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Sample records for bmal1 protein stability

  1. Interaction of circadian clock proteins PER2 and CRY with BMAL1 and CLOCK

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    Bordon Alain

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circadian oscillation of clock-controlled gene expression is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 act as activators of target gene transcription; however, interactions of PER and CRY proteins with the heterodimer abolish its transcriptional activation capacity. PER and CRY are therefore referred to as negative regulators of the circadian clock. To further elucidate the mechanism how positive and negative components of the clock interplay, we characterized the interactions of PER2, CRY1 and CRY2 with BMAL1 and CLOCK using a mammalian two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Results Both PER2 and the CRY proteins were found to interact with BMAL1 whereas only PER2 interacts with CLOCK. CRY proteins seem to have a higher affinity to BMAL1 than PER2. Moreover, we provide evidence that PER2, CRY1 and CRY2 bind to different domains in the BMAL1 protein. Conclusion The regulators of clock-controlled transcription PER2, CRY1 and CRY2 differ in their capacity to interact with each single component of the BMAL1-CLOCK heterodimer and, in the case of BMAL1, also in their interaction sites. Our data supports the hypothesis that CRY proteins, especially CRY1, are stronger repressors than PER proteins.

  2. Circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 in the chromatoid body, a RNA processing granule of male germ cells.

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    Rita L Peruquetti

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a complex differentiation process that involves genetic and epigenetic regulation, sophisticated hormonal control, and extensive structural changes in male germ cells. RNA nuclear and cytoplasmic bodies appear to be critical for the progress of spermatogenesis. The chromatoid body (CB is a cytoplasmic organelle playing an important role in RNA post-transcriptional and translation regulation during the late steps of germ cell differentiation. The CB is also important for fertility determination since mutations of genes encoding its components cause infertility by spermatogenesis arrest. Targeted ablation of the Bmal1 and Clock genes, which encode central regulators of the circadian clock also result in fertility defects caused by problems other than spermatogenesis alterations. We show that the circadian proteins CLOCK and BMAL1 are localized in the CB in a stage-specific manner of germ cells. Both BMAL1 and CLOCK proteins physically interact with the ATP-dependent DEAD-box RNA helicase MVH (mouse VASA homolog, a hallmark component of the CB. BMAL1 is differentially expressed during the spermatogenic cycle of seminiferous tubules, and Bmal1 and Clock deficient mice display significant CB morphological alterations due to BMAL1 ablation or low expression. These findings suggest that both BMAL1 and CLOCK contribute to CB assembly and physiology, raising questions on the role of the circadian clock in reproduction and on the molecular function that CLOCK and BMAL1 could potentially have in the CB assembly and physiology.

  3. Interaction of circadian clock proteins PER2 and CRY with BMAL1 and CLOCK

    OpenAIRE

    Bordon Alain; Tallone Tiziano; Langmesser Sonja; Rusconi Sandro; Albrecht Urs

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Circadian oscillation of clock-controlled gene expression is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 act as activators of target gene transcription; however, interactions of PER and CRY proteins with the heterodimer abolish its transcriptional activation capacity. PER and CRY are therefore referred to as negative regulators of the circadian clock. To further elucidate the mechanism how positive and negative components of the clock int...

  4. Chronotype and stability of spontaneous locomotor activity rhythm in BMAL1-deficient mice.

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    Pfeffer, Martina; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2015-02-01

    Behavior, physiological functions and cognitive performance change over the time of the day. These daily rhythms are either externally driven by rhythmic environmental cues such as the light/dark cycle (masking) or controlled by an internal circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which can be entrained to the light/dark cycle. Within a given species, there is genetically determined variability in the temporal preference for the onset of the active phase, the chronotype. The chronotype is the phase of entrainment between external and internal time and is largely regulated by the circadian clock. Genetic variations in clock genes and environmental influences contribute to the distribution of chronotypes in a given population. However, little is known about the determination of the chronotype, the stability of the locomotor rhythm and the re-synchronization capacity to jet lag in an animal without a functional endogenous clock. Therefore, we analyzed the chronotype of BMAL1-deficient mice (BMAL1-/-) as well as the effects of repeated experimental jet lag on locomotor activity rhythms. Moreover, light-induced period expression in the retina was analyzed to assess the responsiveness of the circadian light input system. In contrast to wild-type mice, BMAL1-/- showed a significantly later chronotype, adapted more rapidly to both phase advance and delay but showed reduced robustness of rhythmic locomotor activity after repeated phase shifts. However, photic induction of Period in the retina was not different between the two genotypes. Our findings suggest that a disturbed clockwork is associated with a late chronotype, reduced rhythm stability and higher vulnerability to repeated external desynchronization. PMID:25216070

  5. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock.

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    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Intracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we established a pivotal role for casein kinase (CK-2-mediated circadian BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation (BMAL1-P in regulating central and peripheral core clocks. Subsequent analysis of the underlying mechanism showed a novel role of CRY as a repressor for protein kinase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions revealed that CRY-mediated periodic binding of CK2β to BMAL1 inhibits BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation by CK2α. The FAD binding domain of CRY1, two C-terminal BMAL1 domains, and particularly BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation/deacetylation by CLOCK/SIRT1, were shown to be critical for CRY-mediated BMAL1-CK2β binding. Reciprocally, BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation is prerequisite for BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation. We propose a dual negative-feedback model in which a CRY-dependent CK2-driven posttranslational BMAL1-P-BMAL1 loop is an integral part of the core clock oscillator.

  6. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock

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    Tamaru, Teruya; Hattori, Mitsuru; Honda, Kousuke; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takamatsu, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we established a pivotal role for casein kinase (CK)-2-mediated circadian BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation (BMAL1-P) in regulating central and peripheral core clocks. Subsequent analysis of the underlying mechanism showed a novel role of CRY as a repressor for protein kinase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and real-time monitoring of protein–protein interactions revealed that CRY-mediated periodic binding of CK2β to BMAL1 inhibits BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation by CK2α. The FAD binding domain of CRY1, two C-terminal BMAL1 domains, and particularly BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation/deacetylation by CLOCK/SIRT1, were shown to be critical for CRY-mediated BMAL1–CK2β binding. Reciprocally, BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation is prerequisite for BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation. We propose a dual negative-feedback model in which a CRY-dependent CK2-driven posttranslational BMAL1–P-BMAL1 loop is an integral part of the core clock oscillator. PMID:26562092

  7. Effects of BMAL1-SIRT1-positive cycle on estrogen synthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells: an implicative role of BMAL1 in PCOS.

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    Zhang, Jiaou; Liu, Jiansheng; Zhu, Kai; Hong, Yan; Sun, Yun; Zhao, Xiaoming; Du, Yanzhi; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1 (BMAL1) is necessary for fertility and has been found to be essential to follicle growth and steroidogenesis. Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) has been reported to interact with BMAL1 and function in a circadian manner. Evidence has shown that SIRT1 regulates aromatase expression in estrogen-producing cells. We aimed to ascertain if there is a relationship between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and BMAL1, and whether and how BMAL1 takes part in estrogen synthesis in human granulosa cells (hGCs). Twenty-four women diagnosed with PCOS and 24 healthy individuals undergoing assisted reproduction were studied. BMAL1 expression in their granulosa cells (GCs) was observed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The level of expression in the PCOS group was lower than that of the group without PCOS (p PCOS. PMID:27117143

  8. Effects of BMAL1-SIRT1-positive cycle on estrogen synthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells: an implicative role of BMAL1 in PCOS.

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    Zhang, Jiaou; Liu, Jiansheng; Zhu, Kai; Hong, Yan; Sun, Yun; Zhao, Xiaoming; Du, Yanzhi; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1 (BMAL1) is necessary for fertility and has been found to be essential to follicle growth and steroidogenesis. Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) has been reported to interact with BMAL1 and function in a circadian manner. Evidence has shown that SIRT1 regulates aromatase expression in estrogen-producing cells. We aimed to ascertain if there is a relationship between polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and BMAL1, and whether and how BMAL1 takes part in estrogen synthesis in human granulosa cells (hGCs). Twenty-four women diagnosed with PCOS and 24 healthy individuals undergoing assisted reproduction were studied. BMAL1 expression in their granulosa cells (GCs) was observed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The level of expression in the PCOS group was lower than that of the group without PCOS (p PCOS.

  9. A Novel Bmal1 Mutant Mouse Reveals Essential Roles of the C-Terminal Domain on Circadian Rhythms.

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    Noheon Park

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock is an endogenous biological timer comprised of transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes. Bmal1 encodes an indispensable transcription factor for the generation of circadian rhythms. Here, we report a new circadian mutant mouse from gene-trapped embryonic stem cells harboring a C-terminus truncated Bmal1 (Bmal1GTΔC allele. The homozygous mutant (Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice immediately lost circadian behavioral rhythms under constant darkness. The heterozygous (Bmal1+/GTΔC mice displayed a gradual loss of rhythms, in contrast to Bmal1+/- mice where rhythms were sustained. Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice also showed arrhythmic mRNA and protein expression in the SCN and liver. Lack of circadian reporter oscillation was also observed in cultured fibroblast cells, indicating that the arrhythmicity of Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice resulted from impaired molecular clock machinery. Expression of clock genes exhibited distinct responses to the mutant allele in Bmal1+/GTΔC and Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice. Despite normal cellular localization and heterodimerization with CLOCK, overexpressed BMAL1GTΔC was unable to activate transcription of Per1 promoter and BMAL1-dependent CLOCK degradation. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of Bmal1 has pivotal roles in the regulation of circadian rhythms and the Bmal1GTΔC mice constitute a novel model system to evaluate circadian functional mechanism of BMAL1.

  10. Expression of human circadiancolock genes Clock protein and Bmal1 protein in cholangiocarcinoma and its significance%生物钟基因Clock、Bmal1蛋白在胆管癌组织中的表达及临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨福全; 王泽平; 王鑫; 丛玉珠; 马锐; 张智深; 孟令勤; 赵海鹰; 刘金钢

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨人类生物钟基因hClock及hBmal1蛋白在人类胆管癌组织中的表达,并研究其表达与人类胆管癌的关系.方法:采用免疫组织化学法检测60例人类胆管癌组织及癌旁组织中hClock基因、hBmal1基因蛋白产物(Clock蛋白及Bmal1蛋白)的表达.结果:60例人胆管癌组织与相应癌旁组织中,Clock蛋白在胆管组织中阳性率为33.33% (20/60),在癌旁组织中阳性率为81.67% (49/60),两者阳性表达率差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);而Bmal1蛋白在胆管癌组织中阳性率为73.33% (44/60),癌旁组织中阳性率为36.67% (22/60),两者阳性表达率差异也有统计学意义(P<0.05).Clock蛋白与Bmal1蛋白表达均与胆管癌TNM分期有关(P<0.05).在胆管癌组织中Clock蛋白与Bmal1蛋白表达呈负相关(r=-0.481,P<0.05).结论:Bmal1蛋白可能与人类胆管癌的发生有关,与侵袭、转移的关系有待深入研究,而Clock蛋白可能为胆管癌发生的抑制因素.

  11. BMAL1 gene and obesity%BMAL1基因与肥胖

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    邢晋袆

    2009-01-01

    生物钟BMAL1基因编码一种bHLH/PAS结构域转录因子家族蛋白质,是分子昼夜震荡器的关键元件,对于哺乳动物昼夜节律的产生是必需的.近年来的研究发现,BMAL1基因不仅在调控生物的昼夜节律中发挥一定作用,而且在脂肪细胞的增殖和分化、糖代谢、能量平衡方面起着关键作用.这些研究结果为BMAL1基因与脂肪代谢以及肥胖之间的联系提供了支持.

  12. Intermolecular recognition revealed by the complex structure of human CLOCK-BMAL1 basic helix-loop-helix domains with E-box DNA

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    Zixi Wang; Yaling Wu; Lanfen Li; Xiao-Dong Su

    2013-01-01

    CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) and BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like 1) are both transcription factors of the circadian core loop in mammals.Recently published mouse CLOCK-BMAL1 bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix)-PAS (period-ARNT-single-minded) complex structure sheds light on the mechanism for heterodimer formation,but the structural details of the protein-DNA recognition mechanisms remain elusive.Here we have elucidated the crystal structure of human CLOCK-BMAL1 bHLH domains bound to a canonical E-box DNA.We demonstrate that CLOCK and BMAL1 bHLH domains can be mutually selected,and that hydrogen-bonding networks mediate their E-box recognition.We identified a hydrophobic contact between BMAL1 Ile80 and a fianking thymine nucleotide,suggesting that CLOCK-BMAL1 actually reads 7-bp DNA and not the previously believed 6-bp DNA.To find potential non-canonical E-boxes that could be recognized by CLOCK-BMAL1,we constructed systematic single-nucleotide mutations on the E-box and measured their relevant affinities.We defined two non-canonical E-box patterns with high affinities,AACGTGA and CATGTGA,in which the flanking A7-T7' base pair is indispensable for recognition.These results will help us to identify functional CLOCK-BMAL1-binding sites in vivo and to search for clock-controlled genes.Furthermore,we assessed the inhibitory role of potential phosphorylation sites in bHLH regions.We found that the phospho-mimicking mutation on BMAL1 Ser78 could efficiently block DNA binding as well as abolish normal circadian oscillation in cells.We propose that BMAL1 Ser78 should be a key residue mediating input signal-regulated transcriptional inhibition for external cues to entrain the circadian clock by kinase cascade.

  13. Robust food anticipatory activity in BMAL1-deficient mice.

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    Julie S Pendergast

    Full Text Available Food availability is a potent environmental cue that directs circadian locomotor activity in rodents. Even though nocturnal rodents prefer to forage at night, daytime food anticipatory activity (FAA is observed prior to short meals presented at a scheduled time of day. Under this restricted feeding regimen, rodents exhibit two distinct bouts of activity, a nocturnal activity rhythm that is entrained to the light-dark cycle and controlled by the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN and a daytime bout of activity that is phase-locked to mealtime. FAA also occurs during food deprivation, suggesting that a food-entrainable oscillator (FEO keeps time in the absence of scheduled feeding. Previous studies have demonstrated that the FEO is anatomically distinct from the SCN and that FAA is observed in mice lacking some circadian genes essential for timekeeping in the SCN. In the current study, we optimized the conditions for examining FAA during restricted feeding and food deprivation in mice lacking functional BMAL1, which is critical for circadian rhythm generation in the SCN. We found that BMAL1-deficient mice displayed FAA during restricted feeding in 12hr light:12hr dark (12L:12D and 18L:6D lighting cycles, but distinct activity during food deprivation was observed only in 18L:6D. While BMAL1-deficient mice also exhibited robust FAA during restricted feeding in constant darkness, mice were hyperactive during food deprivation so it was not clear that FAA consistently occurred at the time of previously scheduled food availability. Taken together, our findings suggest that optimization of experimental conditions such as photoperiod may be necessary to visualize FAA in genetically modified mice. Furthermore, the expression of FAA may be possible without a circadian oscillator that depends on BMAL1.

  14. 生物钟基因hClock hBmal1在肿瘤中的表达研究%Expression of hClock and hBmal1 in Tumors

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    邓香群; 张鹏飞; 贺印旎

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨人类生物钟基因hClock及hBmal1在肿瘤中的表达,研究其在肿瘤发生发展中的意义.方法:采用免疫组织化学检测结直肠肿瘤与相应肿瘤旁组织以及肺癌组织中hClock基因蛋白产物(CLOCK蛋白)的表达,并采用原位杂交检测相应标本hClock及hBmal1基因mRNA的表达.结果:肺癌组织中CLOCK蛋白中度及强阳性表达率与分化程度呈正相关.结直肠良性肿瘤中,CLOCK蛋白中度及强阳性表达率为25.0%(2/8);恶性肿瘤中,中度及强阳性表达率86.5%(32/37).结直肠恶性肿瘤中,hClock mRNA中度及强阳性表达率为75.7%(28/37),hClock mRNA中度及强阳性表达与Dukes'分期呈正相关.37例结直肠恶性肿瘤组织中hBmal1 mRNA中度及强阳性表达率为43.2%(16/37),hBmal1 mRNA中度及强阳性表达与Dukes'分期呈正相关.结论:hClock、hBmal1基因与肿瘤的发生、发展及侵袭、转移有相关性.%Objective: To study the human circadian clock genes hClock and hBmal1, as well as their significance in the development and progression of tumors.Methods: Immunohistochemical detection of colorectal tumors and adjacent tissues, as well as expression of the lung cancer tissue hClock gene protein product ( CLOCK protein ) was conducted.In situ hybridization detection of samples hBmal1 and hClock gene mRNA expressions was carried out.Results: In lung cancer, moderately and strongly positive CLOCK protein expression is positively correlated with the degree of differentiation.In benign colorectal tumors, CLOCK protein has a moderately to strongly positive expression of 25.0% ( 2/8 ).In malignant tumors, it has moderately and strongly positive expression rate of 86.5% ( 32/37).In colorectal malignant tumors, hClock mRNA has a moderately and strongly positive expression rate of 75.7% ( 28/37 ).The moderately and strongly positive hClock mRNA expression is positively correlated with Dukes stage.Up to 37 cases of moderate colorectal malignant tumors

  15. Global and hepatocyte-specific ablation of Bmal1 induces hyperlipidaemia and enhances atherosclerosis

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    Pan, Xiaoyue; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms controlled by clock genes affect plasma lipids. Here we show that global ablation of Bmal1 in Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice and its liver-specific ablation in Apoe−/− (L-Bmal1−/−Apoe−/−) mice increases, whereas overexpression of BMAL1 in L-Bmal1−/−Apoe−/− and Apoe−/−mice decreases hyperlipidaemia and atherosclerosis. Bmal1 deficiency augments hepatic lipoprotein secretion and diminishes cholesterol excretion to the bile. Further, Bmal1 deficiency reduces expression of Shp and Gata4. Reductions in Shp increase Mtp expression and lipoprotein production, whereas reductions in Gata4 diminish Abcg5/Abcg8 expression and biliary cholesterol excretion. Forced SHP expression normalizes lipoprotein secretion with no effect on biliary cholesterol excretion, while forced GATA4 expression increases cholesterol excretion to the bile and reduces plasma lipids in L-Bmal1−/−Apoe−/− and Apoe−/− mice. Thus, our data indicate that Bmal1 modulates lipoprotein production and biliary cholesterol excretion by regulating the expression of Mtp and Abcg5/Abcg8 via Shp and Gata4. PMID:27721414

  16. Genome-wide and phase-specific DNA-binding rhythms of BMAL1 control circadian output functions in mouse liver.

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    Guillaume Rey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock uses interlocked negative feedback loops in which the heterodimeric basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BMAL1/CLOCK is a master regulator. While there is prominent control of liver functions by the circadian clock, the detailed links between circadian regulators and downstream targets are poorly known. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with deep sequencing we obtained a time-resolved and genome-wide map of BMAL1 binding in mouse liver, which allowed us to identify over 2,000 binding sites, with peak binding narrowly centered around Zeitgeber time 6. Annotation of BMAL1 targets confirms carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as the major output of the circadian clock in mouse liver. Moreover, transcription regulators are largely overrepresented, several of which also exhibit circadian activity. Genes of the core circadian oscillator stand out as strongly bound, often at promoter and distal sites. Genomic sequence analysis of the sites identified E-boxes and tandem E1-E2 consensus elements. Electromobility shift assays showed that E1-E2 sites are bound by a dimer of BMAL1/CLOCK heterodimers with a spacing-dependent cooperative interaction, a finding that was further validated in transactivation assays. BMAL1 target genes showed cyclic mRNA expression profiles with a phase distribution centered at Zeitgeber time 10. Importantly, sites with E1-E2 elements showed tighter phases both in binding and mRNA accumulation. Finally, analyzing the temporal profiles of BMAL1 binding, precursor mRNA and mature mRNA levels showed how transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation contribute differentially to circadian expression phase. Together, our analysis of a dynamic protein-DNA interactome uncovered how genes of the core circadian oscillator crosstalk and drive phase-specific circadian output programs in a complex tissue.

  17. BMAL1 and CLOCK, two essential components of the circadian clock, are involved in glucose homeostasis.

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    R Daniel Rudic

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian timing is generated through a unique series of autoregulatory interactions termed the molecular clock. Behavioral rhythms subject to the molecular clock are well characterized. We demonstrate a role for Bmal1 and Clock in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Inactivation of the known clock components Bmal1 (Mop3 and Clock suppress the diurnal variation in glucose and triglycerides. Gluconeogenesis is abolished by deletion of Bmal1 and is depressed in Clock mutants, but the counterregulatory response of corticosterone and glucagon to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia is retained. Furthermore, a high-fat diet modulates carbohydrate metabolism by amplifying circadian variation in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and mutation of Clock restores the chow-fed phenotype. Bmal1 and Clock, genes that function in the core molecular clock, exert profound control over recovery from insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. Furthermore, asynchronous dietary cues may modify glucose homeostasis via their interactions with peripheral molecular clocks.

  18. Ketamine influences CLOCK:BMAL1 function leading to altered circadian gene expression.

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    Marina M Bellet

    Full Text Available Major mood disorders have been linked to abnormalities in circadian rhythms, leading to disturbances in sleep, mood, temperature, and hormonal levels. We provide evidence that ketamine, a drug with rapid antidepressant effects, influences the function of the circadian molecular machinery. Ketamine modulates CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation when these regulators are ectopically expressed in NG108-15 neuronal cells. Inhibition occurs in a dose-dependent manner and is attenuated after treatment with the GSK3β antagonist SB21673. We analyzed the effect of ketamine on circadian gene expression and observed a dose-dependent reduction in the amplitude of circadian transcription of the Bmal1, Per2, and Cry1 genes. Finally, chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that ketamine altered the recruitment of the CLOCK:BMAL1 complex on circadian promoters in a time-dependent manner. Our results reveal a yet unsuspected molecular mode of action of ketamine and thereby may suggest possible pharmacological antidepressant strategies.

  19. Global but not gonadotrope-specific disruption of Bmal1 abolishes the luteinizing hormone surge without affecting ovulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Adrienne; Zhu, Lei; Blum, Ian D;

    2013-01-01

    While there is evidence for a circadian regulation of the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH) surge, the contributions of individual tissue clocks to this process remain unclear. We studied female mice deficient in the Bmal1 gene (Bmal1(-/-)), which is essential for circadian clock function...... pituitaries rhythmically express clock components throughout all cycle-stages. To determine the role of the gonadotrope clock in the preovulatory LH and FSH surge process, we generated mice that specifically lack BMAL1 in gonadotropes (GBmal1KO). GBmal1KO females exhibited a modest elevation in both proestrus...... and baseline LH levels across all estrous stages. BMAL1 elimination from gonadotropes also led to increased variability in estrous cycle length, yet GBmal1KO animals were otherwise reproductively normal. Together our data suggest that the intrinsic clock in gonadotropes is dispensable for LH surge regulation...

  20. Diurnal rhythmicity of the canonical clock genes Per1, per2 and Bmal1 in the rat adrenal gland is unaltered after hypophysectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, J.; Hannibal, J.; Georg, B.

    2008-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are generated by endogenous clocks in the central brain oscillator, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and peripheral tissues. The molecular basis for the circadian clock consists of a number of genes and proteins that form transcriptional/translational feedback loops. Rhythmic...... expression of clock genes in the adrenal glands has previously been reported. Since the central clock in the SCN communicates with the adrenal glands via circadian release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone, we quantified the mRNAs for the canonical clock genes, Per1, Per2 and Bmal1 in the adrenal glands by...... real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction during a 24-h-cycle in normal and hypophysectomised rats. The mRNAs for all the three clock genes disclosed rhythmic oscillations with a period of 24 h and the phase did not differ between the hypophysectomised and intact rats. The expression...

  1. Synchronization of circadian Per2 rhythms and HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction in mouse fibroblasts after short-term heat shock pulse.

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    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are the general physiological processes of adaptation to daily environmental changes, such as the temperature cycle. A change in temperature is a resetting cue for mammalian circadian oscillators, which are possibly regulated by the heat shock (HS pathway. The HS response (HSR is a universal process that provides protection against stressful conditions, which promote protein-denaturation. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 is essential for HSR. In the study presented here, we investigated whether a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms. Circadian Per2 rhythm and HSF1-mediated gene expression were monitored by a real-time bioluminescence assay for mPer2 promoter-driven luciferase and HS element (HSE; HSF1-binding site-driven luciferase activity, respectively. By an optimal duration HS pulse (43°C for approximately 30 minutes, circadian Per2 rhythm was observed in the whole mouse fibroblast culture, probably indicating the synchronization of the phases of each cell. This rhythm was preceded by an acute elevation in mPer2 and HSF1-mediated gene expression. Mutations in the two predicted HSE sites adjacent (one of them proximally to the E-box in the mPer2 promoter dramatically abolished circadian mPer2 rhythm. Circadian Per2 gene/protein expression was not observed in HSF1-deficient cells. These findings demonstrate that HSF1 is essential to the synchronization of circadian rhythms by the HS pulse. Importantly, the interaction between HSF1 and BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer, a central circadian transcription factor, was observed after the HS pulse. These findings reveal that even a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms and cause the HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction, suggesting the pivotal role of crosstalk between the mammalian circadian and HSR systems.

  2. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

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    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day. PMID:27091299

  3. Effects of Tail-suspension on Rhythmic Expression of clock and bmal1 in Mice Liver%尾吊对小鼠肝脏组织中clock与bmal1基因节律的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温美丽; 吕柯; 曲丽娜; 陈海龙; 王艳利; 毕蕾; 万玉民; 刘鸿宇; 李莹辉

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究尾吊对持续黑暗条件下小鼠肝脏节律基因clock与bmal1节律表达的影响.方法 常规明暗光照条件导引(entrainment) C57BL/6J( C57)小鼠1周后,在持续黑暗条件下采用头低位- 30°尾吊C57小鼠,于尾吊第12天、13天、14天每隔4h连续18个时间点进行肝脏组织取材,提取总RNA,并运用Real-time PCR方法检测肝脏组织clock和bmal1节律基因mRNA的表达变化.结果 尾吊组与对照组肝脏clock与bmal1节律基因mRNA水平均呈现出节律性表达特征.在尾吊条件下,clock基因mRNA 的峰值相位提前约4h,bmal1基因mRNA表达节律的振幅在每天授时因子时间(zeitgeber time,ZT)ZT2 与ZT6显著下降(P<0.05).结论 在持续全黑暗条件下,C57小鼠肝脏组织节律基因clock与bmal1的mRNA水平表现出明显的近日节律性,尾吊对clock基因产生峰值相位提前的效应,对bmal1基因产生振幅减少的效应.%Objective To investigate the effects of tail suspension(TS) clock and bmall mRNA expression in liver tissue of mice under constant darkness ( darkness: darkness, DD) conditions. Methods With 1 week of normal light/dark schedule (light: darkness = 12h: 12h) pretreatment, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to -30° head down tail suspension in constant darkness. Liver tissues were obtained at consecutive time points during the 12th, 13th and 14th testing days with equal interval of 4 h. Total RNA was extracted, the rhythmicity patterns of clock and bmall mRNA expression were determined by using real-time polymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR). Results Circadian rhythm of clock and bmall mRNA expression was found in each testing day with similar peak phase in both TS and control (Con) mice. Furthermore, compared with Con, the peak phase of clock gene mRNA level in TS mice advanced approximately 4 h, and the amplitude of bmall gene mRNA level significantly reduced at zeitgeber time(ZT) ZT2 and ZT6 (P <0.05). Conclusion In constant darkness conditions, liver

  4. Shifting the circadian rhythm of feeding in mice induces gastrointestinal, metabolic and immune alterations which are influenced by ghrelin and the core clock gene Bmal1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorien Laermans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In our 24-hour society, an increasing number of people are required to be awake and active at night. As a result, the circadian rhythm of feeding is seriously compromised. To mimic this, we subjected mice to restricted feeding (RF, a paradigm in which food availability is limited to short and unusual times of day. RF induces a food-anticipatory increase in the levels of the hunger hormone ghrelin. We aimed to investigate whether ghrelin triggers the changes in body weight and gastric emptying that occur during RF. Moreover, the effect of genetic deletion of the core clock gene Bmal1 on these physiological adaptations was studied. METHODS: Wild-type, ghrelin receptor knockout and Bmal1 knockout mice were fed ad libitum or put on RF with a normal or high-fat diet (HFD. Plasma ghrelin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Gastric contractility was studied in vitro in muscle strips and in vivo (13C breath test. Cytokine mRNA expression was quantified and infiltration of immune cells was assessed histologically. RESULTS: The food-anticipatory increase in plasma ghrelin levels induced by RF with normal chow was abolished in HFD-fed mice. During RF, body weight restoration was facilitated by ghrelin and Bmal1. RF altered cytokine mRNA expression levels and triggered contractility changes resulting in an accelerated gastric emptying, independent from ghrelin signaling. During RF with a HFD, Bmal1 enhanced neutrophil recruitment to the stomach, increased gastric IL-1α expression and promoted gastric contractility changes. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study demonstrating that ghrelin and Bmal1 regulate the extent of body weight restoration during RF, whereas Bmal1 controls the type of inflammatory infiltrate and contractility changes in the stomach. Disrupting the circadian rhythm of feeding induces a variety of diet-dependent metabolic, immune and gastrointestinal alterations, which may explain the higher prevalence of obesity and

  5. SUMOylation of DEC1 Protein Regulates Its Transcriptional Activity and Enhances Its Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujing; Bi, Hailian; Yang, Chunhua; Zhao, Feng; Liu, Ying; Ao, Xiang; Chang, Alan K.; Wu, Huijian

    2011-01-01

    Differentiated embryo-chondrocyte expressed gene 1 (DEC1, also known as sharp2, stra13, or BHLHB2) is a mammalian basic helix-loop-helix protein that is involved in many aspects of gene regulation through acting as a transcription factor. Changes in DEC1 expression levels have been implicated in the development of cancers. Using COS-7 cell, we showed that DEC1 can be modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifiers, SUMO1, 2 and 3. Two major SUMOylation sites (K159 and K279) were identified in the C-terminal domain of DEC1. Substitution of either K159 or K279 with arginine reduced DEC1 SUMOylation, but substitution of both K159 and K279 abolished SUMOylation, and more protein appeared to be retained in the cytoplasm compared to wild-type DEC1. The expression of DEC1 was up-regulated after serum starvation as previously reported, but at the same time, serum starvation also led to more SUMOylation of DEC1. In MCF-7 cells SUMOylation also stabilized DEC1 through inhibiting its ubiquitination. Moreover, SUMOylation of DEC1 promoted its repression of CLOCK/BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activity through recruitment of histone deacetylase1. These findings suggested that posttranslational modification of DEC1 in the form of SUMOylation may serve as a key factor that regulates the function of DEC1 in vivo. PMID:21829689

  6. SUMOylation of DEC1 protein regulates its transcriptional activity and enhances its stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongde Hong

    Full Text Available Differentiated embryo-chondrocyte expressed gene 1 (DEC1, also known as sharp2, stra13, or BHLHB2 is a mammalian basic helix-loop-helix protein that is involved in many aspects of gene regulation through acting as a transcription factor. Changes in DEC1 expression levels have been implicated in the development of cancers. Using COS-7 cell, we showed that DEC1 can be modified by the small ubiquitin-like modifiers, SUMO1, 2 and 3. Two major SUMOylation sites (K(159 and K(279 were identified in the C-terminal domain of DEC1. Substitution of either K(159 or K(279 with arginine reduced DEC1 SUMOylation, but substitution of both K(159 and K(279 abolished SUMOylation, and more protein appeared to be retained in the cytoplasm compared to wild-type DEC1. The expression of DEC1 was up-regulated after serum starvation as previously reported, but at the same time, serum starvation also led to more SUMOylation of DEC1. In MCF-7 cells SUMOylation also stabilized DEC1 through inhibiting its ubiquitination. Moreover, SUMOylation of DEC1 promoted its repression of CLOCK/BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activity through recruitment of histone deacetylase1. These findings suggested that posttranslational modification of DEC1 in the form of SUMOylation may serve as a key factor that regulates the function of DEC1 in vivo.

  7. Protein stability: a crystallographer’s perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deller, Marc C., E-mail: mdeller@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Shriram Center, 443 Via Ortega, Room 097, MC5082, Stanford, CA 94305-4125 (United States); Kong, Leopold [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Building 8, Room 1A03, 8 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Rupp, Bernhard [k.-k. Hofkristallamt, 91 Audrey Place, Vista, CA 92084 (United States); Medical University of Innsbruck, Schöpfstrasse 41, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-01-26

    An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. Protein stability is a topic of major interest for the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and food industries, in addition to being a daily consideration for academic researchers studying proteins. An understanding of protein stability is essential for optimizing the expression, purification, formulation, storage and structural studies of proteins. In this review, discussion will focus on factors affecting protein stability, on a somewhat practical level, particularly from the view of a protein crystallographer. The differences between protein conformational stability and protein compositional stability will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to key methods useful for analyzing protein stability. Finally, tactics for addressing protein-stability issues during protein expression, purification and crystallization will be discussed.

  8. The Transcriptional Repressor ID2 Can Interact with the Canonical Clock Components CLOCK and BMAL1 and Mediate Inhibitory Effects on mPer1 Expression*

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Sarah M.; Fernando, Shanik J.; Hou, Tim Y.; Duffield, Giles E.

    2010-01-01

    ID2 is a rhythmically expressed HLH transcriptional repressor. Deletion of Id2 in mice results in circadian phenotypes, highlighted by disrupted locomotor activity rhythms and an enhanced photoentrainment response. ID2 can suppress the transactivation potential of the positive elements of the clock, CLOCK-BMAL1, on mPer1 and clock-controlled gene (CCG) activity. Misregulation of CCGs is observed in Id2−/− liver, and mutant mice exhibit associated alterations in lipid homeostasis. These data s...

  9. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Protein Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Nick

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the contribution of the burial of polar groups and their hydrogen bonds to the conformational stability of proteins. We measured the change in stability, Δ(Δ G), for a series of hydrogen bonding mutants in four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) containing 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) containing 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa (RNase Sa) and T1 (RNase T1). Crystal structures were determined for three of the hydrogen bonding mutants of RNase Sa: S24A (1.1Å), Y51F(1.5Å), and T95A(1.3Å). The structures are very similar to wild type RNase Sa and the hydrogen bonding partners always form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to water in the mutants. We compare our results with previous studies of similar mutants in other proteins and reach the following conclusions: 1) Hydrogen bonds contribute favorably to protein stability. 2) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 3) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 4) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar groups are not hydrogen bonded. 5) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is similar for VHP, a small protein, and VlsE, a large protein.

  10. Stabilized polyacrylic saccharide protein conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1996-02-20

    This invention is directed to water soluble protein polymer conjugates which are stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises a protein which is linked to an acrylic polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 16 figs.

  11. Amphiphiles for protein solubilization and stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellman, Samuel Helmer; Chae, Pil Seok; Laible, Philip D.; Wander, Marc J.

    2012-09-11

    The invention provides amphiphiles for manipulating membrane proteins. The amphiphiles can feature carbohydrate-derived hydrophilic groups and branchpoints in the hydrophilic moiety and/or in a lipophilic moiety. Such amphiphiles are useful as detergents for solubilization and stabilization of membrane proteins, including photosynthetic protein superassemblies obtained from bacterial membranes.

  12. Flavor and stability of milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Campbell, R E; Jo, Y; Drake, M A

    2016-06-01

    A greater understanding of the nature and source of dried milk protein ingredient flavor(s) is required to characterize flavor stability and identify the sources of flavors. The objective of this study was to characterize the flavor and flavor chemistry of milk protein concentrates (MPC 70, 80, 85), isolates (MPI), acid and rennet caseins, and micellar casein concentrate (MCC) and to determine the effect of storage on flavor and functionality of milk protein concentrates using instrumental and sensory techniques. Spray-dried milk protein ingredients (MPC, MPI, caseins, MCC) were collected in duplicate from 5 commercial suppliers or manufactured at North Carolina State University. Powders were rehydrated and evaluated in duplicate by descriptive sensory analysis. Volatile compounds were extracted by solid phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-olfactometry. Compounds were identified by comparison of retention indices, odor properties, and mass spectra against reference standards. A subset of samples was selected for further analysis using direct solvent extraction with solvent-assisted flavor extraction, and aroma extract dilution analysis. External standard curves were created to quantify select volatile compounds. Pilot plant manufactured MPC were stored at 3, 25, and 40°C (44% relative humidity). Solubility, furosine, sensory properties, and volatile compound analyses were performed at 0, 1, 3, 6, and 12 mo. Milk proteins and caseins were diverse in flavor and exhibited sweet aromatic and cooked/milky flavors as well as cardboard, brothy, tortilla, soapy, and fatty flavors. Key aroma active compounds in milk proteins and caseins were 2-aminoacetophenone, nonanal, 1-octen-3-one, dimethyl trisulfide, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, heptanal, methional, 1-hexen-3-one, hexanal, dimethyl disulfide, butanoic acid, and acetic acid. Stored milk proteins developed animal and burnt sugar flavors over time. Solubility of

  13. Circadian clock proteins control adaptation to novel environment and memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.Kondratova, Anna; V.Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Antoch, Marina P.; Kondratov, Roman V.

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency of the transcription factor BMAL1, a core component of the circadian clock, results in an accelerated aging phenotype in mice. The circadian clock regulates many physiological processes and was recently implicated in control of brain-based activities, such as memory formation and the regulation of emotions. Aging is accompanied by the decline in brain physiology, particularly decline in the response and adaptation to novelty. We investigated the role of the circadian clock in exploratory behavior and habituation to novelty using the open field paradigm. We found that mice with a deficiency of the circadian transcription factor BMAL1 display hyperactivity in novel environments and impaired intra- and intersession habituation, indicative of defects in short- and long-term memory formation. In contrast, mice double-deficient for the circadian proteins CRY1 and CRY2 (repressors of the BMAL1-mediated transcription) demonstrate reduced activity and accelerated habituation when compared to wild type mice. Mice with mutation in theClock gene (encoding the BMAL1 transcription partner) show normal locomotion, but increased rearing activity and impaired intersession habituation. BMAL1 is highly expressed in the neurons of the hippocampus - a brain region associated with spatial memory formation; BMAL1 deficiency disrupts circadian oscillation in gene expression and reactive oxygen species homeostasis in the brain, which may be among the possible mechanisms involved. Thus, we suggest that the BMAL1:CLOCK activity is critical for the proper exploratory and habituation behavior, and that the circadian clock prepares organism for a new round of everyday activities through optimization of behavioral learning. PMID:20519775

  14. Stability analysis of an autocatalytic protein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Julian

    2016-05-01

    A self-regulatory genetic circuit, where a protein acts as a positive regulator of its own production, is known to be the simplest biological network with a positive feedback loop. Although at least three components—DNA, RNA, and the protein—are required to form such a circuit, stability analysis of the fixed points of this self-regulatory circuit has been performed only after reducing the system to a two-component system, either by assuming a fast equilibration of the DNA component or by removing the RNA component. Here, stability of the fixed points of the three-component positive feedback loop is analyzed by obtaining eigenvalues of the full three-dimensional Hessian matrix. In addition to rigorously identifying the stable fixed points and saddle points, detailed information about the system can be obtained, such as the existence of complex eigenvalues near a fixed point.

  15. Monitoring prion protein stability by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Olivier; Graether, Steffen P; Sykes, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), are a group of fatal neurological diseases that affect both humans and animals. At the end of the 20th century, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), better known as mad cow disease, was shown to be transmissible to humans. This resulted in considerable concern for public health and a number of questions for scientists. The first question answered was the possible source of the disease, which appears to be the prion protein (PrP). There are two major forms of this protein: the native, noninfectious form (PrP(C)), and the misfolded infectious form (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) is mainly alpha-helical in structure, whereas PrP(Sc) aggregates into an assembly of beta-sheets, forming amyloid fibrils. Since the first solution structure of the noninfectious form of the mouse prion protein, about 30 structures of the globular portion of PrP(C) have been characterized from different organisms. However, only a few minor differences are observed when comparing one PrP(C) structure to another. The key to understanding prion formation may then be not in the structure of PrP(C), but in the mechanism underlying PrP(C) unfolding and then conversion into a misfolded fibril state. To identify the possible region(s) of PrP(C) responsible for initiating the conversion into the amyloid fibril formation, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was applied to characterize the stability and structure of PrP(C) and intermediate states during the conversion from PrP(C) to PrP(Sc). Subsequently urea was used to induce unfolding, and data analysis revealed region-specific structural stabilities that may bring insights into the mechanisms underlying conversion of protein into an infectious prion. PMID:19697241

  16. Changes of biological clock protein in neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage%缺氧缺血性脑损伤新生大鼠松果体钟基因表达的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永富; 金美芳; 孙斌; 冯星

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of biological clock protein on circadian disorders in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage ( HIBD) by examining levels of CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins in the pineal gland of neonatal rats. Methods Seventy-two 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into sham-operated and HIBD groups. HIBD model was prepared according to the modified Levine method. Western blot analysis was used to measure the levels of CLOCK and BMAL1 in the pineal gland at 0, 2, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours after operation. Results Both CLOCK and BMAL levels in the pineal gland increased significantly 48 hours after HIBD compared with the sham-operated group ( P 0. 05 ) . Conclusions Levels of CLOCK and BMAL1 proteins in the pineal gland of rats increase significantly 48 hours after HIBD, suggesting that both CLOCK and BMAL1 may be involved the regulatory mechanism of circadian disorders in rats with HIBD.%目的 观察缺氧缺血性脑损伤(hypoxic-ischemic brain damage,HIBD)新生大鼠松果体中CLOCK、BMAL1蛋白表达的变化,探讨钟基因表达异常在HIBD导致的昼夜节律紊乱中的作用.方法 72只7日龄新生Sprague-Dawley大鼠随机分为假手术组与HIBD模型组,每组36只.采用改良Levine法建立HIBD模型,用Western blot方法测定两组新生大鼠术后0、2、12、24、36、48 h松果体中CLOCK、BMAL1蛋白水平.结果 HIBD模型组松果体的CLOCK及BMAL1蛋白表达水平在HIBD后48 h高于假手术组(P<0.05),在0、2、12、24、36 h CLOCK及BMAL1蛋白表达水平与假手术组相比差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 HIBD新生大鼠松果体中CLOCK和BMAL1蛋白在损伤48 h后有显著升高,提示两者可能共同参与缺氧缺血时昼夜节律紊乱的发生.

  17. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  18. Fibrillization of whey proteins improves foaming capacity and foam stability at low protein concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Oboroceanu, Daniela; Wang, Lizhe; Magner, Edmond; Auty, Mark A. E.

    2014-01-01

    peer-reviewed The foaming properties of fibrillar whey proteins were compared with those of native or denatured whey proteins and also with egg white protein. Whey protein foaming capacity and stability were related to protein concentration, pH, time of whipping, pressure and heating treatments. Foams produced from fibrils showed significant improvement in foaming capacity and stability when compared with non-fibrillar whey proteins. Dynamic high shear (microfluidization) or moderate shear...

  19. A Model for Protein Sequence Evolution Based on Selective Pressure for Protein Stability: Application to Hemoglobins

    OpenAIRE

    Lorraine Marsh

    2009-01-01

    Negative selection against protein instability is a central influence on evolution of proteins. Protein stability is maintained over evolution despite changes in underlying sequences. An empirical all-site stability-based model of evolution was developed to focus on the selection of residues arising from their contributions to protein stability. In this model, site rates could vary. A structure-based method was used to predict stationary frequencies of hemoglobin residues based on their prope...

  20. The influence of hepatitis B virus X protein on the clock genes in liver cells and its significance%乙肝病毒X蛋白对肝细胞生物钟基因的影响及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengli Yang; Xiaoli Pan; Zhifan Xiong; Bo Wei; Hongyi Yao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) on the clock genes in LO2 cells and its significance. Methods: A cell line LO2-HBx, Stably transfected with HBx gene, was established. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of CLOCK and BMAL1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blot. Results: The expression of CLOCK mRNA and protein were increased in cell line LO2-HBx (P < 0.05), while the expression of BMAL1 mRNA and protein were decreased in cell line LO2-HBx (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The expressions of core clock gene CLOCK and BMAL1 have been changed by HBx, which breaks down the previous circadian rhythm of liver cells. This maybe one of the reasons leads to the formation of liver cancer.

  1. Protein thermal stabilization in aqueous solutions of osmolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruździak, Piotr; Panuszko, Aneta; Jourdan, Muriel; Stangret, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Proteins' thermal stabilization is a significant problem in various biomedical, biotechnological, and technological applications. We investigated thermal stability of hen egg white lysozyme in aqueous solutions of the following stabilizing osmolytes: Glycine (GLY), N-methylglycine (NMG), N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG), N,N,N-trimethylglycine (TMG), and trimethyl-N-oxide (TMAO). Results of CD-UV spectroscopic investigation were compared with FTIR hydration studies' results. Selected osmolytes increased lysozyme's thermal stability in the following order: Gly>NMG>TMAO≈DMG>TMG. Theoretical calculations (DFT) showed clearly that osmolytes' amino group protons and water molecules interacting with them played a distinctive role in protein thermal stabilization. The results brought us a step closer to the exact mechanism of protein stabilization by osmolytes. PMID:26495438

  2. Tandem Facial Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Gotfryd, Kamil; Pacyna, Jennifer;

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new type of synthetic amphiphile that is intended to support biochemical characterization of intrinsic membrane proteins. Members of this new family displayed favorable behavior with four of five membrane proteins tested, and these amphiphiles formed relatively small micelles....

  3. Stabilized helical peptides: a strategy to target protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Mark A

    2014-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions are critical for cell proliferation, differentiation, and function. Peptides hold great promise for clinical applications focused on targeting protein-protein interactions. Advantages of peptides include a large chemical space and potential diversity of sequences and structures. However, peptides do present well-known challenges for drug development. Progress has been made in the development of stabilizing alpha helices for potential therapeutic applications. Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of helical peptide stabilization are discussed.

  4. Self-assembling peptides form nanodiscs that stabilize membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Pedersen, Martin Cramer; Kirkensgaard, Jacob Judas Kain;

    2014-01-01

    -assemble in combination with phospholipids to form discoidal shaped particles that can stabilize membrane proteins. In the present study, we have investigated an ApoA1 mimetic peptide with respect to its solution structure when in complex with phospholipids. This was achieved using a powerful combination of small-angle X...... show that, like the ApoA1 and derived nanodiscs, these peptide discs can accommodate and stabilize a membrane protein. Finally, we exploit their dynamic properties and show that the 18A discs may be used for transferring membrane proteins and associated phospholipids directly and gently...

  5. Self-consistent field approach to protein structure and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrov, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The organization of the thesis is as follows: after a short introduction (chapter 1), chapter 2 presents a review of the basic physical principle that govern protein structure and focuses on the thermodynamics as well as kinetics of protein folding and ufolding. Then chapter 3 starts with a discussion on the basic elementary interactions, which contribute, to protein structure and stability, with emphasis on the electrostatic interactions.Electrostatic interactions are described on the basis ...

  6. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P;

    2013-01-01

    of Mbs is not significantly different among mammals (with typical oxygenation constants of ∼0.8-1.2 µM(-1)), folding stabilities of cetacean Mbs are ∼2-4 kcal/mol higher than for terrestrial Mbs. Using ancestral sequence reconstruction, maximum likelihood and Bayesian tests to describe the evolution...... of cetacean Mbs, and experimentally calibrated computation of stability effects of mutations, we observe accelerated evolution in cetaceans and identify seven positively selected sites in Mb. Overall, these sites contribute to Mb stabilization with a conditional probability of 0.8. We observe a correlation...... between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected...

  7. Robust enzyme design: bioinformatic tools for improved protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Voevodin, Vladimir; Švedas, Vytas

    2015-03-01

    The ability of proteins and enzymes to maintain a functionally active conformation under adverse environmental conditions is an important feature of biocatalysts, vaccines, and biopharmaceutical proteins. From an evolutionary perspective, robust stability of proteins improves their biological fitness and allows for further optimization. Viewed from an industrial perspective, enzyme stability is crucial for the practical application of enzymes under the required reaction conditions. In this review, we analyze bioinformatic-driven strategies that are used to predict structural changes that can be applied to wild type proteins in order to produce more stable variants. The most commonly employed techniques can be classified into stochastic approaches, empirical or systematic rational design strategies, and design of chimeric proteins. We conclude that bioinformatic analysis can be efficiently used to study large protein superfamilies systematically as well as to predict particular structural changes which increase enzyme stability. Evolution has created a diversity of protein properties that are encoded in genomic sequences and structural data. Bioinformatics has the power to uncover this evolutionary code and provide a reproducible selection of hotspots - key residues to be mutated in order to produce more stable and functionally diverse proteins and enzymes. Further development of systematic bioinformatic procedures is needed to organize and analyze sequences and structures of proteins within large superfamilies and to link them to function, as well as to provide knowledge-based predictions for experimental evaluation.

  8. Development of a simple assay system for protein-stabilizing efficiency based on hemoglobin protection against denaturation and measurement of the cooperative effect of mixing protein stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyu; Manabe, Yoshiyuki; Minamoto, Naoya; Saiki, Naoka; Fukase, Koichi

    2016-10-01

    We have elucidated the cooperative stabilization of proteins by sugars, amino acids, and other protein-stabilizing agents using a new and simple assay system. Our system determines the protein-stabilizing ability of various compounds by measuring their ability to protect hemoglobin from denaturation. Hemoglobin denaturation was readily measured by quantitative changes in its ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum. The efficiency of our assay was confirmed using various sugars such as trehalose and sucrose that are known to be good protein stabilizers. We have also found that mixtures of two different types of protein stabilizers resulted in a cooperative stabilizing effect on protein. PMID:27253914

  9. Protein stability and enzyme activity at extreme biological temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feller, Georges, E-mail: gfeller@ulg.ac.b [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Centre for Protein Engineering, Institute of Chemistry B6a, University of Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2010-08-18

    Psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in permanently cold environments, even at subzero temperatures. To maintain metabolic rates compatible with sustained life, they have improved the dynamics of their protein structures, thereby enabling appropriate molecular motions required for biological activity at low temperatures. As a consequence of this structural flexibility, psychrophilic proteins are unstable and heat-labile. In the upper range of biological temperatures, thermophiles and hyperthermophiles grow at temperatures > 100 {sup 0}C and synthesize ultra-stable proteins. However, thermophilic enzymes are nearly inactive at room temperature as a result of their compactness and rigidity. At the molecular level, both types of extremophilic proteins have adapted the same structural factors, but in opposite directions, to address either activity at low temperatures or stability in hot environments. A model based on folding funnels is proposed accounting for the stability-activity relationships in extremophilic proteins. (topical review)

  10. EKylation: Addition of an Alternating-Charge Peptide Stabilizes Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Erik J; Sinclair, Andrew; Keefe, Andrew J; Nannenga, Brent L; Coyle, Brandon L; Baneyx, François; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-10-12

    For nearly 40 years, therapeutic proteins have been stabilized by chemical conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG), but recently zwitterionic materials have proved to be a more effective substitute. In this work, we demonstrate that genetic fusion of alternating-charge extensions consisting of anionic glutamic acid (E) and cationic lysine (K) is an effective strategy for protein stabilization. This bioinspired "EKylation" method not only confers the stabilizing benefits of poly(zwitterions) but also allows for rapid biosynthesis of target constructs. Poly(EK) peptides of different predetermined lengths were appended to the C-terminus of a native β-lactamase and its destabilized TEM-19 mutant. The EK-modified enzymes retained biological activity and exhibited increased stability to environmental stressors such as high temperature and high-salt solutions. This one-step strategy provides a broadly applicable alternative to synthetic polymer conjugation that is biocompatible and degradable. PMID:26407134

  11. Effect of hydrogen bonds on protein stability

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, Valentino; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of cold- and pressure-denaturation are matter of debate. Some models propose that when denaturation occurs more hydrogen bonds between the molecules of hydration water are formed. Other models identify the cause in the density fluctuations of surface water, or the destabilization of hydrophobic contacts because of the displacement of water molecules inside the protein, as proposed for high pressures. However, it is clear that water plays a fundamental role in the process. Here, we review some models that have been proposed to give insight into this problem. Next we describe a coarse-grained model of a water monolayer that successfully reproduces the complex thermodynamics of water and compares well with experiments on proteins at low hydration level. We introduce its extension for a homopolymer in contact with the water monolayer and study it by Monte Carlo simulations. Our goal is to perform a step in the direction of understanding how the interplay of cooperativity of water and interfacial hyd...

  12. Stabilization of G protein-coupled receptors by point mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eHeydenreich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are flexible integral membrane proteins involved in transmembrane signaling. Their involvement in many physiological processes makes them interesting targets for drug development. Determination of the structure of these receptors will help to design more specific drugs, however, their structural characterization has so far been hampered by the low expression and their inherent instability in detergents which made protein engineering indispensable for structural and biophysical characterization.Several approaches to stabilize the receptors in a particular conformation have led to breakthroughs in GPCR structure determination. These include truncations of the flexible regions, stabilization by antibodies and nanobodies, fusion partners, high affinity and covalently bound ligands as well as conformational stabilization by mutagenesis. In this review we focus on stabilization of GPCRs by insertion of point mutations, which lead to increased conformational and thermal stability as well as improved expression levels. We summarize existing mutagenesis strategies with different coverage of GPCR sequence space and depth of information, design and transferability of mutations and the molecular basis for stabilization. We also discuss whether mutations alter the structure and pharmacological properties of GPCRs.

  13. A topological and conformational stability alphabet for multipass membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiang; Barth, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Multipass membrane proteins perform critical signal transduction and transport across membranes. How transmembrane helix (TMH) sequences encode the topology and conformational flexibility regulating these functions remains poorly understood. Here we describe a comprehensive analysis of the sequence-structure relationships at multiple interacting TMHs from all membrane proteins with structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We found that membrane proteins can be deconstructed in interacting TMH trimer units, which mostly fold into six distinct structural classes of topologies and conformations. Each class is enriched in recurrent sequence motifs from functionally unrelated proteins, revealing unforeseen consensus and evolutionary conserved networks of stabilizing interhelical contacts. Interacting TMHs' topology and local protein conformational flexibility were remarkably well predicted in a blinded fashion from the identified binding-hotspot motifs. Our results reveal universal sequence-structure principles governing the complex anatomy and plasticity of multipass membrane proteins that may guide de novo structure prediction, design, and studies of folding and dynamics. PMID:26780406

  14. RNF4-Dependent Oncogene Activation by Protein Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jane J; Abed, Mona; Heuberger, Julian; Novak, Rostislav; Zohar, Yaniv; Beltran Lopez, Angela P; Trausch-Azar, Julie S; Ilagan, Ma Xenia G; Benhamou, David; Dittmar, Gunnar; Kopan, Raphael; Birchmeier, Walter; Schwartz, Alan L; Orian, Amir

    2016-09-20

    Ubiquitylation regulates signaling pathways critical for cancer development and, in many cases, targets proteins for degradation. Here, we report that ubiquitylation by RNF4 stabilizes otherwise short-lived oncogenic transcription factors, including β-catenin, Myc, c-Jun, and the Notch intracellular-domain (N-ICD) protein. RNF4 enhances the transcriptional activity of these factors, as well as Wnt- and Notch-dependent gene expression. While RNF4 is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, protein stabilization requires the substrate's phosphorylation, rather than SUMOylation, and binding to RNF4's arginine-rich motif domain. Stabilization also involves generation of unusual polyubiquitin chains and docking of RNF4 to chromatin. Biologically, RNF4 enhances the tumor phenotype and is essential for cancer cell survival. High levels of RNF4 mRNA correlate with poor survival of a subgroup of breast cancer patients, and RNF4 protein levels are elevated in 30% of human colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, RNF4-dependent ubiquitylation translates transient phosphorylation signal(s) into long-term protein stabilization, resulting in enhanced oncoprotein activation. PMID:27653698

  15. Storage Stability of Food Protein Hydrolysates-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Qinchun; Klaassen Kamdar, Andre; Labuza, Theodore P

    2016-05-18

    In recent years, mainly due to the specific health benefits associated with (1) the discovery of bioactive peptides in protein hydrolysates, (2) the reduction of protein allergenicity by protein hydrolysis, and (3) the improved protein digestibility and absorption of protein hydrolysates, the utilization of protein hydrolysates in functional foods and beverages has significantly increased. Although the specific health benefits from different hydrolysates are somewhat proven, the delivery and/or stability of these benefits is debatable during distribution, storage, and consumption. In this review, we discuss (1) the quality changes in different food protein hydrolysates during storage; (2) the resulting changes in the structure and texture of three food matrices, i.e., low moisture foods (LMF, aw foods (IMF, 0.6 ≤ aw foods (HMF, aw ≥ 0.85); and (3) the potential solutions to improve storage stability of food protein hydrolysates. In addition, we note there is a great need for evaluation of biofunction availability of bioactive peptides in food protein hydrolysates during storage. PMID:24915379

  16. Physical and Oxidative Stability of Fish Oil-In-Water Emulsions Stabilized with Fish Protein Hydrolysates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Guadix, Antonio; Guadix, Emilia M.;

    2016-01-01

    The emulsifying and antioxidant properties of fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) for the physical and oxidative stabilization of 5% (by weight) fish oil-in-water emulsions were investigated. Muscle proteins from sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) were...... hydrolyzed to degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 3-4-5-6% with subtilisin. Sardine hydrolysates with low DH, 3% and 4%, presented the most effective peptides to physically stabilize emulsions with smaller droplet size. This implied more protein adsorbed at the interface to act as physical barrier against...... prooxidants. This fact might also be responsible for the higher oxidative stability of these emulsions, as shown by their lowest peroxide value and concentration of volatiles such as 1-penten-3-one and 1-penten-3-ol. Among the hydrolysates prepared from small-spotted catshark only the hydrolysate with DH 3...

  17. Inactivation, stabilization and redox regulation of iron-containing proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    SummaryMicroperoxidases: kinetics and stability.Microperoxidases are small enzymes prepared by proteolytic digestion of cytochromes c. The proteolytic removal of most of the protein environment allows these enzymes to use a wide variety of substrates in peroxidase-

  18. Enhanced Stability of a Protein with Increasing Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Joachim Møllesøe; Kristensen, Søren M; Led, Jens J

    2010-01-01

    The unusual stability of a structured but locally flexible protein, human growth hormone (hGH) at pH 2.7, was investigated using the temperature dependence of the nanosecond-picosecond dynamics of the backbone amide groups obtained from (15)N NMR relaxation data. It is found that the flexibility...... of the backbone of the helices decreases with temperature in the range from 24 °C to ~40 °C, corresponding to an increasing stability. A concomitant increase with temperature of the electrostatic interactions between charged residues forming an interhelical network of salt bridges at the center of the four......-helix core suggests that these interactions give rise to the decreasing flexibility and increasing stability of the protein. However, numerous hydrophobic interactions in the interior of the four-helix core may also contribute. Above ~40 °C, where the thermal energy overcomes the electrostatic...

  19. Host Cell Sumoylation Level Influences Papillomavirus E2 Protein Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yu-Chieh; Bian, Xue-Lin; Heaton, Phillip R.; G. Wilson

    2009-01-01

    The stability of papillomavirus E2 proteins is regulated by proteasomal degradation, and regulation of degradation could contribute to the higher expression levels E2 proteins observed in suprabasal layers of differentiated skin. We have recently shown that the E2 proteins are modified by sumoylation [Wu Y-C, Roark AA, Bian X-L, Wilson, VG (2008) Virol 378:329–338], and that sumoylation levels are up-regulated during keratinocyte differentiation [Deyrieux AF, Rosas-Acosta G, Ozbun MA, Wilson ...

  20. The structural stability of wild-type horse prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-10-01

    Prion diseases (e.g. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), variant CJD (vCJD), Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI) and Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cattles) are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches or medications to treat all these prion diseases. Rabbits, dogs, and horses are the only mammalian species reported to be resistant to infection from prion diseases isolated from other species. Recently, the β2-α2 loop has been reported to contribute to their protein structural stabilities. The author has found that rabbit prion protein has a strong salt bridge ASP177-ARG163 (like a taut bow string) keeping this loop linked. This paper confirms that this salt bridge also contributes to the structural stability of horse prion protein. Thus, the region of β2-α2 loop might be a potential drug target region. Besides this very important salt bridge, other four important salt bridges GLU196-ARG156-HIS187, ARG156-ASP202 and GLU211-HIS177 are also found to greatly contribute to the structural stability of horse prion protein. Rich databases of salt bridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts for horse prion protein can be found in this paper. PMID:21875155

  1. Detergent Stabilized Nanopore Formation Kinetics of an Anthrax Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kelby

    2015-03-01

    This summer research project funded through the Society of Physics Students Internship Program and The National Institute of Standards and Technology focused on optimization of pore formation of Protective Antigen protein secreted by Bacillus Anthraces. This experiment analyzes the use of N-tetradecylphosphocholine (FOS-14 Detergent) to stabilize the water soluble protein, protective antigen protein (PA63) to regulate the kinetics of pore formation in a model bilayer lipid membrane. The FOS-14 Detergent was tested under various conditions to understand its impact on the protein pore formation. The optimization of this channel insertion is critical in preparing samples of oriented for neutron reflectometry that provide new data to increase the understanding of the protein's structure.

  2. Protein stabilization by macromolecular crowding through enthalpy rather than entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senske, Michael; Törk, Lisa; Born, Benjamin; Havenith, Martina; Herrmann, Christian; Ebbinghaus, Simon

    2014-06-25

    The interior of the cell is a densely crowded environment in which protein stability is affected differently than in dilute solution. Macromolecular crowding is commonly understood in terms of an entropic volume exclusion effect based on hardcore repulsions among the macromolecules. We studied the thermal unfolding of ubiquitin in the presence of different cosolutes (glucose, dextran, poly(ethylene glycol), KCl, urea). Our results show that for a correct dissection of the cosolute-induced changes of the free energy into its enthalpic and entropic contributions, the temperature dependence of the heat capacity change needs to be explicitly taken into account. In contrast to the prediction by the excluded volume theory, we observed an enthalpic stabilization and an entropic destabilization for glucose, dextran, and poly(ethylene glycol). The enthalpic stabilization mechanism induced by the macromolecular crowder dextran was similar to the enthalpic stabilization mechanism of its monomeric building block glucose. In the case of poly(ethylene glycol), entropy is dominating over enthalpy leading to an overall destabilization. We propose a new model to classify cosolute effects in terms of their enthalpic contributions to protein stability.

