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Sample records for blunted pancreatic polypeptide-induced

  1. MR imaging for blunt pancreatic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Lin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Zhang Xiaoming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.co [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China); Xu Xiaoxue; Tang Wei; Xiao Bo; Zeng Nanlin [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan 637000 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Objective: To study the MR imaging features of blunt pancreatic injury. Materials and methods: Nine patients with pancreatic injury related to blunt abdominal trauma confirmed by surgery performed MR imaging. Two abdominal radiologists conducted a review of the MR images to assess pancreatic parenchymal and pancreatic duct injury, and associated complications. Result: Diagnostic quality MR images were obtained in each of the nine patients. In the nine patients, pancreatic fracture, laceration and contusion were depicted on MR imaging in five, one and three patients, respectively. There were six patients with pancreatic duct disruption, eight patients with peripancreatic fluid collections, and four patients with peripancreatic pseudocyst or hematoma, respectively. All of the MR imaging findings was corresponded to surgical findings. Conclusion: MR imaging is an effective method to detect blunt pancreatic injury and may provide information to guide management decisions.

  2. Pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma: an analysis of 110 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the management of blunt pancreatic injuries using a previously defined protocol to determine which factors predicted morbidity and mortality. Methods. The study design was a retrospective chart review of all adult patients with blunt pancreatic injuries treated at a level 1 trauma centre between March ...

  3. Case Report - AAST grade III pancreatic injury following blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Isolated pancreatic trauma with major pancreatic duct disruption is a rare finding; it can present with equivocal clinical signs. Serum amylase levels and diagnostic contrast-enhanced computed tomography can facilitate the diagnostic process.

  4. Pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma: an analysis of 110 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and one patients underwent a total of 123 operations, including drainage of the pancreatic injury (N=73), distal pancreatectomy (N=39) and Whipple resection (N=5). The overall complication rate was 74.5% and the mortality rate 16.4%. Only 2 of the 18 deaths were attributable to the pancreatic injury.

  5. AAST grade III pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bowel injuries.4 Isolated pancreatic trauma with disruption of the major pancreatic duct is rare.3 When the pancreas is injured in isolation, its retroperitoneal position makes diagnosis difficult, with a subsequent risk of delayed recognition due to the lack of clinical signs. The incidence of isolated major duct disruption is.

  6. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma in children: Review of the National Trauma Data Bank☆,☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englum, Brian R.; Gulack, Brian C.; Rice, Henry E.; Scarborough, John E.; Adibe, Obinna O.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to examine the current management strategies and outcomes after blunt pancreatic trauma in children using a national patient registry. Methods Using the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) from 2007–2011, we identified all patients ≤18 years old who suffered blunt pancreatic trauma. Patients were categorized as undergoing nonoperative pancreatic management (no abdominal operation, abdominal operation without pancreatic-specific procedure, or pancreatic drainage alone) or operative pancreatic management (pancreatic resection/repair). Patient characteristics, operative details, clinical outcomes, and factors associated with operative management were examined. Results Of 610,402 pediatric cases in the NTDB, 1653 children (0.3%) had blunt pancreatic injury and 674 had information on specific location of pancreatic injury. Of these 674 cases, 514 (76.3%) underwent nonoperative pancreatic management. The groups were similar in age, gender, and race; however, pancreatic injury grade > 3, moderate to severe injury severity, and bicycle accidents were associated with operative management in multivariable analysis. Children with pancreatic head injuries or GCS motor score undergo pancreatic operation. Overall morbidity and mortality rates were 26.5% and 5.3%, respectively. Most outcomes were similar between treatment groups, including mortality (2.5% vs. 6.7% in operative vs. nonoperative cohorts respectively; p = 0.07). Conclusion Although rare, blunt pancreatic trauma in children continues to be a morbid injury. In the largest analysis of blunt pancreatic trauma in children, we provide data on which to base future prospective studies. Operative management of pancreatic trauma occurs most often in children with distal ductal injuries, suggesting that prospective studies may want to focus on this group. PMID:27577183

  7. The role of imaging studies in pancreatic injury due to blunt abdominal trauma in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosboom, D. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 667, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Braam, A.W.E. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 815, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Blickman, J.G. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 667, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Wijnen, R.M.H. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Center St Radboud, Postbus 9101, Route 815, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: R.Wijnen@kchir.umcn.nl

    2006-07-15

    Background: The role imaging studies play in the choice of treatment in traumatic pancreas damage remains unclear. This study was performed to gain insight into the role of radiological studies in children 16 years of age or younger admitted to our hospital with pancreatic damage due to a blunt abdominal trauma. Method: Retrospectively, the radiological as well as patient clinical records were reviewed of all children admitted to our hospital between 1975 and 2003 with a pancreatic lesion due to blunt abdominal trauma. Results: Thirty-four children with ages ranging from 3 to 14 years old were admitted with traumatic pancreas damage. Initially 33 children were treated conservatively for the pancreatic damage and only one had immediate surgery of the pancreas with a Roux-y pancreaticojejunostomy. Five other children had immediate surgery for other reasons. Overall, five children proved to have a pancreas transection on CT scans or during laparotomy. One child had a pancreas hematoma and 28 a pancreas contusion. In total 15 children developed a pseudocyst (44%), nine of which resolved spontaneously while six were treated by intervention. None of the children had residual morbidity, and there were no deaths. Considering the pancreas, the 11 available CT's were re-evaluated by two radiologists independently. Grade 3 pancreas damage (distal transection of the pancreatic duct) was diagnosed in five patients by radiologist A and four patients by radiologist B (80% match); Grade 1 was diagnosed in, respectively six and one patients (15% match). An US was performed on 19 children with 82 follow-up examinations, mostly for follow-up of the pseudocysts. Conclusion: Traumatic pancreas damage is a rare and difficult diagnosis. There is no straightforward answer for diagnostic imaging in blunt abdominal trauma in children. The diagnostic relevance of CT is limited. CT in combination with MRCP may be a better option for exclusion of pancreatic duct lesions.

  8. Blunt trauma pancreatic duct injury managed by non-operative technique, a case study and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zala

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 15 year old boy who presented with generalised abdominal pain following a seemingly minor collision at weekend soccer. Investigation revealed a grade IV pancreatic injury that was subsequently managed with pancreatic stent insertion by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP and total parenteral nutrition (TPN prior to recommencing low fat diet 10 days post-injury. Keywords: Trauma, Blunt injury, Pancreas, Non-operative

  9. Delayed Presentation of Isolated Complete Pancreatic Transection as a Result of Sport-Related Blunt Trauma to the Abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Healey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma is a rare but well-recognized cause of pancreatic transection. A delayed presentation of pancreatic fracture following sport-related blunt trauma with the coexisting diagnostic pitfalls is presented. Case Report: A 17-year-old rugby player was referred to our specialist unit after having been diagnosed with traumatic pancreatic transection, having presented 24 h after a sporting injury. Despite haemodynamic stability, at laparotomy he was found to have a diffuse mesenteric hematoma involving the large and small bowel mesentery, extending down to the sigmoid colon from the splenic flexure, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma arising from the pancreas. The pancreas was completely severed with the superior border of the distal segment remaining attached to the splenic vein that was intact. A distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation and evacuation of the retroperitoneal hematoma was performed. Discussion/Conclusion: Blunt pancreatic trauma is a serious condition. Diagnosis and treatment may often be delayed, which in turn may drastically increase morbidity and mortality. Diagnostic difficulties apply to both paraclinical and radiological diagnostic methods. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in such cases, with a multi-modality diagnostic approach and prompt surgical intervention as required.

  10. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  11. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes. Treatment Treatment for pancreatitis may include a hospital stay for intravenous (IV) fluids, pain medicine, and other medicines. Surgery is sometimes needed to treat complications. Eating, Diet, & Nutrition If you have pancreatitis, your health care ...

  12. Isolated gallbladder rupture following blunt abdominal injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-26

    May 26, 2015 ... A retrospective review consisting of. 1449 patients reported the incidence around 0.067%.[3]. Here, we presented a case of isolated gallbladder rupture following a blunt abdominal injury. Case Report. A 39‑year‑old man with history of cholelithiasis, alcoholism‑related liver cirrhosis, and chronic pancreatitis.

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma associated to the superior mesenteric vein thrombosis Diagnóstico de trauma pancreático associado à trombose da veia mesentérica feito através da ultrassonografia endoscópica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everson L. A. Artifon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blunt pancreatic injuries occur when a high-energy crushing force is applied to the upper abdomen. In adults, the majority of blunt pancreatic injuries result from motor vehicle accidents. CASE REPORT: Male with 32 years old had a high-energy crushing history in witch he was pressured by the chest on the front car area. His life signs demonstrated to be regular. Ct scan demonstrated body pancreatic edema. All routine laboratorial exams were normal, EUS revealed pancreatic lesion grade II without involvement of the pancreatic duct and an impressive superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. He was sustained by means of anti- coagulation for about two months and after that time the multislice CT scan showed a mesenteric vein recanalization and a normal pancreatic parenchyma. The patient had an uneventfull follow-up. CONCLUSION: Patients presenting possible pancreatic trauma associated to superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, EUS must be used firstly.INTRODUÇÃO: Traumas pancreáticos fechados ocorrem em acidentes que promovem força intensa no abdome superior, principalmente em acidentes automobilísticos. RELATO DO CASO: Homem de 32 anos foi jogado contra a área frontal de seu automóvel. Seus sinais vitais eram normais. CT mostrou edema pancreático. EUS mostrou lesão pancreática grau II sem envolvimento do ducto pancreático, mas com impressionante trombose da veia mesentérica superior. Ele foi mantido com anticoagulants por dois meses e após este period novo scan mostrou recanalização e pâncreas normal. Teve seguimento favorável. CONCLUSÃO: Paciente apresentando edema pancreático associado a possível trombose de veia mesentérica superior deve ser submetido à EUS para monitorização e acompanhamento.

  14. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tata Memorial Hospital, Dr. E. Borges Road,. Parel, Mumbai ‑ 12, Maharashtra, India. E‑mail: sanketbankar23@gmail.com mobilized. There was complete transection of the third part of the duodenum [Figure 1] with normal pancreas. Edges were freshened and primary anastomosis was done with. 3.0 mersilk in two layers.

  15. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  16. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  17. Blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jeremy S; Benitez, R Michael

    2012-11-01

    Blunt chest trauma represents a spectrum of injuries to the heart and aorta that vary markedly in character and severity. The setting, signs, and symptoms of chest trauma are often nonspecific, which represents a challenge to emergency providers. Individuals with suspected blunt chest trauma who have only mild or no symptoms, a normal electrocardiogram (ECG), and are hemodynamically stable typically have a benign course and rarely require further diagnostic testing or long periods of close observation. Individuals with pain, ECG abnormalities, or hemodynamic instability may require rapid evaluation of the heart by echocardiography and the great vessels by advanced imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Swords with Blunt Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  19. Blunt traumatic diaphragmatic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Nogueira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injury of the diaphragm ranges from 0.6 to 1.2% and rise up to 5%among patients who were victims of blunt trauma and underwent laparotomy.Clinical suspicion associated with radiological assessment contributes to earlydiagnosis. Isolated diaphragmatic injury has a good prognosis. Generallyworse outcomes are associated with other trauma injuries. Bilateral andright diaphragmatic lesions have worse prognosis. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT scan of the chest and abdomen provides better diagnosticaccuracy using the possibility of image multiplanar reconstruction. Surgicalrepair via laparotomy and/ or thoracotomy in the acute phase of the injury hasa better outcome and avoids chronic complications of diaphragmatic hernia.The authors present the case of a young male patient, victim of blunt abdominaltrauma due to motor vehicle accident with rupture of the diaphragm, spleenand kidney injuries. The diagnosis was made by computed tomography of thethorax and abdomen and was confirmed during laparotomy.

  20. [Pancreatic trauma: analysis of 29 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, S R; Duarte Júnior, E; Speranzini, M B

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between complications and the kind of pancreatic lesion and surgery performed. KIND OF STUDY: Retrospective. The patients were operated on at the Pronto Socorro--Mandaqui Hospital Complex, from January 1987 to January 1990. The authors analyzed 29 patients victims of penetrating or blunt abdominal trauma who were operated on in that period. 27 of them were male. 20 (69%) were shotgun victims; 5 (17.2%) were victims of cold steels; and 4 (13.8%) were victims of blunt trauma. In pancreatic head lesions (5 cases), hemostasis and drainage were performed in three cases; duodenopancreatectomy in one case; and suture in one case. In traumas to the pancreatic body (13 cases), six pancreatectomies, five drainages, and two sutures were performed. In traumas to the pancreatic tail (11 cases), six pancreatectomies, four sutures and one drainage were performed. Complications occurred in all patients with pancreatic head lesions, in eight patients with trauma to the pancreatic body, and in five patients trauma to the pancreatic tail. The most frequent complications were intracavitary abscesses (seven cases), and pancreatic fistulae (five cases). Morbidity rate was 72.4% and mortality rate was 17.2%. The authors conclude that indication of pancreatectomy in ductal lesions should be done, exception being made to cases of pancreatic head trauma, for which a suture or simple drainage can be used in superficial lesions. In doubt, an expert surgeon may be called.

  1. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enzymes become prematurely active and irritate the pancreas (pancreatitis). Pseudocysts can also result from injury to the ... alcohol use and gallstones are risk factors for pancreatitis, and pancreatitis is a risk factor for pseudocysts. ...

  2. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  3. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... well it can be treated. Complications of acute pancreatitis may include: Acute kidney failure Long-term lung damage (ARDS) Buildup ...

  4. MDCT in blunt intestinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tortora, Giovanni [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Martino, Antonio [Trauma Center, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Di Pietto, Francesco [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Romano, Luigia [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A.Cardarelli' Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy); Grassi, Roberto [Department ' Magrassi-Lanzara' , Section of Radiology, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    Injuries to the small and large intestine from blunt trauma represent a defined clinical entity, often not easy to correctly diagnose in emergency but extremely important for the therapeutic assessment of patients. This article summarizes the MDCT spectrum of findings in intestinal blunt lesions, from functional disorders to hemorrhage and perforation.

  5. MDCT in blunt intestinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Stefania; Scaglione, Mariano; Tortora, Giovanni; Martino, Antonio; Di Pietto, Francesco; Romano, Luigia; Grassi, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Injuries to the small and large intestine from blunt trauma represent a defined clinical entity, often not easy to correctly diagnose in emergency but extremely important for the therapeutic assessment of patients. This article summarizes the MDCT spectrum of findings in intestinal blunt lesions, from functional disorders to hemorrhage and perforation

  6. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Acute Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  7. Role of computed tomography in pancreatic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Hee; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Oh, Sei Jung [College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    At Yonsei University Hospital from January 1984 to August 1990, computed tomographic (CT) scans of 13 patients with surgically proven pancreatic injuries after blunt abdominal trauma, including 6 pancreatic lacerations or contusions, 6 pancreatic fractures, and one post-traumatic pseudocyst, were retrospectively reviewed to determine the role and accuracy of the CT in evaluating pancreatic injury. CT can document gross pancreatic injury by showing focal or diffuse enlargement (1), area of diminished attenuation (3), separation (5), focal hematoma (2), and peripancreatic change, including peripancreatic hematoma (2), fluid collection (11), perirenal fascial thickening (10), omental and mesenteric change (5), and bowel change (2). CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fracture in 5 cases, post-raumatic pseudocyst in 1 case, and pancreatic laceration in 3 cases in 9 of these patients. There were 4 false negative diagnoses, including 3 pancreatic lacerations and 1 pancreatic fracture. A CT is of pancreatic trauma could be difficult to diagnosis in patients who are scanned within 24 hrs after an injury or to distinguish a motion or streak artifact caused by a nasogastric tube or air-oral contrast fluid level in the stomach.

  8. James Blunt matuselaulude edetabeli tipus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Bereavement Registeri andmetel Suurbritannias matustel tellitavate laulude edetabelis: James Blunt "Goodbye My Lover", Robbie Williams "Angels", Jennifer Warnes ja Bill Medley "I've Had the Time Of My Life", Elton John "Candle in the Wind", Righteous Brothers "Unchained Melody"

  9. The course of traumatic pancreatitis in a patient with pancreas divisum: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Thomas G

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peculiar anatomy of pancreatic ducts in pancreas divisum (PD may interfere with the development of acute chronic pancreatitis. In the presented case, PD influenced the evolution of lesions after pancreatic trauma. Case presentation A 38 years old patient refferred to our hospital with recurrent episodes of mild pancreatitis during the last two years. The first episode occurred four months after blunt abdominal trauma. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging of upper abdomen and Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography disclosed pancreas divisum, changes consistent with chronic pancreatitis in the dorsal pancreatic duct, atrophy in the body and tail of the pancreas and a pseudocyst in the pancreatic head, that was drained endoscopically. Conclusion Pancreas Divisum may interfere with the evolution of posttraumatic changes in the pancreas after blunt abdominal trauma.

  10. Pancreatitis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007679.htm Pancreatitis - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pancreatitis in children occurs when the pancreas becomes swollen ...

  11. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatitis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  12. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  13. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Al Thani, Hassan; Zarour, Ahmad; Latifi, Rifat

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI) are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  14. Understanding traumatic blunt cardiac injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Menyar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac injuries are classified as blunt and penetrating injuries. In both the injuries, the major issue is missing the diagnosis and high mortality. Blunt cardiac injuries (BCI are much more common than penetrating injuries. Aiming at a better understanding of BCI, we searched the literature from January 1847 to January 2012 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE search engines. Using the key word "Blunt Cardiac Injury," we found 1814 articles; out of which 716 articles were relevant. Herein, we review the causes, diagnosis, and management of BCI. In conclusion, traumatic cardiac injury is a major challenge in critical trauma care, but the guidelines are lacking. A high index of suspicion, application of current diagnostic protocols, and prompt and appropriate management is mandatory.

  15. Computed tomography and nonoperative treatment for blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shinsuke; Ishi, Takashi; Kamachi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine if computed tomography (CT) could reliably assist physical examination in the initial assessment of blunt abdominal trauma, and also to examine how various abdominal injuries were managed with the guidance of CT. A total of 255 patients underwent emergency abdominal CT following blunt abdominal trauma over a period of seven years. One hundred and fifty two patients had abnormal CT scans, including 58 hepatic, 36 renal, 25 splenic and 9 pancreatic injuries as well as 67 patients with intra-abdominal hemorrhage and 21 patients with free abdominal air. A comparative study on the detection of pneumoperitoneum revealed CT to be far superior to plain radiography. One hundred and three patients had normal CT scans, all of whom were managed nonoperatively, except for three false-negative cases and two nontherapeutic cases. The patients with injury to the parenchymal organs were given nonoperative treatment if they had stable vital signs and no evidence of associated injuries demanding immediate surgery and the majority of these patients were managed well nonoperatively. CT was thus found to be a useful adjunct in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, since in a rapid and noninvasive fashion, CT accurately defined the extent of parenchymal organ injury and also disclosed any other abdominal injuries. (author)

  16. Anterior Roux‑en‑Y Pancreatico‑jejunostomy for Pancreatic Trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolated pancreatic laceration is a rare injury. The typical mechanism by which it occurs is overstretching of the pancreas across the vertebral column during blunt abdominal trauma. The management depends on the location and extent of the injury. Disruption of the pancreatic duct usually requires operative treatment.

