-26.7 g O(2)/L for BOD(5)). The effluent consisted of 1% total solids, 75% of which represented crude protein. Sixty percent of the total free amino acid content, which imparts flavor in squid species, corresponded to glutamic acid, serine, glycine, arginine, alanine, leucine and lysine. The nucleotide concentration followed this order, Hx>ADP>AMP>ATP>IMP>HxR. The variation observed in the present work was probably due to physiological maturity differences among the squid specimens (i.e., juvenile versus mature). Solids present in squid cooking effluent could be recovered and potentially used as flavor ingredients in squid-analog production by the food industry. PMID:19748263

  11. Vestigial phragmocone in the gladius points to a deepwater origin of squid (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipkin, Alexander I.; Bizikov, Vyacheslav A.; Fuchs, Dirk

    2012-03-01

    The microstructure of the gladius cone was investigated in six species of nektonic squid: shallow-water Loligo gahi (Loliginidae), pelagic eurybathic Illex argentinus, Todarodes pacificus, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), and deepwater Onykia ingens (Onychoteuthidae) and Gonatus antarcticus (Gonatidae) using state-of-the-art microscopy. Apart from L. gahi, all other species had septa-like layers in the gladius cone, which for the first time were investigated in detail and compared with those in extinct Cretaceous belemnites Hibolithes sp. and Pachyteuthis sp., and spirulid Cyrtobelus sp. It was found that the organic layers of the gladius cone in recent squid can be homologized with the organic components of the shell in fossil phragmocone-bearing coleoids. The septa-like layers in modern gladius cones therefore represent a vestigial phragmocone composed of organic septal rudiments of the ancestral phragmocone that has lost the siphuncle and gas-filled chambers. The well-developed rostrum in onychoteuthids and small rostrum of the gladius in ommastrephids and gonatids can be seen as homologous with the belemnoid rostrum, which may indicate a close phylogenetic relationship between belemnites and at least some squid. Possible evolutionary pathways of the reduction of the functional phragmocone in squid ancestors are discussed. Several features such as the loss of shell calcification, deep water speciation, and the structure of the equilibrium organ point to a deep-water origin of squids.

  12. Analytical theory of DC SQUID with a resistively shunted inductance driven by thermal noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Hai-Feng; Gu Jiao; Huang Xin-Tang

    2005-01-01

    An analytical expression for the stationary probability distribution of the DC superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a resistively shunted inductance driven by thermal noise is derived from the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The effects on the SQUID characteristics subject to a large thermal fluctuation with a noise parpameter г>0.20 are discussed by taking into account the thermal noise in the accuracy of numerical simulation. This theory is valid for a reduced inductance β≤1. The analytical formulae for the SQUID characteristics, e.g. the circulating current, the average voltage and the voltage modulation, are obtained and discussed. The theory shows that the voltage modulation increases with the shunted inductance more efficiently for a large inductance parameterβ and small fluctuation parpameterг.

  13. Superconducting Analogues of Quantum Optical Phenomena: Schrodinger Cat States and Squeezing in a SQUID Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, M J; Stiffell, P B; Prance, R J; Prance, H; Vourdas, A; Ralph, J F

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we explore the quantum behaviour of a SQUID ring which has a very strong Josephson coupling energy. We show that that the eigenfunctions of the Hamiltonian for the ring can be used to create Schrodinger cat states. We also show that the ring potential may be utilised to squeeze coherent states. With the SQUID ring as a strong contender as a device for manipulating quantum information, such properties may be of great utility in the future. However, as with all candidate systems for quantum technologies, decoherence is a fundamental problem. In this paper we apply an open systems approach to model the effect of coupling a quantum mechanical SQUID ring to a thermal bath. We use this model to demonstrate the manner in which decoherence affects the quantum states of the ring.

  14. Study on nondestructive inspection using HTS-SQUID for friction stir welding between dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukade, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Yasui, T.; Tsubaki, M.; Fukumono, M.; Tanaka, S.

    2007-10-01

    We have developed an SQUID-NDI technique for evaluation of friction stir welding (FSW) between aluminum alloy A6063 and stainless steel SUS304 from the electric conductivities in board specimens bonded by FSW. A SQUID-NDI system employing an HTS-SQUID gradiometer was constructed to measure current distribution in the FSW specimens by applying voltage to the specimen. By measuring field gradients dBz/dy and dBz/dx above the FSW specimens made with various FSW conditions and then converting them to current vector Jx and Jy, conductivities of FSW areas were estimated. Due to the difference in the FSW conditions, the conductivity distributions varied dramatically. From these results, it was suggested that the conductivities in FSW areas should be varied due to the temperature heated by the friction between the milling tool and the materials.

  15. Monitoring geomagnetic signals of groundwater movement using multiple underground SQUID magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater can influence the geomagnetic field measured underground in at least two key ways. The water levels in rock will determine its electrical conductivity, and thus change the magnitude of the telluric currents induced in the rock by changing magnetic fields generated in the ionosphere. This can be studied by using multiple magnetometers at different underground locations. Secondly the flow of water through rock will generate a small magnetic signal, of unknown magnitude, through the electrokinetic effect. SQUID magnetometry has the potential to allow passive studies of groundwater changes in complex systems such as karst. We have monitored geomagnetic signals using two SQUID magnetometers at the LSBB underground laboratory, and set an initial limit on the magnitude of the electrokinetic signal. We now plan to carry out a longer term measurement using three SQUID systems as well as fluxgate sensors to track changes in the gradient of the magnetic field across the underground complex.

  16. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones II: Blood-oxygen binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active squid that migrates across a strong oxygen and temperature gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Here we analyze the oxygen-binding properties of the squid's respiratory protein (hemocyanin, Hc) that facilitate such activity. A high Hc-oxygen affinity, strong temperature dependence, and pronounced pH sensitivity (P50=0.009T2.03, pH 7.4; Bohr coefficient=ΔlogP50/ΔpH=-1.55+0.034T) of oxygen binding facilitate night-time foraging in the upper water column, and support suppressed oxygen demand in hypoxic waters at greater depths. Expanding hypoxia may act to alter the species habitable depth range. This analysis supports the contention that ocean acidification could limit oxygen carrying capacity in squids at warmer temperature leading to reduced activity levels or altered distribution.

  17. [Determination of proximal chemical composition of squid (dosidicus gigas) and development of gel products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abugoch, L; Guarda, A; Pérez, L M; Paredes, M P

    1999-06-01

    The good nutritional properties of meat from big squid (Dosidicus gigas) living on the Chilean coast, was determined through its proximal composition 70 cal/100 g fresh meat; 82.23 +/- 0.98% moisture; 15.32 +/- 0.93% protein; 1.31 +/- 0.12% ashes; 0.87 +/- 0.18% fat and 0.27% NNE (non-nitrogen extract). The big squid meat was used to develop a gel product which contained NaCl and TPP. It was necessary to use additives for gel preparation, such as carragenin or alginate or egg albumin, due to the lack of gelation properties of squid meat. Formulations containing egg albumin showed the highest gel force measured by penetration as compared to those that contained carragenin or alginate. PMID:10488395

  18. Cryogenic time-domain multiplexer based on SQUID arrays and superconducting/normal conducting switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beev, N.; Kiviranta, M.; van der Kuur, J.; Bruijn, M.; Brandel, O.; Linzen, S.; Fritzsch, L.; Ahoranta, J.; Penttilä, J.; Roschier, L.

    2014-05-01

    We have demonstrated the operation of a 12-channel Beyer-style SQUID-based time domain multiplexer. It was manufactured using a fabrication process that is cross-compatible between VTT and IPHT-Jena. The multiplexer consists of twelve 12-SQUID series arrays, each shunted by a Zappe-style interferometer array acting as a flux-controlled superconducting/normal conducting switch. By keeping all switches but one in the superconducting state, it is possible to select one active readout channel at a time. A flux feedback coil common to all SQUID arrays allows realization of a flux-locked loop. We present characteristics of the multiplexer and measurement data from experiments with a 25-pixel X-ray calorimeter array operated at T < 100 mK in a dilution refrigerator.

  19. Failure Analysis of CCD Image Sensors Using SQUID and GMR Magnetic Current Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, Frederick S.

    2005-01-01

    During electrical testing of a Full Field CCD Image Senor, electrical shorts were detected on three of six devices. These failures occurred after the parts were soldered to the PCB. Failure analysis was performed to determine the cause and locations of these failures on the devices. After removing the fiber optic faceplate, optical inspection was performed on the CCDs to understand the design and package layout. Optical inspection revealed that the device had a light shield ringing the CCD array. This structure complicated the failure analysis. Alternate methods of analysis were considered, including liquid crystal, light and thermal emission, LT/A, TT/A SQUID, and MP. Of these, SQUID and MP techniques were pursued for further analysis. Also magnetoresistive current imaging technology is discussed and compared to SQUID.

  20. Evolution of supercurrent path in Nb /Ru /Sr2RuO4 dc-SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nago, Y.; Ishiguro, R.; Sakurai, T.; Yakabe, M.; Nakamura, T.; Yonezawa, S.; Kashiwaya, S.; Takayanagi, H.; Maeno, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Phase-sensitive measurements of direct-current superconducting quantum interference devices (dc-SQUIDs) composed of Sr2RuO4 -Ru eutectic crystals have been performed to temperatures below a bulk Ru superconducting transition temperature at 0.49 K. A SQUID with Nb /Ru /Sr2RuO4 junctions fabricated on one Ru inclusion exhibits two distinct transitions due to the Ru superconducting transition and competition of proximity-induced superconducting gaps at the junctions. At sufficiently low temperatures, the SQUID interference patterns start to collapse with large phase shifts of the Fraunhofer patterns. This result indicates the influence of magnetic fluxes induced by large bias currents flowing in a strongly asymmetric supercurrent path. Such a large change in supercurrent path suggests superconducting phase mismatch between the s -wave and chiral p -wave states at the Ru /Sr2RuO4 interface.

  1. Slow swimming, fast strikes: effects of feeding behavior on scaling of anaerobic metabolism in epipelagic squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueblood, Lloyd A; Seibel, Brad A

    2014-08-01

    Many pelagic fishes engage prey at high speeds supported by high metabolic rates and anaerobic metabolic capacity. Epipelagic squids are reported to have among the highest metabolic rates in the oceans as a result of demanding foraging strategies and the use of jet propulsion, which is inherently inefficient. This study examined enzymatic proxies of anaerobic metabolism in two species of pelagic squid, Dosidicus gigas and Doryteuthis pealeii (Lesueur 1821), over a size range of six orders of magnitude. We hypothesized that activity of the anaerobically poised enzymes would be high and increase with size as in ecologically similar fishes. In contrast, we demonstrate that anaerobic metabolic capacity in these organisms scales negatively with body mass. We explored several cephalopod-specific traits, such as the use of tentacles to capture prey, body morphology and reduced relative prey size of adult squids, that may create a diminished reliance on anaerobically fueled burst activity during prey capture in large animals. PMID:25079893

  2. Quantum State Engineering with the rf-SQUID: A Brief Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, C

    2003-01-01

    Quantum computers take advantage of the superpositional logic of quantum mechanics to allow for dramatic increases in computational efficiency. rf-SQUIDs show potential for quantum computing applications by forming the qubit component of a quantum computer, through simply treating the direction of current - clockwise or counterclockwise - as the value of the bit. rf-SQUIDs present a major advantage over atomic-scale qubit systems - they are sensitive to parameters that can be engineered. Flux qubits are linked through controlled inductive coupling: the magnetic field of each junction affects the others. The strength of this coupling can be 'tuned,' allowing for refined control over the behaviour of the system. rf-SQUIDs can also be mass produced on-chip, making large-scale production feasible.

  3. Non-destructive testing (NDT) of metal cracks using a high Tc rf-SQUID and eddy current method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, D.F.; Fan, C.; Ruan, J.Z. [Midwest Superconductivity Inc., Lawrence, KS (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    A SQUID is the most sensitive device to detect change in magnetic field. A non-destructive testing (NDT) device using high temperature SQUIDs and eddy current method will be much more sensitive than those currently used eddy current systems, yet much cheaper than one with low temperature SQUIDs. In this paper, we present our study of such a NDT device using a high temperature superconducting rf-SQUID as a gradiometer sensor. The result clearly demonstrates the expected sensitivity of the system, and indicates the feasibility of building a portable HTS SQUID NDT device with the help from cryocooler industry. Such a NDT device will have a significant impact on metal corrosion or crack detection technology.

  4. Comprehensive model of Jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas trophic ecology in the Northern Humboldt current system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Alegre

    Full Text Available The jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas plays an important role in marine food webs both as predator and prey. We investigated the ontogenetic and spatiotemporal variability of the diet composition of jumbo squid in the northern Humboldt Current system. For that purpose we applied several statistical methods to an extensive dataset of 3,618 jumbo squid non empty stomachs collected off Peru from 2004 to 2011. A total of 55 prey taxa was identified that we aggregated into eleven groups. Our results evidenced a large variability in prey composition as already observed in other systems. However, our data do not support the hypothesis that jumbo squids select the most abundant or energetic taxon in a prey assemblage, neglecting the other available prey. Indeed, multinomial model predictions showed that stomach fullness increased with the number of prey taxa, while most stomachs with low contents contained one or two prey taxa only. Our results therefore question the common hypothesis that predators seek locally dense aggregations of monospecific prey. In addition D. gigas consumes very few anchovy Engraulis ringens in Peru, whereas a tremendous biomass of anchovy is potentially available. It seems that D. gigas cannot reach the oxygen unsaturated waters very close to the coast, where the bulk of anchovy occurs. Indeed, even if jumbo squid can forage in hypoxic deep waters during the day, surface normoxic waters are then required to recover its maintenance respiration (or energy?. Oxygen concentration could thus limit the co-occurrence of both species and then preclude predator-prey interactions. Finally we propose a conceptual model illustrating the opportunistic foraging behaviour of jumbo squid impacted by ontogenetic migration and potentially constrained by oxygen saturation in surface waters.

  5. Comprehensive model of Jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas trophic ecology in the Northern Humboldt current system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, Ana; Ménard, Frédéric; Tafur, Ricardo; Espinoza, Pepe; Argüelles, Juan; Maehara, Víctor; Flores, Oswaldo; Simier, Monique; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    The jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas plays an important role in marine food webs both as predator and prey. We investigated the ontogenetic and spatiotemporal variability of the diet composition of jumbo squid in the northern Humboldt Current system. For that purpose we applied several statistical methods to an extensive dataset of 3,618 jumbo squid non empty stomachs collected off Peru from 2004 to 2011. A total of 55 prey taxa was identified that we aggregated into eleven groups. Our results evidenced a large variability in prey composition as already observed in other systems. However, our data do not support the hypothesis that jumbo squids select the most abundant or energetic taxon in a prey assemblage, neglecting the other available prey. Indeed, multinomial model predictions showed that stomach fullness increased with the number of prey taxa, while most stomachs with low contents contained one or two prey taxa only. Our results therefore question the common hypothesis that predators seek locally dense aggregations of monospecific prey. In addition D. gigas consumes very few anchovy Engraulis ringens in Peru, whereas a tremendous biomass of anchovy is potentially available. It seems that D. gigas cannot reach the oxygen unsaturated waters very close to the coast, where the bulk of anchovy occurs. Indeed, even if jumbo squid can forage in hypoxic deep waters during the day, surface normoxic waters are then required to recover its maintenance respiration (or energy?). Oxygen concentration could thus limit the co-occurrence of both species and then preclude predator-prey interactions. Finally we propose a conceptual model illustrating the opportunistic foraging behaviour of jumbo squid impacted by ontogenetic migration and potentially constrained by oxygen saturation in surface waters. PMID:24465788

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-derived omega-crystallins of squid and octopus. Specialization for lens expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovieva, R D; Tomarev, S I; Piatigorsky, J

    1993-05-25

    omega-Crystallin of the octopus lens is related to aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) of vertebrates (Tomarev, S. I., Zinovieva, R. D., and Piatigorsky, J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 24226-24231) and ALDH1/eta-crystallin of elephant shrews (Wistow, G., and Kim, H. (1991) J. Mol. Evol. 32, 262-269). Only very low amounts of omega-crystallin are present in the squid lens. Here, we have cloned omega-crystallin cDNAs of the octopus (Octopus dofleini) and squid (Ommastrephes sloani pacificus) lenses. The deduced amino acid sequences of omega-crystallin from these species are 78% identical to each other, 56-58% identical to cytoplasmic ALDH1 and mitochondrial ALDH2 of vertebrates (which are 66-68% identical to each other), and 40% identical to Escherichia coli and spinach ALDHs. These data are consistent with the idea that the ALDH1/ALDH2 gene duplication in vertebrates occurred after divergence of cephalopods from the line giving rise to vertebrates, but before the separation of squid and octopus. Southern blot hybridization indicated that omega-crystallin is encoded by few genes (possibly just one) in octopus and squid. Northern blot hybridization revealed two bands (2.7 and 9.0 kilobases) of omega-crystallin RNA in the octopus lens and one band (4.2 kilobases) in the squid lens; omega-crystallin RNAs were undetectable in numerous non-lens tissues of octopus and squid, suggesting lens-specific expression of this gene(s). Finally, extracts of the octopus lens had no detectable ALDH activity using different substrates, consistent with omega-crystallin having no enzymatic activity. Taken together, our results suggest that omega-crystallin evolved by duplication of an ancestral gene encoding ALDH and subsequently specialized for refraction in the transparent lens while losing ALDH activity and expression in other tissues. PMID:7684383

  7. Comparison of Ising spin glass noise to flux and inductance noise in SQUIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare C

    2010-06-18

    Recent experiments implicate spins on the surface of metals as the source of flux and inductance noise in SQUIDs. We present Monte Carlo simulations of 2D and 3D Ising spin glasses that produce magnetization noise S(M) consistent with flux noise. At low frequencies S(M) is a maximum at the critical temperature T(C) in three dimensions, implying that flux noise should be a maximum at T(C). The second spectra of the magnetization noise and the noise in the susceptibility are consistent with experimentally measured SQUID inductance noise.

  8. High-Tc SQUID magnetometers for use in moderatemagnetically-shielded room

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUDA, Mizushi; Ono, S.; Kato, K.; Matsuura, T.; Oyama, H; Hayashi, A; Hirano, S.; Kuriki, S; YOKOSAWA, K.

    2001-01-01

    We have fabricated and characterized high-Tc planar SQUID magnetometers and first derivative gradiometers with directly-coupled pickup loops. The devices were made from single layer of YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin film on LSAT bicrystal substrate with 30° or 24° misorientation angle. Magnetic properties were investigated by applying a magnetic field B0 for the SQUID magnetometer patterned with holes to reduce the maximum structural width. We found an increasing low frequency noise with cooling fields B0 ...

  9. The Measurement of Spinal Cord Evoked Magnetic Fields by Vector SQUID Biomagnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Miyamoto, Masakazu; Kawai, Jun; Uehara, Gen

    Biomagnetometry is a powerful method for the investigation of the neural activity. We developed a multi channel superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) biomagnetometer system for the measurement of the evoked magnetic field from stimulated spinal cords. The system is equipped with three dimensionally configured SQUID vector gradiometers, which can detect not only the radial components of the magnetic field to the subject but also the tangential components. With the system, we could successfully observe the distribution of the evoked magnetic field corresponding to neuronal signals transmitting in the spinal cord of small animals as momentarily changing vector map.

  10. Role of squid in the Southern Ocean pelagic ecosystem and the possible consequences of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhouse, Paul G. K.

    2013-10-01

    Southern Ocean squid are important predators and prey and are a potential fishery resource. Their future under climate change is analysed from predictions of change by 2100 and assessments of the effects on squid biology. There are ˜18 Antarctic species of squid. Young feed primarily on crustaceans and switch later to fishes. They are preyed on by odontocetes, seals and seabirds - which together consume ˜34×106tyr-1 - and fish. As predators, squid are second to fish as biomass producers but recent evidence suggests predator consumption of squid needs to be reassessed. Fatty acid composition and stable nitrogen isotope ratios indicate some predators consume less squid in their diet than gut contents data suggest. Southern Ocean oceanography is unique in having circumpolar circulation and frontal systems and at high latitudes it is heavily influenced by sea ice. The Antarctic Peninsula is among the fastest warming regions worldwide but elsewhere the Southern Ocean is warming more slowly and the Ross Sea is probably cooling. Sea ice is receding in the Peninsula region and increasing elsewhere. Modelled predictions for 2100 suggest although the Southern Ocean will warm less than other oceans and sea ice will reduce. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current may shift slightly southwards with intensification of westerly winds but resolution of the models is insufficient to predict mesoscale change. Globally, pH of seawater has decreased by 0.1 units since the mid-1900s and is predicted to decrease by another 0.5 units by 2100. Impact on calcifying organisms will be high in the cold Southern Ocean where solubility of calcium carbonate is high. Predicted temperature increases are unlikely to have major effects on squid other than changes in distribution near the limits of their range; acidification may have greater impact. Small changes in large scale circulation are unlikely to affect squid but changes in mesoscale oceanography may have high impact. Change in sea ice extent

  11. Magnetic field imaging of a tungsten carbide film by scanning nano-SQUID microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yusuke; Nomura, Shintaro; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Nago, Yusuke; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of magnetic field imaging by scanning nano-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy on a tungsten carbide (W-C) film fabricated using focused-ion-beam chemical vapor deposition. We have investigated magnetic field change by a W-C film in an external magnetic field using a scanning nano-SQUID microscope system. We have found that the reduction of the magnetic field above the W-C film was 0.9%, indicating the penetration of vortices in the W-C at an external magnetic field of 0.171 mT.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Collagen from Squid(Ommastreoges bartrami) Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Mingyan; LI Bafang; ZHAO Xue

    2009-01-01

    Collagen of squid (Ommastrephes bartrami) skin was examined in the present study. Histology showed that collagen fiber in the skin was partially cross-linked with muscle fiber. Acid-solubilized collagen (ASC) and pepsin-solubilized collagen (PSC) were extracted from the skin and characterized. The results of amino acid composition and electrophoretic patterns revealed that ASC and PSC were both type Ⅰ collagen, containing α1 and α2 chains. FTIR (fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) investigations con-firmed the existence of helical arrangements in PSC of squid skin. The denaturation temperature (Td) and shrinkage temperature (Ts)of PSC were 29.4℃ and 52.8℃, respectively.

  13. Effects of Gamma Irradiation on Shelf-Life and Sensory Scores of Squid Sundae under Accelerated Storage Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of gamma irradiation on the shelf-life and sensory scores of squid Sundae under accelerated storage conditions. Squid Sundae was stored at 37°C for 35 days following gamma irradiation at doses of 0, 10, and 20 kGy. For total viable cell counts, control and gamma-irradiated (GI) (10 kGy) squid Sundae were already spoiled in 4 days, whereas GI (20 kGy) squid Sundae showed complete suppression of bacterial growth during storage. There were no significant changes in pH values compared to the control. The VBN and TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance) values of GI (20 kGy) squid Sundae were significantly lower than those of the control. In addition, the induction period of GI (20 kGy) squid Sundae as measured by a Rancimat showed a higher level compared to that of the control. In the sensory evaluation, there were no significant changes between the control and GI samples. These results suggest that a dose of 20 kGy is the optimum and effective dose for preservation of squid Sundae. (author)

  14. Comparison live adult Artemia and squid meat on the growth of Penaeid shrimp Metapenaeus dobsoni (Miers)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.R.S.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Royan, J.P.

    An experiment lasting 14 weeks was conducted to compare the efficiency of live adult Artemia with fresh squid meat on growth of penaeid shrimp Metapenaeus dobsoni. The shrimps were found actively feeding on live Artemia and grew 84% more than those...

  15. Rotational population patterns and searches for the nuclear SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents new theoretical results for rotational population patterns in the nuclear SQUID effect. (The term nuclear SQUID is in analogy to the solid-state Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices.) The SQUID effect is an interesting new twist to an old quest to understand Coriolis anti-pairing (CAP) effects in nuclear rotational bands. Two-neutron transfer reaction cross sections among high-spin states have long been touted as more specific CAP probes than other nuclear properties. Heavy projectiles like Sn or Pb generally are recommended to pump the deformed nucleus to as high spin as possible for transfer. The interference and sign reversal of 2n transfer amplitudes at high spin, as predicted in the early SQUID work imposes the difficult requirement of Coulomb pumping to near back-bending spins at closest approach. For Pb on rare earths we find a dramatic departure from sudden-approximation, so that the population depression occurs as low as final spin 10h. 14 refs., 8 figs

  16. A broadband dc SQUID based rf amplifier: experimental basics and development concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokopenko, G.V.; Shitov, S.V.; Mygind, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    We present a concept of a broadband IF amplifier based on experimental results obtained with a dc SQUID rf amplifier (SQA). The frequency range is broadened by using several SQAs, each one tuned to its own central frequency at both input and output; the numerical simulations are presented. A.......(C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Reversible stress softening of collagen based networks from the jumbo squid mantle (Dosidicus gigas)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F.G., E-mail: fgtorres@pucp.edu.pe [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Catholic University of Peru, Lima 32 (Peru); Troncoso, O.P.; Rivas, E.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Catholic University of Peru, Lima 32 (Peru); Gomez, C.G. [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Ciencia dels Materials, Universitat de València, Dr. Moliner 50, Burjassot, E-46100 Valencia (Spain); Lopez, D. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, C.S.I.C., Calle Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Dosidicus gigas is the largest and one of the most abundant jumbo squids in the eastern Pacific Ocean. In this paper we have studied the muscle of the mantle of D. gigas (DGM). Morphological, thermal and rheological properties were assessed by means of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry and oscillatory rheometry. This study allowed us to assess the morphological and rheological properties of a collagen based network occurring in nature. The results showed that the DGM network displays a nonlinear effect called reversible stress softening (RSS) that has been previously described for other types of biological structures such as naturally occurring cellulose networks and actin networks. We propose that the RSS could play a key role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure. The results presented here confirm that this phenomenon occurs in a wider number of materials than previously thought, all of them exhibiting different size scales as well as physical conformation. - Highlights: • We studied the structure property relationships of the jumbo squid mantle. • Rheological tests showed that such a mantle exhibits reversible stress softening (RSS). • RSS could also play a role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure.

  18. 77 FR 67305 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... that fishery to 3,165 mt (a 720-mt increase from status quo). Recently available data indicate that the... United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Specifications and Management Measures... Management Plan. This action raises the butterfish acceptable biological catch (ABC) to 4,200 mt (from...

  19. A high-Tc SQUID-based sensor head cooled by a Joule–Thomson cryocooler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, A.P.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Vries, de E.; Nijhof, N.; Holland, H.J.; Rogalla, H.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the so-called FHARMON project is to develop a high-Tc SQUID-based magnetometer system for the measurement of fetal heart activity in standard clinical environments. To lower the threshold for the application of this fetal heart monitor, it should be simple to operate. It is, therefore, a

  20. Measurement of SQUID noise levels for SuperCDMS SNOLAB detectors - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Maxwell [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB is a second generation direct dark matter search. In the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, detectors are able to pick up from signals from dark matter nuclear recoil interactions which occur inside the bulk of the detectors. These interactions produce both phonon and charge signals. HEMTs read out charge signals whereas TES are used to detect phonon signals which are then read out by SQUID amplifiers. SQUID amplifiers must add negligible noise to the TES intrinsic noise which has been previously measured and is approximately 50pA/√Hz down to 100Hz for ease of signal distinguishability in dark matter nuclear interactions. The intrinsic noise level of the SQUID was tested in the SLAC 300mK fridge and determined to provide adequately low levels of noise with a floor of approximately 3pA/√Hz. Furthermore, a 10x amplifier was tested for addition of extraneous noise. This noise was investigated with and without this amplifier, and it was found that it did not add a significant amount of noise to the intrinsic SQUID noise.

  1. Closed-cycle gas flow system for cooling of high Tc d.c. SQUID magnetometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, van den P.J.; Holland, H.J.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Rogalla, H.

    1995-01-01

    A high Tc.d.c SQUID based magnetometer for magnetocardiography is currently under development at the University of Twente. Since such a magnetometer should be simple to use, the cooling of the system can be realized most practically by means of a cryocooler. A closed-cycle gas flow cooling system in

  2. Reproductive system of the giant squid Architeuthis in South African waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, HJT; Roeleveld, MAC; Lipinski, MR; Melo, Y

    2004-01-01

    The reproductive system is described from 15 giant squid Architeuthis sp., collected between 1972 and 2002 in South African waters. Distinctive features of the mate reproductive system are the long muscular terminal organ, with elaboration of the anterior end, and modification of the tips of the ven

  3. SQUID sensor with additional compensation module for operation in an AC applied field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Penna, S.; Cianflone, F.; Del Gratta, C.; Erné, S. N.; Granata, C.; Pasquarelli, A.; Pentiricci, A.; Pizzella, V.; Russo, M.; Romani, G. L.

    2006-06-01

    A possible implementation of an in-vivo SQUID susceptometer able to estimate the liver iron concentration of humans uses a low frequency applied field together with a lock-in detection. The room-temperature magnetising coils and the detection coils are designed to minimize their mutual coupling. Nevertheless, deviation from ideal behaviour causes a residual signal in the detection coil, with an amplitude significantly larger than the patient's. In addition low frequency noise is added by any relative displacement of the magnetising and sensing coils. Thus, we designed a SQUID sensor using a compact compensating module to be used in a multichannel SQUID susceptometer. The sensor consists of two second order axial gradiometers, wounded one inside the other on the same support. The sensing channel is larger than the compensation channel which is only sensitive to the residual signal. Each gradiometer is coupled to a dc SQUID with parallel washer configuration. The output of the compensation channel is A/D converted and is processed by an adaptive algorithm running on a real time unit. The compensation signal is coupled to the sensing channel by an additional feedback loop. The performances of a prototype module will be presented.

  4. High Sensitivity Magnetic Flux Sensors with Direct Voltage Readout Double Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adelerhof, D.J.; Duuren, van M.J.; Flokstra, J.; Rogalla, H.; Kawai, J.; Kado, H.

    1995-01-01

    The experimental sensitivity of double relaxation oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) has been compared with theory and with the results obtained by numerical simulations. The experimental sensitivity ranges from 60 to 13h, where h is Planck's constant, for relaxation frequencies from 0.4 up to 10 GHz. For l

  5. 77 FR 22678 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... percent of the quota (8,888 mt) (77 FR 16472, March 21, 2012). The regulations also require the... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648- XB145 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries; Closure of the Trimester...

  6. Systematic value of the ultrastructure of the sucker surface in the squid family Mastigoteuthidae (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salcedo-Vargas, Mario Alejandro

    1995-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the sucker surface is described and its systematic value for mastigoteuthid squids, which bear minute suckers, is considered. An introduction to sucker terms is given and a redefinition of these terms is attempted. Using scanning electron microscopic data, two genera and four s

  7. Sphingoid esters from the molecular distillation of squid oil: A preliminary bioactivity determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliu, Francesco; Longhin, Eleonora; Salanti, Anika; Degano, Ilaria; Della Pergola, Roberto

    2016-06-15

    A mixture of sphingoid esters was isolated (1.4% w/w) from the molecular distillation of crude squid visceral oil. A preliminary investigation on the bioactivity profile and toxic potential of this residue was carried out by in vitro experiments. No cytotoxicity and a moderate lipase inhibition activity were highlighted. PMID:26868543

  8. Reversible stress softening of collagen based networks from the jumbo squid mantle (Dosidicus gigas)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosidicus gigas is the largest and one of the most abundant jumbo squids in the eastern Pacific Ocean. In this paper we have studied the muscle of the mantle of D. gigas (DGM). Morphological, thermal and rheological properties were assessed by means of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry and oscillatory rheometry. This study allowed us to assess the morphological and rheological properties of a collagen based network occurring in nature. The results showed that the DGM network displays a nonlinear effect called reversible stress softening (RSS) that has been previously described for other types of biological structures such as naturally occurring cellulose networks and actin networks. We propose that the RSS could play a key role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure. The results presented here confirm that this phenomenon occurs in a wider number of materials than previously thought, all of them exhibiting different size scales as well as physical conformation. - Highlights: • We studied the structure property relationships of the jumbo squid mantle. • Rheological tests showed that such a mantle exhibits reversible stress softening (RSS). • RSS could also play a role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure

  9. Relation between quantum NOT gate speed and asymmetry of the potential of RF-SQUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Ying-Hua; Cai Shi-Hua; Hu Ju-Ju

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between the speed of a quantum not gate and the asymmetry of the potential in an interactive system formed by a two-level RF-SQUID qubit and a classical microwave pulse.The RF-SQUID is characterized by an asymmetric double well potential which gives rise to diagonal matrix elements that describe the interaction of the SQUID with the microwave pulse.And the diagonal matrix elements account for the interaction of the microwave pulse with the SQUID.The results indicate that,when the angular frequency of the microwave field is chosen as near resonate with the transition |0>(→) |1>,i.e.ω1-ω0 ≈ωm,(1) the gate speed is decided by three factors,the Rabi frequency,the difference of the diagonal matrix elements between the two levels,and the angular frequency of the applied microwave pulse Wm;(2) the gate speed descends when the asymmetry of the potential is considered.