  3. Stability of β-carotene in protein-stabilized oil-in-water delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchia, Leonardo; Roos, Yrjo H

    2011-07-13

    Inclusion of liposoluble bioactive compounds in fortified foods represents a complex challenge due to the labile nature of such compounds and the instability of oil-in-water emulsion-based delivery systems. In the present study, dispersions prepared with 10% (w/w) sunflower oil (SO) or hydrogenated palm kernel oil (HPKO) containing 0.05% (w/w) β-carotene were stabilized by various concentrations of whey protein isolate (WPI) or sodium caseinate (NaCas) (0.1 to 2.0% w/w) in 30% (w/w) sucrose aqueous solutions. Physicochemical characterization of emulsions was done considering the particle size, the particle surface protein coverage, and the physical state of continuous and dispersed phases. Physical stability of the systems and their protection properties on β-carotene were compared. The lipid carrier type and interfacial structure were investigated as the two key factors which regulate the stability of labile lipophilic bioactive molecules in food model systems. Our results showed high β-carotene stability when O/W systems were stable (protein concentration ≥0.8% w/w.) A (partially) solid lipid carrier (HPKO) enhanced protection compared to the liquid carrier (SO) as the bioactive molecules were entrapped in isolated domains within the solid lattice and kept apart from reactive species in the surroundings. NaCas provided a better barrier than WPI due to the different amino acid composition and interface structure which significantly reduced β-carotene degradation rate.

  4. Topology, Geometry, and Stability: Protein Folding and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Simmons, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The protein folding problem must ultimately be solved on all length scales from the atomic up through a hierarchy of complicated structures. By analyzing the stability of the folding process using physics and mathematics, this paper shows that features without length scales, i.e. topological features, are potentially of central importance. Topology is a natural mathematical tool for the study of shape and we avail ourselves of that tool to examine the relationship between the amino acid sequence and the shapes of protein molecules. We apply what we learn to conjectures about their biological evolution.

  5. Do salt bridges stabilize proteins? A continuum electrostatic analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hendsch, Z. S.; Tidor, B.

    1994-01-01

    The electrostatic contribution to the free energy of folding was calculated for 21 salt bridges in 9 protein X-ray crystal structures using a continuum electrostatic approach with the DELPHI computer-program package. The majority (17) were found to be electrostatically destabilizing; the average free energy change, which is analogous to mutation of salt bridging side chains to hydrophobic isosteres, was calculated to be 3.5 kcal/mol. This is fundamentally different from stability measurements...

  6. Structuring detergents for extracting and stabilizing functional membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Matar-Merheb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane proteins are privileged pharmaceutical targets for which the development of structure-based drug design is challenging. One underlying reason is the fact that detergents do not stabilize membrane domains as efficiently as natural lipids in membranes, often leading to a partial to complete loss of activity/stability during protein extraction and purification and preventing crystallization in an active conformation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anionic calix[4]arene based detergents (C4Cn, n=1-12 were designed to structure the membrane domains through hydrophobic interactions and a network of salt bridges with the basic residues found at the cytosol-membrane interface of membrane proteins. These compounds behave as surfactants, forming micelles of 5-24 nm, with the critical micellar concentration (CMC being as expected sensitive to pH ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mM. Both by 1H NMR titration and Surface Tension titration experiments, the interaction of these molecules with the basic amino acids was confirmed. They extract membrane proteins from different origins behaving as mild detergents, leading to partial extraction in some cases. They also retain protein functionality, as shown for BmrA (Bacillus multidrug resistance ATP protein, a membrane multidrug-transporting ATPase, which is particularly sensitive to detergent extraction. These new detergents allow BmrA to bind daunorubicin with a Kd of 12 µM, a value similar to that observed after purification using dodecyl maltoside (DDM. They preserve the ATPase activity of BmrA (which resets the protein to its initial state after drug efflux much more efficiently than SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate, FC12 (Foscholine 12 or DDM. They also maintain in a functional state the C4Cn-extracted protein upon detergent exchange with FC12. Finally, they promote 3D-crystallization of the membrane protein. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These compounds seem promising to extract in a functional state

  7. Properties and stability of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by coconut skim milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onsaard, Ekasit; Vittayanont, Manee; Srigam, Sukoncheun; McClements, D Julian

    2005-07-13

    Protein fractions were isolated from coconut: coconut skim milk protein isolate (CSPI) and coconut skim milk protein concentrate (CSPC). The ability of these proteins to form and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions was compared with that of whey protein isolate (WPI). The solubility of the proteins in CSPI, CSPC, and WPI was determined in aqueous solutions containing 0, 100, and 200 mM NaCl from pH 3 to 8. In the absence of salt, the minimum protein solubility occurred between pH 4 and 5 for CSPI and CSPC and around pH 5 for WPI. In the presence of salt (100 and 200 mM NaCl), all proteins had a higher solubility than in distilled water. Corn oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt %) with relatively small droplet diameters (d32 approximately 0.46, 1.0, and 0.5 mum for CSPI, CSPC, and WPI, respectively) could be produced using 0.2 wt % protein fraction. Emulsions were prepared with different pH values (3-8), salt concentrations (0-500 mM NaCl), and thermal treatments (30-90 degrees C for 30 min), and the mean particle diameter, particle size distribution, zeta-potential, and creaming stability were measured. Considerable droplet flocculation occurred in the emulsions near the isoelectric point of the proteins: CSPI, pH approximately 4.0; CSPC, pH approximately 4.5; WPI, pH approximately 4.8. Emulsions with monomodal particle size distributions, small mean droplet diameters, and good creaming stability could be produced at pH 7 for CSPI and WPI, whereas CSPC produced bimodal distributions. The CSPI and WPI emulsions remained relatively stable to droplet aggregation and creaming at NaCl concentrations of < or =50 and < or =100 mM, respectively. In the absence salt, the CSPI and WPI emulsions were also stable to thermal treatments at < or =80 and < or =90 degrees C for 30 min, respectively. These results suggest that CSPI may be suitable for use as an emulsifier in the food industry.

  8. Protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA): protein degradation meets the CRISPR-Cas9 library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of protein stability is a fundamental issue for biophysical processes, but there has not previously been a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability. However, as reported in the article entitled "A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A," recently published in Cell Discovery, our team developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Based on our findings, we are confident that this efficient and unbiased screening method at the genome scale will be used by researchers worldwide to identify regulators of protein stability. PMID:27357860

  9. Protein folding, stability, and solvation structure in osmolyte solutions hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery Pettitt, B.

    2008-03-01

    The hydrophobic effect between solutes in aqueous solutions plays a central role in our understanding of recognition and folding of proteins and self assembly of lipids. Hydrophobicity induces nonideal solution behavior which plays a role in many aspects of biophysics. Work on the use of small biochemical compounds to crowd protein solutions indicates that a quantitative description of their non-ideal behavior is possible and straightforward. Here, we will show what the structural origin of this non-ideal solution behavior is from expression derived from a semi grand ensemble approach. We discuss the consequences of these findings regarding protein folding stability and solvation in crowded solutions through a structural analysis of the m-value or the change in free energy difference of a macromolecule in solution with respect to the concentration of a third component. This effect has recently been restudied and new mechanisms proposed for its origins in terms of transfer free energies and hydrophobicity.

  10. Tankyrase Inhibitors Target YAP by Stabilizing Angiomotin Family Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As the key effector in the Hippo pathway, YAP was identified as an oncoprotein whose expression is elevated in various human cancers. However, the development of potentially therapeutic compounds targeting YAP has been slow and limited. Here, we find that tankyrase inhibitors suppress YAP activity. This effect is mediated by anigomotin (AMOT family proteins. Tankyrases associate with AMOT family proteins and promote their degradation through E3 ligase RNF146. By antagonizing tankyrase activity, tankyrase inhibitors stabilize AMOT family proteins, thereby suppressing YAP oncogenic functions. Together, our studies not only demonstrate the tankyrase-RNF146-AMOT axis as an upstream pathway regulating YAP but also reveal a therapeutic opportunity in targeting YAP for cancer treatment.

  11. Stabilization of Protein-Protein Interactions in chemical biology and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Thiel, Philipp; Briels, Jeroen; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    More than 300,000 Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) can be found in human cells. This number is significantly larger than the number of single proteins, which are the classical targets for pharmacological intervention. Hence, specific and potent modulation of PPIs by small, drug-like molecules would tremendously enlarge the "druggable genome" enabling novel ways of drug discovery for essentially every human disease. This strategy is especially promising in diseases with difficult targets like intrinsically disordered proteins or transcription factors, for example neurodegeneration or metabolic diseases. Whereas the potential of PPI modulation has been recognized in terms of the development of inhibitors that disrupt or prevent a binary protein complex, the opposite (or complementary) strategy to stabilize PPIs has not yet been realized in a systematic manner. This fact is rather surprising given the number of impressive natural product examples that confer their activity by stabilizing specific PPIs. In addition, in recent years more and more examples of synthetic molecules are being published that work as PPI stabilizers, despite the fact that in the majority they initially have not been designed as such. Here, we describe examples from both the natural products as well as the synthetic molecules advocating for a stronger consideration of the PPI stabilization approach in chemical biology and drug discovery. PMID:26093250

  12. Effective stabilization of CLA by microencapsulation in pea protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, A M M; Nunes, J C; Lima, B N B; Pedrosa, C; Calado, V; Torres, A G; Pierucci, A P T R

    2015-02-01

    CLA was microencapsulated by spray drying in ten varied wall systems (WS) consisting of pea protein isolate or pea protein concentrate (PPC) alone at varied core:WS ratios (1:2; 1:3 and 1:4), or blended with maltodextrin (M) and carboxymethylcellulose at a pea protein:carbohydrate ratio of 3:1. The physical-chemical properties of the CLA microparticles were characterised by core retention, microencapsulation efficiency (ME), particle size and moisture. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) showed the most promising results, thus we evaluated the effect of M addition in the WS on other physical-chemical characteristics and oxidative stability (CLA isomer profile, quantification of CLA and volatile compounds by SPME coupled with CG-MS) during two months of storage at room temperature, CLA:PPC (1:4) was selected for comparisons. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) microparticles demonstrated better morphology, solubility, dispersibility and higher glass-transition temperature values. M addition did not influence the oxidative stability of CLA, however its presence improved physical-chemical characteristics necessary for food applications.

  13. Processing, stability and interactions of lung surfactant protein C

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jing

    2005-01-01

    Mature SP-C is a 4.2 kDa transmembrane protein which is uniquely expressed in the alveolar type II cell. Human SP-C is generated via multistep proteolytic cleavage of both the C-terminal and Nterminal regions of proSP-C. The function of SP-C in vivo remains unclear, but effects of SP-C on the adsorption, spreading, and stability of lipid films at an air/water interface have been documented in a number of in vitro studies. Infants with inherited deficiency of SP-B and SP-...

  14. Protein attributes contribute to halo-stability, bioinformatics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Sarvestani, Narjes Rahpayma; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    Halophile proteins can tolerate high salt concentrations. Understanding halophilicity features is the first step toward engineering halostable crops. To this end, we examined protein features contributing to the halo-toleration of halophilic organisms. We compared more than 850 features for halophilic and non-halophilic proteins with various screening, clustering, decision tree, and generalized rule induction models to search for patterns that code for halo-toleration. Up to 251 protein attributes selected by various attribute weighting algorithms as important features contribute to halo-stability; from them 14 attributes selected by 90% of models and the count of hydrogen gained the highest value (1.0) in 70% of attribute weighting models, showing the importance of this attribute in feature selection modeling. The other attributes mostly were the frequencies of di-peptides. No changes were found in the numbers of groups when K-Means and TwoStep clustering modeling were performed on datasets with or without feature selection filtering. Although the depths of induced trees were not high, the accuracies of trees were higher than 94% and the frequency of hydrophobic residues pointed as the most important feature to build trees. The performance evaluation of decision tree models had the same values and the best correctness percentage recorded with the Exhaustive CHAID and CHAID models. We did not find any significant difference in the percent of correctness, performance evaluation, and mean correctness of various decision tree models with or without feature selection. For the first time, we analyzed the performance of different screening, clustering, and decision tree algorithms for discriminating halophilic and non-halophilic proteins and the results showed that amino acid composition can be used to discriminate between halo-tolerant and halo-sensitive proteins. PMID:21592393

  15. Differential stability of the bovine prion protein upon urea unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Olivier; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Thiessen, Angela; Graether, Steffen P; Sykes, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are a group of infectious neurological diseases associated with the structural conversion of an endogenous protein (PrP) in the central nervous system. There are two major forms of this protein: the native and noninfectious cellular form, PrPC; and the misfolded, infectious, and proteinase K-resistant form, PrPSc. The C-terminal domain of PrPC is mainly α-helical in structure, whereas PrPSc in known to aggregate into an assembly of β-sheets, forming amyloid fibrils. To identify the regions of PrPC potentially involved in the initial steps of the conversion to the infectious conformation, we have used high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to characterize the stability and structure of bovine recombinant PrPC (residues 121 to 230) during unfolding with the denaturant urea. Analysis of the 800 MHz 1H NMR spectra reveals region-specific information about the structural changes occurring upon unfolding. Our data suggest that the dissociation of the native β-sheet of PrPC is a primary step in the urea-induced unfolding process, while strong hydrophobic interactions between helices α1 and α3, and between α2 and α3, stabilize these regions even at very high concentrations of urea. PMID:19693935

  16. Solubilizing and Stabilizing Proteins in Anhydrous Ionic Liquids through Formation of Protein-Polymer Surfactant Nanoconstructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Alex P S; Hallett, Jason P

    2016-04-01

    Nonaqueous biocatalysis is rapidly becoming a desirable tool for chemical and fuel synthesis in both the laboratory and industry. Similarly, ionic liquids are increasingly popular anhydrous reaction media for a number of industrial processes. Consequently, the use of enzymes in ionic liquids as efficient, environment-friendly, commercial biocatalysts is highly attractive. However, issues surrounding the poor solubility and low stability of enzymes in truly anhydrous media remain a significant challenge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that engineering the surface of a protein to yield protein-polymer surfactant nanoconstructs allows for dissolution of dry protein into dry ionic liquids. Using myoglobin as a model protein, we show that this method can deliver protein molecules with near native structure into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic anhydrous ionic liquids. Remarkably, using temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to measure half-denaturation temperatures, our results show that protein stability increases by 55 °C in the ionic liquid as compared to aqueous solution, pushing the solution thermal denaturation beyond the boiling point of water. Therefore, the work presented herein could provide a platform for the realization of biocatalysis at high temperatures or in anhydrous solvent systems. PMID:26976718

  17. Structural stability study of protein monolayers in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompa, P. P.; Biasco, A.; Cingolani, R.; Rinaldi, R.; Verbeet, M. Ph.; Canters, G. W.

    2004-03-01

    The assessment of the folding and of the structural stability of a protein in air, upon immobilization in the solid state, represents a critical point from both a fundamental point of view and for the development of solid state nanobioelectronics. The recent demonstrations by Rinaldi et al. [R. Rinaldi et al., Adv. Mater. 14, 1453 (2002); Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 472 (2003); Ann. (N.Y.) Acad. Sci. 1006, 187 (2003)] of protein-based solid state devices and transistors working in air have raised an intriguing question about the behavior of a biomolecule under nonphysiological conditions. The operation principle of the realized devices is based on the physiological electron transfer function of the metalloprotein azurin. This means that azurin should retain its shape and functionality also in the solid state when utilized in air and at room temperature. In this Brief Report, we prove this claim by analyzing the conformational state of the azurin monolayers developed for such devices by means of intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. We show that the immobilization of azurins in the solid state under nonliquid conditions, by means of a specific chemisorption process, does not necessarily lead to protein denaturation. This result is of great importance because it opens up interesting perspectives for the development of solid state hybrid nanodevices for electronic applications requiring nonliquid environments.

  18. Distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations in the denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liujiao Bian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extensive and intensive studies on the unfolding of proteins require appropriate theoretical model and parameter to clearly illustrate the feature and characteristic of the unfolding system. Over the past several decades, four approaches have been proposed to describe the interaction between proteins and denaturants, but some ambiguity and deviations usually occur in the explanation of the experimental data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, a theoretical model was presented to show the dependency of the residual activity ratio of the proteins on the molar denaturant concentration. Through the characteristic unfolding parameters ki and Δmi in this model, the distribution, transition and thermodynamic stability of protein conformations during the unfolding process can be quantitatively described. This model was tested with the two-state unfolding of bovine heart cytochrome c and the three-state unfolding of hen egg white lysozyme induced by both guanidine hydrochloride and urea, the four-state unfolding of bovine carbonic anhydrase b induced by guanidine hydrochloride and the unfolding of some other proteins induced by denaturants. The results illustrated that this model could be used accurately to reveal the distribution and transition of protein conformations in the presence of different concentrations of denaturants and to evaluate the unfolding tendency and thermodynamic stability of different conformations. In most denaturant-induced unfolding of proteins, the unfolding became increasingly hard in next transition step and the proteins became more unstable as they attained next successive stable conformation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work presents a useful method for people to study the unfolding of proteins and may be used to describe the unfolding and refolding of other biopolymers induced by denaturants, inducers, etc.

  19. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwamitra, Deeksha; Curry, Choladda V; Shi, Ping; Alkan, Serhan; Amin, Hesham M

    2015-09-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-expressing (NPM-ALK+) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm.

  20. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha Vishwamitra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase–expressing (NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5(p23;q35 that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm.

  1. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A. (UNL)

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  2. Sample Stability and Protein Composition of Saliva : Implications for Its Use as a Diagnostic Fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esser, Diederik; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; de Vries, Marcel P; Weening, Desiree; Vonk, Roel J; Roelofsen, Han

    2008-01-01

    Saliva is an easy accessible plasma ultra-filtrate. Therefore, saliva can be an attractive alternative to blood for measurement of diagnostic protein markers. Our aim was to determine stability and protein composition of saliva. Protein stability at room temperature was examined by incubating fresh

  3. Adhesive–cohesive model for protein compressibility: An alternative perspective on stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dadarlat, Voichita M.; Post, Carol Beth

    2003-01-01

    As a dynamic property of folded proteins, protein compressibility provides important information about the forces that govern structural stability. We relate intrinsic compressibility to stability by using molecular dynamics to identify a molecular basis for the variation in compressibility among globular proteins. We find that excess surface charge accounts for this variation not only for the proteins simulated by molecular dynamics but also for a larger set of globular proteins. This depend...

  4. Effect of cosolvent on protein stability: A theoretical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalikian, Tigran V., E-mail: chalikan@phm.utoronto.ca [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 144 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3M2 (Canada)

    2014-12-14

    We developed a statistical thermodynamic algorithm for analyzing solvent-induced folding/unfolding transitions of proteins. The energetics of protein transitions is governed by the interplay between the cavity formation contribution and the term reflecting direct solute-cosolvent interactions. The latter is viewed as an exchange reaction in which the binding of a cosolvent to a solute is accompanied by release of waters of hydration to the bulk. Our model clearly differentiates between the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric interactions of solvent or co-solvent molecules with a solute. We analyzed the urea- and glycine betaine (GB)-induced conformational transitions of model proteins of varying size which are geometrically approximated by a sphere in their native state and a spherocylinder in their unfolded state. The free energy of cavity formation and its changes accompanying protein transitions were computed based on the concepts of scaled particle theory. The free energy of direct solute-cosolvent interactions were analyzed using empirical parameters previously determined for urea and GB interactions with low molecular weight model compounds. Our computations correctly capture the mode of action of urea and GB and yield realistic numbers for (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} which are related to the m-values of protein denaturation. Urea is characterized by negative values of (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} within the entire range of urea concentrations analyzed. At concentrations below ∼1 M, GB exhibits positive values of (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} which turn positive at higher GB concentrations. The balance between the thermodynamic contributions of cavity formation and direct solute-cosolvent interactions that, ultimately, defines the mode of cosolvent action is extremely subtle. A 20% increase or decrease in the equilibrium constant for solute-cosolvent binding may change the sign of (∂ΔG°/∂a{sub 3}){sub T,P} thereby altering the mode of

  5. Alpha-haemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) stabilizes apo-α-haemoglobin in a partially folded state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Dickson, Claire F.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Mackay, Joel P.; Gell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS To produce functional haemoglobin, nascent α-globin (αo) and β-globin (βo) chains must each bind a single haem molecule (to form αh and βh) and interact together to form heterodimers. The precise sequence of binding events is unknown, and it has been suggested that additional factors might enhance the efficiency of Hb folding. The α-haemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) has previously been shown to bind αh and regulate redox activity of the haem iron. Here, we use a combination of classical and dynamic light scattering and NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that AHSP forms a heterodimeric complex with αo that inhibits αo aggregation and promotes αo folding in the absence of haem. These findings indicate that AHSP may function as an αo-specific chaperone, and suggest an important role for αo in guiding Hb assembly by stabilizing βo and inhibiting off-pathway self-association of βh. PMID:20860551

  6. AHSP (α-haemoglobin-stabilizing protein) stabilizes apo-α-haemoglobin in a partially folded state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Dickson, Claire F; Weiss, Mitchell J; Mackay, Joel P; Gell, David A

    2010-12-01

    To produce functional Hb (haemoglobin), nascent α-globin (αo) and β-globin (βo) chains must each bind a single haem molecule (to form αh and βh) and interact together to form heterodimers. The precise sequence of binding events is unknown, and it has been suggested that additional factors might enhance the efficiency of Hb folding. AHSP (α-haemoglobin-stabilizing protein) has been shown previously to bind αh and regulate redox activity of the haem iron. In the present study, we used a combination of classical and dynamic light scattering and NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that AHSP forms a heterodimeric complex with αo that inhibits αo aggregation and promotes αo folding in the absence of haem. These findings indicate that AHSP may function as an αo-specific chaperone, and suggest an important role for αo in guiding Hb assembly by stabilizing βo and inhibiting off-pathway self-association of βh.

  7. Stability and Immunogenicity of Hypoallergenic Peanut Protein-Polyphenol Complexes During In Vitro Pepsin Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergenic peanut proteins are relatively resistant to digestion, and if digested, metabolized peptides tend to remain large and immunoreactive, triggering allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. In this study, the stability of hypoallergenic peanut protein-polyphenol complexes was evaluated d...

  8. Analysis of protein stability and ligand interactions by thermal shift assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Kathy; Partch, Carrie L

    2015-02-02

    Purification of recombinant proteins for biochemical assays and structural studies is time-consuming and presents inherent difficulties that depend on the optimization of protein stability. The use of dyes to monitor thermal denaturation of proteins with sensitive fluorescence detection enables rapid and inexpensive determination of protein stability using real-time PCR instruments. By screening a wide range of solution conditions and additives in a 96-well format, the thermal shift assay easily identifies conditions that significantly enhance the stability of recombinant proteins. The same approach can be used as an initial low-cost screen to discover new protein-ligand interactions by capitalizing on increases in protein stability that typically occur upon ligand binding. This unit presents a methodological workflow for small-scale, high-throughput thermal denaturation of recombinant proteins in the presence of SYPRO Orange dye.

  9. Amino acid composition and thermal stability of protein structures: the free energy geography of the Protein Data Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Deiana, Antonio; Shimizu, Kana; Giansanti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We study the combined influence of amino acid composition and chain length on the thermal stability of protein structures. A new parameterization of the internal free energy is considered, as the sum of hydrophobic effect, hydrogen-bond and de-hydration energy terms. We divided a non-redundant selection of protein structures from the Protein Data Bank into three groups: i) rich in order-promoting residues (OPR proteins); ii) rich in disorder-promoting residues (DPR proteins); iii) belonging t...

  10. Protocols for Studying Protein Stability in an Arabidopsis Protoplast Transient Expression System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchais, Séverine; Camborde, Laurent; Jupin, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability influences many aspects of biology, and measuring their stability in vivo can provide important insights into biological systems.This chapter describes in details two methods to assess the stability of a specific protein based on its transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts. First, a pulse-chase assay based on radioactive metabolic labeling of cellular proteins, followed by immunoprecipitation of the protein of interest. The decrease in radioactive signal is monitored over time and can be used to determine the protein's half-life.Alternatively, we also present a nonradioactive assay based on the use of reporter proteins, whose ratio can be quantified. This assay can be used to determine the relative stability of a protein of interest under specific conditions. PMID:27424754

  11. Unraveling protein stabilization mechanisms : Vitrification and water replacement in a glass transition temperature controlled system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasmeijer, N; Stankovic, M; de Waard, H; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the two main mechanisms used to explain the stabilization of proteins by sugar glasses during drying and subsequent storage: the vitrification and the water replacement theory. Although in literature protein stability is often attributed to either v

  12. The influence of selection for protein stability on dN/dS estimations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W. R.; Kepp, Kasper Planeta;

    2014-01-01

    from the neutral theory as a null model. However, from biophysical considerations, mutations have non-negligible effects on the biophysical properties of proteins such as folding stability. In this work, we investigated how stability affects the rate of protein evolution in phylogenetic trees by using...... simulations that combine explicit protein sequences with associated stability changes. We first simulated myoglobin evolution in phylogenetic trees with a biophysically realistic approach that accounts for 3D structural information and estimates of changes in stability upon mutation. We then compared...... stability where protein evolution is neutral. At low folding stabilities and under mutation-selection balance, we observe deviations from neutrality (per gene dN/dS > 1 and dN/dS positive selection detect statistically...

  13. Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization improves oxidative stability and interfacial properties of soy protein isolate-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Avila, C; Trujillo, A J

    2016-10-15

    Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization (100-300MPa) has great potential for technological, microbiological and nutritional aspects of fluid processing. Its effect on the oxidative stability and interfacial properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 4% (w/v) of soy protein isolate and soybean oil (10 and 20%, v/v) were studied and compared to emulsions treated by conventional homogenization (15MPa). Emulsions were characterized by particle size, emulsifying activity index, surface protein concentration at the interface and by transmission electron microscopy. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were evaluated in emulsions upon storage. Emulsions with 20% oil treated at 100 and 200MPa exhibited the most oxidative stability due to higher amount of oil and protein surface load at the interface. This manuscript addresses the improvement in oxidative stability in emulsions treated by UHPH when compared to conventional emulsions. PMID:27173541

  14. Regulation of PCNA-protein interactions for genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailand, Niels; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) has a central role in promoting faithful DNA replication, providing a molecular platform that facilitates the myriad protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that occur at the replication fork. Numerous PCNA-associated proteins compete for binding to ...

  15. Interrelationship of steric stabilization and self-crowding of a glycosylated protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiberg-Nielsen, Rasmus; Westh, Peter; Skov, L.K.;

    2009-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell, protein glycosylation takes place in the crowded environment of the endoplasmatic reticulum. With the purpose of elucidating the impact of high concentration on the interactions of glycoproteins, we have conducted a series of small-angle x-ray scattering experiments...... from the glycans contribute to steric stabilization of the protein, and that glycosylation helps to sustain repulsive electrostatic interactions under crowded conditions. In combination, this aids in stabilizing high concentrations of glycosylated proteins....

  16. Surprisingly high stability of barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, towards denaturant, heat and proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Winther, J R

    2001-01-01

    Barley LTP1 belongs to a large family of plant proteins termed non-specific lipid transfer proteins. The in vivo function of these proteins is unknown, but it has been suggested that they are involved in responses towards stresses such as pathogens, drought, heat, cold and salt. Also, the proteins...... have been suggested as transporters of monomers for cutin synthesis. We have analysed the stability of LTP1 towards denaturant, heat and proteases and found it to be a highly stable protein, which apparently does not denature at temperatures up to 100 degrees C. This high stability may be important...

  17. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  18. A functional protein retention and release multilayer with high stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Kun; An, Qi; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-01

    Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by varying the number of capping layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein-loaded interfacial layers could not only be used to construct catalytic-active interfaces, but also be integrated as the power-generating unit to propel a macroscopic floating device.Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by

  19. The Effect of Protein PEGylation on Physical Stability in Liquid Formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Mcumber, Aaron; Rasmussen, Jakob Ewald;

    2014-01-01

    approximately half as many particles as Lyz, despite its lower apparent thermodynamic stability and more loose protein fold. Further characterization showed that the PEGylation led to a change from attractive to repulsive protein-protein interactions, which may partly explain the reduced particle formation...

  20. Pickering emulsions stabilized by whey protein nanoparticles prepared by thermal cross-linking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Jiande; Shi, Mengxuan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Luhai; Wang, Ze; Yan, Xinzhong; Norde, Willem; Li, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    A Pickering (o/w) emulsion was formed and stabilized by whey protein isolate nanoparticles (WPI NPs). Those WPI NPs were prepared by thermal cross-linking of denatured WPI proteins within w/o emulsion droplets at 80. °C for 15. min. During heating of w/o emulsions containing 10% (w/v) WPI protein

  1. Stability curve prediction of homologous proteins using temperature-dependent statistical potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Pucci

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The unraveling and control of protein stability at different temperatures is a fundamental problem in biophysics that is substantially far from being quantitatively and accurately solved, as it requires a precise knowledge of the temperature dependence of amino acid interactions. In this paper we attempt to gain insight into the thermal stability of proteins by designing a tool to predict the full stability curve as a function of the temperature for a set of 45 proteins belonging to 11 homologous families, given their sequence and structure, as well as the melting temperature (Tm and the change in heat capacity (ΔCP of proteins belonging to the same family. Stability curves constitute a fundamental instrument to analyze in detail the thermal stability and its relation to the thermodynamic stability, and to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the folding free energy. In summary, our approach for predicting the protein stability curves relies on temperature-dependent statistical potentials derived from three datasets of protein structures with targeted thermal stability properties. Using these potentials, the folding free energies (ΔG at three different temperatures were computed for each protein. The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation was then used to predict the protein's stability curve as the curve that best fits these three points. The results are quite encouraging: the standard deviations between the experimental and predicted Tm's, ΔCP's and folding free energies at room temperature (ΔG25 are equal to 13° C, 1.3 kcal/(mol° C and 4.1 kcal/mol, respectively, in cross-validation. The main sources of error and some further improvements and perspectives are briefly discussed.

  2. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-04-26

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols.

  3. Membrane protein stability analyses by means of protein energy profiles in case of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinke, Florian; Labudde, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare endocrine, inheritable disorder with low incidences in an estimated one per 25,000-30,000 live births. This disease is characterized by polyuria and compensatory polydypsia. The diverse underlying causes of DI can be central defects, in which no functional arginine vasopressin (AVP) is released from the pituitary or can be a result of defects in the kidney (nephrogenic DI, NDI). NDI is a disorder in which patients are unable to concentrate their urine despite the presence of AVP. This antidiuretic hormone regulates the process of water reabsorption from the prourine that is formed in the kidney. It binds to its type-2 receptor (V2R) in the kidney induces a cAMP-driven cascade, which leads to the insertion of aquaporin-2 water channels into the apical membrane. Mutations in the genes of V2R and aquaporin-2 often lead to NDI. We investigated a structure model of V2R in its bound and unbound state regarding protein stability using a novel protein energy profile approach. Furthermore, these techniques were applied to the wild-type and selected mutations of aquaporin-2. We show that our results correspond well to experimental water ux analysis, which confirms the applicability of our theoretical approach to equivalent problems.

  4. Membrane Protein Stability Analyses by Means of Protein Energy Profiles in Case of Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heinke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes insipidus (DI is a rare endocrine, inheritable disorder with low incidences in an estimated one per 25,000–30,000 live births. This disease is characterized by polyuria and compensatory polydypsia. The diverse underlying causes of DI can be central defects, in which no functional arginine vasopressin (AVP is released from the pituitary or can be a result of defects in the kidney (nephrogenic DI, NDI. NDI is a disorder in which patients are unable to concentrate their urine despite the presence of AVP. This antidiuretic hormone regulates the process of water reabsorption from the prourine that is formed in the kidney. It binds to its type-2 receptor (V2R in the kidney induces a cAMP-driven cascade, which leads to the insertion of aquaporin-2 water channels into the apical membrane. Mutations in the genes of V2R and aquaporin-2 often lead to NDI. We investigated a structure model of V2R in its bound and unbound state regarding protein stability using a novel protein energy profile approach. Furthermore, these techniques were applied to the wild-type and selected mutations of aquaporin-2. We show that our results correspond well to experimental water ux analysis, which confirms the applicability of our theoretical approach to equivalent problems.

  5. Mechanism of RNA stabilization and translational activation by a pentatricopeptide repeat protein

    OpenAIRE

    Prikryl, Jana; Rojas, Margarita; Schuster, Gadi; Barkan, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins comprise a large family of helical repeat proteins that bind RNA and modulate organellar RNA metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the functions attributed to PPR proteins are unknown. We describe in vitro studies of the maize protein PPR10 that clarify how PPR10 modulates the stability and translation of specific chloroplast mRNAs. We show that recombinant PPR10 bound to its native binding site in the chloroplast atpI–atpH intergenic region (i) blocks ...

  6. Self-consistent field approach to protein structure and stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitrov, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The organization of the thesis is as follows: after a short introduction (chapter 1), chapter 2 presents a review of the basic physical principle that govern protein structure and focuses on the thermodynamics as well as kinetics of protein folding and ufolding. Then chapter 3 starts with a discussi

  7. Co-encapsulation of lyoprotectants improves the stability of protein-loaded PLGA nanoparticles upon lyophilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Seabra, Vítor;

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the influence of the co-encapsulation of lyoprotectants with insulin into PLGA nanoparticles, on the stability of the protein and nanoparticles upon lyophilization. Different lyoprotectants were used, namely trehalose, glucose, sucrose, fructose and sorbitol...... confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Surprisingly, the simultaneous co-encapsulation and addition of lyoprotectants was detrimental to protein stabilization. The insulin in vitro release studies demonstrated that formulations with co-encapsulated trehalose, glucose, sucrose, fructose and sorbitol...

  8. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity ({\\alpha}-helix, \\b{eta}-hairpin, {\\alpha}-helix bundle, and {\\alpha}/\\b{eta}-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly in influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For \\b{eta}-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the \\b{eta}-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on t...

  9. Novel regulation of Ski protein stability and endosomal sorting by actin cytoskeleton dynamics in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Victorio, Genaro; Caligaris, Cassandre; Del Valle-Espinosa, Eugenio; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; González-Arenas, Nelly R; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Briones-Orta, Marco A; Macías-Silva, Marina

    2015-02-13

    TGF-β-induced antimitotic signals are highly regulated during cell proliferation under normal and pathological conditions, such as liver regeneration and cancer. Up-regulation of the transcriptional cofactors Ski and SnoN during liver regeneration may favor hepatocyte proliferation by inhibiting TGF-β signals. In this study, we found a novel mechanism that regulates Ski protein stability through TGF-β and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Ski protein is distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm of normal hepatocytes, and the molecular mechanisms controlling Ski protein stability involve the participation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cytoplasmic Ski is partially associated with actin and localized in cholesterol-rich vesicles. Ski protein stability is decreased by TGF-β/Smads, GPCR/Rho signals, and actin polymerization, whereas GPCR/cAMP signals and actin depolymerization promote Ski protein stability. In conclusion, TGF-β and GPCR signals differentially regulate Ski protein stability and sorting in hepatocytes, and this cross-talk may occur during liver regeneration.

  10. Rigidity versus flexibility: the dilemma of understanding protein thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karshikoff, Andrey; Nilsson, Lennart; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2015-10-01

    The role of fluctuations in protein thermostability has recently received considerable attention. In the current literature a dualistic picture can be found: thermostability seems to be associated with enhanced rigidity of the protein scaffold in parallel with the reduction of flexible parts of the structure. In contradiction to such arguments it has been shown by experimental studies and computer simulation that thermal tolerance of a protein is not necessarily correlated with the suppression of internal fluctuations and mobility. Both concepts, rigidity and flexibility, are derived from mechanical engineering and represent temporally insensitive features describing static properties, neglecting that relative motion at certain time scales is possible in structurally stable regions of a protein. This suggests that a strict separation of rigid and flexible parts of a protein molecule does not describe the reality correctly. In this work the concepts of mobility/flexibility versus rigidity will be critically reconsidered by taking into account molecular dynamics calculations of heat capacity and conformational entropy, salt bridge networks, electrostatic interactions in folded and unfolded states, and the emerging picture of protein thermostability in view of recently developed network theories. Last, but not least, the influence of high temperature on the active site and activity of enzymes will be considered. PMID:26074325

  11. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.

  12. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Thomas; Schellenberg, Katja; Maier, Bert; Kalathur, Ravi Kiran Reddy; Porras, Pablo; Wanker, Erich E; Futschik, Matthias E; Kramer, Achim

    2013-03-01

    Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour) clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression) suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc.) contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner. PMID:23555304

  13. Influence of osmolytes on protein and water structure: a step to understanding the mechanism of protein stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruździak, Piotr; Panuszko, Aneta; Stangret, Janusz

    2013-10-01

    Results concerning the thermostability of hen egg white lysozyme in aqueous solutions with stabilizing osmolytes, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), glycine (Gly), and its N-methyl derivatives, N-methylglycine (NMG), N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG), and N,N,N-trimethylglycine (betaine, TMG), have been presented. The combination of spectroscopic (IR) and calorimetric (DSC) data allowed us to establish a link between osmolytes' influence on water structure and their ability to thermally stabilize protein molecule. Structural and energetic characteristics of stabilizing osmolytes' and lysozyme's hydration water appear to be very similar. The osmolytes increase lysozyme stabilization in the order bulk water < TMAO < TMG < Gly < DMG < NMG, which is consistent with the order corresponding to the value of the most probable oxygen-oxygen distance of water molecules affected by osmolytes in their surrounding. Obtained results verified the hypothesis concerning the role of water molecules in protein stabilization, explained the osmophobic effect, and finally helped to bring us nearer to the exact mechanism of protein stabilization by osmolytes. PMID:23992436

  14. Small-Molecule Stabilization of the 14-3-3/Gab2 Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Bartel, Maria; Sies, Katharina; Halbach, Sebastian; Higuchi, Yusuke; Haranosono, Yu; Brummer, Tilman; Kato, Nobuo; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-04-19

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most promising new areas in drug discovery. In the vast majority of cases only inhibition or disruption of PPIs is realized, whereas the complementary strategy of targeted stabilization of PPIs is clearly under-represented. Here, we report the example of a semi-synthetic natural product derivative--ISIR-005--that stabilizes the cancer-relevant interaction of the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and Gab2. The crystal structure of ISIR-005 in complex with 14-3-3 and the binding motif of Gab2 comprising two phosphorylation sites (Gab2pS210pT391) showed how the stabilizing molecule binds to the rim-of-the-interface of the protein complex. Only in the direct vicinity of 14-3-3/Gab2pT391 site is a pre-formed pocket occupied by ISIR-005; binding of the Gab2pS210 motif to 14-3-3 does not create an interface pocket suitable for the molecule. Accordingly, ISIR-005 only stabilizes the binding of the Gab2pT391 but not the Gab2pS210 site. This study represents structural and biochemical proof of the druggability of the 14-3-3/Gab2 PPI interface with important implications for the development of PPI stabilizers. PMID:26644359

  15. On the Potential Origins of the High Stability of Reconstructed Ancestral Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Devin L; Kaltenbach, Miriam; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-10-01

    Ancestral reconstruction provides instrumental insights regarding the biochemical and biophysical characteristics of past proteins. A striking observation relates to the remarkably high thermostability of reconstructed ancestors. The latter has been linked to high environmental temperatures in the Precambrian era, the era relating to most reconstructed proteins. We found that inferred ancestors of the serum paraoxonase (PON) enzyme family, including the mammalian ancestor, exhibit dramatically increased thermostabilities compared with the extant, human enzyme (up to 30 °C higher melting temperature). However, the environmental temperature at the time of emergence of mammals is presumed to be similar to the present one. Additionally, the mammalian PON ancestor has superior folding properties (kinetic stability)-unlike the extant mammalian PONs, it expresses in E. coli in a soluble and functional form, and at a high yield. We discuss two potential origins of this unexpectedly high stability. First, ancestral stability may be overestimated by a "consensus effect," whereby replacing amino acids that are rare in contemporary sequences with the amino acid most common in the family increases protein stability. Comparison to other reconstructed ancestors indicates that the consensus effect may bias some but not all reconstructions. Second, we note that high stability may relate to factors other than high environmental temperature such as oxidative stress or high radiation levels. Foremost, intrinsic factors such as high rates of genetic mutations and/or of transcriptional and translational errors, and less efficient protein quality control systems, may underlie the high kinetic and thermodynamic stability of past proteins.

  16. Stability of globular proteins in H2O and D2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efimova, Y. M.; Haemers, S.; Wierczinski, B.; Norde, W.; van Well, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    In several experimental techniques D2O rather then H2O is often used as a solvent for proteins. Concerning the influence of the solvent on the stability of the proteins, contradicting results have been reported in literature. In this paper the influence of H2O-D2O solvent substitution on the stabili

  17. Size and molecular flexibility of sugars determine the storage stability of freeze-dried proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnis, W. F.; Mensink, M. A.; de Jager, A.; Maarschalk, K. van der Voort; Frijlink, H. W.; Hinrichs, W. L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based biopharmaceuticals are generally produced as aqueous solutions and stored refrigerated to obtain sufficient shelf life. Alternatively, proteins may be freeze-dried in the presence of sugars to allow storage stability at ambient conditions for prolonged periods. However, to act as a sta

  18. Influence of the mutation on the stability of pyrin protein and development of familial Mediterranean fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arakelov G G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study was carried out for the molecular modeling of the pyrin protein. Tertiary structure of pyrin protein was developed by de novo modeling and treading methods. Subsequent evaluation of the developed model was also carried out and found it stereochemical correct. Furthermore, influence of the mutation on the stability of the pyrin tertiary structure and development of Familial Mediterranean Fever was also studied in the present study. Total 66 mutations were localized at B30.2 domain of pyrin protein and this domain is responsible for manifestation of Familial Mediterranean Fever. It was also reported that among 66 localized mutations 24 mutations affects the stability of pyrin structure while 25 mutations have neutral effect on the stability and rest 17 mutations have stabilizing effect on the tertiary structure of pyrin.

  19. Structure and stability of designed TPR protein superhelices: unusual crystal packing and implications for natural TPR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajander, Tommi; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Mochrie, Simon; Regan, Lynne

    2007-07-01

    The structure and stability of repeat proteins has been little studied in comparison to the properties of the more familiar globular proteins. Here, the structure and stability of designed tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) proteins is described. The TPR is a 34-amino-acid motif which adopts a helix-turn-helix structure and occurs as tandem repeats. The design of a consensus TPR motif (CTPR) has previously been described. Here, the crystal structures and stabilities of proteins that contain eight or 20 identical tandem repeats of the CTPR motif (CTPR8 and CTPR20) are presented. Both CTPR8 and CTPR20 adopt a superhelical overall structure. The structures of the different-length CTPR proteins are compared with each other and with the structures of natural TPR domains. Also, the unusual and perhaps unique crystal-packing interactions resulting in pseudo-infinite crystalline superhelices observed in the different crystal forms of CTPR8 and CTPR20 are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the thermodynamic behavior of CTPR8 and CTPR20 can be predicted from the behavior of other TPRs in this series using an Ising model-based analysis. The designed protein series CTPR2-CTPR20 covers the natural size repertoire of TPR domains and as such is an excellent model system for natural TPR proteins.

  20. New insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Prions are the etiological agent of fatal neurodegenerative diseases called prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious disorders. Prions are due to post-translational modifications of the cellular prion protein leading to the formation of a β-sheet enriched conformer with altered biochemical properties. The molecular events causing prion formation in sporadic prion diseases are still elusive. Recently, we published a research elucidating the contribution of major structural determinants and environmental factors in prion protein folding and stability. Our study highlighted the crucial role of octarepeats in stabilizing prion protein; the presence of a highly enthalpically stable intermediate state in prion-susceptible species; and the role of disulfide bridge in preserving native fold thus avoiding the misfolding to a β-sheet enriched isoform. Taking advantage from these findings, in this work we present new insights into structural determinants of prion protein folding and stability.

  1. Using tryptophan fluorescence to measure the stability of membrane proteins folded in liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, C. Preston; Fleming, Karen G.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the thermodynamic stability of folded membrane proteins require methods for monitoring their conformation that are free of experimental artifacts. For tryptophan fluorescence emission experiments with membrane proteins folded into liposomes, there are two significant sources of artifacts: the first is light scattering by the liposomes; the second is the nonlinear relationship of some tryptophan spectral parameters with changes in protein conformation. Both of these so...

  2. Serum Proteins Stabilized Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles and Its Effect on Bel-7402 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite has a high affinity to biological macromolecules, especially to proteins. Bovine serum proteins were extracted to be used as stablizer to prepare calcium phosphate nanoparticles. 167.7 am and87.7 nm particles were respectively prepared by using bovine serum protein fractions at the concentration of 0.5mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL. As the polysaccharide stabilized hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, the protein-stablized nanoparticles also inhibited the proliferation rate of Bel-7402 cells. It suggested that proteins could be applied to prepare calcium phosphate nanoparticles and it also has the anticancer effect.

  3. Chaperonin-Based Biolayer Interferometry To Assess the Kinetic Stability of Metastable, Aggregation-Prone Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Wendy A; O'Neil, Pierce T; Machen, Alexandra J; Naik, Subhashchandra; Chaudhri, Tapan; McGinn-Straub, Wesley; Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew T; Burns, Joshua R; Baldwin, Michael R; Khar, Karen R; Karanicolas, John; Fisher, Mark T

    2016-09-01

    Stabilizing the folded state of metastable and/or aggregation-prone proteins through exogenous ligand binding is an appealing strategy for decreasing disease pathologies caused by protein folding defects or deleterious kinetic transitions. Current methods of examining binding of a ligand to these marginally stable native states are limited because protein aggregation typically interferes with analysis. Here, we describe a rapid method for assessing the kinetic stability of folded proteins and monitoring the effects of ligand stabilization for both intrinsically stable proteins (monomers, oligomers, and multidomain proteins) and metastable proteins (e.g., low Tm) that uses a new GroEL chaperonin-based biolayer interferometry (BLI) denaturant pulse platform. A kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm is generated by exposing a target protein, immobilized on a BLI biosensor, to increasing denaturant concentrations (urea or GuHCl) in a pulsatile manner to induce partial or complete unfolding of the attached protein population. Following the rapid removal of the denaturant, the extent of hydrophobic unfolded/partially folded species that remains is detected by an increased level of GroEL binding. Because this kinetic denaturant pulse is brief, the amplitude of binding of GroEL to the immobilized protein depends on the duration of the exposure to the denaturant, the concentration of the denaturant, wash times, and the underlying protein unfolding-refolding kinetics; fixing all other parameters and plotting the GroEL binding amplitude versus denaturant pulse concentration result in a kinetically controlled denaturation isotherm. When folding osmolytes or stabilizing ligands are added to the immobilized target proteins before and during the denaturant pulse, the diminished population of unfolded/partially folded protein manifests as a decreased level of GroEL binding and/or a marked shift in these kinetically controlled denaturation profiles to higher denaturant

  4. Prediction of salt effects on protein phase behavior by HIC retention and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kai; Großhans, Steffen; Schütz, Juliane; Suhm, Susanna; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry it is mandatory to know and ensure the correct protein phase state as a critical quality attribute in every process step. Unwanted protein precipitation or crystallization can lead to column, pipe or filter blocking. In formulation, the formation of aggregates can even be lethal when injected into the patient. The typical methodology to illustrate protein phase states is the generation of protein phase diagrams. Commonly, protein phase behavior is shown in dependence of protein and precipitant concentration. Despite using high-throughput methods for the generation of phase diagrams, the time necessary to reach equilibrium is the bottleneck. Faster methods to predict protein phase behavior are desirable. In this study, hydrophobic interaction chromatography retention times were correlated to crystal size and form. High-throughput thermal stability measurements (melting and aggregation temperatures), using an Optim(®)2 system, were successfully correlated to glucose isomerase stability. By using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and thermal stability determinations, glucose isomerase conformational and colloidal stability were successfully predicted for different salts in a specific pH range. PMID:27268946

  5. Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Protein Epitopes: The Basis of Antigenic Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Maino; Bürckert, Jean-Philippe; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Muller, Claude P.; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Globally eliminating measles using available vaccines is biologically feasible because the measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) protein is antigenically stable. The H protein is responsible for receptor binding, and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. The immunodominant epitope, known as the hemagglutinating and noose epitope, is located near the receptor-binding site (RBS). The RBS also contains an immunodominant epitope. Loss of receptor binding correlates with an escape from the neutralization by antibodies that target the epitope at RBS. Another neutralizing epitope is located near RBS and is shielded by an N-linked sugar in certain genotype strains. However, human sera from vaccinees and measles patients neutralized all MV strains with similar efficiencies, regardless of the N-linked sugar modification or mutations at these epitopes. Two other major epitopes exist at a distance from RBS. One has an unstructured flexible domain with a linear neutralizing epitope. When MV-H forms a tetramer (dimer of dimers), these epitopes may form the dimer-dimer interface, and one of the two epitopes may also interact with the F protein. The neutralization mechanisms of antibodies that recognize these epitopes may involve inhibiting the H-F interaction or blocking the fusion cascade after MV-H binds to its receptors. PMID:27490564

  6. Biophysical stability of hyFc fusion protein with regards to buffers and various excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun Yeul; Kim, Nam Ah; Lim, Dae Gon; Eun, Chang-yong; Choi, Donghoon; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A novel non-cytolytic hybrid Fc (hyFc) with an intact Ig structure without any mutation in the hyFc region, was developed to construct a long-acting agonistic protein. The stability of interleukin-7 (IL-7) fused with the hyFc (GXN-04) was evaluated to develop early formulations. Various biophysical methods were utilized and three different buffer systems with various pH ranges were investigated including histidine-acetate, sodium citrate, and tris buffers. Various excipients were incorporated into the systems to obtain optimum protein stability. Two evident thermal transitions were observed with the unfolding of IL-7 and hyFc. The Tm and ΔH increased with pH, suggesting increased conformational stability. Increased Z-average size with PDI and decreased zeta potential with pH increase, with the exception of tris buffer, showed aggregation issues. Moreover, tris buffer at higher pH showed aggregation peaks from DLS. Non-ionic surfactants were effective against agitation by outcompeting protein molecules for hydrophobic surfaces. Sucrose and sorbitol accelerated protein aggregation during agitation, but exhibited a protective effect against oxidation, with preferential exclusion favoring the compact states of GXN-04. The stability of GXN-04 was varied by basal buffers and excipients, hence the buffers and excipients need to be evaluated carefully to achieve the maximum stability of proteins. PMID:26851357

  7. TOPICAL REVIEW: Protein stability and enzyme activity at extreme biological temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Georges

    2010-08-01

    Psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in permanently cold environments, even at subzero temperatures. To maintain metabolic rates compatible with sustained life, they have improved the dynamics of their protein structures, thereby enabling appropriate molecular motions required for biological activity at low temperatures. As a consequence of this structural flexibility, psychrophilic proteins are unstable and heat-labile. In the upper range of biological temperatures, thermophiles and hyperthermophiles grow at temperatures > 100 °C and synthesize ultra-stable proteins. However, thermophilic enzymes are nearly inactive at room temperature as a result of their compactness and rigidity. At the molecular level, both types of extremophilic proteins have adapted the same structural factors, but in opposite directions, to address either activity at low temperatures or stability in hot environments. A model based on folding funnels is proposed accounting for the stability-activity relationships in extremophilic proteins.

  8. Preparation of iron bound succinylated milk protein concentrate and evaluation of its stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpashree, B G; Arora, Sumit; Sharma, Vivek; Bajaj, Rajesh Kumar; Tomar, S K

    2016-04-01

    Major problems associated with the fortification of soluble iron salts include chemical reactivity and incompatibility with other components. Milk protein concentrate (MPC) are able to bind significant amount of iron due to the presence of both casein and whey protein. MPC in its native state possess very poor solubility, therefore, succinylated derivatives of MPC (succ. MPC) were also used for the preparation of protein-iron complex. Preparation of the complex involved centrifugation (to remove insoluble iron), ultrafiltration (to remove unbound iron) and lyophilisation (to attain in dry form). Iron binding ability of MPC enhanced significantly (P<0.05) upon succinylation. Stability of bound iron from both varieties of complexes was monitored under different conditions encountered during processing. Higher stability (P<0.05) of bound iron was observed in succ. MPC-iron complex than native protein complex. This method could be adopted for the production of stable iron enriched protein, an organic iron source.

  9. Probing Bio-Nano Interactions between Blood Proteins and Monolayer-Stabilized Graphene Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Han, Dongxue; Niu, Li; Chi, Qijin

    2015-11-18

    Meeting proteins is regarded as the starting event for nanostructures to enter biological systems. Understanding their interactions is thus essential for a newly emerging field, nanomedicine. Chemically converted graphene (CCG) is a wonderful two-dimensional (2D) material for nanomedicine, but its stability in biological environments is limited. Systematic probing on the binding of proteins to CCG is currently lacking. Herein, we report a comprehensive study on the interactions between blood proteins and stabilized CCG (sCCG). CCG nanosheets are functionalized by monolayers of perylene leading to significant improvement in their resistance to electrolyte salts and long-term stability, but retain their core structural characteristics. Five types of model human blood proteins including human fibrinogen, γ-globulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), insulin, and histone are tested. The main driving forces for blood protein binding involve the π-π interacations between the π-plane of sCCG and surface aromatic amonic acid (sAA) residues of proteins. Several key binding parameters including the binding amount, Hill coefficient, and binding constant are determined. Through a detailed analysis of key controlling factors, we conclude that the protein binding to sCCG is determined mainly by the protein size, the number, and the density of the sAA. PMID:26413807

  10. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Deeksha Vishwamitra; Choladda V. Curry; Ping Shi; Serhan Alkan; Amin, Hesham M.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase–expressing (NPM-ALK+) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with ...

  11. Documentation of an Imperative To Improve Methods for Predicting Membrane Protein Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroncke, Brett M; Duran, Amanda M; Mendenhall, Jeffrey L; Meiler, Jens; Blume, Jeffrey D; Sanders, Charles R

    2016-09-13

    There is a compelling and growing need to accurately predict the impact of amino acid mutations on protein stability for problems in personalized medicine and other applications. Here the ability of 10 computational tools to accurately predict mutation-induced perturbation of folding stability (ΔΔG) for membrane proteins of known structure was assessed. All methods for predicting ΔΔG values performed significantly worse when applied to membrane proteins than when applied to soluble proteins, yielding estimated concordance, Pearson, and Spearman correlation coefficients of Rosetta and PROVEAN showed a modest ability to classify mutations as destabilizing (ΔΔG < -0.5 kcal/mol), with a 7 in 10 chance of correctly discriminating a randomly chosen destabilizing variant from a randomly chosen stabilizing variant. However, even this performance is significantly worse than for soluble proteins. This study highlights the need for further development of reliable and reproducible methods for predicting thermodynamic folding stability in membrane proteins. PMID:27564391

  12. Applications of differential scanning calorimetry for thermal stability analysis of proteins: qualification of DSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jie; Arthur, Kelly; Chemmalil, Letha; Muzammil, Salman; Gabrielson, John; Jiang, Yijia

    2012-03-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to characterize protein thermal stability, overall conformation, and domain folding integrity by the biopharmaceutical industry. Recently, there have been increased requests from regulatory agencies for the qualification of characterization methods including DSC. Understanding the method precision can help determine what differences between samples are significant and also establish the acceptance criteria for comparability and other characterization studies. In this study, we identify the parameters for the qualification of DSC for thermal stability analysis of proteins. We use these parameters to assess the precision and sensitivity of DSC and demonstrate that DSC is suitable for protein thermal stability analysis for these purposes. Several molecules from different structural families were studied. The experiments and data analyses were performed by different analysts using different instruments at different sites. The results show that the (apparent) thermal transition midpoint (T(m)) values obtained for the same protein by same and different instruments and/or analysts are quite reproducible, and the profile similarity values obtained for the same protein from the same instrument are also high. DSC is an appropriate method for assessing protein thermal stability and conformational changes.

  13. Membrane protein thermodynamic stability may serve as the energy sink for sorting in the periplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, C Preston; Zaccai, Nathan R; Fleming, Patrick J; Gessmann, Dennis; Fleming, Karen G

    2013-03-12

    Thermodynamic stabilities are pivotal for understanding structure-function relationships of proteins, and yet such determinations are rare for membrane proteins. Moreover, the few measurements that are available have been conducted under very different experimental conditions, which compromises a straightforward extraction of physical principles underlying stability differences. Here, we have overcome this obstacle and provided structure-stability comparisons for multiple membrane proteins. This was enabled by measurements of the free energies of folding and the m values for the transmembrane proteins PhoP/PhoQ-activated gene product (PagP) and outer membrane protein W (OmpW) from Escherichia coli. Our data were collected in the same lipid bilayer and buffer system we previously used to determine those parameters for E. coli outer membrane phospholipase A (OmpLA). Biophysically, our results suggest that the stabilities of these proteins are strongly correlated to the water-to-bilayer transfer free energy of the lipid-facing residues in their transmembrane regions. We further discovered that the sensitivities of these membrane proteins to chemical denaturation, as judged by their m values, was consistent with that previously observed for water-soluble proteins having comparable differences in solvent exposure between their folded and unfolded states. From a biological perspective, our findings suggest that the folding free energies for these membrane proteins may be the thermodynamic sink that establishes an energy gradient across the periplasm, thus driving their sorting by chaperones to the outer membranes in living bacteria. Binding free energies of these outer membrane proteins with periplasmic chaperones support this energy sink hypothesis.

  14. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties. PMID:27338140

  15. High-throughput thermal scanning for protein stability: making a good technique more robust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, Shane A; Newman, Janet

    2013-08-12

    We present a high-throughput approach to help define experimental formulations that enhance protein stability, which is based on differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). The method involves defining the thermal stability of a protein against a screen of 13 buffer systems, systematically sampling pH from 5.0 to 9.0 at high and low salt concentrations, using both redundancy and extensive controls to make the method robust. The screen allows rapid determination of a suitable base formulation for protein samples, and is particularly useful for difficult samples: those that are rapidly degraded or cannot be sufficiently concentrated for downstream analyses. Data obtained from three samples in this assay illustrate the vastly different values for thermal stability that can be obtained from different formulations. This approach is simple to interpret and reliable enough that it has been implemented as a service through the Collaborative Crystallisation Centre (C3). PMID:23710551

  16. Insights into the role of hydration in protein structure and stability obtained through hydrostatic pressure studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Royer

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of protein structure and stability requires that we elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of both temperature and pressure on protein conformational transitions. While temperature effects are relatively well understood and the change in heat capacity upon unfolding has been reasonably well parameterized, the state of understanding of pressure effects is much less advanced. Ultimately, a quantitative parameterization of the volume changes (at the basis of pressure effects accompanying protein conformational transitions will be required. The present report introduces a qualitative hypothesis based on available model compound data for the molecular basis of volume change upon protein unfolding and its dependence on temperature.

  17. Nonlinear Model of the Specificity of DNA-Protein Interactions and Its Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiputra, D.; Hidayat, W.; Khairani, R.; Zen, F. P.

    2016-08-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are fundamental processes of living cells. We propose a new model of DNA-protein interactions to explain the site specificity of the interactions. The hydrogen bonds between DNA base pairs and between DNA-protein peptide groups play a significant role in determination of the specific binding site. We adopt the Morse potential with coupling terms to construct the Hamiltonian of coupled oscillators representing the hydrogen bonds in which the depth of the potentials vary in the DNA chain. In this paper we investigate the stability of the model to determine the conditions satisfying the biological circumstances of the DNA-protein interactions.

  18. Rational design of protein stability: effect of (2S,4R-4-fluoroproline on the stability and folding pathway of ubiquitin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D Crespo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many strategies have been employed to increase the conformational stability of proteins. The use of 4-substituted proline analogs capable to induce pre-organization in target proteins is an attractive tool to deliver an additional conformational stability without perturbing the overall protein structure. Both, peptides and proteins containing 4-fluorinated proline derivatives can be stabilized by forcing the pyrrolidine ring in its favored puckering conformation. The fluorinated pyrrolidine rings of proline can preferably stabilize either a C(γ-exo or a C(γ-endo ring pucker in dependence of proline chirality (4R/4S in a complex protein structure. To examine whether this rational strategy can be generally used for protein stabilization, we have chosen human ubiquitin as a model protein which contains three proline residues displaying C(γ-exo puckering. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While (2S,4R-4-fluoroproline ((4R-FPro containing ubiquitinin can be expressed in related auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain, all attempts to incorporate (2S,4S-4-fluoroproline ((4S-FPro failed. Our results indicate that (4R-FPro is favoring the C(γ-exo conformation present in the wild type structure and stabilizes the protein structure due to a pre-organization effect. This was confirmed by thermal and guanidinium chloride-induced denaturation profile analyses, where we observed an increase in stability of -4.71 kJ·mol(-1 in the case of (4R-FPro containing ubiquitin ((4R-FPro-ub compared to wild type ubiquitin (wt-ub. Expectedly, activity assays revealed that (4R-FPro-ub retained the full biological activity compared to wt-ub. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results fully confirm the general applicability of incorporating fluoroproline derivatives for improving protein stability. In general, a rational design strategy that enforces the natural occurring proline puckering conformation can be used to stabilize the desired target protein.