  17. Acute pancreatic pseudocyst in an 18-month old girl in a resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute pancreatic pseudocyst is a rare occurrence in young children—infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers. Blunt abdominal trauma which most times would have been overlooked after initial treatment tends to be the commonest cause of pancreatic pseudocyst in young children. The management of an 18-month-old girl who ...

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  19. Blunt Head Trauma and Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Chelse

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  20. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-21

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  1. Pancreatic Juice Culture in Acute Pancreatitis and Other Pancreatic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Masataka Kikuyama; Tatsunori Sato; Takafumi Kurokami; Yuji Ota; Yoshihiro Yokoi

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the results of pancreatic juice cultures of patients with acute pancreatitis and other pancreatic disorders. Methods Twenty patients who underwent pancreatic juice culture were studied. Nine had acute pancreatitis due to alcohol (n=5), idiopathic causes (n=2), drugs (n=1), or gallstones (n=1), and remaining 11 had other pancreatic disorders such as an intraductal papillary mucin-producing neoplasm (n=3) and main pancreatic duct dilatation with a stricture due to a...

  2. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pancreatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...

  5. Gastroduodenal artery aneurysm – A rare complication of traumatic pancreatic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annu Babu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysm of gastroduodenal artery (GDA is rare. Most reported cases are due to pancreatitis and atherosclerosis; however, those following pancreatic trauma have not been reported. We encountered GDA aneurysm in a patient of blunt abdominal trauma, who had pancreatic contusion and retroduodenal air on contrast enhanced computed tomography of abdomen. Emergency laparotomy for suspected duodenal injury revealed duodenal wall and pancreatic head contusion, mild hemoperitoneum and no evidence of duodenal perforation. In the postoperative period, the patient developed upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage on day 5. Repeat imaging revealed GDA aneurysm, which was managed successfully by angioembolization. This case highlights, one, delayed presentation of GDA aneurysm after blunt pancreatic trauma and two, its successful management using endovascular technique.

  6. Blunt and Penetrating Cardiac Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellister, Seth A; Dennis, Bradley M; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Patients with traumatic cardiac injuries can present with wide variability in their severity of illness. The most severe will present in cardiac arrest, whereas the most benign may be altogether asymptomatic; most will fall somewhere in between. Management of cardiac injuries largely depends on mechanism of injury and patient physiology. Understanding the spectrum of injuries and their associated manifestations can help providers react more quickly and initiate potentially life-saving therapies more efficiently when time is critical. This article discusses the workup and management of both blunt and penetrating cardiac injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  8. Hernia Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Aghaie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare type of hernia, which follows blunt trauma to the abdomen, where disruption of the musculature and fascia occurs with the overlying skin remaining intact. Diagnosis of this problem is very difficult and delayed. Traumatic hernia is often diagnosed during laparatomy or laparascopy, but CT scan also has a role in distinguishing this pathology. Delay in diagnosis is very dangerous and can result in gangrene and necrosis of the organs in the hernia. The case report of a 35 years old man with liftruck blunt trauma is reported. His vital signs were stable. On physical examination, tenderness of RUQ was seen. He underwent Dpl for suspected hemoprotein. Dpl was followed up by laparatomy. Laparatomy revealed that the transverse and ascending colon partially herniated in the abdominal wall defect. The colon was reduced in the abdomen and repair of abdominal hernia was done. The patient was discharged after 5 day. The etiology, pathogenesis and management are discussed.

  9. Blunt indentation of core graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, M.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Blunt indentation experiments were carried out on unoxidized and thermally oxidised IM1-24 graphite as a model to simulate local point stresses acting on graphite moderator bricks. Blunt indentation of unoxidized graphite initiates cracks close to the region of maximum tensile stress at the edge of the indentation. Cracks propagate and converge to form a cone of material. Failure is catastrophic, typically forming three pieces of graphite and ejecting the cone referred to above. The failure mode under indentation loading for highly oxidised graphite (weigh loss > 40%) is different from that for the unoxidized graphite. There is no longer a distinct crack path, the indentation is much deeper than in the case of the unoxidized graphite, and there is a region of crushed debris beneath the indentation, producing a crater-like structure. The reduction in the compressive fracture stress, σ cf , under indentation loading with increasing fractional weight loss on oxidation, x, can be fitted to σ cf /σ 0 = exp-[5.2x] where σ 0 is the compressive fracture stress of the unoxidized graphite. This indicates that the effect of thermal oxidation on indentation fracture stress is more severe than the effects of radiolytic oxidation on conventional strengths of nuclear graphites. (author). 8 refs, 12 figs

  10. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatic cysts Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Doctors & departments Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  11. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Advisory Board Volunteer Advisory Council Survivor Council Influencers of Hope Ambassador Circle Learn about the people ... is registered as a 501©3 nonprofit organization. Contributions to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network are tax- ...

  12. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the severity of the pancreatic insufficiency. As further alterations may be needed from time to time, it ... m. PT), or email patientcentral@pancan.org to speak with a knowledgeable and compassionate associate. Information provided ...

  13. Pancreatic pseudocysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrera, J.D.; Uemura, L.; Palma, J.K.; Souza, L.P. de; Ferraz, L.R.L.; Magalhaes, P.J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Radiological and ultrasonographic studies of ten patients with surgically confirmed pancreatic pseudocysts were reviewed. All of them were male, with previous story of chronic alcoholism and clinical evidences of pancreatitis. The most important radiological finding consisted of a mass opacifying the epigastrium, displacing the stomach and bowel loops. ultrasound studies showed that the lesions were predominantly cystic, rounded or oval-shaped with smooth or irregular contours and of various sizes. (Author) [pt

  14. Superman play and pediatric blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machi, J M; Gyuro, J; Losek, J D

    1996-01-01

    Two pediatric patients with life-threatening intra-abdominal injuries associated with Superman play are presented. The cases illustrate the importance of knowing the mechanism of injury in the assessment of children with blunt abdominal trauma. The diagnostic value of liver enzymes and the controversies surrounding the radiographic assessment of pediatric blunt abdominal trauma are presented.

  15. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Endosonography of groove pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, T. L.; Luiken, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis. Distinction between pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is often difficult. Two cases of groove pancreatitis diagnosed by endosonography are described. A hypoechoic pattern between the duodenal wall and pancreas was clearly imaged in both

  17. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrecka, A.; Bilicky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an ongoing inflammatory process that may over time lead to mal digestion, malabsorption and diabetic syndrome. Identification of risk (etiological) factors based on classifications TIGAR-O or later M-ANNHEIM. These factors (environmental and / or genetic) leads to failure of the stability of the digestive and lysosomal enzymes in the acinar cells, resulting in premature activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas, and repeated nekroinflamation and fibrosis. The incidence has of the upward trend. Clinically the disease manifests itself in most cases with pain and possibly with nonspecific dyspeptic troubles. Decisive role in the diagnosis playing imaging methods, trans abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic cholangiopancretography and foremost endoscopic ultrasonography, which has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is currently regarded as a method for therapy, not for diagnosis. Less importance is now attached to a functional test. Symptomatic treatment is usually conservative. Abstinence is necessary, easily digestible, but calorie-rich diet with reduced fat. Most patients needed treatment with analgesics. In case of insufficient effect of analgesics is necessary to consider endoscopic therapy or surgery. If the external secretory insufficiency is present are served pancreatic extracts. Diabetic syndrome requires insulin delivery. Generally, chronic pancreatitis is a disease treatable but incurable. Proportion of patients are also dying of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  19. Blunt cardiac rupture in a toddler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peep Talving

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Blunt cardiac rupture is typically a fatal injury with overall mortality exceeding 90%. Most of the patients never reach the hospital alive. In pediatric patients, only 0.03% of cases following blunt trauma admissions have a cardiac injury. This report presents a rare survivor of 16-months old toddler injured in a domestic accident suffering a right atrial rupture repaired through a median sternotomy. To the best of our knowledge this is the youngest case reported in the literature.

  20. Tricuspid Valve Avulsion after Blunt Chest Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrotra, Deepak; Dalley, Paul; Mahon, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Blunt cardiac trauma causing tricuspid regurgitation is rare and is most often associated with traffic accidents. Falling from a height can also cause such injuries, resulting in hemodynamic compromise and arrhythmias. The signs of traumatic tricuspid regurgitation can appear early or be delayed, depending upon the severity of injury. We present the case of a 68-year-old woman who fell from a height onto rocks during a hike. She sustained blunt cardiac injury with complete tricuspid valve avu...

  1. Tricuspid regurgitation after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone Gabrijelčič

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Our data support the fact that an injury of the tricuspid valve due to blunt chest trauma is rare and easily overlooked. Therefore, ultrasound of the heart should be done in all cases of blunt chest trauma. If negative, it should be repeated. Transoesophageal approach is more reliable than the transthoracic one. The gold standard for therapy is a valve repair, which should be done early enough to prevent further morbidity and mortality.

  2. Recent Insights in Islet Amyloid Polypeptide-Induced Membrane Disruption and Its Role in β-Cell Death in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Khemtémourian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fibrillar protein deposits (amyloid of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans is thought to be related to death of the insulin-producing islet β-cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2. The mechanism of hIAPP-induced β-cell death is not understood. However, there is growing evidence that hIAPP-induced disruption of β-cell membranes is the cause of hIAPP cytotoxicity. Amyloid cytotoxicity by membrane damage has not only been suggested for hIAPP, but also for peptides and proteins related to other misfolding diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and prion diseases. Here we review the interaction of hIAPP with membranes, and discuss recent progress in the field, with a focus on hIAPP structure and on the proposed mechanisms of hIAPP-induced membrane damage in relation to β-cell death in DM2.

  3. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...

  4. Pancreatic enzyme therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2007-04-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency with steatorrhea is a major consequence of pancreatic diseases (eg, chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer), extrapancreatic diseases such as celiac disease and Crohn's disease, and gastrointestinal and pancreatic surgical resection. Recognition of this entity is highly relevant to avoid malnutrition-related morbidity and mortality. Therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is based on the oral administration of pancreatic enzymes aiming at providing the duodenal lumen with sufficient active lipase at the time of gastric emptying of nutrients. Administration of enzymes in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres avoids acid-mediated lipase inactivation and ensures gastric emptying of enzymes in parallel with nutrients. Nevertheless, such factors as acidic intestinal pH and bacterial overgrowth may prevent normalization of fat digestion even in compliant patients. The present article critically reviews current therapeutic approaches to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

  5. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  6. Blunt Force Trauma in Veterinary Forensic Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, L; Hetzel, U; Ricci, E

    2016-09-01

    Veterinary pathologists commonly encounter lesions of blunt trauma. The development of lesions is affected by the object's mass, velocity, size, shape, and angle of impact and by the plasticity and mobility of the impacted organ. Scrape, impact, and pattern abrasions cause localized epidermal loss and sometimes broken hairs and implanted foreign material. Contusions are best identified after reflecting the skin, and must be differentiated from coagulopathies and livor mortis. Lacerations-traumatic tissue tears-may have irregular margins, bridging by more resilient tissue, deviation of the wound tail, crushed hairs, and unilateral abrasion. Hanging or choking can cause circumferential cervical abrasions, contusions and rupture of hairs, hyoid bone fractures, and congestion of the head. Other special forms of blunt trauma include fractured nails, pressure sores, and dog bites. Ocular blunt trauma causes extraocular and intraocular hemorrhages, proptosis, or retinal detachment. The thoracic viscera are relatively protected from blunt trauma but may develop hemorrhages in intercostal muscles, rib fractures, pulmonary or cardiac contusions or lacerations with subsequent hemothorax, pneumothorax, or cardiac arrhythmia. The abdominal wall is resilient and moveable, yet the liver and spleen are susceptible to traumatic laceration or rupture. Whereas extravasation of blood can occur after death, evidence of vital injury includes leukocyte infiltration, erythrophagocytosis, hemosiderin, reparative lesions of fibroblast proliferation, myocyte regeneration in muscle, and callus formation in bone. Understanding these processes aids in the diagnosis of blunt force trauma including estimation of the age of resulting injuries. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Post-traumatic Pancreatic Pseudocyst in a Nigerian boy – Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... include medical therapy, percutaneous drainage, Laparoscopic drainage, Endoscopic drainage, Endoscopic ultrasound- guided drainage (EUS) and Surgical drainage procedures. A case of pancreatic pseudocyst secondary to a blunt abdominal trauma in a 13- year old Nigerian is reported. The literature on the clinical, ...

  8. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract : Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  10. Neural plasticity in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic nerves undergo prominent alterations during the evolution and progression of human chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Intrapancreatic nerves increase in size (neural hypertrophy) and number (increased neural density). The proportion of autonomic and sensory fibres (neural remodelling) is switched, and are infiltrated by perineural inflammatory cells (pancreatic neuritis) or invaded by pancreatic cancer cells (neural invasion). These neuropathic alterations also correlate with neuropathic pain. Instead of being mere histopathological manifestations of disease progression, pancreatic neural plasticity synergizes with the enhanced excitability of sensory neurons, with Schwann cell recruitment toward cancer and with central nervous system alterations. These alterations maintain a bidirectional interaction between nerves and non-neural pancreatic cells, as demonstrated by tissue and neural damage inducing neuropathic pain, and activated neurons releasing mediators that modulate inflammation and cancer growth. Owing to the prognostic effects of pain and neural invasion in pancreatic cancer, dissecting the mechanism of pancreatic neuroplasticity holds major translational relevance. However, current in vivo models of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis contain many discrepancies from human disease that overshadow their translational value. The present Review discusses novel possibilities for mechanistically uncovering the role of the nervous system in pancreatic disease progression.

  11. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  12. Tricuspid valve avulsion after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Deepak; Dalley, Paul; Mahon, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Blunt cardiac trauma causing tricuspid regurgitation is rare and is most often associated with traffic accidents. Falling from a height can also cause such injuries, resulting in hemodynamic compromise and arrhythmias. The signs of traumatic tricuspid regurgitation can appear early or be delayed, depending upon the severity of injury. We present the case of a 68-year-old woman who fell from a height onto rocks during a hike. She sustained blunt cardiac injury with complete tricuspid valve avulsion, and underwent successful repair. In addition, we review the relevant medical literature.

  13. New techniques in the management of pancreatic pseudocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flautner, L E

    1996-01-01

    The results of an analysis on the mortality-morbidity data of 1698 operations performed for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis and/or its complications at the First Department of Surgery of Semmelweis University Medical School between 1975 and 1995 are presented herein. Special attention was focused on the effectiveness of such recently introduced techniques as posterior cystogastrostomy, cysto-Wirsungo gastrostomy, modified pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy, and blunt transparenchymal cystoduodenostomy. The posterior cystogastrostomy is technically easier to perform that the traditional Juras operation, as only the posterior ventricular wall needs to be cut open, and it can be combined with decompression-type operations. On the other hand, the cysto-Wirsungo gastrostomy achieves a long-lasting effect, and the cyst drainage in this operation ensures decompression. Moreover, if this operation is performed at an early stage, the progression of chronic pancreatitis is slowed down. The modified pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy eliminates the disadvantages of the Whipple operation and is a commonly performed operation for chronic pancreatitis localized within the head of the pancreas. However, since the introduction of the blunt transparenchymal cystoduodenostomy, the number of pancreatoduodenectomies has been reduced by 60%. This is an effective method with long-lasting results for the treatment of smaller cysts localized deeply in the head of the pancreas. The findings of this study strongly suggest that that these procedures give significantly better results for certain pathological conditions such as pancreatic pesudocysts than traditional methods.

  14. An evidence based blunt trauma protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, R. van; Kool, D.R.; Lubeek, S.F.K.; Dekker, H.M.; Brink, M.; Deunk, J.; Edwards, M.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Currently CT is rapidly implemented in the evaluation of trauma patients. In anticipation of a large international multicentre trial, this study's aim was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of a new diagnostic protocol, used for the primary radiological evaluation in adult blunt

  15. Tetanus after blunt lawn mower trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Normand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient presented with tetanus ten days after blunt trauma with a lawn mower. Our case describes the diagnosis and treatment of this patient with an infectious disease commonly seen in the developing world but rarely seen in the developed world.

  16. Role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Jean Louis; Lenglet, Sébastien; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Galan, Katia; Pelli, Graziano; Spahr, Laurent; Mach, Francois; Hadengue, Antoine

    2011-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of variable severity. Leucocytes are thought to play a key role in the development of pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. The interactions between inflammatory cells and their mediators are crucial for determining tissue damage. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (or CCL-2), CCR-2 and CCR-4 are chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in leucocyte trafficking. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 chemokine receptors in the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. To address the role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 that attracts leucocytes cells in inflamed tissues, pancreatitis was induced by administering supramaximal doses of cerulein in mice that do not express CCL-2, CCR-2 or CCR-4. The severity of pancreatitis was measured by serum amylase, pancreatic oedema and acinar cell necrosis. Lung injury was quantitated by evaluating lung microvascular permeability and lung myeloperoxidase activity. Chemokine and chemokine-receptor expression were quantitated by real-time PCR. The nature of inflammatory cells invading the pancreas and lungs was studied by immunostaining. The authors have found that pancreas CCL-2 and CCR-2 levels rise during pancreatitis. Both pancreatitis and the associated lung injury are blunted, but not completely prevented, in mice deficient in CCL-2, whereas the deficiency in either CCR-2 or CCR-4 does not reduce the severity of both the pancreatitis and the lung injury. The amounts of neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages (MOMA)-2 cells were significantly lower in mice deficient in CCL-2 compared with their sufficient littermates. These results suggest that CCL-2 plays a key role in pancreatitis by modulating the infiltration by neutrophils and MOMA-2 cells, and that its deficiency may improve the outcome of the disease.