  10. SQUID sensor with additional compensation module for operation in an AC applied field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possible implementation of an in-vivo SQUID susceptometer able to estimate the liver iron concentration of humans uses a low frequency applied field together with a lock-in detection. The room-temperature magnetising coils and the detection coils are designed to minimize their mutual coupling. Nevertheless, deviation from ideal behaviour causes a residual signal in the detection coil, with an amplitude significantly larger than the patient's. In addition low frequency noise is added by any relative displacement of the magnetising and sensing coils. Thus, we designed a SQUID sensor using a compact compensating module to be used in a multichannel SQUID susceptometer. The sensor consists of two second order axial gradiometers, wounded one inside the other on the same support. The sensing channel is larger than the compensation channel which is only sensitive to the residual signal. Each gradiometer is coupled to a dc SQUID with parallel washer configuration. The output of the compensation channel is A/D converted and is processed by an adaptive algorithm running on a real time unit. The compensation signal is coupled to the sensing channel by an additional feedback loop. The performances of a prototype module will be presented

  11. Squid 'ear bones' (statoliths) from the Jurassic succession of South-west England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Malcolm; Page, Kevin; Price, Gregory; Smart, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Squid 'ear bones' - or statoliths - are a part of the balancing organs of modern and probably most fossil squids. Over the course of the last 10 years fossil statoliths have been discovered in the Jurassic sediments of the Wessex Basin (South-west England). They are probably all related to teuthids, such as Belemnotheutis antiquus Pearce, of Callovian-Oxfordian age. Thus far, we have identified four possible 'species' of statolith that are in the process of being formally described, named and their potential relationships determined. The sediments from which these statoliths have been recorded also contain squid hooklets (onycites), otoliths (fish 'ear bones') and other microfossils (including foraminifera). All are, therefore, of marine origin. In the case of the Christian Malford and Ashton Keynes lagerstätte (of late Callovian age), the statoliths are associated with exceptional, soft-bodied preservation of squid and it may be possible to determine the parent animal of the recorded statoliths. A number of museum collections (Natural History Museum [London], Natural History Museum [Paris], Senckenberg [Frankfurt], Smithsonian Institution [Washington], etc.) are being investigated in order to trace the possible host animals for all of the recorded statoliths. Despite many thousands of samples of Cretaceous sediments being investigated for foraminifera over the past 40+ years, no statoliths have been recorded and none are known from the literature.

  12. Relation between quantum NOT gate speed and asymmetry of the potential of RF-SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the relationship between the speed of a quantum not gate and the asymmetry of the potential in an interactive system formed by a two-level RF-SQUID qubit and a classical microwave pulse. The RF-SQUID is characterized by an asymmetric double well potential which gives rise to diagonal matrix elements that describe the interaction of the SQUID with the microwave pulse. And the diagonal matrix elements account for the interaction of the microwave pulse with the SQUID. The results indicate that, when the angular frequency of the microwave field is chosen as near resonate with the transition |0> ↔ |1>0, i.e. ω1 - ω0 ≈ ωm, (1) the gate speed is decided by three factors, the Rabi frequency, the difference of the diagonal matrix elements between the two levels, and the angular frequency of the applied microwave pulse ωm; (2) the gate speed descends when the asymmetry of the potential is considered

  13. 77 FR 74159 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... Adjustment 7, are available from: Dr. Christopher M. Moore, Executive Director, Mid-Atlantic Fishery... Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery Management Plan (FMP) (75 FR 11441, March 11, 2010) as a...: December 10, 2012. Alan Risenhoover, Director, Office of Sustainable Fisheries, performing the...

  14. Impact of high hydrostatic pressure on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jin; Zhang, Yifeng; Jin, Yafang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HHP at 200, 400 or 600MPa) on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles during 10-day storage at 4°C were investigated. HHP increased the concentrations of Cl(-) and volatile compounds, reduced the level of PO4(3-), but did not affect the contents of 5'-uridine monophosphate (UMP), 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP), 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP), Na(+) and Ca(2+) in squids on Day 0. At 600MPa, squids had the highest levels of 5'-adenosine monophosphate, Cl(-) and lactic acid, but the lowest contents of CMP and volatile compounds on Day 10. Essential free amino acids and succinic acids were lower on Day 0 than on Day 10. HHP at 200MPa caused higher equivalent umami concentration (EUC) on Day 0, and the EUC decreased with increasing pressure on Day 10. Generally, HHP at 200MPa was beneficial for improving EUC and volatile compounds of squids. PMID:26471521

  15. SQUIDs as Detectors in a New Experiment to Measure the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, M.A.; Cooper, M.; Lamoreaux, S.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.; Matlachov, A.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-09-13

    A new experiment has been proposed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) to 4x10{sup {minus}28} ecm, a factor of 250 times better than the current experimental limit. Such a measure of the neutron EDM would challenge the theories of supersymmetry and time reversal violation as the origin of the observed cosmological asymmetry in the ratio of baryons to antibaryons. One possible design for this new experiment includes the use of LTC SQUIDs coupled to large ({approximately}100 cm{sup 2}) pick-up coils to measure the precession frequency of the spin-polarized {sup 3}He atoms that act as polarizer, spin analyzer, detector, and magnetometer for the ultra-cold neutrons used in the experiment. The method of directly measuring the {sup 3}He precession signal eliminates the need for very uniform magnetic fields (a major source of systematic error in these types of experiments). It is estimated that a flux of {approximately}2x10{sup {minus}16} Tm{sup 2} (0.1 F{sub 0}) will be coupled into the pick-up coils. To achieve the required signal-to-noise ratio one must have a flux resolution of d F{sub SQ}=2x10{sup {minus}6} F{sub 0}/{radical}Hz at 10 Hz. While this is close to the sensitivity available in commercial devices, the effects of coupling to such a large pick-up coil and flux noise from other sources in the experiment still need to be understood. To determine the feasibility of using SQUIDs in such an application we designed and built a superconducting test cell, which simulates major features of the proposed EDM experiment, and we developed a two-SQUID readout system that will reduce SQUID noise in the experiment. We present an overview of the EDM experiment with SQUIDs, estimations of required SQUID parameters and experimental considerations. We also present the measured performance of a single magnetometer in the test cell as well as the performance of the two SQUID readout technique

  16. Low-Frequency Noise in High-T Superconductor Josephson Junctions, Squids, and Magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklich, Andrew Hostetler

    The design and performance of high-T_ {rm c} dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), the junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with special attention paid to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDs. This noise suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions, in contrast, have levels of critical current noise that are controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5times 10^{-30} J Hz^ {-1} at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)^2 pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz^{-1/2} down to frequencies below 1 Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz^{-1/2} at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50 mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Although the performance of these devices is sufficient for single -channel biomagnetometry or geophysical studies, their relatively poor coupling to the pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy the competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz^{-1/2} in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm) ^2 pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from the processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz^ {-1/2}. High-T_{ rm c} SQUIDs are shown to exhibit additional 1/f noise when they are cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of the additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10-20 in a field of 0.05 mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution

  17. Low-frequency noise in high-(Tc) superconductor Josephson junctions, SQUIDs, and magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklich, A. H.

    1994-05-01

    Design and performance of high-T(sub c) dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID's), junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with attention to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUID's; this suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUID's from bicrystal junctions have levels of critical current noise controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5 x 10(exp -30) J Hz(exp -1) at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm)(exp 2) pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz(exp -1/2) down to frequencies below 1 Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz(exp -1/2) at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Poor coupling to pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz(exp -1/2) in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm)(exp 2) pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz(exp -1/2). High-T(sub c) SQUID's exhibit additional 1/f noise when cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10-20 in a field of 0.05mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution of 9.2 pV Hz(exp -1/2) at 10 Hz (24 pV Hz(exp -1/2) at 1 Hz) is described.

  18. Fishery biology of jumbo flying squid Dosidicus gigas off Costa Rica Dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjun; Li, Jianghua; Liu, Bilin; Li, Gang; Lu, Huajie

    2014-06-01

    The jumbo flying squid ( Dosidicus gigas) population was surveyed with the help of Chinese squid jigging vessels off the Costa Rica Dome (4°-11°N, 90°-100°W) in 2009 and 2010. The daily catch of D. gigas in the two survey cruises ranged from 0 to 5.5 t and was mostly obtained from the areas bounded by 6°-9°N and 91°-94°W and by 6°30'-7°30'N and 96°-97°W. The sea surface temperature in the areas yielding the most catch ranged from 27.5 to 29°C. The sex ratio of the total catch was 3.75:1 (female: male). The mantle length of the squid ranged from 211 to 355 mm (male) and from 204 to 429 mm (female) with an average of 297.9 and 306.7 mm, respectively. In the relationship of the mantle length (mm) and body weight (g) of the squid, there was no significant difference between sexes. The female and male were at a similar maturity, and most individuals are maturing or have matured with a few females being spent. The size (mantle length) and age at the first sexual maturity were 297 mm and 195 d in females, and less than 211 mm and 130 d in males, respectively. Most of the sampled stomachs (70.6%) had no food remains. The major preys of the squids were fish, cephalopods and crustaceans, with the most abundant Myctophum orientale and D. gigas. The preys in more than 65% of the non-empty sampled stomachs evidenced the cannibalism of D. gigas. The results improved current understanding of the fishery biology of D. gigas off the Costa Rica Dome, which may facilitate the assessment and management of relative fishery resources.

  19. The biology and ecology of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas (Cephalopoda in Chilean waters: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Ibáñez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas is the most abundant cephalopod species in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, which supports the biggest cephalopod fishery in the world. Due to its growing economic importance, the population growth and distributional expansion of this squid is being increasingly studied. Nevertheless, some basic features of the biology of D. gigas are still unknown or have been poorly investigated. In this review we summarize the known information regarding the biology and ecology of this species in the southeastern Pacific Ocean; we focus on the Chilean region in order to propose hypotheses and research lines for a better understanding the life history of this organism. Available data on the size structure, reproduction and genetics of D. gigas allows us to propose hypotheses related to the squid's life history traits. Based on the current literature and publications of colleagues, we propose two hypotheses regarding the effect of spatial variation on the life history of D. gigas. Hypothesis 1: Squids mature at large sizes and spawn in oceanic waters with warm temperatures where paralarvae and juveniles develop. Immature squids migrate near shore to feed, grow and mature, and then return to the offshore sites to spawn. Hypothesis 2: Alternatively, juvenile D. gigas in the oceanic zone do not migrate to coastal waters and mature at small sizes compared to individuals living near the coast that mature at larger size and migrate to oceanic waters to spawn. We provide background information about the feeding behavior and parasitism of this species, suggesting that D. gigas is an important trophic link in the southeastern Pacific marine ecosystem. However, more studies on the feeding habits, reproduction and parasite load are needed not only to test hypotheses proposed in this study, but also to advance the overall knowledge of this species.

  20. Fishery Biology of Jumbo Flying Squid Dosidicus gigas off Costa Rica Dome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xinjun; LI Jianghua; LIU Bilin; LI Gang; LU Huajie

    2014-01-01

    The jumbo flying squid (Dosidicus gigas) population was surveyed with the help of Chinese squid jigging vessels off the Costa Rica Dome (4˚-11˚N, 90˚-100˚W) in 2009 and 2010. The daily catch of D. gigas in the two survey cruises ranged from 0 to 5.5 t and was mostly obtained from the areas bounded by 6˚-9˚N and 91˚-94˚W and by 6˚30´-7˚30´N and 96˚-97˚W. The sea surface temperature in the areas yielding the most catch ranged from 27.5 to 29℃. The sex ratio of the total catch was 3.75:1 (female:male). The mantle length of the squid ranged from 211 to 355 mm (male) and from 204 to 429 mm (female) with an average of 297.9 and 306.7 mm, respectively. In the relationship of the mantle length (mm) and body weight (g) of the squid, there was no significant dif-ference between sexes. The female and male were at a similar maturity, and most individuals are maturing or have matured with a few females being spent. The size (mantle length) and age at the first sexual maturity were 297 mm and 195 d in females, and less than 211 mm and 130 d in males, respectively. Most of the sampled stomachs (70.6%) had no food remains. The major preys of the squids were fish, cephalopods and crustaceans, with the most abundant Myctophum orientale and D. gigas. The preys in more than 65%of the non-empty sampled stomachs evidenced the cannibalism of D. gigas. The results improved current understanding of the fishery biology of D. gigas off the Costa Rica Dome, which may facilitate the assessment and management of relative fishery re-sources.

  1. Sequential isotopic signature along gladius highlights contrasted individual foraging strategies of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Lorrain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cephalopods play a major role in marine ecosystems, but knowledge of their feeding ecology is limited. In particular, intra- and inter-individual variations in their use of resources has not been adequatly explored, although there is growing evidence that individual organisms can vary considerably in the way they use their habitats and resources. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using δ(13C and δ(15N values of serially sampled gladius (an archival tissue, we examined high resolution variations in the trophic niche of five large (>60 cm mantle length jumbo squids (Dosidicus gigas that were collected off the coast of Peru. We report the first evidence of large inter-individual differences in jumbo squid foraging strategies with no systematic increase of trophic level with size. Overall, gladius δ(13C values indicated one or several migrations through the squid's lifetime (∼8-9 months, during which δ(15N values also fluctuated (range: 1 to 5‰. One individual showed an unexpected terminal 4.6‰ δ(15N decrease (more than one trophic level, thus indicating a shift from higher- to lower-trophic level prey at that time. The data illustrate the high diversity of prey types and foraging histories of this species at the individual level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The isotopic signature of gladii proved to be a powerful tool to depict high resolution and ontogenic variations in individual foraging strategies of squids, thus complementing traditional information offered by stomach content analysis and stable isotopes on metabolically active tissues. The observed differences in life history strategies highlight the high degree of plasticity of the jumbo squid and its high potential to adapt to environmental changes.

  2. Baseline of organotin pollution in fishes, clams, shrimps, squids and crabs collected from the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jadhav, S.; Bhosale, D.; Bhosle, N.B.

    , crustaceans and molluscans are easily prone to organotins contamination. In view of this, a baseline monitoring study was conducted in order to establish the levels of organotins in edible marine fishes, bivalves, shrimps, squids and crabs collected from...

  3. Stable isotopes on jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) beaks to esitmate its trophic positon: comparison between stomach contents and stable isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Cooley, R.I.; Markaida, U.; Gendron, Diane; Aguíñiga García, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    Stomach contents and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope analysis were used to evaluate trophic relationships of jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas. Buccal masses, beaks and stomach contents of large and medium maturing-sized jumbo squid and muscle from its main prey, the myctophid Benthosema panamense, were collected in the Gulf of California, Mexico during 1996, 1997 and 1999. Both the quantified C and N-isotope ratios in muscle, and stomach content analysis revealed that larger-sized matu...

  4. Ultralow-field NMR on Room Temperature samples using a low TC Two-Stage DC SQUID

    OpenAIRE

    Piscitelli, Michele

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) detection for use on room temperature samples and presents initial test results using various liquid samples. The original proof of principle low-field SQUID NMR spectrometer consists of a cryogenic dipper probe designed for small liquid samples on the order of 100 μl, which is operated in a liquid-helium Dewar equipped with a simple μ-m...

  5. Low-noise ultra-high-speed dc SQUID readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drung, Dietmar [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestrasse 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); Hinnrichs, Colmar [Magnicon GbR, Wachtelweg 7, D-22869 Schenefeld (Germany); Barthelmess, Henry-Jobes [Magnicon GbR, Wachtelweg 7, D-22869 Schenefeld (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    User-friendly ultra-high-speed readout electronics for dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are presented. To maximize the system bandwidth, the SQUID is directly read out without flux modulation. A composite preamplifier is used consisting of a slow dc amplifier in parallel with a fast ac amplifier. In this way, excellent dc precision and a high amplifier bandwidth of 50 MHz are achieved, simultaneously. A virtual 50 {omega} amplifier input resistance with negligible excess noise is realized by active shunting, i.e., by applying feedback from preamplifier output to input via a high resistance. The white voltage and current noise levels are 0.33 nV Hz{sup -1} and 2.6 pA Hz{sup -1/2}, respectively. The electronics is fully computer controlled via a microcontroller integrated into the flux-locked loop (FLL) board. Easy-to-use software makes the various electronic settings accessible. A wide bias voltage range of 1.3 mV enables the readout of series SQUID arrays. Furthermore, additional current sources allow the operation of two-stage SQUIDs or transition edge sensors. The electronics was tested using various SQUIDs with input inductances between 30 nH and 1.5 {mu}H. Typically, the maximum FLL bandwidth was 20 MHz, which is close to the theoretical limit given by transmission line delay within the FLL. Slew rates of up to 4.6 {phi}{sub 0} {mu}s{sup -1} were achieved with series SQUID arrays. Current noise levels as low as 0.47 pA Hz{sup -1/2} and coupled energy sensitivities between 90 h and 500 h were measured at 4.2 K, where h is the Planck constant. The noise did not degrade when the system bandwidth was increased to the maximum value of about 20 MHz. With a two-stage set-up, intrinsic white energy sensitivities of 30 h and 2.3 h were measured at 4.2 and 0.3 K, respectively.

  6. Low-frequency noise in high-{Tc} superconductor Josephson junctions, SQUIDs, and magnetometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklich, A.H.

    1994-05-01

    Design and performance of high-T{sub c} dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUEDs), junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with attention to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDS; this suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions have levels of critical current noise controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5{times}10{sup {minus}30} J Hz{sup {minus}1} at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm){sup 2} pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} down to frequencies below I Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Poor coupling to pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm){sup 2} pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2}. High-T{sub c} SQUIDs exhibit additional 1/f noise when cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10--20 in a field of 0.05mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution of 9.2 pV.Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 10 Hz (24 pV Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz) is described.

  7. Studies on the effect of low dose gamma irradiation on the chemical, microbial quality and shelf life of squid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation was carried out to study the combined effect of low dose gamma irradiation (1, 3 and 5 kGy) and storage at refrigeration (+4℃) and frozen (-18℃) temperatures, on the shelf life extension of fresh squid. The study was based on microbiological and physico-chemical changes occurring in the squid samples. The biochemical parameters such as total volatile base nitrogen and trimethyl amine nitrogen values for irradiated squid samples were significantly lower than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures and the rate of decrease was more pronounced in samples irradiated at the higher dose of 3 and 5 kGy (p<0.05). pH values of squid samples were affected by both irradiation dose and storage temperature (p<0.05). Total microbial load for non- irradiated (control) squid samples were higher than the respective irradiated samples at both storage temperatures. The results revealed that the combination of irradiation and low temperature storage resulted in a significant reduction of microbial growth and extend the shelf life of squid at refrigeration and frozen temperature to about 12 and 90 days respectively. (author)

  8. The giant eyes of giant squid are indeed unexpectedly large, but not if used for spotting sperm whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We recently reported (Curr Biol 22:683–688, 2012) that the eyes of giant and colossal squid can grow to three times the diameter of the eyes of any other animal, including large fishes and whales. As an explanation to this extreme absolute eye size, we developed a theory for visual performance in aquatic habitats, leading to the conclusion that the huge eyes of giant and colossal squid are uniquely suited for detection of sperm whales, which are important squid-predators in the depths where these squid live. A paper in this journal by Schmitz et al. (BMC Evol Biol 13:45, 2013) refutes our conclusions on the basis of two claims: (1) using allometric data they argue that the eyes of giant and colossal squid are not unexpectedly large for the size of the squid, and (2) a revision of the values used for modelling indicates that large eyes are not better for detection of approaching sperm whales than they are for any other task. Results and conclusions We agree with Schmitz et al. that their revised values for intensity and abundance of planktonic bioluminescence may be more realistic, or at least more appropriately conservative, but argue that their conclusions are incorrect because they have not considered some of the main arguments put forward in our paper. We also present new modelling to demonstrate that our conclusions remain robust, even with the revised input values suggested by Schmitz et al. PMID:24010674

  9. High-T{sub c} SQUID gradiometer system for magnetocardiography in an unshielded environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, S H [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipen 116, Taiwan (China); Hsu, S C [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Lin, C C [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Horng, H E [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipen 116, Taiwan (China); Chen, J C [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, M J [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wu, C H [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Yang, H C [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2003-12-01

    We set up an electronic gradiometer for magnetocardiography (MCG) in an unshielded environment. The electronically balanced gradiometer consists of high-temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf SQUID) magnetometers. The rf SQUID magnetometers are arranged to form the electronic first-order, four-vector gradiometer, or second-order gradiometer. The output of the MCG signal was filtered by a band pass (1-30 Hz) and power line filters. We can reduce the noise to {approx}1 pT Hz{sup -1/2} at 1 Hz for second-order or four-vector gradiometers. Two-dimensional MCG imaging is demonstrated. The results are discussed with data measured in the moderate magnetically shielded environment.

  10. Measurement of the signal from a cultured cell using a high-T{sub c} SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Natsume, Miyuki; Uchida, Masashi; Oshita, Miyuki; Aspanut, Zarina; Eki, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Sachiko [Toyohashi University of Technology, Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho Toyohashi Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    Stem cells in developing tissues give rise to the multiple specialized cell types that make up the heart, lung, skin, and other tissues. For scientists, it is important to know the stages of stem cell development. We propose a new method to obtain knowledge of the cell development stages by using a high-T{sub c} SQUID magnetometer. In the first step of the research, we used Wister rat myocardial cells incubated for 12-14 days in a culture dish as a sample, which were not derived from stem cells. With the cells we tried to measure the signal using a SQUID magnetometer. We were able to measure the magnetic signals, which may be generated by ion transport through the cell membrane. A beat signal with a period of 0.6 s was observed. The peak-to-peak value was about 400 pT. This showed good agreement with the result of microscopic observation.

  11. Development of high-T{sub c} SQUID microscope with flux guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Matsuda, Kazuka; Yamazaki, Osamu; Natsume, Miyuki; Ota, Hajime; Mizoguchi, Takahiro [Department of Ecological Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi Aichi (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new type of superconducting interference device (SQUID) microscope. A direct-coupled SQUID magnetometer with a high-{mu} metal needle was used and the substrate was machined to create a dimple for the needle at the centre of the pick-up loop. One end of the needle penetrated through the superconducting pick-up loop in a vacuum; the needle was fixed in the vacuum window with the other end at room temperature in the outside atmosphere. Several kinds of simulation using a Maxwell simulator were performed and the results were applied to our system. As a demonstration, a laser-printed output was scanned by the microscope. Line bars with a line width of 100 {mu}m and a spacing between lines of 200 {mu}m were clearly imaged. (author)

  12. Measurement of metallic contaminants in food with a high-T{sub c} SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Natsume, Miyuki; Uchida, Masashi; Hotta, Naoki; Matsuda, Takemasa; Spanut, Zarina A; Hatsukade, Yoshimi [Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2004-04-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a high-T{sub c} SQUID system for detecting metallic contaminants in foodstuffs. There is a demand for the development of systems for detecting not only magnetic materials but also non-magnetic materials such as Cu and aluminium in foodstuffs to ensure food safety. The system consists of a SQUID magnetometer, an excitation coil and a permanent magnet. For a non-magnetic sample, an AC magnetic field is applied during detection to induce an eddy current in the sample. For a magnetizable sample, a strong magnetic field is applied to the sample prior to the detection attempt. We were able to detect a stainless steel ball with a diameter of 0.1 mm and a Cu ball less than 1 mm in diameter, for example.

  13. Detection of ruptures in prestressed steel rods for concrete structures using HTc-SQUIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestressed steel reinforcement is commonly used to enhance the stability of concrete structures like bridges and buildings because the concrete alone is not able to withstand large tensile stresses. Reinforced constructions can be lighter and may have longer spans. The reinforcement usually consists of jacketed steel bundles each of which is made of about 5 to 50 rods. The occurrence of cracks and ruptures in these rods especially due to hydrogen embrittlement may eventually lead to a failure of the structure with possibly disastrous consequences. Therefore, a method for nondestructively testing the state of rods imbedded in the concrete is needed. In this communication we present a method relying on the magnetic stray flux due to the rupture. As a first step the magnetic signal is detected by normal search coils which are inductively coupled to a rf SQUID. To enhance the sensitivity of this method, the SQUID itself will ultimately have to be used as a sensor. (orig.)

  14. Design and performance of the ADMX SQUID-based microwave receiver

    CERN Document Server

    Asztalos, S J; Hagmann, C; Kinion, D; van Bibber, K; Hotz, M; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Wagner, A; Hoskins, J; Martin, C; Sullivan, N S; Tanner, D B; Bradley, R; Clarke, John

    2011-01-01

    The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) was designed to detect ultra-weakly interacting relic axion particles by searching for their conversion to microwave photons in a resonant cavity positioned in a strong magnetic field. Given the extremely low expected axion-photon conversion power we have designed, built and operated a microwave receiver based on a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). We describe the ADMX receiver in detail as well as the analysis of narrow band microwave signals. We demonstrate the sustained use of a SQUID amplifier operating between 812 and 860 MHz with a noise temperature of 1 K. The receiver has a noise equivalent power of 1.1x10^-24 W/sqrt(Hz) in the band of operation for an integration time of 1.8x10^3 s.

  15. SQUID-based microtesla MRI for in vivo relaxometry of the human brain

    CERN Document Server

    Zotev, V S; Matlashov, A N; Savukov, I M; Owens, T; Espy, M A

    2008-01-01

    SQUID-based MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) at microtesla fields has developed significantly over the past few years. Here we describe application of this method for magnetic relaxation measurements in the living human brain. We report values of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 for brain tissues, measured in vivo for the first time at microtesla fields. The experiments were performed at 46 microtesla field using a seven-channel SQUID system designed for microtesla MRI and MEG. Values of T1, measured for different tissues at this field, are found to be close (within 5%) to the corresponding values of the transverse relaxation time T2 at the same field. Implications of this result for imaging contrast in microtesla MRI are discussed.

  16. All-planar SQUIDs and pickup coils for combined MEG and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luomahaara, J; Kiviranta, M; Groenberg, L; Hassel, J [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO BOX 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Vesanen, P T; Nieminen, J O; Dabek, J; Zevenhoven, C J; Ilmoniemi, R J [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, PO BOX 12200, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Penttilae, J [Aivon Oy, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Simola, J, E-mail: juho.luomahaara@vtt.fi [Elekta Oy, PO Box 34, 00531 Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-07-15

    Flux trapping and random flux movement are common problems in superconducting thin-film devices. Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to large pickup coils are especially vulnerable to strong external fields. The issue has become particularly relevant with the introduction of SQUID-based ultra-low-field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. In this paper, we study the constraints of thin-film-based magnetometers and gradiometers as exposed to magnetic field sequences of ULF MRI. In particular, we address issues such as response recovery, transient noise, magnetization and behaviour under shielded room conditions after prepolarization. As a result, we demonstrate sensors that are suitable for a combined multi-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) and MRI imaging system.

  17. Chemical and Functional Characterization of Sarcoplasmic Proteins from Giant Squid (Dosidicus gigas Mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Linda Lopez-Enriquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of pH and NaCl concentration changed the physicochemical properties of sarcoplasmic proteins (SP from jumbo squid mantle and consequently their functional properties. Better results of emulsifying activity index (EAI and foam capacity (FC were exhibited at pH 11 in NaCl absence due to higher solubility. But better emulsifying stability index (ESI was obtained at pH 11 in 0.5 M NaCl, while, foaming stability (FS was better at pH near to isoelectric point (pI. These results suggest that SP from jumbo squid may be a promising ingredient, whose functional properties can be manipulated by changing pH and NaCl concentration.

  18. Multi-Channel Magnetocardiogardiography System Based on Low-Tc SQUIDs in an Unshielded Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangyan; Zhang, Shulin; Wang, Yongliang; Zeng, Jia; Xie, Xiaoming

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is a new medical diagnostic tool measuring biomagnetic signals that are generated by the electrical activity of the human heart. This technique is completely passive, contactless, and it has an advantage in the early diagnosis of heart diseases. We developed the first unshielded four-channel MCG system based on low-Tc DC SQUIDs in China. Instead of using a costly magnetically shielded room, the environmental noise suppression was realized by using second-order gradiometers and three-axis reference magnetometer. The measured magnetic field resolution of the system is better than 1 pT, and multi-cycle human heart signals can be recorded directly. Also, with the infrared positioning system, 48 points data collection can be realized by moving the non-magnetic bed nine times.

  19. All-planar SQUIDs and pickup coils for combined MEG and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flux trapping and random flux movement are common problems in superconducting thin-film devices. Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) coupled to large pickup coils are especially vulnerable to strong external fields. The issue has become particularly relevant with the introduction of SQUID-based ultra-low-field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. In this paper, we study the constraints of thin-film-based magnetometers and gradiometers as exposed to magnetic field sequences of ULF MRI. In particular, we address issues such as response recovery, transient noise, magnetization and behaviour under shielded room conditions after prepolarization. As a result, we demonstrate sensors that are suitable for a combined multi-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) and MRI imaging system.

  20. Development of a Microwave SQUID-Multiplexed TES Array for MUSTANG-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanchfield, S. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aguirre, J.; Brevik, J. A.; Cho, H. M.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Dober, B.; Egan, D.; Ford, P.; Hilton, G.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Marganian, P.; Mason, B. S.; Mates, J. A. B.; McMahon, J.; Mello, M.; Mroczkowski, T.; Romero, C.; Tucker, C.; Vale, L.; White, S.; Whitehead, M.; Young, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    MUSTANG-2 is a 90 GHz feedhorn-coupled, microwave SQUID-multiplexed TES bolometer array in the final stages of development for operation on the 100-m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. We present the camera design and report the performance during the first season of observation, in which 64 of the available 215 pixels in the focal plane were populated. We highlight the microwave multiplexing readout technology, which is envisioned as a path to read out the next generation of large pixel-count cryogenic focal planes. In this regard, MUSTANG2 is a pathfinder for this multiplexing technology. We present noise spectra which show no detector noise degradation when read out with microwave SQUID multiplexing, and we present first light images of Jupiter and M87, which demonstrate the end-to-end system performance.

  1. SQUID magnetometry for the cryoEDM experiment-Tests at LSBB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High precision magnetometry is an essential requirement of the cryoEDM experiment at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble. We have developed a SQUID system for this purpose, however tests done in Oxford have been limited by the noisy electromagnetic environment inside our laboratory, therefore we have tested a smaller version of our prototype system in the very low noise environment at LSBB, Rustrel, France. We have studied the crosstalk between an array of parallel pick-up loops-where the field generated by a current in one loop is detected by the others. We monitored the magnetic field in the LSBB for over twelve hours; and after correcting these data for SQUID resets, and crosstalk, we compare it to the published values from nearby geomagnetic observatories. We have also measured the noise spectrum of our system and studied the effect that heating one of the pick-up loops into its conducting state has on the other, parallel loops.

  2. A thin-film second-order gradiometer with integrated dc-SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, P.; Castellano, M. G.; Chiaventi, L.; Leoni, R.; Cirillo, M.; Modena, I.

    1993-09-01

    We have fabricated and characterized a superconducting planar gradiometer sensitive to the second-order spatial derivative of the magnetic field. Our device has been patterned on a 12.8×12.8 mm silicon chip on which the sensitive area of the gradiometer and the SQUID inductance are generated by the same four 0.5-mm-square holes. We measured the sensitivity both in flux-locked-loop (FLL) and in open-loop mode. With the second method we used another dc-SQUID as amplifier and in this case we obtained the best noise performance. The gradiometer sensitivity was 18 fT/cm2 √Hz. The magnetic isoflux line distribution generated by a dipolar source was measured by the gradiometer in FLL mode.

  3. Infiltration of chitin by protein coacervates defines the squid beak mechanical gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Tan; Hoon, S; Guerette, PA; Wei, W; Ghadban, A; Hao, C; Miserez, A; Waite, JH

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved. The beak of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas is a fascinating example of how seamlessly nature builds with mechanically mismatched materials. A 200-fold stiffness gradient begins in the hydrated chitin of the soft beak base and gradually increases to maximum stiffness in the dehydrated distal rostrum. Here, we combined RNA-Seq and proteomics to show that the beak contains two protein families. One family consists of chitin-binding proteins (DgCB...

  4. Lack of genetic differentiation among size groups of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas)

    OpenAIRE

    E Sandoval-Castellanos; M Uribe-Alcocer; P Díaz-Jaimes

    2009-01-01

    The population structure of the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) is complex, containing several cohorts and three groups defined by their size (small, medium, and large) and by differences in maturation, growth, and life span. Several authors have indicated the possibility of such groups representing discrete genetic units even at level subspecies or species in statu nascendi. Genetic divergence was tested in samples from the Gulf of California (Mexico) and Peruvian Sea by estimation of populati...

  5. Ecology and Trophic Interactions of Jumbo Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the California Current Ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Gilly, William; Field, John

    2012-01-01

    Humboldt squid have recently demonstrated a range expansion into the waters off California from the previous northern extent of their range in Mexico. In this new environment, we expected the vertical and horizontal migratory behavior and the diet to be generally similar those previously documented in Mexico. However, we also expected significant differences in diet and reproductive activity, with potentially great impacts on ecosystems in the California Current System. In particular, consump...

  6. Physico-chemical and film forming properties of giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) gelatin

    OpenAIRE

    Giménez, B.; Gómez Estaca, Joaquín; Alemán, A.; Gómez Guillén, M. C.; Montero García, Pilar

    2009-01-01

    Giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) inner and outer tunics were subjected to hydrolysis with pepsin prior to gelatin extraction (G1 gelatin) by a mild-acid procedure. Furthermore, a second gelatin extraction (G2 gelatin) was done using the collagenous residues that remained from the first extraction. Pepsin allows the collagen solubilisation and the extraction yield to increase by yielding extracts high in α-chains. G1 exhibited good gel forming ability but G2 showed poor viscoelastic behaviour and...

  7. Invasive range expansion by the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, in the eastern North Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidberg, Louis D.; Robison, Bruce H.

    2007-01-01

    A unique 16-year time series of deep video surveys in Monterey Bay reveals that the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, has substantially expanded its perennial geographic range in the eastern North Pacific by invading the waters off central California. This sustained range expansion coincides with changes in climate-linked oceanographic conditions and a reduction in competing top predators. It is also coincident with a decline in the abundance of Pacific hake, the most important commercial grou...

  8. Jumbo Squid (Dosidicus gigas) in situ Target Strength measurements in Northwest Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Villalobos, H.; Manini-Ramos, F.; Salinas-Zavala, C.; Brehmer, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    In order to convert acoustic abundance indexes into biomass is essential to establish the relationship between squid size dorsal mantle length (DML) and acoustic Target Strength (TS). We had carried out in situ measurement in 2012 off Baja California on Dosidicus gigas. For both frequencies, we found significant differences between modes of measured and predicted TS distributions, 6 and 11 dB for 120 and 38 kHz, respectively. It is known that TS varies with several factors, including echosoun...

  9. Systematic value of the ultrastructure of the sucker surface in the squid family Mastigoteuthidae (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo-Vargas, Mario Alejandro

    1995-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the sucker surface is described and its systematic value for mastigoteuthid squids, which bear minute suckers, is considered. An introduction to sucker terms is given and a redefinition of these terms is attempted. Using scanning electron microscopic data, two genera and four subgenera of Mastigoteuthidae from the Northwest Pacific are distinguished. The presence of “cushions” in the sucker is discussed and considered as a character important for understanding adaptation...