  19. Salt Effects on the Conformational Stability of the Visual G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2011-01-01

    Membrane protein stability is a key parameter with important physiological and practical implications. Inorganic salts affect protein stability, but the mechanisms of their interactions with membrane proteins are not completely understood. We have undertaken the study of a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, the α-helical membrane protein rhodopsin from vertebrate retina, and explored the effects of inorganic salts on the thermal decay properties of both its inactive and photoactivated states. Under high salt concentrations, rhodopsin significantly increased its activation enthalpy change for thermal bleaching, whereas acid denaturation affected the formation of a denatured loose-bundle state for both the active and inactive conformations. This behavior seems to correlate with changes in protonated Schiff-base hydrolysis. However, chromophore regeneration with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and MetarhodopsinII decay kinetics were slower only in the presence of sodium chloride, suggesting that in this case, the underlying phenomenon may be linked to the activation of rhodopsin and the retinal release processes. Furthermore, the melting temperature, determined by means of circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry measurements, was increased in the presence of high salt concentrations. The observed effects on rhodopsin could indicate that salts favor electrostatic interactions in the retinal binding pocket and indirectly favor hydrophobic interactions at the membrane protein receptor core. These effects can be exploited in applications where the stability of membrane proteins in solution is highly desirable. PMID:22261069

  20. In vivo architectonic stability of fully de novo designed protein-only nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Tatkiewicz, Witold; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Conchillo-Solé, Oscar; Álamo, Patricia; Xu, Zhikun; Casanova, Isolda; Corchero, José Luis; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Cedano, Juan; Daura, Xavier; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vazquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Mangues, Ramón

    2014-05-27

    The fully de novo design of protein building blocks for self-assembling as functional nanoparticles is a challenging task in emerging nanomedicines, which urgently demand novel, versatile, and biologically safe vehicles for imaging, drug delivery, and gene therapy. While the use of viruses and virus-like particles is limited by severe constraints, the generation of protein-only nanocarriers is progressively reachable by the engineering of protein-protein interactions, resulting in self-assembling functional building blocks. In particular, end-terminal cationic peptides drive the organization of structurally diverse protein species as regular nanosized oligomers, offering promise in the rational engineering of protein self-assembling. However, the in vivo stability of these constructs, being a critical issue for their medical applicability, needs to be assessed. We have explored here if the cross-molecular contacts between protein monomers, generated by end-terminal cationic peptides and oligohistidine tags, are stable enough for the resulting nanoparticles to overcome biological barriers in assembled form. The analyses of renal clearance and biodistribution of several tagged modular proteins reveal long-term architectonic stability, allowing systemic circulation and tissue targeting in form of nanoparticulate material. This observation fully supports the value of the engineered of protein building blocks addressed to the biofabrication of smart, robust, and multifunctional nanoparticles with medical applicability that mimic structure and functional capabilities of viral capsids. PMID:24708510

  1. Sample Stability and Protein Composition of Saliva: Implications for Its Use as a Diagnostic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Roelofsen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is an easy accessible plasma ultra-filtrate. Therefore, saliva can be an attractive alternative to blood for measurement of diagnostic protein markers. Our aim was to determine stability and protein composition of saliva. Protein stability at room temperature was examined by incubating fresh whole saliva with and without inhibitors of proteases and bacterial metabolism followed by Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization (SELDI analyses. Protein composition was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE fractionation of saliva proteins followed by digestion of excised bands and identification by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Results show that rapid protein degradation occurs within 30 minutes after sample collection. Degradation starts already during collection. Protease inhibitors partly prevented degradation while inhibition of bacterial metabolism did not affect degradation. Three stable degradation products of 2937 Da, 3370 Da and 4132 Da were discovered which can be used as markers to monitor sample quality. Saliva proteome analyses revealed 218 proteins of which 84 can also be found in blood plasma. Based on a comparison with seven other proteomics studies on whole saliva we identified 83 new saliva proteins. We conclude that saliva is a promising diagnostic fl uid when precautions are taken towards protein breakdown.

  2. Sample Stability and Protein Composition of Saliva: Implications for Its Use as a Diagnostic Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Diederik; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; de Vries, Marcel P; Weening, Desiree; Vonk, Roel J; Roelofsen, Han

    2008-02-01

    Saliva is an easy accessible plasma ultra-filtrate. Therefore, saliva can be an attractive alternative to blood for measurement of diagnostic protein markers. Our aim was to determine stability and protein composition of saliva. Protein stability at room temperature was examined by incubating fresh whole saliva with and without inhibitors of proteases and bacterial metabolism followed by Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization (SELDI) analyses. Protein composition was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) fractionation of saliva proteins followed by digestion of excised bands and identification by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results show that rapid protein degradation occurs within 30 minutes after sample collection. Degradation starts already during collection. Protease inhibitors partly prevented degradation while inhibition of bacterial metabolism did not affect degradation. Three stable degradation products of 2937 Da, 3370 Da and 4132 Da were discovered which can be used as markers to monitor sample quality. Saliva proteome analyses revealed 218 proteins of which 84 can also be found in blood plasma. Based on a comparison with seven other proteomics studies on whole saliva we identified 83 new saliva proteins. We conclude that saliva is a promising diagnostic fluid when precautions are taken towards protein breakdown.

  3. Protein denaturation with guanidine hydrochloride or urea provides a different estimate of stability depending on the contributions of electrostatic interactions.

    OpenAIRE

    Monera, O. D.; Kay, C. M.; Hodges, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to address the question of whether or not urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) give the same estimates of the stability of a particular protein. We previously suspected that the estimates of protein stability from GdnHCl and urea denaturation data might differ depending on the electrostatic interactions stabilizing the proteins. Therefore, 4 coiled-coil analogs were designed, where the number of intrachain and interchain electrostatic attractions (A) were ...

  4. Soy protein nanoparticle aggregates as pickering stabilizers for oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu; Tang, Chuan-He

    2013-09-18

    In recent years, there have been increasing interests in developing food-grade Pickering stabilizers, due to their potential applications in formulations of novel functional foods. The present work was to investigate the potential of soy proteins to be developed into a kind of Pickering-like stabilizer for oil-in-water emulsions. The nanoparticle aggregates of soy protein isolate (SPI) were formed by sequential treatments of heating at 95 °C for 15 min and then electrostatic screening with NaCl addition. The particle size and microstructure of these aggregates were characterized using dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy, indicating that the fabricated nanoparticle aggregates were ∼100 nm in size with more surface hydrophobic nature (relative to unheated SPI). The influence of particle concentration (c; 0.5-6.0%, w/w) and increasing oil fraction (ϕ; in the range 0.2-0.6) on the droplet size and coalescence and/or creaming stability of the emulsions stabilized by these nanoparticle aggregates was investigated. The results showed that, at ϕ = 0.2, increasing the c resulted in a progressive but slight decrease in droplet size, and improved the stability against coalescence and creaming; at a specific c, the creaming stability was progressively increased by increasing the ϕ, with better improvement observed at a higher c (e.g., 6.0% vs 2.0%). The improvement of creaming stability was largely associated with the formation of a gel-like network that could entrap the oil droplets within the network. The observations are generally consistent with those observed for the conventional Pickering emulsions, confirming that soy proteins could be applied as a kind of effective Pickering-like stabilizer. The finding may have important implications for the design and fabrication of protein-based emulsion formulations, and even for the development of soy protein products with some unique functions. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first work to report

  5. Insights into the role of hydration in protein structure and stability obtained through hydrostatic pressure studies

    OpenAIRE

    Royer, C A

    2005-01-01

    A thorough understanding of protein structure and stability requires that we elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of both temperature and pressure on protein conformational transitions. While temperature effects are relatively well understood and the change in heat capacity upon unfolding has been reasonably well parameterized, the state of understanding of pressure effects is much less advanced. Ultimately, a quantitative parameterization of the volume changes (at the basis of press...

  6. Rhbdf2 mutations increase its protein stability and drive EGFR hyperactivation through enhanced secretion of amphiregulin

    OpenAIRE

    Hosur, Vishnu; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Burzenski, Lisa M.; Stearns, Timothy M; Maser, Richard S.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal transduction plays a major role in growth, proliferation, and differentiation of mammalian cells. Although inactive rhomboids (iRhoms) are cardinal regulators of EGFR signaling in Drosophila melanogaster, their physiological role in regulating EGFR signaling and their substrates in mammals remain unclear. Here, we show that iRhoms are short-lived proteins, but dominant mutations increase their protein stability and stimulate secretion of specific...

  7. Immobilization of the N-terminal helix stabilizes prefusion paramyxovirus fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Albert S; Poor, Taylor A; Abriata, Luciano A; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Lamb, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family. PIV5 fusion and entry are mediated by the coordinated action of the receptor-binding protein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), and the fusion protein (F). Upon triggering by HN, F undergoes an irreversible ATP- and pH-independent conformational change, going down an energy gradient from a metastable prefusion state to a highly stable postfusion state. Previous studies have highlighted key conformational changes in the F-protein refolding pathway, but a detailed understanding of prefusion F-protein metastability remains elusive. Here, using two previously described F-protein mutations (S443D or P22L), we examine the capacity to modulate PIV5 F stability and the mechanisms by which these point mutants act. The S443D mutation destabilizes prefusion F proteins by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the base of the F-protein globular head. The introduction of a P22L mutation robustly rescues destabilized F proteins through a local hydrophobic interaction between the N-terminal helix and a hydrophobic pocket. Prefusion stabilization conferred by a P22L-homologous mutation is demonstrated in the F protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus of a different genus, suggesting a conserved stabilizing structural element within the paramyxovirus family. Taken together, the available data suggest that movement of the N-terminal helix is a necessary early step for paramyxovirus F-protein refolding and presents a novel target for structure-based drug design. PMID:27335462

  8. The role of zinc in the stability of the marginally stable IscU scaffold protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuzzi, Clara; Adrover, Miquel; Puglisi, Rita; Yan, Robert; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Pastore, Annalisa

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the factors that determine protein stability is interesting because it directly reflects the evolutionary pressure coming from function and environment. Here, we have combined experimental and computational methods to study the stability of IscU, a bacterial scaffold protein highly conserved in most organisms and an essential component of the iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis pathway. We demonstrate that the effect of zinc and its consequence strongly depend on the sample history. IscU is a marginally stable protein at low ionic strength to the point that undergoes cold denaturation at around -8°C with a corresponding dramatic decrease of enthalpy, which is consistent with the fluxional nature of the protein. Presence of constitutively bound zinc appreciably stabilizes the IscU fold, whereas it may cause protein aggregation when zinc is added back posthumously. We discuss how zinc coordination can be achieved by different side chains spatially available and all competent for tetrahedral coordination. The individual absence of some of these residues can be largely compensated by small local rearrangements of the others. We discuss the potential importance of our findings in vitro for the function in vivo of the protein.

  9. Protein extraction from heat-stabilized defatted rice bran. 1. Physical processing and enzyme treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shanhu; Hettiarachchy, Navam S; Shellhammer, Thomas H

    2002-12-01

    Physical processing with or without enzyme treatments on protein extraction from heat-stabilized defatted rice bran (HDRB) was evaluated. Freeze-thaw, sonication, high-speed blending, and high-pressure methods extracted 12%, 15%, 16%, and 11% protein, respectively. Sonication (0-100%, 750 W), followed by amylase and combined amylase and protease treatments, extracted 25.6-33.9% and 54.0-57.8% protein, respectively. Blending followed by amylase and protease treatment extracted 5.0% more protein than the nonblended enzymatic treatments. High-pressure treatments, 0-800 MPa, with water or amylase-protease combinations, extracted 10.5-11.1% or 61.8-66.6% protein, respectively. These results suggest that physical processing in combination with enzyme treatments can be effective in extracting protein from HDRB. PMID:12452673

  10. The role of residue stability in transient protein-protein interactions involved in enzymatic phosphate hydrolysis. A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, Jaume; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Khan, Abdul Kareem; Johnston, Michael A; Corbí, Carles; Gómez, Alex; Rovira, Xavier; Teyra, Joan; Villà-Freixa, Jordi

    2006-04-01

    Finding why protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are so specific can provide a valuable tool in a variety of fields. Statistical surveys of so-called transient complexes (like those relevant for signal transduction mechanisms) have shown a tendency of polar residues to participate in the interaction region. Following this scheme, residues in the unbound partners have to compete between interacting with water or interacting with other residues of the protein. On the other hand, several works have shown that the notion of active site electrostatic preorganization can be used to interpret the high efficiency in enzyme reactions. This preorganization can be related to the instability of the residues important for catalysis. In some enzymes, in addition, conformational changes upon binding to other proteins lead to an increase in the activity of the enzymatic partner. In this article the linear response approximation version of the semimacroscopic protein dipoles Langevin dipoles (PDLD/S-LRA) model is used to evaluate the stability of several residues in two phosphate hydrolysis enzymes upon complexation with their activating partners. In particular, the residues relevant for PPI and for phosphate hydrolysis in the CDK2/Cyclin A and Ras/GAP complexes are analyzed. We find that the evaluation of the stability of residues in these systems can be used to identify not only active site regions but it can also be used as a guide to locate "hot spots" for PPIs. We also show that conformational changes play a major role in positioning interfacing residues in a proper "energetic" orientation, ready to interact with the residues in the partner protein surface. Thus, we extend the preorganization theory to PPIs, extrapolating the results we obtained from the above-mentioned complexes to a more general case. We conclude that the correlation between stability of a residue in the surface and the likelihood that it participates in the interaction can be a general fact for transient

  11. CAN THE STABILITY OF PROTEIN MUTANTS BE PREDICTED BY FREE-ENERGY CALCULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    YUNYU, S; MARK, AE; WANG, CX; HUANG, FH; BERENDSEN, HJC; VANGUNSTEREN, WF

    1993-01-01

    The use of free energy simulation techniques in the study of protein stability is critically evaluated. Results from two simulations of the thermostability mutation Asn218 to Ser218 in Subtilisin are presented. It is shown that components of the free energy change can be highly sensitive to the comp

  12. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth;

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library i...

  13. Characteristics of sugar surfactants in stabilizing proteins during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Koreyoshi; Murai, Katsuyuki; Korehisa, Tamayo; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Yamahira, Ryo; Matsuura, Tsutashi; Tada, Hiroko; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Sugar surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths and sugar head groups were compared for their protein-stabilizing effect during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying. Six enzymes, different in terms of tolerance against inactivation because of freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, were used as model proteins. The enzyme activities that remained after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying in the presence of a sugar surfactant were measured for different types and concentrations of sugar surfactants. Sugar surfactants stabilized all of the tested enzymes both during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, and a one or two order higher amount of added sugar surfactant was required for achieving protein stabilization during freeze-drying than for the cryoprotection. The comprehensive comparison showed that the C10-C12 esters of sucrose or trehalose were the most effective through the freeze-drying process: the remaining enzyme activities after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying increased at the sugar ester concentrations of 1-10 and 10-100 μM, respectively, and increased to a greater extent than for the other surfactants at higher concentrations. Results also indicate that, when a decent amount of sugar was also added, the protein-stabilizing effect of a small amount of sugar ester through the freeze-drying process could be enhanced.

  14. Homogenization Pressure and Temperature Affect Protein Partitioning and Oxidative Stability of Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Barouh, Nathalie; Nielsen, Nina Skall;

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative stability of 10 % fish oil-in-water emulsions was investigated for emulsions prepared under different homogenization conditions. Homogenization was conducted at two different pressures (5 or 22.5 MPa), and at two different temperatures (22 and 72 °C). Milk proteins were used as the ...

  15. Interactions of cullin3/KCTD5 complexes with both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins: Evidence for a role in protein stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutz, Natalja; Heilbronn, Regine; Weger, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.weger@charite.de

    2015-08-28

    Based on its specific interaction with cullin3 mediated by an N-terminal BTB/POZ homologous domain, KCTD5 has been proposed to function as substrate adapter for cullin3 based ubiquitin E3 ligases. In the present study we tried to validate this hypothesis through identification and characterization of additional KCTD5 interaction partners. For the replication protein MCM7, the zinc finger protein ZNF711 and FAM193B, a yet poorly characterized cytoplasmic protein, we could demonstrate specific interaction with KCTD5 both in yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation studies in mammalian cells. Whereas trimeric complexes of cullin3 and KCTD5 with the respective KCTD5 binding partner were formed, KCTD5/cullin3 induced polyubiquitylation and/or proteasome-dependent degradation of these binding partners could not be demonstrated. On the contrary, KCTD5 or Cullin3 overexpression increased ZNF711 protein stability. - Highlights: • KCTD5 nuclear translocation depends upon M phase and protein oligomerization. • Identification of MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193 as KCTD5 interaction partners. • Formation of trimeric complexes of KCTD5/cullin3 with MCM7, ZNF711 and FAM193B. • KCTD5 is not involved in polyubiquitylation of MCM7 replication factor. • The KCTD5/cullin3 complex stabilizes ZNF711 transcription factor.

  16. Elucidating Protein Involvement in the Stabilization of the Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Souza, Michele L.; Corio, Paola; Rodrigues, Alexandre G.; Souza, Ana O.; Gaspari, Priscyla M.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Gozzo, Fábio; Tasic, Ljubica

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been broadly used as antibacterial and antiviral agents. Further, interests for green AgNP synthesis have increased in recent years and several results for AgNP biological synthesis have been reported using bacteria, fungi and plant extracts. The understanding of the role and nature of fungal proteins, their interaction with AgNPs and the subsequent stabilization of nanosilver is yet to be deeply investigated. Therefore, in an attempt to better understand biogenic AgNP stabilization with the extracellular fungal proteins and to describe these supramolecular interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles, AgNPs, produced extracellularly by Aspergillus tubingensis—isolated as an endophytic fungus from Rizophora mangle—were characterized in order to study their physical characteristics, identify the involved proteins, and shed light into the interactions among protein-NPs by several techniques. AgNPs of around 35 nm in diameter as measured by TEM and a positive zeta potential of +8.48 mV were obtained. These AgNPs exhibited a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 440 nm, indicating the nanoparticles formation, and another band at 280 nm, attributed to the electronic excitations in tryptophan, tyrosine, and/or phenylalanine residues in fungal proteins. Fungal proteins were covalently bounded to the AgNPs, mainly through S-Ag bonds due to cysteine residues (HS-) and with few N-Ag bonds from H2N- groups, as verified by Raman spectroscopy. Observed supramolecular interactions also occur by electrostatic and other protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, proteins that remain free on AgNP surface may perform hydrogen bonds with other proteins or water increasing thus the capping layer around the AgNPs and consequently expanding the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles (~264 nm, measured by DLS). FTIR results enabled us to state that proteins adsorbed to the AgNPs did not suffer relevant secondary structure alteration upon

  17. Elucidating Protein Involvement in the Stabilization of the Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballottin, Daniela; Fulaz, Stephanie; Souza, Michele L; Corio, Paola; Rodrigues, Alexandre G; Souza, Ana O; Gaspari, Priscyla M; Gomes, Alexandre F; Gozzo, Fábio; Tasic, Ljubica

    2016-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been broadly used as antibacterial and antiviral agents. Further, interests for green AgNP synthesis have increased in recent years and several results for AgNP biological synthesis have been reported using bacteria, fungi and plant extracts. The understanding of the role and nature of fungal proteins, their interaction with AgNPs and the subsequent stabilization of nanosilver is yet to be deeply investigated. Therefore, in an attempt to better understand biogenic AgNP stabilization with the extracellular fungal proteins and to describe these supramolecular interactions between proteins and silver nanoparticles, AgNPs, produced extracellularly by Aspergillus tubingensis-isolated as an endophytic fungus from Rizophora mangle-were characterized in order to study their physical characteristics, identify the involved proteins, and shed light into the interactions among protein-NPs by several techniques. AgNPs of around 35 nm in diameter as measured by TEM and a positive zeta potential of +8.48 mV were obtained. These AgNPs exhibited a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 440 nm, indicating the nanoparticles formation, and another band at 280 nm, attributed to the electronic excitations in tryptophan, tyrosine, and/or phenylalanine residues in fungal proteins. Fungal proteins were covalently bounded to the AgNPs, mainly through S-Ag bonds due to cysteine residues (HS-) and with few N-Ag bonds from H2N- groups, as verified by Raman spectroscopy. Observed supramolecular interactions also occur by electrostatic and other protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, proteins that remain free on AgNP surface may perform hydrogen bonds with other proteins or water increasing thus the capping layer around the AgNPs and consequently expanding the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles (~264 nm, measured by DLS). FTIR results enabled us to state that proteins adsorbed to the AgNPs did not suffer relevant secondary structure alteration upon

  18. Carotenoid-protein complexes and their stability towards oxygen and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carotenoid-protein complexes isolated from fresh mangoes were found to be more stable to oxygen and radiation when dissolved in water as compared with β-carotene in petroleum ether. Part of the pigment could be released from the complex by gamma irradiation. Observations on the stability of the carotenoid (98% β-carotene) in the complex indicated that the pigment is either associated with the lipid prosthetic group of the protein or loosely attached to the protein by weak hydrophobic bonds. (author)

  19. P22 coat protein structures reveal a novel mechanism for capsid maturation: stability without auxiliary proteins or chemical crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Kristin N; Khayat, Reza; Tu, Long H; Suhanovsky, Margaret M; Cortines, Juliana R; Teschke, Carolyn M; Johnson, John E; Baker, Timothy S

    2010-03-10

    Viral capsid assembly and stability in tailed, dsDNA phage and Herpesviridae are achieved by various means including chemical crosslinks (unique to HK97), or auxiliary proteins (lambda, T4, phi29, and herpesviruses). All these viruses have coat proteins (CP) with a conserved, HK97-like core structure. We used a combination of trypsin digestion, gold labeling, cryo-electron microscopy, 3D image reconstruction, and comparative modeling to derive two independent, pseudoatomic models of bacteriophage P22 CP: before and after maturation. P22 capsid stabilization results from intersubunit interactions among N-terminal helices and an extensive "P loop," which obviate the need for crosslinks or auxiliary proteins. P22 CP also has a telokin-like Ig domain that likely stabilizes the monomer fold so that assembly may proceed via individual subunit addition rather than via preformed capsomers as occurs in HK97. Hence, the P22 CP structure may be a paradigm for understanding how monomers assemble in viruses like phi29 and HSV-1.

  20. Influence of pea protein aggregates on the structure and stability of pea protein/soybean polysaccharide complex emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Baoru; Zhang, Rujing; Yao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry have been hampered by their precipitation in acidic solution. In this study, pea protein isolate (PPI) with poor dispersibility in acidic solution was used to form complexes with soybean soluble polysaccharide (SSPS), and the effects of PPI aggregates on the structure and stability of PPI/SSPS complex emulsions were investigated. Under acidic conditions, high pressure homogenization disrupts the PPI aggregates and the electrostatic attraction between PPI and SSPS facilitates the formation of dispersible PPI/SSPS complexes. The PPI/SSPS complex emulsions prepared from the PPI containing aggregates prove to possess similar droplet structure and similar stability compared with the PPI/SSPS emulsions produced from the PPI in which the aggregates have been previously removed by centrifugation. The oil droplets are protected by PPI/SSPS complex interfacial films and SSPS surfaces. The emulsions show long-term stability against pH and NaCl concentration changes. This study demonstrates that PPI aggregates can also be used to produce stable complex emulsions, which may promote the applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry.

  1. Stabilizing additives added during cell lysis aid in the solubilization of recombinant proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Leibly

    Full Text Available Insoluble recombinant proteins are a major issue for both structural genomics and enzymology research. Greater than 30% of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli appear to be insoluble. The prevailing view is that insolubly expressed proteins cannot be easily solubilized, and are usually sequestered into inclusion bodies. However, we hypothesize that small molecules added during the cell lysis stage can yield soluble protein from insoluble protein previously screened without additives or ligands. We present a novel screening method that utilized 144 additive conditions to increase the solubility of recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. These selected additives are natural ligands, detergents, salts, buffers, and chemicals that have been shown to increase the stability of proteins in vivo. We present the methods used for this additive solubility screen and detailed results for 41 potential drug target recombinant proteins from infectious organisms. Increased solubility was observed for 80% of the recombinant proteins during the primary and secondary screening of lysis with the additives; that is 33 of 41 target proteins had increased solubility compared with no additive controls. Eleven additives (trehalose, glycine betaine, mannitol, L-Arginine, potassium citrate, CuCl(2, proline, xylitol, NDSB 201, CTAB and K(2PO(4 solubilized more than one of the 41 proteins; these additives can be easily screened to increase protein solubility. Large-scale purifications were attempted for 15 of the proteins using the additives identified and eight (40% were prepared for crystallization trials during the first purification attempt. Thus, this protocol allowed us to recover about a third of seemingly insoluble proteins for crystallography and structure determination. If recombinant proteins are required in smaller quantities or less purity, the final success rate may be even higher.

  2. On the Efficiency of NHS Ester Cross-Linkers for Stabilizing Integral Membrane Protein Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fan; Gerber, Sabina; Korkhov, Volodymyr M.; Mireku, Samantha; Bucher, Monika; Locher, Kaspar P.; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-03-01

    We have previously presented a straightforward approach based on high-mass matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) to study membrane proteins. In addition, the stoichiometry of integral membrane protein complexes could be determined by MALDI-MS, following chemical cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. However, glutaraldehyde polymerizes in solution and reacts nonspecifically with various functional groups of proteins, limiting its usefulness for structural studies of protein complexes. Here, we investigated the capability of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters, which react much more specifically, to cross-link membrane protein complexes such as PglK and BtuC2D2. We present clear evidence that NHS esters are capable of stabilizing membrane protein complexes in situ, in the presence of detergents such as DDM, C12E8, and LDAO. The stabilization efficiency strongly depends on the membrane protein structure (i.e, the number of primary amine groups and the distances between primary amines). A minimum number of primary amine groups is required, and the distances between primary amines govern whether a cross-linker with a specific spacer arm length is able to bridge two amine groups.

  3. A Varp-Binding Protein, RACK1, Regulates Dendrite Outgrowth through Stabilization of Varp Protein in Mouse Melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubashi, Soujiro; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2016-08-01

    Varp (VPS9-ankyrin repeat protein) in melanocytes is thought to function as a key player in the pigmentation of mammals. Varp regulates two different melanocyte functions: (i) transport of melanogenic enzymes to melanosomes by functioning as a Rab32/38 effector and (ii) promotion of dendrite outgrowth by functioning as a Rab21-guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The Varp protein level has recently been shown to be negatively regulated by proteasomal degradation through interaction of the ankyrin repeat 2 (ANKR2) domain of Varp with Rab40C. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Varp escapes from Rab40C and retains its own expression level remain completely unknown. Here, we identified RACK1 (receptor of activated protein kinase C 1) as a Varp-ANKR2 binding partner and investigated its involvement in Varp stabilization in mouse melanocytes. The results showed that knockdown of endogenous RACK1 in melanocytes caused dramatic reduction of the Varp protein level and inhibition of dendrite outgrowth, and intriguingly, overexpression of RACK1 inhibited the interaction between Varp and Rab40C and counteracted the negative effect of Rab40C on dendrite outgrowth. These findings indicated that RACK1 competes with Rab40C for binding to the ANKR2 domain of Varp and regulates dendrite outgrowth through stabilization of Varp in mouse melanocytes. PMID:27066885

  4. Molecular Dynamics Driven Design of pH-Stabilized Mutants of MNEI, a Sweet Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Leone

    Full Text Available MNEI is a single chain derivative of monellin, a plant protein that can interact with the human sweet taste receptor, being therefore perceived as sweet. This unusual physiological activity makes MNEI a potential template for the design of new sugar replacers for the food and beverage industry. Unfortunately, applications of MNEI have been so far limited by its intrinsic sensitivity to some pH and temperature conditions, which could occur in industrial processes. Changes in physical parameters can, in fact, lead to irreversible protein denaturation, as well as aggregation and precipitation. It has been previously shown that the correlation between pH and stability in MNEI derives from the presence of a single glutamic residue in a hydrophobic pocket of the protein. We have used molecular dynamics to study the consequences, at the atomic level, of the protonation state of such residue and have identified the network of intramolecular interactions responsible for MNEI stability at acidic pH. Based on this information, we have designed a pH-independent, stabilized mutant of MNEI and confirmed its increased stability by both molecular modeling and experimental techniques.

  5. Effects of rice bran protein hydrolysates on the physicochemical stability of oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetangdee, Nopparat

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of proteins from rice bran was studied, comparing alkaline- and carbohydrase-aided extraction. It was found that protein extractability could be effectively improved using carbohydrases (Viscozyme L and α-amylase), especially when mechanical force was incorporated. Then, rice bran protein hydrolysates (RBPH) were prepared at various degrees of hydrolysis (DH), and employed to stabilize soybean O/W emulsion. Improved colloidal stability of the emulsions could be achieved using RBPH, especially at higher DH level, as indicated by an increase in the emulsifying activity index and better long-term dispersibility. The present work novelty suggested the efficiency of RBPH to improve oxidative stability of the emulsions. The most potent antioxidant activity was exhibited by RBPH with DH of 6.4 and 7.6%. With their efficiency to promote physicochemical stability of the emulsions, RBPH might be potently employed as a natural additive in emulsified food products, which is significant to value addition of rice bran for further industrial application. PMID:25391683

  6. Subunit interactions and protein stability in the cyanobacterial light-harvesting proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Plank, T; Toole, C; Anderson, L K

    1995-01-01

    Strain 4R is a phycocyanin-minus mutant of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain 6803. Although it lacks the light-harvesting protein phycocyanin, 4R has normal levels of phycocyanin (cpc) transcripts. Sequence analysis of the cpcB gene encoding the phycocyanin beta subunit shows an insertion mutation in 4R that causes early termination of translation. Other work has shown that the phycocyanin alpha subunit and the linker proteins encoded on the cpc transcripts are all funct...

  7. Tritiation of protein hormones. Progress report. [Stability of tritium-labelled protein hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    A non-catalytic tritium exchange system using a microwave discharge technique was bult and calibrated in order to optomize the labelling of small organic molecules such as benzoic acid. Analytical and preparative chromatographic procedures, including ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were standardized for use in the publication of tritium and labelled bovine ACTH. Results are reported from extensive studies of the control of chemical and biologic stability of labelled and unlabelled ACTH were carried out.

  8. Brd4-Mediated Nuclear Retention of the Papillomavirus E2 Protein Contributes to Its Stabilization in Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillomavirus E2 is a multifunctional viral protein that regulates many aspects of the viral life cycle including viral episome maintenance, transcriptional activation, and repression. E2 is degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 has been implicated in the stabilization of the E2 protein. E2 normally shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In this study, we demonstrate that E2 ubiquitylation mostly occurs in the cytoplasm. We also find that the interaction with Brd4 promotes nuclear retention of papillomavirus E2 proteins and contributes to their stabilization in the nucleus. Compared to wild type E2 proteins, nuclear-localization-defective mutants are rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway; however, co-expression of Brd4 redirects these mutants into the nucleus and significantly increases their stability. We further demonstrate that tethering E2 proteins to chromatin as either double-bromodomain fusion proteins or histone 2B (H2B fusion proteins significantly stabilizes the E2 proteins. Our studies suggest that chromatin recruitment of the E2 protein via interaction with Brd4 prevents E2 ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in the cytoplasm, leading to its stabilization in the nucleus. These studies bring new insights for understanding Brd4-mediated E2 stabilization, and provide an additional mechanism by which the chromatin-associated Brd4 regulates E2 functions.

  9. Brd4-mediated nuclear retention of the papillomavirus E2 protein contributes to its stabilization in host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Qing; Diaz, Jason; You, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Papillomavirus E2 is a multifunctional viral protein that regulates many aspects of the viral life cycle including viral episome maintenance, transcriptional activation, and repression. E2 is degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 has been implicated in the stabilization of the E2 protein. E2 normally shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In this study, we demonstrate that E2 ubiquitylation mostly occurs in the cytoplasm. We also find that the interaction with Brd4 promotes nuclear retention of papillomavirus E2 proteins and contributes to their stabilization in the nucleus. Compared to wild type E2 proteins, nuclear-localization-defective mutants are rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway; however, co-expression of Brd4 redirects these mutants into the nucleus and significantly increases their stability. We further demonstrate that tethering E2 proteins to chromatin as either double-bromodomain fusion proteins or histone 2B (H2B) fusion proteins significantly stabilizes the E2 proteins. Our studies suggest that chromatin recruitment of the E2 protein via interaction with Brd4 prevents E2 ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in the cytoplasm, leading to its stabilization in the nucleus. These studies bring new insights for understanding Brd4-mediated E2 stabilization, and provide an additional mechanism by which the chromatin-associated Brd4 regulates E2 functions. PMID:24448221

  10. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (∆G of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi-site protein variants, including ancient proteins, is however hard to describe theoretically. From a compilation of experimental ∆∆G vs. ∆G we first find that protein substitutions are subject to large generic protein relaxation effects. Using this discovery, we develop a simple two-parameter model that predicts multi-site ∆∆G as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1kcal/mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche probably occurred already in the ancestor of contemporary baleen and toothed whales. In summary, we have discovered generic stability relaxation effects in proteins that, when incorporated into a simple model, improves the description of multi-site protein variants. PMID:27068539

  11. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (∆G of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi-site protein variants, including ancient proteins, is however hard to describe theoretically. From a compilation of experimental ∆∆G vs. ∆G we first find that protein substitutions are subject to large generic protein relaxation effects. Using this discovery, we develop a simple two-parameter model that predicts multi-site ∆∆G as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1kcal/mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche probably occurred already in the ancestor of contemporary baleen and toothed whales. In summary, we have discovered generic stability relaxation effects in proteins that, when incorporated into a simple model, improves the description of multi-site protein variants.

  12. Analysis and prediction of the metabolic stability of proteins based on their sequential features, subcellular locations and interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    Full Text Available The metabolic stability is a very important idiosyncracy of proteins that is related to their global flexibility, intramolecular fluctuations, various internal dynamic processes, as well as many marvelous biological functions. Determination of protein's metabolic stability would provide us with useful information for in-depth understanding of the dynamic action mechanisms of proteins. Although several experimental methods have been developed to measure protein's metabolic stability, they are time-consuming and more expensive. Reported in this paper is a computational method, which is featured by (1 integrating various properties of proteins, such as biochemical and physicochemical properties, subcellular locations, network properties and protein complex property, (2 using the mRMR (Maximum Relevance & Minimum Redundancy principle and the IFS (Incremental Feature Selection procedure to optimize the prediction engine, and (3 being able to identify proteins among the four types: "short", "medium", "long", and "extra-long" half-life spans. It was revealed through our analysis that the following seven characters played major roles in determining the stability of proteins: (1 KEGG enrichment scores of the protein and its neighbors in network, (2 subcellular locations, (3 polarity, (4 amino acids composition, (5 hydrophobicity, (6 secondary structure propensity, and (7 the number of protein complexes the protein involved. It was observed that there was an intriguing correlation between the predicted metabolic stability of some proteins and the real half-life of the drugs designed to target them. These findings might provide useful insights for designing protein-stability-relevant drugs. The computational method can also be used as a large-scale tool for annotating the metabolic stability for the avalanche of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic age.

  13. Stability of some Cactaceae proteins based on fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinstein, S; Zemser, M; Vargas-Albores, F; Ochoa, J L; Paredes-Lopez, O; Scheler, C; Aksu, S; Salnikow, J

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of three cactus proteins (native and denatured) from Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria), Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo), and Cholla opuntia (Cholla), was based on electrophoretic, fluorescence, CD (circular dichroism), DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), and FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements. The obtained results of intrinsic fluorescence, DSC, and CD were dissimilar for the three species of cactus, providing evidence of differences in secondary and tertiary structures. Cactus proteins may be situated in the following order corresponding to their relative stability: Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria) > Cholla opuntia (Cholla) > Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo). Thermodynamic properties of proteins and their changes upon denaturation (temperature of denaturation, enthalphy, and the number of ruptured hydrogen bonds) were correlated with the secondary structure of proteins and disappearance of alpha-helix. PMID:10333299

  14. Stability of some Cactaceae proteins based on fluorescence, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinstein, S; Zemser, M; Vargas-Albores, F; Ochoa, J L; Paredes-Lopez, O; Scheler, C; Aksu, S; Salnikow, J

    1999-02-01

    Characterization of three cactus proteins (native and denatured) from Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria), Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo), and Cholla opuntia (Cholla), was based on electrophoretic, fluorescence, CD (circular dichroism), DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), and FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) measurements. The obtained results of intrinsic fluorescence, DSC, and CD were dissimilar for the three species of cactus, providing evidence of differences in secondary and tertiary structures. Cactus proteins may be situated in the following order corresponding to their relative stability: Machaerocereus gummosus (Pitahaya agria) > Cholla opuntia (Cholla) > Lophocereu schottii (Garambullo). Thermodynamic properties of proteins and their changes upon denaturation (temperature of denaturation, enthalphy, and the number of ruptured hydrogen bonds) were correlated with the secondary structure of proteins and disappearance of alpha-helix.

  15. Stability and structure of the membrane protein transporter Ffh is modulated by substrates and lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Marika Ejby; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The cytosolic protein Ffh transports membrane proteins from the ribosome to the inner membrane in complex with 4.5S RNA. Here we show that native Ffh binds to the hydrophobic probe ANS in a 1 Ffh:3 ANS stoichiometry, revealing a hydrophobic binding site. Thermal precipitation of Ffh is shifted...... the apoprotein. Escherichia coli lipid and DOPG (and to a smaller extent DOPC) increase Ffh's α-helical content, possibly related to Ffh's role in guiding membrane proteins to the membrane. Binding is largely mediated by electrostatic interactions but does not protect Ffh against trypsinolysis. We conclude...... that Ffh is a structurally flexible and dynamic protein whose stability is significantly modulated by the environment. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  16. Effect of lead on cytoskeletal protein stability in crucian carp Carassius auratus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jia; ZHANG Dongyi; CHU Wuying; LIU Fang; LIU Zhen; ZHOU Ruixue; MENG Tao; ZHANG Jianshe

    2008-01-01

    Inorganic lead (Pb) is one of the most common environmental pollutants. Much evidence indicates that Pb exposure could directly affect fish growth and development. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of Pb on cytoskeletal protein stability at both protein and mRNA level in crucian carp Carassius auratus. Pb(NO3)2 treatment in concentration of 100 μmol/L resulted in decreased expression of both α- and β-tubulin but γ-tubulin as assayed with SDS-PAGE, Western Blot, and ELISA. In vivo and in vitro analyses on protein expression of tubulins are consistent. The effect of Pb on mRNA expression varied among different tissues. Our results suggest that cytotoxicity of Pb at protein translation level is stronger than at mRNA expression level.

  17. Structure and stability insights into tumour suppressor p53 evolutionary related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pagano

    Full Text Available The p53 family of genes and their protein products, namely, p53, p63 and p73, have over one billion years of evolutionary history. Advances in computational biology and genomics are enabling studies of the complexities of the molecular evolution of p53 protein family to decipher the underpinnings of key biological conditions spanning from cancer through to various metabolic and developmental disorders and facilitate the design of personalised medicines. However, a complete understanding of the inherent nature of the thermodynamic and structural stability of the p53 protein family is still lacking. This is due, to a degree, to the lack of comprehensive structural information for a large number of homologous proteins and to an incomplete knowledge of the intrinsic factors responsible for their stability and how these might influence function. Here we investigate the thermal stability, secondary structure and folding properties of the DNA-binding domains (DBDs of a range of proteins from the p53 family using biophysical methods. While the N- and the C-terminal domains of the p53 family show sequence diversity and are normally targets for post-translational modifications and alternative splicing, the central DBD is highly conserved. Together with data obtained from Molecular Dynamics simulations in solution and with structure based homology modelling, our results provide further insights into the molecular properties of evolutionary related p53 proteins. We identify some marked structural differences within the p53 family, which could account for the divergence in biological functions as well as the subtleties manifested in the oligomerization properties of this family.

  18. The role of PEG conformation in mixed layers: from protein corona substrate to steric stabilization avoiding protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Comenge

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although nanoparticles (NPs have been traditionally modified with a single ligand layer, mixture of ligands might help to combine different functionalities and to further engineer the NP surface. A detailed study of the competition between an alkanethiol (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and SH-PEG for the surface of AuNPs and the resultant behaviors of this model nanoconjugate is presented here. As a result, the physicochemical properties of these conjugates can be progressively tuned by controlling the composition and especially the conformation of the mixed monolayer. This has implications in the physiological stability. The controlled changes on the SH-PEG conformation rather than its concentration induce a change in the stabilization mechanism from electrostatic repulsion to steric hindrance, which changes the biological fate of NPs. Importantly, the adsorption of proteins on the conjugates can be tailored by tuning the composition and conformation of the mixed layer.

  19. Thermodynamic Stabilization of the Folded Domain of Prion Protein Inhibits Prion Infection in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhong Kong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, are associated with the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein, PrPC, into a protease-resistant form, PrPSc. Here, we show that mutation-induced thermodynamic stabilization of the folded, α-helical domain of PrPC has a dramatic inhibitory effect on the conformational conversion of prion protein in vitro, as well as on the propagation of TSE disease in vivo. Transgenic mice expressing a human prion protein variant with increased thermodynamic stability were found to be much more resistant to infection with the TSE agent than those expressing wild-type human prion protein, in both the primary passage and three subsequent subpassages. These findings not only provide a line of evidence in support of the protein-only model of TSEs but also yield insight into the molecular nature of the PrPC→PrPSc conformational transition, and they suggest an approach to the treatment of prion diseases.

  20. Structural Interface Forms and Their Involvement in Stabilization of Multidomain Proteins or Protein Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dygut

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The presented analysis concerns the inter-domain and inter-protein interface in protein complexes. We propose extending the traditional understanding of the protein domain as a function of local compactness with an additional criterion which refers to the presence of a well-defined hydrophobic core. Interface areas in selected homodimers vary with respect to their contribution to share as well as individual (domain-specific hydrophobic cores. The basic definition of a protein domain, i.e., a structural unit characterized by tighter packing than its immediate environment, is extended in order to acknowledge the role of a structured hydrophobic core, which includes the interface area. The hydrophobic properties of interfaces vary depending on the status of interacting domains—In this context we can distinguish: (1 Shared hydrophobic cores (spanning the whole dimer; (2 Individual hydrophobic cores present in each monomer irrespective of whether the dimer contains a shared core. Analysis of interfaces in dystrophin and utrophin indicates the presence of an additional quasi-domain with a prominent hydrophobic core, consisting of fragments contributed by both monomers. In addition, we have also attempted to determine the relationship between the type of interface (as categorized above and the biological function of each complex. This analysis is entirely based on the fuzzy oil drop model.

  1. Folding 19 proteins to their native state and stability of large proteins from a coarse-grained model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We develop an intermediate resolution model, where the backbone is modeled with atomic resolution but the side chain with a single bead, by extending our previous model (Proteins (2013) DOI: 10.1002/prot.24269) to properly include proline, preproline residues and backbone rigidity. Starting from random configurations, the model properly folds 19 proteins (including a mutant 2A3D sequence) into native states containing β sheet, α helix, and mixed α/β. As a further test, the stability of H-RAS (a 169 residue protein, critical in many signaling pathways) is investigated: The protein is stable, with excellent agreement with experimental B-factors. Despite that proteins containing only α helices fold to their native state at lower backbone rigidity, and other limitations, which we discuss thoroughly, the model provides a reliable description of the dynamics as compared with all atom simulations, but does not constrain secondary structures as it is typically the case in more coarse-grained models. Further implications are described.

  2. Co-encapsulation of lyoprotectants improves the stability of protein-loaded PLGA nanoparticles upon lyophilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonte, Pedro; Araújo, Francisca; Seabra, Vítor; Reis, Salette; van de Weert, Marco; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-12-30

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the influence of the co-encapsulation of lyoprotectants with insulin into PLGA nanoparticles, on the stability of the protein and nanoparticles upon lyophilization. Different lyoprotectants were used, namely trehalose, glucose, sucrose, fructose and sorbitol at 10% (w/v). Insulin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles with co-encapsulated lyoprotectants achieved a mean particle size of 386-466nm, and a zeta potential ranging between -34 and -38mV, dependent on the lyoprotectant used. Formulations had association efficiencies and loading capacities of 85-91% and 10-12%, respectively. The lyophilization process increased the colloidal stability of nanoparticles, and maintained their spherical shape and smooth surface, particularly in presence of lyoprotectants. XRPD revealed that the lyophilizates of nanoparticles with co-encapsulated lyoprotectants were amorphous, whereas formulations with externally added lyoprotectants, except trehalose, showed crystallinity. FTIR assessment showed that co-encapsulating lyoprotectants better preserved insulin structure upon lyophilization with a spectral area overlap of 82-87%, compared to only 72% in lyoprotectant absence. These results were confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Surprisingly, the simultaneous co-encapsulation and addition of lyoprotectants was detrimental to protein stabilization. The insulin in vitro release studies demonstrated that formulations with co-encapsulated trehalose, glucose, sucrose, fructose and sorbitol achieved 83%, 69%, 70%, 77% and 74%, respectively after 48h. In contrast, formulations added with those lyoprotectants prior lyophilization showed a lower release rate not higher than 60% after 48h. This work gives rise to a different promising strategy of co-encapsulating lyoprotectants and therapeutic proteins, to better stabilize protein structure upon lyophilization.

  3. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Kappes, John C.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Riordan, John R.; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Hunt, John F.; Brouillette, Christie G.

    2014-01-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Not...

  4. Insights into Hemoglobin Assembly through in Vivo Mutagenesis of α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L.; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A.; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO2 subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO2 autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO2 subunits. PMID:22287545

  5. Insights into hemoglobin assembly through in vivo mutagenesis of α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandros, Eugene; Mollan, Todd L; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yao, Yu; D'Souza, Janine; Gell, David A; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2012-03-30

    α-Hemoglobin stabilizing protein (AHSP) is believed to facilitate adult Hemoglobin A assembly and protect against toxic free α-globin subunits. Recombinant AHSP binds multiple forms of free α-globin to stabilize their structures and inhibit precipitation. However, AHSP also stimulates autooxidation of αO(2) subunit and its rapid conversion to a partially unfolded bishistidyl hemichrome structure. To investigate these biochemical properties, we altered the evolutionarily conserved AHSP proline 30 in recombinantly expressed proteins and introduced identical mutations into the endogenous murine Ahsp gene. In vitro, the P30W AHSP variant bound oxygenated α chains with 30-fold increased affinity. Both P30W and P30A mutant proteins also caused decreased rates of αO(2) autooxidation as compared with wild-type AHSP. Despite these abnormalities, mice harboring P30A or P30W Ahsp mutations exhibited no detectable defects in erythropoiesis at steady state or during induced stresses. Further biochemical studies revealed that the AHSP P30A and P30W substitutions had minimal effects on AHSP interactions with ferric α subunits. Together, our findings indicate that the ability of AHSP to stabilize nascent α chain folding intermediates prior to hemin reduction and incorporation into adult Hemoglobin A is physiologically more important than AHSP interactions with ferrous αO(2) subunits.

  6. Stabilizing effects of G protein on the active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor differ depending on G protein type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateyama, Michihiro; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2016-10-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) trigger various cellular and physiological responses upon the ligand binding. The ligand binding induces conformational change in GPCRs which allows G protein to interact with the receptor. The interaction of G protein also affects the active conformation of GPCRs. In this study, we have investigated the effects of Gαi1, Gαo and chimeric Gαqi5 on the active conformation of the adenosine A1 receptor, as each Gα showed difference in the interaction with adenosine A1 receptor. The conformational changes in the adenosine A1 receptor were detected as the agonist-induced decreases in efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins (FPs) fused at the two intracellular domains of the adenosine A1 receptor. Amplitudes of the agonist-induced FRET decreases were subtle when the FP-tagged adenosine A1 receptor was expressed alone, whereas they were significantly enhanced when co-expressed with Gαi1Gβ1Gγ22 (Gi1) or Gαqi5Gβ1Gγ22 (Gqi5) but not with GαοGβ1Gγ22 (Go). The enhancement of the agonist-induced FRET decrease in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly larger than that of Gi1. Furthermore, the FRET recovery upon the agonist removal in the presence of Gqi5 was significantly slower than that of Gi1. From these results it was revealed that the agonist-bound active conformation of adenosine A1 receptor is unstable without the binding of G protein and that the stabilizing effects of G protein differ depending on the types of G protein.

  7. Replication Proteins Influence the Maintenance of Telomere Length and Telomerase Protein Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlén, Maria; Sunnerhagen, Per; Wang, Teresa S.-F.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effects of fission yeast replication genes on telomere length maintenance and identified 20 mutant alleles that confer lengthening or shortening of telomeres. The telomere elongation was telomerase dependent in the replication mutants analyzed. Furthermore, the telomerase catalytic subunit, Trt1, and the principal initiation and lagging-strand synthesis DNA polymerase, Polα, were reciprocally coimmunoprecipitated, indicating these proteins physically coexist as a complex i...

  8. Stability and immunogenicity of hypoallergenic peanut protein-polyphenol complexes during in vitro pepsin digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plundrich, Nathalie J; White, Brittany L; Dean, Lisa L; Davis, Jack P; Foegeding, E Allen; Lila, Mary Ann

    2015-07-01

    Allergenic peanut proteins are relatively resistant to digestion, and if digested, metabolized peptides tend to remain large and immunoreactive, triggering allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. In this study, the stability of hypoallergenic peanut protein-polyphenol complexes was evaluated during simulated in vitro gastric digestion. When digested with pepsin, the basic subunit of the peanut allergen Ara h 3 was more rapidly hydrolyzed in peanut protein-cranberry or green tea polyphenol complexes compared to uncomplexed peanut flour. Ara h 2 was also hydrolyzed more quickly in the peanut protein-cranberry polyphenol complex than in uncomplexed peanut flour. Peptides from peanut protein-cranberry polyphenol complexes and peanut protein-green tea polyphenol complexes were substantially less immunoreactive (based on their capacity to bind to peanut-specific IgE from patient plasma) compared to peptides from uncomplexed peanut flour. These results suggest that peanut protein-polyphenol complexes may be less immunoreactive passing through the digestive tract in vivo, contributing to their attenuated allergenicity.

  9. Stability of buffer-free freeze-dried formulations: A feasibility study of a monoclonal antibody at high protein concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garidel, Patrick; Pevestorf, Benjamin; Bahrenburg, Sven

    2015-11-01

    We studied the stability of freeze-dried therapeutic protein formulations over a range of initial concentrations (from 40 to 160 mg/mL) and employed a variety of formulation strategies (including buffer-free freeze dried formulations, or BF-FDF). Highly concentrated, buffer-free liquid formulations of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been shown to be a viable alternative to conventionally buffered preparations. We considered whether it is feasible to use the buffer-free strategy in freeze-dried formulations, as an answer to some of the known drawbacks of conventional buffers. We therefore conducted an accelerated stability study (24 weeks at 40 °C) to assess the feasibility of stabilizing freeze-dried formulations without "classical" buffer components. Factors monitored included pH stability, protein integrity, and protein aggregation. Because the protein solutions are inherently self-buffering, and the system's buffer capacity scales with protein concentration, we included highly concentrated buffer-free freeze-dried formulations in the study. The tested formulations ranged from "fully formulated" (containing both conventional buffer and disaccharide stabilizers) to "buffer-free" (including formulations with only disaccharide lyoprotectant stabilizers) to "excipient-free" (with neither added buffers nor stabilizers). We evaluated the impacts of varying concentrations, buffering schemes, pHs, and lyoprotectant additives. At the end of 24 weeks, no change in pH was observed in any of the buffer-free formulations. Unbuffered formulations were found to have shorter reconstitution times and lower opalescence than buffered formulations. Protein stability was assessed by visual inspection, sub-visible particle analysis, protein monomer content, charge variants analysis, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All of these measures found the stability of buffer-free formulations that included a disaccharide stabilizer comparable to buffer

  10. Wheat proteins enhance stability and function of adhesion molecules in cryopreserved hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Mélanie; Hamel, Francine; Averill-Bates, Diana A; Sarhan, Fathey

    2009-01-01

    Cryopreserved hepatocytes with good hepatospecific functions upon thawing are important for clinical transplantation and for in vitro drug toxicity testing. However, cryopreservation reduces viability and certain hepatospecific functions, but the most pronounced change is diminished attachment efficiency of hepatocytes. Adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix and cell-cell contacts are crucial for many aspects of cellular function. These processes are partly mediated and controlled by cellular adhesion molecules. The mechanisms responsible for reduced attachment efficiency of cryopreserved hepatocytes are not well understood. To address this question, we investigated the effect of a new cryopreservation procedure, using wheat proteins (WPs) or mixtures of recombinant forms of wheat freezing tolerance-associated proteins, on the stability of three important adhesion molecules (beta1-integrin, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin). Immunoblot analyses revealed that the levels of beta1-integrin, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin were much lower in cryopreserved rat hepatocytes, when compared to fresh cells. Protein expression of the adhesion molecules was generally lower in cells cryopreserved with DMSO, compared to WPs. Moreover, the stability of the adhesion molecules was not affected by cryopreservation to the same degree, with more pronounced decreases occurring for beta1-integrin (62-74%) > beta-catenin (51-58%) > E-cadherin (21-37%). However, when hepatocytes were cryopreserved with partially purified WPs (SulWPE, AcWPE) or with mixtures of recombinant wheat proteins, there was a clear protective effect against the loss of protein expression of beta1-integrin, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin. Protein expression was only 10-20% lower than that observed in fresh hepatocytes. These findings clearly demonstrate that WPs, and more particularly, partially purified WPs and recombinant wheat proteins, were more efficient for cryopreservation of rat hepatocytes by maintaining good

  11. Salt Potentiates Methylamine Counteraction System to Offset the Deleterious Effects of Urea on Protein Stability and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Laishram R.; Warepam, Marina; Ahmad, Faizan; Dar, Tanveer Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cellular methylamines are osmolytes (low molecular weight organic compounds) believed to offset the urea’s harmful effects on the stability and function of proteins in mammalian kidney and marine invertebrates. Although urea and methylamines are found at 2:1 molar ratio in tissues, their opposing effects on protein structure and function have been questioned on several grounds including failure to counteraction or partial counteraction. Here we investigated the possible involvement of cellular salt, NaCl, in urea-methylamine counteraction on protein stability and function. We found that NaCl mediates methylamine counteracting system from no or partial counteraction to complete counteraction of urea’s effect on protein stability and function. These conclusions were drawn from the systematic thermodynamic stability and functional activity measurements of lysozyme and RNase-A. Our results revealed that salts might be involved in protein interaction with charged osmolytes and hence in the urea-methylamine counteraction. PMID:25793733

  12. Salt potentiates methylamine counteraction system to offset the deleterious effects of urea on protein stability and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safikur Rahman

    Full Text Available Cellular methylamines are osmolytes (low molecular weight organic compounds believed to offset the urea's harmful effects on the stability and function of proteins in mammalian kidney and marine invertebrates. Although urea and methylamines are found at 2:1 molar ratio in tissues, their opposing effects on protein structure and function have been questioned on several grounds including failure to counteraction or partial counteraction. Here we investigated the possible involvement of cellular salt, NaCl, in urea-methylamine counteraction on protein stability and function. We found that NaCl mediates methylamine counteracting system from no or partial counteraction to complete counteraction of urea's effect on protein stability and function. These conclusions were drawn from the systematic thermodynamic stability and functional activity measurements of lysozyme and RNase-A. Our results revealed that salts might be involved in protein interaction with charged osmolytes and hence in the urea-methylamine counteraction.

  13. YsxC, an essential protein in Staphylococcus aureus crucial for ribosome assembly/stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Lara Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial growth and division requires a core set of essential proteins, several of which are still of unknown function. They are also attractive targets for the development of new antibiotics. YsxC is a member of a family of GTPases highly conserved across eubacteria with a possible ribosome associated function. Results Here, we demonstrate by the creation of a conditional lethal mutant that ysxC is apparently essential for growth in S. aureus. To begin to elucidate YsxC function, a translational fusion of YsxC to the CBP-ProteinA tag in the staphylococcal chromosome was made, enabling Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP of YsxC-interacting partners. These included the ribosomal proteins S2, S10 and L17, as well as the β' subunit of the RNA polymerase. YsxC was then shown to copurify with ribosomes as an accessory protein specifically localizing to the 50 S subunit. YsxC depletion led to a decrease in the presence of mature ribosomes, indicating a role in ribosome assembly and/or stability in S. aureus. Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that YsxC of S. aureus localizes to the ribosomes, is crucial for ribosomal stability and is apparently essential for the life of S. aureus.

  14. A translational regulator, PUM2, promotes both protein stability and kinase activity of Aurora-A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yei-Hsuan Huang

    Full Text Available Aurora-A, a centrosomal serine-threonine kinase, orchestrates several key aspects of cell division. However, the regulatory pathways for the protein stability and kinase activity of Aurora-A are still not completely understood. In this study, PUM2, an RNA-binding protein, is identified as a novel substrate and interacting protein of Aurora-A. Overexpression of the PUM2 mutant which fails to interact with Aurora-A, and depletion of PUM2 result in a decrease in the amount of Aurora-A. PUM2 physically binds to the D-box of Aurora-A, which is recognized by APC/C(Cdh1. Overexpression of PUM2 prevents ubiquitination and enhances the protein stability of Aurora-A, suggesting that PUM2 protects Aurora-A from APC/C(Cdh1-mediated degradation. Moreover, association of PUM2 with Aurora-A not only makes Aurora-A more stable but also enhances the kinase activity of Aurora-A. Our study suggests that PUM2 plays two different but important roles during cell cycle progression. In interphase, PUM2 localizes in cytoplasm and plays as translational repressor through its RNA binding domain. However, in mitosis, PUM2 physically associates with Aurora-A to ensure enough active Aurora-A at centrosomes for mitotic entry. This is the first time to reveal the moonlight role of PUM2 in mitosis.

  15. Role of alpha-hemoglobin-stabilizing protein in normal erythropoiesis and beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mitchell J; Zhou, Suiping; Feng, Liang; Gell, David A; Mackay, Joel P; Shi, Yigong; Gow, Andrew J

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis is coordinated by homeostatic mechanisms to limit the accumulation of free alpha or beta subunits, which are cytotoxic. Alpha hemoglobin-stabilizing protein (AHSP) is an abundant erythroid protein that specifically binds free alphaHb, stabilizes its structure, and limits its ability to participate in chemical reactions that generate reactive oxygen species. Gene ablation studies in mice demonstrate that AHSP is required for normal erythropoiesis. AHSP-null erythrocytes are short-lived, contain Hb precipitates, and exhibit signs of oxidative damage. Loss of AHSP exacerbates beta-thalassemia in mice, indicating that altered AHSP expression or function could modify thalassemia phenotypes in humans, a topic that is beginning to be explored in clinical studies. We used biochemical, spectroscopic, and crystallographic methods to examine how AHSP stabilizes alphaHb. AHSP binds the G and H helices of alphaHb on a surface that largely overlaps with the alpha1-beta1 interface of HbA. This result explains previous findings that betaHb can competitively displace AHSP from alphaHb to form HbA tetramer. Remarkably, binding of AHSP to oxygenated alphaHb induces dramatic conformational changes and converts the heme-bound iron to an oxidized hemichrome state in which all six coordinate positions are occupied. This structure limits the reactivity of heme iron, providing a mechanism by which AHSP stabilizes alphaHb. These findings suggest a biochemical pathway through which AHSP might participate in normal Hb synthesis and modulate the severity of thalassemias. Moreover, understanding how AHSP stabilizes alphaHb provides a theoretical basis for new strategies to inhibit the damaging effects of free alphaHb that accumulates in beta-thalassemia.

  16. Prion protein insertional mutations increase aggregation propensity but not fiber stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    True Heather L

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the PRNP gene account for ~15% of all prion disease cases. Little is understood about the mechanism of how some of these mutations in PRNP cause the protein to aggregate into amyloid fibers or cause disease. We have taken advantage of a chimeric protein system to study the oligopeptide repeat domain (ORD expansions of the prion protein, PrP, and their effect on protein aggregation and amyloid fiber formation. We replaced the ORD of the yeast prion protein Sup35p with that from wild type and expanded ORDs of PrP and compared their biochemical properties in vitro. We previously determined that these chimeric proteins maintain the [PSI+] yeast prion phenotype in vivo. Interestingly, we noted that the repeat expanded chimeric prions seemed to be able to maintain a stronger strain of [PSI+] and convert from [psi-] to [PSI+] with a much higher frequency. In this study we have attempted to understand the biochemical properties of these chimeric proteins and to establish a system to study the properties of the ORD of PrP both in vivo and in vitro. Results Investigation of the chimeric proteins in vitro reveals that repeat-expansions increase aggregation propensity and that the kinetics of fiber formation depends on the number of repeats. The fiber formation reactions are promiscuous in that the chimeric protein containing 14 repeats can readily cross-seed fiber formation of proteins that have the wild type number of repeats. Morphologically, the amyloid fibers formed by repeat-expanded proteins associate with each other to form large clumps that were not as prevalent in fibers formed by proteins containing the wild type number of repeats. Despite the increased aggregation propensity and lateral association of the repeat expanded proteins, there was no corresponding increase in the stability of the fibers formed. Therefore, we predict that the differences in fibers formed with different repeat lengths may not be due to

  17. Different Stability and Proteasome-Mediated Degradation Rate of SMN Protein Isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Locatelli

    Full Text Available The key pathogenic steps leading to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a genetic disease characterized by selective motor neuron degeneration, are not fully clarified. The full-length SMN protein (FL-SMN, the main protein product of the disease gene SMN1, plays an established role in the cytoplasm in snRNP biogenesis ultimately leading to mRNA splicing within the nucleus. It is also involved in the mRNA axonal transport. However, to what extent the impairment of these two SMN functions contributes to SMA pathogenesis remains unknown. A shorter SMN isoform, axonal-SMN or a-SMN, with more specific axonal localization, has been discovered, but whether it might act in concert with FL-SMN in SMA pathogenesis is not known. As a first step in defining common or divergent intracellular roles of FL-SMN vs a-SMN proteins, we here characterized the turn-over of both proteins and investigated which pathway contributed to a-SMN degradation. We performed real time western blot and confocal immunofluorescence analysis in easily controllable in vitro settings. We analyzed co-transfected NSC34 and HeLa cells and cell clones stably expressing both a-SMN and FL-SMN proteins after specific blocking of transcript or protein synthesis and inhibition of known intracellular degradation pathways. Our data indicated that whereas the stability of both FL-SMN and a-SMN transcripts was comparable, the a-SMN protein was characterized by a much shorter half-life than FL-SMN. In addition, as already demonstrated for FL-SMN, the Ub/proteasome pathway played a major role in the a-SMN protein degradation. We hypothesize that the faster degradation rate of a-SMN vs FL-SMN is related to the protection provided by the protein complex in which FL-SMN is assembled. The diverse a-SMN vs FL-SMN C-terminus may dictate different protein interactions and complex formation explaining the different localization and role in the neuronal compartment, and the lower expression and stability of a-SMN.