  17. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Blunt cerebrovascular injuries Traumatismo cerebrovascular contuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clay Cothren

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, the recognition and subsequent management of blunt cerebrovascular injuries has undergone a marked evolution. Originally thought to be a rare occurrence, blunt cerebrovascular injuries are now diagnosed in approximately 1% of blunt trauma patients. The recognition of a clinically silent period allows for angiographic screening for injuries based upon the mechanism of trauma and the patient's constellation of injuries. Comprehensive screening of patients has resulted in the early diagnosis of blunt cerebrovascular injuries during the asymptomatic phase, thus allowing treatment that could prevent neurologic sequelae. Although the ideal regimen of antithrombotic therapy is yet to be determined, treatment with either antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents has been shown to reduce the blunt cerebrovascular injuries related stroke rate. Blunt cerebrovascular injury is a rare but potentially devastating injury; appropriate angiographic screening in high-risk patients should be performed and prompt treatment initiated to prevent ischemic neurologic events.Durante a década passada, o reconhecimento e tratamento do traumatismo cerebrovascular contuso, sofreu importante evolução. Este tipo de ferimento era considerado como ocorrência rara, mas atualmente o quadro é diagnosticado em cerca de 1% dos pacientes. O reconhecimento da existência de um período clínico silencioso permite uma seleção angiográfica baseada no mecanismo de trauma e na sistematização dos ferimentos dos pacientes. A avaliação sistemática e a suspeita diagnóstica precoce destes pacientes tem resultado em rápido confirmação durante a fase assintomática, permitindo a instauração de tratamento cuja meta é impedir o desenvolvimento de seqüelas neurológicas. Embora o tratamento ideal, antitrombótico, ainda precise ser determinado, o uso de agentes antiplaquetários ou anticoagulantes reduz a incidência de lesões cerebrovasculares relacionada a

  19. A CLINICAL STUDY ON BLUNT INJURY ABDOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kishore Babu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Abdominal trauma continues to account for a large number of trauma-related injuries and deaths. Motor vehicle accidents and urban violence, respectively, are the leading causes of blunt and penetrating trauma to this area of the body. Unnecessary deaths and complications can be minimized by improved resuscitation, evaluation and treatment. The new techniques and diagnostic tools available are important in the management of abdominal trauma. These improved methods, however, still depend on experience and clinical judgment for application and determination of the best care for the injured patient. The aim of the study is to 1. Analyse the incidence, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, indications for laparotomy, therapeutic methods and morbidity & mortality rates. 2. To study nature of blunt abdominal trauma. 3. To assess patient for surgical intervention and to avoid negative laparotomy. 4. To assess morbidity rate in different organs injury. 5. To evaluate modalities of treatment, complications and prognosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study is a prospective study on 97 patients with Blunt injuries to the abdomen admitted in S.V.R.R.G.G. Hospital, Tirupati during October 2013-15. Inclusion Criteria Patients > 13 years, with Blunt injury to abdomen either by RTA, fall, object contact, assault giving written informed consent. Exclusion Criteria Patients <13 yrs. Blunt injuries due to blasts, patients with severe cardiothoracic and head injuries who are hemodynamically unstable. CONCLUSION Blunt Trauma to abdomen is on rise due to excessive use of motor vehicles. It poses a therapeutic and diagnostic dilemma for the attending surgeon due to wide range of clinical manifestations ranging from no early physical findings to progression to shock. So, the Trauma surgeon should rely on his physical findings in association with use of modalities like x-ray abdomen, USG abdomen and abdominal paracentesis. Hollow viscus perforations are

  20. Ventricular septal defect following blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 32-year-old male with ventricular septal defect (VSD following blunt chest trauma. Traumatic VSD is a rare but potentially life-threatening injury, the severity, course and presentation of which are variable. While the diagnosis of myocardial injury may be challenging, cardiac troponins are useful as a screening and diagnostic test. The proposed pathophysiological mechanisms in the development of traumatic VSD are early mechanical rupture and delayed inflammatory rupture. We conducted a literature review to investigate the pathogenesis, distribution of patterns of presentation, and the associated prognoses in patients with VSD following blunt chest trauma. We found that traumatic VSDs diagnosed within 48 hours were more likely to be severe, require emergency surgery and were associated with a higher mortality. Children with traumatic VSDs had an increased mortality risk. Smaller lesions may be managed conservatively but should be followed up to detect late complications. In both groups elective repair was associated with a good outcome.

  1. Hepatic hydrothorax after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Chiung Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a successful treatment result in a rare case of hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis, who had sustained hydrothorax after blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. This was a female patient with liver cirrhosis, Child–Turcotte–Pugh class A, without ascites before injury. She sustained blunt thoracoabdominal trauma with a left clavicle fracture dislocation and right rib fractures. There was no hemopneumothorax at initial presentation. However, dyspnea and right pleural effusion developed gradually. We inserted a chest tube to relieve the patient's symptoms, and the daily drainage amount remained consistent. Hepatic hydrothorax was confirmed by the intraperitoneal injection of radioisotope 99mTc-sulfur colloid that demonstrated one-way transdiaphragmatic flow of fluid from the peritoneal cavity to pleural cavities. Finally, the hydrothorax was treated successfully by minocycline-induced pleural symphysis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of hepatic hydrothorax developed after thoracoabdominal trauma.

  2. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  3. ACR appropriateness criteria blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jonathan H; Cox, Christian W; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Kirsch, Jacobo; Brown, Kathleen; Dyer, Debra Sue; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D

    2014-04-01

    Imaging is paramount in the setting of blunt trauma and is now the standard of care at any trauma center. Although anteroposterior radiography has inherent limitations, the ability to acquire a radiograph in the trauma bay with little interruption in clinical survey, monitoring, and treatment, as well as radiography's accepted role in screening for traumatic aortic injury, supports the routine use of chest radiography. Chest CT or CT angiography is the gold-standard routine imaging modality for detecting thoracic injuries caused by blunt trauma. There is disagreement on whether routine chest CT is necessary in all patients with histories of blunt trauma. Ultimately, the frequency and timing of CT chest imaging should be site specific and should depend on the local resources of the trauma center as well as patient status. Ultrasound may be beneficial in the detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pericardial hemorrhage; transesophageal echocardiography is a first-line imaging tool in the setting of suspected cardiac injury. In the blunt trauma setting, MRI and nuclear medicine likely play no role in the acute setting, although these modalities may be helpful as problem-solving tools after initial assessment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The double jeopardy of blunt thoracoabdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Regan J; Okoye, Obi; Teixeira, Pedro G; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2012-06-01

    To examine the specific injuries, need for operative intervention, and clinical outcomes of patients with blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. Trauma registry and medical record review. Level I trauma center in Los Angeles, California. All patients with thoracoabdominal injuries from January 1996 to December 2010. Injuries, incidence and type of operative intervention, clinical outcomes, and risk factors for mortality. Blunt thoracoabdominal injury occurred in 1661 patients. Overall, 474 (28.5%) required laparotomy, 31 (1.9%) required thoracotomy (excluding resuscitative thoracotomy), and 1146 (69.0%) required no thoracic or abdominal operation. Overall incidence of intraabdominal solid organ injury was 59.7% and hollow viscus injury, 6.0%. Blunt cardiac trauma occurred in 6.3%; major thoracic vessel injury, in 4.6%; and diaphragmatic trauma, in 6.0%. The majority of solid organ injuries were managed nonoperatively (liver, 83.9%; spleen, 68.3%; and kidney, 91.2%). Excluding patients with severe head trauma, mortality ranged from 4.5% with nonoperative management to 18.1% and 66.7% in those requiring laparotomy and dual cavitary exploration, respectively. Age 55 years or older, Injury Severity Score of 25 or more, Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less, initial hypotension, massive transfusion, and liver, cardiac, or abdominal vascular trauma were all independent risk factors for mortality. Most patients with blunt thoracoabdominal trauma are managed nonoperatively. The need for non-resuscitative thoracotomy or combined thoracoabdominal operation is rare. The abdomen contains the overwhelming majority of injuries requiring operative intervention and should be the initial cavity of exploration in the patient requiring emergent surgery without directive radiologic data.

  5. Blunt thoracic aortic injuries: an autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro G R; Inaba, Kenji; Barmparas, Galinos; Georgiou, Chrysanthos; Toms, Carla; Noguchi, Thomas T; Rogers, Christopher; Sathyavagiswaran, Lakshmanan; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the incidence and patterns of thoracic aortic injuries in a series of blunt traumatic deaths and describe their associated injuries. All autopsies performed by the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner for blunt traumatic deaths in 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had a traumatic thoracic aortic (TTA) injury were compared with the victims who did not have this injury for differences in baseline characteristics and patterns of associated injuries. During the study period, 304 (35%) of 881 fatal victims of blunt trauma received by the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner underwent a full autopsy and were included in the analysis. The patients were on average aged 43 years±21 years, 71% were men, and 39% had a positive blood alcohol screen. Motor vehicle collision was the most common mechanism of injury (50%), followed by pedestrian struck by auto (37%). A TTA injury was identified in 102 (34%) of the victims. The most common site of TTA injury was the isthmus and descending thoracic aorta, occurring in 67 fatalities (66% of the patients with TTA injuries). Patients with TTA injuries were significantly more likely to have other associated injuries: cardiac injury (44% vs. 25%, p=0.001), hemothorax (86% vs. 56%, pinjury (74% vs. 49%, pinjury. Patients with a TTA injury were significantly more likely to die at the scene (80% vs. 63%, p=0.002). Thoracic aortic injuries occurred in fully one third of blunt traumatic fatalities, with the majority of deaths occurring at the scene. The risk for associated thoracic and intra-abdominal injuries is significantly increased in patients with thoracic aortic injuries.

  6. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  7. Unraveling Pancreatic Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Yohann; de Mestier, Louis; Perez, Manuela; Avisse, Claude; Lévy, Philippe; Kianmanesh, Reza

    2018-04-01

    Limited pancreatic resections are increasingly performed, but the rate of postoperative fistula is higher than after classical resections. Pancreatic segmentation, anatomically and radiologically identifiable, may theoretically help the surgeon removing selected anatomical portions with their own segmental pancreatic duct and thus might decrease the postoperative fistula rate. We aimed at systematically and comprehensively reviewing the previously proposed pancreatic segmentations and discuss their relevance and limitations. PubMed database was searched for articles investigating pancreatic segmentation, including human or animal anatomy, and cadaveric or surgical studies. Overall, 47/99 articles were selected and grouped into 4 main hypotheses of pancreatic segmentation methodology: anatomic, vascular, embryologic and lymphatic. The head, body and tail segments are gross description without distinct borders. The arterial territories defined vascular segments and isolate an isthmic paucivascular area. The embryological theory relied on the fusion plans of the embryological buds. The lymphatic drainage pathways defined the lymphatic segmentation. These theories had differences, but converged toward separating the head and body/tail parts, and the anterior from posterior and inferior parts of the pancreatic head. The rate of postoperative fistula was not decreased when surgical resection was performed following any of these segmentation theories; hence, none of them appeared relevant enough to guide pancreatic transections. Current pancreatic segmentation theories do not enable defining anatomical-surgical pancreatic segments. Other approaches should be explored, in particular focusing on pancreatic ducts, through pancreatic ducts reconstructions and embryologic 3D modelization.

  8. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Vujasinovic

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  9. Pancreatitis Induced by Cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pablo Chapela

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is one of the commonest diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by epigastric pain of moderate to severe intensity, which radiates to the back, elevation of pancreatic lipase and amylase enzymes, and changes in pancreatic parenchyma in imaging methods. The most common etiologies vary, generally the most frequent being biliary lithiasis and alcohol, followed by hypertriglyceridemia. Among the less frequent causes is drug-induced pancreatitis. We report a case of acute pancreatitis caused by cocaine, rarely described in literature.

  10. [Pancreatic pseudocyst: less is more].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Alvira, R; Elías Pollina, J; Calleja Aguayo, E; Martínez-Pardo, N González; Esteban Ibarz, J A

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts (PQP) are rare in childhood and management tends to be individualized and controversial, and it is a challenge for the pediatric surgeon. The aim of this study is to determine the best management strategies in each patient. Retrospective review of children admitted to our institution with the diagnosis of PQP and review of literature between 1990 and 2007. We report two children with postraumatic PQP that respond to non-operative management and 284 cases that were reported in literature (76% after blunt abdominal trauma). 26% of these patients had complete resolution of PQP with conservative management and the others patients required surgical intervention: external percutaneous drainage (18.6%), non-percutanueous external drainage drenaje (3.87%), cystogastrostomy (28.87%), cystojejunostomy o pancreaticojejunostomy (9.5%), endoscopic drainage (9.5%) or distal pancreatectomy (3.5%). The choice of treatment depends on the surgeon's experience and management of the endoscopic techniques, as well as the availability of interventionist radiology. Asymptomatic PQP in children does no require any specific intervention other than expectant management, especially in patients with trauma-induced PQP. Children with persistent clinical symptoms or those who developed complications may require further intervention.

  11. Rupture of the left atrial roof due to blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Sam Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2013-11-01

    Cardiac rupture after blunt trauma is rare and associated with high mortality. The anatomic pattern of blunt cardiac rupture has been demonstrated with the right cardiac chambers more frequently affected than the left. Furthermore, left atrial injury is usually restricted to the atrial appendage and the pulmonary vein-atrial junction. Herein, we report the first case of a 61-year old man with a rupture of the left atrial roof after blunt trauma with minimal thoracic injury.

  12. Rupture of the left atrial roof due to blunt trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Sam Youn; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac rupture after blunt trauma is rare and associated with high mortality. The anatomic pattern of blunt cardiac rupture has been demonstrated with the right cardiac chambers more frequently affected than the left. Furthermore, left atrial injury is usually restricted to the atrial appendage and the pulmonary vein–atrial junction. Herein, we report the first case of a 61-year old man with a rupture of the left atrial roof after blunt trauma with minimal thoracic injury.

  13. Kuula. Kellele ei meeldiks James Blunt? / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2007-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: James Blunt "Back To Bedlam", Enrique Iglesias "Insomniac", Prince "Planet Earth", Garbage "Absolut Garbage", Justice "Cross", Interpol "Our Love To Admire", Rufus Wainwright "Release The Stars"

  14. Endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shan; Zhang, Xiquan; Chen, Zhong; Zhu, Wei; Pan, Xiaolin [Dept. of nterventional Vascular, The 148th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Zibo (China); Dong, Peng; Sun, Yequan [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Weifang Medical University, Weifang (China); Qi, Deming [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Qilu Medical University, Zibo (China)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular repair for blunt popliteal arterial injuries. A retrospective analysis of seven patients with clinical suspicion of popliteal arterial injuries that were confirmed by arteriography was performed from September 2009 to July 2014. Clinical data included demographics, mechanism of injury, type of injury, location of injury, concomitant injuries, time of endovascular procedures, time interval from trauma to blood flow restoration, instrument utilized, and follow-up. All patients were male (mean age of 35.9 ± 10.3 years). The type of lesion involved intimal injury (n = 1), partial transection (n = 2), complete transection (n = 2), arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). All patients underwent endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Technical success rate was 100%. Intimal injury was treated with a bare-metal stent. Pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery transections were treated with bare-metal stents. Arteriovenous fistula was treated with bare-metal stent and coils. No perioperative death and procedure-related complication occurred. The average follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.3 months (range 18–24 months). One patient underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis due to stent thrombosis at 18 months after the procedure. All limbs were salvaged. Stent migration, deformation, or fracture was not found during the follow-up. Endovascular repair seems to be a viable approach for patients with blunt popliteal arterial injuries, especially on an emergency basis. Endovascular repair may be effective in the short-term. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair.

  15. Fatigue crack growth from blunt notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of methods have been proposed, by which the formation and early growth of fatigue cracks at blunt notches may be predicted. In this report, four methods are compared - i.e. analysis of the crack tip plastic deformation, the cyclic contour integral, δJ, the strain in a critical volume of material, and the notch root plastic strain range. It is shown that these approaches have fundamental elements in common, and that all are compatable with linear elastic fracture mechanics. Early results from a continuing experimental programme are reported. (orig.) [de

  16. Nonoperative management of pancreatic injuries in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigdem, M.K.; Senturk, S.; Onen, A.; Siga, M.; Akay, H.; Otcu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Nonoperative management of minor pancreatic injury is the generally accepted approach. However, the management of major pancreatic injury remains controversial in pediatric patients. The aim of the present study was to determine the safety and efficacy of nonoperative management of pancreatic injury in pediatric patients. Between 2003 and 2009, 31 patients, 28 male and 3 female, with pancreatic injury due to blunt abdominal trauma were treated in our clinic. All patients were evaluated by ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and evaluation of serum amylase levels. Patients with ongoing hemodynamic instability after resuscitation or signs of bowel perforation underwent immediate laparotomy, and the remaining patients were conservatively treated. Conservative treatment consisted of nasogastric tube replacement, total parenteral nutrition, monitoring of amylase levels, and serial clinical examination. The most common mechanism of injury was a fall (35.4%). Ten patients (32.2%) had associated extraabdominal injuries, and 18 patients (58.1%) had associated abdominal injuries. The spleen was the most common site of intra-abdominal injury that was associated with pancreatic trauma. Initial amylase levels were normal in 5 patients, whose CT scans revealed pancreatic injury. Twenty-five patients (80.6%) were conservatively treated. Six patients (19.4%) required surgical intervention because of a hollow viscus or diaphragmatic injury and hemodynamic instability. A pseudocyst developed in 11 of the 25 patients who were nonoperatively treated; 6 patients required intervention for the pseudocyst (percutaneous drainage and cystogastrostomy). No patient succumbed to injury. The majority of the pancreatic injuries in pediatric patients can be successfully treated conservatively, unless there is hemodynamic instability and a hollow viscus injury. The most common complication is a pseudocyst. (author)

  17. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Toru; Nakamori, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  18. Pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Jennifer J; Gideonsen, Mark D; Song, Jonathan Y; Grobman, William A; O'Halloran, Peggy

    2008-11-01

    To estimate the incidence, cause, and complications of pancreatitis in pregnancy and to identify factors associated with adverse outcomes. This study was a chart review of all pregnant patients diagnosed with pancreatitis from 1992-2001 at 15 participating hospitals. Information was collected on presentation, management, and outcome, along with the number of deliveries at each hospital. During the 10 years of the study, 101 cases of pancreatitis occurred among 305,101 deliveries, yielding an incidence of one in 3,021 (.03%). There were no maternal deaths; perinatal mortality was 3.6%. Eighty-nine women had acute pancreatitis, and 12 women had chronic pancreatitis. The majority (66%) of cases of acute pancreatitis were biliary in origin, and they were associated with better outcomes than nonbiliary causes. Cases of gallstone pancreatitis that received surgical or endoscopic intervention during pregnancy had lower rates of preterm delivery and recurrence than those that were conservatively managed, but this difference was not significant (P=.2). Alcohol was responsible for 12.3% of acute pancreatitis cases and 58% of chronic pancreatitis cases and was associated with increased rates of recurrence and preterm delivery. A calcium level, triglycerides, or both was not obtained in half of cases identified as idiopathic. Pancreatitis is a rare event in pregnancy, occurring in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. Although it is most often acute and related to gallstones, nonbiliary causes should be sought because they are associated with worse outcomes. III.

  19. Pancreatic Panniculitis: A rare manifestation of Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ronak Patel; Ali Safdar Khan; Sami Naveed; Jason Brazleton; Mel Wilcox

    2015-01-01

    Context Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication associated with pancreatic disease and perhaps even a presage to pancreatic pathology. Case report We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a 61 year old patient who was treated for sudden onset of abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting secondary to acute pancreatitis of unknown etiology. He subsequently developed skin lesions consistent with pancreatic panniculitis which gradually improved after resolution of his ...

  20. [Airway injuries due to blunt chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Kan; Hamatake, D; Yoshida, Y; Nakajima, H; Shirakusa, T; Yamasaki, S

    2006-10-01

    Although the incidence of blunt chest trauma is very high, the mediastinal tracheobronchial injuries are quite rare. The airway injuries are thought to be one of the most urgent clinical conditions in thoracic surgery, and we are requested to make not only a rapid and sharp diagnosis but also an appropriate treatment plan considering combined injuries. We present 9 cases of tracheobronchial injuries due to blunt chest trauma in recent years. The average age of these patients is 26.1 years, and they are consisted of 6 male and 3 female. The cause of trauma is traffic accident in 7, and occupational crane accident in 2. Bronchoplasty were done in 5 cases (right main bronchus in 2, left main bronchus in 1, trunks intermediate bronchus in 1, and the spur between middle and lower lobe in 1), membranous-tracheoplasty with right pneumonectomy in 1, left pneumonectomy in 1, conservative treatment in 2. Postoperative mortality is occurred in 1 case who was suffering from multiple injuries including severe head injury and contralateral lung contusion. Tracheobronchial plasties should be chosen if possible to preserve lung function for the patient suffering from airway injuries.