  10. Hypoxia tolerance and antioxidant defense system of juvenile jumbo squids in oxygen minimum zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-10-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) is a large oceanic squid endemic off the Eastern Tropical Pacific that undertakes diel vertical migrations into mesopelagic oxygen minimum zones. One of the expected physiological effects of such migration is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the surface, promoted by the transition between hypoxia and reoxygenation states. The aim of this study was to investigate the energy expenditure rates and the antioxidant stress strategies of juvenile D. gigas under normoxia and hypoxia, namely by quantifying oxygen consumption rates, antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], heat shock protein expression (Hsp70/Hsc70), and lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. A high significant decrease (68%) in squid's metabolic rates was observed during hypoxia (pGST activity and MDA concentrations did not change significantly from normoxia to hypoxia (p>0.05), with the latter indicating no enhancement of lipid peroxidation (i.e. cellular damage) at the warmer and normoxic surface waters. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how this species is quickly responding to the impacts of environmental stressors coupled with global climate change.

  11. Assessment of Heavy Metal Contamination in Squid (Loligo Spp.) Tissues of Kedah-Perlis Waters, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to determine the concentration of selected heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in three different tissues collected from the ink-sac, head, and muscle of the squid. Squid samples were caught off the coastal waters of Kedah-Perlis, where only mature squids within the maturity size-range of 13 to 15 cm were used. From this study, the concentration of Zn (35.06 ± 4.06 mg/ kg in dry weight) was found significantly higher in all of the tissues, followed by Cu (15.10 ± 13.28 mg/ kg in dry weight), Cd (4.76 ± 3.77 mg/ kg in dry weight), and Pb with an average value of 4.01 ± 0.08 mg/ kg in dry weight. From this study, it was discovered that Zn and Cu concentrations in the tissues were lower than the maximum limit recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization, Malaysian Food Regulation (1985), as well as other countries. Meanwhile, both non-essential elements namely Cd and Pb recorded higher values than that of the recommended concentrations. According to the Metal Pollution Index (MPI), the ink-sac indicated medium-range contamination, while the head and muscle tissues showed low contamination levels. (author)

  12. Preparation of squid skin collagen hydrolysate as an antihyaluronidase, antityrosinase, and antioxidant agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakchum, Ladawan; Kim, Sang Moo

    2016-01-01

    A collagen was isolated from squid skin, a processing waste product. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid skin collagen hydrolysates were determined to produce a value-added material. Five low-molecular-mass hydrolysate fractions, F1 (>30 kD), F2 (10-30 kD), F3 (3-10 kD), F4 (1-3 kD), and F5 (<1 kD), were manufactured from its enzymatic hydrolysate by ultrafiltration. Fraction F3 had the strongest antihyaluronidase inhibitory activity. Gly, Val, and Pro were major amino acids in F3, while Met, Tyr, and His were minor ones. The molecular mass of F3 was in the range of 3.4 to 10 kD. F3 exhibited copper chelating ability in a concentration-dependent manner. The ferrous chelating ability of F3 was almost 50% at 200 µg/mL. F3 also inhibited tyrosinase activity by 39.65% at 1 mg/mL. Furthermore, F3 had stronger hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (IC50 = 149.94 µg/mL) than ascorbic acid (IC50 = 212.94 µg/mL). Therefore, the squid collagen hydrolysate can be utilized as a nutraceutical or cosmeceutical agent.

  13. Greatly improved cache update times for conditions data with Frontier/Squid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Dave; Lueking, Lee

    2010-04-01

    The CMS detector project loads copies of conditions data to over 100,000 computer cores worldwide by using a software subsystem called Frontier. This subsystem translates database queries into HTTP, looks up the results in a central database at CERN, and caches the results in an industry-standard HTTP proxy/caching server called Squid. One of the most challenging aspects of any cache system is coherency, that is, ensuring that changes made to the underlying data get propagated out to all clients in a timely manner. Recently, the Frontier system was enhanced to drastically reduce the time for changes to be propagated everywhere without heavily loading servers. The propagation time is now as low as 15 minutes for some kinds of data and no more than 60 minutes for the rest of the data. This was accomplished by taking advantage of an HTTP and Squid feature called If-Modified-Since. In order to use this feature, the Frontier server sends a Last-Modified timestamp, but since modification times are not normally tracked by Oracle databases, a PL/SQL program was developed to track the modification times of database tables. We discuss the details of this caching scheme and the obstacles overcome including database and Squid bugs.

  14. SQUIDs vs. Faraday coils for ultlra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance: experimental and simulation comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kraus, Robert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sayukov, Igor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz, Larry J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wurden, Caroline J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging or MRI. Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in ultra-low field (ULF) regime that requires measurement field strengths only of the order of 1 Gauss. These techniques exploit the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group at LANL has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airports security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR/MRI technique. We describe an experimental and computer simulation comparison of the world's first multichannel SQUID based and Faraday coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquids identification.

  15. SQUIDs vs. Induction Coils for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Experimental and Simulation Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlashov, Andrei N; Schultz, Larry J; Espy, Michelle A; Kraus, Robert H; Savukov, Igor M; Volegov, Petr L; Wurden, Caroline J

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime requiring measurement field strengths of the order of only 1 Gauss. This technique exploits the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airport security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers may provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR technique. We describe experimental and computer-simulation results comparing multichannel SQUID based and induction coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquid identification. PMID:21747638

  16. Chitinolytic Bacteria-Assisted Conversion of Squid Pen and Its Effect on Dyes and Pigments Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Wen Liang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to produce chitosanase by fermenting from squid pen, and recover the fermented squid pen for dye removal by adsorption. One chitosanase induced from squid pen powder (SPP-containing medium by Bacillus cereus TKU034 was purified in high purification fold (441 and high yield of activity recovery (51% by ammonium sulfate precipitation and combined column chromatography. The SDS-PAGE results showed its molecular mass to be around 43 kDa. The TKU034 chitosanase used for the chitooligomers preparation was studied. The enzyme products revealed that the chitosanase could degrade chitosan with various degrees of polymerization, ranging from 3 to 9, as well as the chitosanase in an endolytic manner. Besides, the fermented SPP was recovered and displayed a better adsorption rate (up to 99.5% for the disperse dyes (red, yellow, blue, and black than the water-soluble food colorants, Allura Red AC (R40 and Tartrazine (Y4. The adsorbed R40 on the unfermented SPP and the fermented SPP was eluted by distilled water and 1 M NaOH to confirm the dye adsorption mechanism. The fermented SPP had a slightly higher adsorption capacity than the unfermented, and elution of the dye from the fermented SPP was easier than from the unfermented. The main dye adsorption mechanism of fermented SPP was physical adsorption, while the adsorption mechanism of unfermented SPP was chemical adsorption.

  17. Revealing the potential of squid chitosan-based structures for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reys, L L; Silva, S S; Oliveira, J M; Caridade, S G; Mano, J F; Silva, T H; Reis, R L

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to different marine organisms, namely as potential sources of valuable materials with a vast range of properties and characteristics. In this work, β-chitin was isolated from the endoskeleton of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas and further deacetylated to produce chitosan. Then, the squid chitosan was processed into membranes and scaffolds using solvent casting and freeze-drying, respectively, to assess their potential biomedical application. The developed membranes have shown to be stiffer and less hydrophobic than those obtained with commercial chitosan. On the other hand, the morphological characterization of the developed scaffolds, by SEM and micro-computed tomography, revealed that the matrices were formed with a lamellar structure. The findings also indicated that the treatment with ethanol prior to neutralization with sodium hydroxide caused the formation of larger pores and loss of some lamellar features. The in vitro cell culture study has shown that all chitosan scaffolds exhibited a non-cytotoxic effect over the mouse fibroblast-like cell line, L929 cells. Thus, chitosan produced from the endoskeletons of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas has proven to be a valuable alternative to existing commercial materials when considering its use as biomaterial. PMID:23715133

  18. Onshore-offshore movement of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) on the continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Julia S.; Gilly, William F.; Field, John C.; Payne, John C.

    2013-10-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) have greatly extended their range in the California Current System, where they forage on a variety of ecologically and economically important species that inhabit both coastal and offshore mesopelagic regions. Swimming abilities and behavior are important factors in assessing the impacts of this range expansion, particularly in regard to foraging in conjunction with onshore-offshore movement over the continental shelf. Here we describe a study of horizontal movements by jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf off Washington, USA, using acoustic tags in association with the Census of Marine Life's Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking Program (POST) receiver arrays. We detected frequent movements along the shelf break, movement onto the shelf at night, and no evidence of movement as a cohesive school. Our results demonstrate feasibility of using acoustic tags and arrays to document horizontal movements of jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf. This is important in order to determine how those movements overlap with those of other ecologically and commercially important fish species.

  19. Revealing the potential of squid chitosan-based structures for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, much attention has been given to different marine organisms, namely as potential sources of valuable materials with a vast range of properties and characteristics. In this work, β-chitin was isolated from the endoskeleton of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas and further deacetylated to produce chitosan. Then, the squid chitosan was processed into membranes and scaffolds using solvent casting and freeze-drying, respectively, to assess their potential biomedical application. The developed membranes have shown to be stiffer and less hydrophobic than those obtained with commercial chitosan. On the other hand, the morphological characterization of the developed scaffolds, by SEM and micro-computed tomography, revealed that the matrices were formed with a lamellar structure. The findings also indicated that the treatment with ethanol prior to neutralization with sodium hydroxide caused the formation of larger pores and loss of some lamellar features. The in vitro cell culture study has shown that all chitosan scaffolds exhibited a non-cytotoxic effect over the mouse fibroblast-like cell line, L929 cells. Thus, chitosan produced from the endoskeletons of the giant squid Dosidicus gigas has proven to be a valuable alternative to existing commercial materials when considering its use as biomaterial. (paper)

  20. Trace element concentrations in the top predator jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) from the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos; Rosa, Rui

    2014-04-01

    Jumbo (or Humboldt) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a large jet-propelled top oceanic predator off the Eastern Pacific. The present study reports, for the first time, concentrations of V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Cd and Pb in gills, mantle and digestive gland of this powerful pelagic squid in the Gulf of California. Zinc and Cu were the most abundant elements. All elements, with the exception of As, were largely stored in digestive gland; particularly Cd that reached concentrations between 57 and 509 µg g(-1). Significant relationships between tissues were found for Co (digestive gland-gills), As (gills-mantle) and Cd (digestive gland-mantle). Proportionality of Cd concentrations between mantle and digestive gland suggested that detoxification capacity by digestive gland was insufficient to avoid the transfer of this element to mantle and other tissues. Nonetheless, Cd concentrations in the mantle were always below the regulatory limit and, therefore lack of constraints for human consumption. On the basis of the fishery landings, one may estimate that up to 1t of Cd can be annually removed by jumbo squid fisheries. PMID:24530735

  1. Development of HTS-SQUID Gradiometer with an External HTS Multiturn Thin Film Pickup Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, M.; Tsukamoto, A.; Adachi, S.; Takai, H.; Tanabe, K.

    Highly-sensitive HTS-SQUIDs are applied to various systems such as eddy-current non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and compact magnetometer systems. To avoid unstable operation of the SQUID due to an excitation field, a flux transformer made of normal Cu wire is used to separate the pickup coil and SQUID. However, the resistance of the flux transformer generates thermal noise and reduces the signal bandwidth at low frequencies. In this study, we investigate use of a superconducting flux transformer with resistive connections (SFTR). The SFTR consists of pickup and input coils made of HTS thin films. The two coils are connected by using an HTS coated conductor. The input coil is stacked on an HTS thin film gradiometer. From the measured results of resistances of the connections between each coil and the coated conductor, it was found that the resistance of bonding wire was a dominant component. The estimated resistance of the SFTR was 7.2 mΩ, corresponding to a lower cut-off frequency of 11.7 Hz.

  2. Compatibility of photomultiplier tube operation with SQUIDs for a neutron EDM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libersky, Matthew; nEDM Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    An experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the goal of reducing the experimental limit on the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron will measure the precession frequencies of neutrons when a strong electric field is applied parallel and anti-parallel to a weak magnetic field. A difference in these frequencies would indicate a nonzero neutron EDM. To correct for drifts of the magnetic field in the measurement volume, polarized 3He will be used as a co-magnetometer. In one of the two methods built into the apparatus, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) will be used to read out the 3He magnetization. Photomultiplier tubes will be used concurrently to measure scintillation light from neutron capture by 3He. However, the simultaneous noise-sensitive magnetic field measurement by the SQUIDs makes conventional PMT operation problematic due to the alternating current involved in generating the high voltages needed. Tests were carried out at Los Alamos National Laboratory to study the compatibility of simultaneous SQUID and PMT operation, using a custom battery-powered high-voltage power supply developed by Meyer and Smith (NIM A 647.1) to operate the PMT. The results of these tests will be presented.

  3. Niobium dc SQUID with microstrip input coupling as an amplifier for the axion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The output from the 1.4 K cavity of the axion detector at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently amplified by a cooled semiconductor amplifier with a noise temperature of about 3 K. To achieve a lower system noise temperature, one must cool the cavity to a lower temperature and use an amplifier with a lower noise temperature. An amplifier based on a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) has been developed in which the input signal is coupled to one end of the microstrip formed by the input coil and the body of the SQUID. Gains of up to 20 dB have been achieved in the frequency range 100 - 900 MHz. At 4.2 K and with a room-temperature post-amplifier the system noise temperature ranged from 0.5 K ± 0.3 K at 80 MHz to 3.0 K ± 0.7 K at 500 MHz; particularly at the higher frequencies, the measured noise temperature was determined by the noise temperature of the post-amplifier (about 80 K). With the SQUID cooled to 1.8 K and a cooled high electron mobility transistor, the system noise temperature was reduced to 0.3 K ± 0.1 K at 250 MHz and 0.25 K ± 0.1 K at 365 MHz

  4. The fabrication and performance of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} SQUID magnetometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingston, J.J.

    1992-07-01

    To enhance the SQUID`s field sensitivity, it is coupled to a flux transformer, a closed superconducting circuit consisting of a pickup loop, to which a signal is applied, connected in series to an input coil, which is inductively coupled to the SQUID. To fabricate an optimal flux transformer, one must use more than one superconducting thin-film layer, each of which is patterned into narrow strips or wires. Some wires from different layers cross, yet remain electrically isolated, to form crossovers, while in other places there must be superconducting contact between wires from different layers. Together, the superconducting wire, superconducting-superconducting contact and the superconducting crossover constitute a superconducting interconnect or multilayer wiring technology. We discuss the development of an interconnect technology involving the high transition temperature ({Tc}) superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO). Because of the need for epitaxial growth there are limits on materials for the insulating layer separating the YBCO films in multilayer structures, and on deposition and patterning techniques. We discuss the use of pulsed laser deposition in conjunction with patterning by shadow masks and later by photolithography to produce interconnects, multiturn input coils, and flux transformers. We also discuss the performance of SQUID magnetometers, in which a flux transformer fabricated on one substrate is coupled to a SQUID fabricated on another. The first magnetometers were hybrids -- high {Tc} transformers coupled to low {Tc} SQUIDS, while later ones had both high {Tc} transformers and SQUIDs and could operate immersed in liquid nitrogen. We report on a magnetometer with a magnetic field sensitivity at lHz of about 2pTHz{minus}{sup 1/2} at 77K, that was successfully used to perform magnetocardiograms on human subjects.

  5. Effects of environmental variations on the abundance of western winter-spring cohort of neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) in the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wei; CHEN Xinjun; CHEN Yong; YI Qian; ZHANG Yang

    2015-01-01

    During 1995–2011, annual production of winter-spring cohort ofOmmastrephes bartramii for Chinese squid-jigging fishery has greatly fluctuated, which is closely related to the environmental conditions on the spawning and fishing grounds. To better understand how squid recruitment and abundance were influenced by ocean environmental conditions, biological and physical environmental variables including sea surface temperature (SST), SST anomaly (SSTA), chlorophylla (Chla) concentration and the Kuroshio Current were examined during years with the highest (1999), intermediate (2005), and lowest (2009) catches. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) of the squid-jigging vessels was used as an indicator of squid abundance. The results indicated that high SST and Chla concentration on the spawning ground in 1999 resulted in favorable incubation and feeding conditions for squid recruitment. Whereas the suitable spawning zone (SSZ) in 2009 shifted southward and coincided with low SST and Chla concentration, resulting in a reduction in the squid recruitment. The small difference of SSZ area in the three years suggested the SSZ provided limited influences on the variability in squid recruitment. Furthermore, high squid abundance in 1999 and 2005 was associated with warm SSTA on the fishing ground. While the cool SSTA on the fishing ground in 2009 contributed to adverse habitat for the squid, leading to extremely low abundance. It was inferred that strengthened intensity of the Kuroshio force generally yielded favorable environmental conditions forO. bartramii. Future research are suggested to focus on the fundamental research on the early life stage ofO. bartramii and mechanism of how the ocean-climate variability affects the squid abundance and spatial distribution by coupling physical model with squid biological process to explore transport path and abundance distribution.

  6. Chronic Treatment with Squid Phosphatidylserine Activates Glucose Uptake and Ameliorates TMT-Induced Cognitive Deficit in Rats via Activation of Cholinergic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jung Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of squid phosphatidylserine (Squid-PS on the learning and memory function and the neural activity in rats with TMT-induced memory deficits. The rats were administered saline or squid derived Squid-PS (Squid-PS 50 mg kg−1, p.o. daily for 21 days. The cognitive improving efficacy of Squid-PS on the amnesic rats, which was induced by TMT, was investigated by assessing the passive avoidance task and by performing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT and acetylcholinesterase (AchE immunohistochemistry. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose and performed a positron emission tomography (PET scan was also performed. In the passive avoidance test, the control group which were injected with TMT showed a markedly lower latency time than the non-treated normal group (P<0.05. However, treatment of Squid-PS significantly recovered the impairment of memory compared to the control group (P<0.05. Consistent with the behavioral data, Squid-PS significantly alleviated the loss of ChAT immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampal CA3 compared to that of the control group (P<0.01. Also, Squid-PS significantly increased the AchE positive neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3. In the PET analysis, Squid-PS treatment increased the glucose uptake more than twofold in the frontal lobe and the hippocampus (P<0.05, resp.. These results suggest that Squid-PS may be useful for improving the cognitive function via regulation of cholinergic enzyme activity and neural activity.

  7. Extreme plasticity in life-history strategy allows a migratory predator (jumbo squid) to cope with a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, Henk-Jan T; Gilly, William F; Markaida, Unai; Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; -Brown, Zachary W; Daniel, Patrick; Field, John C; Parassenti, Liz; Liu, Bilin; Campos, Bernardita

    2013-07-01

    Dosidicus gigas (jumbo or Humboldt squid) is a semelparous, major predator of the eastern Pacific that is ecologically and commercially important. In the Gulf of California, these animals mature at large size (>55 cm mantle length) in 1-1.5 years and have supported a major commercial fishery in the Guaymas Basin during the last 20 years. An El Niño event in 2009-2010, was accompanied by a collapse of this fishery, and squid in the region showed major changes in the distribution and life-history strategy. Large squid abandoned seasonal coastal-shelf habitats in 2010 and instead were found in the Salsipuedes Basin to the north, an area buffered from the effects of El Niño by tidal upwelling and a well-mixed water column. The commercial fishery also relocated to this region. Although large squid were not found in the Guaymas Basin from 2010 to 2012, small squid were abundant and matured at an unusually small mantle-length (gigas to rapidly adapt to and cope with El Niño. This ability is likely to be an important factor in conjunction with longerterm climate-change and the potential ecological impacts of this invasive predator on marine ecosystems. PMID:23505049

  8. ESR studies on the thermal decomposition of trimethylamine oxide to formaldehyde and dimethylamine in jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junli; Jia, Jia; Li, Xuepeng; Dong, Liangliang; Li, Jianrong

    2013-12-15

    The effects of ferrous iron, heating temperature and different additives on the decomposition of trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) to formaldehyde (FA) and dimethylamine (DMA) and generation of free radicals in jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) extract during heating were evaluated by electron spin resonance (ESR). The thermal decomposition of TMAO to TMA, DMA and FA and free radical signals was observed in squid extract, whereas no DMA, FA and free radical signals were detected in cod extract or in aqueous TMAO solution in vitro at high temperatures. Significant increase in levels of DMA, FA and radicals intensity were observed in squid extract and TMAO solution in the presence of ferrous iron with increasing temperature. Hydrogen peroxide stimulated the production of DMA, FA and ESR signals in squid extract, while citric acid, trisodium citrate, calcium chloride, tea polyphenols and resveratrol had the opposite effect. Similar ESR spectra of six peaks regarded as amminium radical were detected in the squid extract and TMAO-iron(II) solution, suggesting that the amminium radical was involved in the decomposition of TMAO. PMID:23993561

  9. YBa2Cu3O7-δ dc SQUID array for multichannel magnetometry and multichannel flip-chip current sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have prepared arrays of single-layer washer-type dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) on 10 mm 10 mm bicrystal substrates. Each SQUID in the array is equipped with its own modulation loop, which makes a separate operation of them possible. Arrays containing nine or 11 dc SQUIDs have been tested and the crosstalk between neighbouring channels has been found to be 5%. The field sensitivity of the SQUIDs is 85 nT Φ0-1 and 105 nT Φ0-1 for the nine- and 11-device array, respectively. The equivalent flux noise is typically ≤ 20 μΦ0 Hz-1/2 down to 1 Hz with ac bias reversal. A field resolution of less than 2.1 pT Hz-1/2 has been obtained for at least eight channels on a chip. By using multiturn YBa2Cu3O7-δ input coils and mounting them in a flip-chip configuration together with the single-layer dc SQUIDs we have been able to build three-channel current sensors. The current sensitivity equals 3-3.5 μA Φ0-1 depending on the alignment of the flip-chip configuration. The current resolution of the devices is -1/2. We show the possibility of building sensitive magnetometers by connecting the input coil of these current sensors to a normal-conducting pickup antenna. (author)

  10. Deep-sea in situ observations of gonatid squid and their prey reveal high occurrence of cannibalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, H. J. T.; Robison, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    In situ observations are rarely applied in food web studies of deep-sea organisms. Using deep-sea observations obtained by remotely operated vehicles in the Monterey Submarine Canyon, we examined the prey choices of more than 100 individual squids of the genus Gonatus. Off the California coast, these squids are abundant, semelparous (one reproductive cycle) oceanic predators but their diet has remained virtually unknown. Gonatus onyx and Gonatus berryi were observed to feed on mesopelagic fishes (in particular the myctophid Stenobrachius leucopsarus) as often as on squids but inter-specific differences in feeding were apparent. Gonatids were the most common squid prey and while cannibalism occurred in both species it was particularly high in Gonatus onyx (42% of all prey items). Typically, the size of prey was similar to the size of the predator but the squids were also seen to take much larger prey. Postjuvenile gonatids are opportunistic predators that consume nektonic members of the meso-and bathypelagic communities, including their own species. Such voracious feeding is likely necessary to support the high energetic demands associated with the single reproductive event; and for females the long brooding period during which they must depend on stored resources.

  11. The study on fishing ground of neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartrami, and ocean environment based on remote sensing data in the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wei; WU Yumei; CUI Xuesen

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between the neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartrami, and the relative ocean environmental factors are analyzed. The environmental factors collected are sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll concentration (Chl-a) and sea surface height (SSH) from NASA, as well as the yields of neon flying squid in the North Pacific Ocean. The results show that the favorable temperature for neon flying squid living is 10℃-22℃ and the favorite temperature is between 15℃-17℃. The Chl-a concentration is 0.1-0.6 mg/m3. When Chl-a concentration changes to 0.12-0.14 mg/m3, the probability of forming fishing ground becomes very high. In most fishing grounds,the SSH is higher than the mean SSH. The generalized additive model (GAM) was applied to analyze the correlations between neon flying squid and ocean environmental factors. Every year, squids migrate northward from June to August and return southward during October-November, and the characteristics of the both migrations are very different. When squids migrate to the north, most relationships between the yields and SST are positive. The relationships are negative when squids move to southward. The relationships between the yields and Chl-a concentrations are negative from June to October, and insignificant in November. There is no obvious correlation between the catches of squid and longitude, but good with latitude.

  12. Environmental factors which affect growth of Japanese common squid, Todarodes pacificus, analyzed by a bioenergetics model coupled with a lower trophic ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Michio J.; Nakajima, Kazuto; Fujii, Masahiko; Hashioka, Taketo

    2009-09-01

    Bioenergetics model is applied to Japanese common squid, Todarodes pacificus. The temporal change of wet weight of common squid, which migrates in the Sea of Japan, is simulated. The time dependent horizontal distribution of prey is calculated a priori by 3-D coupled physical-biological model. The biological model NEMURO (North Pacific Ecosystem Model for Understanding Regional Oceanography) is used to simulate the lower-trophic ecosystem including three kinds of zooplankton biomass two of which is used as prey of common squid. A bioenergetics model reproduced appropriate growth curve of common squid, migrating in the North Pacific and the Sea of Japan. The results show that the wet weight of common squid in the northern Sea of Japan is heavier than that migrating in the central Sea of Japan, because prey density of the northern Sea of Japan is higher than that of the central Sea of Japan. We also investigate the wet weight anomaly for a global warming scenario. In this case, wet weight of common squid decreases because water temperature exceeds the optimum temperature for common squid. This result indicates that migration route and spawning area of common squid might change with global warming.

  13. Flux-coherent series SQUID array magnetometers operating above 77 K with superior white flux noise than single-SQUIDs at 4.2 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesca, Boris, E-mail: B.Chesca@lboro.ac.uk; John, Daniel [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Mellor, Christopher J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham University, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-19

    A very promising direction to improve the sensitivity of magnetometers based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is to build a series-array of N non-interacting SQUIDs operating flux-coherently, because in this case their voltage modulation depth, ΔV, linearly scales with N whereas the white flux noise S{sub Φ}{sup 1/2} decreases as 1/N{sup 1/2}. Here, we report the realization of both these improvements in an advanced layout of very large SQUID arrays made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Specially designed with large area narrow flux focusers for increased field sensitivity and improved flux-coherency, our arrays have extremely low values for S{sub Φ}{sup 1/2} between (0.25 and 0.44) μΦ{sub 0}/Hz{sup 1/2} for temperatures in the range (77–83) K. In this respect, they outperform niobium/aluminium trilayer technology-based single-SQUIDs operating at 4.2 K. Moreover, with values for ΔV and transimpedance in the range of (10–17) mV and (0.3–2.5) kΩ, respectively, a direct connection to a low-noise room temperature amplifier is allowed, while matching for such readout is simplified and the available bandwidth is greatly increased. These landmark performances suggest such series SQUID arrays are ideal candidates to replace single-SQUIDs operating at 4.2 K in many applications.

  14. Influence of inductance induced noise in an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID at high operation temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, P. Å.; Claeson, T.; Hansen, J. B.;

    1994-01-01

    The voltage modulation depth of a high T(c) dc-SQUID was measured at temperatures close to T(c) and compared to a model by Enpuku et al. where the flux noise from the SQUID inductance is taken into account. The device was an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID made on a bicrystal substrate of SrTiO3. The design...... was of the Ketchen square-washer type with an inductance of 67 pH. Measurements were made in a temperature interval from 75 to 87 K, where the voltage modulation depth changed from 4.5 to 1.4 muV in close agreement with the model....

  15. Fabrication of high sensitivity 3D nanoSQUIDs based on a focused ion beam sculpting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Lacquaniti, Vincenzo; Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a nanofabrication process, based on a focused ion beam (FIB) nanosculpting technique, for high sensitivity three-dimensional nanoscale superconducting quantum interference devices (nanoSQUIDs) is reported. The crucial steps of the fabrication process are described, as are some peculiar features of the superconductor-normal metal-insulator-superconductor (SNIS) Josephson junctions, which may useful for applications in cryocooler systems. This fabrication procedure is employed to fabricate sandwich nanojunctions and high sensitivity nanoSQUIDs. Specifically, the superconductive nanosensors have a rectangular loop of 1 × 0.2-0.4 μm2 interrupted by two square Nb/Al-AlO x /Nb SNIS Josephson junctions with side lengths of 0.3 μm. The characterization of a typical nanoSQUID has been carried out and a spectral density of magnetic flux noise as low as 0.8 μΦ0 Hz-1/2 has been measured.

  16. Analysis of the tenderisation of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) meat by ultrasonic treatment using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaqin; Yu, Hiaxia; Dong, Kaicheng; Yang, Shuibing; Ye, Xingqian; Chen, Shiguo

    2014-10-01

    Due to its unique structure, jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) meat is sensitive to heat treatment, which makes the traditional squid products taste tough and hard. This study aimed to tenderise jumbo squid meat through ultrasonic treatment. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to predict the tenderising effect of various treatment conditions. According to the results of RSM, the optimal conditions appeared to be a power of 186.9 W, a frequency of 25.6 kHz, and a time of 30.8 min, and the predicted values of flexibility and firmness under these optimal conditions were 2.40 mm and 435.1 g, respectively. Protein degradation and a broken muscle fibre structure were observed through histological assay and SDS-PAGE, which suggests a satisfactory tenderisation effect. PMID:24799231

  17. Conformational changes in proteins recovered from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle through pH shift washing treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Ramírez-Suárez, Juan C; Lugo-Sánchez, Maria E; García-Orozco, Karina D; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Peña-Ramos, Aida

    2016-04-01

    Conformational and thermal-rheological properties of acidic (APC) and neutral (NPC) protein concentrates were evaluated and compared to those of squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle proteins (SM). Surface hydrophobicity, sulfhydryl status, secondary structure profile, differential scanning calorimetry and oscillatory dynamic rheology were used to evaluate the effect of treatments on protein properties. Acidic condition during the washing process (APC) promoted structural and conformational changes in the protein present in the concentrate produced. These changes were enhanced during the heat setting of the corresponding sol. Results demonstrate that washing squid muscle under the proposed acidic conditions is a feasible technological alternative for squid-based surimi production improving its yield and gel-forming ability. PMID:26593553

  18. Fabrication of high sensitivity 3D nanoSQUIDs based on a focused ion beam sculpting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Lacquaniti, Vincenzo; Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a nanofabrication process, based on a focused ion beam (FIB) nanosculpting technique, for high sensitivity three-dimensional nanoscale superconducting quantum interference devices (nanoSQUIDs) is reported. The crucial steps of the fabrication process are described, as are some peculiar features of the superconductor–normal metal–insulator–superconductor (SNIS) Josephson junctions, which may useful for applications in cryocooler systems. This fabrication procedure is employed to fabricate sandwich nanojunctions and high sensitivity nanoSQUIDs. Specifically, the superconductive nanosensors have a rectangular loop of 1 × 0.2–0.4 μm2 interrupted by two square Nb/Al–AlO x /Nb SNIS Josephson junctions with side lengths of 0.3 μm. The characterization of a typical nanoSQUID has been carried out and a spectral density of magnetic flux noise as low as 0.8 μΦ0 Hz–1/2 has been measured.

  19. Operation of a high-T C SQUID gradiometer with a two-stage MEMS-based Joule-Thomson micro-cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalabukhov, Alexey; de Hoon, Erik-Jan; Kuit, Kristiaan; Lerou, Pieter-Paul P. P. M.; Chukharkin, Maxim; Schneiderman, Justin F.; Sepehri, Sobhan; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Jesorka, Aldo; Winkler, Dag

    2016-09-01

    Practical applications of high-T C superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) require cheap, simple in operation, and cryogen-free cooling. Mechanical cryo-coolers are generally not suitable for operation with SQUIDs due to their inherent magnetic and vibrational noise. In this work, we utilized a commercial Joule-Thomson microfluidic two-stage cooling system with base temperature of 75 K. We achieved successful operation of a bicrystal high-T C SQUID gradiometer in shielded magnetic environment. The micro-cooler head contains neither moving nor magnetic parts, and thus does not affect magnetic flux noise of the SQUID even at low frequencies. Our results demonstrate that such a microfluidic cooling system is a promising technology for cooling of high-T C SQUIDs in practical applications such as magnetic bioassays.

  20. Operation of a high-T C SQUID gradiometer with a two-stage MEMS-based Joule–Thomson micro-cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalabukhov, Alexey; de Hoon, Erik-Jan; Kuit, Kristiaan; Lerou, Pieter-Paul P. P. M.; Chukharkin, Maxim; Schneiderman, Justin F.; Sepehri, Sobhan; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Jesorka, Aldo; Winkler, Dag

    2016-09-01

    Practical applications of high-T C superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) require cheap, simple in operation, and cryogen-free cooling. Mechanical cryo-coolers are generally not suitable for operation with SQUIDs due to their inherent magnetic and vibrational noise. In this work, we utilized a commercial Joule–Thomson microfluidic two-stage cooling system with base temperature of 75 K. We achieved successful operation of a bicrystal high-T C SQUID gradiometer in shielded magnetic environment. The micro-cooler head contains neither moving nor magnetic parts, and thus does not affect magnetic flux noise of the SQUID even at low frequencies. Our results demonstrate that such a microfluidic cooling system is a promising technology for cooling of high-T C SQUIDs in practical applications such as magnetic bioassays.