  18. Critical lysine residues of Klf4 required for protein stabilization and degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Klf4 undergoes the 26S proteasomal degradation by ubiquitination on its multiple lysine residues. • Essential Klf4 ubiquitination sites are accumulated between 190–263 amino acids. • A mutation of lysine at 232 on Klf4 elongates protein turnover. • Klf4 mutants dramatically suppress p53 expression both under normal and UV irradiated conditions. - Abstract: The transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) plays a crucial role in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). As the ubiquitination and degradation of the Klf4 protein have been suggested to play an important role in its function, the identification of specific lysine sites that are responsible for protein degradation is of prime interest to improve protein stability and function. However, the molecular mechanism regulating proteasomal degradation of the Klf4 is poorly understood. In this study, both the analysis of Klf4 ubiquitination sites using several Klf4 deletion fragments and bioinformatics predictions showed that the lysine sites which are signaling for Klf4 protein degradation lie in its N-terminal domain (aa 1–296). The results also showed that Lys32, 52, 232, and 252 of Klf4 are responsible for the proteolysis of the Klf4 protein. These results suggest that Klf4 undergoes proteasomal degradation and that these lysine residues are critical for Klf4 ubiquitination

  19. Critical lysine residues of Klf4 required for protein stabilization and degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Kim, So-Ra; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Baek, Kwang-Hyun, E-mail: baek@cha.ac.kr

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Klf4 undergoes the 26S proteasomal degradation by ubiquitination on its multiple lysine residues. • Essential Klf4 ubiquitination sites are accumulated between 190–263 amino acids. • A mutation of lysine at 232 on Klf4 elongates protein turnover. • Klf4 mutants dramatically suppress p53 expression both under normal and UV irradiated conditions. - Abstract: The transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) plays a crucial role in generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). As the ubiquitination and degradation of the Klf4 protein have been suggested to play an important role in its function, the identification of specific lysine sites that are responsible for protein degradation is of prime interest to improve protein stability and function. However, the molecular mechanism regulating proteasomal degradation of the Klf4 is poorly understood. In this study, both the analysis of Klf4 ubiquitination sites using several Klf4 deletion fragments and bioinformatics predictions showed that the lysine sites which are signaling for Klf4 protein degradation lie in its N-terminal domain (aa 1–296). The results also showed that Lys32, 52, 232, and 252 of Klf4 are responsible for the proteolysis of the Klf4 protein. These results suggest that Klf4 undergoes proteasomal degradation and that these lysine residues are critical for Klf4 ubiquitination.

  20. Discrimination of Proteins Using an Array of Surfactant-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Jacob L; Verma, Mohit S; Gu, Frank X

    2016-08-01

    Protein analysis is a fundamental aspect of biochemical research. Gold nanoparticles are an emerging platform for various biological applications given their high surface area, biocompatibility, and unique optical properties. The colorimetric properties of gold nanoparticles make them ideal for point-of-care diagnostics. Different aspects of gold nanoparticle-protein interactions have been investigated to predict the effect of protein adsorption on colloidal stability, but the role of surfactants is often overlooked, despite their potential to alter both protein and nanoparticle properties. Herein we present a method by which gold nanoparticles can be prepared in various surfactants and used for array-based quantification and identification of proteins. The exchange of surfactant not only changed the zeta potential of those gold nanoparticles but also drastically altered their aggregation response to five different proteins (bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, immunoglobulin G, lysozyme, and hemoglobin) in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that varying surfactant concentration can be used to control assay sensitivity. PMID:27399345

  1. Directed evolution of the suicide protein O⁶-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase for increased reactivity results in an alkylated protein with exceptional stability

    OpenAIRE

    Mollwitz, Birgit; Brunk, Elizabeth; Schmitt, Simone; Pojer, Florence; Bannwarth, Michael; Schiltz, Marc; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Johnsson, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a biophysical, structural, and computational analysis of the directed evolution of the human DNA repair protein O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (hAGT) into SNAP-tag, a self-labeling protein tag. Evolution of hAGT led not only to increased protein activity but also to higher stability, especially of the alkylated protein, suggesting that the reactivity of the suicide enzyme can be influenced by stabilizing the product of the irreversible reaction. Whereas wild-type hAGT ...

  2. A genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening method for protein stability reveals novel regulators of Cdc25A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Zhou, Liwen; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jinping; Zhang, Ruhua; Liang, Xiaoting; Wang, Li; Deng, Wuguo; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Haojie; Kang, Tiebang

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of stability is particularly crucial for unstable proteins in cells. However, a convenient and unbiased method of identifying regulators of protein stability remains to be developed. Recently, a genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 library has been established as a genetic tool to mediate loss-of-function screening. Here, we developed a protein stability regulators screening assay (Pro-SRSA) by combining the whole-genome CRISPR-Cas9 library with a dual-fluorescence-based protein stability reporter and high-throughput sequencing to screen for regulators of protein stability. Using Cdc25A as an example, Cul4B-DDB1DCAF8 was identified as a new E3 ligase for Cdc25A. Moreover, the acetylation of Cdc25A at lysine 150, which was acetylated by p300/CBP and deacetylated by HDAC3, prevented the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of Cdc25A by the proteasome. This is the first study to report that acetylation, as a novel posttranslational modification, modulates Cdc25A stability, and we suggest that this unbiased CRISPR-Cas9 screening method at the genome scale may be widely used to globally identify regulators of protein stability. PMID:27462461

  3. USP7 and TDP-43: Pleiotropic Regulation of Cryptochrome Protein Stability Paces the Oscillation of the Mammalian Circadian Clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisa Hirano

    Full Text Available Mammalian Cryptochromes, CRY1 and CRY2, function as principal regulators of a transcription-translation-based negative feedback loop underlying the mammalian circadian clockwork. An F-box protein, FBXL3, promotes ubiquitination and degradation of CRYs, while FBXL21, the closest paralog of FBXL3, ubiquitinates CRYs but leads to stabilization of CRYs. Fbxl3 knockout extremely lengthened the circadian period, and deletion of Fbxl21 gene in Fbxl3-deficient mice partially rescued the period-lengthening phenotype, suggesting a key role of CRY protein stability for maintenance of the circadian periodicity. Here, we employed a proteomics strategy to explore regulators for the protein stability of CRYs. We found that ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7 also known as HAUSP associates with CRY1 and CRY2 and stabilizes CRYs through deubiquitination. Treatment with USP7-specific inhibitor or Usp7 knockdown shortened the circadian period of the cellular rhythm. We identified another CRYs-interacting protein, TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43, an RNA-binding protein. TDP-43 stabilized CRY1 and CRY2, and its knockdown also shortened the circadian period in cultured cells. The present study identified USP7 and TDP-43 as the regulators of CRY1 and CRY2, underscoring the significance of the stability control process of CRY proteins for period determination in the mammalian circadian clockwork.

  4. A molecular clock regulates angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Uragami, Shota; Akashi, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Hiroo; Nakashima, Yukiko; Endo, Motoyoshi; Miyata, Keishi; Terada, Kazutoyo; Todo, Takeshi; Node, Koichi; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Various physiological and behavioral processes exhibit circadian rhythmicity. These rhythms are usually maintained by negative feedback loops of core clock genes, namely, CLOCK, BMAL, PER, and CRY. Recently, dysfunction in the circadian clock has been recognized as an important foundation for the pathophysiology of lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. We have reported that angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) contributes to the pathogenesis of these lifestyle-related diseases by inducing chronic inflammation. However, molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of ANGPTL2 expression are poorly understood. Here, we assess circadian rhythmicity of ANGPTL2 expression in various mouse tissues. We observed that ANGPTL2 rhythmicity was similar to that of the PER2 gene, which is regulated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex. Promoter activity of the human ANGPTL2 gene was significantly induced by CLOCK and BMAL1, an induction markedly attenuated by CRY co-expression. We also identified functional E-boxes in the ANGPTL2 promoter and observed occupancy of these sites by endogenous CLOCK in human osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, Cry-deficient mice exhibited arrhythmic Angptl2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that periodic expression of ANGPTL2 is regulated by a molecular clock.

  5. A molecular clock regulates angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kadomatsu

    Full Text Available Various physiological and behavioral processes exhibit circadian rhythmicity. These rhythms are usually maintained by negative feedback loops of core clock genes, namely, CLOCK, BMAL, PER, and CRY. Recently, dysfunction in the circadian clock has been recognized as an important foundation for the pathophysiology of lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. We have reported that angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2 contributes to the pathogenesis of these lifestyle-related diseases by inducing chronic inflammation. However, molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of ANGPTL2 expression are poorly understood. Here, we assess circadian rhythmicity of ANGPTL2 expression in various mouse tissues. We observed that ANGPTL2 rhythmicity was similar to that of the PER2 gene, which is regulated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex. Promoter activity of the human ANGPTL2 gene was significantly induced by CLOCK and BMAL1, an induction markedly attenuated by CRY co-expression. We also identified functional E-boxes in the ANGPTL2 promoter and observed occupancy of these sites by endogenous CLOCK in human osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, Cry-deficient mice exhibited arrhythmic Angptl2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that periodic expression of ANGPTL2 is regulated by a molecular clock.

  6. Effects of monohydric alcohols and polyols on the thermal stability of a protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shota; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-03-28

    The thermal stability of a protein is lowered by the addition of a monohydric alcohol, and this effect becomes larger as the size of hydrophobic group in an alcohol molecule increases. By contrast, it is enhanced by the addition of a polyol possessing two or more hydroxyl groups per molecule, and this effect becomes larger as the number of hydroxyl groups increases. Here, we show that all of these experimental observations can be reproduced even in a quantitative sense by rigid-body models focused on the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of solvent molecules. The solvent is either pure water or water-cosolvent solution. Three monohydric alcohols and five polyols are considered as cosolvents. In the rigid-body models, a protein is a fused hard spheres accounting for the polyatomic structure in the atomic detail, and the solvent is formed by hard spheres or a binary mixture of hard spheres with different diameters. The effective diameter of cosolvent molecules and the packing fractions of water and cosolvent, which are crucially important parameters, are carefully estimated using the experimental data of properties such as the density of solid crystal of cosolvent, parameters in the pertinent cosolvent-cosolvent interaction potential, and density of water-cosolvent solution. We employ the morphometric approach combined with the integral equation theory, which is best suited to the physical interpretation of the calculation result. It is argued that the degree of solvent crowding in the bulk is the key factor. When it is made more serious by the cosolvent addition, the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding is magnified, leading to the enhanced thermal stability. When it is made less serious, the opposite is true. The mechanism of the effects of monohydric alcohols and polyols is physically the same as that of sugars. However, when the rigid-body models are employed for the effect of urea, its addition is predicted to enhance the

  7. Effects of monohydric alcohols and polyols on the thermal stability of a protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shota; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    The thermal stability of a protein is lowered by the addition of a monohydric alcohol, and this effect becomes larger as the size of hydrophobic group in an alcohol molecule increases. By contrast, it is enhanced by the addition of a polyol possessing two or more hydroxyl groups per molecule, and this effect becomes larger as the number of hydroxyl groups increases. Here, we show that all of these experimental observations can be reproduced even in a quantitative sense by rigid-body models focused on the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of solvent molecules. The solvent is either pure water or water-cosolvent solution. Three monohydric alcohols and five polyols are considered as cosolvents. In the rigid-body models, a protein is a fused hard spheres accounting for the polyatomic structure in the atomic detail, and the solvent is formed by hard spheres or a binary mixture of hard spheres with different diameters. The effective diameter of cosolvent molecules and the packing fractions of water and cosolvent, which are crucially important parameters, are carefully estimated using the experimental data of properties such as the density of solid crystal of cosolvent, parameters in the pertinent cosolvent-cosolvent interaction potential, and density of water-cosolvent solution. We employ the morphometric approach combined with the integral equation theory, which is best suited to the physical interpretation of the calculation result. It is argued that the degree of solvent crowding in the bulk is the key factor. When it is made more serious by the cosolvent addition, the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding is magnified, leading to the enhanced thermal stability. When it is made less serious, the opposite is true. The mechanism of the effects of monohydric alcohols and polyols is physically the same as that of sugars. However, when the rigid-body models are employed for the effect of urea, its addition is predicted to enhance the

  8. Acid Stability of the Hemagglutinin Protein Regulates H5N1 Influenza Virus Pathogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, Rebecca M.; Zaraket, Hassan; Reddivari, Muralidhar; Heath, Richard J.; White, Stephen W.; Russell, Charles J. (Tennessee-HSC); (SJCH)

    2012-12-10

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype continue to threaten agriculture and human health. Here, we use biochemistry and x-ray crystallography to reveal how amino-acid variations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein contribute to the pathogenicity of H5N1 influenza virus in chickens. HA proteins from highly pathogenic (HP) A/chicken/Hong Kong/YU562/2001 and moderately pathogenic (MP) A/goose/Hong Kong/437-10/1999 isolates of H5N1 were found to be expressed and cleaved in similar amounts, and both proteins had similar receptor-binding properties. However, amino-acid variations at positions 104 and 115 in the vestigial esterase sub-domain of the HA1 receptor-binding domain (RBD) were found to modulate the pH of HA activation such that the HP and MP HA proteins are activated for membrane fusion at pH 5.7 and 5.3, respectively. In general, an increase in H5N1 pathogenicity in chickens was found to correlate with an increase in the pH of HA activation for mutant and chimeric HA proteins in the observed range of pH 5.2 to 6.0. We determined a crystal structure of the MP HA protein at 2.50 {angstrom} resolution and two structures of HP HA at 2.95 and 3.10 {angstrom} resolution. Residues 104 and 115 that modulate the acid stability of the HA protein are situated at the N- and C-termini of the 110-helix in the vestigial esterase sub-domain, which interacts with the B loop of the HA2 stalk domain. Interactions between the 110-helix and the stalk domain appear to be important in regulating HA protein acid stability, which in turn modulates influenza virus replication and pathogenesis. Overall, an optimal activation pH of the HA protein is found to be necessary for high pathogenicity by H5N1 influenza virus in avian species.

  9. Stability of foot-and-mouth disease virus, its genome and proteins at 37 grad C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infectivity titers of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) types Asia 1 and 0 were reduced by 4 and 2 log units, respectively, after incubation at 37 grad C for 12 hours. The stability of the FMDV RNA genome at 37 grad C was studied using 32P-labelled virus. The RNA of FMDV type 0 was found to be more stable than that of type Asia 1. Oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography showed that 21 % and 31 % of the labelled RNA were bound to the column in the case of types Asia 1 and 0, respectively. Possible correlation between the poly(A) tail length, accessibility of the genome to nucleases and thermo-stability of the infective virus is discussed. A possible correlation between the thermo-stability of the genome and general distribution of a particular virus type seems to exist. A stable genome associated with poor virus immunogenicity may be responsible for the prevalence of FMDV type 0 in the nature. The isoelectric focussing of structural proteins isolated from the virus samples incubated at 37 grad C revealed charge differences in the major immuno-gen between the two FMDV types. A rapid proteolytic degradation of the viral immuno-gen and stability of the genome may be responsible for frequent outbreaks of FMDV, at least, in the endemic countries. (author)

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of protein folding and stability using a tryptophan modification protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingrong; Strickland, Erin C; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2014-07-15

    Described here is the development of a mass spectrometry-based covalent labeling protocol that utilizes the reaction of dimethyl(2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl)sulfonium bromide (HNSB) with tryptophan (Trp) residues to measure protein folding free energies (ΔG(f) values). In the protocol, the chemical denaturant dependence of the rate at which globally protected Trp residues in a protein react with HNSB is evaluated using either a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis of the intact protein or a quantitative, bottom-up proteomics analysis using isobaric mass tags. In the proof-of-principle studies performed here, the protocol yielded accurate ΔG(f) values for the two-state folding proteins, lysozyme and cytochrome c. The protocol also yielded an accurate measure of the dissociation constant (K(d) value) for the binding of N,N',N″-triacetylchitotriose to lysozyme, and it successfully detected the binding of brinzolamide to BCA II, a non-two-state folding protein. The HNSB protocol can be used in combination with SPROX (stability of proteins from rates of oxidation), a previously reported technique that exploits the hydrogen peroxide oxidation of methionine (Met) residues in proteins to make ΔG(f) value measurements. Incorporating the HNSB protocol into SPROX increased the peptide and protein coverage in proteome-wide SPROX experiments by 50% and 25%, respectively. As part of this work, the precision of proteome-wide ΔG(f) value measurements using the combined HNSB and SPROX protocol is also evaluated. PMID:24896224

  11. Impact of glucose polymer chain length on heat and physical stability of milk protein-carbohydrate nutritional beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biye; O'Mahony, James A

    2016-11-15

    This study investigated the impact of glucose polymer chain length on heat and physical stability of milk protein isolate (MPI)-carbohydrate nutritional beverages containing 8.5% w/w total protein and 5% w/w carbohydrate. The maltodextrin and corn syrup solids glucose polymers used had dextrose equivalent (DE) values of 17 or 38, respectively. Increasing DE value of the glucose polymers resulted in a greater increase in brown colour development, ionic calcium, protein particle size, apparent viscosity and pseudoplastic rheological behaviour, and greater reduction in pH, hydration and heat stability on sterilisation at 120°C. Incorporation of glucose polymers with MPI retarded sedimentation of protein during accelerated physical stability testing, with maltodextrin DE17 causing a greater reduction in sedimentation velocity and compressibility of sediment formed than corn syrup solids DE38. The results demonstrate that chain length of the glucose polymer used strongly impacts heat and physical stability of MPI-carbohydrate nutritional beverages.

  12. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  13. Subcritical Water Induced Complexation of Soy Protein and Rutin: Improved Interfacial Properties and Emulsion Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Qi, Jun-Ru; Hou, Jun-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Rutin is a common dietary flavonoid with important antioxidant and pharmacological activities. However, its application in the food industry is limited mainly because of its poor water solubility. The subcritical water (SW) treatment provides an efficient technique to solubilize and achieve the enrichment of rutin in soy protein isolate (SPI) by inducing their complexation. The physicochemical, interfacial, and emulsifying properties of the complex were investigated and compared to the mixtures. SW treatment had much enhanced rutin-combined capacity of SPI than that of conventional method, ascribing to the well-contacted for higher water solubility of rutin with stronger collision-induced hydrophobic interactions. Compared to the mixtures of rutin with proteins, the complex exhibited an excellent surface activity and improved the physical and oxidative stability of its stabilized emulsions. This improving effect could be attributed to the targeted accumulation of rutin at the oil-water interface accompanied by the adsorption of SPI resulting in the thicker interfacial layer, as evidenced by higher interfacial protein and rutin concentrations. This study provides a novel strategy for the design and enrichment of nanovehicle providing water-insoluble hydrophobic polyphenols for interfacial delivery in food emulsified systems.

  14. Pickering emulsions stabilized by whey protein nanoparticles prepared by thermal cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiande; Shi, Mengxuan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Luhai; Wang, Ze; Yan, Xinzhong; Norde, Willem; Li, Yuan

    2015-03-01

    A Pickering (o/w) emulsion was formed and stabilized by whey protein isolate nanoparticles (WPI NPs). Those WPI NPs were prepared by thermal cross-linking of denatured WPI proteins within w/o emulsion droplets at 80°C for 15 min. During heating of w/o emulsions containing 10% (w/v) WPI proteins in the water phase, the emulsions displayed turbid-transparent-turbid phase transitions, which is ascribed to the change in the size of the protein-containing water droplets caused by thermal cross-linking between denatured protein molecules. The transparent stage indicated the formation of WPI NPs. WPI NPs of different sizes were obtained by varying the mixing speed. WPI NPs of 200-500 nm were selected to prepare o/w Pickering emulsions because of their good stability against coalescence. By Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, it was observed that WPI NPs were closely packed and distributed at the surface of the emulsion droplets. By measuring water contact angles of WPI NPs films, it was found that under most conditions WPI NPs present good partial wetting properties, but that at the isoelectric point (pI) and high ionic strength the particles become more hydrophobic, resulting in less stable Pickering emulsion. Thus, at pH above and below the pI of WPI NPs and low to moderate ionic strengths (1-10 mM), and with a WPI NPs concentration of 2% (w/v), a stable Pickering emulsion can be obtained. The results may provide useful information for applications of WPI NPs in environmentally friendly and food grade applications, notably in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic products.

  15. Low thermodynamic but high kinetic stability of an antifreeze protein from Rhagium mordax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Dennis S; Johnsen, Johannes L; Kristiansen, Erlend; Westh, Peter; Ramløv, Hans

    2014-06-01

    The equilibrium heat stability and the kinetic heat tolerance of a recombinant antifreeze protein (AFP) from the beetle Rhagium mordax (RmAFP1) are studied through differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In contrast to other insect AFPs studied with this respect, the RmAFP1 has only one disulfide bridge. The melting temperature, Tm , of the protein is determined to be 28.5°C (pH 7.4), which is much lower than most of those reported for AFPs or globular proteins in general. Despite its low melting temperature, both biophysical and activity measurements show that the protein almost completely refolds into the native state after repeated exposure of 70°C. RmAFP1 thus appears to be kinetically stable even far above its melting temperature. Thermodynamically, the insect AFPs seem to be dividable in three groups, relating to their content of disulfide bridges and widths of the ice binding motifs; high melting temperature AFPs (high disulfide content, TxT motifs), low melting temperature but high refolding capability AFPs (one disulfide bridge, TxTxTxT motifs) and irreversibly unfolded AFPs at low temperatures (no disulfide bridges, TxTxTxTxT motifs). The property of being able to cope with high temperature exposures may appear peculiar for proteins which strictly have their effect at subzero temperatures. Different aspects of this are discussed.

  16. Myc protein is stabilized by suppression of a novel E3 ligase complex in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung H.; Wright, Jason B.; Gerber, Scott A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid Myc protein turnover is critical for maintaining basal levels of Myc activity in normal cells and a prompt response to changing growth signals. We characterize a new Myc-interacting factor, TRPC4AP (transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 4-associated protein)/TRUSS (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated ubiquitous scaffolding and signaling protein), which is the receptor for a DDB1 (damage-specific DNA-binding protein 1)–CUL4 (Cullin 4) E3 ligase complex for selective Myc degradation through the proteasome. TRPC4AP/TRUSS binds specifically to the Myc C terminus and promotes its ubiquitination and destruction through the recognition of evolutionarily conserved domains in the Myc N terminus. TRPC4AP/TRUSS suppresses Myc-mediated transactivation and transformation in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, we found that TRPC4AP/TRUSS expression is strongly down-regulated in most cancer cell lines, leading to Myc protein stabilization. These studies identify a novel pathway targeting Myc degradation that is suppressed in cancer cells. PMID:20551172

  17. Molecular dynamics studies on the structural stability of wild-type dog prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiapu; Liu, David D W

    2011-06-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. In 2008, canine mammals including dogs (canis familials) were the first time academically reported to be resistant to prion diseases (Vaccine 26: 2601-2614 (2008)). Thus, it is very worth studying the molecular structures of dog prion protein to obtain insights into the immunity of dogs to prion diseases. This paper studies the molecular structural dynamics of wild-type dog prion protein. The comparison analyses with rabbit prion protein show that the dog prion protein has stable molecular structures whether under neutral or low pH environments. We also find that the salt bridges such as D177-R163 contribute to the structural stability of wild-type rabbit prion protein under neutral pH environment. PMID:21469747

  18. Sde2: A novel nuclear protein essential for telomeric silencing and genomic stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Initiative for the Promotion of Young Scientists' Independent Research, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Sugiyama, Tomoyasu, E-mail: sugiyamt@biol.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Initiative for the Promotion of Young Scientists' Independent Research, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Sde2 is essential for telomere silencing. {yields} Sde2 is involved in the maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} Sde2 promotes the recruitment of SHREC, a histone deacetylase complex, to telomeres. -- Abstract: Telomeres, specialized domains assembled at the ends of linear chromosomes, are essential for genomic stability in eukaryotes. The formation and maintenance of telomeres are governed by numerous factors such as telomeric repeats, telomere-binding proteins, heterochromatin proteins, and telomerase. Here, we report Sde2, a novel nuclear protein essential for telomeric silencing and genomic stability in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A deficiency in sde2 results in the derepression of the ura4{sup +} gene inserted near telomeric repeats, and the noncoding transcripts from telomeric regions accumulate in sde2{Delta} cells. The loss of Sde2 function compromises transcriptional silencing at telomeres, and this silencing defect is accompanied by increased levels of acetylated histone H3K14 and RNA polymerase II occupancy at telomeres as well as reduced recruitment of the SNF2 ATPase/histone deacetylase-containing complex SHREC to telomeres. Deletion of sde2 also leads to a higher frequency of mitotic minichromosome loss, and sde2{Delta} cells often form asci that contain spores in abnormal numbers, shapes, or both. In addition, sde2{Delta} cells are highly sensitive to several stresses, including high/low temperatures, bleomycin, which induces DNA damage, and thiabendazole, a microtubule-destabilizing agent. Furthermore, Sde2 genetically interacts with the telomere regulators Taz1, Pof3, and Ccq1. These findings demonstrate that Sde2 cooperates with other telomere regulators to maintain functional telomeres, thereby preventing genomic instability.

  19. Small-Protein-Stabilized Semiconductor Nanoprobe for Targeted Imaging of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Liu, Siyu; Jiang, Qike; Lan, Tian; Cheng, Zhen; Liu, Hongguang

    2016-07-01

    Recently, semiconductor nanoparticles such as quantum dots (QDs) have attracted significant attention for bioimaging. Complex chemical functionalization, surface modification, and bioconjugation chemistry are generally required to tag biomolecules to QDs for imaging of different biomarkers. In this study, we report a simple method for production of QDs stabilized by the small protein, Affibody (AF-QDs) for fluorescent imaging of the human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) in human A549 lung cancer cells. This one-pot synthesis of AF-QDs avoids complex chemical conjugation procedures and demonstrates a promising approach for the preparation of fluorescent nanoprobes for imaging of cancer targets. PMID:27123671

  20. Hematopoietic protein-1 regulates the actin membrane skeleton and membrane stability in murine erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia M Chan

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic protein-1 (Hem-1 is a hematopoietic cell specific member of the WAVE (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome verprolin-homologous protein complex, which regulates filamentous actin (F-actin polymerization in many cell types including immune cells. However, the roles of Hem-1 and the WAVE complex in erythrocyte biology are not known. In this study, we utilized mice lacking Hem-1 expression due to a non-coding point mutation in the Hem1 gene to show that absence of Hem-1 results in microcytic, hypochromic anemia characterized by abnormally shaped erythrocytes with aberrant F-actin foci and decreased lifespan. We find that Hem-1 and members of the associated WAVE complex are normally expressed in wildtype erythrocyte progenitors and mature erythrocytes. Using mass spectrometry and global proteomics, Coomassie staining, and immunoblotting, we find that the absence of Hem-1 results in decreased representation of essential erythrocyte membrane skeletal proteins including α- and β- spectrin, dematin, p55, adducin, ankyrin, tropomodulin 1, band 3, and band 4.1. Hem1⁻/⁻ erythrocytes exhibit increased protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of adducin at Ser724, which targets adducin family members for dissociation from spectrin and actin, and subsequent proteolysis. Increased adducin Ser724 phosphorylation in Hem1⁻/⁻ erythrocytes correlates with decreased protein expression of the regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, which is required for PP2A-dependent dephosphorylation of PKC targets. These results reveal a novel, critical role for Hem-1 in the homeostasis of structural proteins required for formation and stability of the actin membrane skeleton in erythrocytes.

  1. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (ΔG of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi....../mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche...... that predicts multi-site ΔΔG as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1 kcal...

  2. How hydrophobicity and the glycosylation site of glycans affect protein folding and stability: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Diannan; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Zheng

    2012-01-12

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in the biosynthesis of protein, but its effect on the protein conformational transitions underpinning folding and stabilization is poorly understood. In this study, we present a coarse-grained off-lattice 46-β barrel model protein glycosylated by glycans with different hydrophobicity and glycosylation sites to examine the effect of glycans on protein folding and stabilization using a Langevin dynamics simulation, in which an H term was proposed as the index of the hydrophobicity of glycan. Compared with its native counterpart, introducing glycans of suitable hydrophobicity (0.1 enthalpy effect. The simulations have shown both the stabilization and the destabilization effects of glycosylation, as experimentally reported in the literature, and provided molecular insight into glycosylated proteins. The understanding of the effects of glycans with different hydrophobicities on the folding and stability of protein, as attempted by the present work, is helpful not only to explain the stabilization and destabilization effect of real glycoproteins but also to design protein-polymer conjugates for biotechnological purposes.

  3. The First Residue of the PWWP Motif Modulates HATH Domain Binding, Stability, and Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Lee, Hsia-Ju; Jiang, Ingjye; Lin, Shang-Chi; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Jan; Sue, Shih-Che

    2015-07-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (hHDGF) and HDGF-related proteins (HRPs) contain conserved N-terminal HATH domains with a characteristic structural motif, namely the PWWP motif. The HATH domain has attracted attention because of its ability to bind with heparin/heparan sulfate, DNA, and methylated histone peptide. Depending on the sequence of the PWWP motif, HRP HATHs are classified into P-type (Pro-His-Trp-Pro) and A-type (Ala-His-Trp-Pro) forms. A-type HATH is highly unstable and tends to precipitate in solution. We replaced the Pro residue in P-type HATHHDGF with Ala and evaluated the influence on structure, dynamics, and ligand binding. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) hydrogen/deuterium exchange and circular dichroism (CD) measurements revealed reduced stability. Analysis of NMR backbone (15)N relaxations (R1, R2, and nuclear Overhauser effect) revealed additional backbone dynamics in the interface between the β-barrel and the C-terminal helix bundle. The β1-β2 loop, where the AHWP sequence is located, has great structural flexibility, which aids HATH-HATH interaction through the loop. A-type HATH, therefore, shows a stronger tendency to aggregate when binding with heparin and DNA oligomers. This study defines the role of the first residue of the PWWP motif in modulating HATH domain stability and oligomer formation in binding.

  4. Milk protein composition and stability changes affected by iron in water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aili; Duncan, Susan E; Knowlton, Katharine F; Ray, William K; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-06-01

    Water makes up more than 80% of the total weight of milk. However, the influence of water chemistry on the milk proteome has not been extensively studied. The objective was to evaluate interaction of water-sourced iron (low, medium, and high levels) on milk proteome and implications on milk oxidative state and mineral content. Protein composition, oxidative stability, and mineral composition of milk were investigated under conditions of iron ingestion through bovine drinking water (infused) as well as direct iron addition to commercial milk in 2 studies. Four ruminally cannulated cows each received aqueous infusions (based on water consumption of 100L) of 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/L Fe(2+) as ferrous lactate, resulting in doses of 0, 200, 500 or 1,250mg of Fe/d, in a 4×4Latin square design for a 14-d period. For comparison, ferrous sulfate solution was directly added into commercial retail milk at the same concentrations: control (0mg of Fe/L), low (2mg of Fe/L), medium (5mg of Fe/L), and high (12.5mg of Fe/L). Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis was applied to characterize milk protein composition. Oxidative stability of milk was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde, and mineral content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For milk from both abomasal infusion of ferrous lactate and direct addition of ferrous sulfate, an iron concentration as low as 2mg of Fe/L was able to cause oxidative stress in dairy cattle and infused milk, respectively. Abomasal infusion affected both caseins and whey proteins in the milk, whereas direct addition mainly influenced caseins. Although abomasal iron infusion did not significantly affect oxidation state and mineral balance (except iron), it induced oxidized off-flavor and partial degradation of whey proteins. Direct

  5. Milk protein composition and stability changes affected by iron in water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aili; Duncan, Susan E; Knowlton, Katharine F; Ray, William K; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-06-01

    Water makes up more than 80% of the total weight of milk. However, the influence of water chemistry on the milk proteome has not been extensively studied. The objective was to evaluate interaction of water-sourced iron (low, medium, and high levels) on milk proteome and implications on milk oxidative state and mineral content. Protein composition, oxidative stability, and mineral composition of milk were investigated under conditions of iron ingestion through bovine drinking water (infused) as well as direct iron addition to commercial milk in 2 studies. Four ruminally cannulated cows each received aqueous infusions (based on water consumption of 100L) of 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/L Fe(2+) as ferrous lactate, resulting in doses of 0, 200, 500 or 1,250mg of Fe/d, in a 4×4Latin square design for a 14-d period. For comparison, ferrous sulfate solution was directly added into commercial retail milk at the same concentrations: control (0mg of Fe/L), low (2mg of Fe/L), medium (5mg of Fe/L), and high (12.5mg of Fe/L). Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis was applied to characterize milk protein composition. Oxidative stability of milk was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde, and mineral content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For milk from both abomasal infusion of ferrous lactate and direct addition of ferrous sulfate, an iron concentration as low as 2mg of Fe/L was able to cause oxidative stress in dairy cattle and infused milk, respectively. Abomasal infusion affected both caseins and whey proteins in the milk, whereas direct addition mainly influenced caseins. Although abomasal iron infusion did not significantly affect oxidation state and mineral balance (except iron), it induced oxidized off-flavor and partial degradation of whey proteins. Direct

  6. Mutation bias favors protein folding stability in the evolution of small populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Raul; Fritsche, Miriam; Porto, Markus; Bastolla, Ugo

    2010-05-01

    Mutation bias in prokaryotes varies from extreme adenine and thymine (AT) in obligatory endosymbiotic or parasitic bacteria to extreme guanine and cytosine (GC), for instance in actinobacteria. GC mutation bias deeply influences the folding stability of proteins, making proteins on the average less hydrophobic and therefore less stable with respect to unfolding but also less susceptible to misfolding and aggregation. We study a model where proteins evolve subject to selection for folding stability under given mutation bias, population size, and neutrality. We find a non-neutral regime where, for any given population size, there is an optimal mutation bias that maximizes fitness. Interestingly, this optimal GC usage is small for small populations, large for intermediate populations and around 50% for large populations. This result is robust with respect to the definition of the fitness function and to the protein structures studied. Our model suggests that small populations evolving with small GC usage eventually accumulate a significant selective advantage over populations evolving without this bias. This provides a possible explanation to the observation that most species adopting obligatory intracellular lifestyles with a consequent reduction of effective population size shifted their mutation spectrum towards AT. The model also predicts that large GC usage is optimal for intermediate population size. To test these predictions we estimated the effective population sizes of bacterial species using the optimal codon usage coefficients computed by dos Reis et al. and the synonymous to non-synonymous substitution ratio computed by Daubin and Moran. We found that the population sizes estimated in these ways are significantly smaller for species with small and large GC usage compared to species with no bias, which supports our prediction.

  7. Mutation bias favors protein folding stability in the evolution of small populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Mendez

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutation bias in prokaryotes varies from extreme adenine and thymine (AT in obligatory endosymbiotic or parasitic bacteria to extreme guanine and cytosine (GC, for instance in actinobacteria. GC mutation bias deeply influences the folding stability of proteins, making proteins on the average less hydrophobic and therefore less stable with respect to unfolding but also less susceptible to misfolding and aggregation. We study a model where proteins evolve subject to selection for folding stability under given mutation bias, population size, and neutrality. We find a non-neutral regime where, for any given population size, there is an optimal mutation bias that maximizes fitness. Interestingly, this optimal GC usage is small for small populations, large for intermediate populations and around 50% for large populations. This result is robust with respect to the definition of the fitness function and to the protein structures studied. Our model suggests that small populations evolving with small GC usage eventually accumulate a significant selective advantage over populations evolving without this bias. This provides a possible explanation to the observation that most species adopting obligatory intracellular lifestyles with a consequent reduction of effective population size shifted their mutation spectrum towards AT. The model also predicts that large GC usage is optimal for intermediate population size. To test these predictions we estimated the effective population sizes of bacterial species using the optimal codon usage coefficients computed by dos Reis et al. and the synonymous to non-synonymous substitution ratio computed by Daubin and Moran. We found that the population sizes estimated in these ways are significantly smaller for species with small and large GC usage compared to species with no bias, which supports our prediction.

  8. The nuclear protein Artemis promotes AMPK activation by stabilizing the LKB1–AMPK complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The nuclear protein Artemis physically interacts with AMPKα2. ► Artemis co-localizes with AMPKα2 in the nucleus. ► Artemis promotes phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. ► The interaction between AMPKα2 and LKB1 is stabilized by Artemis. -- Abstract: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a hetero-trimeric Ser/Thr kinase composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits; it functions as an energy sensor that controls cellular energy homeostasis. In response to an increased cellular AMP/ATP ratio, AMPK is activated by phosphorylation at Thr172 in the α-subunit by upstream AMPK kinases (AMPKKs), including tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1). To elucidate more precise molecular mechanisms of AMPK activation, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening and isolated the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the nuclear protein Artemis/DNA cross-link repair 1C (DCLRE1C) as an AMPKα2-binding protein. Artemis was found to co-immunoprecipitate with AMPKα2, and the co-localization of Artemis with AMPKα2 in the nucleus was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in U2OS cells. Moreover, over-expression of Artemis enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPKα2 and the AMPK substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Conversely, RNAi-mediated knockdown of Artemis reduced AMPK and ACC phosphorylation. In addition, Artemis markedly increased the physical association between AMPKα2 and LKB1. Taken together, these results suggest that Artemis functions as a positive regulator of AMPK signaling by stabilizing the LKB1–AMPK complex.

  9. The nuclear protein Artemis promotes AMPK activation by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Koji, E-mail: k_nakagawa@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, Division of Pharmascience, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, N12 W6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Uehata, Yasuko; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Toshihisa; Darmanin, Stephanie [Department of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Asaka, Masahiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Department of Cancer Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Takeda, Hiroshi [Department of Pathophysiology and Therapeutics, Division of Pharmascience, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, N12 W6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masanobu [Department of Cancer Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); School of Nursing and Social Services, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Ishikari-Toubetsu, Hokkaido 061-0293 (Japan)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear protein Artemis physically interacts with AMPK{alpha}2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis co-localizes with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis promotes phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1 is stabilized by Artemis. -- Abstract: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a hetero-trimeric Ser/Thr kinase composed of a catalytic {alpha} subunit and regulatory {beta} and {gamma} subunits; it functions as an energy sensor that controls cellular energy homeostasis. In response to an increased cellular AMP/ATP ratio, AMPK is activated by phosphorylation at Thr172 in the {alpha}-subunit by upstream AMPK kinases (AMPKKs), including tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1). To elucidate more precise molecular mechanisms of AMPK activation, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening and isolated the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the nuclear protein Artemis/DNA cross-link repair 1C (DCLRE1C) as an AMPK{alpha}2-binding protein. Artemis was found to co-immunoprecipitate with AMPK{alpha}2, and the co-localization of Artemis with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in U2OS cells. Moreover, over-expression of Artemis enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK{alpha}2 and the AMPK substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Conversely, RNAi-mediated knockdown of Artemis reduced AMPK and ACC phosphorylation. In addition, Artemis markedly increased the physical association between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1. Taken together, these results suggest that Artemis functions as a positive regulator of AMPK signaling by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex.

  10. Preheated milk proteins improve the stability of grape skin anthocyanins extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiyong; Xu, Mingzhu; Zeng, Maomao; Qin, Fang; Chen, Jie

    2016-11-01

    The effects of casein and whey proteins, preheated at 40-100°C and 45-60°C for 15min, respectively, on color loss and anthocyanins degradation in grape skin anthocyanins extracts (GSAE) at pH 3.2 and 6.3 were evaluated. Preheating milk proteins effectively improved their protective effects against color loss and anthocyanins degradation in GSAE solutions during thermal treatment (at 80°C for 2h), H2O2 oxidation (0.005% H2O2 for 1h) and illumination (at 5000lx for 5 d). Whey proteins and casein, preheated at 50°C and 60°C for 15min, respectively, demonstrated the optimal protective effects. However, preheated whey proteins had a better protective effect on the thermal, oxidation and photo stability of GSAE, decreasing the thermal, oxidative and photo degradation of anthocyanins in GSAE 71.59%, 32.22% and 56.92% at pH 3.2 and 54.91%, 22.89% and 46.68% at pH 6.3, respectively. PMID:27211641

  11. Sulfatide-Hsp70 Interaction Promotes Hsp70 Clustering and Stabilizes Binding to Unfolded Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Harada

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70, one of the major stress-inducible molecular chaperones, is localized not only in the cytosol, but also in extracellular milieu in mammals. Hsp70 interacts with various cell surface glycolipids including sulfatide (3'-sulfogalactosphingolipid. However, the molecular mechanism, as well as the biological relevance, underlying the glycolipid-Hsp70 interaction is unknown. Here we report that sulfatide promotes Hsp70 oligomerization through the N-terminal ATPase domain, which stabilizes the binding of Hsp70 to unfolded protein in vitro. We find that the Hsp70 oligomer has apparent molecular masses ranging from 440 kDa to greater than 669 kDa. The C-terminal peptide-binding domain is dispensable for the sulfatide-induced oligomer formation. The oligomer formation is impaired in the presence of ATP, while the Hsp70 oligomer, once formed, is unable to bind to ATP. These results suggest that sulfatide locks Hsp70 in a high-affinity state to unfolded proteins by clustering the peptide-binding domain and blocking the binding to ATP that induces the dissociation of Hsp70 from protein substrates.

  12. Preservation of protein in marine systems: Hydrophobic and other noncovalent associations as major stabilizing forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Reno T.; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2001-05-01

    - The fate of proteins during early diagenesis was investigated in environments with low mineral content to assess preservation mechanisms other than mineral sorption. Preservation was examined in anoxic, organic-rich sediments of Mangrove Lake, a marine environment located in Bermuda, and for particulate material generated during oxic decay of diatoms. N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) treatment tested the hypothesis that proteins may undergo modification reactions with glucose to form advanced-glycation end products (AGEs). A small but significant release (additional 14%) of proteins was observed after PTB treatment in surficial sediments, indicating that some aggregations can proceed through an α-dicarbonyl intermediate of the AGE pathway. Size-exclusion high-pressure liquid chromatography with protein fluorescence, absorbance, and evaporative light-scattering detector measurements under native (phosphate or bicarbonate buffers) and denaturing (guanidine · HCl, urea, or acetonitrile) conditions point to the importance of hydrophobic and other noncovalent interactions in the stabilization of proteinaceous material in the environment. Soluble aggregates of substantial, relative molecular mass ( Mr ≳ 10 6) appear to be formed early in the diagenetic sequence. The preferential preservation of very high Mr, multisubunit phytoplankton proteins in sediments suggests that such aggregations confer resistance to degradation. Alternatively, some of the proteinaceous material may represent that fraction of organic matter that is highly prone to aggregations. Extended incubations (18 h; 37°C) with trypsin and proteinase-K showed that much of the aggregates that could be extracted are receptive to proteolytic cleavage. Buffer-, surfactant-, and NaOH-extractable aggregates comprised most of the acid-hydrolyzable proteinaceous material in detritus and surficial sediments but <35% in 9.7-m-deep sediments, suggesting additional mechanisms for preservation might be in

  13. Impact of α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin ratio on the heat stability of model infant milk formula protein systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Shane V; Dowling, Aisling P; Caldeo, Veronica; Kelly, Alan L; O'Mahony, James A

    2016-03-01

    Model infant milk formula systems (5.5% protein) were formulated to contain α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin ratios of 0.1, 0.5, 1.3, 2.1 or 4.6 and assessed for heat stability and heat-induced changes. 'Humanising' the model formulas by increasing α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin enhanced heat stability at 140°C in the pH range 6.6-6.9. The model formulas were analysed after lab-scale high-temperature short-time heating at pH 6.8. Gel electrophoresis indicated that increased heat stability in high α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin samples was due to decreased covalent interactions between proteins. In low α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin formulas, protein-protein interactions caused marked increases in protein particle size and viscosity of the heated systems; conversely, covalent interactions between proteins were minimal in high α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin formulas. Reduced protein-protein interactions with increasing α-lactalbumin:β-lactoglobulin has important implications for subsequent processing; for example, lower viscosity post-heating may affect bulk density in spray-dried products or physical stability in ready-to-feed products.

  14. Storage stability of ascorbic acid incorporated in edible whey protein films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjarasskul, Theeranun; Min, Sea C; Krochta, John M

    2011-12-14

    The stability of ascorbic acid (AA) incorporated in whey protein isolate (WPI) film and the related color changes during storage were studied. No significant loss of AA content was found in any films prepared from pH 2.0 casting solution stored at 30% relative humidity (RH) and 22 °C over 84 days. Total visible color difference (ΔE*(ab)) of all films slowly increased over storage time. The ΔE*(ab) values of pH 3.5 films were significantly higher than those of pH 2.0 films. The stability of AA-WPI films was found to be mainly affected by the pH of the film-forming solution and storage temperature. Oxidative degradation of AA-WPI films followed Arrhenius behavior. Reduction of the casting solution pH to below the pK(a1) (4.04 at 25 °C) of AA effectively maintained AA-WPI storage stability by greatly reducing oxidative degradation, whereas anaerobic and nonenzymatic browning were insignificant. The half-life of pH 2.0 AA-WPI film at 30% RH and 22 °C was 520 days.

  15. Divalent Metal- and High Mobility Group N Protein-Dependent Nucleosome Stability and Conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S. Ong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group N proteins (HMGNs bind specifically to the nucleosome core and act as chromatin unfolding and activating factors. Using an all-Xenopus system, we found that HMGN1 and HMGN2 binding to nucleosomes results in distinct ion-dependent conformation and stability. HMGN2 association with nucleosome core particle or nucleosomal array in the presence of divalent metal triggers a reversible transition to a species with much reduced electrophoretic mobility, consistent with a less compact state of the nucleosome. Residues outside of the nucleosome binding domain are required for the activity, which is also displayed by an HMGN1 truncation product lacking part of the regulatory domain. In addition, thermal denaturation assays show that the presence of 1 mM Mg2+> or Ca2+ gives a reduction in nucleosome core terminus stability, which is further substantially diminished by the binding of HMGN2 or truncated HMGN1. Our findings emphasize the importance of divalent metals in nucleosome dynamics and suggest that the differential biological activities of HMGNs in chromatin activation may involve different conformational alterations and modulation of nucleosome core stability.

  16. Tripartite motif containing 28 (TRIM28) promotes breast cancer metastasis by stabilizing TWIST1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chunli; Cheng, Jingliang; Zhou, Boxv; Zhu, Li; Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; He, Tao; Zhou, Sufang; He, Jian; Lu, Xiaoling; Chen, Hanchun; Zhang, Dianzheng; Zhao, Yongxiang; Fu, Junjiang

    2016-01-01

    TRIM28 regulates its target genes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Here we report that a TRIM28-TWIST1-EMT axis exists in breast cancer cells and TRIM28 promotes breast cancer metastasis by stabilizing TWIST1 and subsequently enhancing EMT. We find that TRIM28 is highly expressed in both cancer cell lines and advanced breast cancer tissues, and the levels of TRIM28 and TWIST1 are positively correlated with the aggressiveness of breast carcinomas. Overexpression and depletion of TRIM28 up- and down-regulates the protein, but not the mRNA levels of TWIST1, respectively, suggesting that TRIM28 upregulates TWIST1 post-transcriptionally. Overexpression of TRIM28 in breast cancer cell line promotes cell migration and invasion. Knockdown of TRIM28 reduces the protein level of TWIST1 with concurrent upregulation of E-cadherin and downregulation of N-cadherin and consequently inhibits cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, Immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays demonstrated that TRIM28 interacts with TWIST1 directly and this interaction is presumed to protect TWIST1 from degradation. Our study revealed a novel mechanism in breast cancer cells that TRIM28 enhances metastasis by stabilizing TWIST1, suggesting that targeting TRIM28 could be an efficacious strategy in breast cancer treatment. PMID:27412325

  17. Probing Protein Folding Kinetics with High-resolution, Stabilized Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wesley; Halvorsen, Ken

    2009-03-01

    Single-molecule techniques provide a powerful means of exploring molecular transitions such as the unfolding and refolding of a protein. However, the quantification of bi-directional transitions and near-equilibrium phenomena poses unique challenges, and is often limited by the detection resolution and long-term stability of the instrument. We have developed unique optical tweezers methods that address these problems, including an interference-based method for high-resolution 3D bead tracking (˜1 nm laterally, ˜0.3 nm vertically, at > 100 Hz), and a continuous autofocus system that stabilizes the trap height to within 1-2 nm longterm [1,2]. We have used our instruments to quantify the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of single protein domains (e.g. spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans). These single-molecule studies are presented, together with the accompanying probabilistic analysis that we have developed. References: 1. W.P. Wong, V. Heinrich, E. Evans, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., 790, P5.1-P5.10 (2004). 2. V. Heinrich, W.P. Wong, K. Halvorsen, E. Evans, Langmuir, 24, 1194-1203 (2008).

  18. High throughput computing to improve efficiency of predicting protein stability change upon mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao-Chin; Lai, Lien-Fu; Gromiha, M Michael; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2014-01-01

    Predicting protein stability change upon mutation is important for protein design. Although several methods have been proposed to improve prediction accuracy it will be difficult to employ those methods when the required input information is incomplete. In this work, we integrated a fuzzy query model based on the knowledge-based approach to overcome this problem, and then we proposed a high throughput computing method based on parallel technologies in emerging cluster or grid systems to discriminate stability change. To improve the load balance of heterogeneous computing power in cluster and grid nodes, a variety of self-scheduling schemes have been implemented. Further, we have tested the method by performing different analyses and the results showed that the present method can process hundreds of predication queries in more reasonable response time and perform a super linear speedup to a maximum of 86.2 times. We have also established a website tool to implement the proposed method and it is available at http://bioinformatics.myweb.hinet.net/para.htm.

  19. Buffers more than buffering agent: introducing a new class of stabilizers for the protein BSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhupender S; Taha, Mohamed; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2015-01-14

    In this study, we have analyzed the influence of four biological buffers on the thermal stability of bovine serum albumin (BSA) using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The investigated buffers include 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazine-propanesulfonic acid (EPPS), 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid sodium salt (HEPES-Na), and 4-morpholinepropanesulfonic acid sodium salt (MOPS-Na). These buffers behave as a potential stabilizer for the native structure of BSA against thermal denaturation. The stabilization tendency follows the order of MOPS-Na > HEPES-Na > HEPES ≫ EPPS. To obtain an insight into the role of hydration layers and peptide backbone in the stabilization of BSA by these buffers, we have also explored the phase transition of a thermoresponsive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM)), a model compound for protein, in aqueous solutions of HEPES, EPPS, HEPES-Na, and MOPS-Na buffers at different concentrations. It was found that the lower critical solution temperatures (LCST) of PNIPAM in the aqueous buffer solutions substantially decrease with increase in buffer concentration. The mechanism of interactions between these buffers and protein BSA was probed by various techniques, including UV-visible, fluorescence, and FTIR. The results of this series of studies reveal that the interactions are mainly governed by the influence of the buffers on the hydration layers surrounding the protein. We have also explored the possible binding sites of BSA with these buffers using a molecular docking technique. Moreover, the activities of an industrially important enzyme α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) in 0.05 M, 0.5 M, and 1.0 M of HEPES, EPPS, HEPES-Na, and MOPS-Na buffer solutions were analyzed at pH = 8.0 and T = 25 °C. Interestingly, the activities of α-CT were found to be enhanced in the aqueous solutions of these investigated buffers. Based upon the Jones-Dole viscosity parameters, the

  20. Denaturation and Oxidative Stability of Hemp Seed (Cannabis sativa L.) Protein Isolate as Affected by Heat Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikos, Vassilios; Duthie, Garry; Ranawana, Viren

    2015-09-01

    The present study investigated the impact of heat treatments on the denaturation and oxidative stability of hemp seed protein during simulated gastrointestinal digestion (GID). Heat-denatured hemp protein isolate (HPI) solutions were prepared by heating HPI (2 mg/ml, pH 6.8) to 40, 60, 80 and 100 °C for 10 min. Heat-induced denaturation of the protein isolates was monitored by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heating HPI at temperatures above 80 °C significantly reduced solubility and led to the formation of large protein aggregates. The isolates were then subjected to in vitro GID and the oxidative stability of the generated peptides was investigated. Heating did not significantly affect the formation of oxidation products during GID. The results suggest that heat treatments should ideally remain below 80 °C if heat stability and solubility of HPI are to be preserved.

  1. Effects of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of protein GB1 studied by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of proteins plays an important role in many biological processes, and sheds light on the design of biomaterials comprised of protein. At present, strategies to regulate protein mechanical stability focus mainly on direct modulation of the force-bearing region of the protein. Interestingly, the mechanical stability of GB1 can be significantly enhanced by the binding of Fc fragments of human IgG antibody, where the binding site is distant from the force-bearing region of the protein. The mechanism of this long-range allosteric control of protein mechanics is still elusive. In this work, the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of GB1 was investigated using steered molecular dynamics simulation, and a mechanism underlying the enhanced protein mechanical stability is proposed. We found that the external force causes deformation of both force-bearing region and ligand binding site. In other words, there is a long-range coupling between these two regions. The binding of ligand restricts the distortion of the binding site and reduces the deformation of the force-bearing region through a long-range allosteric communication, which thus improves the overall mechanical stability of the protein. The simulation results are very consistent with previous experimental observations. Our studies thus provide atomic-level insights into the mechanical unfolding process of GB1, and explain the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical properties of the protein through long-range allosteric regulation, which should facilitate effective modulation of protein mechanical properties. PMID:27444879

  2. Effects of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of protein GB1 studied by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of proteins plays an important role in many biological processes, and sheds light on the design of biomaterials comprised of protein. At present, strategies to regulate protein mechanical stability focus mainly on direct modulation of the force-bearing region of the protein. Interestingly, the mechanical stability of GB1 can be significantly enhanced by the binding of Fc fragments of human IgG antibody, where the binding site is distant from the force-bearing region of the protein. The mechanism of this long-range allosteric control of protein mechanics is still elusive. In this work, the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of GB1 was investigated using steered molecular dynamics simulation, and a mechanism underlying the enhanced protein mechanical stability is proposed. We found that the external force causes deformation of both force-bearing region and ligand binding site. In other words, there is a long-range coupling between these two regions. The binding of ligand restricts the distortion of the binding site and reduces the deformation of the force-bearing region through a long-range allosteric communication, which thus improves the overall mechanical stability of the protein. The simulation results are very consistent with previous experimental observations. Our studies thus provide atomic-level insights into the mechanical unfolding process of GB1, and explain the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical properties of the protein through long-range allosteric regulation, which should facilitate effective modulation of protein mechanical properties.

  3. Brd4-Mediated Nuclear Retention of the Papillomavirus E2 Protein Contributes to Its Stabilization in Host Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Li; Qing Li; Jason Diaz; Jianxin You

    2014-01-01

    Papillomavirus E2 is a multifunctional viral protein that regulates many aspects of the viral life cycle including viral episome maintenance, transcriptional activation, and repression. E2 is degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 has been implicated in the stabilization of the E2 protein. E2 normally shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In this study, we demonstrate that E2 ubiquitylation mostly occurs in the cytoplasm. We also find that th...

  4. Trp RNA-binding attenuation protein: modifying symmetry and stability of a circular oligomer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver W Bayfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subunit number is amongst the most important structural parameters that determine size, symmetry and geometry of a circular protein oligomer. The L-tryptophan biosynthesis regulator, TRAP, present in several Bacilli, is a good model system for investigating determinants of the oligomeric state. A short segment of C-terminal residues defines whether TRAP forms an 11-mer or 12-mer assembly. To understand which oligomeric state is more stable, we examine the stability of several wild type and mutant TRAP proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Among the wild type B. stearothermophilus, B. halodurans and B. subtilis TRAP, we find that the former is the most stable whilst the latter is the least. Thermal stability of all TRAP is shown to increase with L-tryptophan concentration. We also find that mutant TRAP molecules that are truncated at the C-terminus - and hence induced to form 12-mers, distinct from their 11-mer wild type counterparts--have increased melting temperatures. We show that the same effect can be achieved by a point mutation S72N at a subunit interface, which leads to exclusion of C-terminal residues from the interface. Our findings are supported by dye-based scanning fluorimetry, CD spectroscopy, and by crystal structure and mass spectrometry analysis of the B. subtilis S72N TRAP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the oligomeric state of a circular protein can be changed by introducing a point mutation at a subunit interface. Exclusion (or deletion of the C-terminus from the subunit interface has a major impact on properties of TRAP oligomers, making them more stable, and we argue that the cause of these changes is the altered oligomeric state. The more stable TRAP oligomers could be used in potential applications of TRAP in bionanotechnology.

  5. Cyclic AMP and AKAP-mediated targeting of protein kinase A regulates lactate dehydrogenase subunit A mRNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Richard A; Kiryukhina, Olga

    2005-07-01

    Expression of the lactate dehydrogenase A subunit (ldh-A) gene is controlled through transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms. Both mechanisms involve activation of protein kinase A (PKA) into its subunits and subsequent phosphorylation and activation of several key regulatory factors. In rat C6 glioma cells, post-transcriptional gene regulation occurs through PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA and subsequent increase of intracellular LDH-A mRNA levels. Previous studies have demonstrated a cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) located in the LDH-A 3'-untranslated region which, in combination with several phosphorylated CSR-binding proteins (CSR-BP), regulates the PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA. However, the mechanistic details of interaction of CSR with proteins as they pertain to mRNA stabilization by PKA are so far largely unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ribosomal protein extracts (RSW) from glioma cells contain PKA regulatory (RII) and catalytic (C) subunits that, in combination with a protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP 95) and CSR-BPs participate in forming CSR-protein complexes that are responsible for mRNA stability regulation. To demonstrate the importance of CSR-protein complex formation, the PKA subunits and AKAP 95 were removed from the RSW by immunoprecipitation, and the antigen-deleted RSW were subjected to CSR binding analysis using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking. It was shown that AKAP 95 as well as RII formed a direct linkage with CSR during CSR-protein complex formation. In contrast, the catalytic subunit formed part of the CSR-protein complex but did not bind to CSR directly in a covalent linkage. To determine whether formation of CSR complexes that included C, RII, and AKAP 95 constituted a functional event and was necessary for mRNA stabilization, cell-free decay reactions were carried out with RSW extracts, and the kinetics of decay of LDH-A mRNA was determined. Depletion of PKA

  6. Preliminary protein corona formation stabilizes gold nanoparticles and improves deposition efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby, Alexandra O.; Breitner, Emily K.; Comfort, Kristen K.

    2016-08-01

    Due to their advantageous characteristics, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are being increasingly utilized in a vast array of biomedical applications. However, the efficacy of these procedures are highly dependent upon strong interactions between AuNPs and the surrounding environment. While the field of nanotechnology has grown exponentially, there is still much to be discovered with regards to the complex interactions between NPs and biological systems. One area of particular interest is the generation of a protein corona, which instantaneously forms when NPs encounter a protein-rich environment. Currently, the corona is viewed as an obstacle and has been identified as the cause for loss of application efficiency in physiological systems. To date, however, no study has explored if the protein corona could be designed and advantageously utilized to improve both NP behavior and application efficacy. Therefore, we sought to identify if the formation of a preliminary protein corona could modify both AuNP characteristics and association with the HaCaT cell model. In this study, a corona comprised solely of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was successfully formed around 10-nm AuNPs. These EGF-AuNPs demonstrated augmented particle stability, a modified corona composition, and increased deposition over stock AuNPs, while remaining biocompatible. Analysis of AuNP dosimetry was repeated under dynamic conditions, with lateral flow significantly disrupting deposition and the nano-cellular interface. Taken together, this study demonstrated the plausibility and potential of utilizing the protein corona as a means to influence NP behavior; however, fluid dynamics remains a major challenge to progressing NP dosimetry.

  7. Antioxidant activity and emulsion-stabilizing effect of pectic enzyme treated pectin in soy protein isolate-stabilized oil/water emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping-Hsiu; Lu, Hao-Te; Wang, Yuh-Tai; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2011-09-14

    The antioxidant activity of pectic enzyme treated pectin (PET-pectin) prepared from citrus pectin by enzymatic hydrolysis and its potential use as a stabilizer and an antioxidant for soy protein isolate (SPI)-stabilized oil in water (O/W) emulsion were investigated. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) was found to be positively associated with molecular weight (M(w)) of PET-pectin and negatively associated with degree of esterification (DE) of PET-pectin. PET-pectin (1 kDa and 11.6% DE) prepared from citrus pectin after 24 h of hydrolysis by commercial pectic enzyme produced by Aspergillus niger expressed higher α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, TEAC, and reducing power than untreated citrus pectin (353 kDa and 60% DE). The addition of PET-pectin could increase both emulsifying activity (EA) and emulsion stability (ES) of SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion. When the SPI-stabilized lipid droplet was coated with the mixture of PET-pectin and pectin, the EA and ES of the emulsion were improved more than they were when the lipid droplet was coated with either pectin or PET-pectin alone. The amount of secondary oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) produced in the emulsion prepared with the mixture of SPI and PET-pectin was less than the amount produced in the emulsion prepared with either SPI or SPI/pectin. These results suggest that PET-pectin has an emulsion-stabilizing effect and lipid oxidation inhibition ability on SPI-stabilized emulsion. Therefore, PET-pectin can be used as a stabilizer as well as an antioxidant in plant origin in SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion and thus prolong the shelf life of food emulsion. PMID:21806056

  8. Screening of mutations affecting protein stability and dynamics of FGFR1—A simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. George Priya Doss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1 destabilize protein and have been implicated in several genetic disorders like various forms of cancer, Kallamann syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson Weiss syndrome, etc. In order to gain functional insight into mutation caused by amino acid substitution to protein function and expression, special emphasis was laid on molecular dynamics simulation techniques in combination with in silico tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0 and SNAP. It has been estimated that 68% nsSNPs were predicted to be deleterious by I-Mutant, slightly higher than SIFT (37%, PolyPhen 2.0 (61% and SNAP (58%. From the observed results, P722S mutation was found to be most deleterious by comparing results of all in silico tools. By molecular dynamics approach, we have shown that P722S mutation leads to increase in flexibility, and deviated more from the native structure which was supported by the decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, biophysical analysis revealed a clear insight of stability loss due to P722S mutation in FGFR1 protein. Majority of mutations predicted by these in silico tools were in good concordance with the experimental results.