  1. Multiple subfailures characterize blunt aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Brasel, Karen J

    2007-05-01

    Blunt aortic injuries result from rapid deceleration of the thorax as may occur during automotive impacts and falls from extreme heights. Pathological findings can range from failure of specific vessel layers to immediate vessel wall rupture. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the sequence of local structural events that may lead to aortic wall disruption. Fourteen porcine aorta specimens were opened to expose the intima and longitudinally distracted until rupture. Longitudinal mechanics were quantified and subfailures were identified. Histology was used to examine internal layer subfailure. Videography demonstrated that subfailures propagated into complete vessel wall rupture. Subfailures occurred before complete vessel rupture in 93% of specimens. Intimal and medial subfailures were present at 74% of the stress and 82% of the strain to rupture. Multiple subfailures were evident in 79% of specimens. Present results supported the clinical theory that nonimmediate death as a result of blunt aortic injury is commonly caused by propagation of lesser lesions, initiating on the intimal layer, into complete vessel rupture including the adventitial layer. This finding, along with histologic evidence of subfailure pathological findings, confirms the presence of an acute window during which recognition and initiation of permissive hypotension may be lifesaving.

  2. Surgery for Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Navadgi, Suresh; Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Windsor, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for acute pancreatitis has undergone significant changes over the last 3 decades. A better understanding of the pathophysiology has contributed to this, but the greatest driver for change has been the rise of less invasive interventions in the fields of laparoscopy, endoscopy and radiology. Surgery has a very limited role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. The most common indication for intervention in acute pancreatitis is for the treatment of complications and most notably the ...

  3. Isolated gallbladder perforation following blunt abdominal trauma: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-12

    May 12, 2012 ... Schachter P, Czerniak A, Shemesh E, Avigad I, Lotan G, Wolfstein I. Isolated gallbladder rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma. HPB Surg. 1989;1:359‑ 62. 2. Bainbridge J, Shaaban H, Kenefick N, Armstrong CP. Delayed presentation of an isolated gallbladder rupture following blunt abdominal trauma: A ...

  4. (PCR) for direct cloning of blunt-end DNA fragments

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-19

    Sep 19, 2011 ... interest by PCR using proof reading DNA polymerase, such as Pfu, KOD and Primerstar, is preferred since the. PCR products with a higher degree of fidelity are required in many investigations. However, traditional blunt-end cloning method for direct cloning of blunt-end PCR products is not efficient since ...

  5. Determinants of splenectomy in splenic injuries following blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discussion. MVA injury and falls accounted for the vast majority of blunt abdominal trauma in this study. The rate and magnitude of energy transferred versus splenic protective mechanisms at the time of blunt abdominal trauma seems to determine the grade of splenic injury. Interest in splenic salvage surgery, availability of ...

  6. Improving the prognostic value of blunt abdominal trauma scoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is a frequent reason for hospital admission and a significant cause of death in children older than 2 years of age. Mechanisms causing abdominal injuries are predominantly motor vehicle accidents, falls, and intentional injuries. Blunt trauma accounts for 90% of pediatric injuries.

  7. VALIDITY OF PARACENTESIS IN DIAGNOSING BLUNT TRAUMA ABDOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Bin Abdul Majeed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Blunt abdominal trauma is a common case that comes to an emergency department and it is the most easily missed diagnosis resulting in catastrophic consequences. Delay in diagnosing a case is due to the nonspecific character of the symptoms with which it presents. Clinical signs that could be elicited in blunt trauma abdomen are equally nonspecific. Thus, to avoid delay and save the life of the patient, a doctor has to depend on various investigations to rule out blunt trauma abdomen. The modalities which help include paracentesis, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, Focused Abdominal Sonography for Trauma (FAST and ContrastEnhanced Computed Tomography (CECT. To choose the right investigation for the right patient helps in saving precious lives. Validity of each investigation, availability, condition of the patient are the main points to look into before deciding on the right investigative modality. Paracentesis is the simplest investigation that could be done in emergency department and also at the site of accident to triage the patient. Paracentesis has low sensitivity to detect blunt trauma. FAST is a better investigation with higher validity rates than paracentesis. This study aims to validate paracentesis, which is the simplest and commonest investigation used to identify blunt abdominal trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, 106 patients who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were followed up by detailed history, clinical examination, paracentesis and FAST to identify blunt abdominal trauma and then compared with a gold standard investigation, which was assigned as CECT for haemodynamically stable patients and laparotomy for haemodynamically unstable patients. Commonest organs injured in blunt trauma and their management was noted. Patients were followed up till discharge or death. Subsequently, the data were compiled using excel sheet and evaluated using tables and charts. RESULTS Paracentesis is found to have a

  8. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liqun; Li, Weiqin; Geng, Yanxia; Shen, Bo; Li, Jieshou

    2011-06-01

    The highest maternal-fetal risk from pancreatitis in pregnancy is likely to be posed by the most severe cases, which we have compared with mild cases. Retrospective observational study. A general surgery department of a university referral hospital in Nanjing, China. Eighteen pregnancies complicated with severe acute pancreatitis and 51 pregnancies complicated with mild acute pancreatitis. Medical records were reviewed for every pregnant woman with mild or severe acute pancreatitis during January 1999 to December 2009. Information on demographics, clinical and laboratory data, maternal and fetal outcomes. Gestational age of onset was significantly higher in the severe acute pancreatitis group than in the mild acute pancreatitis group. Severe hypertriglyceridemia was considered the main cause of severe acute pancreatitis (OR 20.7; 95% CI 4.6-92.4, ppancreatitis (OR 7.3; 95% CI 1.8-30.1, ppancreatitis and biliary pancreatitis are the main causes of severe and mild disease, respectively. Severe acute pancreatitis in pregnancy usually occurs in the third trimester, and the affected severe patients are more liable to develop a critical condition that results in higher risk of intrauterine fetal death. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica © 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Sharp compared with blunt fascial incision at cesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabakke, Anna J M; Hare, Kristine J; Krebs, Lone

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare patient preference for either sharp incision with scissors or blunt manual cleavage of the fascia at cesarean delivery in a randomized controlled trial in which each woman was her own control. STUDY DESIGN: Women undergoing primary cesarean delivery (n=34) were randomized...... to side distribution of sharp or blunt incision of the fascia (sharp right and blunt left or blunt right and sharp left) and followed three months postoperatively. The primary outcome was patient preference for the right or left side of the scar 3 months postoperatively and modeled by polytomous logistic...... difference was found in patient preference with regard to sharp or blunt incision of the fascia, nor was there a significant difference in postoperative pain scores. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: www.clinicaltrials.org;NCT01297725....

  10. Isolated chyle duct injury in blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanaike, Sharmila; Griswold, John A; Halldorsson, Ari; Frezza, Eldo E

    2006-02-01

    We present a case of a patient sustaining an isolated injury to the right main branch of the cysterna chyli due to a high-speed motor vehicle accident. A 42-year-old man presented after a high-speed collision. CT revealed a collection of hypodense fluid in the gallbladder fossa, which was the clue to take him to the OR. We proceeded to laparoscopic exploration, and based on the milky white color of the fluid, identified a chyle leak. In an open fashion, the retroperitoneum was explored and the injury was identified as disruption of the right lumbar branch entering the cisterna chyli, and this was ligated with silk ties. Chyle duct injury secondary to blunt trauma is a rare finding. The use of CT imaging can identify this injury. Laparoscopy can confirm the injury. Open ligation of the injured duct is the best treatment.

  11. Diagnosing Myocardial Contusion after Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alborzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A myocardial contusion refers to a bruise of the cardiac muscle, the severity of which can vary depending on the severity of the injury and when the injury occurs. It is a major cause of rapid death which happens after blunt chest trauma and should be suspected at triage in the emergency department. We demonstrated that suspected myocardial contusion patients who have normal electrocardiograms (ECGs and biomarker tests can be safely discharged. However, if the test results are abnormal, the next steps should be echocardiography and more advanced measures. Diagnosing myocardial contusion is very difficult because of its nonspecific symptoms. If a myocardial contusion happens, cardiogenic shock or arrhythmia must be anticipated, and the patient must be carefully monitored.

  12. Primary nasal tuberculosis following blunt trauma nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Saha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary nasal tuberculosis is a rare disease with nearly 40 cases reported. Our patient was a young male presented with left sided nasal obstruction, anosmia and occasional epistaxis for last 7 weeks after 6 months of blunt trauma nose. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of the para nasal sinuses showed increased soft-tissue density with contrast enhancement in the left maxillary antrum with extension through left osteomeatal foramen to the left nasal cavity along with further extension through choana to nasopharynx resulting in partial obliteration of the nasopharyngeal airway. Nasal endoscopy revealed a sessile polypoidal pinkish mass arising from the left osteomeatal foramen. Histopathological examination of excisional biopsy of that area showed caseating granuloma. Our patient diagnosed as primary nasal tuberculosis following trauma and treated with anti-tubercular chemotherapy.

  13. Blunted stress reactivity in chronic cannabis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Carrie; Spradlin, Alexander; Nusbaum, Amy T; Whitney, Paul; Hinson, John M; McLaughlin, Ryan J

    2017-08-01

    One of the most commonly cited reasons for chronic cannabis use is to cope with stress. Consistent with this, cannabis users have shown reduced emotional arousal and dampened stress reactivity in response to negative imagery. To our knowledge, the present study represents the first to examine the effects of an acute stress manipulation on subjective stress and salivary cortisol in chronic cannabis users compared to non-users. Forty cannabis users and 42 non-users were randomly assigned to complete either the stress or no stress conditions of the Maastricht Acute Stress Test (MAST). The stress condition of the MAST manipulates both physiological (placing hand in ice bath) and psychosocial stress (performing math under conditions of social evaluation). Participants gave baseline subjective stress ratings before, during, and after the stress manipulation. Cortisol was measured from saliva samples obtained before and after the stress manipulation. Further, cannabis cravings and symptoms of withdrawal were measured. Subjective stress ratings and cortisol levels were significantly higher in non-users in the stress condition relative to non-users in the no stress condition. In contrast, cannabis users demonstrated blunted stress reactivity; specifically, they showed no increase in cortisol and a significantly smaller increase in subjective stress ratings. The stress manipulation had no impact on cannabis users' self-reported cravings or withdrawal symptoms. Chronic cannabis use is associated with blunted stress reactivity. Future research is needed to determine whether this helps to confer resiliency or vulnerability to stress-related psychopathology as well as the mechanisms underlying this effect.

  14. Laparoscopic Splenectomy in Hemodynamically Stable Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gregory S; Chance, Elisha A; Hileman, Barbara M; Emerick, Eric S; Gianetti, Emily A

    2017-01-01

    No criteria define indications for laparoscopic splenectomy in trauma. This investigation compared characteristics of trauma patients and outcomes between laparoscopic and open splenectomies. Patients were identified retrospectively by using ICD-9 codes. Included patients were 18 or older, with a blunt splenic injury from January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2014, and required splenectomy. Excluded patients had penetrating trauma, successful nonoperative management, or successful embolization. Variables included demographics, presenting characteristics, injury severity scores, abdominal abbreviated injury scores, splenic injury grade, surgical indication and approach (open or laparoscopic), surgery length, intra-operative blood loss, transfusions, length of stay, complications, mortality, and discharge disposition. Forty-one patients underwent open splenectomy, and 11 underwent laparoscopic splenectomy. The mean age was 48.7 years, and men comprised the sample majority (36/52). The groups were well matched for age, abdominal injury scores, and admission vital signs. The open group had a significantly lower level of consciousness and more acidosis compared with the laparoscopic group. Most laparoscopic splenectomies were performed after failed nonoperative management or embolization. The indications for open splenectomy were a positive focused assessment with sonography for trauma and computed tomography results. Laparoscopic patients had significantly longer times between presentation and surgery and longer operations, but had significantly less blood loss and fewer transfusions compared with the open group. There were no differences in mortality, length of stay, complications, or discharge dispositions. Laparoscopic splenectomy is useful in patients with blunt trauma in whom conservative management produced no improvement and who do not have other injuries to preclude laparoscopy.

  15. Pancreatitis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Focal pancreatic enlargement: differentiation between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Hee Soo; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Yu, Jeong Sik; Yoon, Sang Wook

    1995-01-01

    To differentiate the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP in cases of focal pancreatic enlargement. We analysed CT findings of 66 patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45) or focal pancreatitis (n = 21) with respect to size, density, calcification, pancreatic or biliary duct dilatation, fat plane obliteration around the vessels, direction of retroperitoneal extension, lymphadenopathy, pseudocyst formation and atrophy of pancreas. ERCP available in 48 patients were analysed in respect to morphologic appearance of CBD and pancreatic duct, and distance between the two ducts. The patients in focal pancreatitis were younger with more common history of alcohol drinking. There was no statistical difference in calcifications of the mass (18% in the adenocarcinoma, 33% in the focal pancreatitis), but a tendency of denser, larger number of calcifications was noted in focal pancreatitis. The finding of fat plane obliteration around the vessels were more common in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and fascial thickenings were more prominent in focal pancreatitis, although not statistically significant. On ERCP, there were no differential points of CBD, pancreatic duct morphology, but distance between the two ducts at the lesion center was more wider in focal pancreatitis. Differentiating focal pancreatitis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is difficult. However, we should consider the possibility of focal pancreatitis in cases of patients with young age, having alcoholic history in association with CT findings of large numbers of and dense calcifications, and ERCP findings of prominent separation of two duct at the lesion center

  17. Focal pancreatic enlargement: differentiation between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Hee Soo; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Yu, Jeong Sik; Yoon, Sang Wook [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    To differentiate the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP in cases of focal pancreatic enlargement. We analysed CT findings of 66 patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45) or focal pancreatitis (n = 21) with respect to size, density, calcification, pancreatic or biliary duct dilatation, fat plane obliteration around the vessels, direction of retroperitoneal extension, lymphadenopathy, pseudocyst formation and atrophy of pancreas. ERCP available in 48 patients were analysed in respect to morphologic appearance of CBD and pancreatic duct, and distance between the two ducts. The patients in focal pancreatitis were younger with more common history of alcohol drinking. There was no statistical difference in calcifications of the mass (18% in the adenocarcinoma, 33% in the focal pancreatitis), but a tendency of denser, larger number of calcifications was noted in focal pancreatitis. The finding of fat plane obliteration around the vessels were more common in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and fascial thickenings were more prominent in focal pancreatitis, although not statistically significant. On ERCP, there were no differential points of CBD, pancreatic duct morphology, but distance between the two ducts at the lesion center was more wider in focal pancreatitis. Differentiating focal pancreatitis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is difficult. However, we should consider the possibility of focal pancreatitis in cases of patients with young age, having alcoholic history in association with CT findings of large numbers of and dense calcifications, and ERCP findings of prominent separation of two duct at the lesion center.

  18. Imaging of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. Mild AP accounts for 75-80% of the cases and it is characterized by interstitial oedema, absent or minimal organ dysfunction, lack of complications and, usually, uneventful recovery. Severe AP is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, protracted clinical course, high incidence of complications, and high mortality rate. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is generally based on clinical and laboratory findings. The role of imaging is to confirm diagnosis, to assess disease severity - especially by detecting pancreatic necrosis-, to reveal complications of the disease and to guide interventions). Contrast- enhanced multidetector CT is the current 'gold standard' imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with AP. The spectrum of findings seen on CT ranges from a normal appearance to diffuse pancreatic enlargement with poorly defined pancreatic contour and heterogeneous attenuation. Stranding of the fat surrounding the pancreas and fluid collections in the anterior pararenal space, the peritoneal cavity or elsewhere, acquiring the form of the anatomic space where they are developed, may also be disclosed. Lack of pancreatic parenchyma enhancement is indicative of the presence of pancreatic necrosis. CT may reveal biliary tract calculi, calcifications in patients with AP combined with chronic pancreatitis- and air in an inflamed pancreas. Pancreatic abscess is usually seen on CT as a focal low attenuation area with a thick wall that may exhibit enhancement following i.v. contrast media administration. Haemorrhage, pseudoaneurysms, renal and splenic parenchyma complications can also be demonstrated by CT. Balthazar et.al have developed CT classification and severity scores based on the presence of fluid collections and pancreatic necrosis. These scores correlate with the incidence of morbidity and

  19. Left atrial rupture due to blunt thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, İlker; İnce, İlker; Aslan, Cemal; Çeber, Mehmet; Kaya, İlker

    2015-07-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is rare and associated with high mortality. The most popular theory of cardiac rupture after blunt thoracic trauma is rapid deceleration with disruption of the atria from their connections to the vena cava and pulmonary veins. In cases with both massive hemothorax and hemopericardium, injury can usually originate from the heart and/or major vessels. Surgical approach through the median sternotomy can provide convenience to repair the defect. In this article, successful treatment with median sternotomy of a 33-year-old male case with a rupture of the left atrium after blunt thoracic trauma was reported.

  20. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...... parenchymal necrosis, or 3) peripancreatic necrosis alone. The classification also defines four types of collections: 1) Acute peripancreatic fluid collection, 2) pseudocyst, 3) acute post-necrotic collection, and 4) walled-off necrosis. This article summarizes the terminology of the revised Atlanta...

  1. Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrique Domínguez-Muñoz, J

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the definition of the disease, the etiological diagnosis of idiopathic disease, the correlation between fibrosis degree and pancreatic secretion in the early stages of chronic pancreatitis, the treatment of the disease and of pain, the clinical relevance of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. A new mechanistic definition of chronic pancreatitis has been proposed. Genetic testing is mainly of help in patients with relapsing idiopathic pancreatitis. A significant correlation has been shown between the degree of pancreatic fibrosis as evaluated by elastography and pancreatic secretion of bicarbonate. New data supports the efficacy of antioxidants and simvastatin for the therapy of chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatoscopy-guided intraductal lithotripsy is an effective alternative to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis. The presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant risk of cardiovascular events. Fine needle biopsy and contrast enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography are of help for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis with pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  3. Massive expanding hematoma of the chin following blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Thanvir Mohamed Niazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic hematoma of the face is common and usually self-limiting in nature. We report an unusual massive expanding hematoma of the chin within 9 h following a blunt trauma with no associated injuries or fracture.

  4. Pectus excavatum in blunt chest trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liodakis Emmanouil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Blunt cardiac rupture is an exceedingly rare injury. Case presentation We report a case of blunt cardiac trauma in a 43-year-old Caucasian German mother with pectus excavatum who presented after a car accident in which she had been sitting in the front seat holding her two-year-old boy in her arms. The mother was awake and alert during the initial two hours after the accident but then proceeded to hemodynamically collapse. The child did not sustain any severe injuries. Intraoperatively, a combined one-cm laceration of the left atrium and right ventricle was found. Conclusion Patients with pectus excavatum have an increased risk for cardiac rupture after blunt chest trauma because of compression between the sternum and spine. Therefore, patients with pectus excavatum and blunt chest trauma should be admitted to a Level I Trauma Center with a high degree of suspicion.

  5. Pancreatitis in scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection prevalent in most parts of India. Acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is a rare complication of this condition. This paper reports acute renal failure, pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation in a 48-year-old female with scrub typhus. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a bulky pancreas with fluid seen along the body of the pancreas in the lesser sac. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline and supportive treatment. Pancreatitis was managed conservatively. This case report highlights the importance of identifying and managing uncommon complications of a common tropical disease for optimum outcome.