  1. A SQUID-Based RF Cavity Search for Dark Matter Axions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Michael T.

    The axion is a hypothetical elementary particle resulting from a solution to the "Strong-CP" problem. This serious problem in the standard model of particle physics is manifested as a 1010 discrepancy between the measured upper limit and the calculated value of the neutron's electric dipole moment. Furthermore, a light (~mueV) axion is an ideal dark matter candidate: axions would have been copiously produced during the Big Bang and would be the primary component of the dark matter in the universe. The resolution of the Strong-CP problem and the discovery of the composition of dark matter are two of the most pressing problems in physics. The observation of a light, dark-matter axion would resolve both of these problems. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) is the most sensitive search for dark-matter axions. Axions in our Milky Way Galaxy may scatter off a magnetic field and convert into microwave photons. ADMX consists of a tunable high-Q RF cavity within the bore of a large, 8.5 Tesla superconducting solenoidal magnet. When the cavity's resonant frequency matches the axion's total energy, the probability of axion-to-photon conversion is enhanced. The cavity's narrow bandwidth requires ADMX to slowly scan possible axion masses. A receiver amplifies, mixes, and digitizes the power developed in the cavity from possible axion-to-photon conversions. This is the most sensitive spectral receiver of microwave radiation in the world. The resulting data is scrutinized for an axion signal above the thermal background. ADMX first operated from 1995-2005 and produced exclusion limits on the energy of dark-matter axions from 1.9 mueV to 3.3 mueV. In order to improve on these limits and continue the search for plausible dark-matter axions, the system was considerably upgraded from 2005 until 2008. In the upgrade, the key technical advance was the use of a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) as a microwave amplifier. The SQUID amplifier's noise level is near

  2. A novel squid pen chitosan/hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate composite for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squid pen chitosan was used in the fabrication of biocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Hydroxyapatite (HA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) obtained from waste mussel shells were used as the calcium phosphate source. The composite was prepared using 2.5% tripolyphosphate (TPP) and 1% glycerol as a cross-linker and plasticizer, respectively. The weight percent (wt.%) ratios of the ceramic components in the composite were 20/10/70, 30/20/50 and 40/30/30 (HA/β-TCP/Chi). The biodegradation rate and structural properties of the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microCT(μCT) results indicated that the composites have a well defined lamellar structure with an average pore size of 200 μm. The porosity of the composites decreased from 88 to 56% by increasing the ratio of HA/β-TCP from 30 to 70%. After 28 days of incubation in a physiological solution, the scaffolds were degraded by approximately 30%. In vitro investigations showed that the composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of L929 and Saos-2 cells. The obtained data suggests that the squid pen chitosan composites are potential candidates for bone regeneration. - Highlights: • Biocomposite scaffolds were made from mussel shells HA and β-TCP, and squid pin chitosan. • The porosity of the composites decreased with an increase in HA/β-TCP ratio. • Composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of L929 and Saos-2 cells. • Composite containing 50% HA and β-TCP had the best mechanical properties

  3. CO2-level Dependent Effects of Ocean Acidification on Squid, Doryteuthis pealeii, Early Life History

    KAUST Repository

    Zakroff, Casey J.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to lead to global oceanic decreases in pH of up to 0.3 units within the next 100 years. However, those levels are already being reached currently in coastal regions due to natural CO2 variability. Squid are a vital component of the pelagic ecosystem, holding a unique niche as a highly active predatory invertebrate and major prey stock for upper trophic levels. This study examined the effects of a range of ocean acidification regimes on the early life history of a coastal squid species, the Atlantic longfin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. Eggs were raised in a flow-through ocean acidification system at CO2 levels ranging from ambient (400ppm) to 2200ppm. Time to hatching, hatching efficiency, and hatchling mantle lengths, yolk sac sizes, and statoliths were all examined to elucidate stress effects. Delays in hatching time of at least a day were seen at exposures above 1300ppm in all trials under controlled conditions. Mantle lengths were significantly reduced at exposures above 1300 ppm. Yolk sac sizes varied between CO2 treatments, but no distinct pattern emerged. Statoliths were increasingly porous and malformed as CO2 exposures increased, and were significantly reduced in surface area at exposures above 1300ppm. Doryteuthis pealeii appears to be able to withstand acidosis stress without major effects up to 1300ppm, but is strongly impacted past that threshold. Since yolk consumption did not vary among treatments, it appears that during its early life stages, D. pealeii reallocates its available energy budget away from somatic growth and system development in order to mitigate the stress of acidosis.

  4. Role of aerobic and anaerobic circular mantle muscle fibers in swimming squid: electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartol, I K

    2001-02-01

    Circular mantle muscle of squids and cuttlefishes consists of distinct zones of aerobic and anaerobic muscle fibers that are thought to have functional roles analogous to red and white muscle in fishes. To test predictions of the functional role of the circular muscle zones during swimming, electromyograms (EMGs) in conjunction with video footage were recorded from brief squid Lolliguncula brevis (5.0-6.8 cm dorsal mantle length, 10.9-18.3 g) swimming in a flume at speeds of 3-27 cm s(-1). In one set of experiments, in which EMGs were recorded from electrodes intersecting both the central anaerobic and peripheral aerobic circular mantle muscles, electrical activity was detected during each mantle contraction at all swimming speeds, and the amplitude and frequency of responses increased with speed. In another set of experiments, in which EMGs were recorded from electrodes placed in the central anaerobic circular muscle fibers alone, electrical activity was not detected during mantle contraction until speeds of about 15 cm s(-1), when EMG activity was sporadic. At speeds greater than 15 cm s(-1), the frequency of central circular muscle activity subsequently increased with swimming speed until maximum speeds of 21-27 cm s(-1), when muscular activity coincided with the majority of mantle contractions. These results indicate that peripheral aerobic circular muscle is used for low, intermediate, and probably high speeds, whereas central anaerobic circular muscle is recruited at intermediate speeds and used progressively more with speed for powerful, unsteady jetting. This is significant because it suggests that there is specialization and efficient use of locomotive muscle in squids.

  5. Digitally controlled high-performance dc SQUID readout electronics for a 304-channel vector magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechstein, S.; Petsche, F.; Scheiner, M.; Drung, D.; Thiel, F.; Schnabel, A.; Schurig, Th

    2006-06-01

    Recently, we have developed a family of dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) readout electronics for several applications. These electronics comprise a low-noise preamplifier followed by an integrator, and an analog SQUID bias circuit. A highly-compact low-power version with a flux-locked loop bandwidth of 0.3 MHz and a white noise level of 1 nV/√Hz was specially designed for a 304-channel low-Tc dc SQUID vector magnetometer, intended to operate in the new Berlin Magnetically Shielded Room (BMSR-2). In order to minimize the space needed to mount the electronics on top of the dewar and to minimize the power consumption, we have integrated four electronics channels on one 3 cm × 10 cm sized board. Furthermore we embedded the analog components of these four channels into a digitally controlled system including an in-system programmable microcontroller. Four of these integrated boards were combined to one module with a size of 4 cm × 4 cm × 16 cm. 19 of these modules were implemented, resulting in a total power consumption of about 61 W. To initialize the 304 channels and to service the system we have developed software tools running on a laptop computer. By means of these software tools the microcontrollers are fed with all required data such as the working points, the characteristic parameters of the sensors (noise, voltage swing), or the sensor position inside of the vector magnetometer system. In this paper, the developed electronics including the software tools are described, and first results are presented.

  6. A novel squid pen chitosan/hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate composite for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavandi, Amin, E-mail: amin.shavandi@postgrad.otago.ac.nz [Department of Food Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Department of Applied Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A. [Department of Food Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Sun, Zhifa; Ali, Azam [Department of Physics, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Gould, Maree [Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand)

    2015-10-01

    Squid pen chitosan was used in the fabrication of biocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Hydroxyapatite (HA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) obtained from waste mussel shells were used as the calcium phosphate source. The composite was prepared using 2.5% tripolyphosphate (TPP) and 1% glycerol as a cross-linker and plasticizer, respectively. The weight percent (wt.%) ratios of the ceramic components in the composite were 20/10/70, 30/20/50 and 40/30/30 (HA/β-TCP/Chi). The biodegradation rate and structural properties of the scaffolds were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microCT(μCT) results indicated that the composites have a well defined lamellar structure with an average pore size of 200 μm. The porosity of the composites decreased from 88 to 56% by increasing the ratio of HA/β-TCP from 30 to 70%. After 28 days of incubation in a physiological solution, the scaffolds were degraded by approximately 30%. In vitro investigations showed that the composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of L929 and Saos-2 cells. The obtained data suggests that the squid pen chitosan composites are potential candidates for bone regeneration. - Highlights: • Biocomposite scaffolds were made from mussel shells HA and β-TCP, and squid pin chitosan. • The porosity of the composites decreased with an increase in HA/β-TCP ratio. • Composites were cytocompatible and supported the growth of L929 and Saos-2 cells. • Composite containing 50% HA and β-TCP had the best mechanical properties.

  7. The fabrication and performance of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] SQUID magnetometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingston, J.J.

    1992-07-01

    To enhance the SQUID's field sensitivity, it is coupled to a flux transformer, a closed superconducting circuit consisting of a pickup loop, to which a signal is applied, connected in series to an input coil, which is inductively coupled to the SQUID. To fabricate an optimal flux transformer, one must use more than one superconducting thin-film layer, each of which is patterned into narrow strips or wires. Some wires from different layers cross, yet remain electrically isolated, to form crossovers, while in other places there must be superconducting contact between wires from different layers. Together, the superconducting wire, superconducting-superconducting contact and the superconducting crossover constitute a superconducting interconnect or multilayer wiring technology. We discuss the development of an interconnect technology involving the high transition temperature ([Tc]) superconductor YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-x] (YBCO). Because of the need for epitaxial growth there are limits on materials for the insulating layer separating the YBCO films in multilayer structures, and on deposition and patterning techniques. We discuss the use of pulsed laser deposition in conjunction with patterning by shadow masks and later by photolithography to produce interconnects, multiturn input coils, and flux transformers. We also discuss the performance of SQUID magnetometers, in which a flux transformer fabricated on one substrate is coupled to a SQUID fabricated on another. The first magnetometers were hybrids -- high [Tc] transformers coupled to low [Tc] SQUIDS, while later ones had both high [Tc] transformers and SQUIDs and could operate immersed in liquid nitrogen. We report on a magnetometer with a magnetic field sensitivity at lHz of about 2pTHz[minus][sup 1/2] at 77K, that was successfully used to perform magnetocardiograms on human subjects.

  8. Mitochondrial genome diversity and population structure of the giant squid Architeuthis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkelmann, Inger; Campos, Paula F; Strugnell, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    Despite its charismatic appeal to both scientists and the general public, remarkably little is known about the giant squid Architeuthis, one of the largest of the invertebrates. Although specimens of Architeuthis are becoming more readily available owing to the advancement of deep-sea fishing...... information to provide new and otherwise difficult to obtain insights into the life of this animal. The results show no detectable phylogenetic structure at the mitochondrial level and, furthermore, that the level of nucleotide diversity is exceptionally low. These observations are consistent...

  9. Preparation of Macroscopic Quantum Superposition States of Cavity Modes Using rf-SQUIDs in a Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo

    2008-01-01

    We propose a potential scheme of preparing Schrodinger-cat state of the cavity mode by placing an rf-superconducting quantum interference device (rf-SQUID) in a single-mode microwave cavity. By properly adjusting the detuning and the strength regarding the radiation fields, we show how to generate single-mode Schrodinger-eat state. Generalizing this method we discuss the generation of the engtangled coherent states. The experimental feasibility of our scheme is discussed under consideration of the cavity decay.

  10. BabySQUID: A mobile, high-resolution multichannel magnetoencephalography system for neonatal brain assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Pratt, Kevin; Atwood, Christopher; Mascarenas, Anthony; Reineman, Richard; Nurminen, Jussi; Paulson, Douglas

    2006-02-01

    We developed a prototype of a mobile, high-resolution, multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, called babySQUID, for assessing brain functions in newborns and infants. Unlike electroencephalography, MEG signals are not distorted by the scalp or the fontanels and sutures in the skull. Thus, brain activity can be measured and localized with MEG as if the sensors were above an exposed brain. The babySQUID is housed in a moveable cart small enough to be transported from one room to another. To assess brain functions, one places the baby on the bed of the cart and the head on its headrest with MEG sensors just below. The sensor array consists of 76 first-order axial gradiometers, each with a pickup coil diameter of 6mm and a baseline of 30mm, in a high-density array with a spacing of 12-14mm center-to-center. The pickup coils are 6±1mm below the outer surface of the headrest. The short gap provides unprecedented sensitivity since the scalp and skull are thin (as little as 3-4mm altogether) in babies. In an electromagnetically unshielded room in a hospital, the field sensitivity at 1kHz was ˜17fT/√Hz. The noise was reduced from ˜400to200fT/√Hz at 1Hz using a reference cancellation technique and further to ˜40fT/√Hz using a gradient common mode rejection technique. Although the residual environmental magnetic noise interfered with the operation of the babySQUID, the instrument functioned sufficiently well to detect spontaneous brain signals from babies with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of as much as 7.6:1. In a magnetically shielded room, the field sensitivity was 17fT/√Hz at 20Hz and 30fT/√Hz at 1Hz without implementation of reference or gradient cancellation. The sensitivity was sufficiently high to detect spontaneous brain activity from a 7month old baby with a SNR as much as 40:1 and evoked somatosensory responses with a 50Hz bandwidth after as little as four averages. We expect that both the noise and the sensor gap can be reduced further by

  11. Multi-Channel SQUID System for MEG and Ultra-Low-Field MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Espy, Michelle A.; Mosher, John C.; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Newman, Shaun G.; Kraus Jr, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    A seven-channel system capable of performing both magnetoencephalography (MEG) and ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI) is described. The system consists of seven second-order SQUID gradiometers with 37 mm diameter and 60 mm baseline, having magnetic field resolution of 1.2-2.8 fT/rtHz. It also includes four sets of coils for 2-D Fourier imaging with pre-polarization. The system's MEG performance was demonstrated by measurements of auditory evoked response. The system was also...

  12. Non-Demolition Dispersive Measurement of a Superconducting Qubit with a Microstrip SQUID Amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Kinion, D; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the possibility of a single-shot non-demolition measurement of a superconducting qubit using a microstrip SQUID amplifier (MSA). The Johnson noise generated by all resistors in the MSA is taken into consideration. We show that a single-shot non-demolition measurement is possible with six photons in the measurement resonator. For a phase qubit inductively coupled to a measurement resonator we have obtained the expression for the mutual inductance required for measurement of the qubit state.

  13. Sensory, chemical and bacteriological changes during storage of iced squid ( Todaropsis eblanae )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paarup, T.; Sanchez, J.A.; Moral, A.;

    2002-01-01

    psychrophilic and had a requirement for NaCl. 16S rDNA sequence analyses identified the strains as belonging to the genus Pseudoalteromonas . Shewanella putrefaciens , Pseudoalteromonas sp. and Pseudomonas sp. dominated in spoiled gutted squid. Identification of strains from the stomach and digestive gland...... to spoilage through activity in the digestive gland, followed by diffusion of volatile compounds and amines to the mantle. Significance and Impact of the Study: Due to the psychrophilic nature of P. phosphoreum and Pseudoalteromonas sp., spread- plating and low temperature incubation are recommended...

  14. Untersuchungen zur störarmen Pulsrohr-Kühlung hochempfindlicher SQUID-Magnetometer aus Hochtemperatursupraleitern

    OpenAIRE

    Lienerth, Christian

    2001-01-01

    Die kommerzielle Einführung bzw. Akzeptanz von supraleitenden Anwendungen ist eng verbunden mit der Verfügbarkeit einer angemessenen Kältemaschine, welche einen kontinuierlichen Betrieb des Systems ermöglicht, ohne Nachfüllintervalle von flüssigen Kryogen wie z.B. flüssigen Stickstoff oder flüssiges Helium. Zur Kühlung von hochempfindlichen HT-SQUID Sensoren hat das Kühlsysteme eine Reihe von strengen Anforderungen zu erfüllen, welche die vom Kühlsystem ausgehenden Störsignale betref...

  15. Low frequency noise in small-area tunnel junction dc SQUIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The noise in a small-area tunnel junction dc SQUID fabricated with a 2.5 μm Pb-alloy technology has been measured in the frequency interval 0.5 Hz -0.9 at 1.6 K, and epsilon α f-0.75 at 4.2 K. The presence of the increased noise at lower frequencies can be understood in terms of a thermal fluctuation model in which equilibrium temperature fluctuations modulate junction critical currents. (orig.)

  16. Chemical and Functional Characterization of Sarcoplasmic Proteins from Giant Squid (Dosidicus gigas) Mantle

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Linda Lopez-Enriquez; Victor Manuel Ocano-Higuera; Wilfrido Torres-Arreola; Josafat Marina Ezquerra-Brauer; Enrique Marquez-Rios

    2015-01-01

    Modification of pH and NaCl concentration changed the physicochemical properties of sarcoplasmic proteins (SP) from jumbo squid mantle and consequently their functional properties. Better results of emulsifying activity index (EAI) and foam capacity (FC) were exhibited at pH 11 in NaCl absence due to higher solubility. But better emulsifying stability index (ESI) was obtained at pH 11 in 0.5 M NaCl, while, foaming stability (FS) was better at pH near to isoelectric point (pI). These results s...

  17. Invasive range expansion by the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, in the eastern North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidberg, Louis D; Robison, Bruce H

    2007-07-31

    A unique 16-year time series of deep video surveys in Monterey Bay reveals that the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, has substantially expanded its perennial geographic range in the eastern North Pacific by invading the waters off central California. This sustained range expansion coincides with changes in climate-linked oceanographic conditions and a reduction in competing top predators. It is also coincident with a decline in the abundance of Pacific hake, the most important commercial groundfish species off western North America. Recognizing the interactive effects of multiple changes in the environment is an issue of growing concern in ocean conservation and sustainability research. PMID:17646649

  18. Diet of the minimal armhook squid (Berryteuthis anonychus) (Cephalopoda: Gonatidae) in the northeast Pacific during spring

    OpenAIRE

    Uchikawa, Kazuhisa; Bower, John R.; Yasuko SATO; Sakurai, Yasunori

    2004-01-01

    The stomach contents of the minimal armhook squid (Berryteuthis anonychus) were examined for 338 specimens captured in the northeast Pacific during May 1999. The specimens were collected at seven stations between 145−165°W and 39−49°N and ranged in mantle length from 10.3 to 102.2 mm. Their diet comprised seven major prey groups (copepods, chaetognaths, amphipods, euphausiids, ostracods, unidentified fish, and unidentified gelatinous prey) and was dominated by copepods and chaetognaths. Co...

  19. High-temperature superconducting YBCO dc SQUID gradiometers fabricated on STO bicrystal substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, C.; Eulenburg, A.; Romans, E.J.; Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    HTS dc gradiometers have been fabricated with slots and flux dams in their SQUID washers. Using a single layer of YBCO, the gradient sensitivity is limited by the sensing magnetometer in the centre of the structure. The spatial response of such devices has been measured experimentally indicating that single layer devices, in terms of gradient sensitivity, have characteristics that deviate slightly from idealized first order gradiometers. The flux noise of these devices is discussed with particular emphasis on their unshielded low frequency noise properties. We also discuss the effect of different cooldown procedures on the flux noise. (author)

  20. Micro-SQUIDs based on MgB2 nano-bridges for NEMS readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolli, L.; Li, T.; Portesi, C.; Taralli, E.; Acharya, N.; Chen, K.; Rajteri, M.; Cox, D.; Monticone, E.; Gallop, J.; Hao, L.

    2016-10-01

    We show the results obtained from the fabrication and characterisation of MgB2 loops with two nano-bridges as superconducting weak links. These ring structures are made to operate as superconducting quantum interference devices and are investigated as readout system for cryogenics NEMS resonators. The nano-constrictions are fabricated by EBL and ion beam milling. The SQUIDs are characterised at different temperatures and measurements of the noise levels have been performed. The devices show high critical current densities and voltage modulations under applied magnetic field, close to the critical temperatures.

  1. Wormhole spacetimes, CTCs and chronology protection in a dc-SQUID array

    CERN Document Server

    Sabín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We present an analog quantum simulator of spacetimes containing traversable wormholes. A suitable spatial dependence in the external bias of a dc-SQUID array mimics the propagation of light in a 1D wormhole background. The impedance of the array places severe limitations on the type of spacetime that we are able to implement. However, we find that wormhole throat radius in the sub-mm range are achievable. We show how to modify this spacetime in order to allow the existence of closed timelike curves. The quantum fluctuations of the phase associated to the finite array impedance might be seen as an analogue of Hawking's chronology protection mechanism.

  2. Magnetic properties of thin Ni films measured by a dc SQUID-based magnetic microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snigirev, O.V.; Andreev, K.E.; Tishin, A.M.;

    1997-01-01

    We have applied a scanning HTS (high-temperature superconductor) de SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) -based magnetic microscope to study the magnetic properties of Au/Ni/Si(100) films in the thickness range from 8 to 200 Angstrom at T = 77 K. A one-domain structure with in......-plane orientation of the magnetic moment was found for film thicknesses exceeding 26 Angstrom. A drastic decrease of the magnetization of the film was detected when the thickness is less than 26 Angstrom....

  3. High intracellular pH reversibly prevents gating-charge immobilization in squid axons.

    OpenAIRE

    E. Wanke; Testa, P L; Prestipino, G; Carbone, E

    1983-01-01

    Squid giant axons were used to study the reversible effects of high intracellular pH (pHi) on gating currents. Under depolarization, when Na channels are activated, internal solutions buffered at high pHi (10.2) affect considerably the time course of gating charge associated with channel closing, QOFF, with almost no alteration of QON records. In particular, at pHi 10.2 the charge corresponding to the fast phase of IgOFF, measured after long depolarizing pulses (7.7 ms), was consistently larg...

  4. Hydroacoustic survey of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas in the Gulf of California during March and September-October 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Carlos J.; Laura Avilés-Díaz; Jaime Gómez-Gutiérrez; César Salinas-Zavala; Susana Camarillo-Coop; Arminda Mejia-Rebollo

    2014-01-01

    The horizontal and vertical distribution and the dorsal mantle length (DML) of the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) were investigated in the Gulf of California (26-33 °N) during March and September-October 2010 using a Simrad EY-60 echosounder (120 kHz split beam transducer) and jig sampling. During March jumbo squids were captured and echo-detected off Santa Rosalía and around and south of the Grandes Islas region, in regions where satellite sea surface temperatures ranged between 16.5 and 18 °...

  5. EPR and SQUID studies on magnetic properties of SiO2-doped Ni-Zn ferrite nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of the silica content and temperature on the magnetic properties of Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4/SiO2 nanocomposites have been studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technique. The content of TEOS in the starting solution affects the interaction between NiZn ferrite and silica, and then determines the particle size and the EPR properties. In addition, the SQUID properties of the composites were sensitive to particle size. It was observed that the saturation magnetization (M s), remnant magnetization (M r) and initial susceptibility (χ i) decreased with increasing SiO2 content

  6. Tunable microstrip SQUID amplifiers for the Gen 2 Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelley, Sean; Hilton, Gene; Clarke, John

    We present a series of tunable microstrip SQUID amplifiers (MSAs) for installation in ADMX. The axion dark matter candidate is detected via Primakoff conversion to a microwave photon in a high-Q (~100,000) tunable microwave cavity cooled with a dilution refrigerator in the presence of a 7-tesla magnetic field. The microwave photon frequency ν is a function of the unknown axion mass, so both the cavity and amplifier must be scanned over a wide frequency range. An MSA is a linear, phase-preserving amplifier consisting of a superconducting, resonant microstrip flux-coupled to a resistively-shunted dc SQUID biased into the voltage state. Tunability is achieved by terminating the microstrip with low inductance GaAs varactor diodes that operate below 100 mK. By varying the bias voltage of the varactors we vary their capacitance, allowing a reflected phase varying from nearly 0 to π, thus achieving a tunability close to a factor of 2. We demonstrate several devices operating below 100 mK, matched to the discrete operating bands of ADMX at frequencies ranging from 560 MHz to 1 GHz, that exhibit gains exceeding 20 dB. The associated noise temperatures, measured with a hot/cold load, approach the standard quantum limit (hν/kB) for a linear phase-preserving amplifier.

  7. A Helmet-type MEG System with 1st order SQUID Gradiometer Located in Vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fabricated a helmet type magnetoencephalogrphy(MEG) with a 1st order gradiometer in vacuum to improve the signal-to-noise ratio(SNR) and the boil-off rate of liquid helium(LHe). The axial type first-order gradiometer was fabricated with a double relaxation oscillation SQUID(DROS) sensor which was directly connected with a pickup coil. The neck space of LHe dewar was made to be smaller than that of a conventional dewar, but the LHe boil-off ratio appeared to increase. To reduce the temperature of low Tc SQUID sensor and pickup coil to 9 K, a metal shield made of, such as copper, brass or aluminum, have been usually used for thermal transmission. But the metal shield exhibited high thermal noise and eddy current fluctuation. We quantified the thermal noise and the eddy current fluctuation of metal. In this experiment, we used the bobbin which was made of an alumina to wind Nb superconductive wire for pickup coil and the average noise of coil-in-vacuum type MEG system was 3.5 fT/Hz1/2. Finally, we measured the auditory evoked signal to prove the reliability of coil-in-vacuum type MEG system.

  8. Squids old and young: Scale-free design for a simple billboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Squids employ a large range of brightness-contrast spatial frequencies in their camouflage and signalling displays. The 'billboard' of coloured elements ('spots'=chromatophore organs) in the skin is built autopoietically-probably by lateral inhibitory processes-and enlarges as much as 10,000-fold during development. The resulting two-dimensional array is a fractal-like colour/size hierarchy lying in several layers of a multilayered network. Dynamic control of the array by muscles and nerves produces patterns that recall 'half-tone' processing (cf. ink-jet printer). In the more sophisticated (loliginid) squids, patterns also combine 'continuous tones' (cf. dye-sublimation printer). Physiologists and engineers can exploit the natural colour-coding of the integument to understand nerve and muscle system dynamics, examined here at the level of the ensemble. Integrative functions of the whole (H) are analysed in terms of the power spectrum within and between ensembles and of spontaneous waves travelling through the billboard. Video material may be obtained from the author at the above address.

  9. Adverse effects of ocean acidification on early development of squid (Doryteuthis pealeii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell B Kaplan

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 is being absorbed into the ocean, altering seawater chemistry, with potentially negative impacts on a wide range of marine organisms. The early life stages of invertebrates with internal and external aragonite structures may be particularly vulnerable to this ocean acidification. Impacts to cephalopods, which form aragonite cuttlebones and statoliths, are of concern because of the central role they play in many ocean ecosystems and because of their importance to global fisheries. Atlantic longfin squid (Doryteuthis pealeii, an ecologically and economically valuable taxon, were reared from eggs to hatchlings (paralarvae under ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations in replicated experimental trials. Animals raised under elevated pCO2 demonstrated significant developmental changes including increased time to hatching and shorter mantle lengths, although differences were small. Aragonite statoliths, critical for balance and detecting movement, had significantly reduced surface area and were abnormally shaped with increased porosity and altered crystal structure in elevated pCO2-reared paralarvae. These developmental and physiological effects could alter squid paralarvae behavior and survival in the wild, directly and indirectly impacting marine food webs and commercial fisheries.

  10. Adverse effects of ocean acidification on early development of squid (Doryteuthis pealeii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Maxwell B; Mooney, T Aran; McCorkle, Daniel C; Cohen, Anne L

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is being absorbed into the ocean, altering seawater chemistry, with potentially negative impacts on a wide range of marine organisms. The early life stages of invertebrates with internal and external aragonite structures may be particularly vulnerable to this ocean acidification. Impacts to cephalopods, which form aragonite cuttlebones and statoliths, are of concern because of the central role they play in many ocean ecosystems and because of their importance to global fisheries. Atlantic longfin squid (Doryteuthis pealeii), an ecologically and economically valuable taxon, were reared from eggs to hatchlings (paralarvae) under ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations in replicated experimental trials. Animals raised under elevated pCO2 demonstrated significant developmental changes including increased time to hatching and shorter mantle lengths, although differences were small. Aragonite statoliths, critical for balance and detecting movement, had significantly reduced surface area and were abnormally shaped with increased porosity and altered crystal structure in elevated pCO2-reared paralarvae. These developmental and physiological effects could alter squid paralarvae behavior and survival in the wild, directly and indirectly impacting marine food webs and commercial fisheries.

  11. High temperature superconducting thin films and quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Graf zu Eulenburg, A

    1999-01-01

    the best balance and gradient sensitivity at 1kHz were 3x10 sup - sup 3 and 222fT/(cm sq root Hz))) respectively. The measured spatial response to a current carrying wire was in good agreement with a theoretical model. A significant performance improvement was obtained with the development of a single layer gradiometer with 13mm baseline, fabricated on 30x10mm sup 2 bicrystals. For such a device, the gradient sensitivity at 1kHz was 50fT/(cm sq root Hz)) and the gradiometer was used successfully for unshielded magnetocardiography. A parasitic effective area compensation scheme was employed with two neighbouring SQUIDs coupled in an opposite sense to the same gradiometer loop. This improved the balance from the intrinsic value of 10 sup - sup 3 to 3x10 sup - sup 5. This thesis describes several aspects of the development of gradiometers using high temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID). The pulsed laser deposition of thin films of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (YBCO) on Sr...

  12. Evaluation of joint interface of friction stir welding between dissimilar metals using HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashiko, Y.; Hatsukade, Y.; Yasui, T.; Takenaka, H.; Todaka, Y.; Fukumoto, M.; Tanaka, S.

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we investigated conductive properties of joint interfaces of friction stir welding (FSW) between dissimilar metals, stainless steel SUS304 and aluminum A6063, using a SQUID nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system. With current injection method, the current maps above the FSW specimens jointed under various conditions were measured by a HTS-SQUID gradiometer. The conductivities of the joint interfaces, which were estimated from the current maps, differed between the joint conditions. By destructive tests using optical microscope, large voids were observed on the joint interfaces with low welding speed that generated excess heating. In case of one specimen, which was welded with welding speed of 500 and 200 mm/min, the conductivity of the former was higher than that of the latter, although the inside voids in the respective regions were not much different. From these results, it is suggested that the current maps were influenced not only by the conductivity of the joint interface but also by inside voids. By hardness test on the SUS boards near the interfaces, only the SUS jointed with 200 mm/min was about half softer than its matrix.

  13. The energy level splitting for Unharmonic dc SQUID to be used as phase Q-bit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klenov, Nicolai V.; Kornev, Victor K.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    2006-01-01

    Dc-SQUID with Josephson junctions characterized by nonsinusoidal current-phase relation is being considered as a basis for phase qubit. It has been shown that the second and third harmonic components each in the current-phase relation are able to provide double-well potential and the energy level......-C to the Coulomb energy E-Q0. It has been shown that the gap value comes to about 7E(Q0) with increase of the ratio s. No external field needed, no bias current required and no circular currents are major advantages of such a qubit. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......Dc-SQUID with Josephson junctions characterized by nonsinusoidal current-phase relation is being considered as a basis for phase qubit. It has been shown that the second and third harmonic components each in the current-phase relation are able to provide double-well potential and the energy level...... splitting. Threshold condition for the double-well form origin has been determined taking into account the impact of both harmonics. The splitting gap of the ground energy level has been calculated as a function of the harmonic amplitudes for different ratio s of characteristic Josephson energy E...

  14. Time-domain multiplexed SQUID readout of a bolometer camera for APEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakosarenko, V; Schulz, M; Krueger, A; Heinz, E; Anders, S; Peiselt, K; May, T; Meyer, H-G [Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Kreysa, E; Siringo, G; Esch, W [Max-Planck-Institute for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Starkloff, M, E-mail: zakosarenko@ipht-jena.de [Supracon AG, Wildenbruchstrasse 15, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    We describe the development and fabrication of the sub-millimeter APEX (Atacama pathfinder experiment) bolometer camera (SABOCA) and its installation at the APEX radio telescope in Chile. SABOCA has 37 bolometers for a wavelength of about 0.35 mm. The bolometers with superconducting transition-edge sensors are read out by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Time-domain multiplexing was used to compress 40 readout signals into four output channels, which are further amplified by superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIF). The multiplexer readout circuit is described in detail. One spare SQUID and two spare bolometers have been used as reference to evaluate contributions to the bolometer noise figure. SABOCA's electrical noise equivalent power is about 7 x 10{sup -16} W Hz{sup -1/2}, whereas the optical noise equivalent flux density measured at APEX is better than 0.35 Jy Hz{sup -1/2} (1 Jy = 10{sup -26} W m{sup -2} Hz{sup -1}). The measured bolometer noise exceeds the theoretical estimation by factor of two, possibly caused by excess noise in the transition-edge sensor. Nevertheless the achieved instrumental sensitivity meets the specification given by the APEX board. SABOCA was commissioned as the facility instrument in the spring of 2009.