  9. Entropic formulation for the protein folding process: hydrophobic stability correlates with folding rates

    CERN Document Server

    Molin, J P Dal

    2016-01-01

    We assume that the protein folding process follows two autonomous steps: the conformational search for the native, mainly ruled by the hydrophobic effect; and, the final adjustment stage, which eventually gives stability to the native. Our main tool of investigation is a 3D lattice model provided with a ten-letter alphabet, the stereochemical model. This model was conceived for Monte Carlo (MC) simulations when one keeps in mind the kinetic behavior of protein-like chains in solution. In order to characterize the folding characteristic time ({\\tau}) by two distinct sampling methods, first we present two sets of 10^{3} MC simulations for a fast protein-like sequence. For these sets of folding times, {\\tau} and {\\tau}_{q} were obtained with the application of the standard Metropolis algorithm (MA), and a modified algorithm (M_{q}A). The results for {\\tau}_{q}reveal two things: i) the hydrophobic chain-solvent interactions plus a set of inter-residues steric constraints are enough to emulate the first stage of t...

  10. Stability of Norwalk virus capsid protein interfaces evaluated by in-silico nanoindentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Boyd

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Norwalk virus causes severe gastroenteritis for which there is currently no specific anti-viral therapy. A stage of the infection process is uncoating of the protein capsid to expose the viral genome and allow for viral replication. A mechanical characterization of the Norwalk virus may provide important information relating to the mechanism of uncoating. The mechanical strength of the Norwalk virus has previously been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM nanoindentation experiments. Those experiments cannot resolve specific molecular interactions, and therefore we have employed a molecular modeling approach to gain insights into the potential uncoating mechanism of the Norwalk capsid. In this study, we perform simulated nanoindentation using a coarse-grained structure based model, which provides an estimate of the spring constant in good agreement with the experimentally determined value. We further analyze the fracture mechanisms and determine weak interfaces in the capsid structure which are potential sites to inhibit uncoating by stabilization of these weak interfaces. We conclude by identifying potential target sites at the junction of a weak protein-protein interface.

  11. Human single-stranded DNA binding proteins: guardians of genome stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanzhong Wu; Jinping Lu; Tiebang Kang

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are essential for maintaining the integrity of the genome in all organisms.All processes related to DNA,such as replication,excision,repair,and recombination,require the participation of SSBs whose oligonucleotideaoligosaccharide-binding (OB)-fold domain is responsible for the interaction with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA).For a long time,the heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA) complex was believed to be the only nuclear SSB in eukanyotes to participate in ssDNA processing,while mitochondrial SSBs that are consewed with prokaryotic SSBs were shown to be essential for maintaining genome stability in eukaryotic mitochondria.In recent years,two new proteins,hSSB1 and hSSB2 (human SSBs 1/2),were identified and have better sequence similarity to bacterial and archaeal SSBs than RPA.This review summarizes the current understanding of these human SSBs in DNA damage repair and in cell-cycle checkpoint activation following DNA damage,as well as their relationships with cancer.

  12. Influence of yogurt fermentation and refrigerated storage on the stability of protein toxin contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Lauren S; Triplett, Odbert A; Tolleson, William H

    2015-06-01

    Dairy products sold in a ready-to-eat form present the risk that adulterants persisting through manufacturing, storage, and distribution would reach consumers. Pathogenic microbes, including shigatoxigenic strains of Escherichia coli and the toxins they produce, are common food safety hazards associated with dairy products. Ricin and abrin are plant-derived ribosome-inactivating protein toxins related to the shiga-like toxins produced by E. coli. Limited information exists on the effects of manufacturing processes on the stabilities of these heat-resistant ribosome-inactivating proteins in the presence of foods. The goal of this study was to determine how typical yogurt manufacturing and storage processes influence ribosome-inactivating protein toxins. Ricin and abrin were added to skim or whole milk and batch pasteurized. Complete inactivation of both toxins was observed after 30 minutes at 85 °C. If the toxins were added after pasteurization, the levels of ricin and abrin in yogurt and their cytotoxic activities did not change significantly during fermentation or refrigerated storage for 4 weeks. The activities of ricin and abrin were inhibited by skim milk, nonfat yogurt, whole milk, and whole milk yogurt. The results showed minimal effects of the toxins on yogurt pH and %titratable acidity but inhibitory effects of yogurt on toxin activity.

  13. Solvent effects and polar interactions in the structural stability and dynamics of globular proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finney, J.L.; Gellatly, B.J.; Golton, I.C.; Goodfellow, J.

    1980-10-01

    Using detailed hydrogen bonding, surface exposure, internal environment, and solvent interaction calculations on several proteins, in conjnction with data from quantum mechanical hydrogen-bonding studies, various contributions to the free energy of folding are estimated and their likely relative significance discussed. A picture emerges of globular proteins as extremely well-fitting jigsaw-puzzles, in which no single driving force dominates the marginal stability of the native conformation. Rather, the folded structure is seen as the result of a complex global maximization of several strongly-interacting driving forces. In particular, the necessity to maintain very efficient internal hydrogen-bonding, and the role of the solvent as a hydrogen-bond sink, are stressed as strong constraints on the (incomplete) maximization of hydrophobic effects. The possible significance of internal dipole-induced dipole interactions is discussed tentatively. Although quantitative estimates of the various contributions remain uncertain, consideration of effective force constants suggests that polar, including solvent, interactions may largely determine the overall curvatures of the native conformation's potential well, and be important in controlling the flexibility of local regions which are important for the exact positioning of groups during enzyme catalysis, as well as the molecule's overall dynamics. In contrast, hydrophobic interactions change less for small geometrical perturbations, and seem more relevant to directing the folding protein along a path to a region in configurational space where the polar interactions can switch on for the final docking.

  14. The interaction of perfluorooctane sulfonate with hemoglobin: Influence on protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Kang, Yijun; Fei, Zhenghao; Cao, Jian

    2016-07-25

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is among the most prominent xenobiotics contaminants in human blood. To evaluate the toxicity of PFOS at the protein level, the influences of PFOS on the stability and conformation of hemoglobin (Hb) has been investigated by circular dichroism (CD), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling. CD spectral data indicated that the binding process of PFOS with Hb induced the relatively large changes in secondary structure of protein. Thermal denaturation of Hb, when carried out in the presence of PFOS, also indicated that PFOS acted as a structure destabilizer for protein. UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopic data indicated that the tertiary structures of Hb were also changed by PFOS binding. Hb did undergo significant changes in the heme group symmetry, implying that the functions of Hb could be disturbed by PFOS. In addition, molecular modeling study shows that PFOS could enter into the binding cavity of Hb by many noncovalent interactions. Overall, these data provide a mechanist explanation for the longer biological half-life of PFOS in human blood and provide useful information that could be associated with the toxicity of PFOS. PMID:27206695

  15. An Outlook on Biothermodynamics: Needs, Problems, and New Developments. I. Stability and Hydration of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jürgen U.

    2008-12-01

    The application of concepts, principles, and methods of thermodynamics of equilibria and processes to bioengineering systems has led to a new and growing field: engineering biothermodynamics. This article, which is meant as the first in a series, gives an outline of basic aspects, changes, and actual examples in this field. After a few introductory remarks, the basic concepts and laws of thermodynamics extended to systems with internal variables, which serve as models for biofluids and other biosystems, are given. The method of thermodynamics is then applied to the problem of thermal stability of aqueous protein solutions, especially to that of myoglobin solutions. After this, the phenomenon of hydration of proteins by adsorption and intrusion of water molecules is considered. Several other phenomena like the adsorption of proteins on solid surfaces or cell membranes and their temperature and pressure-related behavior represented by an equation of state, or the thermodynamics of bacterial solutions including chemical reactions like wine fermentation, etc., will be presented in Parts II and III of this article.

  16. FAT10 suppression stabilizes oxidized proteins in liver cells: Effects of HCV and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Murali; Hindman, Joseph; Tillman, Brittany; Jaramillo, Lee; Poluektova, Larisa I; French, Barbara A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; French, Samuel W; Osna, Natalia A

    2015-12-01

    FAT10 belongs to the ubiquitin-like modifier (ULM) family that targets proteins for degradation and is recognized by 26S proteasome. FAT10 is presented on immune cells and under the inflammatory conditions, is synergistically induced by IFNγ and TNFα in the non-immune (liver parenchymal) cells. It is not clear how viral proteins and alcohol regulate FAT10 expression on liver cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether FAT10 expression on liver cells is activated by the innate immunity factor, IFNα and how HCV protein expression in hepatocytes and ethanol-induced oxidative stress affect the level of FAT10 in liver cells. For this study, we used HCV(+) transgenic mice that express structural HCV proteins and their HCV(-) littermates. Mice were fed Lieber De Carli diet (control and ethanol) as specified in the NIH protocol for chronic-acute ethanol feeding. Alcohol exposure enhanced steatosis, induced oxidative stress and decreased proteasome activity in the liversof these mice, with more robust response to ethanol in HCV(+) mice. IFNα induced transcriptional activation of FAT10 in liver cells, which was dysregulated by ethanol feeding. Accordingly, IFNα-activated expression of FAT10 in hepatocytes (measured by indirect immunofluorescent of liver tissue) was also suppressed by ethanol exposure in both HCV(+) and HCV(-) mice. This suppression was accompanied with ethanol-mediated induction of lipid peroxidation marker, 4-HNE. All aforementioned effects of ethanol were attenuated by in vivo feeding of mice with the pro-methylating agent, betaine, which exhibits strong anti-oxidant properties. Based on this study, we hypothesize that FAT10 targets oxidatively modified proteins for proteasomal degradation, and that the reduction in FAT10 levels along with decreased proteasome activity may contribute to stabilization of these altered proteins in hepatocytes. In conclusion, IFNα induced FAT10 expression, which is suppressed by ethanol feeding in both HCV

  17. Physicochemical stability, microrheological properties and microstructure of lutein emulsions stabilized by multilayer membranes consisting of whey protein isolate, flaxseed gum and chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duoxia; Aihemaiti, Zulipiya; Cao, Yanping; Teng, Chao; Li, Xiuting

    2016-07-01

    The impact of chitosan (CTS) on the physicochemical stability, microrheological property and microstructure of whey protein isolate (WPI)-flaxseed gum (FG) stabilized lutein emulsions at pH 3.0 was studied. A layer-by-layer electrostatic deposition method was used to prepare multilayered lutein emulsions. Droplet size, zeta-potential, instability index, microstructure and microrheological behavior of lutein emulsions were measured. The influences of interfacial layer, metal chelator and free radical scavenger on the chemical stability of lutein emulsions were also investigated. It was found that multilayer emulsions had better physical stability showing the pronounced effect of 1wt% CTS. The mean square displacement analysis demonstrated that CTS led to increases of macroscopic viscosity and elasticity index for WPI-FG stabilized lutein emulsions due to CTS embedding in the network. CTS also helped to chemically stabilize the lutein emulsions against degradation. The combination of interfacial membrane and prooxidative metal chelator or free radical scavenger was an effective method to control lutein degradation. PMID:26920280

  18. Determining the Composition and Stability of Protein Complexes Using an Integrated Label-Free and Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Todd M.; Guise, Amanda J.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2016-01-01

    In biological systems, proteins catalyze the fundamental reactions that underlie all cellular functions, including metabolic processes and cell survival and death pathways. These biochemical reactions are rarely accomplished alone. Rather, they involve a concerted effect from many proteins that may operate in a directed signaling pathway and/or may physically associate in a complex to achieve a specific enzymatic activity. Therefore, defining the composition and regulation of protein complexes is critical for understanding cellular functions. In this chapter, we describe an approach that uses quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) to assess the specificity and the relative stability of protein interactions. Isolation of protein complexes from mammalian cells is performed by rapid immunoaffinity purification, and followed by in-solution digestion and high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis. We employ complementary quantitative MS workflows to assess the specificity of protein interactions using label-free MS and statistical analysis, and the relative stability of the interactions using a metabolic labeling technique. For each candidate protein interaction, scores from the two workflows can be correlated to minimize nonspecific background and profile protein complex composition and relative stability. PMID:26867737

  19. Evolution of liquid holdup profile in a standing protein stabilized foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zebin; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2004-12-01

    Evolution of liquid holdup profile in a standing foam formed by whipping and stabilized by sodium caseinate in the presence of xanthan gum when subjected to 16 and 29g centrifugal force fields was measured using magnetic resonance imaging for different pH, ionic strength, protein and xanthan gum concentrations. Drainage resulted in the formation of a separate liquid layer at the bottom at longer times. Foam drainage was slowest at pH 7, lower ionic strength, higher protein and gum concentrations. Foam was found to be most stable at pH 5.1 near the isoelectric point of protein, lower ionic strength and higher protein and xanthan gum concentrations. A predicted equilibrium liquid holdup profile based on a previous model (G. Narsimhan, J. Food Eng. 14 (1991) 139) agreed well with experimental values at sufficiently long times. A proposed model for velocity of drainage of a power law fluid in a Plateau border for two different simplified geometries was incorporated in a previously developed model for foam drainage (G. Narsimhan, J. Food Eng. 14 (1991) 139) to predict the evolution of liquid holdup profiles. The model predictions for simplified circular geometry of Plateau border compared well with the experimental data of liquid holdup profiles at small times. At longer times, however, the predicted liquid holdup profile was larger than the observed, this discrepancy being due to coarsening of bubble size and decrease in foam height not accounted for in the model. A Newtonian model for foam drainage under predicted drainage rates did not agree with the experimental data. PMID:15476794

  20. Using protein-fatty acid complexes to improve vitamin D stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannik Nedergaard; Frislev, Henriette Kristina Søster; Pedersen, Jan Skov;

    2016-01-01

    and evaluated their ability to protect vitD upon exposure to heating or intense UV light. Additionally, the stability of liprotides toward pH, Ca(2+), and BSA was determined. The best results were obtained with liprotides made from α-lactalbumin and oleate. These liprotides were able to completely solubilize...... to those made at 20°C. Nevertheless, the fatty acid binding protein BSA reduced the ability of both liprotides to protect vitD; the amount of vitD left after 20 d at 20°C fell from 79 ± 3% in the absence of BSA to 49 ± 4 and 23 ± 3% in the presence of BSA for liprotides made at 80 and 20°C, respectively...

  1. Thermal stability of chemically denatured green fluorescent protein (GFP) A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a light emitter in the bioluminescence reaction of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. The protein consist of 238 amino acids and produces green fluorescent light (λmax=508 nm), when irradiated with near ultraviolet light. The fluorescence is due to the presence of chromophore consisting of an imidazolone ring, formed by a post-translational modification of the tripeptide -Ser65-Tyr66-Gly67-, which buried into β-barrel. GFP is extremely compact and heat stable molecule. In this work, we present data for the effect of chemical denaturing agent on the thermal stability of GFP. When denaturing agent is applied, global thermal stability and the melting point of the molecule is decreases, that can be monitored with differential scanning calorimetry. The results indicate, that in 1-6 M range of GuHCl the melting temperature is decreasing continuously from 83 to 38 deg. C. Interesting finding, that the calculated calorimetric enthalpy decreases with GuHCl concentration up to 3 M (5.6-0.2 kJ mol-1), but at 4 M it jumps to 8.4 and at greater concentration it is falling down to 1.1 kJ mol-1. First phenomena, i.e. the decrease of melting point with increasing GuHCl concentration can be easily explained by the effect of the extended chemical denaturation, when less and less amount of heat required to diminish the remaining hydrogen bonds in β-barrel. The surprising increase of calorimetric enthalpy at 4 M concentration of GuHCl could be the consequence of a dimerization or a formation of stable complex between GFP and denaturing agent as well as a precipitation at an extreme GuHCl concentration. We are planning further experiments to elucidate fluorescent consequence of these processes

  2. Physicochemical and functional properties, microstructure, and storage stability of whey protein/polyvinylpyrrolidone based glue sticks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guorong Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A glue stick is comprised of solidified adhesive mounted in a lipstick-like push-up tube. Whey is a byproduct of cheese making. Direct disposal of whey can cause environmental pollution. The objective of this study was to use whey protein isolate (WPI as a natural polymer along with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP to develop safe glue sticks. Pre-dissolved WPI solution, PVP, sucrose, 1,2-propanediol (PG, sodium stearate, defoamer, and preservative were mixed and dissolved in water at 90 oC and then molded in push-up tubes. Chemical composition, functional properties (bonding strength, glue setting time, gel hardness, extension/retraction, and spreading properties, microstructure, and storage stability of the prototypes were evaluated in comparison with a commercial control. Results showed that all WPI/PVP prototypes had desirable bonding strength and exhibited faster setting than PVP prototypes and control. WPI could reduce gel hardness and form less compact and rougher structures than that of PVP, but there was no difference in bonding strength. PVP and sucrose could increase the hygroscopicity of glue sticks, thus increasing storage stability. Finally, the optimized prototype GS3 (major components: WPI 8.0%, PVP 12.0%, 1,2-propanediol 10.0%, sucrose 10.0%, and stearic sodium 7.0% had a comparable functionality to the commercial control. Results indicated that whey protein could be used as an adhesive polymer for glue stick formulations, which could be used to bond fiber or cellulose derived substrates such as paper.

  3. Cables1 controls p21/Cip1 protein stability by antagonizing proteasome subunit alpha type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; Li, Z; Li, Z J; Cheng, K; Du, Y; Fu, H; Khuri, F R

    2015-05-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor 1A, p21/Cip1, is a vital cell cycle regulator, dysregulation of which has been associated with a large number of human malignancies. One critical mechanism that controls p21 function is through its degradation, which allows the activation of its associated cell cycle-promoting kinases, CDK2 and CDK4. Thus delineating how p21 is stabilized and degraded will enhance our understanding of cell growth control and offer a basis for potential therapeutic interventions. Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism that controls the dynamic status of p21 through its interaction with Cdk5 and Abl enzyme substrate 1 (Cables1). Cables1 has a proposed role as a tumor suppressor. We found that upregulation of Cables1 protein was correlated with increased half-life of p21 protein, which was attributed to Cables1/p21 complex formation and supported by their co-localization in the nucleus. Mechanistically, Cables1 interferes with the proteasome (Prosome, Macropain) subunit alpha type 3 (PSMA3) binding to p21 and protects p21 from PSMA3-mediated proteasomal degradation. Moreover, silencing of p21 partially reverses the ability of Cables1 to induce cell death and inhibit cell proliferation. In further support of a potential pathophysiological role of Cables1, the expression level of Cables1 is tightly associated with p21 in both cancer cell lines and human lung cancer patient tumor samples. Together, these results suggest Cables1 as a novel p21 regulator through maintaining p21 stability and support the model that the tumor-suppressive function of Cables1 occurs at least in part through enhancing the tumor-suppressive activity of p21. PMID:24975575

  4. Albumen foam stability and s-ovalbumin contents in eggs coated with whey protein concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ACC Alleoni

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Food products such as breads, cakes, crackers, meringues, ice creams and several bakery items depend on air incorporation to maintain their texture and structure during or after processing. Proteins are utilized in the food industry since they improve texture attributes through their ability to encapsulate and retain air. The objectives of this work were to quantify s-ovalbumin contents in albumen and to determine alterations in egg white foam stability in fresh eggs, and in eggs coated and non-coated with a whey protein-based concentrate film (WPC, stored at 25°C for 28 days. The volume of drained liquid was higher in non-coated eggs than in coated eggs stored at 25°C at all storage periods. The difference on the third day of storage was in the order of 59% between coated and non-coated eggs, while on the twenty-eighth day it was 202%. During the storage period, an increase in pH and drainage volume was observed for non-coated eggs. After three days, the non-coated eggs showed a s-ovalbumin content 33% higher than coated eggs; this increase jumped to 205% at 28 days of storage. There was a positive correlation between s-ovalbumin content and the volume of drained liquid for coated and non-coated eggs; in other words, when the s-ovalbumin content increased, there was an increase in the volume of drained liquid and a decrease in foam stability. WPC coating maintain egg quality, since it is an effective barrier against the loss of CO2, avoiding changes in the pH of egg white.

  5. Orange protein has a role in phytoene synthase stabilization in sweetpotato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyeon; Kim, Ho Soo; Jung, Young Jun; Kim, Sun Ha; Ji, Chang Yoon; Wang, Zhi; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids have essential roles in light-harvesting processes and protecting the photosynthetic machinery from photo-oxidative damage. Phytoene synthase (PSY) and Orange (Or) are key plant proteins for carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation. We previously isolated the sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) Or gene (IbOr), which is involved in carotenoid accumulation and salt stress tolerance. The molecular mechanism underlying IbOr regulation of carotenoid accumulation was unknown. Here, we show that IbOr has an essential role in regulating IbPSY stability via its holdase chaperone activity both in vitro and in vivo. This protection results in carotenoid accumulation and abiotic stress tolerance. IbOr transcript levels increase in sweetpotato stem, root, and calli after exposure to heat stress. IbOr is localized in the nucleus and chloroplasts, but interacts with IbPSY only in chloroplasts. After exposure to heat stress, IbOr predominantly localizes in chloroplasts. IbOr overexpression in transgenic sweetpotato and Arabidopsis conferred enhanced tolerance to heat and oxidative stress. These results indicate that IbOr holdase chaperone activity protects IbPSY stability, which leads to carotenoid accumulation, and confers enhanced heat and oxidative stress tolerance in plants. This study provides evidence that IbOr functions as a molecular chaperone, and suggests a novel mechanism regulating carotenoid accumulation and stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27633588

  6. Spray-dried amorphous isomalt and melibiose, two potential protein-stabilizing excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiäinen, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Marikki; Räikkönen, Heikki; Juppo, Anne

    2016-08-20

    The possibility of producing amorphous isomalt and melibiose by spray drying was studied. The impact of process parameters on yield and solid-state stability was compared to sucrose and trehalose. All powders remained amorphous during 2-3 weeks. Processing was challenging due to powder stickiness. Low-temperature and low-humidity drying processes generally performed best. Most isomalt and sucrose powder was retrieved when using 60°C inlet temperature, 800L/h atomizing rate, 1.4ml/min feed rate, 15% concentration and 100% aspirator rate, giving 42-43°C outlet temperature. Isomalt was the most problematic, because it had the lowest Tg and became sticky very easily, therefore process parameters needed to be precisely balanced. There was more freedom in designing processes for melibiose but best yields were obtained with low-temperature (50°C inlet temperature, 800L/h atomizing rate, 4.9ml/min feed rate, 10% concentration and 100% aspirator, 39°C outlet temperature). Trehalose was different in that higher temperatures resulted in better yields. Yet, trehalose generally contained the highest moisture contents. The possibility to produce amorphous isomalt and melibiose at low-temperature process conditions makes them promising considering spray drying applications for heat-sensitive proteins. Melibiose is a better candidate than isomalt because of easier processability and superior solid-state stability. PMID:27321131

  7. Stability Mechanisms of Laccase Isoforms using a Modified FoldX Protocol Applicable to Widely Different Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels J.; Kepp, Kasper P.

    2013-01-01

    A recent computational protocol that accurately predicts and rationalizes protein multisite mutant stabilities has been extended to handle widely different isoforms of laccases. We apply the protocol to four isoenzymes of Trametes versicolor laccase (TvL) with variable lengths (498–503 residues) ......, and 245, or near substrate, mainly 265, are identified that contribute to stability-function trade-offs, of relevance to the search for new proficient and stable variants of these important industrial enzymes....

  8. UV irradiation leads to transient changes in phosphorylation and stability of tumor suppressor protein p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidtmann, K; Landsberg, G

    1996-12-01

    Tumor suppressor protein p53 is thought to play a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of the genome. DNA damage caused by genotoxic drugs, UV or gamma-irradiation leads to accumulation of p53 and activation of its DNA binding and transcriptional activities and subsequently to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. We investigated whether the apparent activation of p53 might be due to post-translational modification. The rat fibroblast cell lines REF52, 208F, and rat1 were irradiated with W-A and the synthesis, stability and phosphorylation state of p53 were investigated by pulse chase experiments, SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping. The three cell lines exhibited different sensitivities and biological responses to UV irradiation, REF52 cells responded with a growth arrest whereas 208F and rat1 cells underwent apoptosis. The fate of p53 was similar in all cases. Both the stability of p53 and its phosphorylation increased instantaneously but transiently. However, the amount of p53 that accumulated after UV treatment was much higher in 208F and rat1 than in REF52 cells. Interestingly, p53 that was synthesized early after irradiation was stable for more than 14 h whereas molecules synthesized 8 or more hours post irradiation were increasingly susceptible to degradation. Moreover, between 14 and 20 h after treatment, the rate of synthesis of p53 decreased to a level lower than in untreated cells suggesting negative feed back control. The expression of different p53-responsive genes, waf1/cip1, Gadd45, and bax was investigated by protein analyses. Surprisingly, p21(waf1) was expressed only in REF52 cells but not in the others. Furthermore, UV irradiation led only to a moderate increase of p21(waf1) expression. Expression of Gadd45 and box was detectable in both cell types but its expression did not change significantly upon UV treatment. Our results suggest i) that both cell types share a common pathway which upon UV irradiation results in enhanced

  9. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, M. Luisa; Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values) and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values) is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm’s, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm’s are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV’s but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm’s for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate) can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C) that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms. PMID:27253436

  10. Hydration and stability of some globular proteins in the nonpolar medium in the presence of phosphatidilholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimovich, Valeriy M.; Gulay, I. S.

    2000-12-01

    Intention of present work is research the influence of non- polar medium and phosphatidilholine on stability of the macromolecules and hydration of cytohrom-C, tripsine and insulin by use of methods laser Raman and Infrared spectroscopy and isotope H/D exchange. It is shown, that the non-polar environment causes convertible changes of spatial pattern of macromolecules a protein degree of order of macromolecules as a result of which is increased. The presence of water at a system results in a converse effect. At interaction of phosphatidilcholin with the protondonors groups a protein will derivate complexes with a hydrogen bonds. Thereof quantity of aminoacidic oddments which are generatix a polar circuit of a plaited layer is augmented. The outcomes of the analysis of bands of compound tone of water testify to presence in a system of three varieties of water clusters distinguished by frequencies of libration oscillations. It is suspected, that the hydrophobic environment can cause reduction of movability of molecules of water in different clusters.

  11. CNOT3 suppression promotes necroptosis by stabilizing mRNAs for cell death-inducing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toru; Kikuguchi, Chisato; Sharma, Sahil; Sasaki, Toshio; Tokumasu, Miho; Adachi, Shungo; Natsume, Tohru; Kanegae, Yumi; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    The CCR4-NOT complex is conserved in eukaryotes and is involved in mRNA metabolism, though its molecular physiological roles remain to be established. We show here that CNOT3-depleted mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) undergo cell death. Levels of other complex subunits are decreased in CNOT3-depleted MEFs. The death phenotype is rescued by introduction of wild-type (WT), but not mutated CNOT3, and is not suppressed by the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fluoromethylketone. Gene expression profiling reveals that mRNAs encoding cell death-related proteins, including receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) and RIPK3, are stabilized in CNOT3-depleted MEFs. Some of these mRNAs bind to CNOT3, and in the absence of CNOT3 their poly(A) tails are elongated. Inhibition of RIPK1-RIPK3 signaling by a short-hairpin RNA or a necroptosis inhibitor, necrostatin-1, confers viability upon CNOT3-depleted MEFs. Therefore, we conclude that CNOT3 targets specific mRNAs to prevent cells from being disposed to necroptotic death. PMID:26437789

  12. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  13. Protein loop compaction and the origin of the effect of arginine and glutamic acid mixtures on solubility, stability and transient oligomerization of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blobel, Jascha; Brath, Ulrika; Bernadó, Pau; Diehl, Carl; Ballester, Lidia; Sornosa, Alejandra; Akke, Mikael; Pons, Miquel

    2011-12-01

    Addition of a 50 mM mixture of L: -arginine and L: -glutamic acid (RE) is extensively used to improve protein solubility and stability, although the origin of the effect is not well understood. We present Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) results showing that RE induces protein compaction by collapsing flexible loops on the protein core. This is suggested to be a general mechanism preventing aggregation and improving resistance to proteases and to originate from the polyelectrolyte nature of RE. Molecular polyelectrolyte mixtures are expected to display long range correlation effects according to dressed interaction site theory. We hypothesize that perturbation of the RE solution by dissolved proteins is proportional to the volume occupied by the protein. As a consequence, loop collapse, minimizing the effective protein volume, is favored in the presence of RE. PMID:21390527

  14. Stability of plant immune-receptor resistance proteins is controlled by SKP1-CULLIN1-F-box (SCF)-mediated protein degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu Ti; Li, Yingzhong; Huang, Shuai; Huang, Yan; Dong, Xinnian; Zhang, Yuelin; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeats containing proteins (NLRs) serve as immune receptors in both plants and animals. Overaccumulation of NLRs often leads to autoimmune responses, suggesting that the levels of these immune receptors must be tightly controlled. However, the mechanism by which NLR protein levels are regulated is unknown. Here we report that the F-box protein CPR1 controls the stability of plant NLR resistance proteins. Loss-of-function mutations in CPR1 lead to higher accumulation of the NLR proteins SNC1 and RPS2, as well as autoactivation of immune responses. The autoimmune responses in cpr1 mutant plants can be largely suppressed by knocking out SNC1. Furthermore, CPR1 interacts with SNC1 and RPS2 in vivo, and overexpressing CPR1 results in reduced accumulation of SNC1 and RPS2, as well as suppression of immunity mediated by these two NLR proteins. Our data suggest that SKP1-CULLIN1-F-box (SCF) complex-mediated stability control of plant NLR proteins plays an important role in regulating their protein levels and preventing autoimmunity. PMID:21873230

  15. Novel Structural Components Contribute to the High Thermal Stability of Acyl Carrier Protein from Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Guen; Jung, Min-Cheol; Song, Heesang; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Bang, Eunjung; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Kim, Yangmee

    2016-01-22

    Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium that lives in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. It causes severe infections because of high antibiotic resistance. E. faecalis can endure extremes of temperature and pH. Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a key element in the biosynthesis of fatty acids responsible for acyl group shuttling and delivery. In this study, to understand the origin of high thermal stabilities of E. faecalis ACP (Ef-ACP), its solution structure was investigated for the first time. CD experiments showed that the melting temperature of Ef-ACP is 78.8 °C, which is much higher than that of Escherichia coli ACP (67.2 °C). The overall structure of Ef-ACP shows the common ACP folding pattern consisting of four α-helices (helix I (residues 3-17), helix II (residues 39-53), helix III (residues 60-64), and helix IV (residues 68-78)) connected by three loops. Unique Ef-ACP structural features include a hydrophobic interaction between Phe(45) in helix II and Phe(18) in the α1α2 loop and a hydrogen bonding between Ser(15) in helix I and Ile(20) in the α1α2 loop, resulting in its high thermal stability. Phe(45)-mediated hydrophobic packing may block acyl chain binding subpocket II entry. Furthermore, Ser(58) in the α2α3 loop in Ef-ACP, which usually constitutes a proline in other ACPs, exhibited slow conformational exchanges, resulting in the movement of the helix III outside the structure to accommodate a longer acyl chain in the acyl binding cavity. These results might provide insights into the development of antibiotics against pathogenic drug-resistant E. faecalis strains.

  16. Impact of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation on protein aggregates stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bria, Carmen R M; Williams, S Kim Ratanathanawongs

    2016-09-23

    The impact of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) on protein aggregate species is investigated with the aid of multiangle light scattering (MALS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The experimental parameters probed in this study include aggregate stability in different carrier liquids, shear stress (related to sample injection), sample concentration (during AF4 focusing), and sample dilution (during separation). Two anti-streptavidin (anti-SA) IgG1 samples composed of low and high molar mass (M) aggregates are subjected to different AF4 conditions. Aggregates suspended and separated in phosphate buffer are observed to dissociate almost entirely to monomer. However, aggregates in citric acid buffer are partially stable with dissociation to 25% and 5% monomer for the low and high M samples, respectively. These results demonstrate that different carrier liquids change the aggregate stability and low M aggregates can behave differently than their larger counterparts. Increasing the duration of the AF4 focusing step showed no significant changes in the percent monomer, percent aggregates, or the average Ms in either sample. Syringe-induced shear related to sample injection resulted in an increase in hydrodynamic diameter (dh) as measured by batch mode DLS. Finally, calculations showed that dilution during AF4 separation is significantly lower than in size exclusion chromatography with dilution occurring mainly at the AF4 channel outlet and not during the separation. This has important ramifications when analyzing aggregates that rapidly dissociate (theory may be more accurate than that measured by online DLS. Experimentally, the dhs determined by online DLS generally agreed with AF4 theory except for the more well retained larger aggregates for which DLS showed smaller sizes. These results highlight the importance of using AF4 retention theory to understand the impacts of dilution on analytes. PMID:27575921

  17. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Ming He; Bin-Guang Ma

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophil...

  18. Interfacial properties of air/water interfaces stabilized by oligofructose palmitic acid esters in the presence of whey protein isolate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, van S.E.H.J.; Maas, K.; Schols, H.A.; Linden, van der E.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    To study the applicability of oligofructose palmitic acid esters (OF-C16) as novel surfactants in food systems, the functional properties of OF-C16 were studied in the presence of whey protein isolate (WPI). Surface tension measurements, surface dilatational rheology, foam stability tests and Brewst

  19. Oil-in-water Pickering emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles from the water-insoluble protein zein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Folter, J.W.J.; van Ruijven, M.W.M.; Velikov, K.

    2012-01-01

    Few fully natural and biocompatible materials are available for the effective particle-stabilization of emulsions since strict requirements, such as insolubility in both fluid phases and intermediate wettability, need to be met. In this paper, we demonstrate the first use of water-insoluble proteins

  20. Impact of glucose polymer chain length on heat and physical stability of milk protein-carbohydrate nutritional beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biye; O'Mahony, James A

    2016-11-15

    This study investigated the impact of glucose polymer chain length on heat and physical stability of milk protein isolate (MPI)-carbohydrate nutritional beverages containing 8.5% w/w total protein and 5% w/w carbohydrate. The maltodextrin and corn syrup solids glucose polymers used had dextrose equivalent (DE) values of 17 or 38, respectively. Increasing DE value of the glucose polymers resulted in a greater increase in brown colour development, ionic calcium, protein particle size, apparent viscosity and pseudoplastic rheological behaviour, and greater reduction in pH, hydration and heat stability on sterilisation at 120°C. Incorporation of glucose polymers with MPI retarded sedimentation of protein during accelerated physical stability testing, with maltodextrin DE17 causing a greater reduction in sedimentation velocity and compressibility of sediment formed than corn syrup solids DE38. The results demonstrate that chain length of the glucose polymer used strongly impacts heat and physical stability of MPI-carbohydrate nutritional beverages. PMID:27283657

  1. Bcl-2 regulates HIF-1alpha protein stabilization in hypoxic melanoma cells via the molecular chaperone HSP90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Trisciuoglio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1 is a transcription factor that is a critical mediator of the cellular response to hypoxia. Enhanced levels of HIF-1alpha, the oxygen-regulated subunit of HIF-1, is often associated with increased tumour angiogenesis, metastasis, therapeutic resistance and poor prognosis. It is in this context that we previously demonstrated that under hypoxia, bcl-2 protein promotes HIF-1/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF-mediated tumour angiogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using human melanoma cell lines and their stable or transient derivative bcl-2 overexpressing cells, the current study identified HIF-1alpha protein stabilization as a key regulator for the induction of HIF-1 by bcl-2 under hypoxia. We also demonstrated that bcl-2-induced accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein during hypoxia was not due to an increased gene transcription or protein synthesis. In fact, it was related to a modulation of HIF-1alpha protein expression at a post-translational level, indeed its degradation rate was faster in the control lines than in bcl-2 transfectants. The bcl-2-induced HIF-1alpha stabilization in response to low oxygen tension conditions was achieved through the impairment of ubiquitin-dependent HIF-1alpha degradation involving the molecular chaperone HSP90, but it was not dependent on the prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-1alpha protein. We also showed that bcl-2, HIF-1alpha and HSP90 proteins form a tri-complex that may contribute to enhancing the stability of the HIF-1alpha protein in bcl-2 overexpressing clones under hypoxic conditions. Finally, by using genetic and pharmacological approaches we proved that HSP90 is involved in bcl-2-dependent stabilization of HIF-1alpha protein during hypoxia, and in particular the isoform HSP90beta is the main player in this phenomenon. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified the stabilization of HIF-1alpha protein as a mechanism through which bcl-2 induces the

  2. Bcl-2 Regulates HIF-1α Protein Stabilization in Hypoxic Melanoma Cells via the Molecular Chaperone HSP90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Gabellini, Chiara; Desideri, Marianna; Ziparo, Elio; Zupi, Gabriella; Del Bufalo, Donatella

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that is a critical mediator of the cellular response to hypoxia. Enhanced levels of HIF-1α, the oxygen-regulated subunit of HIF-1, is often associated with increased tumour angiogenesis, metastasis, therapeutic resistance and poor prognosis. It is in this context that we previously demonstrated that under hypoxia, bcl-2 protein promotes HIF-1/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)-mediated tumour angiogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings By using human melanoma cell lines and their stable or transient derivative bcl-2 overexpressing cells, the current study identified HIF-1α protein stabilization as a key regulator for the induction of HIF-1 by bcl-2 under hypoxia. We also demonstrated that bcl-2-induced accumulation of HIF-1α protein during hypoxia was not due to an increased gene transcription or protein synthesis. In fact, it was related to a modulation of HIF-1α protein expression at a post-translational level, indeed its degradation rate was faster in the control lines than in bcl-2 transfectants. The bcl-2-induced HIF-1α stabilization in response to low oxygen tension conditions was achieved through the impairment of ubiquitin-dependent HIF-1α degradation involving the molecular chaperone HSP90, but it was not dependent on the prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-1α protein. We also showed that bcl-2, HIF-1α and HSP90 proteins form a tri-complex that may contribute to enhancing the stability of the HIF-1α protein in bcl-2 overexpressing clones under hypoxic conditions. Finally, by using genetic and pharmacological approaches we proved that HSP90 is involved in bcl-2-dependent stabilization of HIF-1α protein during hypoxia, and in particular the isoform HSP90β is the main player in this phenomenon. Conclusions/Significance We identified the stabilization of HIF-1α protein as a mechanism through which bcl-2 induces the activation of HIF-1 in hypoxic tumour cells involving the

  3. Conserved CPEs in the p53 3' untranslated region influence mRNA stability and protein synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken W; Vinther, Jeppe; Mittler, Gerhard;

    2008-01-01

    CaT skin and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were established. Quantitative PCR and an enzymatic assay were used to quantify the reporter mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Proteins binding to the CPEs were identified by RNA-immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectroscopy. RESULTS: The wild...... irradiation. Several proteins (including GAPDH, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) D and A/B) were identified from the MCF-7 cytoplasmic extracts that bound specifically to the CPEs. CONCLUSION: Two conserved CPEs in the p53 3'UTR regulate stability and translation of a reporter mRNA in non...

  4. Role of interfacial protein membrane in oxidative stability of vegetable oil substitution emulsions applicable to nutritionally modified sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiang; Xiong, Youling L

    2015-11-01

    The potential health risk associated with excessive dietary intake of fat and cholesterol has led to a renewed interest in replacing animal fat with nutritionally-balanced unsaturated oil in processed meats. However, as oils are more fluid and unsaturated than fats, one must overcome the challenge of maintaining both physical and chemical (oxidative) stabilities of prepared emulsions. Apart from physical entrapments, an emulsion droplet to be incorporated into a meat protein gel matrix (batter) should be equipped with an interactive protein membrane rather than a small surfactant, and the classical DLVO stabilization theory becomes less applicable. This review paper describes the steric effects along with chemical roles (radical scavenging and metal ion chelation) of proteins and their structurally modified derivatives as potential interface-building materials for oxidatively stable meat emulsions.

  5. Particle designs for the stabilization and controlled-delivery of protein drugs by biopolymers: a case study on insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hui-Peng; Tey, Beng-Ti; Chan, Eng-Seng

    2014-07-28

    Natural biopolymers have attracted considerable interest for the development of delivery systems for protein drugs owing to their biocompatibility, non-toxicity, renewability and mild processing conditions. This paper offers an overview of the current status and future perspectives of particle designs using biopolymers for the stabilization and controlled-delivery of a model protein drug--insulin. We first describe the design criteria for polymeric encapsulation and subsequently classify the basic principles of particle fabrication as well as the existing particle designs for oral insulin encapsulation. The performances of these existing particle designs in terms of insulin stability and in vitro release behavior in acidic and alkaline media, as well as their in vivo performance are compared and reviewed. This review forms the basis for future works on the optimization of particle design and material formulation for the development of an improved oral delivery system for protein drugs.

  6. Intrinsic stability of Brassicaceae plasma membrane in relation to changes in proteins and lipids as a response to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalbi, Najla; Martínez-Ballesta, Ma Carmen; Youssef, Nabil Ben; Carvajal, Micaela

    2015-03-01

    Changes in plasma membrane lipids, such as sterols and fatty acids, have been observed as a result of salt stress. These alterations, together with modification of the plasma membrane protein profile, confer changes in the physical properties of the membrane to be taken into account for biotechnological uses. In our experiments, the relationship between lipids and proteins in three different Brassicaceae species differing in salinity tolerance (Brassica oleracea, B. napus and Cakile maritima) and the final plasma membrane stability were studied. The observed changes in the sterol (mainly an increase in sitosterol) and fatty acid composition (increase in RUFA) in each species led to physical adaptation of the plasma membrane to salt stress. The in vitro vesicles stability was higher in the less tolerant (B. oleracea) plants together with low lipoxygenase activity. These results indicate that the proteins/lipids ratio and lipid composition is an important aspect to take into account for the use of natural vesicles in plant biotechnology.

  7. Mechanism for the stabilization of protein clusters above the solubility curve: the role of non-ideal chemical reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lutsko, James F

    2016-01-01

    Dense protein clusters are known to play an important role in nucleation of protein crystals from dilute solutions. While these have generally been thought to be formed from a metastable phase, the observation of similar, if not identical, clusters above the critical point for the dilute-solution/strong-solution phase transition has thrown this into doubt. Furthermore, the observed clusters are stable for relatively long times. Because protein aggregation plays an important role in some pathologies, understanding the nature of such clusters is an important problem. One mechanism for the stabilization of such structures was proposed by Pan, Vekilov and Lubchenko and was investigated using a DDFT model which confirmed the viability of the model. Here, we revisit that model and incorporate additional physics in the form of state-dependent reaction rates. We show by a combination of numerical results and general arguments that the state-dependent rates disrupt the stability mechanism. Finally, we argue that the s...

  8. Comparative study of urea and betaine solutions by dielectric spectroscopy: liquid structures of a protein denaturant and stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Katsumoto, Yoichi; Oshige, Ikuya; Omori, Shinji; Yasuda, Akio

    2007-10-11

    We performed dielectric spectroscopy measurements on aqueous solutions of glycine betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine), which is known to be a strong stabilizer of globular proteins, over a wide concentration range (3-62 wt %) and compared the results with our previously published data for aqueous solutions of urea, a representative protein denaturant. The hydration number of betaine (9), calculated on the basis of the reduction in the dielectric relaxation strength of bulk water with addition of betaine, is significantly larger than that of urea (2). Furthermore, the dielectric relaxation time increased with betaine concentration, while that remained nearly constant for the urea-water system over a wide concentration range. This difference between urea and betaine is probably related to their opposite effects on the protein stabilization. PMID:17877386

  9. Completely Green Synthesis of Ag Nanoparticles Stabilized by Soy Protein Isolate under UV Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ren; LIU Shilin; ZHOU Hua; YANG Cheng; LIU Xiaoya

    2012-01-01

    A completely green pathway for the preparation of Ag nanoparticles was proposed,by using soy protein isolate (SPI) as stabilizer under UV irradiation and H2O as the environmentally benign solvent throughout the preparation.Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and zeta potential characterization results indicated that the Ag nanoparticles were stable and well dispersed with an average diameter about 13 nm,and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of SPI/Ag composite nanoparticles confirmed the formation of metallic silver.UV-Vis spectrum showed that the Ag nanoparticles dispersion solution had the maximum absorbance at about 430 nm due to surface plasmon resonance of the Ag nanoparticles.Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that the polypeptide backbone of SPI was not cleaved during the conjugation process and that some active amino groups were oxidized.The SPI/Ag composite nanoparticles have excellent antibacterial activity against two representative bacteria,staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive) and escherichia coli (Gram negative) in the presence of SPI.

  10. Protein denaturation with guanidine hydrochloride or urea provides a different estimate of stability depending on the contributions of electrostatic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monera, O. D.; Kay, C. M.; Hodges, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to address the question of whether or not urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) give the same estimates of the stability of a particular protein. We previously suspected that the estimates of protein stability from GdnHCl and urea denaturation data might differ depending on the electrostatic interactions stabilizing the proteins. Therefore, 4 coiled-coil analogs were designed, where the number of intrachain and interchain electrostatic attractions (A) were systematically changed to repulsions (R): 20A, 15A5R, 10A10R, and 20R. The GdnHCl denaturation data showed that the 4 coiled-coil analogs, which had electrostatic interactions ranging from 20 attractions to 20 repulsions, had very similar [GdnHCl]1/2 values (average of congruent to 3.5 M) and, as well, their delta delta Gu values were very close to 0 (0.2 kcal/mol). In contrast, urea denaturation showed that the [urea]1/2 values proportionately decreased with the stepwise change from 20 electrostatic attractions to 20 repulsions (20A, 7.4 M; 15A5R, 5.4 M; 10A10R, 3.2 M; and 20R, 1.4 M), and the delta delta Gu values correspondingly increased with the increasing differences in electrostatic interactions (20A-15A5R, 1.5 kcal/mol; 20A-10A10R, 3.7 kcal/mol; and 20A-20R, 5.8 kcal/mol). These results indicate that the ionic nature of GdnHCl masks electrostatic interactions in these model proteins, a phenomenon that was absent when the unchanged urea was used. Thus, GdnHCl and urea denaturations may give vastly different estimates of protein stability, depending on how important electrostatic interactions are to the protein. PMID:7703845

  11. 蛋白质工程在提高蛋白质稳定性中的应用%The Application of Protein Engineering in Improving Protein Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵黎明

    2011-01-01

    过去18年中,通过蛋白质工程技术进行体外突变来提高蛋白质稳定性的大量文献被报道.这些报道涉及从利用最早的理性设计来处理像T4溶菌酶和芽孢杆菌RNA酶等一些小酶,以及目前的蛋白设计和定向进化技术.本文着重介绍提高蛋白质稳定性的途径以及通过理性设计、DNA改组、组合设计、数据驱动设计方法等提高蛋白质,特别是酶的稳定性的研究进展.%During the past 18 years there has been a continuous flow of reports describing proteins stabilized by the introduction of mutations. These reports span a period from pioneering rational design work on small enzymes such as T4 lysozyme and barnase to present protein design and directed evolution technique. This literature plays emphasis on introducing the paths to improve protein stability, and the advances of researches in enhance the stability of protein especially of the enzyme, by rational design method, DNA shuffling, combinational design and data-driven design methods.

  12. Two Chlamydomonas OPR proteins stabilize chloroplast mRNAs encoding small subunits of photosystem II and cytochrome b6 f.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Johnson, Xenie; Cavaiuolo, Marina; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola; Nickelsen, Joerg; Vallon, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In plants and algae, chloroplast gene expression is controlled by nucleus-encoded proteins that bind to mRNAs in a specific manner, stabilizing mRNAs or promoting their splicing, editing, or translation. Here, we present the characterization of two mRNA stabilization factors of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which both belong to the OctotricoPeptide Repeat (OPR) family. MCG1 is necessary to stabilize the petG mRNA, encoding a small subunit of the cytochrome b6 f complex, while MBI1 stabilizes the psbI mRNA, coding for a small subunit of photosystem II. In the mcg1 mutant, the small RNA footprint corresponding to the 5'-end of the petG transcript is reduced in abundance. In both cases, the absence of the small subunit perturbs assembly of the cognate complex. Whereas PetG is essential for formation of a functional cytochrome b6 f dimer, PsbI appears partly dispensable as a low level of PSII activity can still be measured in its absence. Thus, nuclear control of chloroplast gene expression is not only exerted on the major core subunits of the complexes, but also on small subunits with a single transmembrane helix. While OPR proteins have thus far been involved in translation or trans-splicing of plastid mRNAs, our results expand the potential roles of this repeat family to their stabilization. PMID:25898982

  13. IGF-IR promotes prostate cancer growth by stabilizing α5β1 integrin protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aejaz Sayeed

    Full Text Available Dynamic crosstalk between growth factor receptors, cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix is essential for cancer cell migration and invasion. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that bind extracellular matrix proteins and enable cell adhesion and cytoskeletal organization. They also mediate signal transduction to regulate cell proliferation and survival. The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR mediates tumor cell growth, adhesion and inhibition of apoptosis in several types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that β1 integrins regulate anchorage-independent growth of prostate cancer (PrCa cells by regulating IGF-IR expression and androgen receptor-mediated transcriptional functions. Furthermore, we have recently reported that IGF-IR regulates the expression of β1 integrins in PrCa cells. We have dissected the mechanism through which IGF-IR regulates β1 integrin expression in PrCa. Here we report that IGF-IR is crucial for PrCa cell growth and that β1 integrins contribute to the regulation of proliferation by IGF-IR. We demonstrate that β1 integrin regulation by IGF-IR does not occur at the mRNA level. Exogenous expression of a CD4 - β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain chimera does not interfere with such regulation and fails to stabilize β1 integrin expression in the absence of IGF-IR. This appears to be due to the lack of interaction between the β1 cytoplasmic domain and IGF-IR. We demonstrate that IGF-IR stabilizes the β1 subunit by protecting it from proteasomal degradation. The α5 subunit, one of the binding partners of β1, is also downregulated along with β1 upon IGF-IR knockdown while no change is observed in the expression of the α2, α3, α4, α6 and α7 subunits. Our results reveal a crucial mechanistic role for the α5β1 integrin, downstream of IGF-IR, in regulating cancer growth.

  14. Stabilization of Nrf2 protein by D3T provides protection against ethanol-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Dong

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that maternal ethanol exposure induces a moderate increase in Nrf2 protein expression in mouse embryos. Pretreatment with the Nrf2 inducer, 3H-1, 2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T, significantly increases the Nrf2 protein levels and prevents apoptosis in ethanol-exposed embryos. The present study, using PC12 cells, was designed to determine whether increased Nrf2 stability is a mechanism by which D3T enhances Nrf2 activation and subsequent antioxidant protection. Ethanol and D3T treatment resulted in a significant accumulation of Nrf2 protein in PC 12 cells. CHX chase analysis has shown that ethanol treatment delayed the degradation of Nrf2 protein in PC12 cells. A significantly greater decrease in Nrf2 protein degradation was observed in the cells treated with D3T alone or with both ethanol and D3T. In addition, D3T treatment significantly reduced ethanol-induced apoptosis. These results demonstrate that the stabilization of Nrf2 protein by D3T confers protection against ethanol-induced apoptosis.

  15. Cloning and mutational analysis of the gamma gene from Azotobacter vinelandii defines a new family of proteins capable of metallocluster binding and protein stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Luis M; Rangaraj, Priya; Homer, Mary J; Roberts, Gary P; Ludden, Paul W

    2002-04-19

    Dinitrogenase is a heterotetrameric (alpha(2)beta(2)) enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonium and contains the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) at its active site. Certain Azotobacter vinelandii mutant strains unable to synthesize FeMo-co accumulate an apo form of dinitrogenase (lacking FeMo-co), with a subunit composition alpha(2)beta(2)gamma(2), which can be activated in vitro by the addition of FeMo-co. The gamma protein is able to bind FeMo-co or apodinitrogenase independently, leading to the suggestion that it facilitates FeMo-co insertion into the apoenzyme. In this work, the non-nif gene encoding the gamma subunit (nafY) has been cloned, sequenced, and found to encode a NifY-like protein. This finding, together with a wealth of knowledge on the biochemistry of proteins involved in FeMo-co and FeV-co biosyntheses, allows us to define a new family of iron and molybdenum (or vanadium) cluster-binding proteins that includes NifY, NifX, VnfX, and now gamma. In vitro FeMo-co insertion experiments presented in this work demonstrate that gamma stabilizes apodinitrogenase in the conformation required to be fully activable by the cofactor. Supporting this conclusion, we show that strains containing mutations in both nafY and nifX are severely affected in diazotrophic growth and extractable dinitrogenase activity when cultured under conditions that are likely to occur in natural environments. This finding reveals the physiological importance of the apodinitrogenase-stabilizing role of which both proteins are capable. The relationship between the metal cluster binding capabilities of this new family of proteins and the ability of some of them to stabilize an apoenzyme is still an open matter. PMID:11823455

  16. Transient gene expression control: effects of transfected DNA stability and trans-activation by viral early proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwine, J C

    1985-05-01

    The effects of trans-acting factors and transfected DNA stability on promoter activity were examined with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) transient expression analysis. With cotransfection into CV-1P and HeLa cells, simian virus 40 T antigen, adenovirus E1a, and herpes-virus IE proteins were compared for their ability to trans-activate a variety of eucaryotic promoters constructed into CAT plasmids. T antigen and the IE protein were promiscuous activators of all the promoters tested [the simian virus 40 late promoter, the adenovirus E3 promoter, the alpha 2(I) collagen promoter, and the promoter of the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat]. Conversely the E1a protein was specific, activating only the adenovirus E3 promoter and suppressing the basal activity of the other promoters. This specificity of activation by E1a contrasted with the high activity generated by all of the promoter-CAT plasmids when transfected into 293 cells, which endogenously produce E1a protein. Examination of transfected 293 cells determined that they stabilized much greater amounts of plasmid DNA than any other cells tested (CV-1P, COS, NIH-3T3, KB). Thus the high activity of nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmids in 293 cells results from the cumulative effect of basal promoter activity from a very large number of gene copies, not from E1a activation. This conclusion was supported by similar transfection analysis of KB cell lines which endogenously produce E1a protein. These cells stabilize plasmid DNA at a level comparable to that of CV-1P cells and, in agreement with the CV-1P cotransfection results, did not activate a nonadenovirus promoter-CAT plasmid. These results indicate that the stability of plasmid DNA must be considered when transient gene expression is being compared between cell lines. The use of relative plasmid copy numbers for the standardization of transient expression results is discussed. PMID:2987671

  17. Role of T198 modification in the regulation of p27(Kip1 protein stability and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Schiappacassi

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene p27(Kip1 plays a fundamental role in human cancer progression. Its expression and/or functions are altered in almost all the different tumor histotype analyzed so far. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the tumor suppression function of p27 resides not only in the ability to inhibit Cyclins/CDKs complexes through its N-terminal domain but also in the capacity to modulate cell motility through its C-terminal portion. Particular interest has been raised by the last amino-acid, (Threonine 198 in the regulation of both protein stability and cell motility.Here, we describe that the presence of Threonine in position 198 is of primary importance for the regulation of the protein stability and for the control of cell motility. However, while the control of cell motility is dependent on the phosphorylation of T198, the stability of the protein is specifically controlled by the steric hindrance of the last amino acid. The effects of T198 modification on protein stability are not linked to the capacity of p27 to bind Cyclins/CDKs complexes and/or the F-box protein Skp2. Conversely, our results support the hypothesis that conformational changes in the disordered structure of the C-terminal portion of p27 are important in its ability to be degraded via a proteasome-dependent mechanism. On the other hand T198 phosphorylation favors p27/stathmin interaction eventually contributing to the regulation of cell motility, supporting the hypothesis that the presence of T198 is fundamental for the regulation of p27 functions.

  18. Protein structure, stability and folding in the cell -- in silico biophysical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Margaret

    2010-03-01

    How the crowded environment inside a cell affects the structural conformation of a protein with aspherical shape is a vital question because the geometry of proteins and protein-protein complexes are far from globules in vivo. Here we address this question by combining computational and experimental studies of a spherical protein (i.e. apoflavodoxin), a football-shaped protein (i.e., Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE) and a dumbbell-shaped protein (i.e. calmodulin) under crowded, cell-like conditions. The results show that macromolecular crowding affects protein folding dynamics as well as an overall protein shape associated with changes in secondary structures. Our work demonstrates the malleability of ``native'' proteins and implies that crowding-induced shape changes may be important for protein function and malfunction in vivo.

  19. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNVKUN) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNVKUN replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNVKUN replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of Proline13 of the WNV NS4A protein is lethal to replication. • 1st TMB helix of NS4A contributes to protein stability and membrane remodelling. • Unstable mutants of NS4A can be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. • This study (and of others) contributes to a functional mapping of the NS4A protein

  20. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrose, R.L.; Mackenzie, J.M., E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au

    2015-07-15

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNV{sub KUN} replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNV{sub KUN} replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of Proline13 of the WNV NS4A protein is lethal to replication. • 1st TMB helix of NS4A contributes to protein stability and membrane remodelling. • Unstable mutants of NS4A can be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. • This study (and of others) contributes to a functional mapping of the NS4A protein.

  1. Effect of xanthan/enzyme-modified guar gum mixtures on the stability of whey protein isolate stabilized fish oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chityala, Pavan Kumar; Khouryieh, Hanna; Williams, Kevin; Conte, Eric

    2016-12-01

    The effect of xanthan gum (XG) and enzyme-modified guar (EMG) gum mixtures on the physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of 2wt% whey protein isolate (WPI) stabilized oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing 20%v/v fish oil was investigated. EMG was obtained by hydrolyzing native guar gum using α-galactosidase enzyme. At higher gum concentrations (0.2 and 0.3wt%), the viscosity of the emulsions containing XG/EMG gum mixtures was significantly higher (P<0.05) of all emulsions. Increasing concentrations (0-0.3wt%) of XG/EMG gum mixtures did not affect the droplet size of emulsions. Microstructure images revealed decreased flocculation at higher concentrations. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation measurements indicated a slower rate of oxidation in emulsions containing XG/EMG gum mixtures, compared to XG, guar (GG), and XG/GG gum mixtures. These results indicate that XG/EMG gum mixtures can be used in O/W emulsions to increase physical and oxidative stabilities of polyunsaturated fatty acids in foods. PMID:27374540

  2. Effect of integral proteins in the phase stability of a lipid bilayer: Application to raft formation in cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Jordi; Sagués, Francesc; Reigada, Ramon

    2010-04-01

    The existence of lipid rafts is a controversial issue. The affinity of cholesterol for saturated lipids is manifested in macroscopic phase separation in model membranes, and is believed to be the thermodynamic driving force for raft formation. However, there is no clear reason to explain the small (nanometric) size of raft domains in cell membranes. In a recent paper Yethiraj and Weisshaar [Biophys. J. 93, 3113 (2007)] proposed that the effect of neutral integral membrane proteins may prevent from the formation of large lipid domains. In this paper we extend this approach by studying the effect of the protein size, as well as the lipid-protein interaction. Depending on these factors, two different mechanisms for nanodomain stabilization are shown to be possible for static proteins. The application of these results to a biological context is discussed.

  3. Low thermodynamic but high kinetic stability of an antifreeze protein from Rhagium mordax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Dennis Steven; Johnsen, Johannes Lørup; Kristiansen, Erlend;

    2014-01-01

    The equilibrium heat stability and the kinetic heat tolerance of a recombinant antifreeze protein (AFP) from the beetle Rhagium mordax (RmAFP1) are studied through differential scanning calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In contrast to other insect AFPs studied with this respect, the...... RmAFP1 has only one disulfide bridge. The melting temperature, Tm, of the protein is determined to be 28.5°C (pH 7.4), which is much lower than most of those reported for AFPs or globular proteins in general. Despite its low melting temperature, both biophysical and activity measurements show that...... the protein almost completely refolds into the native state after repeated exposure of 70°C. RmAFP1 thus appears to be kinetically stable even far above its melting temperature. Thermodynamically, the insect AFPs seem to be dividable in three groups, relating to their content of disulfide bridges and...

  4. Stabilizing and destabilizing protein surfactant-based foams in the presence of a chemical surfactant: Effect of adsorption kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huazhen; Le Brun, Anton P; Agyei, Dominic; Shen, Wei; Middelberg, Anton P J; He, Lizhong

    2016-01-15

    Stimuli-responsive protein surfactants promise alternative foaming materials that can be made from renewable sources. However, the cost of protein surfactants is still higher than their chemical counterparts. In order to reduce the required amount of protein surfactant for foaming, we investigated the foaming and adsorption properties of the protein surfactant, DAMP4, with addition of low concentrations of the chemical surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). The results show that the small addition of SDS can enhance foaming functions of DAMP4 at a lowered protein concentration. Dynamic surface tension measurements suggest that there is a synergy between DAMP4 and SDS which enhances adsorption kinetics of DAMP4 at the initial stage of adsorption (first 60s), which in turn stabilizes protein foams. Further interfacial properties were revealed by X-ray reflectometry measurements, showing that there is a re-arrangement of adsorbed protein-surfactant layer over a long period of 1h. Importantly, the foaming switchability of DAMP4 by metal ions is not affected by the presence of SDS, and foams can be switched off by the addition of zinc ions at permissive pH. This work provides fundamental knowledge to guide formulation using a mixture of protein and chemical surfactants towards a high performance of foaming at a low cost. PMID:26433478

  5. Formulating food protein-stabilized indomethacin nanosuspensions into pellets by fluid-bed coating technology: physical characterization, redispersibility, and dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He W

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wei He,1,2 Yi Lu,1 Jianping Qi,1 Lingyun Chen,3 Lifang Yin,2 Wei Wu1 1School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery of Ministry of Education and PLA, Shanghai, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background: Drug nanosuspensions are very promising for enhancing the dissolution and bioavailability of drugs that are poorly soluble in water. However, the poor stability of nanosuspensions, reflected in particle growth, aggregation/agglomeration, and change in crystallinity state greatly limits their applications. Solidification of nanosuspensions is an ideal strategy for addressing this problem. Hence, the present work aimed to convert drug nanosuspensions into pellets using fluid-bed coating technology. Methods: Indomethacin nanosuspensions were prepared by the precipitation-ultrasonication method using food proteins (soybean protein isolate, whey protein isolate, ß-lactoglobulin as stabilizers. Dried nanosuspensions were prepared by coating the nanosuspensions onto pellets. The redispersibility, drug dissolution, solid-state forms, and morphology of the dried nanosuspensions were evaluated. Results: The mean particle size for the nanosuspensions stabilized using soybean protein isolate, whey protein isolate, and β-lactoglobulin was 588 nm, 320 nm, and 243 nm, respectively. The nanosuspensions could be successfully layered onto pellets with high coating efficiency. Both the dried nanosuspensions and nanosuspensions in their original amorphous state and not influenced by the fluid-bed coating drying process could be redispersed in water, maintaining their original particle size and size distribution. Both the dried nanosuspensions and the original drug nanosuspensions showed similar dissolution profiles, which were both much

  6. The splicing factor U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeonghee; Chung, In Kwon, E-mail: topoviro@yonsei.ac.kr

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Identification of U2AF65 as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. •U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. •U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4. •U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres. -- Abstract: The human telomeric protein TRF1 is a component of the six-subunit protein complex shelterin, which provides telomere protection by organizing the telomere into a high-order structure. TRF1 functions as a negative regulator of telomere length by controlling the access of telomerase to telomeres. Thus, the cellular abundance of TRF1 at telomeres should be maintained and tightly regulated to ensure proper telomere function. Here, we identify U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) auxiliary factor 65 (U2AF65), an essential pre-mRNA splicing factor, as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. U2AF65 interacts with TRF1 in vitro and in vivo and is capable of stabilizing TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. We also found that U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for TRF1. Depletion of endogenous U2AF65 expression by short interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the stability of endogenous TRF1 whereas overexpression of U2AF65 significantly extended the half-life of TRF1. These findings demonstrate that U2AF65 plays a critical role in regulating the level of TRF1 through physical interaction and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Hence, U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres.