  6. [Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Acevedo, Z; Pomares Rey, B; Alpera Tenza, M R; Andrada Becerra, E

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are uncommon malignant plasma cell tumors that present outside the bone marrow; 80% of extramedullary plasmacytomas are located in the upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal plasmacytomas are rare. We present the case of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man in whom a pancreatic mass was found incidentally. The lesion was determined to be a pancreatic plasmacytoma after fine-needle aspiration cytology and surgical resection. No clinical, laboratory, or imaging findings indicative of multiple myeloma or association with other plasmacytomas were found, so the tumor was considered to be a primary pancreatic plasmacytoma. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Ascending aortic injuries following blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiumei; Hong, Jenny; Lowery, Robert; Goldstein, Steven; Wang, Zuyue; Lindsay, Joseph; Hill, Peter C; Corso, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    The diagnosis and the management of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries have undergone significant changes due to new technology and improved prehospital care. Most of the discussions have focused on descending aortic injuries. In this review, we discuss the recent management of ascending aortic injuries. We found 5 cohort studies on traumatic aortic injuries and 11 case reports describing ascending aortic injuries between 1998 to the present through Medline research. Among case reports, 78.9% of cases were caused by motor vehicle accidents (MVA). 42.1% of patients underwent emergent open repair and the operative mortality was 12.5%. 36.8% underwent delayed repair. Associated injuries occurred in 84.2% of patients. Aortic valve injury was concurrent in 26.3% of patients. The incidence of ascending aortic injury ranged 1.9-20% in cohort studies. Traumatic injuries to the ascending aorta are relatively uncommon among survivors following blunt trauma. Aortography has been replaced by computed tomography and echocardiography as a diagnostic tool. Open repair, either emergent or delayed, remains the treatment of choice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Observations on injuries by blunt objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terazawa, Koichi

    2010-12-01

    Based on my personal experience publishing case reports on blunt injuries, I hereby focus on issues that have recently come to my attention. 1. Abrasions: 1) As to whether they occurred ante-mortem or post-mortem; those reddish in color cannot always have occurred antemortem. When they overlap with reddish (-purple) discoloration, as in hypostasis, post-mortem abrasions look reddish as well. Abrasions larger than the tip of the finger or the palm of the hand are often seen post-mortem and are thought to occur due to the touching of putrefied skin post-mortem. 2) There are cases where the direction in which the epidermis peeled-off is not apparent, when it peels off in many directions or where there is no residual epidermis. 3) The shape and size of an abrasion can indicate the structure of the offending blunt object. When there is an abrasion on the scalp 3 to 4 cm in diameter, with structures 5 mm in diameter at the margins of the abrasion, it can be inferred that the victim fell on a paved gravel road. 2. Bruises: 1) Inferring the nature of a blunt object: (1) Evidence of a fist blow: Co-existence of the following three features indicates a blow by the fist : 1. macular discoloration, 2. within an area of approximately 8 cm by 5 cm, 3. with an abrasion from the thumb nail. (2) Evidence of being grabbed:Try to grab the corpse with your own hand during autopsy to find how the person was grabbed. Bruise-like discoloration can be generated post-mortem on the upper arm, when a body is being drawn out of water, for example. 2) Tram-line bruises: These appear when a victim was struck by a stick. To estimate the diameter of the object, it is useful to measure two parts of the bruising : the width of the pale part between the bruises and the width between the outer margins of the bruises. 3. Intradermal bleeding: There tends to be a grouping of hemorrhagic spots, the interval between which 1 mm or less. It can be generated by both direct and indirect force. Abrasions may

  9. Tracheobronchial injuries in blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vahid Montazeri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tracheobronchial injuries are uncommon but potentially fatal complication of blunt thoracic trauma harboring a high morbidity and mortality if not diagnosed early . A recent series gleaning cases from four major Trauma Center in Los Angeles nine cases in a seven- year period , but the incidence of these injuries has been increasing recently. This has been attributed to improvement in hospital care and advanced Trauma Centers and earlier diagnosis of such injuries. Disruption of tight main bronchus is more common, such injuries are often associated with rib or clavicular fractures. Findings: Clinical and paraclinical data gathered from records of three patients referred with tracheobronchial injuries during the recent ten years have been reviewed .These include clinical manifestations, diagnostic findings, treatment modality and clinical course. The outcome has been satisfactory in all three patients who have undergone operation 2-5 hours after sustaining the injury. We have not had any mortality. Conclusion: These results are similar to those of other series emphasizing over early diagnosis and treatment of such injuries .

  10. Overload blunts baroreflex only in overreached athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdillon, Nicolas; Yazdani, Sasan; Nilchian, Masih; Mariano, Alessio; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Millet, Grégoire P

    2018-01-31

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is commonly used to diagnose overreaching and monitor athletes' responses to training. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is modified by changes in training load and might be another means to detect overreaching. The goal of this study was to assess BRS and HRV changes in two groups of athletes responding either negatively (FOR) or positively (AF) to similar training overload. Fifteen athletes performed 2-week baseline (BSL) training followed by 3-week overload (+45%; OVL) and 2-week recovery (-20%; RCV). HRV, training load and subjective fatigue were measured daily via questionnaires. BRS, salivary cortisol and testosterone, and submaximal exercise and maximal 3-km run performances were measured at the end of each period. Based on their performance change during OVL, 8 athletes were diagnosed as FOR and 7 as AF. Subjective fatigue was increased in FOR athletes during OVL. BRS increased in AF but not in FOR athletes during RCV. At the end of RCV, cortisol and testosterone were higher than BSL in both groups. Three weeks of similar training overload can induce either performance enhancement or overreaching. The changes in submaximal exercise and maximal performances and in subjective fatigue were the fastest-responding parameters that distinguished the two groups of athletes during OVL. Training overload blunted the increase in BRS in FOR only. Most of the differences in BRS were observed during the recovery period. BRS appears to be a more sensitive parameter than HRV for early monitoring of responses to training. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Pediatric blunt splenic trauma: a comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Karen N.; Werder, Gabriel M.; Callaghan, Rachel M.; Jafri, Zafar H. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Sullivan, Ashley N. [St. George' s University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies (Grenada); Bloom, David A. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Abdominal trauma is a leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age. The spleen is the most common organ injured following blunt abdominal trauma. Pediatric trauma patients present unique clinical challenges as compared to adults, including different mechanisms of injury, physiologic responses, and indications for operative versus nonoperative management. Splenic salvage techniques and nonoperative approaches are preferred to splenectomy in order to decrease perioperative risks, transfusion needs, duration/cost of hospitalization, and risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection. Early and accurate detection of splenic injury is critical in both adults and children; however, while imaging findings guide management in adults, hemodynamic stability is the primary determinant in pediatric patients. After initial diagnosis, the primary role of imaging in pediatric patients is to determine the level and duration of care. We present a comprehensive literature review regarding the mechanism of injury, imaging, management, and complications of traumatic splenic injury in pediatric patients. Multiple patients are presented with an emphasis on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury grading system. Clinical practice guidelines from the American Pediatric Surgical Association are discussed and compared with our experience at a large community hospital, with recommendations for future practice guidelines. (orig.)

  12. Clinical value of different detection methods in blunt ocular trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Blunt ocular can cause persistent change of eye structure and function, the method of detection which is closely related to eye injury including B-can ultrasonography, UBM, OCT, FFA, scanning laser polarimetry, fundus autofluorescence, each examination with particular emphasis. This paper aims to review the advantages and disadvantages of different inspection methods in order to provide reference for clinical diagnosis and treatment of blunt ocular trauma.

  13. Transient electrocardiographic abnormalities following blunt chest trauma in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Udink ten Cate, Floris; Heerde, van, Marc; Rammeloo, Lukas; Hruda, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Blunt cardiac injury may occur in patients after suffering nonpenetrating trauma of the chest. It encompasses a wide spectrum of cardiac injury with varied severity and clinical presentation. Electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently encountered. This article presents a case of a child who presented with complete right bundle branch block on the initial ECG at the emergency department. She suffered blunt chest trauma during a horseback riding accident. She was admitted for cardiac mon...

  14. Non-operative versus operative treatment for blunt pancreatic trauma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Michael V; Wettergren, André; Hillingsø, Jens Georg

    2014-01-01

    METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 5, 2013), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED and CPCI-S) and ZETOC. In addition, we searched bibliographies of relevant articles, conference...... or language of publication. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used relevant search strategies to obtain the titles and abstracts of studies that were relevant for the review. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility. MAIN RESULTS: The search found 83 relevant references. We excluded all...

  15. Radiotherapy of pancreatic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pobijakova, M.; Scepanovic, D.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the tenth most common cancer in the western world and has become the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death. Surgery remains the only potentially curative treatment modality for pancreatic cancer. However, only a minority of patients are candidates for surgery at diagnosis, and only a minority of patients who undergo surgery are cured. The role of radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer continues to be investigated. Its use in the adjuvant setting remains controversial. Indication of radiotherapy is more generally accepted in borderline resectable disease, but prospective data are sparse. Randomized trials have yielded conflicting data in locally advanced disease. Radiation techniques have improved over time. This article aims to give an overview of the current knowledge regarding the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. (author)

  16. Pancreatic Exocrine Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Advisory Board Volunteer Advisory Council Survivor Council Influencers of Hope Ambassador Circle Learn about the people ... is registered as a 501©3 nonprofit organization. Contributions to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network are tax- ...

  17. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNETs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Advisory Board Volunteer Advisory Council Survivor Council Influencers of Hope Ambassador Circle Learn about the people ... is registered as a 501©3 nonprofit organization. Contributions to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network are tax- ...

  18. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  19. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNETs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Our signature PurpleStride run/walk events raise spirits, awareness and funds in communities nationwide. FIND YOUR ... two main pancreatic hormones. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels, while glucagon raises blood sugar levels. Together, these ...

  20. Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent meals. Avoid greasy and fried foods. Limit consumption of raw fruits and vegetables, initially. Gradually increase ... pancreatic enzyme replacement products with all meals and snacks. Gradually start adding solid foods. The timing of ...

  1. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each

  2. Imaging of acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Elmar M.; Goerich, Johannes [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Ulm, Steinhoevel Strasse 9, 89075 Ulm (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is defined as an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. This article reports the current classification, definition and terminology, epidemiology and etiology, pathogenesis and pathological findings, clinical and laboratory findings, and finally imaging findings of acute pancreatitis with emphasis on cross-sectional imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  3. CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Baoqing; Jin Erhu; Zhang Lizhen; Jiang Haibin

    1997-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. The CT findings of 154 cases with pancreatic carcinoma, chronic pancreatitis and mis-diagnosed other pancreatic diseases proven clinically and pathologically were analysed. Slice thickness of 8 mm and slice interval of 8 mm were used and thin-section scan and enhancement study were performed in some cases. The main signs in degassing and differential diagnosis between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis included: (1) focal or diffuse enlargement and density abnormality of pancreas; (2) dilated common bile duct was suddenly obstructed, peripancreatic blood vessels were invaded and cancerous thrombus was revealed, enlargement of abdominal lymph nodes and metastasis in the liver were discovered; (3) calcium deposit in the pancreatic duct area and dilated pancreatic duct which passed through the lesion or not; (4) presence and location of pancreatic cyst and its relationship to pancreatic contour. CT is the imaging modality of choice in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis at present. The diagnostic accuracy of CT was over 90% in this series

  4. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheong J; Dosch, Joseph; Simeone, Diane M

    2008-06-10

    Cellular heterogeneity in cancer was observed decades ago by studies in mice which showed that distinct subpopulations of cells within a tumor mass are capable of driving tumorigenesis. Conceptualized from this finding was the stem-cell hypothesis for cancer, which suggests that only a specific subset of cancer cells within each tumor is responsible for tumor initiation and propagation, termed tumor initiating cells or cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent data has been provided to support the existence of CSCs in human blood cell-derived cancers and solid organ tumors of the breast, brain, prostate, colon, and skin. Study of human pancreatic cancers has also revealed a specific subpopulation of cancer cells that possess the characteristics of CSCs. These pancreatic cancer stem cells express the cell surface markers CD44, CD24, and epithelial-specific antigen, and represent 0.5% to 1.0% of all pancreatic cancer cells. Along with the properties of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, pancreatic CSCs display upregulation of important developmental genes that maintain self-renewal in normal stem cells, including Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and BMI-1. Signaling cascades that are integral in tumor metastasis are also upregulated in the pancreatic CSC. Understanding the biologic behavior and the molecular pathways that regulate growth, survival, and metastasis of pancreatic CSCs will help to identify novel therapeutic approaches to treat this dismal disease.

  5. The efficacy and benefits of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in patients with blunt splenic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwack, Kyu Sung; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, Myung Sub; Kim, Dong Jin; Hong, In Soo

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and benefits of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in patients with blunt splenic injury after blunt abdominal trauma. We retrospectively analyzed the results of transcatheter arterial embolization in 23 patients who suffered splenic injury after blunt abdominal trauma. Fourteen of the patients were male, and 9 were female; 13 were adults, and 10 were children. Transcatheter arterial embolization was performed in patients with hypotension, tachycardia, evidence of hemodynamic instability due, for example, to low levels of Hgb and Hct, or those who needed fluid therapy or blood transfusion. After embolization the patients' progress was monitored by CT scanning, abdominal sonography, or 99m Tc-sulfur colloid scintigraphy. The degree of splenic injury was classified according to the system devised by Mirvis et al.; nine cases were CT grade III, and 14 were grade IV. After demonstrating angiographically the site of contrast leakage, embolization was performed; for this, a coil only was used in 16 cases, gelfoam only in four, and both coil and gelfoam in three. There were three sites of vascular embolization: 16 procedures were performed in the proximal part of the main trunk of the splenic artery, four in a superselected branch of this same artery, and three in both the splenic artery and one of its superselected branches. Of the 23 cases, 18 recovered without splenectomy after embolization, three adult patients died from coexisting conditions (spinal or cerebral injuries, liver cirrhosis, or pelvic bone fracture) or complications (acute renal failure or disseminated intravascular coagulation). Due to co-existing pancreatic and mesenteric vessel injury, two of the adult patients who underwent TAE also underwent delayed surgery; intraoperatively, there was no evidence of splenic rebleeding. In all patients who did not undergo surgery, follow-up observation revealed a decreased volume of hemoperitoneum, increased uptake of radionuclide in

  6. The efficacy and benefits of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in patients with blunt splenic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwack, Kyu Sung; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, Myung Sub; Kim, Dong Jin; Hong, In Soo [Wonju Christian Hospital, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and benefits of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in patients with blunt splenic injury after blunt abdominal trauma. We retrospectively analyzed the results of transcatheter arterial embolization in 23 patients who suffered splenic injury after blunt abdominal trauma. Fourteen of the patients were male, and 9 were female; 13 were adults, and 10 were children. Transcatheter arterial embolization was performed in patients with hypotension, tachycardia, evidence of hemodynamic instability due, for example, to low levels of Hgb and Hct, or those who needed fluid therapy or blood transfusion. After embolization the patients' progress was monitored by CT scanning, abdominal sonography, or {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid scintigraphy. The degree of splenic injury was classified according to the system devised by Mirvis et al.; nine cases were CT grade III, and 14 were grade IV. After demonstrating angiographically the site of contrast leakage, embolization was performed; for this, a coil only was used in 16 cases, gelfoam only in four, and both coil and gelfoam in three. There were three sites of vascular embolization: 16 procedures were performed in the proximal part of the main trunk of the splenic artery, four in a superselected branch of this same artery, and three in both the splenic artery and one of its superselected branches. Of the 23 cases, 18 recovered without splenectomy after embolization, three adult patients died from coexisting conditions (spinal or cerebral injuries, liver cirrhosis, or pelvic bone fracture) or complications (acute renal failure or disseminated intravascular coagulation). Due to co-existing pancreatic and mesenteric vessel injury, two of the adult patients who underwent TAE also underwent delayed surgery; intraoperatively, there was no evidence of splenic rebleeding. In all patients who did not undergo surgery, follow-up observation revealed a decreased volume of hemoperitoneum, increased uptake of

  7. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  8. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  9. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  10. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M. E.; Rauws, E. A.; Tytgat, G. N.; Huibregtse, K.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the long-term results of endoscopic pancreatic stone removal in patients with chronic pancreatitis. We retrospectively included 53 patients with chronic pancreatitis, in whom an attempt was made at endoscopic stone removal between 1984 and 1993. Patients

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hereditary pancreatitis: a population-based cohort study in Denmark. Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Aug;105(8):1876- ... Hammel P, Ruszniewski P, Lévy P. The natural history of hereditary pancreatitis: a national series. Gut. 2009 ...

  12. CT of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Toshio

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and two cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were studied by computed tomography. Fluid collection was detected by CT in 45 cases, and the common extrapancreatic sites of involvement included the lesser sac (13 cases), anterior pararenal space (9 cases), transverse mesocolon (7 cases) and posterior pararenal space (5 cases). Ten cases of spontaneous resolution of pancreatic pseudocysts were encountered. Cystojejunostomy was done on 6 patients. A 4-to-6-weeks time interval has been currently accepted as necessary for pseudocyst wall maturation. However, the surgery was not possible in two patients in this series since the cyst wall was too thin. It is considered that the time over 3 months is required for surgical anastomosis of the cyst to the gastrointestinal tract. Pancreatic abscess has become the most common cause of death from pancreatitis. In this series pancreatic abscess occurred in 8 patients. Gas collection in the pancreas was observed in only one patient. In the other patients, pseudocysts had become infected and converted to abscesses. The CT number of 4 infected pseudocysts was less than 15 HU. Thus, it was not possible to distinguish infected from noninfected pseudocysts by CT. The author studied 9 patients with focal inflammatory mass of the pancreas with histologically proved severe fibrosis. All masses were small. Angiography showed occlusion or marked stenosis of the splenic vein in 3 cases. The postcontract CT (after intravenous bolus injection) in 7 cases of focal inflammatory mass demonstrated almost equal enhanced effect of the mass as compared with the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is considered to be useful in distinguishing inflammatory mass from pancreatic carcinoma. (author)

  13. CT of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Toshio (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-09-01

    One hundred and two cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were studied by computed tomography. Fluid collection was detected by CT in 45 cases, and the common extrapancreatic sites of involvement included the lesser sac (13 cases), anterior pararenal space (9 cases), transverse mesocolon (7 cases) and posterior pararenal space (5 cases). Ten cases of spontaneous resolution of pancreatic pseudocysts were encountered. Cystojejunostomy was done on 6 patients. A 4-to-6-weeks time interval has been currently accepted as necessary for pseudocyst wall maturation. However, the surgery was not possible in two patients in this series since the cyst wall was too thin. It is considered that the time over 3 months is required for surgical anastomosis of the cyst to the gastrointestinal tract. Pancreatic abscess has become the most common cause of death from pancreatitis. In this series pancreatic abscess occurred in 8 patients. Gas collection in the pancreas was observed in only one patient. In the other patients, pseudocysts had become infected and converted to abscesses. The CT number of 4 infected pseudocysts was less than 15 HU. Thus, it was not possible to distinguish infected from noninfected pseudocysts by CT. The author studied 9 patients with focal inflammatory mass of the pancreas with histologically proved severe fibrosis. All masses were small. Angiography showed occlusion or marked stenosis of the splenic vein in 3 cases. The postcontract CT (after intravenous bolus injection) in 7 cases of focal inflammatory mass demonstrated almost equal enhanced effect of the mass as compared with the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is considered to be useful in distinguishing inflammatory mass from pancreatic carcinoma. (author).

  14. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hong Il [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  15. Improvement of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jun Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise is investigated using both computational aero-acoustic and semi-empirical approach. For engineering purposes, one of the most commonly used prediction tools for trailing edge noise are based on semi-empirical approaches, for example, the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini airfoil noise prediction model developed by Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini (NASA Reference Publication 1218, 1989. It was found in previous study that the Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini model tends to over-predict noise at high frequencies. Furthermore, it was observed that this was caused by a lack in the model to predict accurately noise from blunt trailing edges. For more physical understanding of bluntness noise generation, in this study, we also use an advanced in-house developed high-order computational aero-acoustic technique to investigate the details associated with trailing edge bluntness noise. The results from the numerical model form the basis for an improved Brooks, Pope, and Marcolini trailing edge bluntness noise model.