  15. Characteristics of deacetylation and depolymerization of β-chitin from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jooyeoun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2011-09-27

    This study evaluated the deacetylation characteristics of β-chitin from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) pens by using strongly alkaline solutions of NaOH or KOH. Taguchi design was employed to investigate the effect of reagent concentration, temperature, time, and treatment step on molecular mass (MM) and degree of deacetylation (DDA) of the chitosan obtained. The optimal treatment conditions for achieving high MM and DDA of chitosan were identified as: 40% NaOH at 90°C for 6h with three separate steps (2h+2h+2h) or 50% NaOH at 90°C for 6h with one step, or 50% KOH at 90°C for 4h with three steps (1h+1h+2h) or 6h with one step. The most important factor affecting DDA and MM was temperature and time, respectively. The chitosan obtained was then further depolymerized by cellulase or lysozyme with cellulase giving a higher degradation ratio, lower relative viscosity, and a larger amount of reducing-end formations than that of lysozyme due to its higher susceptibility. This study demonstrated that jumbo squid pens are a good source of materials to produce β-chitosan with high DDA and a wide range of MM for various potential applications. PMID:21700271

  16. Purification and characterization of trimethylamine-N-oxide demethylase from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xue-Yan; Xue, Chang-Hu; Miao, Ben-Chun; Liang, Jun-Ni; Li, Zhao-Jie; Cui, Feng-Xia

    2006-02-01

    Trimethylamine-N-oxide demethylase (TMAOase) was purified from Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) and characterized in detail herein. The TMAOase was extracted from squid with 20 mM Tris-acetate buffer (pH 7.0) containing 1.0 M NaCl, followed by acid treatment and heat treatment. Then it was purified by deithylaminoethyl-cellulose and Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, subsequently resulting in an 839-fold purification. The molecular mass of the TMAOase was defined to be 17.5 kDa. The optimum pH of the purified TMAOase was 7.0, and its optimum temperature was confirmed to be 55 degrees C. The TMAOase was stable to heat treatment up to 50 degrees C and stable at pH 7.0-9.0. Reducing agents such as DTT, Na2SO3, and NADH were effective at activating TMAOase, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, as well as Mg2+ and Ca2+, could also enhance the activity of TMAOase remarkably, whereas the TMAOase could be significantly inhibited by tea polyphenol, phytic acid and acetic acid. In addition, the TMAOase converted TMAO to dimethylamine and formaldehyde stoichiometrically with a K(m) of 26.2 mM. PMID:16448210

  17. Reversible stress softening of collagen based networks from the jumbo squid mantle (Dosidicus gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, F G; Troncoso, O P; Rivas, E R; Gomez, C G; Lopez, D

    2014-04-01

    Dosidicus gigas is the largest and one of the most abundant jumbo squids in the eastern Pacific Ocean. In this paper we have studied the muscle of the mantle of D. gigas (DGM). Morphological, thermal and rheological properties were assessed by means of atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry and oscillatory rheometry. This study allowed us to assess the morphological and rheological properties of a collagen based network occurring in nature. The results showed that the DGM network displays a nonlinear effect called reversible stress softening (RSS) that has been previously described for other types of biological structures such as naturally occurring cellulose networks and actin networks. We propose that the RSS could play a key role on the way jumbo squids withstand hydrostatic pressure. The results presented here confirm that this phenomenon occurs in a wider number of materials than previously thought, all of them exhibiting different size scales as well as physical conformation. PMID:24582216

  18. Foetal magnetocardiography with a multi-channel HTS rf SQUID gradiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Wolters, N [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Lomparski, D [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Zander, W [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Banzet, M [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Schubert, J [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Krause, H-J [Institute of Thin Films and Interfaces, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Geue, D [Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy, University of Witten/Herdecke, Universitaetsstrasse 142, D-44799 Bochum (Germany); Leeuwen, P van [Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy, University of Witten/Herdecke, Universitaetsstrasse 142, D-44799 Bochum (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Foetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is a promising technique for prenatal cardiac diagnosis. In this paper, we discuss the special requirements of a system for fMCG measurements. A SQUID system incorporating five HTS rf SQUID magnetometers has been developed and constructed. Four magnetometers are arranged at the bottom of the cryostat in a 4 cm x 4 cm square configuration. One reference magnetometer is located 20 cm above the plane to form four first-order axial gradiometers with the four bottom magnetometers. The magnetometer with a 18 mm diameter flux focuser, which reaches a field sensitivity of 20-30 fT Hz{sup -1/2}, proved sufficient for recording foetal magnetocardiograms in a magnetically shielded room. The cardiac activities of two foetuses (31st and 33rd weeks of gestation) were recorded in 90 Hz bandwidth. The foetal QRS peak signals ranged from 4 to 7 pT and could easily be identified in the real-time gradiometer outputs with a signal-to-noise ratio of up to five. Furthermore, the averaged fMCG data enabled the determination of de- and repolarization time intervals. Overall, the fMCG signals proved of sufficient quality to perform foetal heart diagnostics.

  19. An efficient calibration method for SQUID measurement system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Li; Shu-Lin, Zhang; Chao-Xiang, Zhang; Xiang-Yan, Kong; Xiao-Ming, Xie

    2016-06-01

    For a practical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based measurement system, the Tesla/volt coefficient must be accurately calibrated. In this paper, we propose a highly efficient method of calibrating a SQUID magnetometer system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils. The Tesla/volt coefficient is regarded as the magnitude of a vector pointing to the normal direction of the pickup coil. By applying magnetic fields through a three-dimensional Helmholtz coil, the Tesla/volt coefficient can be directly calculated from magnetometer responses to the three orthogonally applied magnetic fields. Calibration with alternating current (AC) field is normally used for better signal-to-noise ratio in noisy urban environments and the results are compared with the direct current (DC) calibration to avoid possible effects due to eddy current. In our experiment, a calibration relative error of about 6.89 × 10‑4 is obtained, and the error is mainly caused by the non-orthogonality of three axes of the Helmholtz coils. The method does not need precise alignment of the magnetometer inside the Helmholtz coil. It can be used for the multichannel magnetometer system calibration effectively and accurately. Project supported by the “Strategic Priority Research Program (B)” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB04020200) and the Shanghai Municipal Science and Technology Commission Project, China (Grant No. 15DZ1940902).

  20. Acoustic mapping of squid egg clusters and their bottom habitat in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kenneth G.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Iampietro, Pat J.; Kvitek, Rikk G.

    2004-10-01

    Clusters of gelatinous egg capsules, known as mops or beds, of the market squid (Loligo opalescens) were mapped in a shallow-water, sandy habitat of Monterey Bay, California. The benthic egg clusters were imaged using an EdgeTech 272-TD dual-frequency sidescan sonar towed from R/V MACGINITIE, an 8-m-long survey vessel, with data recorded on a Triton Elics International Isis digital data acquisition system. Verification of target identity was accomplished independently by video photography from a remotely operated vehicle. The survey area included a 4-km stretch of sandy seafloor between Lover's Point and Cannery Row in Monterey at depths of 15-30 m. The study area had previously been mapped using the RESON SeaBat 8101 240-kHz multibeam sonar. Resulting high-resolution bathymetric data, with 1-m resolution, were used during the survey planning and execution. Squid egg clusters were clearly visible in the very-high-resolution, 400-kHz backscatter imagery, with pixel size 10-20 cm, recorded from the towed sidescan sonar. The concentration of egg clusters was greatest along a sloping feature believed to be a submarine fault. Egg mops with diameter as small as 0.5 m were distinguishable. [Support by Sea Grant is acknowledged.

  1. A tunable microstrip SQUID amplifier for the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelley, Sean; Weingarten, Elan; Mueck, Michael; Hansen, Jorn; Clarke, John

    2014-03-01

    We present a microstrip SQUID amplifier (MSA) with an octave of tunability for use in the ADMX collaboration. The axion dark matter candidate is detected via conversion to a microwave photon stimulated by an apparatus consisting of an 8 tesla magnet and a cryogenically cooled high-Q tunable microwave cavity. The microwave photon frequency is a function of the unknown axion mass, so the detector must scan over a broad frequency range. An MSA is constructed by flux-coupling a resonant microstrip to a resistively-shunted SQUID biased into the voltage state. We demonstrate a gain exceeding 20 dB with a tunability of nearly one octave from 415 MHz to 800 MHz. Tunability is achieved by terminating the microstrip with a low inductance GaAs varactor that operates at cryogenic temperatures, allowing a variable reflected phase of nearly 0 to π at the end of the microstrip, and thus a standing wave tunable from nearly λ/2 to λ/4.

  2. Improved tunable microstrip SQUID amplifier for the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelley, Sean; Hansen, Jorn; Mol, Jan-Michael; Hilton, Gene; Clarke, John

    2015-03-01

    We present a series of tunable microstrip SQUID amplifiers (MSAs) for use in ADMX. The axion dark matter candidate is detected via Primakoff conversion to a microwave photon in a high-Q (~ 105) tunable microwave cavity, cooled to 1.6 K or lower, in the presence of a 7-tesla magnetic field. The microwave photon frequency is a function of the unknown axion mass, so that the cavity and amplifier must be scanned over a broad frequency range. An MSA is constructed by flux-coupling a resonant microstrip to a resistively-shunted SQUID biased into the voltage state. We demonstrate gains exceeding 20 dB, at frequencies above 900 MHz. Tunability is achieved by terminating the microstrip with a low inductance GaAs varactor diode that operates at cryogenic temperatures. By varying the voltage bias of the varactor we vary its capacitance, allowing a reflected phase varying from nearly 0 to π at the end of the microstrip, and thus a standing wave tunable from nearly λ/2 to λ/4. With proper design of the microwave environment, a noise temperature of 1/2 to 1/4 of the physical temperature is demonstrated.

  3. An efficient calibration method for SQUID measurement system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Li; Shu-Lin, Zhang; Chao-Xiang, Zhang; Xiang-Yan, Kong; Xiao-Ming, Xie

    2016-06-01

    For a practical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based measurement system, the Tesla/volt coefficient must be accurately calibrated. In this paper, we propose a highly efficient method of calibrating a SQUID magnetometer system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils. The Tesla/volt coefficient is regarded as the magnitude of a vector pointing to the normal direction of the pickup coil. By applying magnetic fields through a three-dimensional Helmholtz coil, the Tesla/volt coefficient can be directly calculated from magnetometer responses to the three orthogonally applied magnetic fields. Calibration with alternating current (AC) field is normally used for better signal-to-noise ratio in noisy urban environments and the results are compared with the direct current (DC) calibration to avoid possible effects due to eddy current. In our experiment, a calibration relative error of about 6.89 × 10-4 is obtained, and the error is mainly caused by the non-orthogonality of three axes of the Helmholtz coils. The method does not need precise alignment of the magnetometer inside the Helmholtz coil. It can be used for the multichannel magnetometer system calibration effectively and accurately. Project supported by the “Strategic Priority Research Program (B)” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB04020200) and the Shanghai Municipal Science and Technology Commission Project, China (Grant No. 15DZ1940902).

  4. High-J{sub c} superconducting YBCO thin films for SQUIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsaros, A.; Savvides, N.; Foley, C. [CSIRO, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Applied Physics

    1996-12-31

    Full text: High critical current density, J{sub c}, and reproducibility of film quality are major issues in high-T{sub c} superconducting device technology. Because many factors such as substrate quality, deposition parameters and film stoichiometry impact on film quality the growth of high-J{sub c} YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films suitable for devices is a demanding task. For optimum device performance c-axis epitaxial films are required with smooth surfaces, controlled microstructure and crystalline orientation, high T{sub c} (> 87 K) and high J{sub c} (> 1x10{sup 6} A cm{sup -2}). Consequently a stable platform in film quality is critical in developing and maintaining world class device technology. In previous Wagga meetings and elsewhere we presented details of our thin film deposition system, results of film growth studies, techniques of film characterisation and SQUID performance. In this paper we present transport properties and lattice parameters for a large number of films deposited over a period of ten months using a single target and under similar sputtering conditions. The data serve to illustrate the level of reproducibility of our deposition technology while closer examination of the data reveal some interesting `correlations` among properties. We have used these correlations to assist us to control both the deposition of films and subsequent processing into test structures and SQUIDs 5 refs.

  5. Time-domain multiplexed SQUID readout of a bolometer camera for APEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the development and fabrication of the sub-millimeter APEX (Atacama pathfinder experiment) bolometer camera (SABOCA) and its installation at the APEX radio telescope in Chile. SABOCA has 37 bolometers for a wavelength of about 0.35 mm. The bolometers with superconducting transition-edge sensors are read out by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Time-domain multiplexing was used to compress 40 readout signals into four output channels, which are further amplified by superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIF). The multiplexer readout circuit is described in detail. One spare SQUID and two spare bolometers have been used as reference to evaluate contributions to the bolometer noise figure. SABOCA's electrical noise equivalent power is about 7 x 10-16 W Hz-1/2, whereas the optical noise equivalent flux density measured at APEX is better than 0.35 Jy Hz-1/2 (1 Jy = 10-26 W m-2 Hz-1). The measured bolometer noise exceeds the theoretical estimation by factor of two, possibly caused by excess noise in the transition-edge sensor. Nevertheless the achieved instrumental sensitivity meets the specification given by the APEX board. SABOCA was commissioned as the facility instrument in the spring of 2009.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in commercial squids from different geographical origins: levels and risks for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Filipa; Oliveira, Marta; Ramalhosa, Maria João; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Morais, Simone

    2013-09-01

    The concentrations of 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in five commercially valuable squid species from different geographical origins (Atlantic, Indic and Pacific Oceans). Out of the 18 quantified PAHs (the 16 PAHs considered by US EPA as priority pollutants, dibenzo(a,l)pyrene and benzo(j)fluoranthene) only dibenz(a,h)anthracene was not detected. The total concentrations of PAHs varied by a factor of more than 100-fold, from 0.22 (Loligo gahi) to 60.9 μg/kg ww (Loligo reynaudii). Intra- and inter-specific variability of PAH levels was statistically assessed. Nine carcinogenic (probable/possible) PAHs accounted for 1% (L. reynaudii) to 26% (Loligo opalescens) of the total PAHs content being the main contributors naphthalene (in Loligo duvaucelii, L. reynaudii and Loligo vulgaris species), chrysene (in L. opalescens) and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene (in L. gahi). PAHs source analysis indicated that four of the five zones of capture of the different squid species are significantly affected by both petrogenic and pyrolytic sources. Assessment of the target carcinogenic risks, established by the US EPA, suggested that L. gahi (Atlantic Ocean) and L. opalescens (from Pacific Ocean) may pose additional risks for consumers, if not eaten in moderation, derived from benzo(a)pyrene ingestion.

  7. 76 FR 3044 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sculpins, Sharks, Squid, and Octopus in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Sculpins, Sharks, Squid, and Octopus in the Gulf of Alaska AGENCY: National... octopus in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). This action is necessary to prevent exceeding the 2011...

  8. Projected near-future CO2 levels increase activity and alter defensive behaviours in the tropical squid Idiosepius pygmaeus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake L. Spady

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 levels projected to occur in the oceans by the end of this century cause a range of behavioural effects in fish, but whether other highly active marine organisms, such as cephalopods, are similarly affected is unknown. We tested the effects of projected future CO2 levels (626 and 956 µatm on the behaviour of male two-toned pygmy squid, Idiosepius pygmaeus. Exposure to elevated CO2 increased the number of active individuals by 19–25% and increased movement (number of line-crosses by nearly 3 times compared to squid at present-day CO2. Squid vigilance and defensive behaviours were also altered by elevated CO2 with >80% of individuals choosing jet escape responses over defensive arm postures in response to a visual startle stimulus, compared with 50% choosing jet escape responses at control CO2. In addition, more escape responses were chosen over threat behaviours in body pattern displays at elevated CO2 and individuals were more than twice as likely to use ink as a defence strategy at 956 µatm CO2, compared with controls. Increased activity could lead to adverse effects on energy budgets as well as increasing visibility to predators. A tendency to respond to a stimulus with escape behaviours could increase survival, but may also be energetically costly and could potentially lead to more chases by predators compared with individuals that use defensive postures. These results demonstrate that projected future ocean acidification affects the behaviours of a tropical squid species.

  9. Reproductive system and the spermatophoric reaction of the mesopelagic squid Octopoteuthis sicula (Ruppell 1844) (Cephalopoda : Octopoteuthidae) from southern African waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, H. J. T.; Lipinski, M. R.; Videler, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive features of the poorly known oceanic squid Octopoteuthis sicula are described and quantified to gain insight into the reproductive biology of the species. The data are based on 39 complete and partial specimens from southern African waters, collected between 1975 and 2005. The specimens

  10. Range expansion of the jumbo squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N decrypts multiple origins, migration and habitat use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio I Ruiz-Cooley

    Full Text Available Coincident with climate shifts and anthropogenic perturbations, the highly voracious jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas reached unprecedented northern latitudes along the NE Pacific margin post 1997-98. The physical or biological drivers of this expansion, as well as its ecological consequences remain unknown. Here, novel analysis from both bulk tissues and individual amino acids (Phenylalanine; Phe and Glutamic acid; Glu in both gladii and muscle of D. gigas captured in the Northern California Current System (NCCS documents for the first time multiple geographic origins and migration. Phe δ(15N values, a proxy for habitat baseline δ(15N values, confirm at least three different geographic origins that were initially detected by highly variable bulk δ(15N values in gladii for squid at small sizes (60 cm converged, indicating feeding in a common ecosystem. The strong latitudinal gradient in Phe δ(15N values from composite muscle samples further confirmed residency at a point in time for large squid in the NCCS. These results contrast with previous ideas, and indicate that small squid are highly migratory, move into the NCCS from two or more distinct geographic origins, and use this ecosystem mainly for feeding. These results represent the first direct information on the origins, immigration and habitat use of this key "invasive" predator in the NCCS, with wide implications for understanding both the mechanisms of periodic D. gigas population range expansions, and effects on ecosystem trophic structure.

  11. Chromogenic behaviors of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) studied in situ with an animal-borne video package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Hannah; Gilly, William; Bell, Lauren; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2015-01-15

    Dosidicus gigas (Humboldt or jumbo flying squid) is an economically and ecologically influential species, yet little is known about its natural behaviors because of difficulties in studying this active predator in its oceanic environment. By using an animal-borne video package, National Geographic's Crittercam, we were able to observe natural behaviors in free-swimming D. gigas in the Gulf of California with a focus on color-generating (chromogenic) behaviors. We documented two dynamic displays without artificial lighting at depths of up to 70 m. One dynamic pattern, termed 'flashing' is characterized by a global oscillation (2-4 Hz) of body color between white and red. Flashing was almost always observed when other squid were visible in the video frame, and this behavior presumably represents intraspecific signaling. Amplitude and frequency of flashing can be modulated, and the phase relationship with another squid can also be rapidly altered. Another dynamic display termed 'flickering' was observed whenever flashing was not occurring. This behavior is characterized by irregular wave-like activity in neighboring patches of chromatophores, and the resulting patterns mimic reflections of down-welled light in the water column, suggesting that this behavior may provide a dynamic type of camouflage. Rapid and global pauses in flickering, often before a flashing episode, indicate that flickering is under inhibitory neural control. Although flashing and flickering have not been described in other squid, functional similarities are evident with other species. PMID:25609785

  12. Range expansion of the jumbo squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N decrypts multiple origins, migration and habitat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I; Ballance, Lisa T; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Coincident with climate shifts and anthropogenic perturbations, the highly voracious jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas reached unprecedented northern latitudes along the NE Pacific margin post 1997-98. The physical or biological drivers of this expansion, as well as its ecological consequences remain unknown. Here, novel analysis from both bulk tissues and individual amino acids (Phenylalanine; Phe and Glutamic acid; Glu) in both gladii and muscle of D. gigas captured in the Northern California Current System (NCCS) documents for the first time multiple geographic origins and migration. Phe δ(15)N values, a proxy for habitat baseline δ(15)N values, confirm at least three different geographic origins that were initially detected by highly variable bulk δ(15)N values in gladii for squid at small sizes (60 cm) converged, indicating feeding in a common ecosystem. The strong latitudinal gradient in Phe δ(15)N values from composite muscle samples further confirmed residency at a point in time for large squid in the NCCS. These results contrast with previous ideas, and indicate that small squid are highly migratory, move into the NCCS from two or more distinct geographic origins, and use this ecosystem mainly for feeding. These results represent the first direct information on the origins, immigration and habitat use of this key "invasive" predator in the NCCS, with wide implications for understanding both the mechanisms of periodic D. gigas population range expansions, and effects on ecosystem trophic structure. PMID:23527242

  13. Age, maturation, and population structure of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas off the Peruvian Exclusive Economic Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bilin; Chen, Xinjun; Chen, Yong; Tian, Siquan; Li, Jianhua; Fang, Zhou; Yang, Mingxia

    2013-01-01

    Age, maturation and population structure of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas were studied based on random sampling of the Chinese jigging fishery off the Peruvian Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) during 2008-2010. Estimated ages ranged from 144 to 633 days, confirming that the squid is a short-lived species with longevity no longer than 2 years. Occurrence of mature females and hatching in each month indicated that Humboldt squid spawned year-round. Back-calculated hatching dates for the samples were from January 22nd, 2008 to April 22nd, 2010 with a peak between January and March. Two size-based and two hatching date-based populations could be defined from mantle length (ML) at maturity and back-calculated hatching dates, respectively. Females matured at a larger size than males, and there was a significant difference in ML at maturity between the two hatching groups ( P <0.05). The waters adjacent to 11°S off the Peruvian EEZ may be a potential spawning ground. This study shows the complexity of the population structure and large variability in key life history parameters in the Humboldt squid off the Peruvian EEZ, which should be considered in the assessment and management of this important resource.

  14. 77 FR 44172 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Squid in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... BSAI exclusive economic zone according to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 679 RIN 0648-XC119 Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Squid in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area AGENCY:...

  15. Age, maturation, and population structure of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas off the Peruvian Exclusive Economic Zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bilin; CHEN Xinjun; CHEN Yong; TIAN Siquan; LI Jianhua; FANG Zhou; YANG Mingxia

    2013-01-01

    Age,maturation and population structure of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas were studied based on random sampling of the Chinese jigging fishery off the Peruvian Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) during 2008-2010.Estimated ages ranged from 144 to 633 days,confirming that the squid is a short-lived species with longevity no longer than 2 years.Occurrence of mature females and hatching in each month indicated that Humboldt squid spawned year-round.Back-calculated hatching dates for the samples were from January 22nd,2008 to April 22nd,2010 with a peak between January and March.Two size-based and two hatching date-based populations could be defined from mantle length (ML) at maturity and back-calculated hatching dates,respectively.Females matured at a larger size than males,and there was a significant difference in ML at maturity between the two hatching groups (P<0.05).The waters adjacent to 11°S off the Peruvian EEZ may be a potential spawning ground.This study shows the complexity of the population structure and large variability in key life history parameters in the Humboldt squid off the Peruvian EEZ,which should be considered in the assessment and management of this important resource.

  16. Population size of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas in the central Gulf of California, Mexico, based on mark-recapture data

    OpenAIRE

    Morales Bojorquez, Enrique; Hernández Herrera, Agustin; Nevárez Martínez, Manuel O; Díaz Uribe, Juan Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    The use of mark-recapture data can be an alternative to other methods for estimating abundance of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas and can be used when catch-per-unit-effort data applied to depletion models or estimates from survey research are not available. Two mark-recapture events were analyzed in the central Gulf of California, Mexico, during October 2001 and April 2002 to assess the status of jumbo squid. Results from October 2001 yielded a population size of 20.2 million squid with a 95...

  17. YBa2Cu3O7- dc SQUID array for multichannel magnetometry and multichannel flip-chip current sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, J.; Zakosarenko, V.; IJsselsteijn, R.; Stolz, R.; Schultze, V.; Chwala, A.; Hoenig, H. E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    1999-09-01

    We have prepared arrays of single-layer washer-type dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) on 10 mm × 10 mm bicrystal substrates. Each SQUID in the array is equipped with its own modulation loop, which makes a separate operation of them possible. Arrays containing nine or 11 dc SQUIDs have been tested and the crosstalk between neighbouring channels has been found to be 5%. The field sensitivity of the SQUIDs is 85 nT icons/Journals/Common/Phi" ALT="Phi" ALIGN="TOP"/>0-1 and 105 nT icons/Journals/Common/Phi" ALT="Phi" ALIGN="TOP"/>0-1 for the nine- and 11-device array, respectively. The equivalent flux noise is typically icons/Journals/Common/le" ALT="le" ALIGN="TOP"/> 20 icons/Journals/Common/mu" ALT="mu" ALIGN="TOP"/>icons/Journals/Common/Phi" ALT="Phi" ALIGN="TOP"/>0 Hz-1/2 down to 1 Hz with ac bias reversal. A field resolution of less than 2.1 pT Hz-1/2 has been obtained for at least eight channels on a chip. By using multiturn YBa2Cu3O7-icons/Journals/Common/delta" ALT="delta" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> input coils and mounting them in a flip-chip configuration together with the single-layer dc SQUIDs we have been able to build three-channel current sensors. The current sensitivity equals 3-3.5 icons/Journals/Common/mu" ALT="mu" ALIGN="TOP"/>A icons/Journals/Common/Phi" ALT="Phi" ALIGN="TOP"/>0-1 depending on the alignment of the flip-chip configuration. The current resolution of the devices is coil of these current sensors to a normal-conducting pickup antenna.

  18. X-ray solution scattering of squid heavy meromyosin: strengthening the evidence for an ancient compact off state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E Gillilan

    Full Text Available The overall conformations of regulated myosins or heavy meromyosins from chicken/turkey, scallop, tarantula, limulus, and scorpion sources have been studied by a number of techniques, including electron microscopy, sedimentation, and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance. These studies have indicated that the binding of regulatory ions changes the conformation of the molecule from a compact shape found in the "off" state of the muscle to extended relationships between the tail and independently mobile heads that predominate in the "on" state. Here we strengthen the argument for the generality of this conformational change by using small angle X-ray scattering on heavy meromyosin from squid. Small angle X-ray scattering allows the protein to be visualized in solution under mild and relatively physiological conditions, and squid differs from the other species studied by at least 500 million years of evolution. Analysis of the data indicates that upon addition of Ca(2+ the radius of gyration increases. Differences in the squid "on" and "off" states are clearly distinguishable as bimodal and unimodal pair distance distribution functions respectively. These observations are consistent with a Ca(2+-free squid heavy meromyosin that is compact, but which becomes extended when Ca(2+ is bound. Further, the scattering profile derived from the current model of tarantula heavy meromyosin in the "off" state is in excellent agreement with the measured "off" state scattering profile for squid heavy meromyosin. The previous and current studies together provide significant evidence that regulated myosin's compact off-state conformation is an ancient trait, inherited from a common ancestor during divergent evolution.

  19. SQUID-magnetometry on Fe monolayers on GaAs(001) in UHV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kebe, T.

    2006-12-11

    This thesis deals with the characterization of the growth and of the magnetic properties of ultrathin Fe films on GaAs(001). In particular, a scanning SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) magnetometer was used in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), whose performance has been improved within the scope of this thesis. By probing the magnetic stray field of a magnetized film, the absolute remanent magnetization can be determined with submonolayer sensitivity. In the context of this thesis the magnetic stray field has been calculated analytically. The combined use of SQUID and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) on the same film in UHV allows for the independent determination of the magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constants as a function of temperature, film thickness, topography of the substrate and oxygen exposure. The results of this thesis are: 1. The thickness dependent remanent magnetization from 2 to 20 monolayer (ML) Fe on GaAs(001) without cap layer was measured as a function of temperature. 2. The continuous in-plane reorientation of the magnetization (from [1 1 0] to [1 0 0]) of Fe films with increasing film thickness was observed using the scanning SQUID technique and showed good agreement with FMR measurements. 3. The influence of controlled oxygen exposure on the remanent magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constants of 5 to 16 ML Fe was investigated. A faster reduction of the magnetization is found for the thinner Fe films when the volume of the Fe oxide is taken into consideration. At low oxygen exposure (<10 Langmuir), the perpendicular uniaxial anisotropy constant K{sub 2} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} is reduced by about 40% whereas other anisotropy contributions remain virtually unchanged. In addition, structural investigations using IV-LEED during the oxygen exposure were carried out. 4. An 8.6 ML Fe/GaAs(001) film which was exposed to 25000 L O{sub 2} exhibits a spontaneous magnetization perpendicular to the film plane at low

  20. A modular, extendible and field-tolerant multichannel vector magnetometer based on current sensor SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, J.-H.; Drung, D.; Burghoff, M.; Körber, R.

    2016-09-01

    We present the prototype module of our extendible and robust multichannel SQUID magnetometer system. A large multi-module arrangement can be implemented by using up to 7 modules. The system is intended for high-precision measurements of biomagnetism and spin precession. Further demanding applications are magnetorelaxometry and ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ULF NMR), where pulsed magnetic fields of up to 100 mT are typically applied. The system is operated inside the Berlin magnetically shielded room (BMSR-2) and equipped with 18 magnetometers consisting of niobium (Nb) wire-wound pick-up coils. A total of 16 small pick-up coils with 17.1 mm diameter form a regular grid with individual channels arranged to ensure system sensitivity covers all three orthogonal spatial directions. Two large hexagonal pick-up coils with an equivalent diameter of 74.5 mm sensitive in z-direction surround the grid at two different heights and are suitable for the detection of deep sources. Each pick-up coil is connected to the input of a thin-film Nb SQUID current sensor via a detachable superconducting contact. The SQUIDs are equipped with integrated input current limiters. Feedback into the pick-up coils is employed to minimise crosstalk between channels. The current sensor chip package includes a superconducting shield of Nb. The field distortion of the prototype and a multi-module arrangement was analysed by numerical simulation. The measured noise of the small magnetometers was between 0.6 and 1.5 fT {{Hz}}-1/2, and well below 1 fT {{Hz}}-1/2 for the large ones. Using a software gradiometer, we achieved a minimum noise level of 0.54 fT {{Hz}}-1/2. We performed ULF NMR experiments, verifying the system’s robustness against pulsed fields, and magnetoencephalographgy (MEG) on somatosensory evoked neuronal activity. The low noise performance of our 18-channel prototype enabled the detection of high-frequency components at around 1 kHz by MEG.

  1. Concentrations of biogenic amines in fish, squid and octopus and their changes during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Huang, Zhiyong; Li, Jian; Yang, Hong

    2012-12-15

    The concentrations of seven biogenic amines (BA) were simultaneously determined in 74 samples of fish, squid and octopus, by the method of HPLC coupled with pre-column derivatisation. The relationship between the formation of BA in aquatic products and the growth of microbial flora during storage was also investigated. Results showed that putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine were the dominant BA in the studied samples, but the concentrations of histamine and tyramine were mostly less than 50 and 100 mgkg(-1), respectively. Freezing can effectively prevent the formation of BA, but the levels of putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine significantly increased (poctopus strongly and positively correlated with the formation of amines (such as putrescine, cadaverine, histamine and tyramine) during storage, except for histamine in octopus.

  2. FEM enhanced signal processing approach for pattern recognition in the SQUID based NDE system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient Non-Destructive Evaluation algorithm has been developed in order to extract the required information for pattern recognition of defects in the conductive samples. Using high-Tc gradiometer RF-SQUIDs in unshielded environments and incorporating an automated two dimensional non-magnetic scanning robot, samples with different intentional defects have been tested. We have used a developed noise cancellation approach for the improvement of the effectiveness of the used inverse-problem technique. In this approach we have used a well examined Finite Element Method (FEM) to apply a noise reduction filtering on the obtained raw magnetic image data before incorporating the signal processing analysis. By applying this noise cancellation filter and incorporating three different signal processing algorithms and comparing the results of the predicted images by the pattern of the intentionally made defects, we have investigated the ability of these methods for pattern recognition of unknown defects.

  3. FEM enhanced signal processing approach for pattern recognition in the SQUID based NDE system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarreshtedari, F; Jahed, N M S; Hosseni, N; Pourhashemi, A; Fardmanesh, M [Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Banzet, Marko; Schubert, Juergen, E-mail: fardmanesh@sharif.ed [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Bio and Nanosystems, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2010-06-01

    An efficient Non-Destructive Evaluation algorithm has been developed in order to extract the required information for pattern recognition of defects in the conductive samples. Using high-Tc gradiometer RF-SQUIDs in unshielded environments and incorporating an automated two dimensional non-magnetic scanning robot, samples with different intentional defects have been tested. We have used a developed noise cancellation approach for the improvement of the effectiveness of the used inverse-problem technique. In this approach we have used a well examined Finite Element Method (FEM) to apply a noise reduction filtering on the obtained raw magnetic image data before incorporating the signal processing analysis. By applying this noise cancellation filter and incorporating three different signal processing algorithms and comparing the results of the predicted images by the pattern of the intentionally made defects, we have investigated the ability of these methods for pattern recognition of unknown defects.

  4. Customizing Properties of β-Chitin in Squid Pen (Gladius by Chemical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ianiro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The squid pen (gladius from the Loligo vulgaris was used for preparation of β-chitin materials characterized by different chemical, micro- and nano-structural properties that preserved, almost completely the macrostructural and the mechanical ones. The β-chitin materials obtained by alkaline treatment showed porosity, wettability and swelling that are a function of the duration of the treatment. Microscopic, spectroscopic and synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques showed that the chemical environment of the N-acetyl groups of the β-chitin chains changes after the thermal alkaline treatment. As a consequence, the crystalline packing of the β-chitin is modified, due to the intercalation of water molecules between β-chitin sheets. Potential applications of these β-chitin materials range from the nanotechnology to the regenerative medicine. The use of gladii, which are waste products of the fishing industry, has also important environmental implications.

  5. Research on high-Tc SQUID based non-destructive evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hui-Wu; He Yu-Sheng; Yang Qian-Sheng; Kong Xiang-Yan; Ren Yu-Feng; Yu Hong-Wei; Ding Hong-Sheng; Zhao Shi-Ping; Chen Geng-Hua; Zhou Yue-Liang; Zhang Li-Hua

    2004-01-01

    @@ A non-destructive evaluation system based on high-Tc dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device)incorporating a gradient field excitation has been built. By using this system a 1mm-diameter hole at a depth of 2mm inside an aluminium plate at room temperature can be easily detected and imaged in an unshielded environment. The relation between the spatial resolution, or the smallest detectable flaw size, and experimental parameters is briefly analysed in terms of a simple metal ring model. The result shows that the spatial resolution depends strongly on the sensor-sample separation as well as on some other parameters, such as signal-to-noise ratio of excitation, excitation frequency and material conductivity.

  6. Multi-Channel SQUID System for MEG and Ultra-Low-Field MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Zotev, V S; Volegov, P L; Sandin, H J; Espy, M A; Mosher, J C; Urbaitis, A V; Newman, S G; Zotev, Vadim S.; Matlachov, Andrei N.; Volegov, Petr L.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Espy, Michelle A.; Mosher, John C.; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Newman, Shaun G.; Jr, Robert H. Kraus

    2007-01-01

    A seven-channel system capable of performing both magnetoencephalography (MEG) and ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI) is described. The system consists of seven second-order SQUID gradiometers with 37 mm diameter and 60 mm baseline, having magnetic field resolution of 1.2-2.8 fT/rtHz. It also includes four sets of coils for 2-D Fourier imaging with pre-polarization. The system's MEG performance was demonstrated by measurements of auditory evoked response. The system was also used to obtain a multi-channel 2-D image of a whole human hand at the measurement field of 46 microtesla with 3 by 3 mm resolution.

  7. Survey of Cooling Options for Application in a Low-TC Squid System for Fetal Magnetocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijpma, A. P.; Uzunbajakau, S.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Peters, M. J.; Rogalla, H.