  7. Mechanical properties of protein adsorption layers at the air/water and oil/water interface: a comparison in light of the thermodynamical stability of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Varvara; Mütze, Annekathrin; Fischer, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decades numerous studies on the interfacial rheological response of protein adsorption layers have been published. The comparison of these studies and the retrieval of a common parameter to compare protein interfacial activity are hampered by the fact that different boundary conditions (e.g. physico-chemical, instrumental, interfacial) were used. In the present work we review previous studies and attempt a unifying approach for the comparison between bulk protein properties and their adsorption films. Among many common food grade proteins we chose bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme for their difference in thermodynamic stability and studied their adsorption at the air/water and limonene/water interface. In order to achieve this we have i) systematically analyzed protein adsorption kinetics in terms of surface pressure rise using a drop profile analysis tensiometer and ii) we addressed the interfacial layer properties under shear stress using an interfacial shear rheometer under the same experimental conditions. We could show that thermodynamically less stable proteins adsorb generally faster and yield films with higher shear rheological properties at air/water interface. The same proteins showed an analog behavior when adsorbing at the limonene/water interface but at slower rates. PMID:24332621

  8. Expression of the moss PpLEA4-20 gene in rice enhances membrane protection and client proteins stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Deng, Dandan; Chen, Xi; Wu, Baomei; Hu, Ke; Qiu, Tianhang; Cui, Suxia; Huang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    Green vegetative tissues of the moss Physcomitrella patens possess a powerful ability to tolerate severe drought stress. Proteomics analysis have revealed that a large number of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins were key players in the drought tolerance of the photosynthetic tissues. PpLEA4-20, a member of the moss LEA protein family, was selected for further function study using an ectopic expression method in rice. Through molecular identification via PCR, southern blotting and TAIL-PCR, we demonstrated that the PpLEA4-20 gene was transformed and inserted into a non-encoded region in chromosome 4 of rice and expressed stably in transgenic rice. Unexpectedly, PpLEA4-20 protein emerged as two high-expressed spots on 2-D gels generated from transgenic rice, suggesting that PpLEA4-20 proteins are complete compatible and might be modified in rice. Both growth and physiological analysis showed that seedlings of transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice displayed altered phenotypes and tolerance to salt. In addition, electrolyte leakage was reduced in transgenic PpLEA4-20 compared to wild type under stress conditions. Anti-aggregation analysis found that the PpLEA4-20 protein expressed in rice remained soluble at high temperature and in addition to some native proteins from transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice. Based on Nano LC MS/MS analysis, we identified several proteins from transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice of increased heat-stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of PpLEA4-20 in salt tolerance and stabilization of client proteins. PMID:25791479

  9. Calculation of the relative chemical stabilities of proteins as a function of temperature and redox chemistry in a hot spring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Dick

    Full Text Available Uncovering the chemical and physical links between natural environments and microbial communities is becoming increasingly amenable owing to geochemical observations and metagenomic sequencing. At the hot spring known as Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park, the cooling of the water in the outflow channel is associated with an increase in oxidation potential estimated from multiple field-based measurements. Representative groups of proteins whose sequences were derived from metagenomic data also exhibit an increase in average oxidation state of carbon in the protein molecules with distance from the hot-spring source. The energetic requirements of reactions to form selected proteins used in the model were computed using amino-acid group additivity for the standard molal thermodynamic properties of the proteins, and the relative chemical stabilities of the proteins were investigated by varying temperature, pH and oxidation state, expressed as activity of dissolved hydrogen. The relative stabilities of the proteins were found to track the locations of the sampling sites when the calculations included a function for hydrogen activity that increases with temperature and is higher, or more reducing, than values consistent with measurements of dissolved oxygen, sulfide and oxidation-reduction potential in the field. These findings imply that spatial patterns in the amino acid compositions of proteins can be linked, through energetics of overall chemical reactions representing the formation of the proteins, to the environmental conditions at this hot spring, even if microbial cells maintain considerably different internal conditions. Further applications of the thermodynamic calculations are possible for other natural microbial ecosystems.

  10. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  11. Stability, protein binding and clearance studies of [99mTc]DTPA. Evaluation of a commercially available dry-kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehling, M

    1988-01-01

    the quality of a commercial [99mTc]DTPA preparation (C.I.S., France) with reference to stability, protein binding and accuracy of the determined plasma clearance values as a measure of GFR. The stability of the preparations was studied by thin-layer chromatography, the in vitro protein binding by Sephadex...... filtration after incubation with human serum albumin and in vivo protein binding by filtration of human plasma. The accuracy of the plasma clearance values was investigated by comparison with the simultaneously measured plasma clearance of [51Cr]EDTA. There was no detectable free pertechnetate or hydrolysed...... reduced technetium in eight vials five and six hours after the preparation. The in vitro protein binding 10 (20), 120 and 300 min after the preparation of eight vials was 2.3% (0.8%), 0.2% and 0.1%, respectively. The in vivo protein binding in 12 patients 5, 90 and 180 min after the injection was 0.3%, 0...

  12. Predicting free energy contributions to the conformational stability of folded proteins from the residue sequence with radial basis function networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadio, R.; Fariselli, P.; Vivarelli, F. [Univ. of Bologna (Italy); Compiani, M. [Univ. of Camerino (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    Radial basis function neural networks are trained on a data base comprising 38 globular proteins of well resolved crystallographic structure and the corresponding free energy contributions to the overall protein stability (as computed partially from crystallographic analysis and partially with multiple regression from experimental thermodynamic data by Ponnuswamy and Gromiha (1994)). Starting from the residue sequence and using as input code the percentage of each residue and the total residue number of the protein, it is found with a cross-validation method that neural networks can optimally predict the free energy contributions due to hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions and the unfolded state. Terms due to electrostatic and disulfide bonding free energies are poorly predicted. This is so also when other input codes, including the percentage of secondary structure type of the protein and/or residue-pair information are used. Furthermore, trained on the computed and/or experimental {Delta}G values of the data base, neural networks predict a conformational stability ranging from about 10 to 20 kcal mol{sup -1} rather independently of the residue sequence, with an average error per protein of about 9 kcal mol{sup -1}.

  13. Predicting free energy contributions to the conformational stability of folded proteins from the residue sequence with radial basis function networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, R; Compiani, M; Fariselli, P; Vivarelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Radial basis function neural networks are trained on a data base comprising 38 globular proteins of well resolved crystallographic structure and the corresponding free energy contributions to the overall protein stability (as computed partially from chrystallographic analysis and partially with multiple regression from experimental thermodynamic data by Ponnuswamy and Gromiha (1994)). Starting from the residue sequence and using as input code the percentage of each residue and the total residue number of the protein, it is found with a cross-validation method that neural networks can optimally predict the free energy contributions due to hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions and the unfolded state. Terms due to electrostatic and disulfide bonding free energies are poorly predicted. This is so also when other input codes, including the percentage of secondary structure type of the protein and/or residue-pair information are used. Furthermore, trained on the computed and/or experimental delta G values of the data base, neural networks predict a conformational stability ranging from about 10 to 20 kcal mol-1 rather independently of the residue sequence, with an average error per protein of about 9 kcal mol-1.

  14. Investigating the linkage between disease-causing amino acid variants and their effect on protein stability and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yunhui; Alexov, Emil

    2016-02-01

    Single amino acid variations (SAV) occurring in human population result in natural differences between individuals or cause diseases. It is well understood that the molecular effect of SAV can be manifested as changes of the wild type characteristics of the corresponding protein, among which are the protein stability and protein interactions. Typically the effect of SAV on protein stability and interactions was assessed via the changes of the wild type folding and binding free energies. However, in terms of SAV affecting protein functionally and disease susceptibility, one wants to know to what extend the wild type function is perturbed by the SAV. Here it is demonstrated that relative, rather than the absolute, change of the folding and binding free energy serves as a good indicator for SAV association with disease. Using HumVar as a source for disease-causing SAV and experimentally determined free energy changes from ProTherm and SKEMPI databases, correlation coefficients (CC) between the disease index (Pd) and relative folding (Ppr,f) and binding (Ppr,b) probability indexes, respectively, was achieved. The obtained CCs demonstrated the applicability of the proposed approach and it served as good indicator for SAV association with disease. PMID:26650512

  15. Sequential dimerization of human zipcode-binding protein IMP1 on RNA: a cooperative mechanism providing RNP stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.; Kristensen, M. A.; Willemoes, Martin;

    2004-01-01

    zipcode-binding protein IMP1 on targets in the 3'-UTR from Igf-II mRNA and in H19 RNA. In both cases, two molecules of IMP1 bound to RNA by a sequential, cooperative mechanism, characterized by an initial fast step, followed by a slow second step. The first step created an obligatory assembly intermediate...... of low stability, whereas the second step was the discriminatory event that converted a putative RNA target into a ‘locked' stable RNP. The ability to dimerize was also observed between members of the IMP family of zipcode-binding proteins, providing a multitude of further interaction possibilities...

  16. A Phytophthora sojae effector suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated immunity by stabilizing plant Binding immunoglobulin Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Li, Haiyang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Haonan; Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Huawei; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Qiao, Yongli; Tyler, Brett M.; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete an array of specific effector proteins to manipulate host innate immunity to promote pathogen colonization. However, little is known about the host targets of effectors and the specific mechanisms by which effectors increase susceptibility. Here we report that the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses an essential effector PsAvh262 to stabilize endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-luminal binding immunoglobulin proteins (BiPs), which act as negative regulators of plant resistance to Phytophthora. By stabilizing BiPs, PsAvh262 suppresses ER stress-triggered cell death and facilitates Phytophthora infection. The direct targeting of ER stress regulators may represent a common mechanism of host manipulation by microbes. PMID:27256489

  17. Development and characterization of stabilized, polymerized phospholipid bilayers on silica particles for specific immobilization of His-tagged proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seid M Adem

    2015-04-01

    Stabilized phospholipid bilayer (PLB) coated silica microspheres were prepared via polymerization of lipid monomers. These lipid coated silica microspheres are stable to both extended storage in solution at 4°C and dry storage at room temperature. These stabilized lipid coated microspheres have also been functionalized with nickel-chelating lipids, a commonly used tool for immobilizing polyhistidine-tagged proteins. It is shown that 6xHis-EGFP interacts with (poly)bis-SorbPC/DOGS-NTA-Ni2+ coated silica and this interaction was interrupted by washing with imidazole indicating the reversibility of the interaction. No interaction was observed between the functionalized silica substrate and EGFP, which lacks the 6xHis-tag. Furthermore, these biocompatible (poly)bis-SorbPC coated microspheres were able to minimize non-specific protein adsorption.

  18. Stabilization of native amyloid β-protein oligomers by Copper and Hydrogen peroxide Induced Cross-linking of Unmodified Proteins (CHICUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas L; Serpell, Louise C; Urbanc, Brigita

    2016-03-01

    Oligomeric assemblies are postulated to be proximate neurotoxic species in human diseases associated with aberrant protein aggregation. Their heterogeneous and transient nature makes their structural characterization difficult. Size distributions of oligomers of several amyloidogenic proteins, including amyloid β-protein (Aβ) relevant to Alzheimer's disease (AD), have been previously characterized in vitro by photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Due to non-physiological conditions associated with the PICUP chemistry, Aβ oligomers cross-linked by PICUP may not be representative of in vivo conditions. Here, we examine an alternative Copper and Hydrogen peroxide Induced Cross-linking of Unmodified Proteins (CHICUP), which utilizes naturally occurring divalent copper ions and hydrogen peroxide and does not require photo activation. Our results demonstrate that CHICUP and PICUP applied to the two predominant Aβ alloforms, Aβ40 and Aβ42, result in similar oligomer size distributions. Thioflavin T fluorescence data and atomic force microscopy images demonstrate that both CHICUP and PICUP stabilize Aβ oligomers and attenuate fibril formation. Relative to noncross-linked peptides, CHICUP-treated Aβ40 and Aβ42 cause prolonged disruption to biomimetic lipid vesicles. CHICUP-stabilized Aβ oligomers link the amyloid cascade, metal, and oxidative stress hypotheses of AD into a more comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of AD pathology. Because copper and hydrogen peroxide are elevated in the AD brain, CHICUP-stabilized Aβ oligomers are biologically relevant and should be further explored as a new therapeutic target.

  19. Antioxidant Effectiveness of Vegetable Powders on the Lipid and Protein Oxidative Stability of Cooked Turkey Meat Patties: Implications for Health

    OpenAIRE

    Wendy Russell; Sylvia Stephen; Charles Bestwick; Fiona Campbell; Garry Duthie

    2013-01-01

    Lipid and protein oxidation decreases the shelf-life of foods and may result in formation of end-products potentially detrimental for health. Consumer pressure to decrease the use of synthetic phenolic antioxidants has encouraged identification of alternative compounds or extracts from natural sources. We have assessed whether inclusion of dried vegetable powders improves the oxidative stability of turkey meat patties. Such powders are not only potentially-rich sources of phenolic antioxidant...

  20. The effect of the application of protein and cellulose preparations as iodine carriers on stability of thiamine in processed meats

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Szymandera-Buszka; Katarzyna Waszkowiak; Marzanna Hęś; Anna Jędrusek-Golińska

    2011-01-01

      Fortification of processed meat with iodised table salt was shown to increase thiamine losses, both during thermal processing and storage. Taking into consideration the fact, as well as the recommendation for reduction of consumption of table salt, alternative iodine carriers need to be searched for. Thus the aim of the study was to determine the effect of soy protein isolate (SPI) and wheat fibre (WF) as iodine salts’ (potassium iodide and iodate) carriers on thiamine stabil...

  1. Impact of ingredient interactions on the physico-chemical stability of milk protein-stabilised oil-in-water emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Neirynck, Nico

    2009-01-01

    Besides an oil phase and an aqueous phase, emulsions also contain an emulsifier (e.g. protein). In addition, most food emulsions contain other ingredients, which are intended to adjust the macroscopic appearance, rheology or gravitational stability. Thickeners are used to slow down creaming or sedimentation phenomena. Using a model system including guar gum in a sodium caseinate stabilised oil-in-water emulsion, it was shown that intermediate concentrations may have the opposite effect: i...

  2. Food protein-stabilized nanoemulsions as potential delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs: preparation, in vitro characterization, and pharmacokinetics in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Tian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Wei He1, Yanan Tan1, Zhiqiang Tian1, Lingyun Chen2, Fuqiang Hu3, Wei Wu11Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Nanoemulsions stabilized by traditional emulsifiers raise toxicological concerns for long-term treatment. The present work investigates the potential of food proteins as safer stabilizers for nanoemulsions to deliver hydrophobic drugs. Nanoemulsions stabilized by food proteins (soybean protein isolate, whey protein isolate, ß-lactoglobulin were prepared by high-pressure homogenization. The toxicity of the nanoemulsions was tested in Caco-2 cells using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium-bromide viability assay. In vivo absorption in rats was also evaluated. Food protein-stabilized nanoemulsions, with small particle size and good size distribution, exhibited better stability and biocompatibility compared with nanoemulsions stabilized by traditional emulsifiers. Moreover, ß-lactoglobulin had a better emulsifying capacity and biocompatibility than the other two food proteins. The pancreatic degradation of the proteins accelerated drug release. It is concluded that an oil/water nanoemulsion system with good biocompatibility can be prepared by using food proteins as emulsifiers, allowing better and more rapid absorption of lipophilic drugs.Keywords: oil in water nanoemulsions, food proteins, poorly water-soluble drugs, biocompatibility, in vivo absorption

  3. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems.

  4. Antioxidant Effectiveness of Vegetable Powders on the Lipid and Protein Oxidative Stability of Cooked Turkey Meat Patties: Implications for Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Russell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipid and protein oxidation decreases the shelf-life of foods and may result in formation of end-products potentially detrimental for health. Consumer pressure to decrease the use of synthetic phenolic antioxidants has encouraged identification of alternative compounds or extracts from natural sources. We have assessed whether inclusion of dried vegetable powders improves the oxidative stability of turkey meat patties. Such powders are not only potentially-rich sources of phenolic antioxidants, but also may impart additional health benefits, as inadequate vegetable consumption is a risk factor for heart disease and several cancers. In an accelerated oxidation system, six of eleven vegetable powders significantly (p < 0.05 improved oxidative stability of patties by 20%–30% (spinach < yellow pea < onion < red pepper < green pea < tomato. Improved lipid oxidative stability was strongly correlated with the decreased formation of protein carbonyls (r = 0.747, p < 0.01. However, improved lipid stability could not be ascribed to phenolic acids nor recognized antioxidants, such as α- and γ-tocopherol, despite their significant (p < 0.01 contribution to the total antioxidant capacity of the patties. Use of chemically complex vegetable powders offers an alternative to individual antioxidants for increasing shelf-life of animal-based food products and may also provide additional health benefits associated with increased vegetable intake.

  5. The stability of a stochastic CaMKII switch: dependence on the number of enzyme molecules and protein turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Miller

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular switches have been implicated in the storage of information in biological systems. For small structures such as synapses, these switches are composed of only a few molecules and stochastic fluctuations are therefore of importance. Such fluctuations could potentially lead to spontaneous switch reset that would limit the lifetime of information storage. We have analyzed a model of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII switch implicated in long-term memory in the nervous system. The bistability of this switch arises from autocatalytic autophosphorylation of CaMKII, a reaction that is countered by a saturable phosphatase-1-mediated dephosphorylation. We sought to understand the factors that control switch stability and to determine the functional relationship between stability and the number of molecules involved. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the lifetime of states of the switch increase exponentially with the number of CaMKII holoenzymes. Switch stability requires a balance between the kinase and phosphatase rates, and the kinase rate must remain high relative to the rate of protein turnover. Thus, a critical limit on switch stability is set by the observed turnover rate (one per 30 h on average. Our computational results show that, depending on the timescale of fluctuations in enzyme numbers, for a switch composed of about 15 CaMKII holoenzymes, the stable persistent activation can span from a few years to a human lifetime.

  6. The Stability of a Stochastic CaMKII Switch: Dependence on the Number of Enzyme Molecules and Protein Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Paul

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular switches have been implicated in the storage of information in biological systems. For small structures such as synapses, these switches are composed of only a few molecules and stochastic fluctuations are therefore of importance. Such fluctuations could potentially lead to spontaneous switch reset that would limit the lifetime of information storage. We have analyzed a model of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII switch implicated in long-term memory in the nervous system. The bistability of this switch arises from autocatalytic autophosphorylation of CaMKII, a reaction that is countered by a saturable phosphatase-1-mediated dephosphorylation. We sought to understand the factors that control switch stability and to determine the functional relationship between stability and the number of molecules involved. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the lifetime of states of the switch increase exponentially with the number of CaMKII holoenzymes. Switch stability requires a balance between the kinase and phosphatase rates, and the kinase rate must remain high relative to the rate of protein turnover. Thus, a critical limit on switch stability is set by the observed turnover rate (one per 30 h on average. Our computational results show that, depending on the timescale of fluctuations in enzyme numbers, for a switch composed of about 15 CaMKII holoenzymes, the stable persistent activation can span from a few years to a human lifetime.

  7. New aspects of protein stability and turnover in the regulation of genome integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallina, Irene

    Mechanisms of surveillance of DNA replication and DNA repair are essential for genome stability and cell viability. Both the integrity of the repair pathways and the timely regulation of the repair mechanisms are essential for the maintenance of genome stability. One of the layers of regulation o...

  8. The La protein functions redundantly with tRNA modification enzymes to ensure tRNA structural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copela, Laura A; Chakshusmathi, Ghadiyaram; Sherrer, R Lynn; Wolin, Sandra L

    2006-04-01

    Although the La protein stabilizes nascent pre-tRNAs from nucleases, influences the pathway of pre-tRNA maturation, and assists correct folding of certain pre-tRNAs, it is dispensable for growth in both budding and fission yeast. Here we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae La shares functional redundancy with both tRNA modification enzymes and other proteins that contact tRNAs during their biogenesis. La is important for growth in the presence of mutations in either the arginyl tRNA synthetase or the tRNA modification enzyme Trm1p. In addition, two pseudouridine synthases, PUS3 and PUS4, are important for growth in strains carrying a mutation in tRNA(Arg)(CCG) and are essential when La is deleted in these strains. Depletion of Pus3p results in accumulation of the aminoacylated mutant tRNA(Arg)(CCG) in nuclei, while depletion of Pus4p results in decreased stability of the mutant tRNA. Interestingly, the degradation of mutant unstable forms of tRNA(Arg)(CCG) does not require the Trf4p poly(A) polymerase, suggesting that yeast cells possess multiple pathways for tRNA decay. These data demonstrate that La functions redundantly with both tRNA modifications and proteins that associate with tRNAs to achieve tRNA structural stability and efficient biogenesis.

  9. Universal charge quenching and stability of proteins in 1-methyl-3-alkyl (hexyl/octyl) imidazolium chloride ionic liquid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Kamla; Bohidar, H B

    2012-09-13

    This study reports pH dependent stability of protein dispersions of five common proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA), human serum albumin (HSA), immunoglobulin (IgG), β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg), and gelatin-B (Gel-B), all having isoelectric pH, pI ≈ 5, in room temperature ionic liquid solutions of 1-methyl-3-alkyl (hexyl/octyl) imidazolium chloride (concentration 0-0.2% w/v). Molecular hydrophobicity index, (H-index = hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) of these molecules spanned the range 0.43-0.87. Electrophoretic characteristics, surface tension data and hydrodynamic size information revealed that IL solutions provide dispersion stability owing to specific protein-IL binding which did not alter their pI values though their surface charge was considerably screened. Change in maximum (ζ(max)) and minimum (ζ(min)) zeta potential values observed at pH ~3 (maximum protonated state) and pH ~8 (maximum deprotonated state) could be described universally as function of IL concentration, c as Δζ(x) = [1 - exp(-ac)] where Δζ(x) is either |(ζ(max) - ζ(w))|/ζ(w) or |(ζ(min) - ζ(w))|/ζ(w), and ζ(w) is the corresponding value in water. Tensiometry data showed two major stages of protein-IL interactions: (i) for c cmc free IL-aggregates begin to form. Similarly, we can define Δγ(x) as either |(γ(max) - γ(w))|/γ(w) at pH 3 or |(γ(min) - γ(w))|/γ(w) at pH 8. Both Δζ(x) and Δγ(x) showed linear dependence with c, Δγ(min, max) (or Δζ(min, max)) = (1 - K(γ) (or K(ζ)) H-index), where the slopes K(ζ) and K(γ) defined intermolecular interactions. Hydrodynamic radii data revealed protein stabilization, circular dichroism spectra implied retention of secondary structures, and Raman spectra confirmed a marginal increase in water structure. Results concluded that selective binding of IL molecules to protein surface in the form of bilayer screen protein surface charge, thereby, contributing to its dispersion stability. PMID:22891622

  10. Metals content of Glossoscolex paulistus extracellular hemoglobin: Its peroxidase activity and the importance of these ions in the protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Celia S; Biazin, Ezer; Carvalho, Francisco A O; Tabak, Marcel; Bachega, José F R

    2016-08-01

    In this work we investigate the presence of divalent cations bound to the Glossoscolex paulistus (HbGp) hemoglobin and their effect over the protein stability and the peroxidase (POD) activity. Atomic absorption studies show that the HbGp iron content is consistent with the presence of 144 ions per protein. Moreover, using iron as a reference, the content of calcium was estimated as 30±4 ions per protein, independently of the EDTA pre-treatment or not prior to the acidic treatment performed in the protein digestion. The zinc content was 14±2 ions in the absence of EDTA pre-treatment, and 3±1 ions per protein in the presence of EDTA pre-treatment, implying the presence of one zinc ion per protomer (1/12 of the whole molecule). Finally, the copper concentration is negligible. Different from the vertebrate hemoglobins, where the effectors are usually organic anions, the hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins have as effectors inorganic cations that increase the oxygen affinity and stabilize the structure. Previous studies have suggested that the presence of divalent cations, such as copper and zinc, is related to the different types of antioxidant enzymatic activities as the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity shown by giant hemoglobin from Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt). Recently, studies on HbGp crystal structure have confirmed the presence of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) binding sites. The Ca(2+) sites are similar as observed in the HbLt crystal structure. Otherwise, the Zn(2+) sites have no relation with those observed in Cu/Zn SODs. Our peroxidase assays with guaiacol confirm the POD activity and the effect of the zinc ions for HbGp. Our present results on HbGp metal content and their stability effects is the first step to understand the role of these cations in HbGp function in the future. PMID:27221949

  11. The fragile X protein controls microtubule-associated protein 1B translation and microtubule stability in brain neuron development

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Robert; Wang, Houping; Liang, Zhe; Ku, Li; O'Donnell, William T.; Li, Wen; Warren, Stephen T; Feng, Yue

    2004-01-01

    The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is a selective RNA-binding protein implicated in regulating translation of its mRNA ligands. The absence of FMRP results in fragile X syndrome, one of the leading causes of inherited mental retardation. Delayed dendritic spine maturation was found in fragile X mental retardation patients as well as in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, indicating the functional requirement of FMRP in synaptic development. However, the biochemical link between FMRP deficie...

  12. Increased protein stability of CDKN1C causes a gain-of-function phenotype in patients with IMAGe syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Hamajima

    Full Text Available Mutations in the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA-binding domain of the CDKN1C gene were recently identified in patients with IMAGe syndrome. However, loss of PCNA binding and suppression of CDKN1C monoubiquitination by IMAGe-associated mutations hardly explain the reduced-growth phenotype characteristic of IMAGe syndrome. We demonstrate here that IMAGe-associated mutations in the CDKN1C gene dramatically increased the protein stability. We identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.815T>G (p.Ile272Ser, in the CDKN1C gene in three siblings manifesting clinical symptoms associated with IMAGe syndrome and their mother (unaffected carrier. PCNA binding to CDKN1C was disrupted in the case of p.Ile272Ser, and for two other IMAGe-associated mutations, p.Asp274Asn and p.Phe276Val. Intriguingly, the IMAGe-associated mutant CDKN1C proteins were fairly stable even in the presence of cycloheximide, whereas the wild-type protein was almost completely degraded via the proteasome pathway, as shown by the lack of degradation with addition of a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. These results thus suggested that the reduced-growth phenotype of IMAGe syndrome derives from CDKN1C gain-of-function due to IMAGe-associated mutations driving increased protein stability.

  13. Regulation of the Axillary Osmidrosis-Associated ABCC11 Protein Stability by N-Linked Glycosylation: Effect of Glucose Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Miyata, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette C11 (ABCC11) is a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of a variety of lipophilic anions. ABCC11 wild-type is responsible for the high-secretion phenotypes in human apocrine glands, such as that of wet-type ear wax, and the risk of axillary osmidrosis. We have previously reported that mature ABCC11 is a glycoprotein containing two N-linked glycans at Asn838 and Asn844. However, little is known about the role of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of ABCC11 protein. In the current study, we investigated the effects of N-linked glycosylation on the protein level and localization of ABCC11 using polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. When the N-linked glycosylation in ABCC11-expressing cells was chemically inhibited by tunicamycin treatment, the maturation of ABCC11 was suppressed and its protein level was significantly decreased. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that the protein level of the N-linked glycosylation-deficient mutant (N838Q and N844Q: Q838/844) was about half of the ABCC11 wild-type level. Further biochemical studies with the Q838/844 mutant showed that this glycosylation-deficient ABCC11 was degraded faster than wild-type probably due to the enhancement of the MG132-sensitive protein degradation pathway. Moreover, the incubation of ABCC11 wild-type-expressing cells in a low-glucose condition decreased mature, glycosylated ABCC11, compared with the high-glucose condition. On the other hand, the protein level of the Q838/844 mutant was not affected by glucose condition. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is important for the protein stability of ABCC11, and physiological alteration in glucose may affect the ABCC11 protein level and ABCC11-related phenotypes in humans, such as axillary osmidrosis. PMID:27281343

  14. Activity dependent protein degradation is critical for the formation and stability of fear memory in the amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Jarome

    Full Text Available Protein degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome system [UPS] plays a critical role in some forms of synaptic plasticity. However, its role in memory formation in the amygdala, a site critical for the formation of fear memories, currently remains unknown. Here we provide the first evidence that protein degradation through the UPS is critically engaged at amygdala synapses during memory formation and retrieval. Fear conditioning results in NMDA-dependent increases in degradation-specific polyubiquitination in the amygdala, targeting proteins involved in translational control and synaptic structure and blocking the degradation of these proteins significantly impairs long-term memory. Furthermore, retrieval of fear memory results in a second wave of NMDA-dependent polyubiquitination that targets proteins involved in translational silencing and synaptic structure and is critical for memory updating following recall. These results indicate that UPS-mediated protein degradation is a major regulator of synaptic plasticity necessary for the formation and stability of long-term memories at amygdala synapses.

  15. The transient nature of Bunyamwera orthobunyavirus NSs protein expression: effects of increased stability of NSs protein on virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg van Knippenberg

    Full Text Available The NSs proteins of bunyaviruses are the viral interferon antagonists, counteracting the host's antiviral response to infection. During high-multiplicity infection of cultured mammalian cells with Bunyamwera orthobunyavirus (BUNV, NSs is rapidly degraded after reaching peak levels of expression at 12hpi. Through the use of inhibitors this was shown to be the result of proteasomal degradation. A recombinant virus (rBUN4KR, in which all four lysine residues in NSs were replaced by arginine residues, expresses an NSs protein (NSs4KR that is resistant to degradation, confirming that degradation is lysine-dependent. However, despite repeated attempts, no direct ubiquitylation of NSs in infected cells could be demonstrated. This suggests that degradation of NSs, although lysine-dependent, may be achieved through an indirect mechanism. Infection of cultured mammalian cells or mice indicated no disadvantage for the virus in having a non-degradable NSs protein: in fact rBUN4KR had a slight growth advantage over wtBUNV in interferon-competent cells, presumably due to the increased and prolonged presence of NSs. In cultured mosquito cells there was no difference in growth between wild-type BUNV and rBUN4KR, but surprisingly NSs4KR was not stabilised compared to the wild-type NSs protein.

  16. The transient nature of Bunyamwera orthobunyavirus NSs protein expression: effects of increased stability of NSs protein on virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Knippenberg, Ingeborg; Fragkoudis, Rennos; Elliott, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    The NSs proteins of bunyaviruses are the viral interferon antagonists, counteracting the host's antiviral response to infection. During high-multiplicity infection of cultured mammalian cells with Bunyamwera orthobunyavirus (BUNV), NSs is rapidly degraded after reaching peak levels of expression at 12hpi. Through the use of inhibitors this was shown to be the result of proteasomal degradation. A recombinant virus (rBUN4KR), in which all four lysine residues in NSs were replaced by arginine residues, expresses an NSs protein (NSs4KR) that is resistant to degradation, confirming that degradation is lysine-dependent. However, despite repeated attempts, no direct ubiquitylation of NSs in infected cells could be demonstrated. This suggests that degradation of NSs, although lysine-dependent, may be achieved through an indirect mechanism. Infection of cultured mammalian cells or mice indicated no disadvantage for the virus in having a non-degradable NSs protein: in fact rBUN4KR had a slight growth advantage over wtBUNV in interferon-competent cells, presumably due to the increased and prolonged presence of NSs. In cultured mosquito cells there was no difference in growth between wild-type BUNV and rBUN4KR, but surprisingly NSs4KR was not stabilised compared to the wild-type NSs protein. PMID:23667701

  17. Computational Studies of the Structural Stability of Rabbit Prion Protein Compared to Human and Mouse Prion Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    Prion diseases are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. The neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Str$\\ddot{a}$ussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle belong to prion diseases. By now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. Dogs, rabbits and horses were reported to be resistant to prion diseases. By the end of year 2010 all the NMR structures of dog, rabbit and horse prion proteins (X-ray for rabbits too) had been finished to release into protein data bank. Thus, at this moment it is very worth studying the NMR and X-ray molecular structures of horse, dog and rabbit prion proteins to obtain insights into their immunity prion diseases. The author found that dog and horse prion proteins have sta...

  18. Antioxidant effectiveness of vegetable powders on the lipid and protein oxidative stability of cooked Turkey meat patties: implications for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Garry; Campbell, Fiona; Bestwick, Charles; Stephen, Sylvia; Russell, Wendy

    2013-04-01

    Lipid and protein oxidation decreases the shelf-life of foods and may result in formation of end-products potentially detrimental for health. Consumer pressure to decrease the use of synthetic phenolic antioxidants has encouraged identification of alternative compounds or extracts from natural sources. We have assessed whether inclusion of dried vegetable powders improves the oxidative stability of turkey meat patties. Such powders are not only potentially-rich sources of phenolic antioxidants, but also may impart additional health benefits, as inadequate vegetable consumption is a risk factor for heart disease and several cancers. In an accelerated oxidation system, six of eleven vegetable powders significantly (p yellow pea pea < tomato). Improved lipid oxidative stability was strongly correlated with the decreased formation of protein carbonyls (r = 0.747, p < 0.01). However, improved lipid stability could not be ascribed to phenolic acids nor recognized antioxidants, such as α- and γ-tocopherol, despite their significant (p < 0.01) contribution to the total antioxidant capacity of the patties. Use of chemically complex vegetable powders offers an alternative to individual antioxidants for increasing shelf-life of animal-based food products and may also provide additional health benefits associated with increased vegetable intake. PMID:23595133

  19. In vivo architectonic stability of fully de novo designed protein-only nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta Elorza, Ugutz; Tatkiewicz, Witold; Sánchez Chardi, Alejandro; Conchillo-Solé, Óscar; Álamo, Patricia; Xu, Zhikun; Casanova, Isolda; Corchero Nieto, José Luis; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Cedano, J.; Daura i Ribera, Xavier; Ratera Bastardas, Imma; Veciana i Miró, Jaume; Ferrer Miralles, Neus

    2014-01-01

    The fully de novo design of protein building blocks for self-assembling as functional nanoparticles is a challenging task in emerging nanomedicines, which urgently demand novel, versatile, and biologically safe vehicles for imaging, drug delivery, and gene therapy. While the use of viruses and virus-like particles is limited by severe constraints, the generation of protein-only nanocarriers is progressively reachable by the engineering of protein–protein interactions, resulting in self-assemb...

  20. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Tegument Protein VP22 Induces the Stabilization and Hyperacetylation of Microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Gillian; O’Hare, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The role of the herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22 during infection is as yet undefined. We have previously shown that VP22 has the unusual property of efficient intercellular transport, such that the protein spreads from single expressing cells into large numbers of surrounding cells. We also noted that in cells expressing VP22 by transient transfection, the protein localizes in a distinctive cytoplasmic filamentous pattern. Here we show that this pattern represents a colocali...

  1. The Effects of Threonine Phosphorylation on the Stability and Dynamics of the Central Molecular Switch Region of 18.5-kDa Myelin Basic Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Vassall, Kenrick A.; Kyrylo Bessonov; Miguel De Avila; Eugenia Polverini; George Harauz

    2013-01-01

    The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP) are essential for the formation and maintenance of myelin in the central nervous system of higher vertebrates. The protein is involved in all facets of the development, compaction, and stabilization of the multilamellar myelin sheath, and also interacts with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform of MBP is an intrinsically-disordered protein that is a candidate auto-antigen in the human demyelinating disease mul...

  2. Sequences of a hairpin structure in the 3'-untranslated region mediate regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein B mRNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Helen W; Payne, David E; Bi, Weizhen; Pan, Su; Bruce, Shirley R; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2012-05-15

    The ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension requires adequate expression of surfactant protein B (SP-B). Dexamethasone (DEX, 10(-7) M) increases human SP-B mRNA stability by a mechanism that requires a 126-nt-long segment (the 7.6S region) of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). The objective of this study was to identify sequences in the 7.6S region that mediate regulation of SP-B mRNA stability. The 7.6S region was found to be sufficient for DEX-mediated stabilization of mRNA. Sequential substitution mutagenesis of the 7.6S region indicates that a 90-nt region is required for DEX-mediated stabilization and maintenance of intrinsic stability. In this region, one 30-nt-long element (002), predicted to form a stem-loop structure, is sufficient for DEX-mediated stabilization of mRNA and intrinsic mRNA stability. Cytosolic proteins specifically bind element 002, and binding activity is unaffected whether proteins are isolated from cells incubated in the absence or presence of DEX. While loop sequences of element 002 have no role in regulation of SP-B mRNA stability, the proximal stem sequences are required for DEX-mediated stabilization and specific binding of proteins. Mutation of the sequences that comprise the proximal or distal arm of the stem negates the destabilizing activity of element 002 on intrinsic SP-B mRNA stability. These results indicate that cytosolic proteins bind a single hairpin structure that mediates intrinsic and hormonal regulation of SP-B mRNA stability via mechanisms that involve sequences of the stems of the hairpin structure. PMID:22367784

  3. Engineering of isoamylase: improvement of protein stability and catalytic efficiency through semi-rational design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youran; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Zhongyang; Gu, Zhenghua; Shi, Guiyang

    2016-01-01

    Isoamylase catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,6-glycosidic linkages in glycogen, amylopectin and α/β-limit dextrins. A semi-rational design strategy was performed to improve catalytic properties of isoamylase from Bacillus lentus. Three residues in vicinity of the essential residues, Arg505, Asn513, and Gly608, were chosen as the mutation sites and were substituted by Ala, Pro, Glu, and Lys, respectively. Thermal stability of the mutant R505P and acidic stability of the mutant R505E were enhanced. The k cat /K m values of the mutant G608V have been promoted by 49%, and the specific activity increased by 33%. This work provides an effective strategy for improving the catalytic activity and stability of isoamylase, and the results obtained here may be useful for the improvement of catalytic properties of other α/β barrel enzymes.

  4. C11orf83, a Mitochondrial Cardiolipin-Binding Protein Involved in bc1 Complex Assembly and Supercomplex Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Michelangelo; Raemy, Etienne; Vaz, Frédéric Maxime; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Bairoch, Amos

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria may contain up to 1,500 different proteins, and many of them have neither been confidently identified nor characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that C11orf83, which was lacking experimental characterization, is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein facing the intermembrane space. This protein is specifically associated with the bc1 complex of the electron transport chain and involved in the early stages of its assembly by stabilizing the bc1 core complex. C11orf83 displays some overlapping functions with Cbp4p, a yeast bc1 complex assembly factor. Therefore, we suggest that C11orf83, now called UQCC3, is the functional human equivalent of Cbp4p. In addition, C11orf83 depletion in HeLa cells caused abnormal crista morphology, higher sensitivity to apoptosis, a decreased ATP level due to impaired respiration and subtle, but significant, changes in cardiolipin composition. We showed that C11orf83 binds to cardiolipin by its α-helices 2 and 3 and is involved in the stabilization of bc1 complex-containing supercomplexes, especially the III2/IV supercomplex. We also demonstrated that the OMA1 metalloprotease cleaves C11orf83 in response to mitochondrial depolarization, suggesting a role in the selection of cells with damaged mitochondria for their subsequent elimination by apoptosis, as previously described for OPA1. PMID:25605331

  5. Hepatitis B Virus X Upregulates HuR Protein Level to Stabilize HER2 Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Ming Hung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus- (HBV- associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most common type of liver cancer. However, the underlying mechanism of HCC tumorigenesis is very complicated and HBV-encoded X protein (HBx has been reported to play the most important role in this process. Activation of downstream signal pathways of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family is known to mediate HBx-dependent HCC tumor progression. Interestingly, HER2 (also known as ErbB2/Neu/EGFR2 is frequently overexpressed in HBx-expressing HCC patients and is associated with their poor prognosis. However, it remains unclear whether and how HBx regulates HER2 expression. In this study, our data showed that HBx expression increased HER2 protein level via enhancing its mRNA stability. The induction of RNA-binding protein HuR expression by HBx mediated the HER2 mRNA stabilization. Finally, the upregulated HER2 expression promoted the migration ability of HBx-expressing HCC cells. These findings deciphered the molecular mechanism of HBx-mediated HER2 upregulation in HBV-associated HCC.

  6. In silico functional dissection of saturation mutagenesis: Interpreting the relationship between phenotypes and changes in protein stability, interactions and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Douglas E V; Chen, Jing; Blundell, Tom L; Ascher, David B

    2016-01-01

    Despite interest in associating polymorphisms with clinical or experimental phenotypes, functional interpretation of mutation data has lagged behind generation of data from modern high-throughput techniques and the accurate prediction of the molecular impact of a mutation remains a non-trivial task. We present here an integrated knowledge-driven computational workflow designed to evaluate the effects of experimental and disease missense mutations on protein structure and interactions. We exemplify its application with analyses of saturation mutagenesis of DBR1 and Gal4 and show that the experimental phenotypes for over 80% of the mutations correlate well with predicted effects of mutations on protein stability and RNA binding affinity. We also show that analysis of mutations in VHL using our workflow provides valuable insights into the effects of mutations, and their links to the risk of developing renal carcinoma. Taken together the analyses of the three examples demonstrate that structural bioinformatics tools, when applied in a systematic, integrated way, can rapidly analyse a given system to provide a powerful approach for predicting structural and functional effects of thousands of mutations in order to reveal molecular mechanisms leading to a phenotype. Missense or non-synonymous mutations are nucleotide substitutions that alter the amino acid sequence of a protein. Their effects can range from modifying transcription, translation, processing and splicing, localization, changing stability of the protein, altering its dynamics or interactions with other proteins, nucleic acids and ligands, including small molecules and metal ions. The advent of high-throughput techniques including sequencing and saturation mutagenesis has provided large amounts of phenotypic data linked to mutations. However, one of the hurdles has been understanding and quantifying the effects of a particular mutation, and how they translate into a given phenotype. One approach to overcome

  7. Characterization of the influence of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride on the structure and thermal stability of green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are finding a vast array of applications as novel solvents for a wide variety of processes that include enzymatic chemistry, particularly as more biocompatible ILs are designed and discovered. While it is assumed that a native or near-native structure is required for enzymatic activity, there is some evidence that ILs alter protein structure and oligomerization states in a manner than can negatively impact function. The IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride, (bmim)Cl, is a well-studied, water-miscible member of the popular 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium IL family. To improve our understanding of the impact of water-miscible ILs on proteins, we have characterized the structure and oligomerization state of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in aqueous solutions containing 25 and 50 vol % (bmim)Cl using a combination of optical spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Measurements were also performed as a function of temperature to provide insight into the effect of the IL on the thermal stability of GFP. While GFP exists as a dimer in water, the presence of 25 vol % (bmim)Cl causes GFP to transition to a monomeric state. The SANS data indicate that GFP is a great deal less compact in 50 vol % (bmim)Cl than in neat water, indicative of unfolding from the native structure. The oligomerization state of the protein in IL-containing aqueous solution changes from a dimer to a monomer in response to the IL, but does not change as a function of temperature in the IL-containing solution. The SANS and spectroscopic results also demonstrate that the addition of (bmim)Cl to the solution decreases the thermal stability of GFP, allowing the protein to unfold at lower temperatures than in aqueous solution.

  8. Maltose-neopentyl glycol (MNG) amphiphiles for solubilization, stabilization and crystallization of membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Rana, Rohini R;

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of integral membrane protein (IMP) structure and function is hampered by the difficulty of handling these proteins. Aqueous solubilization, necessary for many types of biophysical analysis, generally requires a detergent to shield the large lipophilic surfaces of native IMPs. Many...

  9. Proteomic study on the stability of proteins in bovine, camel, and caprine milk sera after processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Lina; Boeren, Sjef; Smits, Marcel; Hooijdonk, van Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; Hettinga, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Milk proteins have been shown to be very sensitive to processing. This study aims to investigate the changes of the bovine, camel, and caprine milk proteins after freezing, pasteurization (62 °C, 30 min), and spray drying by proteomic techniques, filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) and dimethy

  10. The PsbW protein stabilizes the supramolecular organization of photosystem II in higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Cerdan, Jose G.; Kovacs, Laszlo; Toth, Tuende; Kereiche, Sami; Aseeva, Elena; Boekema, Egbert J.; Mamedov, Fikret; Funk, Christiane; Schroder, Wolfgang P.; Tóth, Tünde; Kereïche, Sami; Schröder, Wolfgang P.

    2011-01-01

    P>PsbW, a 6.1-kDa low-molecular-weight protein, is exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, and associates with the photosystem II (PSII) protein complex. In vivo and in vitro comparison of Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type plants with T-DNA insertion knock-out mutants completely lacking the PsbW protei

  11. A New Class of Amphiphiles Bearing Rigid Hydrophobic Groups for Solubilization and Stabilization of Membrane Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Rana, Rohini R;

    2012-01-01

    Non-traditional amphiphiles: Conferring aqueous solubility on membrane proteins generally requires the use of a detergent or other amphiphilic agent. A new class of amphiphiles was synthesized, based on steroidal lipophilic groups, and evaluated with several membrane proteins. The results show th...

  12. Transient calnexin interaction confers long-term stability on folded K+ channel protein in the ER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Rajesh; Lee, Eun Jeon; Papazian, Diane M

    2004-06-15

    We recently showed that an unglycosylated form of the Shaker potassium channel protein is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and degraded by proteasomes in mammalian cells despite apparently normal folding and assembly. These results suggest that channel proteins with a native structure can be substrates for ER-associated degradation. We have now tested this hypothesis using the wild-type Shaker protein. Wild-type Shaker is degraded by cytoplasmic proteasomes when it is trapped in the ER and prevented from interacting with calnexin. Neither condition alone is sufficient to destabilize the protein. Proteasomal degradation of the wild-type protein is abolished when ER mannosidase I trimming of the core glycan is inhibited. Our results indicate that transient interaction with calnexin provides long-term protection from ER-associated degradation. PMID:15161937

  13. Estimation of the maximum change in stability of globular proteins upon mutation of a hydrophobic residue to another of smaller size.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, B.(Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea)

    1993-01-01

    Although the hydrophobic effect is generally considered to be one of the most important forces in stabilizing the folded structure of a globular protein molecule, there is a lack of consensus on the precise magnitude of this effect. The magnitude of the hydrophobic effect is most directly measured by observing the change in stability of a protein molecule when an internal hydrophobic residue is mutated to another of smaller size. Results of such measurements have, however, been confusing beca...

  14. The von Hippel-Lindau protein sensitizes renal carcinoma cells to apoptotic stimuli through stabilization of BIMEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Schoell, MC; Freeman, RS

    2009-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is caused by germ-line mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene and is the most common cause of inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Mutations in the VHL gene also occur in a large majority of sporadic cases of clear-cell RCC, which have high intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Here we show that VHL-deficient RCC cells express lower levels of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein BIMEL and are more resistant to etoposide and UV radiation induced death compared to the same cells stably expressing the wild type VHL protein (pVHL). Re-introducing pVHL into VHL-null cells increased the half-life of BIMEL protein without affecting its mRNA expression, and over-expressing pVHL inhibited BIMEL polyubiquitination. Suppressing pVHL expression with RNA interference resulted in a decrease in BIMEL protein and a corresponding decrease in the sensitivity of RCC cells to apoptotic stimuli. Directly inhibiting BIMEL expression in pVHL-expressing RCC cells caused a similar decrease in cell death. These results demonstrate that pVHL acts to promote BIMEL protein stability in RCC cells, and that destabilization of BIMEL in the absence of pVHL contributes to the increased resistance of VHL-null RCC cells to certain apoptotic stimuli. PMID:19305426

  15. The von Hippel-Lindau protein sensitizes renal carcinoma cells to apoptotic stimuli through stabilization of BIM(EL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Schoell, M C; Freeman, R S

    2009-04-23

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is caused by germ-line mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene and is the most common cause of inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Mutations in the VHL gene also occur in a large majority of sporadic cases of clear-cell RCC, which have high intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Here we show that VHL-deficient RCC cells express lower levels of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family protein BIM(EL) and are more resistant to etoposide and UV radiation-induced death compared to the same cells stably expressing the wild-type VHL protein (pVHL). Reintroducing pVHL into VHL-null cells increased the half-life of BIM(EL) protein without affecting its mRNA expression, and overexpressing pVHL inhibited BIM(EL) polyubiquitination. Suppressing pVHL expression with RNA interference resulted in a decrease in BIM(EL) protein and a corresponding decrease in the sensitivity of RCC cells to apoptotic stimuli. Directly inhibiting BIM(EL) expression in pVHL-expressing RCC cells caused a similar decrease in cell death. These results demonstrate that pVHL acts to promote BIM(EL) protein stability in RCC cells, and that destabilization of BIM(EL) in the absence of pVHL contributes to the increased resistance of VHL-null RCC cells to certain apoptotic stimuli. PMID:19305426

  16. MitoNEET Is a Uniquely Folded 2Fe-2S Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Stabilized By Pioglitazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddock, M.L.; Wiley, S.E.; Axelrod, H.L.; Cohen, A.E.; Roy, M.; Abresch, E.C.; Capraro, D.; Murphy, A.N.; Nechushtai, R.; Dixon, J.E.; Jennings, P.A.; /UC, San Diego /SLAC, SSRL /Hebrew U.

    2007-10-19

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins are key players in vital processes involving energy homeostasis and metabolism from the simplest to most complex organisms. We report a 1.5 Angstrom x-ray crystal structure of the first identified outer mitochondrial membrane Fe-S protein, mitoNEET. Two protomers intertwine to form a unique dimeric structure that constitutes a new fold to not only the {approx}650 reported Fe-S protein structures but also to all known proteins. We name this motif the NEET fold. The protomers form a two-domain structure: a {beta}-cap domain and a cluster-binding domain that coordinates two acid-labile 2Fe-2S clusters. Binding of pioglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing thiazolidinedione used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, stabilizes the protein against 2Fe-2S cluster release. The biophysical properties of mitoNEET suggest that it may participate in a redox-sensitive signaling and/or in Fe-S cluster transfer.

  17. Effect of dietary cation-anion difference on performance of lactating dairy cows and stability of milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C M M R; Arcari, M A; Welter, K C; Netto, A S; Oliveira, C A F; Santos, M V

    2015-04-01

    Casein micelle stability is negatively correlated with milk concentrations of ionic calcium, which may change according to the metabolic and nutritional status of dairy cows. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) on concentrations of casein subunits, whey proteins, ionic calcium, and milk heat and ethanol stability. Sixteen Holstein cows were distributed in 4 contemporary 4 × 4 Latin square designs, which consisted of 4 periods of 21 d and 4 treatments according to DCAD: 290, 192, 98, and -71 mEq/kg of dry matter (DM). The milk concentrations of ionic calcium and κ-casein were reduced as DCAD increased, whereas the milk urea nitrogen and β-lactoglobulin concentrations were increased. As a result of these alterations, the milk ethanol stability and milk stability during heating at 140 °C were increased linearly with increasing DCAD [Y = 74.87 (standard error = 0.87) + 0.01174 (standard error = 0.0025) × DCAD (mEq/kg of DM) and Y = 3.95 (standard error = 1.02) + 0.01234 (standard error = 0.0032) × DCAD (mEq/kg of DM), respectively]. In addition, 3.5% fat-corrected milk and fat, lactose, and total milk solids contents were linearly increased by 13.52, 8.78, 2.5, and 2.6%, respectively, according to DCAD increases from -71 to 290 mEq/kg of DM, whereas crude protein and casein content were linearly reduced by 4.83 and 4.49%, respectively. In conclusion, control of metabolic changes in lactating dairy cows to maintain blood acid-base equilibrium plays an important role in keeping milk stable to ethanol and during heat treatments. PMID:25622868

  18. The solubility and stability of recombinant proteins are increased by their fusion to NusA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new bacterial vector pETM60 enables the expression of His-tagged recombinant proteins fused to the C-terminus of NusA through a TEV protease recognition sequence. Three sequences coding for two protein domains (Xklp3A and Tep3Ag) and one membrane-bound viral protein (E8R) could not be expressed in a soluble form in bacteria. Their GST-fusions were mostly soluble but quickly degraded during purification. The same sequences cloned in pETM60 were efficiently purified by metal affinity and recovered soluble after the removal of the fusion partner. The NusA-fused constructs enabled to yield 13-20 mg of fusion protein per litre of culture and 2.5-5 mg of pure protein per litre of culture. Structural analysis indicated that the purified proteins were monodispersed and correctly folded. NusA has been used to raise antibodies that have been successfully used for Western blot and immunoprecipitation of NusA fusion proteins

  19. Influence of Tableting on the Conformation and Thermal Stability of Trypsin as a Model Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klukkert, Marten; Van De Weert, Marco; Fanø, Mathias;

    2015-01-01

    reversible upon tablet reconstitution. Aqueous-state IR spectroscopy combined with partial least squares was shown to be a powerful tool to follow irreversible structural changes and evaluate sample bioactivity. Besides its conformation, the thermal stability of trypsin was altered as a result of the applied...

  20. Improvement of Solubility and Stability of the Antimicrobial Peptide Nisin by Protein Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rollema, Harry S.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Both, Paula; Vos, Willem M. de; Siezen, Roland J.

    1995-01-01

    Nisin is a 3.4-kDa antimicrobial peptide that, as a result of posttranslational modifications, contains unsaturated amino acids and lanthionine residues. It is applied as a preservative in various food products. The solubility and stability of nisin and nisin mutants have been studied. It is demonst

  1. Respective importance of protein folding and glycosylation in the thermal stability of recombinant feruloyl esterase A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benoit, Isabelle; Asther, Michèle; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Record, Eric; Marmuse, Laurence; Parsiegla, Goetz; Gimbert, Isabelle; Asther, Marcel; Bignon, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    The thermal stability of four molecular forms (native, refolded, glycosylated, non-glycosylated) of feruloyl esterase A (FAEA) was studied. From the most to the least thermo-resistant, the four molecular species ranked as follows: (i) glycosylated form produced native, (ii) non-glycosylated form pro

  2. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R; Fersht, Alan R; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-09-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be 'rescued' and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant.

  3. The challenges in and importance of analysing protein structure and physical stability in complex formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, L.; Jensen, Minna Grønning; Roest, N.;

    2013-01-01

    In this review several analytical challenges that may be encountered during protein formulation development of complex formulations are discussed through recent examples. These examples show how selected advanced biophysical methods can greatly increase our understanding of the system under inves...

  4. Electrostatic contribution of surface charge residues to the stability of a thermophilic protein: benchmarking experimental and predicted pKa values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ho Chan

    Full Text Available Optimization of the surface charges is a promising strategy for increasing thermostability of proteins. Electrostatic contribution of ionizable groups to the protein stability can be estimated from the differences between the pKa values in the folded and unfolded states of a protein. Using this pKa-shift approach, we experimentally measured the electrostatic contribution of all aspartate and glutamate residues to the stability of a thermophilic ribosomal protein L30e from Thermococcus celer. The pKa values in the unfolded state were found to be similar to model compound pKas. The pKa values in both the folded and unfolded states obtained at 298 and 333 K were similar, suggesting that electrostatic contribution of ionizable groups to the protein stability were insensitive to temperature changes. The experimental pKa values for the L30e protein in the folded state were used as a benchmark to test the robustness of pKa prediction by various computational methods such as H++, MCCE, MEAD, pKD, PropKa, and UHBD. Although the predicted pKa values were affected by crystal contacts that may alter the side-chain conformation of surface charged residues, most computational methods performed well, with correlation coefficients between experimental and calculated pKa values ranging from 0.49 to 0.91 (p<0.01. The changes in protein stability derived from the experimental pKa-shift approach correlate well (r = 0.81 with those obtained from stability measurements of charge-to-alanine substituted variants of the L30e protein. Our results demonstrate that the knowledge of the pKa values in the folded state provides sufficient rationale for the redesign of protein surface charges leading to improved protein stability.

  5. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lihua; Kota, Pradeep; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Tim; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Riordan, John R

    2013-02-01

    Most cystic fibrosis is caused by the deletion of a single amino acid (F508) from CFTR and the resulting misfolding and destabilization of the protein. Compounds identified by high-throughput screening to improve ΔF508 CFTR maturation have already entered clinical trials, and it is important to understand their mechanisms of action to further improve their efficacy. Here, we showed that several of these compounds, including the investigational drug VX-809, caused a much greater increase (5- to 10-fold) in maturation at 27 than at 37°C (CFTR can be completely assembled and evade cellular quality control systems, while remaining thermodynamically unstable. He, L., Kota, P., Aleksandrov, A. A., Cui, L., Jensen, T., Dokholyan, N. V., Riordan, J. R. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein.

  6. Storage stability of phenolic compounds in powdered BRS Violeta grape juice microencapsulated with protein and maltodextrin blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Poliana; Telis, Vânia Regina Nicoletti; de Andrade Neves, Nathália; García-Romero, Esteban; Gómez-Alonso, Sergio; Hermosín-Gutiérrez, Isidro

    2017-01-01

    The stabilities of the phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and colour parameters of microencapsulated powdered BRS Violeta red grape juice were evaluated throughout storage at 5, 25 and 35°C for up to 150days. Different soy protein (S) or whey protein (W) blends with maltodextrin (M) were used as carrier agents, added at diverse concentrations and proportions. The treatment combining S and M with the highest carrier agent concentration (1SM) preserved almost all the anthocyanins. Except for 1SM, the proportion of p-coumaroylated anthocyanins increased during storage, and the flavonol content of the 1SM powder decreased after 150days. The hydroxycinnamate content decreased for all treatments, independent of storage temperature, and flavan-3-ols were lost at 35°C. The time and temperature did not influence the antioxidant activity of the powder or the colour of the reconstituted grape juice after 150days. PMID:27507480

  7. Notch-mediated post-translational control of Ngn3 protein stability regulates pancreatic patterning and cell fate commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Afelik, Solomon; Jensen, Jan Nygaard;

    2013-01-01

    Ngn3 is recognized as a regulator of pancreatic endocrine formation, and Notch signaling as an important negative regulator Ngn3 gene expression. By conditionally controlling expression of Ngn3 in the pancreas, we find that these two signaling components are dynamically linked. This connection...... involves transcriptional repression as previously shown, but also incorporates a novel post-translational mechanism. In addition to its ability to promote endocrine fate, we provide evidence of a competing ability of Ngn3 in the patterning of multipotent progenitor cells in turn controlling the formation...... protein stabilization in the normal mouse pancreas explants. We conclude that the mutually exclusive expression pattern of Ngn3/Hes1 proteins in the mammalian pancreas is partially controlled through Notch-mediated post-translational regulation and we demonstrate that the formation of insulin...

  8. Direct Measurement of the Nanomechanical Stability of a Redox Protein Active Site and Its Dependence upon Metal Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Marina I; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Artés, Juan M; Sanz, Fausto; Guallar, Victor; Gorostiza, Pau

    2015-09-10

    The structural basis of the low reorganization energy of cupredoxins has long been debated. These proteins reconcile a conformationally heterogeneous and exposed metal-chelating site with the highly rigid copper center required for efficient electron transfer. Here we combine single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments with statistical analysis and computer simulations to show that the metal-binding region of apo-azurin is mechanically flexible and that high mechanical stability is imparted by copper binding. The unfolding pathway of the metal site depends on the pulling residue and suggests that partial unfolding of the metal-binding site could be facilitated by the physical interaction with certain regions of the redox protein. PMID:26305718

  9. A combinatorial F box protein directed pathway controls TRAF adaptor stability to regulate inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bill B; Coon, Tiffany A.; Glasser, Jennifer R; McVerry, Bryan J.; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; Zou, Chunbin; Ellis, Bryon; Sciurba, Frank C.; Zhang, Yingze; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) proteins may result in profound tissue injury by linking surface signals to cytokine release. Here we show that a ubiquitin E3 ligase component, Fbxo3, potently stimulates cytokine secretion from human inflammatory cells by destabilizing a sentinel TRAF inhibitor, Fbxl2. Fbxo3 and TRAF protein in circulation positively correlated with cytokine responses in septic subjects and we furthermore identified a hypofun...

  10. Seed-specific expression of spider silk protein multimers causes long-term stability

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola eWeichert; Valeska eHauptmann; Christine eHelmold; Udo eConrad

    2016-01-01

    Seeds enable plants to germinate and to grow in situations of limited availability of nutrients. The stable storage of different seed proteins is a remarkable presumption for successful germination and growth. These strategies have been adapted and used in several molecular farming projects. In this study, we explore the benefits of seed-based expression to produce the high molecular weight spider silk protein FLAG using intein-based trans-splicing. Multimers larger than 460 kDa in size are r...

  11. Chromatin Adaptor Brd4 Modulates E2 Transcription Activity and Protein Stability*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Brd4 is a chromatin adaptor containing tandem bromodomains binding to acetylated histone H3 and H4. Although Brd4 has been implicated in the transcriptional control of papillomavirus-encoded E2 protein, it is unclear how Brd4 regulates E2 function and whether the involvement of Brd4 in transactivation and transrepression is common to different types of E2 proteins. Using DNase I footprinting performed with in vitro reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin and...

  12. Interaction of Bovine Papillomavirus E2 Protein with Brd4 Stabilizes Its Association with Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    McPhillips, Maria G.; Ozato, Keiko; Alison A McBride

    2005-01-01

    The bovine papillomavirus E2 protein maintains and segregates the viral extrachromosomal genomes by tethering them to cellular mitotic chromosomes. E2 interacts with a cellular bromodomain protein, Brd4, to mediate the segregation of viral genomes into daughter cells. Brd4 binds acetylated histones and has been observed to diffusely coat mitotic chromosomes in several cell types. In this study, we show that in mitotic C127 cells, Brd4 diffusely coated the condensed chromosomes. However, in th...