  16. Acute pancreatitis: staging with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gialeli, E.; Petrocheilou, G.; Georgaki, S.; Tzemailas, I.; Adraktas, A.; Charilas, G.; Patsiogiannis, V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Computed Tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Objectives and tasks: The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the findings in CT images which are useful for staging acute pancreatitis according to Balthazar, their significance and restrictions. Materials and methods: CT images from patients who were referred to our Department for an abdominal CT scan for the diagnosis or/and staging of acute pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. Results: In acute pancreatitis, CT helps to stage the severity of inflammatory process, to detect pancreatic necrosis and to depict local complications. CT severity index (CTSI), which was proposed by Balthazar et al, combines the grade of pancreatitis with the extent of pancreatic necrosis assigning points to the patients in order to find the severity index which scales from 0-10. More points are given for a higher grade of pancreatitis and for more extensive necrosis. Types of pancreatitis according to CTSI are: interstitial (Balthazar grade A-C), exudative (Balthazar grade D or E), necrotising (Balthazar grade E, CTSI:10) and central gland necrotising. Patients with pancreatitis but no collections or necrosis have an interstitial (mild) pancreatitis. In exudative pancreatitis there is normal enhancement of the entire pancreas associated with extensive peripancreatic collections. Necrotizing (severe) pancreatitis is characterized by protacted clinical course, high incidence of local complications and high mortality rate. Central gland necrosis is a subtype of necrotizing pancreatitis. Conclusions: The combination of CT imaging and clinical and laboratory evaluation allows the early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis may vary from a mild uneventful disease to a severe life-threatening illness with multisystemic organ failure. Thus, it is crucial to identify patients who are at high risk of severe

  17. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  18. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Ifosfamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Chiu Hung

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication during chemotherapy for pediatric patients with solid tumors. We report a 9-year-old boy with osteosarcoma who experienced 2 episodes of pancreatitis 1 day and 48 days after infusion of ifosfamide (IFOS, respectively. From a MEDLINE search, this is the 3rd reported case and 2nd reported pediatric case of IFOS-induced pancreatitis, and only this case experienced late-onset pancreatitis.

  19. Identification of blunt abdominal injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynick, Nina H; Brennan, Maureen; Schmit, Pierre; Noseworthy, Steve; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2014-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) to screen for injuries in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is increasing, concurrent with increasing concern over long-term risk of radiation-associated malignancies. We proposed to determine features that could be identified in the early assessment of these patients, which can predict the likelihood of clinically important intra-abdominal injuries warranting imaging by CT. We further queried if these were discrepant from factors associated with the decision to obtain an abdominal CT. Data of patients admitted with BAT to one of two Level I pediatric trauma centers were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical, laboratory, radiographic, and epidemiologic data were collected. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between pre-CT findings and ultimate diagnoses of "notable" or "clinically important" intra-abdominal injuries. Similar analyses were performed to determine which findings were associated with actually receiving an abdominal CT scan. Of 571 patients, 37% had a notable intra-abdominal injury and 18% a clinically important intra-abdominal injury. After adjusting for all covariates, hematuria (gross or microscopic), elevated serum alanine aminotransferase, and documentation of clinically concerning abdominal findings upon examination remained significant predictors (odds ratio (OR), 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-6.8; OR, 10.9; 95% CI, 2.5-47, respectively) of a clinically important injury. Undergoing a CT head and the presence of hematuria were significantly associated with obtaining a CT of the abdomen (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.5-7.7; OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3, respectively), while concerning abdominal findings and decreased Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score were not. Clinical variables may be used to predict intra-abdominal injuries after pediatric BAT that may warrant imaging with CT scanning. Combined with findings from similar studies, it may be possible to derive and validate a decision-making rule both

  20. Obesity and increased mortality in blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choban, P S; Weireter, L J; Maynes, C

    1991-09-01

    To determine the effect of admission body weight on blunt trauma victims, a chart review of all patients greater than 12 years of age admitted to Sentara Norfolk General Hospital between January 1 and July 31, 1987 was undertaken. The charts of 351 patients were reviewed; 184 records contained admission height and weight. These 184 patients made up the study group and age, gender, injuries, Injury Severity Score (ISS), ventilator days (VD), complications, length of stay (LOS), and outcome were noted. Body Mass Index (BMI) (weight (kg)/(height(m))2, was calculated for each patient. The average ISS was 21.87 (range, 1-66) and the average BMI was 25.15 kg/m2 (range, 16-46 kg/m2). The overall mortality for the population was 9%. The population was grouped according to BMI: average (less than 27 kg/m2), overweight (27-31 kg/m2), and severely overweight (greater than 31 kg/m2). The mortality of 5.0% and 8.0% in the average and overweight groups was not different. The severely overweight group had a higher mortality at 42.1% compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.0001). The groups did not differ in age, ISS, LOS, nor VD. Age, BMI, and ISS were subjected to regression analysis. By this method BMI and ISS were independent determinants of outcome (p less than 0.0001). There was an increase in complications, mainly pulmonary problems, in the SO group (p less than 0.05). The three groups were subdivided into survivors and nonsurvivors. The nonsurvivors had a longer average LOS at 26.6 days compared with nonsurvivors in the overweight (5.0 days) or severely overweight (8.62 days) groups (p less than 0.007). The severely group was characterized by a rapid deterioration and demise that was unresponsive to intervention. ISS did not differ among nonsuvivors. Among survivors the severely overweight group had a lower ISS, 9.73. This was different from the overweight group (21.57) and from the average group (20.21) (p less than 0.04).

  1. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was

  2. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  3. Vaginal metastasis of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhayoune, Khadija; El Fatemi, Hinde; El Ghaouti, Meryem; Bannani, Abdelaziz; Melhouf, Abdelilah; Harmouch, Taoufik

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal metastasis from pancreatic cancer is an extreme case and often indicates a poor prognosis. We present a case of pancreatic carcinoma with metastasis to the vagina that was discovered by vaginal bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the third case in the world of a primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma discovered of symptoms from a vaginal metastasis.

  4. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Penny

    2012-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis used to be considered uncommon in dogs, but recent pathological and clinical studies have confirmed that it is in fact a common and clinically significant disease. Clinical signs can vary from low-grade recurrent gastrointestinal signs to acute exacerbations that are indistinguishable from classical acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a significant cause of chronic pain in dogs, which must not be underestimated. It also results in progressive impairment of endocrine and exocrine function and the eventual development of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or both in some affected dogs at end stage. The etiology is unknown in most cases. Chronic pancreatitis shows an increased prevalence in certain breeds, and recent work in English Cocker Spaniels suggests it is part of a polysystemic immune-mediated disease in this breed. The histological and clinical appearance is different in different breeds, suggesting that etiologies may also be different. Diagnosis is challenging because the sensitivities of the available noninvasive tests are relatively low. However, with an increased index of suspicion, clinicians will recognize more cases that will allow them to institute supportive treatment to improve the quality of life of the patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  6. [ACUTE PANCREATITIS OF PREGNANCY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostukhina, N F; Salov, L A; Novichkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    The study included 78 pregnant women with acute pancreatiis. Group 1 contained 43 4-37 weeks pregnant women and group 2 35 non-pregnant women. Control group was comprised of 30 women with physiological pregnancy. Comparative analysis of peculiarities of the clinical course of acute pancreatitis showed its similar manifestations in all three groups. However pregnancy itself variability of pancreatitis symptoms and their similarity to those of other acute surgical and obstetric pathologies, high (25.6) percent ofpainlessforms, late detection and inadequate treatment pose difficultiesfor diagnostics and delay the onset of pathogenetic therapy. The study of endogenous intoxication markers (leukocytic index, medium molecular weight molecules, circulating immune complexes, total endotoxins) revealed endotoxicosis in the pregnant women with acute pancreatitis that has negative effect on the fetoplacental complex and the development of pregnancy; moreover pancreatitis increases the risk of premature delivery up to 79.21%. The results of the study dictate the necessity of the searchfor new safe treatment and rehabilitation modalities for ptregnant women with acute pancreatitis.

  7. [Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldivar-Rodríguez, D; Treviño-Montemayor, O R; Guzmán-López, A; Treviño-Martínez, G; Flores-Acosta, C C

    2016-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that affects the pancreatic tissue, which have been proposed numerous causes, with unpredictable results, it appears as a complication of rare occurrence, so the information on maternal and fetal complications is limited. Objective: Exposing obstetric and perinatal outcomes of patients diagnosed with pancreatitis complicating pregnancy. A retrospective, observational, transverse and descriptive study; data were obtained and analyzed by reviewing medical records of patients diagnosed with pancreatitis and pregnancy. A total of 9 cases were included, corresponding to an incidence of 39/100,000 live births in the time period analyzed. The median age was 22, the mean gestational age at diagnosis was 31 weeks. 4 patients had cesarean delivery and 2 patients natural delivery. 3 patients had Ranson 3, a 2 and other Ranson Ranson 1 the remaining 4 Ranson 0. All products had adequate evolution. A case of maternal death as a complication of the disease was presented, because of metabolic acidosis and ARDS. Acute pancreatitis is an entity of variable incidence, which increases their appearance with advancing pregnancy, and can lead to serious complications for pregnant women. It is extremely important to pay attention to early symptoms of the disease, and achieve an accurate diagnosis and provide adequate multidisciplinary management for a better prognosis for maternal-fetal binomial.

  8. [Penetrating cardiac injury in blunt trauma: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereli, Yüksel; Öncel, Murat

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac injuries may rarely be observed due to blunt thoracic traumas. Cardiac injury often creates a life-threatening condition requiring urgent surgical intervention, and follow-up of these patients should be carefully carried out in the perioperative period. These injuries depend on various factors including clinical presentation, type of injury, the time that passes until the patient reaches the hospital, bleeding, cardiac tamponade, or additional injuries. This article aimed to report a case who suffered penetrating cardiac injury in blunt thoracic trauma. Evaluated in the emergency department due to a motor vehicle accident, the 61-year-old male patient's chest x-ray revealed pulmonary contusion, rib fractures and cardiac tamponade. The patient was operated emergently. Right atrial injury was observed in the operation. The cardiac injury was repaired with primary suture technique. Cardiac injury in patients with blunt thoracic trauma is likely to be observed. In these patients, careful physical examination, early diagnosis, and treatment are very important.

  9. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guo-Jun; Gao, Chun-Fang; Wei, Dong; Wang, Cun; Ding, Si-Qin

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hype...

  10. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  11. an extended pancreatic normal subjects and ~in pancreatItIs In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    function . . patIents. N. H. GILlNSKY, A. S. MEE, I. N. MARKS. Summary. Exocrine pancreatic response was evaluated in patients with varying degrees of pancreatic damage and in control subjects by ... hormones, the Lundh meal and an oral pancreatic function test .... is any different from that of the cells in me normal gland.

  12. The cigar as a drug delivery device: youth use of blunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldz, Stephen; Huyser, Dana Joy; Dorsey, Elizabeth

    2003-10-01

    Blunts are hollowed-out cigars used to smoke marijuana (and perhaps other substances) in the United States. We investigated rates of blunt use; whether cigar use reported in surveys may actually be blunt use; the relationship of blunt to cigar use; characteristics of blunt users; brands of cigars used to make blunts; and drugs added to blunts. A school-based survey of youth, the Cigar Use Reasons Evaluation (CURE). Eleven schools across Massachusetts. A total of 5016 students in grades 7-12. CURE items assessing blunt, cigar and cigarette use, brands used to make blunts, drugs added to blunts and demographics were used. Life-time blunt use was reported by 20.0% of the sample, with use greater among high school (25.6%) than middle school (11.4%) students, and among males (23.7%) than females (16.6%). Self-reported cigar use rates were not influenced strongly by blunt use being misreported as cigar use. In a multivariate model, blunt use was associated with male gender, higher grade in school, lower GPA, truancy, lower school attachment, not living in a two-parent family, being of 'other' race/ethnicity and current use of both cigarettes and cigars. 'Phillies' was the most popular brand of cigar for making blunts, used by 59% of users. 'Garcia y Vega' (18.0%) was the second most popular. Twenty-eight per cent of blunt users had added drugs other than marijuana to blunts. The use of blunts as a drug delivery device is a serious problem. Efforts to address it will require the cooperation of the tobacco control and substance abuse prevention systems.

  13. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palas, J.; Matos, A.P.; Ramalho, M.; Mascarenhas, V.; Heredia, V.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  14. Effect of nose bluntness on boundary layer stability and transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. R.; Spall, R. E.; Chang, C.-L.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of nose bluntness on boundary layer instability is studied theoretically for a Mach 8 flow past a 7 degree semivertex cone. The basic flow is computed by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. Linear stability analysis of the basic flow reveals that, with small amount of bluntness, the critical Reynolds number for the onset of instability increases by an order of magnitude compared to the sharp cone value. The computed second mode frequencies are also in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. The results are used to explain the effect of unit Reynolds number on transition present in the quiet aeroballistic range data.

  15. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  16. Partial tearing of the interventricular septum after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ruiz, Nilson; Ramírez Gil, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac trauma after blunt chest trauma is a rare complication of patients arriving alive to an emergency department. We here present the case of patient who had a partial rupture of the interventricular septum after having had a blunt chest trauma in a traffic accident. As there was no ventricular septal defect, conservative management was deemed appropriate. At 3-year follow-up, the patient was free of right heart failure symptoms suggestive of the septal defect progression. Copyright © 2015 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Chylothorax after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawit Sriprasit

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic chylothorax after blunt chest trauma alone is considered rare. Our patient was a 27-year-old female who was in a motorcycle accident and sustained blunt thoracic and traumatic thoracic aortic injuries with T1–T2 vertebral subluxation. She underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair from T4 to T9 without any thoracic or spinal surgery. On postoperative day 7, the drainage from her left chest turned into a milky- white fluid indicative of chyle leakage. The patient was treated conservatively for 2 weeks and then the chest drain was safely removed. The results show that traumatic chylothorax can be successfully managed with conservative treatment.

  18. An Update on Pediatric Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla-Udawatta, Monica; Madani, Shailender; Kamat, Deepak

    2017-05-01

    There has been a rise in the incidence and number of admissions of children with pancreatitis over the past 20 years. Current management practices for pancreatitis in children are adapted from standards of care for adults, and there are a lack of multicenter, prospective research studies on pancreatitis in children. There are inherent differences in the clinical presentation and natural course of pancreatitis between adults and children. This review focuses on the current understanding of the epidemiology, etiologies, evaluation, and management of children with pancreatitis. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(5):e207-e211.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Acute hyperlipidemic pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Luminita S; Steidl, Erin T; Rivera-Alsina, Manuel E

    2008-05-01

    Pancreatitis in pregnancy remains a rare event and is most often associated with gallstone disease. Hyperlipidemic gestational pancreatitis usually occurs in women with a preexisting abnormality of the lipid metabolism and poses particular problems in diagnosis and clinical management. We describe 5 patients with acute episodes of pancreatitis during pregnancy caused by hyperlipidemia. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causes significant morbidity. Even though it is often associated with gallstones, we describe 5 cases in which the etiology of the pancreatitis was maternal hyperlipidemia. Etiology, diagnosis, and management will be discussed.

  20. Pancreatic transplant imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Wiese, J.A.; Abu-Yousef, M.M.; Rezai, K.; Sato, Y.; Kao, S.C.S.; Hunsicker, L.G.; Corry, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two MR studies, 162 radionuclide scintigraphic studies, and 57 sonographic studies were performed on 15 pancreatic transplant patients for evaluation of suspected graft rejection. The results of these studies were correlated with clinical presentations, laboratory data, and pathologic specimens when available. Radionuclide studies provide excellent information for estimating graft size and for evaluation of perfusion. Sonography is valuable for evaluation of the gland texture and peripancreatic abnormalities. MR provides useful information regarding parenchymal changes in rejection and response of the graft to treatment. These three imaging modalities are therefore complementary in the evaluation of pancreatic transplantation

  1. Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimac, Davor; Stimac, Tea

    2011-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is a rare condition estimated to occur in 1 per 1000 to 1 per 12,000 pregnancies. The most frequent etiology in pregnancy is biliary, followed by hyperlipidemia and/or alcohol abuse. Abdominal ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound are ideal imaging techniques for diagnosing disease because they have no radiation risk. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography should be used with caution. Treatment could be conservative or surgical, and standard algorithms are slightly modified in pregnant women. In the last decades the outcome of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is much better, and perinatal mortality is less than 5%.

  2. Post-partum pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai P

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy and post-partum period, rarely encountered in surgical practice, can have a lethal effect on the mother and the foetus. We report here a case of a 35 year old tertigravida who presented with high grade fever, abdominal pain with distension, tachycardia and tachypnoea. Chest examination and X-rays were suggestive of pneumonia. The abdomen was tense and tender. Peristalsis was absent. Ultrasound revealed presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity which on paracentesis was found to contain Gram positive cocci. Fluid amylase levels were high. On exploratory laparotomy, haemorrhagic oedematous pancreatitis was noticed. The patient expired on the 2nd post operative day.

  3. [Treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesani, C; D'Amato, A; Citone, G; Procacciante, F; Giannoni, F; Narilli, P; Ribotta, G

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of treatment of a personal series of 13 cases of pseudocyst of the pancreas, between 1974 and the present day, it is suggested that the choice of therapy should be surgical. An internal shunt is preferred for pseudocysts as a result of acute pancreatitis or injury, whereas a wider cysto-wirsung jejunostomy is recommended for cysts developing during the course of chronic pancreatitis. These proposals follow analysis of immediate and long-term (mean: 51 months) follow-up, on the basis of mortality, morbidity, pain symptoms, malabsorption and postoperative diabetes.

  4. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendersky VA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria A Bendersky,1 Mohan K Mallipeddi,2 Alexander Perez,2 Theodore N Pappas,2 1School of Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications. Keywords: necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic necrosectomy, VARD, pancreatic debridement, pancreatic collections

  5. MR imaging of pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Katsuyoshi E-mail: itokatsu@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Koike, Shinji; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2001-05-01

    This article presents current MR imaging techniques for the pancreas, and review a spectrum of MR imaging features of various pancreatic diseases. These include: 1) congenital anomalies such as anomalous union of pancreatobiliary ducts, divisum, and annular pancreas, 2) inflammatory diseases, including acute or chronic pancreatitis with complications, groove pancreatitis, and autoimmune pancreatitis, tumor-forming pancreatitis, 3) pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinoma, islet cell tumors, and cystic neoplasms (microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and intraductal mucin-producing pancreatic tumor). Particular attention is paid to technical advances in MR imaging of the pancreas such as fat-suppression, MR pancreatography (single- or multi-slice HASTE), and thin-section 3D multiphasic contrast-enhanced dynamic sequences. Imaging characteristics that may lead to a specific diagnosis or narrow the differential diagnosis are also discussed.