    2004-06-01

    As part of the development of a low-Tc SQUID-based magnetometer system for measuring fetal heart activity, the means of cooling is evaluated. To lower the threshold for the clinical application of this fetal heart monitor, it should be simple to operate. It is, therefore, deemed necessary to replace the liquid helium by a closed-cycle refrigerator. In this paper, the requirements with respect to the cryogenic system are defined. These include operating temperature (4 K), temperature stability (0.1 W) and requirements on magnetic and mechanical interference. The paper also reviews the most relevant options for the realization of the cryogenic system. After comparison, we selected a 4-K mechanical cooler. To reduce the interference, it is placed at several meters from the magnetometer. The cooling power is to be transferred by circulation of helium.

  8. Infiltration of chitin by protein coacervates defines the squid beak mechanical gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, YerPeng; Hoon, Shawn; Guerette, Paul A; Wei, Wei; Ghadban, Ali; Hao, Cai; Miserez, Ali; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-07-01

    The beak of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas is a fascinating example of how seamlessly nature builds with mechanically mismatched materials. A 200-fold stiffness gradient begins in the hydrated chitin of the soft beak base and gradually increases to maximum stiffness in the dehydrated distal rostrum. Here, we combined RNA-Seq and proteomics to show that the beak contains two protein families. One family consists of chitin-binding proteins (DgCBPs) that physically join chitin chains, whereas the other family comprises highly modular histidine-rich proteins (DgHBPs). We propose that DgHBPs play multiple key roles during beak bioprocessing, first by forming concentrated coacervate solutions that diffuse into the DgCBP-chitin scaffold, and second by inducing crosslinking via an abundant GHG sequence motif. These processes generate spatially controlled desolvation, resulting in the impressive biomechanical gradient. Our findings provide novel molecular-scale strategies for designing functional gradient materials. PMID:26053298

  9. Detection of antiferromagnetic signals in a diamond-anvil cell using a SQUID vibrating coil magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of highly sensitive magnetic measurements in a diamond-anvil cell using a SQUID vibrating coil magnetometer, which were made to investigate the possibility of increasing its sensitivity by improving the system. The Neel temperature TN of PrSn3 (TN = 8.4 K at ambient pressure) was measured with good signal-to-noise ratio up to about 10 GPa using a tungsten gasket, where the magnitude of the anomaly in the temperature dependence of the susceptibility, assigned as TN, was as small as 10-3 emu cm-3. It appeared that elimination of unnecessary motion of the lead wire of the detection coil was needed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio

  10. Detection of antiferromagnetic signals in a diamond-anvil cell using a SQUID vibrating coil magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, M

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of highly sensitive magnetic measurements in a diamond-anvil cell using a SQUID vibrating coil magnetometer, which were made to investigate the possibility of increasing its sensitivity by improving the system. The Neel temperature T sub N of PrSn sub 3 (T sub N = 8.4 K at ambient pressure) was measured with good signal-to-noise ratio up to about 10 GPa using a tungsten gasket, where the magnitude of the anomaly in the temperature dependence of the susceptibility, assigned as T sub N , was as small as 10 sup - sup 3 emu cm sup - sup 3. It appeared that elimination of unnecessary motion of the lead wire of the detection coil was needed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. Detecting degradation in Ni-based superalloy Udimet520 with scanning SQUID microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isawa, K., E-mail: kazu@rdc-tohoku.j [R and D Center, Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., 2-1 Nakayama 7-chome, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-0952 (Japan); Igarashi, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Sato, F.; Ogota, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Miyaguchi, K. [R and D Center, Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., 2-1 Nakayama 7-chome, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-0952 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    In order to develop a new method for detecting degradation nondestructively in Udimet520 (U520), which is used for blades of aircraft jet-engine components and land-based gas turbines, fractured and interrupted samples in low-cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep tests were studied using scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM). High temperature LCF and creep experiments on U520 were conducted to obtain various samples with different damage level. Simultaneously, we also examined the artificially degraded samples by optical microscopy, electron backscattering diffraction, and hardness measurements to ensure the damage level. On the basis of the magnetic permeability data, the virgin sample is nonmagnetic. However, for the artificially damaged samples, the observation of magnetic signals on the field maps indicates the potential of SSM to evaluate the degradation in U520 superalloy nondestructively.

  12. Neuromagnetic recordings of the human peripheral nerve with planar SQUID gradiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, G.; Maas, P.; Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Shahani, U.; Weir, A.I. [Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TF (United Kingdom)

    1998-08-01

    Magnetic fields produced by a travelling volley in the human ulnar nerve have been successfully measured in a lightly shielded environment. Recordings of the tangential component of the magnetic field were made using a planar second-order gradiometer integrated with a first-order gradiometric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Devices were fabricated in our clean-room facility at the University of Strathclyde and measurements taken in an eddy-current shielded room at the Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit. We use no additional shielding and no electronic differencing or field-nulling techniques. Evoked magnetic fields of 60 fT peak-to-peak were obtained after 1536 averages but they could be seen easily as early as 512 averages. Measurements were made over four points above the ulnar nerve on the upper arm and from these the conduction velocity was calculated as 60 m s{sup -1}. (author)

  13. A high- Tc SQUID-based sensor head cooled by a Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijpma, A. P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; de Vries, E.; Nijhof, N.; Holland, H. J.; Rogalla, H.

    2002-08-01

    The goal of the so-called FHARMON project is to develop a high- Tc SQUID-based magnetometer system for the measurement of fetal heart activity in standard clinical environments. To lower the threshold for the application of this fetal heart monitor, it should be simple to operate. It is, therefore, advantageous to replace the liquid cryogen bath by a closed-cycle refrigerator. For this purpose, we selected a mixed-gas Joule-Thomson cooler; the APD Cryotiger ©. Because of its magnetic interference, the compressor of this closed-cycle cooler will be placed at a distance of ≈2 m from the actual sensor, which is an axial second order gradiometer. The gradiometer is formed by three magnetometers placed on an alumina cylinder, which is connected to the cold head of the cooler. This paper describes the sensor head in detail and reports on test experiments.

  14. DC current distribution mapping system of the solar panels using a HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar panels are expected to play a major role as a source of sustainable energy. In order to evaluate solar panels, non-destructive tests, such as defect inspections and response property evaluations, are necessary. We developed a DC current distribution mapping system of the solar panels using a High Critical Temperature Superconductor Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (HTS-SQUID) gradiometer with ramp edge type Josephson junctions. Two independent components of the magnetic fields perpendicular to the panel surface (∂Bz/∂x, ∂Bz/∂y) were detected. The direct current of the solar panel is visualized by calculating the composition of the two signal components, the phase angle, and mapping the DC current vector. The developed system can evaluate the uniformity of DC current distributions precisely and may be applicable for defect detection of solar panels.

  15. An HTS X-band DC SQUID based amplifier: Modeling and development concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokopenko, G.V.; Shitov, S.V.; Borisenko, I.V.;

    2003-01-01

    on a combination of single-layer slot and coplanar lines forming novel input and output circuits. The following parameters (per stage) are obtained via simulation for central frequency 11 GHz: bandwidth 0.5-1 GHz, power gain 11-12 dB, noise temperature 5-10 K. A saturation product as high as 500-1000 K......We present an X-band amplifier concept based on a HTS grain boundary dc SQUID, which allow for extended dynamic range for use with SIS mixers, e.g., as a buffer amplifier in front of an RSFQ ADC, or possibly for satellite and cellular phone communications. The proposed rf design is based......(.)GHz is estimated for a characteristic voltage of 1-2 mV. The realization of these parameters makes HTS SQA competitive with existing coolable HEMT-amplifiers for radio astronomy and satellite communication....

  16. Biomimetic production of silk-like recombinant squid sucker ring teeth proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dawei; Guerette, Paul A; Hoon, Shawn; Kong, Kiat Whye; Cornvik, Tobias; Nilsson, Martina; Kumar, Akshita; Lescar, Julien; Miserez, Ali

    2014-09-01

    The sucker ring teeth (SRT) of Humboldt squid exhibit mechanical properties that rival those of robust engineered synthetic polymers. Remarkably, these properties are achieved without a mineral phase or covalent cross-links. Instead, SRT are exclusively made of silk-like proteins called "suckerins", which assemble into nanoconfined β-sheet reinforced supramolecular networks. In this study, three streamlined strategies for full-length recombinant suckerin protein production and purification were developed. Recombinant suckerin exhibited high solubility and colloidal stability in aqueous-based solvents. In addition, the colloidal suspensions exhibited a concentration-dependent conformational switch, from random coil to β-sheet enriched structures. Our results demonstrate that recombinant suckerin can be produced in a facile manner in E. coli and processed from mild aqueous solutions into materials enriched in β-sheets. We suggest that recombinant suckerin-based materials offer potential for a range of biomedical and engineering applications. PMID:25068184

  17. Turning performance in squid and cuttlefish: unique dual-mode, muscular hydrostatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrebsky, Rachel A; Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S

    2016-05-01

    Although steady swimming has received considerable attention in prior studies, unsteady swimming movements represent a larger portion of many aquatic animals' locomotive repertoire and have not been examined extensively. Squids and cuttlefishes are cephalopods with unique muscular hydrostat-driven, dual-mode propulsive systems involving paired fins and a pulsed jet. These animals exhibit a wide range of swimming behavior, but turning performance has not been examined quantitatively. Brief squid, Lolliguncula brevis, and dwarf cuttlefish, Sepia bandensis, were filmed during turns using high-speed cameras. Kinematic features were tracked, including the length-specific radius of the turn (R/L), a measure of maneuverability, and angular velocity (ω), a measure of agility. Both L. brevis and S. bandensis demonstrated high maneuverability, with (R/L)min values of 3.4×10(-3)±5.9×10(-4) and 1.2×10(-3)±4.7×10(-4) (mean±s.e.m.), respectively, which are the lowest measures of R/L reported for any aquatic taxa. Lolliguncula brevis exhibited higher agility than S. bandensis (ωa,max=725.8 versus 485.0 deg s(-1)), and both cephalopods have intermediate agility when compared with flexible-bodied and rigid-bodied nekton of similar size, reflecting their hybrid body architecture. In L. brevis, jet flows were the principal driver of angular velocity. Asymmetric fin motions played a reduced role, and arm wrapping increased turning performance to varying degrees depending on the species. This study indicates that coordination between the jet and fins is important for turning performance, with L. brevis achieving faster turns than S. bandensis and S. bandensis achieving tighter, more controlled turns than L. brevis.

  18. A tunable microstrip SQUID amplifier for the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelley, Sean; Hansen, Jorn; Weingarten, Elan; Mueck, Michael; Hilton, Gene; Clarke, John

    2014-03-01

    We describe a microstrip SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) amplifier (MSA) used as the photon detector in the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX). Cooled to 100 mK or lower, an optimized MSA approaches the quantum limit of detection. The axion dark matter is detected via Primakoff conversion to a microwave photon in a high-Q (~ 105) tunable microwave cavity, currently cooled to about 1.6 K, in the presence of a 7-tesla magnetic field. The MSA consists of a square loop of thin Nb film, incorporating two Josephson tunnel junctions with resistive shunts to prevent hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristic. The microstrip is a square Nb coil deposited over an intervening insulating layer. Since the photon frequency is determined by the unknown axion mass, the cavity and amplifier must be tunable over a broad frequency range. Tunability is achieved by terminating the microstrip with a GaAs varactor diode with a voltage-controlled capacitance that enables us to vary the resonance from nearly 1/2 to 1/4 of a wavelength. With the SQUID current-biased in the voltage state, we demonstrate a gain of typically 20 dB over nearly one octave, 415 MHz to 800 MHz. Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41029, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, NSF grants PHY-1067242 and PHY-1306729, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  19. A numerical and experimental investigation of planar asymmetric SQUID gradiometer characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, U.; Walker, M.E.; Cochran, A.; Hutson, D.; Lang, G.; Weston, R.G.; Pegrum, C.M. [University of Strathclyde, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    A low-cost, high-performance magnetic field sensor for applications such as biomagnetism and nondestructive evaluation can be fabricated by integrating a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and a gradiometer on a single chip. Conventionally, the gradiometric pick-up loop would have a rectangular outline divided symmetrically about the midpoint of its length so that its spatial response was also symmetrical. However, it is also possible to divide the same outline asymmetrically, maintaining the field rejection order of the gradiometer by adding an extra crossover. The spatial response of this arrangement will also be asymmetric, which may be exploited to reduce the effects of the nearby SQUID as a magnetic anomaly or to enhance the sensitivity of the device to magnetic sources at a particular distance. The techniques to calculate the crossover positions are well established. Here we outline how different designs may be evaluated theoretically and report on first experimental results for three simple designs. Several devices have been fabricated using a well established Nb/Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb trilayer process with high yields. The measurement of the spatial response of an asymmetric first-order gradiometer shows the expected magnetometer characteristics for a magnetic dipole source in the near field and first-order gradiometric characteristics for a far-field source. The balance of the integrated gradiometer appears to be better than one part in 10{sup 4}, and the magnetic field gradient sensitivity has been measured to be 100 fT cm{sup -1} Hz{sup -1/2}. (author)

  20. Standardizing CPUE of Ommastrephes bartramii for Chinese squid-jigging fishery in Northwest Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Siquan; CHEN Xinjun; CHEN Yong; XU Liuxiong; DAI Xiaojie

    2009-01-01

    Generalized linear models (GLM) and generalized additive models (GAM) were used to standardize catch per unit fishing effort (CPUE) of Ommastrephes bartramii for Chinese squid-jigging fishery in Northwest Pacific Ocean. Three groups of variables were considered in the standardization: spatial variables (longitude and latitude), temporal variables (year and month) and environmental variables, including sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea level height (SLH). CPUE was treated as the dependent variable and its error distribution was assumed to be log-normal in each model. The model selections of GLM and GAM were based on the finite sample-corrected Akaike information criterion (AICC) and pseudo-coefficient (Pcf) combined P-value, respectively. Both GAM and GLM analysis showed that the month was the most important variable affecting CPUE and could explain 21.3% of variability in CPUE while other variables only explained 8.66%. The interaction of spatial and temporal variables weakly influenced the CPUE. Moreover, spatio-temporal factors may be more important in influencing the CPUE of this squid than environmental variables. The standardized and nominal CPUEs were similar and had the same trends in spatio-temporal distribution, but the standardized CPUE values tended to be smaller than the nominal CPUE. The CPUE tended to have much higher monthly variation than annual variations and their values increased with month. The CPUE became higher with increasing latitude-high CPUE usually occurred in 145°E-148°E and 149°E-162°E. The CPUE was higher when SST was 14-21°C and the SLH from -22 cm to -18 cm. In this study, GAM tended to be more suitable than GLM in analysis of CPUE.

  1. Sound detection by the longfin squid (Loligo pealeii) studied with auditory evoked potentials: sensitivity to low-frequency particle motion and not pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mooney, T. Aran; Hanlon, Roger T; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob;

    2010-01-01

    extinguished at all frequencies if (1) water temperatures were less than 8°C, (2) statocysts were ablated, or (3) recording electrodes were placed in locations other than near the statocysts. Both the AEP response characteristics and the range of responses suggest that squid detect sound similarly to most fish......Although hearing has been described for many underwater species, there is much debate regarding if and how cephalopods detect sound. Here we quantify the acoustic sensitivity of the longfin squid (Loligo pealeii) using near-field acoustic and shaker-generated acceleration stimuli. Sound field......, with the statocyst acting as an accelerometer through which squid detect the particle motion component of a sound field. The modality and frequency range indicate that squid probably detect acoustic particle motion stimuli from both predators and prey as well as low-frequency environmental sound signatures that may...

  2. Combined climate- and prey-mediated range expansion of Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas), a large marine predator in the California Current System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Julia S; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Foley, David G; Gilly, William F; Robison, Bruce H; Field, John C

    2014-06-01

    Climate-driven range shifts are ongoing in pelagic marine environments, and ecosystems must respond to combined effects of altered species distributions and environmental drivers. Hypoxic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in midwater environments are shoaling globally; this can affect distributions of species both geographically and vertically along with predator-prey dynamics. Humboldt (jumbo) squid (Dosidicus gigas) are highly migratory predators adapted to hypoxic conditions that may be deleterious to their competitors and predators. Consequently, OMZ shoaling may preferentially facilitate foraging opportunities for Humboldt squid. With two separate modeling approaches using unique, long-term data based on in situ observations of predator, prey, and environmental variables, our analyses suggest that Humboldt squid are indirectly affected by OMZ shoaling through effects on a primary food source, myctophid fishes. Our results suggest that this indirect linkage between hypoxia and foraging is an important driver of the ongoing range expansion of Humboldt squid in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. PMID:24443361

  3. Baseband Feedback Frequency-Division Multiplexing with Low-Power dc-SQUIDs and Digital Electronics for TES X-Ray Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K.; Takei, Y.; Yamamoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Kohjiro, S.; Miyazaki, T.

    2014-08-01

    We are developing frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) systems with baseband feedback for TES X-ray microcalorimeter arrays for use with the DIOS mission. To meet the requirement of limited cooling capacity at cryogenic temperatures, we developed low-power and FDM-optmized dc-SQUIDs. To make maximum use of the SQUIDs, we also developed digital electronics using FPGA evaluation boards and ADC/DAC FMC daughter cards, and evaluated signal-to-noise ratios and gain-bandwidth products.

  4. ESTIMATION OF THE CATCH PER UNIT EFFORT (CPUE) AND MEDIUM SIZE OF GIANT SQUID (DOSIDICUS GIGAS) USING DIFFERENT TYPES OF JIGS IN PERU

    OpenAIRE

    JUAN MANUEL VALLES-MEZA; JOSÉ IANNACONE; MARCO ESPINO; LUIS MARIÁTEGUI

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate catch per unit effort (CPUE) and mean size of the giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) using different types of jigs in the squid jig fishing fleet operating in waters of Peru during December 1999 to December 2000. Detailed information of fishing operations were registered, along with the CPUE, catch, fishing effort, dorsal mantle dorsal length (DML) and other biological variables. The following results were obtained: (1) The number of crowns of jigs alone does ...

  5. Evaluation of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) byproduct hydrolysates obtained by acid-enzymatic hydrolysis and by autohydrolysis in practical diets for Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    OpenAIRE

    Mayra Lizett González-Félix; Martin Perez-Velazquez; Josafat Marina Ezquerra-Brauer; Lorena Bringas-Alvarado; Anabel Sánchez-Sánchez; Wilfrido Torres-Arreola

    2014-01-01

    The marine bioprocessing industry offers great potential to utilize byproducts for fish meal replacement in aquafeeds. Jumbo squid is an important fishery commodity in Mexico, but only the mantle is marketed. Head, fins, guts and tentacles are discarded in spite of being protein-rich byproducts. This study evaluated the use of two jumbo squid byproduct hydrolysates obtained by acid-enzymatic hydrolysis (AEH) and by autohydrolysis (AH) as ingredients in practical diets for shrimp. The hydrolys...

  6. Food web and fish stock changes in central Chile: comparing the roles of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) predation, the environment, and fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, Sergio; Arancibia, Hugo

    2013-10-01

    We analyzed recent food web and fish stock changes in the central Chile marine ecosystem, comparing the roles of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) as predator, the environment, and fishing. To accomplish this we used food web modeling and the Ecopath with Ecosim software (EwE). The principal fish stocks have experienced wide decadal fluctuations in the past 30 years, including stock collapses of horse mackerel (Trachurus murphyi) and hake (Merluccius gayi), and there was a large influx of jumbo squid during the mid-2000s. We used two EwE models representing the food web off central Chile to test the hypothesis that predation by jumbo squid has been significant in explaining the dynamics of the main fishing resources and other species in the study area. Results indicate that predation by jumbo squid on fish stocks is lower than that of other predators (e.g. hake) and the fishery. Long-term fluctuations (1978-2004) in the biomass of the main fish stocks (as well as other components of the food web) seem to be related to fishing and to variation in primary production, rather than to predation by jumbo squid alone. Jumbo squid seems to play a role as predator rather than prey in the system, but its impacts are low when compared with the impacts of other predators and fishing. Therefore, we conclude that jumbo squid predation on its prey was not the primary force behind the collapse of important fish stocks off central Chile. Future efforts should be directed to better understanding factors that trigger sudden increases in jumbo squid abundance off central Chile, as well as modeling its trophic impacts.

  7. Environmental pH, O2 and Capsular Effects on the Geochemical Composition of Statoliths of Embryonic Squid Doryteuthis opalescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O. Navarro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Spawning market squid lay embryo capsules on the seafloor of the continental shelf of the California Current System (CCS, where ocean acidification, deoxygenation and intensified upwelling lower the pH and [O2]. Squid statolith geochemistry has been shown to reflect the squid’s environment (e.g., seawater temperature and elemental concentration. We used real-world environmental levels of pH and [O2] observed on squid-embryo beds to test in the laboratory whether or not squid statolith geochemistry reflects environmental pH and [O2]. We asked whether pH and [O2] levels might affect the incorporation of element ratios (B:Ca, Mg:Ca, Sr:Ca, Ba:Ca, Pb:Ca, U:Ca into squid embryonic statoliths as (1 individual elements and/or (2 multivariate elemental signatures, and consider future applications as proxies for pH and [O2] exposure. Embryo exposure to high and low pH and [O2] alone and together during development over four weeks only moderately affected elemental concentrations of the statoliths, and uranium was an important element driving these differences. Uranium:Ca was eight-times higher in statoliths exposed to low pHT (7.57–7.58 and low [O2] (79–82 µmol·kg−1 than those exposed to higher ambient pHT (7.92–7.94 and [O2] (241–243 µmol·kg−1. In a separate experiment, exposure to low pHT (7.55–7.56 or low [O2] (83–86 µmol·kg−1 yielded elevated U:Ca and Sr:Ca in the low [O2] treatment only. We found capsular effects on multiple elements in statoliths of all treatments. The multivariate elemental signatures of embryonic statoliths were distinct among capsules, but did not reflect environmental factors (pH and/or [O2]. We show that statoliths of squid embryos developing inside capsules have the potential to reflect environmental pH and [O2], but that these “signals” are generated in concert with the physiological effects of the capsules and embryos themselves.

  8. Ventilation rates and activity levels of juvenile jumbo squid under metabolic suppression in the oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trübenbach, Katja; Pegado, Maria R; Seibel, Brad A; Rosa, Rui

    2013-02-01

    The Humboldt (jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a part-time resident of the permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and, thereby, it encounters oxygen levels below its critical oxygen partial pressure. To better understand the ventilatory mechanisms that accompany the process of metabolic suppression in these top oceanic predators, we exposed juvenile D. gigas to the oxygen levels found in the OMZ (1% O(2), 1 kPa, 10 °C) and measured metabolic rate, activity cycling patterns, swimming mode, escape jet (burst) frequency, mantle contraction frequency and strength, stroke volume and oxygen extraction efficiency. In normoxia, metabolic rate varied between 14 and 29 μmol O(2) g(-1) wet mass h(-1), depending on the level of activity. The mantle contraction frequency and strength were linearly correlated and increased significantly with activity level. Additionally, an increase in stroke volume and ventilatory volume per minute was observed, followed by a mantle hyperinflation process during high activity periods. Squid metabolic rate dropped more than 75% during exposure to hypoxia. Maximum metabolic rate was not achieved under such conditions and the metabolic scope was significantly decreased. Hypoxia changed the relationship between mantle contraction strength and frequency from linear to polynomial with increasing activity, indicating that, under hypoxic conditions, the jumbo squid primarily increases the strength of mantle contraction and does not regulate its frequency. Under hypoxia, jumbo squid also showed a larger inflation period (reduced contraction frequency) and decreased relaxed mantle diameter (shortened diffusion pathway), which optimize oxygen extraction efficiency (up to 82%/34%, without/with consideration of 60% potential skin respiration). Additionally, they breathe 'deeply', with more powerful contractions and enhanced stroke volume. This deep-breathing behavior allows them to display a stable ventilatory volume per

  9. Horizontal movements, vertical-habitat utilization and diet of the jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas) in the Pacific Ocean off Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzino, Gastón; Gilly, William F.; Markaida, Unai; Salinas-Zavala, César A.; Ramos-Castillejos, Jorge

    2010-07-01

    We deployed four pop-up archival-transmitting (PAT) tags on jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas) collected in the Pacific Ocean off the main entrance to Magdalena Bay on the Baja California peninsula in June 2005. This is the first successful deployment of PAT tags on jumbo squid in an area outside the Gulf of California. Summary data were obtained through the ARGOS satellite system for three of the tags; the fourth tag was physically recovered. All of the tagged squid tended to remain on the shallow continental shelf for several days after tagging and then moved offshore into deeper water. Three of the four squid appeared to migrate in a general southerly direction while the fourth remained offshore of Magdalena Bay. All of the squid spent most daylight hours at depths that were associated with the hypoxic oxygen minimum layer, and at night they spent a majority of time in the upper 50 m of the water column. Stomach content analysis and tag temperature-depth data during the first days after tagging revealed that the squid were feeding on pelagic red crabs ( Pleuroncodes planipes) and several larger, neritic fishes over the continental shelf off Magdalena Bay during a seasonal nearshore upwelling. Comparison of our results with those previously collected in the Gulf of California reveal that Dosidicus gigas can vary its behavior and diet to suit local environmental conditions. This adaptability is likely to be an important factor in the ability of D. gigas to invade and colonize new areas.

  10. Determination of biogenic amines in squid and white prawn by high-performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-Xi; Xu, Jie; Xue, Chang-Hu; Sheng, Wen-Jing; Gao, Rui-Chang; Xue, Yong; Li, Zhao-Jie

    2007-04-18

    A simple method was developed for the determination of biogenic amines in aquatic food products using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn automatic o-phthalaldehyde derivatization and fluorescence detection. The linearity, repeatability, and recovery of the method for seven amines (tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, agmatine, spermidine, and spermine) were evaluated. This optimized method was applied to detect biogenic amines in squid and white prawn during refrigerated storage. Sensory analysis, pH value, and total volatile base nitrogen value were combined to evaluate the freshness quality of these two raw materials. Agmatine and cadaverine in squid, cadaverine, and putrescine in white prawn were the most obviously changed amines during the storage at two different temperatures, and these biogenic amines could be the effective quality indicators for the freshness of the raw aquatic materials. PMID:17381105

  11. Effect of Bovine Plasma Protein on Autolysis and Gelation of Protein Extracted from Giant Squid (Dosidicus gigas Mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Raquel Marquez-Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bovine plasma protein (BPP on the inhibition of autolytic activity and its effect on the gelling properties of a protein concentrate (PC obtained from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas mantle were investigated. Sols and gels were prepared from the PC by adding different amounts of BPP (0, 1, and 2%. Dynamic oscillatory measurements indicated that systems with 1% BPP had a higher elastic modulus (G′, in which hydrophobic interactions were favored. Concerning the technological and textural quality of the gels, BPP caused a greater water holding capacity (WHC, force, cohesiveness, and elasticity, probably due to improvement of the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions during gel formation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM allowed visualization of the formation of more rigid and ordered gels with less porosity when BPP was added. Therefore, the addition of BPP improved the gelling capacity of proteins extracted from giant squid.

  12. Importance of jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas (Orbigny, 1835) in the pelagic ecosystem of the central Gulf of California

    OpenAIRE

    Rosas-Luis, R. (Rigoberto); Salinas-Zavala, C.A; Kock, V; Del Monte Luna, Pablo; Morales Zárate, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    The Humboldt squid is an important predator in the pelagic ecosystem of the central Gulf of California to the commercial catch of this species has increased over the past decade, probable due to a decrease of several top predators (sharks, large pelagic fish and the marine mammals) and the optimal feeding conditions in this area. Its high abundance and important position in the pelagic food web was quantified through two trophic models of the pelagic ecosystem of the central Gulf of Californi...

  13. Effect of Bovine Plasma Protein on Autolysis and Gelation of Protein Extracted from Giant Squid (Dosidicus gigas) Mantle

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Raquel Marquez-Alvarez; Wilfrido Torres-Arreola; Victor Manuel Ocano-Higuera; Benjamin Ramirez-Wong; Enrique Marquez-Rios

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bovine plasma protein (BPP) on the inhibition of autolytic activity and its effect on the gelling properties of a protein concentrate (PC) obtained from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle were investigated. Sols and gels were prepared from the PC by adding different amounts of BPP (0, 1, and 2%). Dynamic oscillatory measurements indicated that systems with 1% BPP had a higher elastic modulus (G′), in which hydrophobic interactions were favored. Concerning the technological and...

  14. Behavior ecology of the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas: insights from an animal-borne video and data logging system

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Lauren Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large pelagic cephalopod of the eastern Pacific that has recently undergone an unexpected, significant range expansion up the coast of North America. The impact that such a range expansion is expected to have on local fisheries and marine ecosystems has motivated a thorough study of this top predator, a squid whose lifestyle has been quite mysterious until recently. Unfortunately, Dosidicus spends daylight hours at depths prohibitive to making observations without signifi...

  15. Range Expansion of the Jumbo Squid in the NE Pacific: δ15N Decrypts Multiple Origins, Migration and Habitat Use

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Cooley, Rocio I.; Ballance, Lisa T.; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Coincident with climate shifts and anthropogenic perturbations, the highly voracious jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas reached unprecedented northern latitudes along the NE Pacific margin post 1997-98. The physical or biological drivers of this expansion, as well as its ecological consequences remain unknown. Here, novel analysis from both bulk tissues and individual amino acids (Phenylalanine; Phe and Glutamic acid; Glu) in both gladii and muscle of D. gigas captured in the Northern California Cur...

  16. Enlightenment of old ideas from new investigations: more questions regarding the evolution of bacteriogenic light organs in squids

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiguchi, M. K.; Lopez, J. E.; Boletzky, S. v.

    2004-01-01

    Bioluminescence is widespread among many different types of marine organisms. Metazoans contain two types of luminescence production, bacteriogenic (symbiotic with bacteria) or autogenic, via the production of a luminous secretion or the intrinsic properties of luminous cells. Several species in two families of squids, the Loliginidae and the Sepiolidae (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) harbor bacteriogenic light organs that are found central in the mantle cavity. These light organs are exceptional in ...

  17. Global observation of 24 November 2006 Pc5 pulsations by single mid-latitude underground [SQUID]2 system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available On 24 November 2006, simultaneous observations of Pc5 pulsations, electron precipitation and whistler-mode chorus, as well as solar wind and IMF parameters have been analyzed based on data from IMAGE magnetometers, riometer array and temporal VLF station. This paper focuses on the Pc5 pulsations detected at the same time, in the 1–25 millihertz range, by the [SQUID]2 system (SQUID magnetometer within a Shielding QUalified for Ionosphere Detection installed 518 m underground at 43.92° N, 5.48° E. As expected, the 3-D-frequency spectrum of these mid-latitude [SQUID]2 signals exhibits frequency peaks quasi identical to those observed by polar stations of close geomagnetic longitude. The signal/noise ratio allows the observation of the wave polarization and the beatings of the frequencies. As a result, the possibility of studying, at mid-latitude, magnetic Pc5 pulsations linked with an event in the magnetosphere can improve the description of both behaviour and propagation of these waves.

  18. Body Size Regression Formulae, Proximate Composition and Energy Density of Eastern Bering Sea Mesopelagic Fish and Squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Elizabeth H; Walker, William A; Thomason, James R

    2015-01-01

    The ecological significance of fish and squid of the mesopelagic zone (200 m-1000 m) is evident by their pervasiveness in the diets of a broad spectrum of upper pelagic predators including other fishes and squids, seabirds and marine mammals. As diel vertical migrators, mesopelagic micronekton are recognized as an important trophic link between the deep scattering layer and upper surface waters, yet fundamental aspects of the life history and energetic contribution to the food web for most are undescribed. Here, we present newly derived regression equations for 32 species of mesopelagic fish and squid based on the relationship between body size and the size of hard parts typically used to identify prey species in predator diet studies. We describe the proximate composition and energy density of 31 species collected in the eastern Bering Sea during May 1999 and 2000. Energy values are categorized by body size as a proxy for relative age and can be cross-referenced with the derived regression equations. Data are tabularized to facilitate direct application to predator diet studies and food web models.

  19. Body Size Regression Formulae, Proximate Composition and Energy Density of Eastern Bering Sea Mesopelagic Fish and Squid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth H Sinclair

    Full Text Available The ecological significance of fish and squid of the mesopelagic zone (200 m-1000 m is evident by their pervasiveness in the diets of a broad spectrum of upper pelagic predators including other fishes and squids, seabirds and marine mammals. As diel vertical migrators, mesopelagic micronekton are recognized as an important trophic link between the deep scattering layer and upper surface waters, yet fundamental aspects of the life history and energetic contribution to the food web for most are undescribed. Here, we present newly derived regression equations for 32 species of mesopelagic fish and squid based on the relationship between body size and the size of hard parts typically used to identify prey species in predator diet studies. We describe the proximate composition and energy density of 31 species collected in the eastern Bering Sea during May 1999 and 2000. Energy values are categorized by body size as a proxy for relative age and can be cross-referenced with the derived regression equations. Data are tabularized to facilitate direct application to predator diet studies and food web models.

  20. Performance of a 4 Kelvin pulse-tube cooled cryostat with dc SQUID amplifiers for bolometric detector testing

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Darcy; Keating, Brian; Quillin, Ron; Stebor, Nathan; Wilson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    The latest generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescopes is searching for the undetected faint signature of gravitational waves from inflation in the polarized signal of the CMB. To achieve the unprecedented levels of sensitivity required, these experiments use arrays of superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers that are cooled to sub-Kelvin temperatures for photon-noise limited performance. These TES detectors are read out using low- noise SQUID amplifiers. To rapidly test these detectors and similar devices in a laboratory setting, we constructed a cryogenic refrigeration chain consisting of a commercial two-stage pulse-tube cooler, with a base temperature of 3 K, and a closed-cycle 3He/4He/3He sorption cooler, with a base temperature of 220 mK. A commercial dc SQUID system, with sensors cooled to 4 K, was used as a highly-sensitive cryogenic ammeter. Due to the extreme sensitivity of SQUIDs to changing magnetic fields, there are several challenges involving cooling them with puls...