  13. Transient recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells: the role of mRNA level and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Wulhfard, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Transient gene expression (TGE) is a rapid method for generating recombinant proteins in mammalian cells, but the volumetric productivities for secreted proteins in transiently transfected CHO DG44 cells are typically more than an order of magnitude lower than the yields achieved with recombinant CHO-derived cell lines. The goals of the thesis are to identify the limitations to higher TGE yields in CHO DG44 cells and to find possible solutions to overcome the problems. Initially an attempt wa...

  14. Stabilization and development of sustained-release formulations of protein/antibody for subcutaneous delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Marquette, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACTThis project aimed at developing a drug delivery system (DDS) able to enhance the stability andresidence time in vivo of antibodies (Abs). The system will deliver drug by the subcutaneousroute (SC), while ensuring accurate control of the drug release and the resulting plasmatic level. This technology platform will allow to reduce frequency of injection, potentially decrease side effects and maintain high concentration of Abs which will improve life of patient having chronic disease su...

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. PMID:26405031

  16. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Structural Stability of Wild-Type Rabbit Prion Protein: Surface Electrostatic Charge Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    Prion diseases cover a large range of neurodegenerative diseases in humans and animals, which are invariably fatal and highly infectious. By now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches or medications to treat all prion diseases. Fortunately, numerous experimental experiences have showed that rabbits are resistant to infection from prion diseases isolated from other species, and recently the molecular structures of rabbit prion protein and its mutants were released into protein data bank. Prion diseases are "protein structural conformational" diseases. Thus, in order to reveal some secrets of prion diseases, it is amenable to study rabbits by techniques of the molecular structure and its dynamics. Wen et al. (PLoS One 5(10) e13273 (2010), Journal of Biological Chemistry 285(41) 31682-31693 (2010)) reported the surface of NMR RaPrPC(124-228) molecular snapshot has a large land of continuous positive charge distribution, which contributes to the structural stability of rabbit prion protein. Thi...

  17. The PPR-SMR protein PPR53 enhances the stability and translation of specific chloroplast RNAs in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoschke, Reimo; Watkins, Kenneth P; Miranda, Rafael G; Barkan, Alice

    2016-03-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are helical repeat proteins that bind RNA and influence gene expression in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Several PPR proteins in plants harbor a carboxy-terminal small-MutS-related (SMR) domain, but the functions of the SMR appendage are unknown. To address this issue, we studied a maize PPR-SMR protein denoted PPR53 (GRMZM2G438524), which is orthologous to the Arabidopsis protein SOT1 (AT5G46580). Null ppr53 alleles condition a chlorotic, seedling-lethal phenotype and a reduction in plastid ribosome content. Plastome-wide transcriptome and translatome analyses revealed strong defects in the expression of the ndhA and rrn23 genes, which were superimposed on secondary effects resulting from a decrease in plastid ribosome content. Transcripts with processed 5'-ends mapping approximately 70 nucleotides upstream of rrn23 and ndhA are absent in ppr53 mutants, and the translational efficiency of the residual ndhA mRNAs is reduced. Recombinant PPR53 binds with high affinity and specificity to the 5' proximal region of the PPR53-dependent 23S rRNA, suggesting that PPR53 protects this RNA via a barrier mechanism similar to that described for several PPR proteins lacking SMR motifs. However, recombinant PPR53 did not bind with high affinity to the ndhA 5' untranslated region, suggesting that PPR53's RNA-stabilization and translation-enhancing effects at the ndhA locus involve the participation of other factors. PMID:26643268

  18. Structural stability and endonuclease activity of a PI-SceI GFP-fusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza G. Senejani, J. Peter Gogarten

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Homing endonucleases are site-specific and rare cutting endonucleases often encoded by intron or intein containing genes. They lead to the rapid spread of the genetic element that hosts them by a process termed 'homing'; and ultimately the allele containing the element will be fixed in the population. PI-SceI, an endonuclease encoded as a protein insert or intein within the yeast V-ATPase catalytic subunit encoding gene (vma1, is among the best characterized homing endonucleases. The structures of the Sce VMA1 intein and of the intein bound to its target site are known. Extensive biochemical studies performed on the PI-SceI enzyme provide information useful to recognize critical amino acids involved in self-splicing and endonuclease functions of the protein. Here we describe an insertion of the Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP into a loop which is located between the endonuclease and splicing domains of the Sce VMA1 intein. The GFP is functional and the additional GFP domain does not prevent intein excision and endonuclease activity. However, the endonuclease activity of the newly engineered protein was different from the wild-type protein in that it required the presence of Mn2+ and not Mg2+ metal cations for activity.

  19. Effects of solute-solute interactions on protein stability studied using various counterions and dendrimers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtiss P Schneider

    Full Text Available Much work has been performed on understanding the effects of additives on protein thermodynamics and degradation kinetics, in particular addressing the Hofmeister series and other broad empirical phenomena. Little attention, however, has been paid to the effect of additive-additive interactions on proteins. Our group and others have recently shown that such interactions can actually govern protein events, such as aggregation. Here we use dendrimers, which have the advantage that both size and surface chemical groups can be changed and therein studied independently. Dendrimers are a relatively new and broad class of materials which have been demonstrated useful in biological and therapeutic applications, such as drug delivery, perturbing amyloid formation, etc. Guanidinium modified dendrimers pose an interesting case given that guanidinium can form multiple attractive hydrogen bonds with either a protein surface or other components in solution, such as hydrogen bond accepting counterions. Here we present a study which shows that the behavior of such macromolecule species (modified PAMAM dendrimers is governed by intra-solvent interactions. Attractive guanidinium-anion interactions seem to cause clustering in solution, which inhibits cooperative binding to the protein surface but at the same time, significantly suppresses nonnative aggregation.

  20. Long-term manure amendments reduced soil aggregate stability via redistribution of the glomalin-related soil protein in macroaggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongtu; Li, Jianwei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Lianfeng; Wang, Jingkuan; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-10-01

    Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) contributes to the formation and maintenance of soil aggregates, it is however remains unclear whether long-term intensive manure amendments alter soil aggregates stability and whether GRSP regulates these changes. Based on a three-decade long fertilization experiment in northeast China, this study examined the impact of long-term manure input on soil organic carbon (SOC), total and easily extractable GRSP (GRSPt and GRSPe) and their respective allocations in four soil aggregates (>2000 μm 2000-250 μm 250-53 μm and fertilization (CK), low and high manure amendment (M1, M2), chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilizers (NPK), and combined manure and chemical fertilizers (NPKM1, NPKM2). Though SOC, GRSPe and GRSPt in soil and SOC in each aggregate generally increased with increasing manure input, GRSPt and GRSPe in each aggregate showed varying changes with manure input. Both GRSP in macroaggregates (2000-250 μm) were significantly higher under low manure input, a pattern consistent with changes in soil aggregate stability. Constituting 38~49% of soil mass, macroaggregates likely contributed to the nonlinear changes of aggregate stability under manure amendments. The regulatory process of GRSP allocations in soil aggregates has important implications for manure management under intensive agriculture.

  1. A cis-proline in alpha-hemoglobin stabilizing protein directs the structural reorganization of alpha-hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, David A; Feng, Liang; Zhou, Suiping; Jeffrey, Philip D; Bendak, Katerina; Gow, Andrew; Weiss, Mitchell J; Shi, Yigong; Mackay, Joel P

    2009-10-23

    alpha-Hemoglobin (alphaHb) stabilizing protein (AHSP) is expressed in erythropoietic tissues as an accessory factor in hemoglobin synthesis. AHSP forms a specific complex with alphaHb and suppresses the heme-catalyzed evolution of reactive oxygen species by converting alphaHb to a conformation in which the heme is coordinated at both axial positions by histidine side chains (bis-histidyl coordination). Currently, the detailed mechanism by which AHSP induces structural changes in alphaHb has not been determined. Here, we present x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and mutagenesis data that identify, for the first time, the importance of an evolutionarily conserved proline, Pro(30), in loop 1 of AHSP. Mutation of Pro(30) to a variety of residue types results in reduced ability to convert alphaHb. In complex with alphaHb, AHSP Pro(30) adopts a cis-peptidyl conformation and makes contact with the N terminus of helix G in alphaHb. Mutations that stabilize the cis-peptidyl conformation of free AHSP, also enhance the alphaHb conversion activity. These findings suggest that AHSP loop 1 can transmit structural changes to the heme pocket of alphaHb, and, more generally, highlight the importance of cis-peptidyl prolyl residues in defining the conformation of regulatory protein loops.

  2. A cis-Proline in α-Hemoglobin Stabilizing Protein Directs the Structural Reorganization of α-Hemoglobin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, David A.; Feng, Liang; Zhou, Suiping; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Bendak, Katerina; Gow, Andrew; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Shi, Yigong; Mackay, Joel P.

    2009-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin (αHb) stabilizing protein (AHSP) is expressed in erythropoietic tissues as an accessory factor in hemoglobin synthesis. AHSP forms a specific complex with αHb and suppresses the heme-catalyzed evolution of reactive oxygen species by converting αHb to a conformation in which the heme is coordinated at both axial positions by histidine side chains (bis-histidyl coordination). Currently, the detailed mechanism by which AHSP induces structural changes in αHb has not been determined. Here, we present x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and mutagenesis data that identify, for the first time, the importance of an evolutionarily conserved proline, Pro30, in loop 1 of AHSP. Mutation of Pro30 to a variety of residue types results in reduced ability to convert αHb. In complex with αHb, AHSP Pro30 adopts a cis-peptidyl conformation and makes contact with the N terminus of helix G in αHb. Mutations that stabilize the cis-peptidyl conformation of free AHSP, also enhance the αHb conversion activity. These findings suggest that AHSP loop 1 can transmit structural changes to the heme pocket of αHb, and, more generally, highlight the importance of cis-peptidyl prolyl residues in defining the conformation of regulatory protein loops. PMID:19706593

  3. UV-Visible intensity ratio (aggregates/single particles) as a measure to obtain stability of gold nanoparticles conjugated with protein A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios-Corripio, M. A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, CIBA-Tlaxcala (Mexico); Garcia-Perez, B. E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Inmunologia, ENCB (Mexico); Jaramillo-Flores, M. E. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, ENCB (Mexico); Gayou, V. L.; Rojas-Lopez, M., E-mail: marlonrl@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, CIBA-Tlaxcala (Mexico)

    2013-05-15

    We have analyzed the titration process of gold nanoparticles with several amounts of protein A (0.3, 0.5, 1, 3, 6, and 9 {mu}g/ml) in the presence of NaCl, which induces aggregation if the surface of particles is not fully covered with protein A. The colloidal solutions with different particle size (16, 18, 20, 33 nm) were synthesized by citrate reduction to be conjugated with protein A. UV-Visible spectroscopy was used to measure the absorption of the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles as a function of the concentration of protein A. Such dependence shows an aggregation region (0 < x<6 {mu}g/ml), where the amount of protein A was insufficient to cover the surface of particles, obtaining aggregation caused by NaCl. The next part is the stability region (x {>=} 6 {mu}g/ml), where the amount of protein used covers the surface of particles and protects it from the aggregation. In addition to that the ratio between the intensities of both: the aggregates and of the gold nanoparticle bands was plotted as a function of the concentration of protein A. It was determined that 6 {mu}g/ml is a sufficient value of protein A to stabilize the gold nanoparticle-protein A system. This method provides a simple way to stabilize gold nanoparticles obtained by citrate reduction, with protein A.

  4. Impact of pH on molecular structure and surface properties of lentil legumin-like protein and its application as foam stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarpa-Parra, M; Bamdad, F; Tian, Z; Zeng, Hongbo; Temelli, Feral; Chen, L

    2015-08-01

    The capacity of a protein to form and stabilize foams and emulsions depends on its structural characteristics and its physicochemical properties. The structural properties of lentil legumin-like protein including molecular weight, hydrodynamic size, surface charge and hydrophobicity, and conformation were studied in relation to its air-water interfacial behaviors. Kinetics study suggested that the foaming stability was closely related to the surface conformation of the protein that strongly affected adsorption and re-organization of the protein layer at the air-water interface. Foams prepared at neutral pH showed dense and strong networks at the interface, where combination of the α-helix secondary structure, medium hydrodynamic molecular size, and balance between solubility/hydrophobicity all contributed to the formation of such strong protein network at the interface. At pH 5.0, the protein formed a dense and thick network composed of randomly aggregated protein particles at the air-water interface. Whereas at pH 3.0, the unordered structure increased intra-protein flexibility producing a less compact and relaxed interface that reduces elasticity modulus with time and reduced foam resistance against collapse. This research revealed that lentil legumin-like protein could form long-life foams at mild acidic and neutral pH. The potential for use of lentil protein as a novel foaming plant-based stabilizer is demonstrated in food and non-food applications where stable, long-life foams are required. PMID:26005930

  5. A combinatorial F box protein directed pathway controls TRAF adaptor stability to regulate inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bill B; Coon, Tiffany A; Glasser, Jennifer R; McVerry, Bryan J; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; Zou, Chunbin; Ellis, Bryon; Sciurba, Frank C; Zhang, Yingze; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2013-05-01

    Uncontrolled activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) proteins may result in profound tissue injury by linking surface signals to cytokine release. Here we show that a ubiquitin E3 ligase component, Fbxo3, potently stimulates cytokine secretion from human inflammatory cells by destabilizing a sentinel TRAF inhibitor, Fbxl2. Fbxo3 and TRAF protein in circulation positively correlated with cytokine responses in subjects with sepsis, and we identified a polymorphism in human Fbxo3, with one variant being hypofunctional. A small-molecule inhibitor targeting Fbxo3 was sufficient to lessen severity of cytokine-driven inflammation in several mouse disease models. These studies identified a pathway of innate immunity that may be useful to detect subjects with altered immune responses during critical illness or provide a basis for therapeutic intervention targeting TRAF protein abundance. PMID:23542741

  6. Dietary citrus pulp improves protein stability in lamb meat stored under aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravador, Rufielyn Sungcaya; Jongberg, Sisse; Andersen, Mogens Larsen;

    2014-01-01

    The antioxidant effects of dried citrus pulp on proteins in lamb meat, when used as a replacement of concentrate in the feed, was studied using meat from 26 male Comisana lambs. The lambs of age 90. days had been grouped randomly to receive one of the three dietary treatments: (1) commercial...... concentrate with 60% barley (Control, n=8), (2) concentrate with 35% barley and 24% citrus pulp (Cp24, n=9), or (3) concentrate with 23% barley and 35% citrus pulp (Cp35, n=9). Slices from the longissimus thoracis et lomborum muscle were packed aerobically and stored for up to 6. days at 4°C in the dark....... The citrus pulp groups, Cp24 and Cp35, significantly decreased protein radicals and carbonyls, and preserved more thiols within six days of storage compared to the Control group. The citrus pulp groups significantly slowed down the rate of protein oxidation, indicating that dietary citrus pulp reduced...

  7. Phosphorylation of Puma modulates its apoptotic function by regulating protein stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fricker, M; O'Prey, J.; Tolkovsky, A M; Ryan, K M

    2010-01-01

    Puma is a potent BH3-only protein that antagonises anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, promotes Bax/Bak activation and has an essential role in multiple apoptotic models. Puma expression is normally kept very low, but can be induced by several transcription factors including p53, p73, E2F1 and FOXO3a, whereby it can induce an apoptotic response. As Puma can to bind and inactivate all anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, its activity must be tightly controlled. We report here, for the first ...

  8. Tradeoff between stability and multispecificity in the design of promiscuous proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menachem Fromer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural proteins often partake in several highly specific protein-protein interactions. They are thus subject to multiple opposing forces during evolutionary selection. To be functional, such multispecific proteins need to be stable in complex with each interaction partner, and, at the same time, to maintain affinity toward all partners. How is this multispecificity acquired through natural evolution? To answer this compelling question, we study a prototypical multispecific protein, calmodulin (CaM, which has evolved to interact with hundreds of target proteins. Starting from high-resolution structures of sixteen CaM-target complexes, we employ state-of-the-art computational methods to predict a hundred CaM sequences best suited for interaction with each individual CaM target. Then, we design CaM sequences most compatible with each possible combination of two, three, and all sixteen targets simultaneously, producing almost 70,000 low energy CaM sequences. By comparing these sequences and their energies, we gain insight into how nature has managed to find the compromise between the need for favorable interaction energies and the need for multispecificity. We observe that designing for more partners simultaneously yields CaM sequences that better match natural sequence profiles, thus emphasizing the importance of such strategies in nature. Furthermore, we show that the CaM binding interface can be nicely partitioned into positions that are critical for the affinity of all CaM-target complexes and those that are molded to provide interaction specificity. We reveal several basic categories of sequence-level tradeoffs that enable the compromise necessary for the promiscuity of this protein. We also thoroughly quantify the tradeoff between interaction energetics and multispecificity and find that facilitating seemingly competing interactions requires only a small deviation from optimal energies. We conclude that multispecific proteins have been

  9. Maximizing Plasmid Stability and Production of Released Proteins in Yersinia enterocolitica

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huaiyu; Bhaduri, Saumya; Magee, Wayne E.

    1998-01-01

    Virulent serotypes of Yersinia enterocolitica carry a plasmid (pYV) encoding a family of proteins that are released into the medium and whose expression is temperature and calcium regulated. The plasmid is easily lost from cells during their growth in the laboratory. We have used sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting with a monoclonal antibody (3.2C) that is specific for a 25-kDa released protein to show that 32°C is the lowest temperature at which pla...

  10. Understanding the Relationship Between Biotherapeutic Protein Stability and Solid–Liquid Interfacial Shear in Constant Region Mutants of IgG1 and IgG4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli-Keshe, Roumteen; Phillips, Jonathan J; Turner, Richard; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    Relative stability of therapeutic antibody candidates is currently evaluated primarily through their response to thermal degradation, yet this technique is not always predictive of stability in manufacture, shipping, and storage. A rotating disk shear device is proposed that produces defined shear conditions at a known solid–liquid interface to measure stability in this environment. Five variants of IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies were created using combinations of two discrete triple amino acid sequence mutations denoted TM and YTE. Antibodies were ranked for stability based on shear device output (protein decay coefficient, PDC), and compared with accelerated thermal stability data and the melting temperature of the CH2 domain (Tm1) from differential scanning calorimetry to investigate technique complimentarity. Results suggest that the techniques are orthogonal, with thermal methods based on intramolecular interaction and shear device stability based on localized unfolding revealing less stable regions that drive aggregation. Molecular modeling shows the modifications’ effects on the antibody structures and indicates a possible role for Fc conformation and Fab-Fc docking in determining suspended protein stability. The data introduce the PDC value as an orthogonal stability indicator, complementary to traditional thermal methods, allowing lead antibody selection based on a more full understanding of process stability. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:437–444, 2014 PMID:24357426

  11. ARNTL (BMAL1 and NPAS2 gene variants contribute to fertility and seasonality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Kovanen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian clocks guide the metabolic, cell-division, sleep-wake, circadian and seasonal cycles. Abnormalities in these clocks may be a health hazard. Circadian clock gene polymorphisms have been linked to sleep, mood and metabolic disorders. Our study aimed to examine polymorphisms in four key circadian clock genes in relation to seasonal variation, reproduction and well-being in a sample that was representative of the general population, aged 30 and over, living in Finland. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the ARNTL, ARNTL2, CLOCK and NPAS2 genes were genotyped in 511 individuals. 19 variants were analyzed in relation to 31 phenotypes that were assessed in a health interview and examination study. With respect to reproduction, women with ARNTL rs2278749 TT genotype had more miscarriages and pregnancies, while NPAS2 rs11673746 T carriers had fewer miscarriages. NPAS2 rs2305160 A allele carriers had lower Global Seasonality Scores, a sum score of six items i.e. seasonal variation of sleep length, social activity, mood, weight, appetite and energy level. Furthermore, carriers of A allele at NPAS2 rs6725296 had greater loadings on the metabolic factor (weight and appetite of the global seasonality score, whereas individuals with ARNTL rs6290035 TT genotype experienced less seasonal variation of energy level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ARNTL and NPAS2 gene variants were associated with reproduction and with seasonal variation. Earlier findings have linked ARNTL to infertility in mice, but this is the first time when any polymorphism of these genes is linked to fertility in humans.

  12. Bmal1 is a direct transcriptional target of the orphan nuclear receptor, NR2F1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphan nuclear receptor NR2F1 (also known as COUP-TFI, Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor I) is a highly conserved member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. NR2F1 plays a critical role during embryonic development, particularly in the central and peripheral nervous systems a...

  13. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tamaru (Teruya); M. Hattori (Mitsuru); K. Honda (Kousuke); Y. Nakahata (Yasukazu); P. Sassone-Corsi (Paolo); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); T. Ozawa (Takeaki); K. Takamatsu (Ken)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we establi

  14. Probing Bio-Nano Interactions between Blood Proteins and Monolayer-Stabilized Graphene Sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, Shiyu; Zhong, Lijie; Han, Dongxue;

    2015-01-01

    Meeting proteins is regarded as the starting event for nanostructures to enter biological systems. Understanding their interactions is thus essential for a newly emerging field, nanomedicine. Chemically converted graphene (CCG) is a wonderful two-dimesional (2D) material for nanomedecine, but its...

  15. Extensible byssus of Pinctada fucata: Ca2+-stabilized nanocavities and a thrombospondin-1 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuang; Li, Shiguo; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Jia, Ganchu; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-10-01

    The extensible byssus is produced by the foot of bivalve animals, including the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata, and enables them to attach to hard underwater surfaces. However, the mechanism of their extensibility is not well understood. To understand this mechanism, we analyzed the ultrastructure, composition and mechanical properties of the P. fucata byssus using electron microscopy, elemental analysis, proteomics and mechanical testing. In contrast to the microstructures of Mytilus sp. byssus, the P. fucata byssus has an exterior cuticle without granules and an inner core with nanocavities. The removal of Ca2+ by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment expands the nanocavities and reduces the extensibility of the byssus, which is accompanied by a decrease in the β-sheet conformation of byssal proteins. Through proteomic methods, several proteins with antioxidant and anti-corrosive properties were identified as the main components of the distal byssus regions. Specifically, a protein containing thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), which is highly expressed in the foot, is hypothesized to be responsible for byssus extensibility. Together, our findings demonstrate the importance of inorganic ions and multiple proteins for bivalve byssus extension, which could guide the future design of biomaterials for use in seawater.

  16. Speed-stability paradox in DNA-scanning by zinc-finger proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Iwahara, Junji; Levy, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Extensive contact with DNA via multiple zinc fingers allows highly specific DNA-binding of zinc-finger-class transcription factors, but can also slow the target search process. Here we introduce recent insights into how zinc-finger proteins can rapidly scan DNA. Potential application of the new knowledge to the zinc-finger-based technology is also discussed.

  17. The Role of RNA Binding Proteins in Insulin Messenger Stability and Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Fred, Rikard G.

    2010-01-01

    Although the reason for insufficient release of insulin in diabetes mellitus may vary depending on the type and stage of the disease, it is of vital importance that an amplified insulin biosynthesis can meet the increased need during periods of hyperglycemia. The insulin mRNA is highly abundant in beta cells and changes in insulin mRNA levels are, at least in part, controlled by altered rates of mRNA degradation. Since the mechanisms behind the control of insulin messenger stability and trans...

  18. pRb controls estrogen receptor alpha protein stability and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Isabella; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Giordano, Antonio; Rizzolio, Flavio

    2013-06-01

    A cross talk between the Estrogen Receptor (ESR1) and the Retinoblastoma (pRb) pathway has been demonstrated to influence the therapeutic response of breast cancer patients but the full mechanism remains poorly understood. Here we show that the N-terminal domain of pRb interacts with the CD domain of ESR1 to allow for the assembly of intermediate complex chaperone proteins HSP90 and p23. We demonstrated that a loss of pRb in human/mouse breast cells decreases the expression of the ESR1 protein through the proteasome pathway. Our work reveals a novel regulatory mechanism of ESR1 basal turnover and activity and an unanticipated relationship with the pRb tumor suppressor.

  19. Yeast surface display for directed evolution of protein expression, affinity, and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, E T; Wittrup, K D

    2000-01-01

    The described protocols enable thorough screening of polypeptide libraries with high confidence in the isolation of improved clones. It should be emphasized that the protocols have been fashioned for thoroughness, rather than speed. With library plasmid DNA in hand, the time to plated candidate yeast display mutants is typically 2-3 weeks. Each of the experimental approaches required for this method is fairly standard: yeast culture, immunofluorescent labeling, flow cytometry. Protocols that are more rapid could conceivably be developed by using solid substrate separations with magnetic beads, for instance. However, loss of the two-color normalization possible with flow cytometry would remove the quantitative advantage of the method. Yeast display complements existing polypeptide library methods and opens the possibility of examining extracellular eukaryotic proteins, an important class of proteins not generally amenable to yeast two-hybrid or phage display methodologies.

  20. A novel role for the nuclear localization signal in regulating hnRNP K protein stability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Erica J; Belrose, Jamie L; Szaro, Ben G

    2016-09-16

    hnRNP K is a highly conserved nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, which associates with RNAs through synergistic binding via its three KH domains. hnRNP K is required for proper nuclear export and translational control of its mRNA targets, and these processes are controlled by hnRNP K's movement between subcellular compartments. Whereas the nuclear export and localization of hnRNP K that is associated with mRNP complexes has been well studied, the trafficking of hnRNP K that is unbound to mRNA has yet to be elucidated. To that end, we expressed an EGFP-tagged RNA binding-defective form of hnRNP K in intact Xenopus embryos, and found it was rapidly degraded in vivo. Deleting hnRNP K's nuclear localization signal (NLS), which contains two prospective ubiquitination sites, rescued the protein from degradation. These data demonstrate a novel activity for the NLS of hnRNP K in regulating the protein's stability in vivo when it is unbound to nucleic acids.

  1. Theoretical Insights into the Biophysics of Protein Bi-stability and Evolutionary Switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikosek, Tobias; Krobath, Heinrich; Chan, Hue Sun

    2016-06-01

    Deciphering the effects of nonsynonymous mutations on protein structure is central to many areas of biomedical research and is of fundamental importance to the study of molecular evolution. Much of the investigation of protein evolution has focused on mutations that leave a protein's folded structure essentially unchanged. However, to evolve novel folds of proteins, mutations that lead to large conformational modifications have to be involved. Unraveling the basic biophysics of such mutations is a challenge to theory, especially when only one or two amino acid substitutions cause a large-scale conformational switch. Among the few such mutational switches identified experimentally, the one between the GA all-α and GB α+β folds is extensively characterized; but all-atom simulations using fully transferrable potentials have not been able to account for this striking switching behavior. Here we introduce an explicit-chain model that combines structure-based native biases for multiple alternative structures with a general physical atomic force field, and apply this construct to twelve mutants spanning the sequence variation between GA and GB. In agreement with experiment, we observe conformational switching from GA to GB upon a single L45Y substitution in the GA98 mutant. In line with the latent evolutionary potential concept, our model shows a gradual sequence-dependent change in fold preference in the mutants before this switch. Our analysis also indicates that a sharp GA/GB switch may arise from the orientation dependence of aromatic π-interactions. These findings provide physical insights toward rationalizing, predicting and designing evolutionary conformational switches. PMID:27253392

  2. Intravenous delivery of hydrophobin-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles: stability, plasma protein adsorption and biodistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarparanta, Mirkka; Bimbo, Luis M; Rytkönen, Jussi; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo J; Laaksonen, Päivi; Nyman, Markus; Salonen, Jarno; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A; Airaksinen, Anu J

    2012-03-01

    Rapid immune recognition and subsequent elimination from the circulation hampers the use of many nanomaterials as carriers to targeted drug delivery and controlled release in the intravenous route. Here, we report the effect of a functional self-assembled protein coating on the intravenous biodistribution of (18)F-labeled thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles in rats. (18)F-Radiolabeling enables the sensitive and easy quantification of nanoparticles in tissues using radiometric methods and allows imaging of the nanoparticle biodistribution with positron emission tomography. Coating with Trichoderma reesei HFBII altered the hydrophobicity of (18)F-THCPSi nanoparticles and resulted in a pronounced change in the degree of plasma protein adsorption to the nanoparticle surface in vitro. The HFBII-THCPSi nanoparticles were biocompatible in RAW 264.7 macrophages and HepG2 liver cells making their intravenous administration feasible. In vivo, the distribution of the nanoparticles between the liver and spleen, the major mononuclear phagocyte system organs in the body, was altered compared to that of uncoated (18)F-THCPSi. Identification of the adsorbed proteins revealed that certain opsonins and apolipoproteins are enriched in HFBII-functionalized nanoparticles, whereas the adsorption of abundant plasma components such as serum albumin and fibrinogen is decreased.

  3. Seed-Specific Expression of Spider Silk Protein Multimers Causes Long-Term Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, Nicola; Hauptmann, Valeska; Helmold, Christine; Conrad, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Seeds enable plants to germinate and to grow in situations of limited availability of nutrients. The stable storage of different seed proteins is a remarkable presumption for successful germination and growth. These strategies have been adapted and used in several molecular farming projects. In this study, we explore the benefits of seed-based expression to produce the high molecular weight spider silk protein FLAG using intein-based trans-splicing. Multimers larger than 460 kDa in size are routinely produced, which is above the native size of the FLAG protein. The storage of seeds for 8 weeks and 1 year at an ambient temperature of 15°C does not influence the accumulation level. Even the extended storage time does not influence the typical pattern of multimerized bands. These results show that seeds are the method of choice for stable accumulation of products of complex transgenes and have the capability for long-term storage at moderate conditions, an important feature for the development of suitable downstream processes. PMID:26858734

  4. Sequence-specific size, structure, and stability of tight protein knots

    CERN Document Server

    Dzubiella, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the known protein structures display knotted configurations in their native fold but their function is not understood. It has been speculated that the entanglement may inhibit mechanical protein unfolding or transport, e.g., as in cellular threading or translocation processes through narrow biological pores. Here we investigate tigh peptide knot (TPK) characteristics in detail by pulling selected 3_1 and 4_1-knotted peptides using all-atom molecular dynamics computer simulations. We find that the 3_1 and 4_1-TPK lengths are typically Delta l~4.7 nm and 6.9 nm, respectively, for a wide range of tensions (F < 1.5 nN), pointing to a pore diameter of ~2 nm below which a translocated knotted protein might get stuck. The 4_1-knot length is in agreement with recent AFM pulling experiments. Detailed TPK characteristics however, may be sequence-specific: we find a different size and structural behavior in polyglycines, and, strikingly, a strong hydrogen bonding and water molecule trapping capabi...

  5. The smallest capsid protein mediates binding of the essential tegument protein pp150 to stabilize DNA-containing capsids in human cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghong Dai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that causes birth defects in newborns and life-threatening complications in immunocompromised individuals. Among all human herpesviruses, HCMV contains a much larger dsDNA genome within a similarly-sized capsid compared to the others, and it was proposed to require pp150, a tegument protein only found in cytomegaloviruses, to stabilize its genome-containing capsid. However, little is known about how pp150 interacts with the underlying capsid. Moreover, the smallest capsid protein (SCP, while dispensable in herpes simplex virus type 1, was shown to play essential, yet undefined, role in HCMV infection. Here, by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM, we determine three-dimensional structures of HCMV capsid (no pp150 and virion (with pp150 at sub-nanometer resolution. Comparison of these two structures reveals that each pp150 tegument density is composed of two helix bundles connected by a long central helix. Correlation between the resolved helices and sequence-based secondary structure prediction maps the tegument density to the N-terminal half of pp150. The structures also show that SCP mediates interactions between the capsid and pp150 at the upper helix bundle of pp150. Consistent with this structural observation, ribozyme inhibition of SCP expression in HCMV-infected cells impairs the formation of DNA-containing viral particles and reduces viral yield by 10,000 fold. By cryoEM reconstruction of the resulting "SCP-deficient" viral particles, we further demonstrate that SCP is required for pp150 functionally binding to the capsid. Together, our structural and biochemical results point to a mechanism whereby SCP recruits pp150 to stabilize genome-containing capsid for the production of infectious HCMV virion.

  6. Renal protein reactivity and stability of antibiotic amphenicols: structure and affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fei; Peng, Wei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Jiang, Yu-Ting

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, the molecular recognition of the oldest active amphenicols by the most popular renal carrier, lysozyme, was deciphered by using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular modeling at the molecular scale. Steady state fluorescence data showed that the recognition of amphenicol by lysozyme yields a static type of fluorescence quenching. This corroborates time-resolved fluorescence results that lysozyme-amphenicol adduct formation has a moderate affinity of 10(4) M(-1), and the driving forces were found to be chiefly hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions and π stacking. Far-UV CD spectra confirmed that the spatial structure of lysozyme was slightly changed with a distinct reduction of α-helices in the presence of amphenicol, suggesting partial destabilization of the protein. Furthermore, via the extrinsic 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorescence spectral properties and molecular modeling, one could see that the amphenicol binding site was situated at the deep crevice on the protein surface, and the ligand was also near to several crucial amino acid residues, such as Trp-62, Trp-63 and Arg-73. Simultaneously, contrastive studies of protein-amphenicols revealed clearly that some substituting groups, e.g. nitryl in the molecular structure of ligands, may be vitally important for the recognition activity of amphenicols with lysozyme. Due to the connection of amphenicols with fatal detrimental effects and because lysozyme has been applied as a drug carrier for proximal tubular targeting, the discussion herein is necessary for rational antibiotic use, development of safe antibiotics and particularly a better appraisal of the risks associated with human exposure to toxic agrochemicals. PMID:25016933

  7. Dietary citrus pulp improves protein stability in lamb meat stored under aerobic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gravador, Rufielyn S.; Jongberg, Sisse; Andersen, Mogens L.; Luciano, Giuseppe; Priolo, Alessandro; Lund, Marianne N.

    2014-01-01

    The antioxidant effects of dried citrus pulp on proteins in lamb meat, when used as a replacement of concentrate in the feed, was studied using meat from 26 male Comisana lambs. The lambs of age 90 days had been grouped randomly to receive one of the three dietary treatments: (1) commercial concentrate with 60% barley (Control, n = 8), (2) concentrate with 35% barley and 24% citrus pulp (Cp24, n = 9), or (3) concentrate with 23% barley and 35% citrus pulp (Cp35, n = 9). Slices from the longis...

  8. Cyclin D2 Protein Stability Is Regulated in Pancreatic β-Cells

    OpenAIRE

    He, Lu Mei; Sartori, Daniel J.; Teta, Monica; Opare-Addo, Lynn M.; Rankin, Matthew M.; Long, Simon Y.; Diehl, J. Alan; Kushner, Jake A.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular determinants of β-cell mass expansion remain poorly understood. Cyclin D2 is the major D-type cyclin expressed in β-cells, essential for adult β-cell growth. We hypothesized that cyclin D2 could be actively regulated in β-cells, which could allow mitogenic stimuli to influence β-cell expansion. Cyclin D2 protein was sharply increased after partial pancreatectomy, but cyclin D2 mRNA was unchanged, suggesting posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms influence cyclin D2 expression...

  9. Regulation of mRNA stability via BRF1 and other AU-binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidlin-Stalder, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Steady state levels of mRNAs are determined by the rate of synthesis and degradation. A well-known cis-element conferring instability to mRNA is the so-called AU-rich element (ARE), which is present in the 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR) of many cytokines, chemokines, growth factors or proto-oncogenes. The ARE is recognized by a variety of ARE-binding proteins (AUBPs), which decide about the fate of the RNA. Multiple signaling cascades regulate the activity of the AUBPs. Butyrate response fact...

  10. A single intermolecular contact mediates intramolecular stabilization of both RNA and protein

    OpenAIRE

    Calabro, Valerie; Daugherty, Matthew D.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2005-01-01

    An arginine-rich peptide from the Jembrana disease virus (JDV) Tat protein is a structural “chameleon” that binds bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) or HIV TAR RNAs in two different binding modes, with an affinity for BIV TAR even higher than the cognate BIV peptide. We determined the NMR structure of the JDV Tat–BIV TAR high-affinity complex and found that the C-terminal tyrosine in JDV Tat forms a network of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding and stacking interactions that simultan...

  11. Protein Kinase B/Akt Binds and Phosphorylates PED/PEA-15, Stabilizing Its Antiapoptotic Action

    OpenAIRE

    Trencia, Alessandra; Perfetti, Anna; Cassese, Angela; Vigliotta, Giovanni; Miele, Claudia; Oriente, Francesco; Santopietro, Stefania; Giacco, Ferdinando; Condorelli, Gerolama; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    The antiapoptotic protein PED/PEA-15 features an Akt phosphorylation motif upstream from Ser116. In vitro, recombinant PED/PEA-15 was phosphorylated by Akt with a stoichiometry close to 1. Based on Western blotting with specific phospho-Ser116 PED/PEA-15 antibodies, Akt phosphorylation of PED/PEA-15 occurred mainly at Ser116. In addition, a mutant of PED/PEA-15 featuring the substitution of Ser116→Gly (PEDS116→G) showed 10-fold-decreased phosphorylation by Akt. In intact 293 cells, Akt also i...

  12. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashko, Oleg N; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-05-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane-protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E-membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1-499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (K(d)) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the "large" domain (amino acids 1-400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5'-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E-membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  13. Synapse-Assembly Proteins Maintain Synaptic Vesicle Cluster Stability and Regulate Synaptic Vesicle Transport in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Stacey L; Yorks, Rosalina M; Morrison, Logan M; Hoover, Christopher M; Miller, Kenneth G

    2015-09-01

    The functional integrity of neurons requires the bidirectional active transport of synaptic vesicles (SVs) in axons. The kinesin motor KIF1A transports SVs from somas to stable SV clusters at synapses, while dynein moves them in the opposite direction. However, it is unclear how SV transport is regulated and how SVs at clusters interact with motor proteins. We addressed these questions by isolating a rare temperature-sensitive allele of Caenorhabditis elegans unc-104 (KIF1A) that allowed us to manipulate SV levels in axons and dendrites. Growth at 20° and 14° resulted in locomotion rates that were ∼3 and 50% of wild type, respectively, with similar effects on axonal SV levels. Corresponding with the loss of SVs from axons, mutants grown at 14° and 20° showed a 10- and 24-fold dynein-dependent accumulation of SVs in their dendrites. Mutants grown at 14° and switched to 25° showed an abrupt irreversible 50% decrease in locomotion and a 50% loss of SVs from the synaptic region 12-hr post-shift, with no further decreases at later time points, suggesting that the remaining clustered SVs are stable and resistant to retrograde removal by dynein. The data further showed that the synapse-assembly proteins SYD-1, SYD-2, and SAD-1 protected SV clusters from degradation by motor proteins. In syd-1, syd-2, and sad-1 mutants, SVs accumulate in an UNC-104-dependent manner in the distal axon region that normally lacks SVs. In addition to their roles in SV cluster stability, all three proteins also regulate SV transport.

  14. Histone demethylase Jumonji D3 (JMJD3 as a tumor suppressor by regulating p53 protein nuclear stabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chibawanye I Ene

    Full Text Available Histone methylation regulates normal stem cell fate decisions through a coordinated interplay between histone methyltransferases and demethylases at lineage specific genes. Malignant transformation is associated with aberrant accumulation of repressive histone modifications, such as polycomb mediated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3 resulting in a histone methylation mediated block to differentiation. The relevance, however, of histone demethylases in cancer remains less clear. We report that JMJD3, a H3K27me3 demethylase, is induced during differentiation of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs, where it promotes a differentiation-like phenotype via chromatin dependent (INK4A/ARF locus activation and chromatin independent (nuclear p53 protein stabilization mechanisms. Our findings indicate that deregulation of JMJD3 may contribute to gliomagenesis via inhibition of the p53 pathway resulting in a block to terminal differentiation.

  15. A CSTR-hollow-fiber system for continuous hydrolysis of proteins. Factors affecting long-term stability of the reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeslie, W D; Cheryan, M

    1982-01-01

    Factors affecting the long-term operational stability of a CSTR-hollow-fiber reactor for continuous hydrolysis of proteins were studied. The activity declined in a stepwise manner during a run. Declining from 92% conversion to 60% conversion in about ten hours at a space time of four minutes. Initial decay appears to be due to leakage of small active fragments of the enzyme mixture (Pronase) through the membrane, and later decay due to thermal degradation and loss of activators such as calcium through the membrane. The rate of buildup of unconverted substrate in the reaction vessel was controlled by operational variables, but did not appear to affect the reactor output or the operation of the reactor. The decay of the reactor could be partially compensated for by appropriate manipulation of the space-time variables.

  16. Influence of protein-micelle ratios and cysteine residues on the kinetic stability and unfolding rates of human mitochondrial VDAC-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Rajkumar Maurya

    Full Text Available Delineating the kinetic and thermodynamic factors which contribute to the stability of transmembrane β-barrels is critical to gain an in-depth understanding of membrane protein behavior. Human mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel isoform 2 (hVDAC-2, one of the key anti-apoptotic eukaryotic β-barrel proteins, is of paramount importance, owing to its indispensable role in cell survival. We demonstrate here that the stability of hVDAC-2 bears a strong kinetic contribution that is dependent on the absolute micellar concentration used for barrel folding. The refolding efficiency and ensuing stability is sensitive to the lipid-to-protein (LPR ratio, and displays a non-linear relationship, with both low and high micellar amounts being detrimental to hVDAC-2 structure. Unfolding and aggregation process are sequential events and show strong temperature dependence. We demonstrate that an optimal lipid-to-protein ratio of 2600∶1 - 13,000∶1 offers the highest protection against thermal denaturation. Activation energies derived only for lower LPRs are ∼17 kcal mol(-1 for full-length hVDAC-2 and ∼23 kcal mol(-1 for the Cys-less mutant, suggesting that the nine cysteine residues of hVDAC-2 impart additional malleability to the barrel scaffold. Our studies reveal that cysteine residues play a key role in the kinetic stability of the protein, determine barrel rigidity and thereby give rise to strong micellar association of hVDAC-2. Non-linearity of the Arrhenius plot at high LPRs coupled with observation of protein aggregation upon thermal denaturation indicates that contributions from both kinetic and thermodynamic components stabilize the 19-stranded β-barrel. Lipid-protein interaction and the linked kinetic contribution to free energy of the folded protein are together expected to play a key role in hVDAC-2 recycling and the functional switch at the onset of apoptosis.

  17. A Network of Multi-Tasking Proteins at the DNA Replication Fork Preserves Genome Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the network that maintains high fidelity genome replication, we have introduced two conditional mutant alleles of DNA2, an essential DNA replication gene, into each of the approximately 4,700 viable yeast deletion mutants and determined the fitness of the double mutants. Fifty-six DNA2-interacting genes were identified. Clustering analysis of genomic synthetic lethality profiles of each of 43 of the DNA2-interacting genes defines a network (consisting of 322 genes and 876 interactions whose topology provides clues as to how replication proteins coordinate regulation and repair to protect genome integrity. The results also shed new light on the functions of the query gene DNA2, which, despite many years of study, remain controversial, especially its proposed role in Okazaki fragment processing and the nature of its in vivo substrates. Because of the multifunctional nature of virtually all proteins at the replication fork, the meaning of any single genetic interaction is inherently ambiguous. The multiplexing nature of the current studies, however, combined with follow-up supporting experiments, reveals most if not all of the unique pathways requiring Dna2p. These include not only Okazaki fragment processing and DNA repair but also chromatin dynamics.

  18. PROTS-RF: a robust model for predicting mutation-induced protein stability changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqi Li

    Full Text Available The ability to improve protein thermostability via protein engineering is of great scientific interest and also has significant practical value. In this report we present PROTS-RF, a robust model based on the Random Forest algorithm capable of predicting thermostability changes induced by not only single-, but also double- or multiple-point mutations. The model is built using 41 features including evolutionary information, secondary structure, solvent accessibility and a set of fragment-based features. It achieves accuracies of 0.799,0.782, 0.787, and areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of 0.873, 0.868 and 0.862 for single-, double- and multiple- point mutation datasets, respectively. Contrary to previous suggestions, our results clearly demonstrate that a robust predictive model trained for predicting single point mutation induced thermostability changes can be capable of predicting double and multiple point mutations. It also shows high levels of robustness in the tests using hypothetical reverse mutations. We demonstrate that testing datasets created based on physical principles can be highly useful for testing the robustness of predictive models.

  19. CCM2-CCM3 interaction stabilizes their protein expression and permits endothelial network formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draheim, Kyle M.; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Fisher, Oriana S.; Villari, Giulia; Boggon, Titus J.; Calderwood, David A. [Yale

    2015-04-21

    Mutations in the essential adaptor proteins CCM2 or CCM3 lead to cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM), vascular lesions that most frequently occur in the brain and are strongly associated with hemorrhagic stroke, seizures, and other neurological disorders. CCM2 binds CCM3, but the molecular basis of this interaction, and its functional significance, have not been elucidated. Here, we used x-ray crystallography and structure-guided mutagenesis to show that an α-helical LD-like motif within CCM2 binds the highly conserved “HP1” pocket of the CCM3 focal adhesion targeting (FAT) homology domain. By knocking down CCM2 or CCM3 and rescuing with binding-deficient mutants, we establish that CCM2–CCM3 interactions protect CCM2 and CCM3 proteins from proteasomal degradation and show that both CCM2 and CCM3 are required for normal endothelial cell network formation. However, CCM3 expression in the absence of CCM2 is sufficient to support normal cell growth, revealing complex-independent roles for CCM3.

  20. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gil-Hah, E-mail: khkim@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Plant Medicine, College of Agriculture, Life and Environment Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii. - Highlights: > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal development of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation inhibited normal reproduction of the leaf miner. > Electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage. > Electron beam irradiation induced p53 stability.

  1. Genotype by environment interaction and yield stability analysis of quality protein maize genotypes in Terai Region of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiban Shrestha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Grain yield stability for the new maize genotypes is an important target in maize breeding programs. The main objective of this study was to identify stable high yielding quality protein maize (QPM genotypes under various locations and years in terai region of Nepal. Six quality protein maize genotypes along with Poshilo Makai-1 (Standard Check and Farmer’s Variety (Local Check were tested at three different locations namely Ayodhyapuri-2, Devendrapur, Madi, Chitwan; Rajahar-8, Bartandi, Rajahar, Nawalparasi; Mangalpur-2, Rampur, Chitwan during 2011 and 2012 spring and winter seasons under rainfed condition. The experiment was conducted using Randomized Complete Block Design with two replications in farmer’s fields. There was considerable variation among genotypes and environments for grain yield. The analysis of variance showed that mean squares of environments (E was highly significant and genotypes (G and genotype x environment interaction (GEI were non significant. The genotypes S03TLYQ- AB02 and RampurS03FQ02 respectively produced the higher mean grain yield 5422±564 kg/ha and 5274±603 kg/ha across the locations. Joint regression analysis showed that RampurS03FQ02 and S03TLYQ-AB02 with regression coefficient 1.10 and 1.22 respectively are the most stable genotypes over the tested environments. The coefficient of determination (R2 for genotypes Rampur S03FQ02 and S03TLYQ-AB02 were as high as 0.954, confirming their high predictability to stability. Further confirmation from GGE biplot analysis showed that maize genotype S03TLYQ-AB02 followed by Rampur S03FQ02 were more stable and adaptive genotypes across the tested environments. Thus these genotypes could be recommended to farmers for general cultivation.

  2. Heat shock protein 90β stabilizes focal adhesion kinase and enhances cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xiangyang [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Wang, Yao [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Liu, Chengmei [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Lu, Quqin [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Liu, Tao [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Chen, Guoan [Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China); Rao, Hai [Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Luo, Shiwen, E-mail: shiwenluo@ncu.edu.cn [Center for Experimental Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Street, Donghu District, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330006 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) acts as a regulator of cellular signaling and may promote cell spreading, motility, invasion and survival in malignancy. Elevated expression and activity of FAK frequently correlate with tumor cell metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. However, the mechanisms by which the turnover of FAK is regulated remain elusive. Here we report that heat shock protein 90β (HSP90β) interacts with FAK and the middle domain (amino acids 233–620) of HSP90β is mainly responsible for this interaction. Furthermore, we found that HSP90β regulates FAK stability since HSP90β inhibitor 17-AAG triggers FAK ubiquitylation and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, disrupted FAK-HSP90β interaction induced by 17-AAG contributes to attenuation of tumor cell growth, migration, and invasion. Together, our results reveal how HSP90β regulates FAK stability and identifies a potential therapeutic strategy to breast cancer. - Highlights: • HSP90β protects FAK from degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK attenuates tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. • Genetic repression of HSP90β or FAK inhibits tumor cell migration and proliferation. • Inhibition of HSP90β or FAK interferes cell invasion and cytoskeleton.

  3. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2012-01-01

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii.

  4. Citrate-stabilized CdSe/CdS quantum dots as fluorescence probe for protein determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xin; HUANG Ke-long; LIU Su-qin

    2010-01-01

    A rapid,ultrasensitive and convenient fluorescence measurement technology based on the enhancement of the fluorescence intensity resulting from the interaction of functionalized CdSe/CdS quantum dots(QDs)with bovine serum albumin(BSA)was proposed.The citrate-stabilized CdSe/CdS(QDs)were synthesized by using Se powder and Na2S as precursors instead of any pyrophoric organometallic precursors.The modified CdSe/CdS QDs are brighter and more stable against photobleaching in comparison with organic fluorophores.At pH 7.0,the fluorescence signal of CdSe/CdS is enhanced by increasing the concentration of BSA in the range of 0.1-10 μg/mL,and the low detection limit is 0.06 μg/mL.A linear relationship between the enhanced fluorescence peak intensity(ΔF)and BSA concentration(c)is established using equation AF=50.7c+16.4(R=0.996 36).Results of determination for BSA in three synthetic samples are identical with the true values,and the recovery(98.9%-102.4%)and relative standard deviation(RSD,1.8%-2.5%)are satisfactory.

  5. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    CERN Document Server

    Brust, M; Thiebaud, M; Flormann, D; Verdier, C; Kaestner, L; Laschke, M W; Selmi, H; Benyoussef, A; Podgorski, T; Coupier, G; Misbah, C; Wagner, C

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These pers...

  6. Purification of barley dimeric α-amylase inhibitor-1 (BDAI-1) and avenin-like protein-a (ALP) from beer and their impact on beer foam stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimure, Takashi; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Kazuhiro; Ogushi, Kensuke

    2015-04-01

    Foam stability is a key factor of beer quality for consumers and brewers. Recent beer proteome analyses have suggested that barley dimeric α-amylase inhibitor-1 (BDAI-1) and avenin-like protein-a (ALP) derived from barley are important for beer foam stability. In this study, BDAI-1 and ALP were purified from a Japanese commercial beer sample using salt precipitation and column chromatography. The purification level was verified using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and database searches. Purified BDAI-1 and ALP were added to a beer sample to compare the foam stability to that of a control beer sample. As a result, beer foam stability was significantly improved by BDAI-1 but not by ALP, thereby suggesting that BDAI-1 affects beer foam stability whereas ALP does not.

  7. Biophysical characterization of Met-G-CSF: effects of different site-specific mono-pegylations on protein stability and aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Natalello

    Full Text Available The limited stability of proteins in vitro and in vivo reduces their conversion into effective biopharmaceuticals. To overcome this problem several strategies can be exploited, as the conjugation of the protein of interest with polyethylene glycol, in most cases, improves its stability and pharmacokinetics. In this work, we report a biophysical characterization of the non-pegylated and of two different site-specific mono-pegylated forms of recombinant human methionyl-granulocyte colony stimulating factor (Met-G-CSF, a protein used in chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. In particular, we found that the two mono-pegylations of Met-G-CSF at the N-terminal methionine and at glutamine 135 increase the protein thermal stability, reduce the aggregation propensity, preventing also protein precipitation, as revealed by circular dichroism (CD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopies and dynamic light scattering (DLS. Interestingly, the two pegylation strategies were found to drastically reduce the polydispersity of Met-G-CSF, when incubated under conditions favouring protein aggregation, as indicated by DLS measurements. Our in vitro results are in agreement with preclinical studies, underlining that preliminary biophysical analyses, performed in the early stages of the development of new biopharmaceutical variants, might offer a useful tool for the identification of protein variants with improved therapeutic values.

  8. The bornavirus-derived human protein EBLN1 promotes efficient cell cycle transit, microtubule organisation and genome stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Katie N.; Barone, Giancarlo; Ganesh, Anil; Staples, Christopher J.; Howard, Anna E.; Beveridge, Ryan D.; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J. Mark; Collis, Spencer J.

    2016-01-01

    It was recently discovered that vertebrate genomes contain multiple endogenised nucleotide sequences derived from the non-retroviral RNA bornavirus. Strikingly, some of these elements have been evolutionary maintained as open reading frames in host genomes for over 40 million years, suggesting that some endogenised bornavirus-derived elements (EBL) might encode functional proteins. EBLN1 is one such element established through endogenisation of the bornavirus N gene (BDV N). Here, we functionally characterise human EBLN1 as a novel regulator of genome stability. Cells depleted of human EBLN1 accumulate DNA damage both under non-stressed conditions and following exogenously induced DNA damage. EBLN1-depleted cells also exhibit cell cycle abnormalities and defects in microtubule organisation as well as premature centrosome splitting, which we attribute in part, to improper localisation of the nuclear envelope protein TPR. Our data therefore reveal that human EBLN1 possesses important cellular functions within human cells, and suggest that other EBLs present within vertebrate genomes may also possess important cellular functions. PMID:27739501

  9. Thermal and Chemical Stability of Two Homologous POZ/BTB Domains of KCTD Proteins Characterized by a Different Oligomeric Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Pirone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available POZ/BTB domains are widespread modules detected in a variety of different biological contexts. Here, we report a biophysical characterization of the POZ/BTB of KCTD6, a protein that is involved in the turnover of the muscle small ankyrin-1 isoform 5 and, in combination with KCTD11, in the ubiquitination and degradation of HDAC1. The analyses show that the domain is a tetramer made up by subunits with the expected α/ structure. A detailed investigation of its stability, carried out in comparison with the homologous pentameric POZ/BTB domain isolated from KCTD5, highlights a number of interesting features, which are shared by the two domains despite their different organization. Their thermal/chemical denaturation curves are characterized by a single and sharp inflection point, suggesting that the denaturation of the two domains is a cooperative two-state process. Furthermore, both domains present a significant content of secondary structure in their denatured state and a reversible denaturation process. We suggest that the ability of these domains to fold and unfold reversibly, a property that is somewhat unexpected for these oligomeric assemblies, may have important implications for their biological function. Indeed, these properties likely favor the formation of heteromeric associations that may be essential for the intricate regulation of the processes in which these proteins are involved.

  10. Ubiquitin ligase RNF20/40 facilitates spindle assembly and promotes breast carcinogenesis through stabilizing motor protein Eg5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yang; Huo, Dawei; Gao, Jie; Wu, Heng; Ye, Zheng; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Kai; Shan, Lin; Zhou, Xing; Wang, Yue; Su, Dongxue; Ding, Xiang; Shi, Lei; Wang, Yan; Shang, Yongfeng; Xuan, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    Whether transcriptional regulators are functionally involved in mitosis is a fundamental question in cell biology. Here we report that the RNF20/40 complex, a major ubiquitin ligase catalysing histone H2B monoubiquitination, interacts with the motor protein Eg5 during mitosis and participates in spindle assembly. We show that the RNF20/40 complex monoubiquitinates and stabilizes Eg5. Loss of RNF20/40 results in spindle assembly defects, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Consistently, depletion of either RNF20/40 or Eg5 suppresses breast cancer in vivo. Significantly, RNF20/40 and Eg5 are concurrently upregulated in human breast carcinomas and high Eg5 expression is associated with poorer overall survival of patients with luminal A, or B, breast cancer. Our study uncovers an important spindle assembly role of the RNF20/40 complex, and implicates the RNF20/40-Eg5 axis in breast carcinogenesis, supporting the pursuit of these proteins as potential targets for breast cancer therapeutic interventions. PMID:27557628

  11. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues.

  12. Drebrin-like protein DBN-1 is a sarcomere component that stabilizes actin filaments during muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Bodensiek, Kai; Fakhri, Nikta; von Roden, Kerstin; Schaap, Iwan A T; Majoul, Irina; Schmidt, Christoph F; Klopfenstein, Dieter R

    2015-07-06

    Actin filament organization and stability in the sarcomeres of muscle cells are critical for force generation. Here we identify and functionally characterize a Caenorhabditis elegans drebrin-like protein DBN-1 as a novel constituent of the muscle contraction machinery. In vitro, DBN-1 exhibits actin filament binding and bundling activity. In vivo, DBN-1 is expressed in body wall muscles of C. elegans. During the muscle contraction cycle, DBN-1 alternates location between myosin- and actin-rich regions of the sarcomere. In contracted muscle, DBN-1 is accumulated at I-bands where it likely regulates proper spacing of α-actinin and tropomyosin and protects actin filaments from the interaction with ADF/cofilin. DBN-1 loss of function results in the partial depolymerization of F-actin during muscle contraction. Taken together, our data show that DBN-1 organizes the muscle contractile apparatus maintaining the spatial relationship between actin-binding proteins such as α-actinin, tropomyosin and ADF/cofilin and possibly strengthening actin filaments by bundling.

  13. Multi-scale thermal stability of a hard thermoplastic protein-based material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latza, Victoria; Guerette, Paul A.; Ding, Dawei; Amini, Shahrouz; Kumar, Akshita; Schmidt, Ingo; Keating, Steven; Oxman, Neri; Weaver, James C.; Fratzl, Peter; Miserez, Ali; Masic, Admir

    2015-01-01

    Although thermoplastic materials are mostly derived from petro-chemicals, it would be highly desirable, from a sustainability perspective, to produce them instead from renewable biopolymers. Unfortunately, biopolymers exhibiting thermoplastic behaviour and which preserve their mechanical properties post processing are essentially non-existent. The robust sucker ring teeth (SRT) from squid and cuttlefish are one notable exception of thermoplastic biopolymers. Here we describe thermoplastic processing of squid SRT via hot extrusion of fibres, demonstrating the potential suitability of these materials for large-scale thermal forming. Using high-resolution in situ X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular and nanoscale features responsible for this behaviour and show that SRT consist of semi-crystalline polymers, whereby heat-resistant, nanocrystalline β-sheets embedded within an amorphous matrix are organized into a hexagonally packed nanofibrillar lattice. This study provides key insights for the molecular design of biomimetic protein- and peptide-based thermoplastic structural biopolymers with potential biomedical and 3D printing applications. PMID:26387704

  14. Brain transcriptional stability upon prion protein-encoding gene invalidation in zygotic or adult mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béringue Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of the prion protein remains largely elusive while its key role in prion infection has been expansively documented. To potentially assess this conundrum, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the brain of wild-type mice with that of transgenic mice invalidated at this locus either at the zygotic or at the adult stages. Results Only subtle transcriptomic differences resulting from the Prnp knockout could be evidenced, beside Prnp itself, in the analyzed adult brains following microarray analysis of 24 109 mouse genes and QPCR assessment of some of the putatively marginally modulated loci. When performed at the adult stage, neuronal Prnp disruption appeared to sequentially induce a response to an oxidative stress and a remodeling of the nervous system. However, these events involved only a limited number of genes, expression levels of which were only slightly modified and not always confirmed by RT-qPCR. If not, the qPCR obtained data suggested even less pronounced differences. Conclusions These results suggest that the physiological function of PrP is redundant at the adult stage or important for only a small subset of the brain cell population under classical breeding conditions. Following its early reported embryonic developmental regulation, this lack of response could also imply that PrP has a more detrimental role during mouse embryogenesis and that potential transient compensatory mechanisms have to be searched for at the time this locus becomes transcriptionally activated.

  15. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  16. Self-Assembling Peptide Surfactants A6K and A6D Adopt a-Helical Structures Useful for Membrane Protein Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furen Zhuang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Elucidation of membrane protein structures have been greatly hampered by difficulties in producing adequately large quantities of the functional protein and stabilizing them. A6D and A6K are promising solutions to the problem and have recently been used for the rapid production of membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. We propose that despite their short lengths, these peptides can adopt α-helical structures through interactions with micelles formed by the peptides themselves. These α-helices are then able to stabilize α-helical motifs which many membrane proteins contain. We also show that A6D and A6K can form β-sheets and appear as weak hydrogels at sufficiently high concentrations. Furthermore, A6D and A6K together in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS can form expected β-sheet structures via a surprising α-helical intermediate.

  17. Novel prediction method of beer foam stability using protein Z, barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (BDAI-1) and yeast thioredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimure, Takashi; Takoi, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Takafumi; Kihara, Makoto; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Ito, Kazutoshi; Sato, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Kazuyoshi

    2008-09-24

    Foam stability is an important quality trait of beer. Our previous results of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) analyses of beer proteins implied a relationship between barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (BDAI-1) and beer foam stability as judged by the NIBEM-T analyzer. To develop a novel prediction method of beer foam stability under different conditions of barley cultivar and malt modification, multiple linear regression analysis was applied. The spot intensities of major beer proteins on 2DE gel were quantified and used as explanatory variables. The foam stabilities of 25 beer samples each brewed from malt with different malt modification in one of the three cultivars (cultivars A, B, and C) were explained by the spot intensities of BDAI-1 at the 5% significance level ( r = 0.421). Furthermore, two other major protein spots (b0 and b5) were observed on the 2DE gels of Japanese commercial beer samples with different foam stability. Then, multiple regression for foam stability was calculated using these three spot intensities as explanatory variables. As a result, 72.1% of the beer foam stability in 25 beer samples was explained by a novel multiple regression equation calculated using spot b0 and BDAI-1 as positive explanatory variables and spot b5 as a negative variable. To verify the validity of the multiple regression equation and the explanatory variables, the beer foam stability in practical beer samples was analyzed. As a result, 81.5% of the beer foam stability in 10 Japanese commercial beer samples was also explained by using spot b0 and BDAI-1 as positive explanatory variables and spot b5 as a negative variable. Mass spectrometry analyses followed by database searches revealed that protein spots b0 and b5 were identified as protein Z originated from barley and thioredoxin originated from yeast, respectively. These results confirm that BDAI-1 and protein Z are foam-positive factors and identify yeast thioredoxin as a possible novel foam

  18. CdTe quantum dots: aqueous phase synthesis, stability studies and protein conjugation for development of biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borse, Vivek; Sadawana, Mayur; Srivastava, Rohit

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of quantum dots (QDs) in aqueous medium is advantageous as compared to the organic solvent mediated synthesis, as the aqueous synthesis is less toxic, reagent effective, easily reproducible and importantly, synthesized QDs have biological compatibility. The QDs should be aqueous in nature for use in cell imaging, drug labeling, tracking and delivery. Structural modifications are necessary to enable their use in biosensing application. In this work, mercaptopropionic acid capped cadmium telluride QDs (MPA-CdTe QDs) were synthesized by hydrothermal method and characterized by various techniques. Water and various biochemical buffers were used to study the fluorescence intensity stability of the QDs at different physicochemical conditions. QDs stored in 4° C showed excellent stability of fluorescence intensity values as compared to the samples stored at room temperature. Staphylococcal protein A (SPA) was conjugated with the QDs (SPA-QDs) and characterized using UV and fluorescence spectroscopy, zeta potential, HRTEM, FTIR, and AFM. Blue shift was observed in the fluorescence emission spectra that may be due to reduction in the surface charge as carboxyl groups on QDs were replaced by amino groups of SPA. This SPA conjugated to QDs enables binding of the C-terminal of antibodies on its surface allowing N-terminal binding site remain free to bind with antigenic biomarkers. Thus, the biosensor i.e. antibody bound on SPA-QDs would bind to the antigenic biomarkers in sample and the detection system could be developed. As QDs have better fluorescence properties than organic dyes, this biosensor will provide high sensitivity and quantitative capability in diagnostics.