  6. Peritonitis secondary to traumatic duodenal laceration in the presence of a large pancreatic pseudocyst: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seenath Marlon M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A pancreatic pseudocyst is a common sequela of severe acute pancreatitis. Commonly, it presents with abdominal pain and a mass in the epigastrium several weeks after the acute episode and can be managed conservatively, endoscopically or surgically. We report a patient with a pancreatic pseudocyst awaiting endoscopic therapy who developed a life-threatening complication following a rather innocuous trauma to the abdomen. Case presentation A 23-year-old Asian male student presented as an emergency with an acute abdomen a week after a minor trauma to his upper abdomen. The injury occurred when he was innocently punched in the abdomen by a friend. He experienced only moderate discomfort briefly at the time. His past medical history included coeliac disease and an admission four months previously with severe acute pancreatitis. He was hospitalized for 15 days; his pancreatitis was thought to be due to alcohol binge drinking on weekends. Ultrasound scanning showed no evidence of gallstone disease. Five days after the trauma, he became anorexic, lethargic and feverish and started vomiting bilious content. Seven days post-trauma, he presented to our emergency department with severe abdominal pain. An emergency laparotomy was performed where a transverse linear duodenal laceration was found at the junction of the first and second part of his duodenum, with generalized peritonitis. His stomach and duodenum were stretched over a large pancreatic pseudocyst posterior to his stomach. It was postulated that an incomplete duodenal injury (possibly a serosal tear occurred following the initial minor trauma, which was followed by local tissue necrosis at the injury site resulting in a delayed presentation of generalized peritonitis. Conclusion This is the first reported case of a traumatic duodenal laceration following minor blunt trauma in the presence of a large pancreatic pseudocyst. Minor blunt abdominal trauma in a normal healthy adult

  7. MRI of pancreatic transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studniarek, M.; Deschamps, P.Y.; Finas, B.; Pinet, A.

    1993-01-01

    The value of MRI in assessing pancreatic transplants was studied in 37 patients. Sixty-seven MRI examinations were performed in patients with an uncomplicated transplant, 14 in patients with poorly functioning transplant, and 10 in patients with a non-functioning graft. On the basis of 54 follow-up studies, it was shown that the volume of the graft decreased systematically during the 8 months after transplantation. On T1-weighted images the normal transplant was poorly delineated, with an almost homogeneous isointense or slightly hyperintense structure when compared with either renal transplant cortex or muscle. On T2-weighted images the organ was isointense or slightly hypointense compared with fat and hyperintense compared with muscle. T2-weighted delayed echo time image (TR = 2000 ms, TE = 150-200 ms) showed transplanted pancreas as well-delineated, hypointense and with a lobulated structure. This structure was characteristic of normal whole pancreatic grafts. Patent transplant vessels were seen as tubular structures of low signal intensity on T2-weighted short echo time images (TR = 2000 ms, TE = 50 ms). In the 10 patients with a non-functioning pancreatic transplant there were: 4 cases of focal intraparenchymal abnormalities, 6 cases in which the lobular structure was absent, and 4 cases of absence of patent graft main vessels (3 thromboses). There was no configuration of signal intensity of pancreatic parenchyma on MRI which could be considered typical for normal or non-functioning transplant. (orig.)

  8. Metronidazole-Induced Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O'Halloran

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. This case provides the eighth report of Metronidazole induced pancreatitis. All of the cases were reported in females and ran a benign course.Early diagnosis, discontinuation of the drug and supportive care will lead to a successful recovery in the majority of cases.

  9. Pancreatitis del surco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Araújo-Fernández

    2014-03-01

    It is a rare disease, but we must keep it in mind when we make the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal pain of unknown origin. It is very important to distinguish this pathology from a pancreatic head carcinoma, as both treatments and prognosis differ greatly, so we believe important communication of a new case.

  10. Radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nooijen, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    The author presents some of the problems and concepts related to the development of a radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon. A specific derivatization of glucagon for raising specific anti-glucagon antisera is introduced, and special procedures for diminishing the non-specific effect are outlined. (G.T.H.)

  11. Pleuravocht bij chronische pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamme, B.; Boerma, D.; Boermeester, M. A.; Gouma, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    In three patients, a 44-year-old schizophrenic woman and two men aged 54 and 42, who presented with dyspnoea, a pancreaticopleural fistula was diagnosed as a complication of pancreatitis, i.e. a fistulous tract between the pancreas and the pleural cavity. In general, these fistulas have a good

  12. Use of urethral catheters for diagnostic peritoneal lavage in blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL) has been reported to be a reliable diagnostic tool in assessing the need for liparotomy in blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) with a diagnostic accuracy of more thin 95% when using a peritoneal lavage catheter (PLC). The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic ...

  13. Headache in traumatic brain injuries from blunt head trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Chelse, Ana B.; Epstein, Leon G.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  14. Determinants of splenectomy in splenic injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinkuolie, A A; Lawal, O O; Arowolo, O A; Agbakwuru, E A; Adesunkanmi, A R K

    2010-02-01

    The management of splenic injuries has shifted from splenectomy to splenic preservation owing to the risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI). This study aimed to identify the factors that determine splenectomy in patients with isolated splenic injuries, with a view to increasing the rate of splenic preservation. Files of 55 patients managed for isolated splenic injuries from blunt abdominal trauma between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively analysed using a pro forma. Management options were classified into nonoperative, operative salvage and splenectomy. The majority of patients suffered splenic injury as a result of motor vehicle accident (MVA) trauma or falls. Splenectomy was undertaken in 33 (60%) patients, 12 (22%) had non-operative management, and operative salvage was achieved in 10 (18%) patients. Significant determinants of splenectomy were grade of splenic injury, hierarchy of the surgeon, and hierarchy of the assistant. MVA injury and falls accounted for the vast majority of blunt abdominal trauma in this study. The rate and magnitude of energy transferred versus splenic protective mechanisms at the time of blunt abdominal trauma seems to determine the grade of splenic injury. Interest in splenic salvage surgery, availability of technology that enables splenic salvage surgery, and the experience of the surgeon and assistant appear to determine the surgical management. Legislation on vehicle safety and good parental control may reduce the severity of splenic injury in blunt abdominal trauma. When surgery is indicated, salvage surgery should be considered in intermediate isolated splenic injury to reduce the incidence of OPSI.

  15. Microstructural modelling of creep crack growth from a blunted crack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; Giessen, E. van der

    1998-01-01

    The effect of crack tip blunting on the initial stages of creep crack growth is investigated by means of a planar microstructural model in which grains are represented discretely. The actual linking-up process of discrete microcracks with the macroscopic crack is simulated, with full account of the

  16. Successful Nonoperative Management of High-Grade Blunt Renal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Allison M; Darwish, Oussama; Dang, Brian; Monda, John J; Adsul, Prajakta; Syed, Johar; Siddiqui, Sameer A

    2016-01-01

    Current management of high-grade blunt renal trauma favors a nonoperative approach when possible. We performed a retrospective study of high grade blunt renal injuries at our level I trauma center to determine the indications and success of nonoperative management (NOM). 47 patients with blunt grade IV or V injuries were identified between October 2004 and December 2013. Immediate operative patients (IO) were compared to nonoperatively managed (NOM). Of the 47 patients, 3 (6.4%) were IO and 44 (95.6%) NOM. IO patients had a higher heart rate on admission, 133 versus 100 in NOM ( P = 0.01). IO patients had a higher rate of injury to the renal vein or artery (100%) compared to NOM group (18%) ( P = 0.01). NOM failed in 3 of 44 patients (6.8%). Two required nonemergent nephrectomy and one required emergent exploration resulting in nephrectomy. Six NOM patients had kidney-related complications (13.6%). The renal salvage rate for the entire cohort was 87.2% and 93.2% for NOM. Nonoperative management for hemodynamically stable patients with high-grade blunt renal trauma is safe with a low risk of complications. Management decisions should consider hemodynamic status and visualization of active renal bleeding as well as injury grade in determining operative management.

  17. Base Deficit as an Indicator of Significant Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    multiruka1

    Abstract. Background: Blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among trauma patients. Base deficit (BD) has been proposed as an early available tool alongside focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) in the screening of patients suspected to have BAT and also to help ...

  18. Blunt Splenic Trauma in Children : Are We Too Careful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, W. J. J.; Nellensteijn, D. R.; ten Duis, H. J.; Albers, M. J. I. J.; El Moumni, M.; Hulscher, J. B. F.

    Introduction: There has been a shift from operative treatment (OT) to non-operative treatment (NOT) of splenic injury. We evaluated the outcomes of treatment of pediatric patients with blunt splenic trauma in our hospital, with special focus on the outcomes after NOT. Patients and Methods: The data

  19. Upper abdominal visceral injury resulting from blunt trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients who sustained severe blunt injury to the pelvis without external injury to the upper abdomen or lower chest, yet who were found to have a ruptured solid upper abdominal viscus, are reported. The first patient on delayed arrival revealed clinical features suggestive of intra-abdominal bleeding and was found to.

  20. Improving the prognostic value of blunt abdominal trauma scoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Children. We then added plain, erect, abdominal radiographic films to these systems. ... and two cases was car accidents, falling from heights in seven, and kicks and abuse in 41 cases. The mean time .... The overall estimated risk of lifetime cancer development due to exposure of children to.

  1. Homicide by blunt force in 2 Scandinavian capitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogde, Sidsel; Hougen, Hans P; Poulsen, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    In the Oslo and Copenhagen areas, 77 instances of blunt force homicides were committed from 1985-1994, accounting for 18% of all homicides in that 10-year period. Fifty-four (70%) of the victims were male, often killed by an acquaintance during a fight. Almost 70% of the female victims were kille...

  2. Factors for failure of nonoperative management of blunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Trauma is major cause of morbidity and mortality in children with blunt abdominal trauma; the most commonly injured organs are the liver and the spleen. A high rate of operative complications caused a shift from operative to nonoperative management (NOM) in patients suffering from hemodynamically stable ...

  3. Severe blunt thoracic trauma: Differences between adults and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    both adults and children requires advanced imaging and critical care support that places strain on a resource-limited healthcare system. Paediatric trauma from MVCs is often multisystem, with a high incidence of thoracic involvement.[5] Paediatric blunt thoracic trauma presents difficulties in both diagnosis and management.

  4. Transient electrocardiographic abnormalities following blunt chest trauma in a child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Udink ten Cate, Floris; Heerde, van Marc; Rammeloo, Lukas; Hruda, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Blunt cardiac injury may occur in patients after suffering nonpenetrating trauma of the chest. It encompasses a wide spectrum of cardiac injury with varied severity and clinical presentation. Electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently encountered. This article presents a case of a child

  5. Gastrointestinal injuries from blunt abdominal trauma in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: A retrospective study. Setting: Ahmadu ... Results: In the l9 year period, 1984-2002, 92 children were treated for blunt abdominal trauma, 21(23%) of who had injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. ... One patient each developed prolonged ileus, urinary tract infection and chest infection, respectively postoperatively.

  6. Blunt injuries to the abdomen in Makurdi, Benue State: Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Splenic rupture was the commonest intra abdominal injury and was managed by splenectomy in all cases. Delay in presentation and slow reaction time were observed. These worsened the haemodynamic instability and further accounted for the high mortality rate of 26.6%. Keywords: blunt injuries, road traffic accidents

  7. Exercise-Induced Secretion of FGF21 and Follistatin Are Blocked by Pancreatic Clamp and Impaired in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Schiøler; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Xu, Guowang

    2016-01-01

    of the study was to investigate the regulatory roles of glucagon to insulin ratio and T2D on exercise-induced FGF21 and follistatin secretion. Design /Interventions: Young healthy males performed a 2-hour bicycle exercise bout followed by 5 hours of rest in supine position with and without a pancreatic clamp...... a 10-fold (P clamp. Exercise with the pancreatic clamp completely blunted the exercise-induced increase in FGF21 (P = .007), whereas the induction of follistatin was approximately 50% reduced (P...... = .04). Exercise-induced FGF21 secretion was completely absent in patients with T2D, whereas the exercise-induced follistatin increase was impaired. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Exercise-induced increases in plasma FGF21 and follistatin are attenuated by the pancreatic clamp, indicating important roles...

  8. Surgical Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Büchler, Markus W.

    2003-10-01

    Patients with predicted severe necrotizing pancreatitis as diagnosed by C-reactive protein (>150 mg/L) and/or contrast-enhanced computed tomography should be managed in the intensive care unit. Prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce infection rates and survival in severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic sphincterotomy is a causative therapy for gallstone pancreatitis with impacted stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. Fine needle aspiration for bacteriology should be performed to differentiate between sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with sepsis syndrome. Infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis is an indication for surgery. Patients with sterile pancreatic necrosis should be managed conservatively. Surgery in patients with sterile necrosis may be indicated in cases of persistent necrotizing pancreatitis and in the rare cases of "fulminant acute pancreatitis." Early surgery, within 14 days after onset of the disease, is not recommended in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The surgical approach should be organ-preserving (debridement/necrosectomy) and combined with a postoperative management concept that maximizes postoperative evacuation of retroperitoneal debris and exudate. Minimally invasive surgical procedures have to be regarded as an experimental approach and should be restricted to controlled trials. Cholecystectomy should be performed to avoid recurrence of gallstone-associated acute pancreatitis.

  9. The use of angiography in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Stephen J; Sandoval, Kristin N; Stevens, Austin M; Scaife, Eric R

    2016-08-01

    Angiography is a common treatment used in adults with blunt abdominal trauma and/or severe pelvic fractures. The Committee on Trauma of the American College of Surgeons has recently advocated for this resource to be urgently available at pediatric trauma centers; however, its usefulness in the pediatric setting is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of angiography in the treatment of blunt abdominal trauma among injured children. An analysis was performed using an established public use data set of children (younger than 18 years) treated at 20 participating trauma centers for blunt torso trauma through the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network. Patients who underwent angiography of the abdomen or pelvis were identified and analyzed. Of the 12,044 children evaluated for blunt abdominal trauma included within the data set, 973 sustained abdominopelvic injuries. Of these, only 26 (3%) underwent angiography. The median age was 14 years, 65% were males, with a mortality rate of 19%. Overall, 29 angiographic procedures were performed: 21 abdominal, 8 pelvic, with 3 patients undergoing both abdominal and pelvic. Eleven patients underwent embolization of a bleeding vessel, all of which were related to the spleen. No hepatic, renal, or pelvic vessels required embolization. The median time to angiography from emergency department evaluation was 7.3 hours. In addition to angiography, 50% also required surgical intervention, of which 31% underwent a laparotomy. Thirty-five percent of these patients required blood product transfusion, and 42% were admitted to the intensive care unit. The emergent use of angiography with embolization is uncommon in pediatric patients with blunt abdominal injuries. The requirement that pediatric trauma centers have access to interventional radiology within 30 minutes may be unnecessary. Epidemiologic study, level III; therapeutic study, level IV.

  10. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Ankita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/day with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat.

  11. Dicumarol inhibition of NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase induces growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer via a superoxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Joseph J; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Grady, Matthew; Gaut, Andrew W; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yu Ping; Weydert, Christine J Darby; Domann, Frederick E; Oberley, Larry W

    2003-09-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO(1)), a homodimeric, ubiquitous, flavoprotein, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. This reaction prevents the one-electron reduction of quinones by cytochrome P450 reductase and other flavoproteins that would result in oxidative cycling with generation of superoxide (O(2)(.-)). NQO(1) gene regulation may be up-regulated in some tumors to accommodate the needs of rapidly metabolizing cells to regenerate NAD(+). We hypothesized that pancreatic cancer cells would exhibit high levels of this enzyme, and inhibiting it would suppress the malignant phenotype. Reverse transcription-PCR, Western blots, and activity assays demonstrated that NQO(1) was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines tested but present in very low amounts in the normal human pancreas. To determine whether inhibition of NQO(1) would alter the malignant phenotype, MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells were treated with a selective inhibitor of NQO(1), dicumarol. Dicumarol increased intracellular production of O(2)(.-), as measured by hydroethidine staining, and inhibited cell growth. Both of these effects were blunted with infection of an adenoviral vector containing the cDNA for manganese superoxide dismutase. Dicumarol also inhibited cell growth, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. We conclude that inhibition of NQO(1) increases intracellular O(2)(.-) production and inhibits the in vitro malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer. These mechanisms suggest that altering the intracellular redox environment of pancreatic cancer cells may inhibit growth and delineate a potential strategy directed against pancreatic cancer.

  12. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2010-08-28

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to help evaluate the presence and degree of pancreatic necrosis, and is crucial for identifying complications of acute pancreatitis and predicting prognosis. The purpose of this article is to describe MRI techniques for acute pancreatitis, to review the spectrum of pancreatic and peripancreatic patterns, as well as to survey various complications secondary to acute pancreatitis on MRI. The role of MRI in the initial evaluation and staging of acute pancreatitis is emphasized.

  14. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  15. Laparoscopic cystogastrostomy in the management of pancreatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Pancreatic pseudocysts develop following acute or chronic pancreatitis. Majority of the cases resolve spontaneously but some persist beyond six weeks. Active management of pancreatic pseudocysts involves draining of the fluid collection through open surgery, endoscopically, laparoscopically or percutaneously.

  16. Supportive use of total peripheral parenteral alimentation in children with severe pancreatic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, G E; Grace, A E; Beardmore, H E

    1976-12-01

    Although blunt abdominal trauma is common during childhood, experience with major pancreatic injuries is rare. Three such cases were recently treated at the Montreal Children's Hospital. Because of the complicated problems related to these injuries, these children needed prolonged nutritional support. Total peripheral parenteral nutrition was used to provide complete rest of the pancreas and avoid the risks of sepsis associated with central venous feeding. This technique enables the maintenance of caloric intake and weight gain during difficult complications and was instrumental in the early complete recovery of these children.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru B.H. Ko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP is a progressive inflammatory disease in which the pancreatic secretory parenchyma is destroyed and replaced by fibrosis. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stone(s is important for the diagnosis of CP; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in CP were left largely unknown. CFTR is a chloride channel expressed in the apical plasma membrane of pancreatic duct cells and plays a central role in HCO3- secretion. In previous studies, we have found that CFTR is largely mislocalized to the cytoplasm of pancreatic duct cells in all forms of CP and corticosteroids normalizes the localization of CFTR to the proper apical membrane at least in autoimmune pancreatitis. From these observations, we could conclude that the mislocalization of CFTR is a cause of protein plug formation in CP, subsequently resulting in pancreatic stone formation.Considering our observation that the mislocalization of CFTR also occurs in alcoholic or idiopathic CP, it is very likely that these pathological conditions can also be treated by corticosteroids, thereby preventing pancreatic stone formation in these patients. Further studies are definitely required to clarify these fundamental issues.

  18. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... were compared with preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) morphology. The preoperatively elevated pressure decreased in all patients but one, to normal or slightly elevated values. The median pressure decrease was 50% (range, 0-90%; p = 0.01). The drainage anastomosis (a...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  19. Endoscopic Treatment of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis and Smoldering Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rohit; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is a challenging condition that can lead to chronic pancreatitis and long-term morbidity. Etiology-based treatment can potentially have an impact on the natural history of RAP and its progression to chronic pancreatitis. In cases of divisum-associated RAP and idiopathic RAP, several studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic therapy in alleviation of symptoms and frequency of AP events. This review discusses the literature available on these topic as well as touching on the role of endoscopic therapy in smoldering acute pancreatitis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Association between pancreatitis and fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is a common digestive disease with a high mortality rate. Clinical physicians often encounter patients with pancreatitis and fatty liver disease. This article investigates the association between pancreatitis and fatty liver disease from the aspects of the prevalence of fatty liver disease in patients with pancreatitis, the influence of fatty liver disease on the prognosis of pancreatitis, and pancreatitis induced by acute fatty liver disease during pregnancy.