  1. Bio-mimetic composite scaffold from mussel shells, squid pen and crab chitosan for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavandi, Amin; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Ali, M Azam; Sun, Zhifa

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, chitosan/hydroxyapatite (HA)/β-tircalcium phosphate (β-TCP) composites were produced using squid pen derived chitosan (CHS) and commercial crab derived chitosan (CHC). CHS was prepared from squid pens by alkaline N-deacetylation. HA and β-TCP were extracted from mussel shells using a microwave irradiation method. Two different composites were prepared by incorporating 50% (w/w) HA/(β-TCP) in CHS or CHC followed by lyophilization and cross-linking of composites by tripolyphosphate (TPP). The effect of different freezing temperatures of -20, -80 and -196 °C on the physicochemical characteristics of composites was investigated. A simulated body fluid (SBF) solution was used for preliminary in vitro study for 1, 7, 14 and 28 days and the composites were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, SEM, μ-CT and ICP-MS. Porosity, pore size, water uptake; water retention abilities and in vitro degradations of the prepared composites were evaluated. The CHS composites were found to have higher porosity (62%) compared to the CHC composites (porosity 42%) and better mechanical properties. The results of this study indicated that composites produced at -20 °C had higher mechanical properties and lower degradation rate compared with -80 °C. Chitosan from the squid pen is an excellent biomaterial candidate for bone tissue engineering applications.

  2. SQUID-based systems for co-registration of ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance images and magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlashov, A. N.; Burmistrov, E.; Magnelind, P. E.; Schultz, L.; Urbaitis, A. V.; Volegov, P. L.; Yoder, J.; Espy, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    The ability to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ultra-low magnetic fields (ULF) of ∼100 μT, using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection, has enabled a new class of magnetoencephalography (MEG) instrumentation capable of recording both anatomical (via the ULF MRI) and functional (biomagnetic) information about the brain. The combined ULF MRI/MEG instrument allows both structural and functional information to be co-registered to a single coordinate system and acquired in a single device. In this paper we discuss the considerations and challenges required to develop a combined ULF MRI/MEG device, including pulse sequence development, magnetic field generation, SQUID operation in an environment of pulsed pre-polarization, and optimization of pick-up coil geometries for MRI in different noise environments. We also discuss the design of a “hybrid” ULF MRI/MEG system under development in our laboratory that uses SQUID pick-up coils separately optimized for MEG and ULF MRI.

  3. Characterization of directly coupled YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} SQUID magnetometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaume, Alexander; Beister, Verena; Scholtyssek, Jan M.; Ludwig, Frank; Schilling, Meinhard [Institut fuer Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Str. 66, D-38106 Braunschweig, Germany. (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) can be employed as highly sensitive magnetic field sensors in a variety of applications such as magnetoencephalography or magnetic nanoparticle detection. We fabricated SQUIDs from the high-T{sub c} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} on symmetric SrTiO{sub 3}-bicrystal substrates by pulsed laser deposition and argon ion etching. The layout consists of two directly coupled magnetometers on one chip which are attached to a rectangular pickup loop. The measurements were carried out in a liquid nitrogen container using a variable temperature insert. The temperature at the magnetically shielded sample holder can be adjusted between 77 K and 100 K. Here, we present measurements of the I-V-curves under the influence of a magnetic field for different sample temperatures. Also, the influence of the temperature and the influence of the bias current on the V-{Phi}-curves were investigated. From these measurements, parameters of the SQUID were calculated and compared to the theoretical estimations. Additionally, noise spectra were recorded for different bias reversal frequencies by using a direct-coupled flux-locked loop electronics from Magnicon GmbH.

  4. SQUID-based systems for co-registration of ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance images and magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, A.N., E-mail: matlach@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Burmistrov, E.; Magnelind, P.E.; Schultz, L.; Urbaitis, A.V.; Volegov, P.L.; Yoder, J.; Espy, M.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    The ability to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ultra-low magnetic fields (ULF) of {approx}100 {mu}T, using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection, has enabled a new class of magnetoencephalography (MEG) instrumentation capable of recording both anatomical (via the ULF MRI) and functional (biomagnetic) information about the brain. The combined ULF MRI/MEG instrument allows both structural and functional information to be co-registered to a single coordinate system and acquired in a single device. In this paper we discuss the considerations and challenges required to develop a combined ULF MRI/MEG device, including pulse sequence development, magnetic field generation, SQUID operation in an environment of pulsed pre-polarization, and optimization of pick-up coil geometries for MRI in different noise environments. We also discuss the design of a 'hybrid' ULF MRI/MEG system under development in our laboratory that uses SQUID pick-up coils separately optimized for MEG and ULF MRI.

  5. A cryo-amplifier working in a double loop-flux locked loop scheme for SQUID readout of TES detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrioli, Guido; Bastia, Paolo; Piro, Luigi; Macculi, Claudio; Colasanti, Luca

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we report on a novel SQUID readout scheme, called Double Loop-Flux Locked loop (DL-FLL), that we are investigating in the frame of ASI and ESA technological development contracts. This scheme is based on the realization of a cryogenic amplifier which is used in order to readout TES detectors in the Frequency Division Multiplexing technique, where high loop-gain is required up to few MHz. Loop-gain in feedback systems is, usually, limited by the propagation delay of the signals traveling in the loop because of the distance between the feedback loop elements. This problem is particularly evident in the case of SQUID systems, where the elements of the feedback loop are placed both at cryogenic and room temperature. To solve this issue we propose a low power dissipation cryo-amplifier capable to work at cryogenic temperatures so that it can be placed close to the SQUID realizing a local cryogenic loop. The adoption of the DL-FLL scheme allows to simplify considerably the cryo-amplifier which, being AC-coupled, don't require the features of a precision DC-coupled amplifier and can be made with a limited number of electronic components and with a consequent reduction of power dissipation.

  6. Effect of stimulation and hyperpolarization on non-electrolyte and sodium permeability in perfused axons of squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, C; Latorre, R

    1970-11-01

    1. The permeability for micro-injected [(3)H]ethylene glycol was measured in resting state and during stimulation at 100/sec in squid giant axons. No detectable changes during electrical activity were observed.2. The influxes of urethane, tritiated water, ethylene glycol, urea and sodium were measured in internally perfused squid axons. Ethylene glycol and urea influxes were determined simultaneously with sodium influxes. The electrical stimulation of the fibre produced an increase in the influx of sodium but did not alter the influxes of the non-electrolytes listed above.3. Experiments were done with the combined voltage clamp-perfusion technique. The influxes of ethylene glycol and sodium were simultaneously measured in resting state and during maximum sodium current under stimulation at 10/sec. The influx of sodium increased in these conditions but the influx of ethylene glycol remained constant. In some experiments, the fibre was hyperpolarized to 10 or 20 mV, above the resting potential and the influxes of ethylene glycol and sodium were measured. The sodium influx decreased to 60% at 20 mV above the resting potential whereas the influx of ethylene glycol remained constant.4. These results indicate that in the giant axons of the squid Dosidicus gigas, sodium and non-electrolytes fluxes are not coupled. PMID:5500991

  7. Production and functional evaluation of a protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) by acid dissolution and isoelectric precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Ruiz, Juan A; Pacheco-Aguilar, Ramón; Elena Lugo-Sánchez, M; Gisela Carvallo-Ruiz, M; García-Sánchez, Guillermina

    2008-09-15

    A protein concentrate from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) was produced under acidic conditions and its functional-technological capability evaluated in terms of its gel-forming ability, water holding capacity and colour attributes. Technological functionality of the concentrate was compared with that of squid muscle and a neutral concentrate. Protein-protein aggregates insoluble at high ionic strength (I=0.5M), were detected in the acidic concentrate as result of processing with no preclusion of its gel-forming ability during the sol-to-gel thermal transition. Even though washing under acidic condition promoted autolysis of the myosin heavy chain, the acidic concentrate displayed an outstanding ability to gel giving samples with a gel strength of 455 and 1160gcm at 75% and 90% compression respectively, and an AA folding test grade indicative of high gel strength, elasticity, and cohesiveness. The process proved to be a good alternative for obtaining a functional protein concentrate from giant squid muscle. PMID:26049243

  8. Stable isotopes document the trophic structure of a deep-sea cephalopod assemblage including giant octopod and giant squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherel, Y; Ridoux, V; Spitz, J; Richard, P

    2009-06-23

    Although deep-sea cephalopods are key marine organims, their feeding ecology remains essentially unknown. Here, we report for the first time the trophic structure of an assemblage of these animals (19 species) by measuring the isotopic signature of wings of their lower beaks, which accumulated in stomachs of stranded sperm whales. Overall, the species encompassed a narrow range in delta(13)C values (1.7 per thousand), indicating that they lived in closely related and overlapping habitats. delta(13)C values can be interpreted in terms of distribution with the more (13)C-depleted species (e.g. Stigmatoteuthis arcturi, Vampyroteuthis infernalis) having a more pelagic habitat than the more (13)C-enriched, bathyal species (e.g. Todarodes sagittatus and the giant squid Architeuthis dux). The cephalopods sampled had delta(15)N values ranging 4.6 per thousand, which is consistent with the species spanning approximately 1.5 trophic levels. Neither the giant octopod (Haliphron atlanticus) nor the giant squid reached the highest trophic position. Species delta(15)N was independent of body size, with large squids having both the highest (Taningia danae) and lowest (Lepidoteuthis grimaldii) delta(15)N values. Their trophic position indicates that some species share the top of the food web, together with other megacarnivores such as the sperm whale. PMID:19324634

  9. Suppression of ringing in the tuned input circuit of a SQUID detector used in low-field NMR measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In low-field NMR measurements, we employ a high temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as a detector with an inductively coupled liquid-nitrogen-cooled LC tuned input circuit. However, ringing across the LC circuit appears after the sudden switch-off of the prepolarizing magnetic field. This ringing leads to instability of the SQUID readout and prevents the acquisition of short-relaxation-time signals. We developed and tested two simple and effective FET-based Q switch circuits with adjustable parameters which suppress the ringing. Each of these Q switches makes it possible to record free induction decay signals with a Larmor frequency of 1.2 kHz and an effective relaxation time constant of 30 ms. A gradually changing current caused by the release of charges stored in the p-n junction of the FET, which delays the Q value recovery of the LC circuit, can only be observed by the SQUID because of its frequency-independent sensitivity.

  10. A SQUID-based 3He Co-magnetometer Readout for the SNS nEDM Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Clayton, Steven

    2014-03-01

    A discovery of a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron would provide one of the most important low energy tests of the discrete symmetries beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. A new experimental neutron EDM search, to be conducted at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at ORNL, has been proposed to improve the present experimental limit of 10-26 e .cm by two orders of magnitude. The experiment is based on the magnetic-resonance technique in which polarized neutrons precess at the Larmor frequency when placed in a static magnetic field; a non-zero EDM would be evident as a difference in precession frequency when a strong electric field is applied parallel vs. anti-parallel to the magnetic field. In addition to its role as neutron spin-analyzer via the spin-dependent n+3He nuclear capture process, polarized helium-3 (which has negligible EDM) will serve as co-magnetometer to correct for drifts in the magnetic field. The helium-3 magnetization signal will be read out by superconducting gradiometers coupled to SQUIDs. We describe a proposed SQUID system suitable for the complex neutron EDM apparatus, and demonstrate that the field noise in the SQUID system, tested in an environment similar to the EDM apparatus, meets the nEDM requirement.

  11. Magnetorelaxometry of few Fe3O4 nanoparticles at 77 K employing a self-compensated SQUID magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Alexander; Scholtyssek, Jan M.; Lak, Aidin; Kassner, Alexander; Ludwig, Frank; Schilling, Meinhard

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of great interest for industrial and medical applications. Therefore, the properties of the particles have to be well controlled. Several magnetic measurement schemes have been developed in order to determine particle parameters such as size distribution and structural properties. In general, systems are designed either for the analysis of large amounts of MNP (≫1000) or for single particle investigation. Up to now, the region in between has been less studied. However, small and well defined amounts of MNPs are of high interest, e.g. for the systematic investigation of particle-particle interactions. In this paper, we present a method using electron beam lithographic preparation of small amounts of MNPs directly on a self-compensating high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with micrometer dimensions which is insensitive to homogeneous fields and first order gradients but very sensitive to internal magnetic dipole fields. Magnetorelaxometry (MRX) measurements were carried out at 77 K sample temperature in a magnetically shielded room in order to analyze the dynamic behavior of MNP samples and to evaluate the detection limit of our SQUID sensors. Calculations based on the magnetic moment superposition model (MSM) and finite element simulations (FEM) indicate that the MNP samples can be fabricated in a well-defined way by the presented method. Based on MRX measurements of a sample with 200 single-core magnetite MNPs with core diameters of 12 nm, we estimate the detection limit of our SQUID MRX setup as 70 MNPs.

  12. Magnetite Biomineralization: Fifty years of progress, from beach-combing to the SQUID microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Dixson, A. D.; Raub, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetite biomineralization was first discovered 50 years ago as a hardening agent in the teeth of the Polyplacophoran molluscs (chitons) by the late Prof. Heinz A. Lowenstam of Caltech, when he noticed unusual erosional effects produced by their grazing in the intertidal zones of Palau (Lowenstam, 1962). Since then, biogenic magnetite has been detected in a broad range of organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria, protists, insects, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans. In many species, the role of ferromagnetic material as a neurophysiological transducer is demonstrated clearly through the effects of pulse-remagnetization on behavior. A brief (1 uS), properly configured magnetic discharge from a rectified LC circuit, tailored to exceed the coercivity of the magnetite, will often abolish a magnetic behavioral response, or in some cases make the organism go the wrong way. This is a unique ferromagnetic effect. The genes controlling magnetite biomineralization are well characterized in several species of bacteria, and the ability of some of these bacterial genes to initiate magnetite precipitation in mammalian cell lines argues for a common descent, probably via a magnetotactic mitochondrial ancestor. Previous studies in fish reported the presence of single-domain magnetite crystals in cells near projections of the trigeminal nerve, co-located in the olfactory epithelium. Although the cells are rare, the recent development of a spinning magnetic field technique allows easy identification and isolation of these cells for individual study (Eder et al., 2012). The cells are surprisingly magnetic, with moments hundreds of times larger than typical magnetotactic bacteria. Subsequent efforts to identify the anatomical seat of magnetoreceptors have focused on the same locations in new organisms, excluding other areas. Using SQUID moment magnetometry and SQUID scanning microscopy, we report here the unexpected presence of biogenic magnetite in

  13. Interannual and seasonal variability of winter-spring cohort of neon flying squid abundance in the Northwest Pacific Ocean during 1995-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian

    2016-06-01

    The neon flying squid, Ommastrephes bartramii, is a species of economically important cephalopod in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Its short lifespan increases the susceptibility of the distribution and abundance to the direct impact of the environmental conditions. Based on the generalized linear model (GLM) and generalized additive model (GAM), the commercial fishery data from the Chinese squid-jigging fleets during 1995 to 2011 were used to examine the interannual and seasonal variability in the abundance of O. bartramii, and to evaluate the influences of variables on the abundance (catch per unit effort, CPUE). The results from GLM suggested that year, month, latitude, sea surface temperature (SST), mixed layer depth (MLD), and the interaction term ( SST×MLD) were significant factors. The optimal model based on GAM included all the six significant variables and could explain 42.43% of the variance in nominal CPUE. The importance of the six variables was ranked by decreasing magnitude: year, month, latitude, SST, MLD and SST×MLD. The squid was mainly distributed in the waters between 40°N and 44°N in the Northwest Pacific Ocean. The optimal ranges of SST and MLD were from 14 to 20°C and from 10 to 30 m, respectively. The squid abundance greatly fluctuated from 1995 to 2011. The CPUE was low during 1995-2002 and high during 2003-2008. Furthermore, the squid abundance was typically high in August. The interannual and seasonal variabilities in the squid abundance were associated with the variations of marine environmental conditions and the life history characteristics of squid.

  14. Squids, supercurrents, and slope anomalies: Nuclear structure from heavy-ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the past five years we have developed experimental techniques to study heavy-ion transfer reactions to high spin states in deformed nuclei. These methods have been turned into a quantitative tool to assess the influence of collective excitation on single-particle and pairing structure. I discuss some of the nuclear structure questions which are being answered in these experiments: How strong is ground state pairing? How does pairing change with angular momentum? Why is two-neutron transfer much stronger than expected at large radial separation? What is the evidence for a nuclear Josephson Effect? What is the evidence for a nuclear Berry phase effect (nuclear SQUID)? Why does one-neutron transfer populate much higher spins than would be naively expected? Conversely, why does two-neutron transfer populate much lower spins than anyone expected? The answer to each of these questions involves the influence of detailed nuclear structure on transfer reactions, and represents quantitative new information about the effect of angular momentum and excitation energy on many-body systems with a finite number of particles. 8 refs., 6 figs

  15. Salting-in effect on muscle protein extracted from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ru; Pan, Weichun; Lin, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Li, Mengya; Li, Jianrong; Niu, Fuge; Li, Ang

    2017-01-15

    The salting-in effect on muscle protein is well-known in food science but hard to explain using conventional theories. Myofibrillar protein extracted from the giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) was selected as a model muscle protein to study this mechanism in KCl solutions. Changes in the secondary structures of myofibrillar protein molecules caused by concentrated salts, particularly in the paramyosin molecule conformation, have been reported. Zeta-potential determinations showed that these secondary structures have modified protein molecule surfaces. The zeta-potential of the myofibrillar protein molecules fell from -7.24±0.82 to -9.99±1.65mV with increasing salt concentration from 0.1 to 0.5M. The corresponding second virial coefficient increased from -85.43±3.8×10(-7) to -3.45±1.3×10(-7) molmLg(-2). The extended law of corresponding states suggests that reduced attractive interactions increase the protein solubility. Solubility measurements in alternating KCl concentrations showed that the conformational change was reversible.

  16. Open water camouflage via 'leaky' light guides in the midwater squid Galiteuthis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Amanda L; Sweeney, Alison M

    2016-06-01

    Galiteuthis, a midwater squid, has photophores on the ventral surfaces of its eyes. These photophores emit bioluminescence to counter-illuminate the shadows cast by the eyes in downwelling sunlight, thereby hiding the eyes from upward-looking predators. The photophores consist of laminated fibre-like cells with semi-coaxial protein-dense layers around axial cytoplasm. These cells have been suggested to function as light guides: bioluminescence is an isotropic process used to hide in an anisotropic light environment, so any emission must be reshaped to be effective. We found a wide variation in cross-sectional geometries of photophore cells; some were more efficient at light guiding than others. We used a set of optical models to place these photophores in the context of the radiance where Galiteuthis lives and discovered a possible adaptive reason for this variation. In Galiteuthis's horizontal and vertical range, ocean radiance is also quite variable. For complete camouflage, photophores must reproduce this variation in radiance using an isotropic source. Our models show that variation in the geometry of the photophore light guides reproduces the predicted variation in ocean radiance experienced by this species. By selectively activating geometrically distinct populations of photophore cells, the animal may reproduce the angular distribution of light at all positions in its habitat. PMID:27278362

  17. An Unexpected Diversity of Photoreceptor Classes in the Longfin Squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra C N Kingston

    Full Text Available Cephalopods are famous for their ability to change color and pattern rapidly for signaling and camouflage. They have keen eyes and remarkable vision, made possible by photoreceptors in their retinas. External to the eyes, photoreceptors also exist in parolfactory vesicles and some light organs, where they function using a rhodopsin protein that is identical to that expressed in the retina. Furthermore, dermal chromatophore organs contain rhodopsin and other components of phototransduction (including retinochrome, a photoisomerase first found in the retina, suggesting that they are photoreceptive. In this study, we used a modified whole-mount immunohistochemical technique to explore rhodopsin and retinochrome expression in a number of tissues and organs in the longfin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. We found that fin central muscles, hair cells (epithelial primary sensory neurons, arm axial ganglia, and sucker peduncle nerves all express rhodopsin and retinochrome proteins. Our findings indicate that these animals possess an unexpected diversity of extraocular photoreceptors and suggest that extraocular photoreception using visual opsins and visual phototransduction machinery is far more widespread throughout cephalopod tissues than previously recognized.

  18. Integration of a Cryocooler into a SQUID Magnetospinography System for Reduction of Liquid Helium Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke; Kawai, Jun; Ogata, Hisanao; Uehara, Gen

    We are currently developing a magnetospinography (MSG) system for noninvasive functional imaging of the spinal cord. The MSG system is a device for observing a weak magnetic field accompanied by the neural activity of the spinal cord by using an array of low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic flux sensors. As in the case of other biomagnetic measurement systems such as the magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, the running cost of the MSG system is mainly dependent on the liquid helium (LHe) consumption of a dewar vessel. We integrated a cryocooler into the MSG system to reduce LHe consumption. A pulse tube cryocooler with a cooling power of 0.5Wat 4 K was placed adjacent to a magnetically shielded room and was directly connected to the thermal radiation shield of the dewar by an electrically isolated transfer tube. Cold helium gas was circulated between the cryocooler and the radiation shield. Consequently, the temperature of the radiation shield decreased below 40 K. Previous studies have shown that the detection of a weak magnetic field is often hindered by severe low-frequency band noise from the cryocooler. However, the band of the MSG signals is much higher than that of the cryocooler noise. Therefore, the noise can be filtered out and has a less detrimental effect on MSG measurement than on other biomagnetic field measurements such as MEG measurement. As a result, LHe consumption was reduced by 46%, with no increase in the noise floor.

  19. SQUID-Detected MRI in the Limit of Zero Static Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, Nathan Dean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-12-14

    This thesis describes an implementation of the so-called"zero-field MRI" (ZFMRI) pulse sequence, which allows for imaging in an arbitrarily low B0 field. The ZFMRI sequence created an effective unidirectional gradient field by using a train of pi pulses to average out the concomitant gradient components during encoding. The signals were acquired using a low-transition temperature dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (low-Tc dc SQUID) coupled to a first-order axial gradiometer. The experiments were carried out in a liquid helium dewar which was magnetically shielded with a single-layer mu-metal can around the outside and a superconducting Pb can contained within the helium space. We increased the filling factor of the custom-made, double-walled Pyrex insert by placing the liquid alcohol sample, at a temperature of approximately -50 degrees C, at the center of one loop of the superconducting gradiometer, which was immersed in the helium bath.

  20. Sneaker Male Squid Produce Long-lived Spermatozoa by Modulating Their Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirohashi, Noritaka; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Nakaya, Fumio; Iida, Tomohiro; Iwata, Yoko

    2016-09-01

    Spermatozoa released by males should remain viable until fertilization. Hence, sperm longevity is governed by intrinsic and environmental factors in accordance with the male mating strategy. However, whether intraspecific variation of insemination modes can impact sperm longevity remains to be elucidated. In the squid Heterololigo bleekeri, male dimorphism (consort and sneaker) is linked to two discontinuous insemination modes that differ in place and time. Notably, only sneaker male spermatozoa inseminated long before egg spawning can be stored in the seminal receptacle. We found that sneaker spermatozoa exhibited greater persistence in fertilization competence and flagellar motility than consort ones because of a larger amount of flagellar glycogen. Sneaker spermatozoa also showed higher capacities in glucose uptake and lactate efflux. Lactic acidosis was considered to stabilize CO2-triggered self-clustering of sneaker spermatozoa, thus establishing hypoxia-induced metabolic changes and sperm survival. These results, together with comparative omics analyses, suggest that postcopulatory reproductive contexts define sperm longevity by modulating the inherent energy levels and metabolic pathways. PMID:27385589

  1. Ndel1-derived peptides modulate bidirectional transport of injected beads in the squid giant axon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Segal

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectional transport is a key issue in cellular biology. It requires coordination between microtubule-associated molecular motors that work in opposing directions. The major retrograde and anterograde motors involved in bidirectional transport are cytoplasmic dynein and conventional kinesin, respectively. It is clear that failures in molecular motor activity bear severe consequences, especially in the nervous system. Neuronal migration may be impaired during brain development, and impaired molecular motor activity in the adult is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases leading to neuronal cell death. The mechanisms that regulate or coordinate kinesin and dynein activity to generate bidirectional transport of the same cargo are of utmost importance. We examined how Ndel1, a cytoplasmic dynein binding protein, may regulate non-vesicular bidirectional transport. Soluble Ndel1 protein, Ndel1-derived peptides or control proteins were mixed with fluorescent beads, injected into the squid giant axon, and the bead movements were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Automated tracking allowed for extraction and unbiased analysis of a large data set. Beads moved in both directions with a clear bias to the anterograde direction. Velocities were distributed over a broad range and were typically slower than those associated with fast vesicle transport. Ironically, the main effect of Ndel1 and its derived peptides was an enhancement of anterograde motion. We propose that they may function primarily by inhibition of dynein-dependent resistance, which suggests that both dynein and kinesin motors may remain engaged with microtubules during bidirectional transport.

  2. Retinal Development and Ommin Pigment in the Cranchiid Squid Teuthowenia pellucida (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron B Evans

    Full Text Available The cranchiid Teuthowenia pellucida, like many deep-sea squid species, possesses large eyes that maximise light sensitivity in a nearly aphotic environment. To assess ontogenetic changes in the visual system, we conducted morphometric and histological analyses of the eyes using specimens from New Zealand collections. While the ratio between eye diameter and mantle length maintained a linear relationship throughout development, histological sections of the retina revealed that the outer photoreceptor layer became proportionally longer as the animal aged, coincident with a habitat shift into deeper, darker ocean strata. Other retinal layers maintained the same absolute thickness as was observed in paralarvae. Granules of the pigment ommin, normally located in the screening layer positioned at the base of the photoreceptors, were also observed at the outer end of the photoreceptor segments throughout the retina in young and mid-sized specimens. Early developmental stages of this species, dwelling in shallow waters, may therefore rely on migratory ommin to help shield photoreceptors from excess light and prevent over-stimulation. The oldest, deeper-dwelling specimens of T. pellucida examined had longer photoreceptors, and little or no migrated ommin was observed; we suggest therefore that short-term adaptive mechanisms for bright light conditions may be used primarily during epipelagic, early life stages in this species.

  3. Quasi-molecular bosonic complexes-a pathway to SQUID with controlled sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Capogrosso-Sansone, Barbara; Kuklov, Anatoly; Penna, Vittorio

    2016-02-01

    Recent experimental advances in realizing degenerate quantum dipolar gases in optical lattices and the flexibility of experimental setups in attaining various geometries offer the opportunity to explore exotic quantum many-body phases stabilized by anisotropic, long-range dipolar interaction. Moreover, the unprecedented control over the various physical properties of these systems, ranging from the quantum statistics of the particles, to the inter-particle interactions, allow one to engineer novel devices. In this paper, we consider dipolar bosons trapped in a stack of one-dimensional optical lattice layers, previously studied in (Safavi-Naini et al 2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 043604). Building on our prior results, we provide a description of the quantum phases stabilized in this system which include composite superfluids (CSFs), solids, and supercounterfluids, most of which are found to be threshold-less with respect to the dipolar interaction strength. We also demonstrate the effect of enhanced sensitivity to rotations of a SQUID-type device made of two CSF trapped in a ring-shaped optical lattice layer with weak links.

  4. Nanohertz Frequency Determination for the Gravity Probe B HF SQUID Signal

    CERN Document Server

    Salomon, M; Kozaczuk, J; Berberian, J E; Santiago, D I; Keiser, G M; Silbergleit, A S; Worden, P

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method to measure the frequency and the frequency change rate of a digital signal. This method consists of three consecutive algorithms: frequency interpolation, phase differencing, and a third algorithm specifically designed and tested by the authors. The succession of these three algorithms allowed a 5 parts in 10^10 resolution in frequency determination. The algorithm developed by the authors can be applied to a sampled scalar signal such that a model linking the harmonics of its main frequency to the underlying physical phenomenon is available. This method was developed in the framework of the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) mission. It was applied to the High Frequency (HF) component of GP-B's Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) signal, whose main frequency fz is close to the spin frequency of the gyroscopes used in the experiment. A 30 nHz resolution in signal frequency and a 0.1 pHz/sec resolution in its decay rate were achieved out of a succession of 1.86 second-long...

  5. Front-end Multiplexing - applied to SQUID multiplexing : Athena X-IFU and QUBIC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Prêle, Damien

    2015-01-01

    As we have seen for digital camera market and a sensor resolution increasing to "megapixels", all the scientific and high-tech imagers (whatever the wave length - from radio to X-ray range) tends also to always increases the pixels number. So the constraints on front-end signals transmission increase too. An almost unavoidable solution to simplify integration of large arrays of pixels is front-end multiplexing. Moreover, "simple" and "efficient" techniques allow integration of read-out multiplexers in the focal plane itself. For instance, CCD (Charge Coupled Device) technology has boost number of pixels in digital camera. Indeed, this is exactly a planar technology which integrates both the sensors and a front-end multiplexed readout. In this context, front-end multiplexing techniques will be discussed for a better understanding of their advantages and their limits. Finally, the cases of astronomical instruments in the millimeter and in the X-ray ranges using SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device...

  6. Self-heterodyne detection of the {\\it in-situ} phase of an atomic-SQUID

    CERN Document Server

    Mathew, Ranchu; Eckel, Stephen; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Campbell, Gretchen K; Edwards, Mark; Tiesinga, Eite

    2015-01-01

    We present theoretical and experimental analysis of an interferometric measurement of the {\\it in-situ} phase drop across and current flow through a rotating barrier in a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This experiment is the atomic analog of the rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The phase drop is extracted from a spiral-shaped density profile created by the spatial interference of the expanding toroidal BEC and a reference BEC after release from all trapping potentials. We characterize the interferometer when it contains a single particle, which is initially in a coherent superposition of a torus and reference state, as well as when it contains a many-body state in the mean-field approximation. The single-particle picture is sufficient to explain the origin of the spirals, to relate the phase-drop across the barrier to the geometry of a spiral, and to bound the expansion times for which the {\\it in-situ} phase can be accurately determined. Mean-field estimates and numerical sim...

  7. Computational Study on a Squid-Like Underwater Robot with Two Undulating Side Fins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Mahbubar Rahman; Yasuyuki Toda; Hiroshi Miki

    2011-01-01

    The undulating fin propulsion system is an instance of the bio-inspired propulsion systems. In the current study, the swimming motion of a squid-like robot with two undulating side fins, mimicking those of a Stingray or a Cuttlefish, was investigated through flow computation around the body. We used the finite analytic method for space discretization and Euler implicit scheme for time discretization along with the PISO algorithm for velocity pressure coupling. A body-fitted moving grid was generated using the Poisson equation at each time step. Based on the computed results, we discussed the features of the flow field and hydrodynamic forces acting on the body and fin. A simple relationship among the fin's principal dimensions was established. Numerical computation was done for various aspect ratios, fin angles and frequencies in order to validate the proposed relationship among principal dimensions. Subsequently, the relationship was examined base on the distribution of pressure difference between upper and lower surfaces and the distribution of the thrust force. In efficiency calculations, the undulating fins showed promising results. Finally, for the fin, the open characteristics from computed data showed satisfactory conformity with the experimental results.

  8. Investigation of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) skin gelatin peptides for their in vitro antioxidant effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Eresha; Rajapakse, Niranjan; Byun, Hee-Guk; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2005-09-01

    Peptides derived from tryptic hydrolysate of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) skin gelatin were assessed for their antioxidant properties in different in vitro assay systems. The hydrolysate itself exhibited a strong lipid peroxidation inhibition and it was much higher than that of natural antioxidant, alpha-tocopherol. In addition, it could scavenge highly active free radicals in oxidative systems, in the order of hydroxyl and carbon-centered radicals. Two representative peptides with comparatively higher antioxidant potency were purified and characterized as Phe-Asp-Ser-Gly-Pro-Ala-Gly-Val-Leu (880.18 Da) and Asn-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gln-Ala-Gly-Gln-Pro-Gly-Glu-Arg (1241.59 Da). Furthermore, viability of radical-mediated oxidation-induced human lung fibroblasts was enhanced following the treatment of two peptides. However it did not exhibit substantial ion chelation, and we presumed that the observed radical scavenging potency of these peptides play a vital role for their strong antioxidant activity. Based on our results we suggest that hydrophobic amino acids present in peptide sequences contributed greatly for observed antioxidant activities. PMID:15916780

  9. Methods to obtain protein concentrates from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) and evaluation of their functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Rongel, A; Ezquerra-Brauer, J M; Ocano-Higuera, V M; Ramirez-Wong, B; Torres-Arreola, W; Rouzaud-Sandez, O; Marquez-Rios, E

    2014-03-01

    Jumbo squid is an important fishery resource in Mexico, and its muscle is lean and white and it has a very low price in the market. It is abundant, but with little or nothing added value, therefore is necessary to search alternatives of processing. Due to muscle characteristics, the aim of this study was to obtain protein concentrates using different methods. They were obtained by means of acidic (acid protein concentrates) and alkaline (alkaline protein concentrates) dissolution. Moreover, a protein concentrate was obtained by direct isoelectric precipitation and by the traditional method (neutral protein concentrates). The yield with better results was alkaline protein concentrates (63.58 ± 1.8%). The gel hardness was significantly different (p < 0.05), especially for the alkaline protein concentrates. The acid protein concentrates, isoelectric precipitation and alkaline protein concentrates were better with regard to the neutral protein concentrates, concerning the emulsifying and foaming properties. The protein concentrates by means of alkaline dissolution gave a better gelling property, but all the processes had the potential to obtain protein with emulsifying and foaming properties. PMID:23733825

  10. Visualization of ion transportation in an electrolyte using an HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Direct detection of magnetic fields generated by the ion currents was performed. • The hysteresis signals caused by the redox reactions of the electrolyte were observed. • The magnetic signal during the pulsed voltammetry was measured at various positions. - Abstract: Direct detection of magnetic fields generated by the ion currents in electrolytic cells was performed and the ion currents were mapped during a cyclic voltammetry experiment. A high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometer with ramp-edge Josephson junctions was used as the detector and thus the first derivative of the magnetic field along the electrolytic cell surface was obtained. The electric potential vs. the reference electrode was measured between −0.3 V and 0.8 V and the hysteresis signals caused by the redox reactions of the electrolyte were observed. The vector component of the ion current during cyclic voltammetry was mapped along the electrolytic cell. As a demonstration of visualization of ion transportation, the magnetic signal was also measured at various positions above the electrolytic cell surface

  11. Front-end multiplexing—applied to SQUID multiplexing: Athena X-IFU and QUBIC experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prele, D.