  19. Structural basis of thermal stability of the tungsten cofactor synthesis protein MoaB from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastassia Havarushka

    Full Text Available Molybdenum and tungsten cofactors share a similar pterin-based scaffold, which hosts an ene-dithiolate function being essential for the coordination of either molybdenum or tungsten. The biosynthesis of both cofactors involves a multistep pathway, which ends with the activation of the metal binding pterin (MPT by adenylylation before the respective metal is incorporated. In the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus, the hexameric protein MoaB (PfuMoaB has been shown to catalyse MPT-adenylylation. Here we determined the crystal structure of PfuMoaB at 2.5 Å resolution and identified key residues of α3-helix mediating hexamer formation. Given that PfuMoaB homologues from mesophilic organisms form trimers, we investigated the impact on PfuMoaB hexamerization on thermal stability and activity. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we successfully disrupted the hexamer interface in PfuMoaB. The resulting PfuMoaB-H3 variant formed monomers, dimers and trimers as determined by size exclusion chromatography. Circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry confirmed a wild-type-like fold of the protomers as well as inter-subunits contacts. The melting temperature of PfuMoaB-H3 was found to be reduced by more than 15 °C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, thus demonstrating hexamerization as key determinant for PfuMoaB thermal stability. Remarkably, while a loss of activity at temperatures higher than 50 °C was observed in the PfuMoaB-H3 variant, at lower temperatures, we determined a significantly increased catalytic activity. The latter suggests a gain in conformational flexibility caused by the disruption of the hexamerization interface.

  20. Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: oxidation linked to changes in protein composition at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit M.; Baron, Caroline P.; Let, Mette B.;

    2007-01-01

    Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 °C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed that h...

  1. Expression, protein stability and transcriptional activity of retinoic acid receptors are affected by microtubules interfering agents and all-trans retinoic acid in primary rat hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Expression, protein stability and transcriptional activity of retinoic acid receptors are affected by microtubules interfering agents and all-trans retinoic acid in primary rat hepatocytes CZECH REPUBLIC (Dvorak, Zdenek) CZECH REPUBLIC Received: 2006-08-22 Revised: 2006-11-16 Accepted: 2007-01-02

  2. Recombinant expression and purification of T4 phage Hoc, Soc, gp23, gp24 proteins in native conformations with stability studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Miernikiewicz

    Full Text Available Understanding the biological activity of bacteriophage particles is essential for rational design of bacteriophages with defined pharmacokinetic parameters and to identify the mechanisms of immunobiological activities demonstrated for some bacteriophages. This work requires highly purified preparations of the individual phage structural proteins, possessing native conformation that is essential for their reactivity, and free of incompatible biologically active substances such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In this study we describe expression in E. coli and purification of four proteins forming the surface of the bacteriophage T4 head: gp23, gp24, gphoc and gpsoc. We optimized protein expression using a set of chaperones for effective production of soluble proteins in their native conformations. The assistance of chaperones was critical for production of soluble gp23 (chaperone gp31 of T4 phage and of gpsoc (chaperone TF of E. coli. Phage head proteins were purified in native conditions by affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. Two-step LPS removal allowed immunological purity grade with the average endotoxin activity less than 1 unit per ml of protein preparation. The secondary structure and stability of the proteins were studied using circular dichroism (CD spectrometry, which confirmed that highly purified proteins preserve their native conformations. In increasing concentration of a denaturant (guanidine hydrochloride, protein stability was proved to increase as follows: gpsoc, gp23, gphoc. The denaturation profile of gp24 protein showed independent domain unfolding with the most stable larger domain. The native purified recombinant phage proteins obtained in this work were shown to be suitable for immunological experiments in vivo and in vitro.

  3. Natural insertions within the N-terminal region of the coat protein of Maize dwarf mosaic potyvirus (MDMV) have an effect on the RNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Kathrin; Sebestyén, Endre; Gell, Gyöngyvér; Balázs, Ervin

    2010-02-01

    A 13 amino acid residue insertion was found in the N-terminal region of the coat protein of several Maize dwarf mosaic virus isolates (MDMV). These insertions seem to be the result of a direct duplication event, but differ in some positions. In order to evaluate the influence of the insertion on the RNA secondary structure and stability, the RNA secondary structures and minimum free energies (MFE) of all existing MDMV coat protein sequences were estimated using three different softwares, the Vienna RNA Package, NUPACK, and UNAFold, and compared to the secondary structure and MFE of various random sequence collections preserving the nucleotide distribution of MDMV. The bioinformatic analysis showed that the insertion stabilizes the RNA structure of the coat protein gene.

  4. Influence of Hydrocolloids (Dietary Fibers) on Lipid Digestion of Protein-Stabilized Emulsions: Comparison of Neutral, Anionic, and Cationic Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Dingkui; Yang, Xiaojun; Gao, Songran; Yao, Junhu; McClements, David Julian

    2016-07-01

    The impact of dietary fibers on lipid digestion within the gastrointestinal tract depends on their molecular and physicochemical properties. In this study, the influence of the electrical characteristics of dietary fibers on their ability to interfere with the digestion of protein-coated lipid droplets was investigated using an in vitro small intestine model. Three dietary fibers were examined: cationic chitosan; anionic alginate; neutral locust bean gum (LBG). The particle size, ζ-potential, microstructure, and apparent viscosity of β-lactoglobulin stabilized oil-in-water emulsions containing different types and levels of dietary fiber were measured before and after lipid digestion. The rate and extent of lipid digestion depended on polysaccharide type and concentration. At relatively low dietary fiber levels (0.1 to 0.2 wt%), the initial lipid digestion rate was only reduced by chitosan, but the final extent of lipid digestion was unaffected by all 3 dietary fibers. At relatively high dietary fiber levels (0.4 wt%), alginate and chitosan significantly inhibited lipid hydrolysis, whereas LBG did not. The impact of chitosan on lipid digestion was attributed to its ability to promote fat droplet aggregation through bridging flocculation, thereby retarding access of the lipase to the droplet surfaces. The influence of alginate was mainly ascribed to its ability to sequester calcium ions and promote depletion flocculation. PMID:27300319

  5. 水牛奶乳清蛋白的热稳定性%Heat stability of whey proteins from buffalo milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永强; 杨士花; 夏晓辉; 李淳; 初雅洁; 黄艾祥

    2012-01-01

    以水牛奶为材料,利用native-PAGE和SDS-PAGE,通过不同温度和加热条件下总乳清蛋白和单体蛋白质量浓度的变化,研究水牛奶乳清蛋白的热稳定性.结果表明:水牛奶乳清蛋白在native-PAGE条件下只有β-LG一条条带,在SDS-PAGE条件下得到4条单体乳清蛋白条带;随着提取温度和时间的增加,水牛奶单体乳清蛋白和总乳清蛋白质量浓度均呈下降趋势,说明水牛奶乳清蛋白热稳定性较差;4种乳清单体蛋白中,α-LA的热稳定性最好,IG的热稳定性最差,热稳定性顺序为:α-LA>β-LG>BSA>IG.%The heat stability of buffalo milk whey proteins were investigated by means of the changes of total whey proteins and individual whey protein at different heat temperatures and times, using native-PAGE and SDS-PAGE. Results showed only β-LG was found by native-PAGE, but four whey protein bands were found by SDS-PAGE. Individual whey protein and total whey proteins contents were decreased when temperatures and times were increased, indicated buffalo whey proteins had poor heat stability. Among the four individual whey protein, α-LA exhibited the strongest heat-tolerance but IG was opposite. The heat stability order was: α-LA >β-LG >BSA>IG.

  6. NCYM, a Cis-antisense gene of MYCN, encodes a de novo evolved protein that inhibits GSK3β resulting in the stabilization of MYCN in human neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Suenaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of pre-existing genes has long been thought of as the major mode of new gene generation. Recently, de novo gene birth from non-genic DNA was found to be an alternative mechanism to generate novel protein-coding genes. However, its functional role in human disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that NCYM, a cis-antisense gene of the MYCN oncogene, initially thought to be a large non-coding RNA, encodes a de novo evolved protein regulating the pathogenesis of human cancers, particularly neuroblastoma. The NCYM gene is evolutionally conserved only in the taxonomic group containing humans and chimpanzees. In primary human neuroblastomas, NCYM is 100% co-amplified and co-expressed with MYCN, and NCYM mRNA expression is associated with poor clinical outcome. MYCN directly transactivates both NCYM and MYCN mRNA, whereas NCYM stabilizes MYCN protein by inhibiting the activity of GSK3β, a kinase that promotes MYCN degradation. In contrast to MYCN transgenic mice, neuroblastomas in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice were frequently accompanied by distant metastases, behavior reminiscent of human neuroblastomas with MYCN amplification. The NCYM protein also interacts with GSK3β, thereby stabilizing the MYCN protein in the tumors of the MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice. Thus, these results suggest that GSK3β inhibition by NCYM stabilizes the MYCN protein both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the survival of MYCN transgenic mice bearing neuroblastoma was improved by treatment with NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor shown to destabilize MYCN via GSK3β activation. In contrast, tumors caused in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice showed chemo-resistance to the drug. Collectively, our results show that NCYM is the first de novo evolved protein known to act as an oncopromoting factor in human cancer, and suggest that de novo evolved proteins may functionally characterize human disease.

  7. Site-specific thermodynamic stability and unfolding of a de novo designed protein structural motif mapped by 13C isotopically edited IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubelka, Ginka S; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-04-23

    The mechanism of protein folding remains poorly understood, in part due to limited experimental information available about partially folded states. Isotopically edited infrared (IR) spectroscopy has emerged as a promising method for studying protein structural changes with site-specific resolution, but its full potential to systematically probe folding at multiple protein sites has not yet been realized. We have used (13)C isotopically edited IR spectroscopy to investigate the site-specific thermal unfolding at seven different locations in the de novo designed helix-turn-helix protein αtα. As one of the few stable helix-turn-helix motifs, αtα is an excellent model for studying the roles of secondary and tertiary interactions in folding. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments on the full αtα motif and its two peptide fragments show that interhelical tertiary contacts are critical for stabilization of the secondary structure. The site-specific thermal unfolding probed by (13)C isotopically edited IR is likewise consistent with primarily tertiary stabilization of the local structure. The least thermally stable part of the αtα motif is near the turn where the interhelical contacts are rather loose, while the motif's center with best established core packing has the highest stability. Similar correlation between the local thermal stability and tertiary contacts was found previously for a naturally occurring helix-turn-helix motif. These results underline the importance of native-like tertiary stabilizing interactions in folding, in agreement with recent state-of-the art folding simulations as well as simplified, native-centric models.

  8. Sequences of a hairpin structure in the 3′-untranslated region mediate regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein B mRNA stability

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Helen W.; Payne, David E.; Bi, Weizhen; Pan, Su; Bruce, Shirley R.; Alcorn, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension requires adequate expression of surfactant protein B (SP-B). Dexamethasone (DEX, 10−7 M) increases human SP-B mRNA stability by a mechanism that requires a 126-nt-long segment (the 7.6S region) of the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). The objective of this study was to identify sequences in the 7.6S region that mediate regulation of SP-B mRNA stability. The 7.6S region was found to be sufficient for DEX-mediated stabilizati...

  9. Glucocorticoid regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein-B (SP-B) mRNA stability is independent of activated glucocorticoid receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Tillis, Ceá C.; Huang, Helen W.; Bi, Weizhen; Pan, Su; Bruce, Shirley R.; Alcorn, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Adequate expression of surfactant protein-B (SP-B) is critical in the function of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension. Expression of SP-B mRNA is restricted to specific lung-airway epithelial cells, and human SP-B mRNA stability is increased in the presence of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX). Although the mechanism of SP-B mRNA stabilization by DEX is unknown, studies suggest involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). We developed a dual-cistronic pl...

  10. Nutritional Control of mRNA Stability Is Mediated by a Conserved AU-rich Element That Binds the Cytoplasmic Shuttling Protein HuR*

    OpenAIRE

    Yaman, Ibrahim; Fernandez, James; Sarkar, Bedabrata; Schneider, Robert J.; Snider, Martin D.; Nagy, Laura E.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The cationic amino acid transporter, Cat-1, is a high affinity transporter of the essential amino acids, arginine and lysine. Expression of the cat-1 gene increases during nutritional stress as part of the adaptive response to starvation. Amino acid limitation induces coordinate increases in stability and translation of the cat-1 mRNA, at a time when global protein synthesis decreases. It is shown here that increased cat-1 mRNA stability requires an 11 nucleotide AU-rich element within the di...

  11. Human serum albumin as protecting agent of silver nanoparticles: role of the protein conformation and amine groups in the nanoparticle stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Emilio I.; Bueno-Alejo, Carlos J.; Noel, Christopher W.; Stamplecoskie, Kevin G. [Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, University of Ottawa, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Pacioni, Natalia L. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, INFIQC, Departamento de Quimica Organica (Argentina); Poblete, Horacio [Center for Bioinformatics and Molecular Simulations, Universidad de Talca (Chile); Scaiano, J. C., E-mail: tito@photo.chem.uottawa.ca [Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, University of Ottawa, Department of Chemistry (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Thermally denatured human serum albumin interacts with {approx}3.0 nm spherical AgNP enhancing the fluorescence of Trp-214 at large protein/nanoparticle ratios. However, using native HSA, no changes in the emission were observed. The observation is likely due to differences between native and denatured protein packing resulting from protein corona formation. We have also found that NH{sub 2} blocking of the protein strongly affects the ability of the protein to protect AgNP from different salts/ions such as NaCl, PBS, Hank's buffer, Tris-HCl, MES, and DMEM. Additionally, AgNP can be readily prepared in aqueous solutions by a photochemical approach employing HSA as an in situ protecting agent. The role of the protein in this case is beyond that of protecting agent; thus, Ag{sup +} ions and I-2959 complexation within the protein structure also affects the efficiency of AgNP formation. Blocking NH{sub 2} in HSA modified the AgNP growth profile, surface plasmon band shape, and long-term stability suggesting that amine groups are directly involved in the formation and post-stabilization of AgNP. In particular, AgNP size and shape are extensively influenced by NH{sub 2} blocking, leading primarily to cubes and plates with sizes around 5-15 nm; in contrast, spherical monodisperse 4.0 nm AgNP are observed for native HSA. The nanoparticles prepared by this protocol are non-toxic in primary cells and have remarkable antibacterial properties. Finally, surface plasmon excitation of native HSA-AgNP promoted loss of protein conformation in just 5 min, suggesting that plasmon heating causes protein denaturation using continuous light sources such as commercial LED.

  12. Physical and oxidative stability of functional olive oil-in-water emulsions formulated using olive mill wastewater biophenols and whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, Nicola; Genovese, Alessandro; Burke, Róisín; Barry-Ryan, Catherine; Sacchi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reports on the use of phenolic extracts from olive mill wastewater (OMW) in model olive oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions to study their effect on their physical and chemical stability. Spray-dried OMW polyphenols were added to a model 20% olive O/W emulsion stabilized with whey protein isolate (WPI) and xanthan gum, in phosphate buffer solution at pH 7. The emulsions were characterised under accelerated storage conditions (40 °C) up to 30 days. Physical stability was evaluated by analysing the creaming rate, mean particle size distribution and mean droplet size, viscosity and rheological properties, while chemical stability was assessed through the measurement of primary and secondary oxidation products. The rheological behaviour and creaming stability of the emulsions were dramatically improved by using xanthan gum, whereas the concentration of WPI and the addition of encapsulated OMW phenolics did not result in a significant improvement of physical stability. The formation of oxidation products was higher when higher concentrations of encapsulated polyphenols were used, indicating a possible binding with the WPI added in the system as a natural emulsifier. This paper might help in solving the issue of using the olive mill wastewater from olive processing in formulating functional food products with high antioxidant activity and improved health properties. PMID:26692051

  13. Whole genome sequencing identifies a deletion in protein phosphatase 2A that affects its stability and localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawen Lin

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and small insertions/deletions (indels among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3 in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating.

  14. Coniferyl Aldehyde Reduces Radiation Damage Through Increased Protein Stability of Heat Shock Transcriptional Factor 1 by Phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seo-Young [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae-June [Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Joo-Won; Seo, Eun-Kyoung [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sil, E-mail: yslee0425@ewha.ac.kr [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ewha Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: We previously screened natural compounds and found that coniferyl aldehyde (CA) was identified as an inducer of HSF1. In this study, we further examined the protective effects of CA against ionizing radiation (IR) in normal cell system. Methods and Materials: Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests were performed to evaluate expression of HSF1, HSP27, and HSP70 in response to CA. Cell death and cleavage of PARP and caspase-3 were analyzed to determine the protective effects of CA in the presence of IR or taxol. The protective effects of CA were also evaluated using animal models. Results: CA increased stability of the HSF1 protein by phosphorylation at Ser326, which was accompanied by increased expression of HSP27 and HSP70. HSF1 phosphorylation at Ser326 by CA was mediated by EKR1/2 activation. Cotreatment of CA with IR or taxol in normal cells induced protective effects with phosphorylation- dependent patterns at Ser326 of HSF1. The decrease in bone marrow (BM) cellularity and increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling–positive BM cells by IR were also significantly inhibited by CA in mice (30.6% and 56.0%, respectively). A549 lung orthotopic lung tumor model indicated that CA did not affect the IR-mediated reduction of lung tumor nodules, whereas CA protected normal lung tissues from the therapeutic irradiation. Conclusions: These results suggest that CA may be useful for inducing HSF1 to protect against normal cell damage after IR or chemotherapeutic agents.

  15. Coniferyl Aldehyde Reduces Radiation Damage Through Increased Protein Stability of Heat Shock Transcriptional Factor 1 by Phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We previously screened natural compounds and found that coniferyl aldehyde (CA) was identified as an inducer of HSF1. In this study, we further examined the protective effects of CA against ionizing radiation (IR) in normal cell system. Methods and Materials: Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests were performed to evaluate expression of HSF1, HSP27, and HSP70 in response to CA. Cell death and cleavage of PARP and caspase-3 were analyzed to determine the protective effects of CA in the presence of IR or taxol. The protective effects of CA were also evaluated using animal models. Results: CA increased stability of the HSF1 protein by phosphorylation at Ser326, which was accompanied by increased expression of HSP27 and HSP70. HSF1 phosphorylation at Ser326 by CA was mediated by EKR1/2 activation. Cotreatment of CA with IR or taxol in normal cells induced protective effects with phosphorylation- dependent patterns at Ser326 of HSF1. The decrease in bone marrow (BM) cellularity and increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling–positive BM cells by IR were also significantly inhibited by CA in mice (30.6% and 56.0%, respectively). A549 lung orthotopic lung tumor model indicated that CA did not affect the IR-mediated reduction of lung tumor nodules, whereas CA protected normal lung tissues from the therapeutic irradiation. Conclusions: These results suggest that CA may be useful for inducing HSF1 to protect against normal cell damage after IR or chemotherapeutic agents

  16. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy ETHE1 R163W/R163Q mutations alter protein stability and redox properties of the iron centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bárbara J; Lucas, Tânia G; Rodrigues, João V; Frederiksen, Jane H; Teixeira, Miguel S; Tiranti, Valeria; Bross, Peter; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2014-01-01

    ETHE1 is an iron-containing protein from the metallo β-lactamase family involved in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. Mutations in ETHE1 causing loss of function result in sulfide toxicity and in the rare fatal disease Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy (EE). Frequently mutations resulting in depletion of ETHE1 in patient cells are due to severe structural and folding defects. However, some ETHE1 mutations yield nearly normal protein levels and in these cases disease mechanism was suspected to lie in compromised catalytic activity. To address this issue and to elicit how ETHE1 dysfunction results in EE, we have investigated two such pathological mutations, ETHE1-p.Arg163Gln and p.Arg163Trp. In addition, we report a number of benchmark properties of wild type human ETHE1, including for the first time the redox properties of the mononuclear iron centre. We show that loss of function in these variants results from a combination of decreased protein stability and activity. Although structural assessment revealed that the protein fold is not perturbed by mutations, both variants have decreased thermal stabilities and higher proteolytic susceptibilities. ETHE1 wild type and variants bind 1 ± 0.2 mol iron/protein and no zinc; however, the variants exhibited only ≈ 10% of wild-type catalytically activity. Analysis of the redox properties of ETHE1 mononuclear iron centre revealed that the variants have lowered reduction potentials with respect to that of the wild type. This illustrates how point mutation-induced loss of function may arise via very discrete subtle conformational effects on the protein fold and active site chemistry, without extensive disruption of the protein structure or protein-cofactor association. PMID:25198162

  17. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy ETHE1 R163W/R163Q mutations alter protein stability and redox properties of the iron centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara J Henriques

    Full Text Available ETHE1 is an iron-containing protein from the metallo β-lactamase family involved in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway. Mutations in ETHE1 causing loss of function result in sulfide toxicity and in the rare fatal disease Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy (EE. Frequently mutations resulting in depletion of ETHE1 in patient cells are due to severe structural and folding defects. However, some ETHE1 mutations yield nearly normal protein levels and in these cases disease mechanism was suspected to lie in compromised catalytic activity. To address this issue and to elicit how ETHE1 dysfunction results in EE, we have investigated two such pathological mutations, ETHE1-p.Arg163Gln and p.Arg163Trp. In addition, we report a number of benchmark properties of wild type human ETHE1, including for the first time the redox properties of the mononuclear iron centre. We show that loss of function in these variants results from a combination of decreased protein stability and activity. Although structural assessment revealed that the protein fold is not perturbed by mutations, both variants have decreased thermal stabilities and higher proteolytic susceptibilities. ETHE1 wild type and variants bind 1 ± 0.2 mol iron/protein and no zinc; however, the variants exhibited only ≈ 10% of wild-type catalytically activity. Analysis of the redox properties of ETHE1 mononuclear iron centre revealed that the variants have lowered reduction potentials with respect to that of the wild type. This illustrates how point mutation-induced loss of function may arise via very discrete subtle conformational effects on the protein fold and active site chemistry, without extensive disruption of the protein structure or protein-cofactor association.

  18. Testing the dependence of stabilizing effect of osmolytes on the fractional increase in the accessible surface area on thermal and chemical denaturations of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Safikur; Ali, Syed Ausaf; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-02-01

    Here we have generated two different denatured states using heat- and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced denaturations of three disulfide bond free proteins (barstar, cytochrome-c and myoglobin). We have observed that these two denatured states of barstar and myoglobin are structurally and energetically different, for, heat-induced denatured state contains many un-melted residual structure that has a significant amount of secondary and tertiary interactions. We show that structural properties of the denatured state determine the magnitude of the protein stabilization in terms of Gibbs free energy change (ΔGD°) induced by an osmolyte, i.e., the greater the exposed surface area, the greater is the stabilization. Furthermore, we predicted the m-values (ability of osmolyte to fold or unfold proteins) using Tanford's transfer-free energy model for the transfer of proteins to osmolyte solutions. We observed that, for each protein, m-value is comparable with our experimental data in cases of TMAO (trimethylamine-N-oxide) and sarcosine. However, a significant discrepancy between predicted and experimental m-values were observed in the case of glycine-betaine. PMID:26686265

  19. Testing the dependence of stabilizing effect of osmolytes on the fractional increase in the accessible surface area on thermal and chemical denaturations of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Safikur; Ali, Syed Ausaf; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-02-01

    Here we have generated two different denatured states using heat- and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced denaturations of three disulfide bond free proteins (barstar, cytochrome-c and myoglobin). We have observed that these two denatured states of barstar and myoglobin are structurally and energetically different, for, heat-induced denatured state contains many un-melted residual structure that has a significant amount of secondary and tertiary interactions. We show that structural properties of the denatured state determine the magnitude of the protein stabilization in terms of Gibbs free energy change (ΔGD°) induced by an osmolyte, i.e., the greater the exposed surface area, the greater is the stabilization. Furthermore, we predicted the m-values (ability of osmolyte to fold or unfold proteins) using Tanford's transfer-free energy model for the transfer of proteins to osmolyte solutions. We observed that, for each protein, m-value is comparable with our experimental data in cases of TMAO (trimethylamine-N-oxide) and sarcosine. However, a significant discrepancy between predicted and experimental m-values were observed in the case of glycine-betaine.

  20. Difference in fibril core stability between two tau four-repeat domain proteins: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Gayathri; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2013-12-10

    One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies is fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The purpose of this study was to compare the high-resolution structure of fibrils formed by two different tau four-repeat domain constructs, tau4RD and tauK18, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry as a tool. While the two fibrils are found to be constructed on similar structural principles, the tauK18 fibril has a slightly more stable core. This difference in fibril core stability appears to be reflective of the mechanistic differences in the aggregation pathways of the two proteins. PMID:24256615

  1. A loose domain swapping organization confers a remarkable stability to the dimeric structure of the arginine binding protein from Thermotoga maritima.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Ruggiero

    Full Text Available The arginine binding protein from Thermatoga maritima (TmArgBP, a substrate binding protein (SBP involved in the ABC system of solute transport, presents a number of remarkable properties. These include an extraordinary stability to temperature and chemical denaturants and the tendency to form multimeric structures, an uncommon feature among SBPs involved in solute transport. Here we report a biophysical and structural characterization of the TmArgBP dimer. Our data indicate that the dimer of the protein is endowed with a remarkable stability since its full dissociation requires high temperature as well as SDS and urea at high concentrations. In order to elucidate the atomic level structural properties of this intriguing protein, we determined the crystallographic structures of the apo and the arginine-bound forms of TmArgBP using MAD and SAD methods, respectively. The comparison of the liganded and unliganded models demonstrates that TmArgBP tertiary structure undergoes a very large structural re-organization upon arginine binding. This transition follows the Venus Fly-trap mechanism, although the entity of the re-organization observed in TmArgBP is larger than that observed in homologous proteins. Intriguingly, TmArgBP dimerizes through the swapping of the C-terminal helix. This dimer is stabilized exclusively by the interactions established by the swapping helix. Therefore, the TmArgBP dimer combines a high level of stability and conformational freedom. The structure of the TmArgBP dimer represents an uncommon example of large tertiary structure variations amplified at quaternary structure level by domain swapping. Although the biological relevance of the dimer needs further assessments, molecular modelling suggests that the two TmArgBP subunits may simultaneously interact with two distinct ABC transporters. Moreover, the present protein structures provide some clues about the determinants of the extraordinary stability of the biomolecule

  2. Tumor suppressor protein DAB2IP participates in chromosomal stability maintenance through activating spindle assembly checkpoint and stabilizing kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Abdisalaam, Salim; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Gupta, Arun; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Saha, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Defects in kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) during cell division are strongly associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). CIN has been linked to carcinogenesis, metastasis, poor prognosis and resistance to cancer therapy. We previously reported that the DAB2IP is a tumor suppressor, and that loss of DAB2IP is often detected in advanced prostate cancer (PCa) and is indicative of poor prognosis. Here, we report that the loss of DAB2IP results in impaired KT-MT attachment, compromised SAC and aberrant chromosomal segregation. We discovered that DAB2IP directly interacts with Plk1 and its loss inhibits Plk1 kinase activity, thereby impairing Plk1-mediated BubR1 phosphorylation. Loss of DAB2IP decreases the localization of BubR1 at the kinetochore during mitosis progression. In addition, the reconstitution of DAB2IP enhances the sensitivity of PCa cells to microtubule stabilizing drugs (paclitaxel, docetaxel) and Plk1 inhibitor (BI2536). Our findings demonstrate a novel function of DAB2IP in the maintenance of KT-MT structure and SAC regulation during mitosis which is essential for chromosomal stability. PMID:27568005

  3. Colour, lipid and protein stability of Rhea americana meat during air- and vacuum-packaged storage: influence of muscle on oxidative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueras, R S; Gatellier, P; Aubry, L; Thomas, A; Bauchart, D; Durand, D; Zambiazi, R C; Santé-Lhoutellier, V

    2010-11-01

    Physicochemical characteristics and oxidative stability during storage were determined in Gastrocnemius pars interna (GN) and Iliofiburalis (IF) muscles of Rhea americana. Glycolytic potential (GP) and pH decline of muscles were measured within the first 24 h post mortem. Colour, lipid and protein stability were determined during storage of meat, i.e. 5 days under air-packaging at 4°C, or 28 days under vacuum-packaging at 4°C. In parallel, anti-oxidant status of muscles was estimated by measuring α-tocopherol content and anti-oxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and catalase), while pro-oxidant status was evaluated by determining haeminic iron and long chain fatty acids (especially polyunsaturated fatty acids). The ultimate pH was similar in both muscles, but the GP value was significantly higher in IF than in GN muscle. Haeminic iron and alpha-tocopherol content differed between muscles, with 30% more haeminic iron (ppackaging, lipid and protein oxidation of rhea muscles increased up to 275% and 30%, respectively. This increase was more rapidly and marked in IF muscle. The IF also showed high level of metmyoglobin accumulation after 3 days of storage (47%) and was rejected by 1 consumer out of 2 in sensorial analysis. Under vacuum-packaging, both muscles showed a high stability of colour and no oxidation of lipids and proteins.

  4. The Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein PPR5 Stabilizes a Specific tRNA Precursor in Maize Chloroplasts▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Beick, Susanne; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Williams-Carrier, Rosalind; Jensen, Bryan; Barkan, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Genes for pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are found in all eukaryotic genomes analyzed but are particularly abundant in land plants. The majority of analyzed PPR proteins play a role in the processing or translation of organellar RNAs. Few PPR proteins have been studied in detail, and the functional repertoire and mechanisms of action of proteins in the PPR family are poorly understood. Here we analyzed a maize ortholog of the embryo-essential Arabidopsis thaliana gene AtPPR5. A genom...

  5. A Trypanosomal Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Stabilizes the Mitochondrial mRNAs of Cytochrome Oxidase Subunits 1 and 2

    OpenAIRE

    Pusnik, Mascha; Schneider, André

    2012-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family consists of organellar proteins predicted to bind to specific RNA sequences. Plants have hundreds of distinct PPR proteins, whereas other eukaryotes generally have many fewer. The genome of the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei is predicted to encode more than 30 different PPR proteins, which is an extraordinarily high number for a nonplant organism. Here we report the characterization T. brucei PPR9 (TbPPR9). Epitope tagging shows that t...

  6. The Drosophila Microtubule-Associated Protein Mars Stabilizes Mitotic Spindles by Crosslinking Microtubules through Its N-Terminal Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Beati, Hamze; Nilsson, Jakob;

    2013-01-01

    reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function....... Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs....

  7. The role of position a in determining the stability and oligomerization state of alpha-helical coiled coils: 20 amino acid stability coefficients in the hydrophobic core of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Wagschal, K.; Tripet, B; Lavigne, P; Mant, C.; Hodges, R. S.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here a systematic investigation into the role of position a in the hydrophobic core of a model coiled-coil protein in determining coiled-coil stability and oligomerization state. We employed a model coiled coil that allowed the formation of an extended three-stranded trimeric oligomerization state for some of the analogs; however, due to the presence of a Cys-Gly-Gly linker, unfolding occurred from the same two-stranded monomeric oligomerization state for all of the analogs. Denat...

  8. Testing the ability of non-methylamine osmolytes present in kidney cells to counteract the deleterious effects of urea on structure, stability and function of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeza Khan

    Full Text Available Human kidney cells are under constant urea stress due to its urine concentrating mechanism. It is believed that the deleterious effect of urea is counteracted by methylamine osmolytes (glycine betaine and glycerophosphocholine present in kidney cells. A question arises: Do the stabilizing osmolytes, non-methylamines (myo-inositol, sorbitol and taurine present in the kidney cells also counteract the deleterious effects of urea? To answer this question, we have measured structure, thermodynamic stability (ΔG D (o and functional activity parameters (K m and k cat of different model proteins in the presence of various concentrations of urea and each non-methylamine osmolyte alone and in combination. We observed that (i for each protein myo-inositol provides perfect counteraction at 1∶2 ([myo-inositol]:[urea] ratio, (ii any concentration of sorbitol fails to refold urea denatured proteins if it is six times less than that of urea, and (iii taurine regulates perfect counteraction in a protein specific manner; 1.5∶2.0, 1.2∶2.0 and 1.0∶2.0 ([taurine]:[urea] ratios for RNase-A, lysozyme and α-lactalbumin, respectively.

  9. Testing the Ability of Non-Methylamine Osmolytes Present in Kidney Cells to Counteract the Deleterious Effects of Urea on Structure, Stability and Function of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sheeza; Bano, Zehra; Singh, Laishram R.; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2013-01-01

    Human kidney cells are under constant urea stress due to its urine concentrating mechanism. It is believed that the deleterious effect of urea is counteracted by methylamine osmolytes (glycine betaine and glycerophosphocholine) present in kidney cells. A question arises: Do the stabilizing osmolytes, non-methylamines (myo-inositol, sorbitol and taurine) present in the kidney cells also counteract the deleterious effects of urea? To answer this question, we have measured structure, thermodynamic stability (ΔGDo) and functional activity parameters (Km and kcat) of different model proteins in the presence of various concentrations of urea and each non-methylamine osmolyte alone and in combination. We observed that (i) for each protein myo-inositol provides perfect counteraction at 1∶2 ([myo-inositol]:[urea]) ratio, (ii) any concentration of sorbitol fails to refold urea denatured proteins if it is six times less than that of urea, and (iii) taurine regulates perfect counteraction in a protein specific manner; 1.5∶2.0, 1.2∶2.0 and 1.0∶2.0 ([taurine]:[urea]) ratios for RNase-A, lysozyme and α-lactalbumin, respectively. PMID:24039776

  10. Glucocorticoid regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein-B (SP-B) mRNA stability is independent of activated glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillis, Ceá C; Huang, Helen W; Bi, Weizhen; Pan, Su; Bruce, Shirley R; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2011-06-01

    Adequate expression of surfactant protein-B (SP-B) is critical in the function of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension. Expression of SP-B mRNA is restricted to specific lung-airway epithelial cells, and human SP-B mRNA stability is increased in the presence of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX). Although the mechanism of SP-B mRNA stabilization by DEX is unknown, studies suggest involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). We developed a dual-cistronic plasmid-based expression assay in which steady-state levels of SP-B mRNA, determined by Northern analysis, reproducibly reflect changes in SP-B mRNA stability. Using this assay, we found that steady-state levels of SP-B mRNA increased greater than twofold in transfected human-airway epithelial cells (A549) incubated with DEX (10(-7) M). DEX-mediated changes in SP-B mRNA levels required the presence of the SP-B mRNA 3'-untranslated region but did not require ongoing protein synthesis. The effect of DEX on SP-B mRNA levels was dose dependent, with maximal effect at 10(-7) M. DEX increased levels of SP-B mRNA in cells lacking GR, and the presence of the GR antagonist RU486 did not interfere with the effect of DEX. Surprisingly, other steroid hormones (progesterone, estradiol, and vitamin D; 10(-7) M) significantly increased SP-B mRNA levels, suggesting a common pathway of steroid hormone action on SP-B mRNA stability. These results indicate that the effect of DEX to increase SP-B mRNA stability is independent of activated GR and suggests that the mechanism is mediated by posttranscriptional or nongenomic effects of glucocorticoids. PMID:21398497

  11. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  12. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetu Sharma

    Full Text Available Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  13. A PPR protein in the PLS subfamily stabilizes the 5'-end of processed rpl16 mRNAs in maize chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammani, Kamel; Takenaka, Mizuki; Miranda, Rafael; Barkan, Alice

    2016-05-19

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are a large family of helical-repeat proteins that bind RNA in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Precise RNA targets and functions have been assigned to only a small fraction of the >400 members of the PPR family in plants. We used the amino acid code governing the specificity of RNA binding by PPR repeats to infer candidate-binding sites for the maize protein PPR103 and its ortholog Arabidopsis EMB175. Genetic and biochemical data confirmed a predicted binding site in the chloroplast rpl16 5'UTR to be a site of PPR103 action. This site maps to the 5' end of transcripts that fail to accumulate in ppr103 mutants. A small RNA corresponding to the predicted PPR103 binding site accumulates in a PPR103-dependent fashion, as expected of PPR103's in vivo footprint. Recombinant PPR103 bound specifically to this sequence in vitro These observations imply that PPR103 stabilizes rpl16 mRNA by impeding 5'→3' RNA degradation. Previously described PPR proteins with this type of function consist of canonical PPR motifs. By contrast, PPR103 is a PLS-type protein, an architecture typically associated with proteins that specify sites of RNA editing. However, PPR103 is not required to specify editing sites in chloroplasts. PMID:27095196

  14. A PPR protein in the PLS subfamily stabilizes the 5′-end of processed rpl16 mRNAs in maize chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammani, Kamel; Takenaka, Mizuki; Miranda, Rafael; Barkan, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are a large family of helical-repeat proteins that bind RNA in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Precise RNA targets and functions have been assigned to only a small fraction of the >400 members of the PPR family in plants. We used the amino acid code governing the specificity of RNA binding by PPR repeats to infer candidate-binding sites for the maize protein PPR103 and its ortholog Arabidopsis EMB175. Genetic and biochemical data confirmed a predicted binding site in the chloroplast rpl16 5′UTR to be a site of PPR103 action. This site maps to the 5′ end of transcripts that fail to accumulate in ppr103 mutants. A small RNA corresponding to the predicted PPR103 binding site accumulates in a PPR103-dependent fashion, as expected of PPR103's in vivo footprint. Recombinant PPR103 bound specifically to this sequence in vitro. These observations imply that PPR103 stabilizes rpl16 mRNA by impeding 5′→3′ RNA degradation. Previously described PPR proteins with this type of function consist of canonical PPR motifs. By contrast, PPR103 is a PLS-type protein, an architecture typically associated with proteins that specify sites of RNA editing. However, PPR103 is not required to specify editing sites in chloroplasts. PMID:27095196

  15. [small beta]-Turn mimetic-based stabilizers of protein-protein interactions for the study of the non-canonical roles of leucyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Chanwoo; Jung, Jinjoo; Thanh Tung, Truong;

    2016-01-01

    For the systematic perturbation of protein-protein interactions, we designed and synthesized tetra-substituted hexahydro-4H-pyrazino[2,1-c][1,2,4]triazine-4,7(6H)-diones as [small beta]-turn mimetics. We then devised a new synthetic route to obtain [small beta]-turn mimetic scaffolds via tandem N...

  16. Enhanced Stability of the Model Mini-protein in Amino Acid Ionic Liquids and Their Aqueous Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Chevrot, Guillaume; Chaban, Vitaly V

    2015-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, the structure of model mini-protein was thoroughly characterized in the imidazolium-based amino acid ionic liquids and their aqueous solutions. We report that the mini-protein is more stable when AAIL is added as a cosolvent. Complete substitution of water by organic cations and anions further results in hindered conformational flexibility of the mini-protein. This observation suggests that AAILs are able to defend proteins from thermally induced denaturation. We show by means of radial distributions that the mini-protein is efficiently solvated by both solvents due to agood mutual miscibility. However, amino acid based anions prevail in the first coordination sphere of the mini-protein.

  17. Glucocorticoid Regulation of Human Pulmonary Surfactant Protein-B mRNA Stability Involves the 3′-Untranslated Region

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Helen W.; Bi, Weizhen; Jenkins, Gaye N.; Alcorn, Joseph L.

    2007-01-01

    Expression of pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that acts to reduce alveolar surface tension, is developmentally regulated and restricted to lung alveolar type II cells. The hydrophobic protein surfactant protein-B (SP-B) is essential in surfactant function, and insufficient levels of SP-B result in severe respiratory dysfunction. Glucocorticoids accelerate fetal lung maturity and surfactant synthesis both experimentally and clinically. Glucocorticoids act transcr...

  18. Structural determinants of stability to proteolysis, processing and impact on allergenic potential of non-specific lipid transfer proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Syed Umer

    2012-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a class of low molecular weight hydrophobic conserved proteins comprising four intramolecular disulphide bonds making the structure very resistant to proteolysis and harsh food processing conditions. These proteins are identified as strong allergens sensitizing through the gut and share epitopes with LTPs from closely related species. Peach LTP, Pru p 3 is the primary sensitizer in the Mediterranean area being the most frequent food allergen. Wheat LTP, Tri ...

  19. Structural evidence for solvent-stabilisation by aspartic acid as a mechanism for halophilic protein stability in high salt concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Samuel; Walsh, Danielle L; Rhys, Natasha H; Soper, Alan K; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-21

    Halophilic organisms have adapted to survive in high salt environments, where mesophilic organisms would perish. One of the biggest challenges faced by halophilic proteins is the ability to maintain both the structure and function at molar concentrations of salt. A distinct adaptation of halophilic proteins, compared to mesophilic homologues, is the abundance of aspartic acid on the protein surface. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of halophilic proteins suggest an important role for solvent interactions with the surface aspartic acid residues. This interaction, between the regions of the acidic protein surface and the solvent, is thought to maintain a hydration layer around the protein at molar salt concentrations thereby allowing halophilic proteins to retain their functional state. Here we present neutron diffraction data of the monomeric zwitterionic form of aspartic acid solutions at physiological pH in 0.25 M and 2.5 M concentration of potassium chloride, to mimic mesophilic and halophilic-like environmental conditions. We have used isotopic substitution in combination with empirical potential structure refinement to extract atomic-scale information from the data. Our study provides structural insights that support the hypothesis that carboxyl groups on acidic residues bind water more tightly under high salt conditions, in support of the residue-ion interaction model of halophilic protein stabilisation. Furthermore our data show that in the presence of high salt the self-association between the zwitterionic form of aspartic acid molecules is reduced, suggesting a possible mechanism through which protein aggregation is prevented. PMID:27327567

  20. Synonymous codon usage in different protein secondary structural classes of human genes: Implication for increased non-randomness of GC3 rich genes towards protein stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pamela Mukhopadhyay; Surajit Basak; Tapash Chandra Ghosh

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between the synonymous codon usage and different protein secondary structural classes were investigated using 401 Homo sapiens proteins extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB). A simple Chi-square test was used to assess the significance of deviation of the observed and expected frequencies of 59 codons at the level of individual synonymous families in the four different protein secondary structural classes. It was observed that synonymous codon families show non-randomness in codon usage in four different secondary structural classes. However, when the genes were classified according to their GC3 levels there was an increase in non-randomness in high GC3 group of genes. The non-randomness in codon usage was further tested among the same protein secondary structures belonging to four different protein folding classes of high GC3 group of genes. The results show that in each of the protein secondary structural unit there exist some synonymous family that shows class specific codonusage pattern. Moreover, there is an increased non-random behaviour of synonymous codons in sheet structure of all secondary structural classes in high GC3 group of genes. Biological implications of these results have been discussed.

  1. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1 °C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9 °C with oligomers ≥10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1 µM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9 °C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  2. The physicochemical properties of legume protein isolates and their ability to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions with and without genipin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Stuart P; Nickerson, Michael T; Low, Nicholas H

    2015-07-01

    The physicochemical and emulsifying properties of legume protein isolates prepared from chickpea (CPI), faba bean (FPI), lentil (LPI) and soy (SPI) were investigated in the presence and absence of genipin. Solubility was highest for CPI (~94 %), followed by LPI (~90 %), FPI (~85 %) and SPI (~50 %). Surface characteristics revealed similar zeta potentials (~ - 47 mV) for CPI, LPI and FPI, but lower for SPI (~ - 44 mV). Contrastingly, surface hydrophobicity was greatest for CPI (~137 arbitrary units, AU), followed by SPI/LPI (~70 AU) and FPI (~24 AU). A significant (from 16.73 to ~8.42 mN/m) reduction in interfacial tension was observed in canola oil-water mixtures in the presence of non-crosslinked legume protein isolates. The extent of legume protein isolate-genipin crosslinking was found to be similar for all isolates. Overall, creaming stability increased in the presence of genipin, with maximum stability observed for SPI (65 %), followed by FPI (61 %), LPI (56 %) and finally CPI (50 %).

  3. Key Role for Intracellular K+ and Protein Kinases Sat4/Hal4 and Hal5 in the Plasma Membrane Stabilization of Yeast Nutrient Transporters▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Valle, Jorge; Jenkins, Huw; Merchan, Stephanie; Montiel, Vera; Ramos, José; Sharma, Sukesh; Serrano, Ramón; Yenush, Lynne

    2007-01-01

    K+ transport in living cells must be tightly controlled because it affects basic physiological parameters such as turgor, membrane potential, ionic strength, and pH. In yeast, the major high-affinity K+ transporter, Trk1, is inhibited by high intracellular K+ levels and positively regulated by two redundant “halotolerance” protein kinases, Sat4/Hal4 and Hal5. Here we show that these kinases are not required for Trk1 activity; rather, they stabilize the transporter at the plasma membrane under low K+ conditions, preventing its endocytosis and vacuolar degradation. High concentrations (0.2 M) of K+, but not Na+ or sorbitol, transported by undefined low-affinity systems, maintain Trk1 at the plasma membrane in the hal4 hal5 mutant. Other nutrient transporters, such as Can1 (arginine permease), Fur4 (uracil permease), and Hxt1 (low-affinity glucose permease), are also destabilized in the hal4 hal5 mutant under low K+ conditions and, in the case of Can1, are stabilized by high K+ concentrations. Other plasma membrane proteins such as Pma1 (H+-pumping ATPase) and Sur7 (an eisosomal protein) are not regulated by halotolerance kinases or by high K+ levels. This novel regulatory mechanism of nutrient transporters may participate in the quiescence/growth transition and could result from effects of intracellular K+ and halotolerance kinases on membrane trafficking and/or on the transporters themselves. PMID:17548466

  4. Stability of Trans-Resveratrol Encapsulated in a Protein Matrix Produced Using Spray Drying to UV Light Stress and Simulated Gastro-Intestinal Digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Clarissa C; Andrade, Juan E; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Lee, Youngsoo

    2016-02-01

    Trans-resveratrol has demonstrated the potential to provide both therapeutic and preventive activities against chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer. The incorporation of trans-resveratrol into food products would allow for broader access of this bioactive compound to a larger population. However, this strategy is limited by instability of trans-resveratrol under environmental conditions and within the digestive system leading to isomerization of trans-resveratrol (bioactive form) to cis-resveratrol (bio-inactive form). Studies in the stabilization of trans-resveratrol into protein microparticles are presented. Trans-resveratrol was encapsulated using whey protein concentrate (WPC) or sodium caseinate (SC), with or without anhydrous milk fat (AMF). Binding of resveratrol and aromatic residues in protein was estimated utilizing the Stern-Volmer equation and the number of tryptophan residues. The stability of encapsulated resveratrol was evaluated after exposure to ultraviolet A (UVA) light and 3-stage in vitro digestion. After UVA light exposure, SC-based microcapsules maintained a higher trans:cis resveratrol ratio (0.63, P trans-resveratrol to UVA light exposure and simulated digestion conditions. This encapsulation-system-approach can be extended to other labile, bioactive polyphenols.

  5. IRS1 deficiency protects β-cells against ER stress-induced apoptosis by modulating sXBP-1 stability and protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Tomozumi; Shirakawa, Jun; Roe, Michael W; Leech, Colin A; Maier, Bernhard F; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is among several pathological features that underlie β-cell failure in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Adaptor proteins in the insulin/insulin-like-growth factor-1 signaling pathways, such as insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) and IRS2, differentially impact β-cell survival but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that β-cells deficient in IRS1 (IRS1KO) are resistant, while IRS2 deficiency (IRS2KO) makes them susceptible to ER stress-mediated apoptosis. IRS1KOs exhibited low nuclear accumulation of spliced XBP-1 due to its poor stability, in contrast to elevated accumulation in IRS2KO. The reduced nuclear accumulation in IRS1KO was due to protein instability of Xbp1 secondary to proteasomal degradation. IRS1KO also demonstrated an attenuation in their general translation status in response to ER stress revealed by polyribosomal profiling. Phosphorylation of eEF2 was dramatically increased in IRS1KO enabling the β-cells to adapt to ER stress by blocking translation. Furthermore, significantly high ER calcium (Ca(2+)) was detected in IRS1KO β-cells even upon induction of ER stress. These observations suggest that IRS1 could be a therapeutic target for β-cell protection against ER stress-mediated cell death by modulating XBP-1 stability, protein synthesis, and Ca(2+) storage in the ER. PMID:27378176

  6. Forster Resonance Energy Transfer and Conformational Stability of Proteins: An Advanced Biophysical Module for Physical Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Katheryn M.; Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2008-01-01

    Protein folding is an exploding area of research in biophysics and physical chemistry. Here, we describe the integration of several techniques, including absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, to probe important topics in protein folding. Cytochrome c is used as a model…

  7. Ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics of stabilized A state mutants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP): Snipping the proton wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two blue absorbing and emitting mutants (S65G/T203V/E222Q and S65T at pH 5.5) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) have been investigated through ultrafast time resolved infra-red (TRIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. In these mutants, in which the excited state proton transfer reaction observed in wild-type GFP has been blocked, the photophysics are dominated by the neutral A state. It was found that the A* excited state lifetime is short, indicating that it is relatively less stabilised in the protein matrix than the anionic form. However, the lifetime of the A state can be increased through modifications to the protein structure. The TRIR spectra show that a large shifts in protein vibrational modes on excitation of the A state occurs in both these GFP mutants. This is ascribed to a change in H-bonding interactions between the protein matrix and the excited state

  8. Studies on the Coordination of Ribosomal Protein Assembly Events Involved in Processing and Stabilization of Yeast Early Large Ribosomal Subunit Precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uli Ohmayer

    Full Text Available Cellular production of ribosomes involves the formation of highly defined interactions between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs. Moreover in eukaryotic cells, efficient ribosome maturation requires the transient association of a large number of ribosome biogenesis factors (RBFs with newly forming ribosomal subunits. Here, we investigated how r-protein assembly events in the large ribosomal subunit (LSU rRNA domain II are coordinated with each other and with the association of RBFs in early LSU precursors of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specific effects on the pre-ribosomal association of RBFs could be observed in yeast mutants blocked in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. Moreover, formation of a cluster of r-proteins was identified as a downstream event in LSU rRNA domain II assembly. We analyzed in more detail the functional relevance of eukaryote specific bridges established by this r-protein cluster between LSU rRNA domain II and VI and discuss how they can support the stabilization and efficient processing of yeast early LSU precursor RNAs.

  9. A ubiquitin-10 promoter-based vector set for fluorescent protein tagging facilitates temporal stability and native protein distribution in transient and stable expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefen, Christopher; Donald, Naomi; Hashimoto, Kenji; Kudla, Jörg; Schumacher, Karin; Blatt, Michael R

    2010-10-01

    Fluorescent tagging of proteins and confocal imaging techniques have become methods of choice in analysing the distributions and dynamic characteristics of proteins at the subcellular level. In common use are a number of strategies for transient expression that greatly reduce the preparation time in advance of imaging, but their applications are limited in success outside a few tractable species and tissues. We previously developed a simple method to transiently express fluorescently-tagged proteins in Arabidopsis root epidermis and root hairs. We describe here a set of Gateway-compatable vectors with fluorescent tags incorporating the ubiqutin-10 gene promoter (P(UBQ10) ) of Arabidopsis that gives prolonged expression of the fluorescently-tagged proteins, both in tobacco and Arabidopsis tissues, after transient transformation, and is equally useful in generating stably transformed lines. As a proof of principle, we carried out transformations with fluorescent markers for the integral plasma membrane protein SYP121, a member of the SNARE family of vesicle-trafficking proteins, and for DHAR1, a cytosolic protein that facilitates the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. We also carried out transformations with SYP121 and its interacting partner, the KC1 K(+) channel, to demonstrate the utility of the methods in bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). Transient transformations of Arabidopsis using Agrobacterium co-cultivation methods yielded expression in all epidermal cells, including root hairs and guard cells. Comparative studies showed that the P(UBQ10) promoter gives similar levels of expression to that driven by the native SYP121 promoter, faithfully reproducing the characteristics of protein distributions at the subcellular level. Unlike the 35S-driven construct, expression under the P(UBQ10) promoter remained elevated for periods in excess of 2 weeks after transient transformation. This toolbox of vectors and fluorescent tags promises significant

  10. 调酸型乳味饮料工艺研究%A Study on Stabilizer of the Low-protein Beverages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟彦

    2013-01-01

      Study of a low protein content of fresh sour milk beverage products stable system. Sour milk beverage of protein with acid denaturation precipitation. Impact on product quality and characters,choose the suitable stabilizer and suitable process conditions, so that products in the acidic protein from the influence of acid denaturation precipitation, thus ensuring the appearance of products, quality and taste. The results show that, the soybean polysaccharides and pectin with use, the pressure in the (180±20)kg/cm2 homogeneous, concentrated acid rapidly adding milk and stabilizer mixture can meet the requirement of product stability.%  研究了低蛋白含量的清爽型调酸型乳味饮料的产品稳定体系。调酸型乳味饮料中蛋白质遇酸变性沉淀,会影响产品品质及性状,选择适宜的稳定剂及适宜的制程条件,使产品在调酸时蛋白质不受酸的影响变性沉淀,从而保证产品的外观、品质及口感。结果表明,选用大豆多糖与果胶配合使用,在(180±20)kg/cm2压力下均质,采用浓酸液迅速加入乳及稳定剂混合液中可满足产品稳定性要求。

  11. Microscopic stability of cold shock protein A examined by NMR native state hydrogen exchange as a function of urea and trimethylamine N-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaravine, V. A.; Rathgeb-Szabo, K.; Alexandrescu, A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Native state hydrogen exchange of cold shock protein A (CspA) has been characterized as a function of the denaturant urea and of the stabilizing agent trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The structure of CspA has five strands of beta-sheet. Strands beta1-beta4 have strongly protected amide protons that, based on experiments as a function of urea, exchange through a simple all-or-none global unfolding mechanism. By contrast, the protection of amide protons from strand beta5 is too weak to measure in water. Strand beta5 is hydrogen bonded to strands beta3 and beta4, both of which afford strong protection from solvent exchange. Gaussian network model (GNM) simulations, which assume that the degree of protection depends on tertiary contact density in the native structure, accurately predict the strong protection observed in strands beta1-beta4 but fail to account for the weak protection in strand beta5. The most conspicuous feature of strand beta5 is its low sequence hydrophobicity. In the presence of TMAO, there is an increase in the protection of strands beta1-beta4, and protection extends to amide protons in more hydrophilic segments of the protein, including strand beta5 and the loops connecting the beta-strands. TMAO stabilizes proteins by raising the free energy of the denatured state, due to highly unfavorable interactions between TMAO and the exposed peptide backbone. As such, the stabilizing effects of TMAO are expected to be relatively independent of sequence hydrophobicity. The present results suggest that the magnitude of solvent exchange protection depends more on solvent accessibility in the ensemble of exchange susceptible conformations than on the strength of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the native structure. PMID:10716181

  12. Hen egg-white lysozyme crystallisation: protein stacking and structure stability enhanced by a Tellurium(VI)-centred polyoxotungstate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic, Aleksandar; Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan G; Al-Oweini, Rami; Kortz, Ulrich; Rompel, Annette

    2015-01-19

    As synchrotron radiation becomes more intense, detectors become faster and structure-solving software becomes more elaborate, obtaining single crystals suitable for data collection is now the bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Hence, there is a need for novel and advanced crystallisation agents with the ability to crystallise proteins that are otherwise challenging. Here, an Anderson-Evans-type polyoxometalate (POM), specifically Na6 [TeW6 O24 ]⋅22 H2 O (TEW), is employed as a crystallisation additive. Its effects on protein crystallisation are demonstrated with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), which co-crystallises with TEW in the vicinity (or within) the liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) region. The X-ray structure (PDB ID: 4PHI) determination revealed that TEW molecules are part of the crystal lattice, thus demonstrating specific binding to HEWL with electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The negatively charged TEW polyoxotungstate binds to sites with a positive electrostatic potential located between two (or more) symmetry-related protein chains. Thus, TEW facilitates the formation of protein-protein interfaces of otherwise repulsive surfaces, and thereby the realisation of a stable crystal lattice. In addition to retaining the isomorphicity of the protein structure, the anomalous scattering of the POMs was used for macromolecular phasing. The results suggest that hexatungstotellurate(VI) has great potential as a crystallisation additive to promote both protein crystallisation and structure elucidation. PMID:25521080

  13. The Escherichia coli antiterminator protein BglG stabilizes the 5' region of the bgl mRNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhilasha Gulati; S Mahadevan

    2001-06-01

    The -glucoside utilization (bgl) genes of Escherichia coli are positively regulated by the product of the bglG gene, which functions as an antiterminator by binding to specific sequences present within the bgl mRNA. BglG is inactivated by phosphorylation in the absence of -glucosides by BglF, the bgl-specific component of the phosphotransferase system (PTS). Here, we present evidence for an additional function for BglG, namely the stabilization of the 5— end of the bgl mRNA. Half-life measurements of the promoter-proximal region of the bgl mRNA indicate a five fold enhancement of stability in the presence of active (unphosphorylated) BglG. This enhancement is lost when the binding of BglG to mRNA is prevented by deletion of the binding site. Interestingly, stabilization by BglG does not extend to downstream sequences. The enhanced stability of the upstream sequences suggest that BglG remains bound to its target on the mRNA even after the downstream sequences have been degraded. Implications of these observations for the mechanism of positive regulation of the operon by BglG are discussed.

  14. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent protein kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCord, Ronald A; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao;

    2009-01-01

    The Sir2 chromatin regulatory factor links maintenance of genomic stability to life span extension in yeast. The mammalian Sir2 family member SIRT6 has been proposed to have analogous functions, because SIRT6-deficiency leads to shortened life span and an aging-like degenerative phenotype in mice...

  15. Introduction of an electron push-pull system yields a planar Red Kaede fluorescence protein chromophore analogue stabilized by a C = O… interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashish Singh; Basanta Kumar Rajbongshi; Gurunath Ramanathan

    2015-05-01

    Crystal structures of four red kaede fluorescence protein chromophore analogues are reported here. Molecules I-III adopt a non-planar geometry stabilized by … stacking and hydrogen bonding. Introduction of an electron push-pull system induces molecule IV to be planar and a C = O… supramolecular interaction is observed as well. Strong electron withdrawing and donating groups also ensure formation of a higher order two and three dimensional supramolecular architecture through hydrogen bonds in molecules I and IV. All the analogues exhibit good photoluminescence properties and emit in the red region with excellent quantum yields.

  16. The molecular organization of the beta-sheet region in Corneous beta-proteins (beta-keratins) of sauropsids explains its stability and polymerization into filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Eckhart, Leopold; Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    The hard corneous material of avian and reptilian scales, claws, beak and feathers is mainly derived from the presence of proteins formerly known as beta-keratins but now termed Corneous beta-proteins of sauropsids to distinguish them from keratins, which are members of the intermediate filament protein family. The modeling of the conserved 34 amino acid residues long central beta-sheet region of Corneous beta-proteins using an ab initio protein folding and structure prediction algorithm indicates that this region is formed by four antiparallel beta-sheets. Molecular dynamic simulations and Molecular Mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) analysis showed that the disposition of polar and apolar amino acids within the beta-region gives rise to an amphipathic core whose stability is further increased, especially in an aqueous environment, by the association into a dimer due to apolar interactions and specific amino-acid interactions. The dimers in turn polymerize into a 3nm thick linear beta-filament due to van der Waals and hydrogen-bond interactions. It is suggested that once this nuclear core of anti-parallel sheets evolved in the genome of a reptilian ancestor of the extant reptiles and birds about 300 millions years ago, new properties emerged in the corneous material forming scales, claws, beaks and feathers in these amniotes based on the tendency of these unique corneous proteins to form stable filaments different from keratin intermediate filaments or sterical structures formed by other corneous proteins so far known. PMID:26965557

  17. Structures of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKG) Iα Leucine Zippers Reveal an Interchain Disulfide Bond Important for Dimer Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Liying; Reger, Albert S.; Guo, Elaine; Yang, Matthew P.; Zwart, Peter; Casteel, Darren E.; Kim, Choel

    2016-01-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) Iα is a central regulator of smooth muscle tone and vasorelaxation. The N-terminal leucine zipper (LZ) domain dimerizes and targets PKG Iα by interacting with G-kinase-anchoring proteins. The PKG Iα LZ contains C42 that is known to form a disulfide bond upon oxidation and to activate PKG Iα. To understand the molecular details of the PKG Iα LZ and C42–C42′ disulfide bond, we determined crystal structures of the PKG Iα wild-type (WT) LZ and C42L LZ. Our data demonstrate that the C42–C42′ disulfide bond dramatically stabilizes PKG Iα and that the C42L mutant mimics the oxidized WT LZ structurally. PMID:26132214

  18. Effects of lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, and palmitic acid on monolayer stability.

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, J; Takamoto, D Y; von Nahmen, A; Lipp, M M; Lee, K Y; Waring, A J; Zasadzinski, J A

    2001-01-01

    Langmuir isotherms and fluorescence and atomic force microscopy images of synthetic model lung surfactants were used to determine the influence of palmitic acid and synth