    2015-08-01

    As we have seen for digital camera market and a sensor resolution increasing to "megapixels", all the scientific and high-tech imagers (whatever the wave length - from radio to X-ray range) tends also to always increases the pixels number. So the constraints on front-end signals transmission increase too. An almost unavoidable solution to simplify integration of large arrays of pixels is front-end multiplexing. Moreover, "simple" and "efficient" techniques allow integration of read-out multiplexers in the focal plane itself. For instance, CCD (Charge Coupled Device) technology has boost number of pixels in digital camera. Indeed, this is exactly a planar technology which integrates both the sensors and a front-end multiplexed readout. In this context, front-end multiplexing techniques will be discussed for a better understanding of their advantages and their limits. Finally, the cases of astronomical instruments in the millimeter and in the X-ray ranges using SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) will be described.

  12. Differential conductivity mapping of solar panels using a high-T{sub C} superconductor SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiwa, T., E-mail: kiwa@elec.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushimanaka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Maeda, S.; Miyake, K.; Kataoka, N. [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushimanaka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Tsukamoto, A.; Adachi, S.; Tanabe, K. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, ISTEC, 1-10-13 Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Kandori, A. [Advanced Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 1-280 Higashi-Koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan); Tsukada, K. [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushimanaka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    To visualise the distribution of the electric property of solar cells, we developed a differential conductivity mapping system using high-T{sub C} (HTS-) superconductor SQUID with a normal conducting pick-up coil. The bias ac voltage with an offset voltage was applied to a solar panel made from amorphous silicon, and the normal component of the generated magnetic field was lock-in-detected. Thus the measured signal was converted to dB/dV properties, which are inverse-proportional to the differential resistivity, as the function of the offset voltage. By scanning the pick-up coil across the panel surface, we obtained the distribution of dB/dV properties across the solar panel was obtained by scanning the pick-up coil across the panel surface. The distribution of dB/dV on the panel differed between when the light source was on and when it was off. This result suggests that the proposed system is a potential tool for diagnosing the electric properties of solar cells.

  13. On the Possibility of Detecting Wormholes in a Quantum Coherence Experiment with a RF SQUID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Subhendra

    Wormholes are tunneling events in which small closed universes branch off from our universe. Hawking has claimed that wormholes lead to a loss of quantum coherence since they carry away a part of the final state. A different avatar of this loss of quantum coherence is seen when we integrate out the wormhole variables from the path integral and obtain a non-local effective action. With this non -local action the time evolution of a quantum state is seen to violate the superposition principle. A very stringent test of the superposition principle is the macroscopic quantum coherence experiment with a SQUID proposed by Leggett. Since the ground state of a superconductor has a macroscopic number of particles in the same quantum state, we find that the effective coupling with a wormhole is enhanced by the total number of Copper pairs. For a 1mm ^3 superconducting ring the number of Copper pairs is ~10^{19 } and we find that the coherent oscillations of the flux will be suppressed at a rate of exp {-beta^2t^2} with beta~10^{-4}s ^{-1}.

  14. Salting-in effect on muscle protein extracted from giant squid (Dosidicus gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ru; Pan, Weichun; Lin, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Li, Mengya; Li, Jianrong; Niu, Fuge; Li, Ang

    2017-01-15

    The salting-in effect on muscle protein is well-known in food science but hard to explain using conventional theories. Myofibrillar protein extracted from the giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) was selected as a model muscle protein to study this mechanism in KCl solutions. Changes in the secondary structures of myofibrillar protein molecules caused by concentrated salts, particularly in the paramyosin molecule conformation, have been reported. Zeta-potential determinations showed that these secondary structures have modified protein molecule surfaces. The zeta-potential of the myofibrillar protein molecules fell from -7.24±0.82 to -9.99±1.65mV with increasing salt concentration from 0.1 to 0.5M. The corresponding second virial coefficient increased from -85.43±3.8×10(-7) to -3.45±1.3×10(-7) molmLg(-2). The extended law of corresponding states suggests that reduced attractive interactions increase the protein solubility. Solubility measurements in alternating KCl concentrations showed that the conformational change was reversible. PMID:27542474

  15. Differential conductivity mapping of solar panels using a high-TC superconductor SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To visualise the distribution of the electric property of solar cells, we developed a differential conductivity mapping system using high-TC (HTS-) superconductor SQUID with a normal conducting pick-up coil. The bias ac voltage with an offset voltage was applied to a solar panel made from amorphous silicon, and the normal component of the generated magnetic field was lock-in-detected. Thus the measured signal was converted to dB/dV properties, which are inverse-proportional to the differential resistivity, as the function of the offset voltage. By scanning the pick-up coil across the panel surface, we obtained the distribution of dB/dV properties across the solar panel was obtained by scanning the pick-up coil across the panel surface. The distribution of dB/dV on the panel differed between when the light source was on and when it was off. This result suggests that the proposed system is a potential tool for diagnosing the electric properties of solar cells.

  16. Magnetic anisotropy of polycrystalline magnetoferritin investigated by SQUID and electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, F., E-mail: fabrizio.moro@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Physics, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD Nottingham (United Kingdom); Miguel, R. de [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Jenkins, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Gómez-Moreno, C. [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Sells, D.; Tuna, F. [EPSRC National UK EPR Facility, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McInnes, E.J.L. [EPSRC National UK EPR Facility, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Lostao, A. [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Fundación ARAID (Spain); Luis, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Slageren, J. van [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Magnetoferritin molecules with an average inorganic core diameter of 5.7±1.6 nm and polycrystalline internal structure were investigated by a combination of transmission electron microscopy, magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, and electron magnetic resonance (EMR) experiments. The temperature and frequency dependence of the magnetic susceptibility allowed for the determination of the magnetic anisotropy on an experimental time scale which spans from seconds to nanoseconds. In addition, angle-dependent EMR experiments were carried out for the determination of the nanoparticle symmetry and internal magnetic field. Due to the large surface to volume ratio, the nanoparticles show larger and uniaxial rather than cubic magnetic anisotropies compared to bulk maghemite and magnetite. - Highlights: • Synthesis of polycristalline magnetoferritin with average particle size of 5.7 nm. • Observation of surface effects and estimation of the anisotropy constant and energy barrier by a combined SQUID and EMR study. • Deviation of Gilbert relaxation of the magnetization in magnetoferritin. • Determination of particle symmetry and internal magnetic field by angle-dependent EMR studies.

  17. Metabolic suppression during protracted exposure to hypoxia in the jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas, living in an oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A; Häfker, N Sören; Trübenbach, Katja; Zhang, Jing; Tessier, Shannon N; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Rosa, Rui; Storey, Kenneth B

    2014-07-15

    The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas, can survive extended forays into the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Previous studies have demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and a limited anaerobic contribution to ATP production, suggesting the capacity for substantial metabolic suppression during hypoxic exposure. Here, we provide a more complete description of energy metabolism and explore the expression of proteins indicative of transcriptional and translational arrest that may contribute to metabolic suppression. We demonstrate a suppression of total ATP demand under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen, PO2 =0.8 kPa) in both juveniles (52%) and adults (35%) of the jumbo squid. Oxygen consumption rates are reduced to 20% under hypoxia relative to air-saturated controls. Concentrations of arginine phosphate (Arg-P) and ATP declined initially, reaching a new steady state (~30% of controls) after the first hour of hypoxic exposure. Octopine began accumulating after the first hour of hypoxic exposure, once Arg-P breakdown resulted in sufficient free arginine for substrate. Octopine reached levels near 30 mmol g(-1) after 3.4 h of hypoxic exposure. Succinate did increase through hypoxia but contributed minimally to total ATP production. Glycogenolysis in mantle muscle presumably serves to maintain muscle functionality and balance energetics during hypoxia. We provide evidence that post-translational modifications on histone proteins and translation factors serve as a primary means of energy conservation and that select components of the stress response are altered in hypoxic squids. Reduced ATP consumption under hypoxia serves to maintain ATP levels, prolong fuel store use and minimize the accumulation of acidic intermediates of anaerobic ATP-generating pathways during prolonged diel forays into the OMZ. Metabolic suppression likely limits active, daytime foraging at depth in the core of the OMZ, but confers an energetic advantage over competitors that must

  18. Postmortem biochemical behavior of giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle stored in ice and its relation with quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Ríos, E; Morán-Palacio, E F; Lugo-Sánchez, M E; Ocano-Higuera, V M; Pacheco-Aguilar, R

    2007-09-01

    Several freshness and spoilage indicators were monitored to characterize the postmortem biochemistry of giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle. Squid samples were obtained directly from the sea and kept at 0 degrees C during a 15-d storage period. Data at zero time were obtained from cryogenically frozen samples at time of capture. The adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) degradation followed a different pattern as compared with that from fish species. ATP was almost completely depleted at 24-h postcatch from 6.54 to <1 micromol/g, while at the same time Hx was the predominant catabolite with a concentration of 4 mumol/g, reaching 6.85 micromol/g at day 15. K-value data followed a logarithmic pattern with time instead of a linear one, with no change after day 3, thus reducing its suitability as a freshness index. The coefficient Hx/AMP seems to be an adequate alternative for this purpose due to its constant increment with time. The high NH4Cl content in mantle muscle (461.3 +/- 24.5 mg of NH4(+)/100 g) derived from its physiological importance for the species compromises the use of the distillation step of the TVB-N analysis commonly used as a spoilage index. This fact explains why the initially high value of TVB-N detected in mantle muscle (243.7 mg N/100 g) did not correlate with the initial low TMA-N content (1.5 +/- 0.1 mg/100 g of muscle). The results suggested that under the experimental conditions the shelf life of squid exceeds 15 d. PMID:17995632

  19. Locomotion and behavior of Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, in relation to natural hypoxia in the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilly, William F; Zeidberg, Louis D; Booth, J Ashley T; Stewart, Julia S; Marshall, Greg; Abernathy, Kyler; Bell, Lauren E

    2012-09-15

    We studied the locomotion and behavior of Dosidicus gigas using pop-up archival transmitting (PAT) tags to record environmental parameters (depth, temperature and light) and an animal-borne video package (AVP) to log these parameters plus acceleration along three axes and record forward-directed video under natural lighting. A basic cycle of locomotor behavior in D. gigas involves an active climb of a few meters followed by a passive (with respect to jetting) downward glide carried out in a fins-first direction. Temporal summation of such climb-and-glide events underlies a rich assortment of vertical movements that can reach vertical velocities of 3 m s(-1). In contrast to such rapid movements, D. gigas spends more than 80% of total time gliding at a vertical velocity of essentially zero (53% at 0±0.05 m s(-1)) or sinking very slowly (28% at -0.05 to -0.15 m s(-1)). The vertical distribution of squid was compared with physical features of the local water column (temperature, oxygen and light). Oxygen concentrations of ≤20 μmol kg(-1), characteristic of the midwater oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), can influence the daytime depth of squid, but this depends on location and season, and squid can 'decouple' from this environmental feature. Light is also an important factor in determining daytime depth, and temperature can limit nighttime depth. Vertical velocities were compared over specific depth ranges characterized by large differences in dissolved oxygen. Velocities were generally reduced under OMZ conditions, with faster jetting being most strongly affected. These data are discussed in terms of increased efficiency of climb-and-glide swimming and the potential for foraging at hypoxic depths. PMID:22915711

  20. Volumetric flow imaging reveals the importance of vortex ring formation in squid swimming tail-first and arms-first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartol, Ian K; Krueger, Paul S; Jastrebsky, Rachel A; Williams, Sheila; Thompson, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    Squids use a pulsed jet and fin movements to swim both arms-first (forward) and tail-first (backward). Given the complexity of the squid multi-propulsor system, 3D velocimetry techniques are required for the comprehensive study of wake dynamics. Defocusing digital particle tracking velocimetry, a volumetric velocimetry technique, and high-speed videography were used to study arms-first and tail-first swimming of brief squid Lolliguncula brevis over a broad range of speeds [0-10 dorsal mantle lengths (DML) s(-1)] in a swim tunnel. Although there was considerable complexity in the wakes of these multi-propulsor swimmers, 3D vortex rings and their derivatives were prominent reoccurring features during both tail-first and arms-first swimming, with the greatest jet and fin flow complexity occurring at intermediate speeds (1.5-3.0 DML s(-1)). The jet generally produced the majority of thrust during rectilinear swimming, increasing in relative importance with speed, and the fins provided no thrust at speeds >4.5 DML s(-1). For both swimming orientations, the fins sometimes acted as stabilizers, producing negative thrust (drag), and consistently provided lift at low/intermediate speeds (swimming orientation, and η for swimming sequences with clear isolated jet vortex rings was significantly greater (η=78.6±7.6%, mean±s.d.) than that for swimming sequences with clear elongated regions of concentrated jet vorticity (η=67.9±19.2%). This study reveals the complexity of 3D vortex wake flows produced by nekton with hydrodynamically distinct propulsors.

  1. Immunohistochemical localization of a GnRH-like peptide in the brain of the cephalopod spear-squid, Loligo bleekeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Masafumi; Oka, Yoshitaka; Nagai, Yoshinori; Amiya, Noriko; Yamamori, Kunio

    2008-04-01

    We examined whether a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like peptide exists in the brain of the cephalopod spear-squid, Loligo bleekeri, by performing a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay and immunohistochemistry. The displacement curve obtained for serially diluted extracts of the spear-squid brain paralleled the chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) standard curve, indicating the existence of a cGnRH-II-like peptide in the brain. For immunohistochemistry, a mouse monoclonal antibody raised against the common amino acid sequence of GnRH (LRH13) and a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against cGnRH-II were used. GnRH-like-immunoreactive (ir) cell bodies (that reacted with LRH13) were mainly detected in the central part of the ventral magnocellular lobe (vmL), and a few cell bodies were also detected in the olfactory lobe and palliovisceral lobe (pvL). Bundles of GnRH-like-ir axons were observed running from the vmL to the internal brain regions. GnRH-like-ir fibers were widely distributed in almost all the brain regions. cGnRH-II-ir cell bodies were localized in the optic gland, outer region of the vmL, and pvL. Further, cGnRH-II-ir fibers were distributed in the wide areas of the brain. These results suggest that at least two forms of GnRH-like peptidergic neuronal systems exist in the spear-squid brain. PMID:18313672

  2. Improved tunable microstrip SQUID amplifiers for the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelley, Sean; Hansen, Jørn; Hilton, Gene; Mol, Jan-Michael; Clarke, John; ADMX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We describe a series of tunable microstrip SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) amplifiers (MSAs) used as the photon detector in the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX). Cooled to 100mK or lower, an optimized MSA approaches the quantum limit of detection. The axion dark matter candidate would be detected via Primakoff conversion to a microwave photon in a high-Q (~ 105) tunable microwave cavity, cooled to 1.6 K or lower, in the presence of a 7-tesla magnetic field. The MSA consists of a square loop of thin Nb film, incorporating two resistively shunted Josephson tunnel junctions biased to the voltage state, flux-coupled to a resonant microstrip. The photon frequency is determined by the unknown axion mass, so the cavity and amplifier must be tunable over a broad frequency range. MSA tunability is achieved by terminating the microstrip with a GaAs varactor diode that operates at cryogenic temperatures. This voltage-controlled capacitance enables us to vary the resonant microstrip mode from nearly λ/2 to λ/4. We demonstrate gains exceeding 20 dB, at frequencies above 900 MHz. With proper design of the microwave environment, a noise temperature of 1/2 to 1/4 of the physical temperature is demonstrated. Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41029, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE- AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, NSF Grant 1067242, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  3. Tunable microstrip SQUID amplifiers for the Gen 2 Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelley, Sean; Hilton, Gene; Clarke, John; ADMX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present a series of tunable microstrip SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) amplifiers (MSAs) for installation in ADMX. The axion dark matter candidate is detected via Primakoff conversion to a microwave photon in a high-Q (~100,000) tunable microwave cavity cooled with a dilution refrigerator in a 7-tesla magnetic field. The microwave photon frequency ν is a function of the unknown axion mass, so both the cavity and amplifier must be scanned over a wide frequency range. An MSA is a linear, phase-preserving amplifier consisting of a square washer loop, fabricated from a thin Nb film, incorporating two Josephson tunnel junctions with resistive shunts to prevent hysteresis. The input is coupled via a microstrip made from a square Nb coil deposited over the washer with an intervening insulating layer. Tunability is achieved by terminating the microstrip with GaAs varactors that operate below 100 mK. By varying the varactor capacitance with a bias voltage, the resonant frequency is varied by up to a factor of 2. We demonstrate several devices operating below 100 mK, matched to the discrete operating bands of ADMX at frequencies ranging from 560 MHz to 1 GHz. The MSAs exhibit gains exceeding 20 dB and the associated noise temperatures, measured with a hot/cold load, approach the standard quantum limit (hν/kB) . Supported by DOE Grants DE - FG02 - 97ER41029, DE - FG02 - 96ER40956, DE - AC52 - 07NA27344, DE - AC03 - 76SF00098, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  4. Tetragenococcus muriaticus sp. nov., a new moderately halophilic lactic acid bacterium isolated from fermented squid liver sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomi, M; Kimura, B; Mizoi, M; Sato, T; Fujii, T

    1997-07-01

    A total of 11 strains of moderately halophilic histamine-producing bacteria isolated from fermented squid liver sauce were studied phenotypically, genotypically, and phylogenetically. These strains are considered members of the genus Tetragenococcus based on their physiological, morphological, and chemotaxonomic characteristics. A 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that these strains clustered with, but were separate from, Tetragenococcus halophilus. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments indicated that the new isolates represent a new Tetragenococcus species, for which we propose the name Tetragenococcus muriaticus; strain X-1 (= JCM 10006) is the type strain of this species. PMID:9226914

  5. Detection of spatial hot spots and variation for the neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii resources in the northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongjiu; Chen, Xinjun; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing effects of global climate change and fishing activities, the spatial distribution of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) is changing in the traditional fishing ground of 150°-160°E and 38°-45°N in the northwest Pacific Ocean. This research aims to identify the spatial hot and cold spots (i.e. spatial clusters) of O. bartramii to reveal its spatial structure using commercial fishery data from 2007 to 2010 collected by Chinese mainland squid-jigging fleets. A relatively strongly-clustered distribution for O. bartramii was observed using an exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) method. The results show two hot spots and one cold spot in 2007 while only one hot and one cold spots were identified each year from 2008 to 2010. The hot and cold spots in 2007 occupied 8.2% and 5.6% of the study area, respectively; these percentages for hot and cold spot areas were 5.8% and 3.1% in 2008, 10.2% and 2.9% in 2009, and 16.4% and 11.9% in 2010, respectively. Nearly half (>45%) of the squid from 2007 to 2009 reported by Chinese fleets were caught in hot spot areas while this percentage reached its peak at 68.8% in 2010, indicating that the hot spot areas are central fishing grounds. A further change analysis shows the area centered at 156°E/43.5°N was persistent as a hot spot over the whole period from 2007 to 2010. Furthermore, the hot spots were mainly identified in areas with sea surface temperature (SST) in the range of 15-20°C around warm Kuroshio Currents as well as with the chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration above 0.3 mg/m3. The outcome of this research improves our understanding of spatiotemporal hotspots and its variation for O. bartramii and is useful for sustainable exploitation, assessment, and management of this squid.

  6. Age, growth and maturation of jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) from the Gulf of California, México

    OpenAIRE

    Markaida, U.; Quiñonez Velazquez, Casimiro; Nishizaki S., O.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the age and growth of large specimens of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas that supported the fishery in the Gulf of California in 1995-1997. Statoliths of 299 females (10.8-87.5 cm mantle length, ML) and 147 males (17-73.9 cm ML) were read. Assuming a daily rhythm of statolith deposition the smallest female (10.8 cm ML) was 84 days old and the largest (87.5 cm ML) 386 days old. The oldest females were 14-15 months old. The smallest male (17 cm ML) was 135 days old and the ...

  7. On the occurrence of egg masses of the diamond-shaped squid Thysanoteuthis rhombus Troschel, 1857 in the subtropical eastern Atlantic (Canary Islands. A potential commercial species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Escanez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Data on opportunistic sightings of diamond-shaped squid Thysanoteuthis rhombus egg masses in the Canary Islands (Atlantic Ocean are presented. A total of 16 egg masses of this species were recorded and photographed from 2000 to 2010 around the western islands of the archipelago (El Hierro, Tenerife and La Gomera. These data reveal the existence of an important spawning area for diamond-shaped squid around the Canary Islands, in subtropical east Atlantic waters. We provide preliminary data for the potential development of an artisanal fishery focused on this species, and a discussion on its potential impacts on the marine ecosystem.

  8. Low-frequency flux noise and visualization of vortices in a YBa2Cu3O7 dc SQUID washer with an integrated input coil

    OpenAIRE

    Straub, R; Keil, S.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2001-01-01

    We used low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) for imaging quantized magnetic flux (vortices) in direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with approximately 1 micron spatial resolution at temperature T=77 K in a controllable magnetic field up to 20 microTesla. We demonstrate that LTSEM allows to image the spatial distribution of vortices in a YBa2Cu3O7/SrTiO3/YBa2Cu3O7 multilayer thin-film structure consisting of a dc SQUID washer with an integra...

  9. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones I: Oxygen consumption rates and critical oxygen partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueblood, Lloyd A.; Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active, epipelagic squid known to undertake diel vertical migrations across a large temperature and oxygen gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Hypoxia is known to cause metabolic suppression in D. gigas. However, the precise oxygen level at which metabolic suppression sets in is unknown. Here we describe a novel ship-board swim tunnel respirometer that was used to measure metabolic rates and critical oxygen partial pressures (Pcrit) for adult squids (2-7kg). Metabolic rate measurements were validated by comparison to the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, citrate synthase, in mantle muscle tissue (2-17kg). We recorded a mean routine metabolic rate of 5.91μmolg-1h-1 at 10°C and 12.62μmolg-1h-1 at 20°C. A temperature coefficient, Q10, of 2.1 was calculated. D. gigas had Pcrits of 1.6 and 3.8kPa at 10 and 20°C, respectively. Oxygen consumption rate (MO2) varied with body mass (M) according to MO2=11.57M-0.12±0.03 at 10°C. Citrate synthase activity varied with body mass according to Y=9.32M-0.19±0.02.

  10. Differential impacts of ocean acidification and warming on winter and summer progeny of a coastal squid (Loligo vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rui; Trübenbach, Katja; Pimentel, Marta S; Boavida-Portugal, Joana; Faleiro, Filipa; Baptista, Miguel; Dionísio, Gisela; Calado, Ricardo; Pörtner, Hans O; Repolho, Tiago

    2014-02-15

    Little is known about the capacity of early life stages to undergo hypercapnic and thermal acclimation under the future scenarios of ocean acidification and warming. Here, we investigated a comprehensive set of biological responses to these climate change-related variables (2°C above winter and summer average spawning temperatures and ΔpH=0.5 units) during the early ontogeny of the squid Loligo vulgaris. Embryo survival rates ranged from 92% to 96% under present-day temperature (13-17°C) and pH (8.0) scenarios. Yet, ocean acidification (pH 7.5) and summer warming (19°C) led to a significant drop in the survival rates of summer embryos (47%, Pocean acidification and summer warming scenarios. The occurrence of prolonged embryogenesis along with lowered thermal tolerance limits under such conditions is expected to negatively affect the survival success of squid early life stages during the summer spawning period, but not winter spawning.

  11. Observations on the spawning behavior, egg masses and paralarval development of the ommastrephid squid Todarodes pacificus in a laboratory mesocosm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puneeta, Pandey; Vijai, Dharmamony; Yoo, Hae-Kyun; Matsui, Hajime; Sakurai, Yasunori

    2015-12-01

    The spawning behavior of ommastrephid squids has never been observed under natural conditions. Previous laboratory observations of Japanese flying squid (Todarodes pacificus) suggest that pre-spawning females might rest on the continental shelf or slope before they ascend above the pycnocline to spawn, and that the egg masses might settle in the pycnocline. Here, two mesocosm experiments were conducted in a 300 m(3) tank that was 6 m deep to investigate this hypothesis. In the first experiment, a thermocline (2.5-3.5 m) was established in the tank by creating a thermally stratified (17-22°C) water column. In the second experiment, the temperature was uniform (22°C) at all depths. Prior to spawning, females did not rest on the tank floor. In the stratified water column, egg masses remained suspended in the thermocline, but in an unstratified water column, they settled on the tank bottom, collapsed and were infested by microbes, resulting in abnormal or nonviable embryos. Eleven females spawned a total of 18 egg masses (17-80 cm in diameter), indicating that females can spawn more than once when under stress. Paralarvae hatched at stage 30/31 and survived for up to 10 days, allowing us to observe the most advanced stage of paralarvae in captivity. Paralarvae survived after consumption of the inner yolk, suggesting they might have fed in the tank.

  12. Study of Cu-wound Flux transformer for high-Tc SQUID ultra-low field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We constructed a ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system employing a high-temperature superconductor (High Tc) SQUID with a separated Cu-wound flux transformer. The pickup coil consisted of two single solenoid coils and each coil was differentially connected each other. The flux transformer consisted of a pickup coil at room temperature and an input coil, which was put in liquid nitrogen and was magnetically coupled with a high-Tc SQUID. The ratio of the transformer was considered and optimized. A water phantom of 10 mL was located in the one side of pickup coil. In the system, we applied polarizing field Bp perpendicular to the measurement field Bm before measurements. Bp was 0.8 T and permanent magnet was used. By using this system, free induction decay (FID) signals of 2H were measured at Bm of 30 μT to evaluate the system. The longitudinal relaxation times T1 of water were also estimated by changing the polarizing time of Bp.

  13. Relationship Between Beak Morphological Variables and Body Size and Mantle Length of Male and Female Argentine Shortfin Squid (Illex argentinus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xinjun; LU Huajie; LIU Bilin; FANG Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Beak of cephalopod is an important hard tissue.Understanding the morphology of beak can yield critical information on the role of cephalopods in the ecosystem.The south patagonic stock of the Argentine shortfin squid,Illex argentinus,is not only one of the most important fishing targets,but also one of the most important species in the marine eco-system of the southwest Atlantic.A total of 430 samples of I.argentinus,including 229 females 103-346mm in mantle length (ML) and 201males 140-298mm in ML,were collected from the area off the Exclusive Economic Zone of Argentinean waters by Chinese squid jigging vessels during February to May 2007.The morphology of their beaks was evaluated.The relationships between beak morphological variables and ML differed significantly among males and females.They could be best described by logarithmic functions for females and linear functions for males except for upper wing length (UWL) and lower rostrum length (LRL),which followed exponential functions in their relationships with ML.The results showed the sexual dimorphism in the relationship between ML and beak morphology for the south patagonic stock of I.argentinus.However,no significant difference was found between males and females in the relationships of beak morphological variables (except for UWL) versus body weight (BW),suggesting that the relationship between beak morphological variables and BW can be used for estimating the biomass consumed by their predators.

  14. Isolation and properties of AMP deaminase from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle from the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Rios, E; Pacheco-Aguilar, R; Castillo-Yañez, F J; Figueroa-Soto, C G; Ezquerra-Brauer, J M; Gollas-Galvan, T

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase was purified from jumbo squid mantle muscle by chromatography in cellulose phosphate, Q-Fast and 5'-AMP sepharose. Specific activity of 2.5U/mg protein, 4.5% recovery and 133.68 purification fold were obtained at the end of the experiment. SDS-PAGE showed a single band with 87kDa molecular mass, native PAGE proved a band of 178kDa, whereas gel filtration detected a 180kDa protein, suggesting the homodimeric nature of this enzyme, in which subunits are not linked by covalent forces. Isoelectric focusing of this enzyme showed a pI of 5.76, which agrees with pI values of AMP deaminase from other invertebrate organisms. AMP deaminase presented a kinetic sigmoidal plot with Vmax of 1.16μM/min/mg, Km of 13mM, Kcat of 3.48μM.s(-1) and a Kcat/Km of 267 (mol/L)(-1).s(-1). The apparent relative low catalytic activity of jumbo squid muscle AMP deaminase in the absence of positive effectors is similar to that reported for homologous enzymes in other invertebrate organisms. PMID:26050167

  15. Purification and in vitro antioxidative effects of giant squid muscle peptides on free radical-mediated oxidative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Niranjan; Mendis, Eresha; Byun, Hee-Guk; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2005-09-01

    Low molecular weight peptides obtained from ultrafiltration (UF) of giant squid (Dosidicus gigas) muscle protein were studied for their antioxidative effects in different in vitro oxidative systems. The most potent two peptides, Asn-Ala-Asp-Phe-Gly-Leu-Asn-Gly-Leu-Glu-Gly-Leu-Ala (1307 Da) and Asn-Gly-Leu-Glu-Gly-Leu-Lys (747 Da), exhibited their antioxidant potential to act as chain-breaking antioxidants by inhibiting radical-mediated peroxidation of linoleic acid, and their activities were closer to highly active synthetic antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene. Addition of these peptides could enhance the viability of cytotoxic embryonic lung fibroblasts significantly (P<.05) at a low concentration of 50 microg/ml, and it was presumed due to the suppression of radical-induced oxidation of membrane lipids. Electron spin trapping studies revealed that the peptides were potent scavengers of free radicals in the order of carbon-centered (IC(50) 396.04 and 304.67 microM), hydroxyl (IC(50) 497.32 and 428.54 microM) and superoxide radicals (IC(50) 669.34 and 573.83 microM). Even though the exact molecular mechanism for scavenging of free radicals was unclear, unusually high hydrophobic amino acid composition (more than 75%) of giant squid muscle peptides was presumed to be involved in the observed activities. PMID:16115545

  16. Highly Sensitive Measurements of the Dark Current of Superconducting Cavities for TESLA Using a SQUID Based Cryogenic Current Comparator

    CERN Document Server

    Vodel, W; Nietzsche, S

    2004-01-01

    This contribution presents a Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) as an excellent tool for detecting dark currents generated, e.g. by superconducting cavities for the upcoming TESLA project (X-FEL) at DESY. To achieve the maximum possible energy the gradient of the superconducting RF cavities should be pushed close to the physical limit of 50 MV/m. The undesired field emission of electrons (so-called dark current) of the superconducting RF cavities at strong fields may limit the maximum gradient. The absolute measurement of the dark current in correlation with the gradient will give a proper value to compare and classify the cavities. The main component of the CCC is a highly sensitive LTS-DC SQUID system which is able to measure extremely low magnetic fields, e.g. caused by the dark current. For this reason the input coil of the SQUID is connected across a special designed toroidal niobium pick-up coil for the passing electron beam. A noise limited current resolution of nearly 2 pA/√(Hz) with a measu...

  17. 3He comagnetometer readout using SQUIDs in the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment at SNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Steven; Kim, Young; nEDM Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The nEDM collaboration is developing a new experiment to measure the neutron's electric dipole moment to ~10-28 e-cm. A non-zero neutron EDM would be the first observation of CP violation in a baryon containing only light quarks, while a null result would be inconsistent with predictions from most variants of supersymmetry. The experiment will measure the difference in spin precession, of polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN) produced and stored in a superfluid-helium-filled cell, when the magnetic and electric fields are parallel and antiparallel. A key feature of the experimental method is the use of polarized 3He atoms within the cell acting as both spin analyzer and comagnetometer to the UCN. In one mode of running, the 3He precession signal is detected by SQUID gradiometers adjacent to the cell. This talk will cover recent experimental studies of a prototype SQUID gradiometer suitable for the nEDM experiment. This work was supported by DOE Office Of Science, Nuclear Physics.

  18. Feasibility study of contaminant detection for food with ULF-NMR/MRI system using HTS-SQUID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukade, Yoshimi, E-mail: hatukade@ens.tut.ac.jp; Tsunaki, Shingo; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Abe, Takayuki; Hatta, Junichi; Tanaka, Saburo

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Feasibility of application of ultra-low field (ULF) NMR/MRI was studied. •ULF-NMR/MRI system utilized HTS-rf-SQUID and permanent magnet of 1.1 T. •Magnetic contaminants in water were successfully detected by NMR measurements. •Non-magnetic contaminants in water were distinguished by 1D-MRI measurements. -- Abstract: We have developed an ultra-low frequency (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system utilizing an HTS-SQUID for an application of contaminant detection in food and drink. In the system, a permanent magnet of 1.1 T was used to pre-polarize protons in a water sample. We measured NMR signals from water samples with or without various contaminants, such as stainless steel (SUS304), aluminum, and glass balls using the system. In the case that the contaminant was the SUS304 ball, the NMR signal intensity was reduced compared to that from the sample without the contaminant due to the remnant field of the contaminant. One-dimensional (1D) MRIs of the samples were also acquired to detect non-magnetic contaminants. In the 1D MRIs, changes of the MRI spectra were detected, corresponding to positions of the contaminants. These results show that the feasibility of the system to detect various contaminants in foods.

  19. Cephalopods in the North-Eastern Atlantic: Species, Biogeography, Ecology, explotation and conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Hastie, L. C.; Pierce, G.J.; Jing WANG; Bruno, I. (Isabel); Moreno, A.; Piatkowski, Uwe; Robin, J P

    2009-01-01

    Cephalopods play a significant role in coastal and oceanic ecosystems, both as consumers of invertebrates and small fish and as the prey of some fish, seabirds and marine mammals and other large predators. Approximately 30 species of cephalopod have been recorded in the north-eastern Atlantic and adjacent waters, including 18 teuthid (squid), seven sepiolid (bobtail), three sepiid (cuttlefish) and 10 octopod (octopus) species. A number of these are exploited commercially and support important...

  20. Pygmy squids and giant brains: mapping the complex cephalopod CNS by phalloidin staining of vibratome sections and whole-mount preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollesen, T; Loesel, R; Wanninger, A

    2009-01-01

    Among bilaterian invertebrates, cephalopod molluscs (e.g., squids, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a central nervous system (CNS) that rivals in complexity that of the phylogenetically distant vertebrates (e.g., mouse and human). However, this prime example of convergent evolution has rarely been ...