  1. [Osteo-articular manifestations after suppurative pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateş, I N; Dinu, Daniela; Lupu, Amelia; Popescu, Luminiţa; Bălănescu, Andra; Constantinoiu, S

    2003-01-01

    Osseous and joint manifestations (decalcification, osteolysis, osteonecrosis; poliarthrytis; periarticular fat necrosis) are sometimes encountered in chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma, but exceptional after severe acute pancreatitis, especially infected pancreatic necrosis. Pathogenesis of calcium deficiency in acute pancreatitis is multifactorial, including extensive lipolysis and metabolic disturbances. We report on a healthy, young male, that developed decalcification and polyarthritis consecutive to a long-outcome, severe acute pancreatitis. We comment upon hypocalcemia, as a rare complication of acute pancreatitis.

  2. [Robot-assisted pancreatic resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müssle, B; Distler, M; Weitz, J; Welsch, T

    2017-06-01

    Although robot-assisted pancreatic surgery has been considered critically in the past, it is nowadays an established standard technique in some centers, for distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic head resection. Compared with the laparoscopic approach, the use of robot-assisted surgery seems to be advantageous for acquiring the skills for pancreatic, bile duct and vascular anastomoses during pancreatic head resection and total pancreatectomy. On the other hand, the use of the robot is associated with increased costs and only highly effective and professional robotic programs in centers for pancreatic surgery will achieve top surgical and oncological quality, acceptable operation times and a reduction in duration of hospital stay. Moreover, new technologies, such as intraoperative fluorescence guidance and augmented reality will define additional indications for robot-assisted pancreatic surgery.

  3. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  4. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct associated with pancreatic ductal obstruction due to pancreas carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Susumu, Seiya; Tsutsumi, Ryuji; Kitasato, Amane; Adachi, Tomohiko; Mishima, Takehiro; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2006-08-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis is a well-known clinical entity; however, acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct in the setting of pancreatic ductal obstruction is an uncommon pancreatic disorder. We report a case of acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct without either a concomitant pancreatic abscess or an infected pseudocyst, presenting as acute relapsing pancreatitis. In this case, the underlying cause of suppuration of the pancreatic duct was pancreatic ductal obstruction and chronic pancreatitis secondary to pancreas head carcinoma along with infection of Escherichia coli. Endoscopic placement of a pancreatic stent resulted in an evacuation of grayish thick pus from the distal pancreatic duct with a dramatic improvement of the disease. This case proposes the concept that acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct is a complex process involving the chronically damaged pancreas, pancreatic outflow obstruction, and subsequent bacterial infection. Antibiotic treatment is effective but temporary; therefore, the immediate drainage of the infected pancreatic duct is mandatory.

  5. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis i...

  6. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Norimasa; Sowa, Etsuji; Fujii, Satoru; Seki, Junichi; Wada, Masahisa

    1975-01-01

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200μCi of 75 Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of 75 Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of 75 Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arteriosclerosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions. (auth.)

  7. Probiotics and Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lorenzo Fantini

    2006-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is frequently associated with necrosis of the gland, and the principal late complication is infection of the necrosis. The gut barrier plays an important role in severe acute pancreatitis; in fact, gut barrier integrity prevents bacteria translocation resulting from an atrophic and leaky gut, and reduces the systemic inflammatory syndrome of the pancreatitis from gut atrophy. The maintenance of gut barrier integrity is one of the goals in the treatment of severe acut...

  8. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  9. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. [Acute pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun-Abraham, Mauro Enrique; Obregón-Guerrero, Gabriela; Romero-Espinoza, Larry; Valencia-Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcaemia due to primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, with a reported prevalence of 1.5 to 8%. There is no clear pathophysiological basis, but elevated parathyroid hormone and high serum calcium levels could be responsible for calcium deposit in the pancreatic ducts and activation of pancreatic enzymes, which may be the main risk factor for developing acute pancreatitis. The aim of this report is to describe four cases. Four cases are reported of severe pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism; three of them with complications (two pseudocysts and one pancreatic necrosis). Cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, studies showed the parathyroid adenoma. Surgical resection was the definitive treatment in all four cases. None of the patients had recurrent acute pancreatitis events during follow-up. Acute pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcaemia of primary hyperparathyroidism is rare; however, when it occurs it is associated with severe pancreatitis. It is suspected in patients with elevated serum calcium and high parathyroid hormone levels. Imaging techniques such as cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, should be performed, to confirm clinical suspicion. Surgical resection is the definitive treatment with excellent results. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Early management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotna, T.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance or frank diabetes mellitus is known to occur more frequently in patients with pancreatic cancer than in the general population. At the time of the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, more than 70% of patients taking the glucose tolerance test show diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (1). Relationship among diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer is vague but sure, although neither the nature nor the sequence of the possible cause – effect relationship has been established. The reason for the high frequency of glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatic cancer remains controversial. (author)

  14. Targeting Trysin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0258 TITLE: Targeting trypsin-inflammation axis for pancreatitis therapy in a humanized pancreatitis model PRINCIPAL...From - To) 15 Sep 2016 – 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting trypsin-inflammation axis for pancreatitis therapy in a humanized pancreatitis ... pancreatitis especially due to alcohol and smoking goes onto chronic pancreatitis which, in turn, is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Because only a

  15. Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Claus; Detlefsen, Sönke; Palnæs Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. STUDY POPULATION: Since May 1, 2011, all patients...... with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas have been registered in the database. As of June 30, 2014, the total number of patients registered was 2,217. All data are cross-referenced with the Danish Pathology Registry and the Danish Patient Registry to ensure the completeness of registrations....... MAIN VARIABLES: The main registered variables are patient demographics, performance status, diagnostic workup, histological and/or cytological diagnosis, and clinical tumor stage. The following data on treatment are registered: type of operation, date of first adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and first...

  16. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  17. Pregnancy associated pancreatitis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbinosa, Osamuyimen; Poddar, Sameer; Pitchumoni, Capercomorin

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the demographics, risk factors and outcomes of pregnancy associated pancreatitis (PAP). A retrospective chart review was done using ICD-9 Code 577.0 (acute pancreatitis) from January 2005 through December 2009. Women aged 18 to 45 years, who were pregnant and 6 months after delivery were considered for the study. For each case, two women of the same age (± 4 years) with no history of pancreatitis were matched as control. Demographics, etiology, diagnostic modality and intervention were obtained. During the 5 years of study, 29 cases of PAP occurred among 25,600 total hospital deliveries, yielding prevalence of 0.001%: Hispanics 48%, Caucasians 24%, African Americans 17.2%, and Asian/Pacific Islanders 13% (Ppregnancy body mass index (BMI) more than 30 kg/m(2) had PAP, versus 24% with BMI between 25 and 30 kg/m(2) and 10% with BMI less than 25 kg/m(2) (Ppregnancy. Gallstone disease is the most frequent etiology for PAP and tends to occur more often in Hispanics in New Jersey. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Transplantable pancreatic acinar carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    Fragments of the nafenopin-induced pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma of rat have been examined in vitro for patterns of intracellular protein transport and carbamylcholine-induced protein discharge. Continuous incubation of the fragments with [3H]-leucine for 60 minutes resulted in labeling of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi cisternae, and mature zymogen granules, revealed by electron microscope autoradiography. This result indicates transport of newly synthesized protein from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to mature zymogen granules in approximately 60 minutes. The secretagogue carbamylcholine induced the discharge of radioactive protein by carcinoma fragments pulse-chase labeled with [3H]-leucine. A maximal effective carbamylcholine concentration of 10(-5) M was determined. The acinar carcinoma resembles normal exocrine pancreas in the observed rate of intracellular protein transport and effective secretagogue concentration. However, the acinar carcinoma fragments demonstrated an apparent low rate of carbamylcholine-induced radioactive protein discharge as compared with normal pancreatic lobules or acinar cells. It is suggested that the apparent low rate of radioactive protein discharge reflects functional immaturity of the acinar carcinoma. Possible relationships of functional differentiation to the heterogeneous cytodifferentiation of the pancreatic acinar carcinoma are discussed

  19. Physiological blunting during pregnancy extends to induced relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, Janet A; Mendelson, Tamar; Williams, Erica L; Costigan, Kathleen A

    2012-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that pregnancy is accompanied by hyporesponsivity to physical, cognitive, and psychological challenges. This study evaluates whether observed autonomic blunting extends to conditions designed to decrease arousal. Physiological and psychological responsivity to an 18-min guided imagery relaxation protocol in healthy pregnant women during the 32nd week of gestation (n=54) and non-pregnant women (n=28) was measured. Data collection included heart period (HP), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), tonic and phasic measures of skin conductance (SCL and NS-SCR), respiratory period (RP), and self-reported psychological relaxation. As expected, responses to the manipulation included increased HP, RSA, and RP and decreased SCL and NS-SCR, followed by post-manipulation recovery. However, responsivity was attenuated for all physiological measures except RP in pregnant women, despite no difference in self-reported psychological relaxation. Findings support non-specific blunting of physiological responsivity during pregnancy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Conservative therapy for missed esophageal perforation after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C E; Splittgerber, F; Ledgerwood, A M

    1986-11-01

    An 80-year-old man was treated, non-operatively, for a distal esophageal perforation, diagnosed nine days after blunt thoracic trauma. Emergency department diagnosis was impeded by absence of mediastinal air; right chest-wall emphysema was thought to result from associated rib fractures. Conservative therapy consisting of nasogastric suction, intravenous antibiotics, right-chest tube drainage of a large communicating empyema cavity, temporary nasotracheal intubation with ventilatory support, total parenteral nutrition, and, finally, nasoduodenal intubation for elemental feeding were employed. This mode of therapy may be best in comparable elderly patients with esophageal perforation that is overlooked during the initial 24 hours after injury. Possibly, routine barium swallow in all patients with chest-wall emphysema and rib fractures would circumvent missed esophageal rupture after blunt trauma.

  1. Multi-detector row computed tomography and blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, Mariano; Pinto, Antonio; Pedrosa, Ivan; Sparano, Amelia; Romano, Luigia

    2008-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries. The clinical presentation of trauma patients varies widely from one individual to another and ranges from minor reports of pain to shock. Knowledge of the mechanism of injury, the time of injury, estimates of motor vehicle accident velocity and deceleration, and evidence of associated injury to other systems are all salient features to provide for an adequate assessment of chest trauma. Multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanning and MDCT-angiography are being used more frequently in the diagnosis of patients with chest trauma. The high sensitivity of MDCT has increased the recognized spectrum of injuries. This new technology can be regarded as an extremely valuable adjunct to physical examination to recognize suspected and unsuspected blunt chest trauma

  2. Blunt adrenal gland trauma in the pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Roupakias

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective review of the literature was performed to determine the natural history, prevalence, prognosis and management of adrenal injury associated with blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric population. Blunt adrenal injury in children is uncommon, rarely isolated, and typically present as part of a multi organ trauma. Adrenal hemorrhage is being diagnosed more frequently since the emergence of computed tomography in modern emergency rooms. Obstetric birth trauma during vaginal delivery of a macrosomic fetus may result in neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. In children appear to be an incidental finding that resolves on follow-up imaging. Most of these injuries are self-limited and do not require intervention. The differential diagnosis of an adrenal neoplasm, especially in children with an isolated adrenal hemorrhage, must be considered. The presence of adrenal hemorrhage in the absence of a trauma history should alert to the possibility of pediatric inflicted injury.

  3. Bronchial and cardiac ruptures due to blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misao, Takahiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Aoe, Motoi; Iga, Norichika; Furukawa, Masashi; Suezawa, Takanori; Tago, Mamoru

    2011-03-01

    Tracheobronchial and cardiac injuries following blunt thoracic trauma are uncommon but can be life-threatening. We report a case in which the patient with bronchial and right atrial ruptures due to blunt trauma survived after emergent repairs. An 18-year-old female driver was transported to our hospital after a traffic accident and was hemodynamically stable on arrival. Chest computed tomography revealed cervicomediastinal emphysema and hemopericardium, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed a tear in the right main bronchus. She was intubated with a double-lumen endotracheal tube guided by bronchoscopy. A median sternotomy was undertaken, and a laceration of the right atrium was oversewn without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. After that, right-sided thoracotomy was performed. The tear in the membranous portion of the right main bronchus was repaired with interrupted sutures, and the suture lines were wrapped with a pedicled flap of intercostal muscle.

  4. Carotid Artery Dissection and Cerebral Infarction Secondary to Blunt Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Gökçe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic carotid artery dissection may appear after blunt head or neck trauma. Patients were either asymptomatic or clinically symptoms may include loss of consciousness, hemiparesis, aphasia and Horner syndrome, these typically occurring after an interval of hours to days. Patients were either asymptomatic or clinically symptoms may include headache, transient ischemic attack, stroke, Horner Syndrome and loss of consciousness, these typically occurring after an interval of hours to days. Prognosis is good if an early diagnosis and treatment were established. As cerebral ischemia and neurological deficits may develop in subsequent periods, it is essential that the carotid artery dissection should be kept in mind for possible cases in order to evaluate and diagnose it properly. In this article, we present a case of internal carotid artery dissection including diagnostic neuroimaging, which occurred after 6 hours of blunt trauma and subsequent cerebral infarction following a car accident. Clinical features, neuroradiological diagnostic methods and treatments options are discussed with the relevant literature

  5. CT findings in children with blunt trauma in the spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiguchi, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Toshihisa; Ohmura, Makoto; Kawai, Naoki; Tauchi, Hayato; Hayakawa, Masao; Nishio, Yoshinori (Kyoto Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)); Watanabe, Shinsuke

    1991-09-01

    We evaluated CT findings in 19 children with blunt injuries in the spleen. CT demonstrated laceration of the spleen in 7 children, rupture of the spleen in 7, and splenic hematoma in 5. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in 3 children, of whom 1 was treated by arterial embolization. Laparotomy was performed in 3 children (15.8%) other than the 3 showing contrast medium leakage; hemostasis by compression was performed in 1 with laceration, and splenectomy in 2 with rupture. Late splenic rupture or abscess did not occur in any child. One child (5.3%) died of complicating injuries. Many of children with blunt splenic injuries can be successfully treated with conservative treatment, and CT scanning is useful for evaluating the degree of splenic injuries and complicating injuries. (author).

  6. Diagnostic Accuracy of Secondary Ultrasound Exam in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabzadeh Kanafi, Alireza; Giti, Masoumeh; Gharavi, Mohammad Hossein; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Pourghorban, Ramin; Shekarchi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid

  7. Physiological blunting during pregnancy extends to induced relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Mendelson, Tamar; Williams, Erica L.; Costigan, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that pregnancy is accompanied by hyporesponsivity to physical, cognitive, and psychological challenges. This study evaluates whether observed autonomic blunting extends to conditions designed to decrease arousal. Physiological and psychological responsivity to an 18-minute guided imagery relaxation protocol in healthy pregnant women during the 32nd week of gestation (n = 54) and non-pregnant women (n = 28) was measured. Data collection included heart period (HP)...

  8. Blunt Facial Trauma Causing Isolated Optic Nerve Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic optic neuropathy is an uncommon, yet serious, result of facial trauma. The authors present a novel case of a 59-year-old gentleman who presented with an isolated blunt traumatic left optic nerve hematoma causing vision loss. There were no other injuries or fractures to report. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of this rare injury and reviews the current literature and management of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  9. Are routine pelvic radiographs in major pediatric blunt trauma necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagisetty, Jyothi [Memorial Hermann Medical Center, Emergency Medicine Department, Houston, TX (United States); Slovis, Thomas [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Pediatric Imaging, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Ronald [Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Detroit, MI (United States); Knazik, Stephen; Stankovic, Curt [Wayne State University of Medicine, Division of Emergency Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Screening pelvic radiographs to rule out pelvic fractures are routinely used for the initial evaluation of pediatric blunt trauma. Recently, the utility of routine pelvic radiographs in certain subsets of patients with blunt trauma has been questioned. There is a growing amount of evidence that shows the clinical exam is reliable enough to obviate the need for routine screening pelvic radiographs in children. To identify variables that help predict the presence or absence of pelvic fractures in pediatric blunt trauma. We conducted a retrospective study from January 2005 to January 2010 using the trauma registry at a level 1 pediatric trauma center. We analyzed all level 1 and level 2 trauma victims, evaluating history, exam and mechanism of injury for association with the presence or absence of a pelvic fracture. Of 553 level 1 and 2 trauma patients who presented during the study period, 504 were included in the study. Most of these children, 486/504 (96.4%), showed no evidence of a pelvic fracture while 18/504 (3.6%) had a pelvic fracture. No factors were found to be predictive of a pelvic fracture. However, we developed a pelvic fracture screening tool that accurately rules out the presence of a pelvic fracture P = 0.008, NPV 99, sensitivity 96, 8.98 (1.52-52.8). This screening tool combines eight high-risk clinical findings (pelvic tenderness, laceration, ecchymosis, abrasion, GCS <14, positive urinalysis, abdominal pain/tenderness, femur fracture) and five high-risk mechanisms of injury (unrestrained motor vehicle collision [MVC], MVC with ejection, MVC rollover, auto vs. pedestrian, auto vs. bicycle). Pelvic fractures in pediatric major blunt trauma can reliably be ruled out by using our pelvic trauma screening tool. Although no findings accurately identified the presence of a pelvic fracture, the screening tool accurately identified the absence of a fracture, suggesting that pelvic radiographs are not warranted in this subset of patients. (orig.)

  10. Core curriculum case illustration: blunt traumatic thoracic aortic pseudo aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Muhammad Mubashir; Fadl, Shaimaa Abdelhassib; Robinson, Jeffrey D

    2017-06-19

    Core Curriculum Illustration: [blunt thoracic aortic pseudo aneurysm]. This is the [40th] installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at: http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.html.

  11. Blunt cardiac trauma: lessons learned from the medical examiner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro G R; Georgiou, Chrysanthos; Inaba, Kenji; Dubose, Joseph; Plurad, David; Chan, Linda S; Toms, Carla; Noguchi, Thomas T; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze autopsy findings after blunt traumatic deaths to identify the incidence of cardiac injuries and describe the patterns of associated injuries. All autopsies performed by the Los Angeles County Forensic Medicine Division for blunt traumatic deaths in 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Only cases that underwent a full autopsy including internal examination were included in the analysis. The study population was divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of a cardiac injury and compared for differences in baseline characteristics and types of associated injuries. Of the 881 fatal victims of blunt trauma received by the Los Angeles County Forensic Medicine Division, 304 (35%) underwent a full autopsy with internal examination and were included in the analysis. The mean age was 43 years +/- 21 years, patients were more often men (71%) and were intoxicated in 39% of the cases. The most common mechanism was motor vehicle collision (50%), followed by pedestrian struck by auto (37%), and 32% had a cardiac injury. Death at the scene was significantly more common in patients with a cardiac injury (78% vs. 65%, p = 0.02). The right chambers were the most frequently injured (30%, right atrium; 27%, right ventricle). Among the 96 patients with cardiac injuries, 64% had transmural rupture. Multiple chambers were ruptured in 26%, the right atrium in 25%, and the right ventricle in 20% of these patients. Patients with cardiac injuries were significantly more likely to have other associated injuries: thoracic aorta (47% vs. 27%, p = 0.001), hemothorax (81% vs. 59%, p injury (77% vs. 48%, p cardiac injury. Of the 96 patients with a cardiac injury, 78% died at the scene of the crash and 22% died en route or at the hospital. Cardiac injury is a common autopsy finding after blunt traumatic fatalities, with the majority of deaths occurring at the scene. Patients with cardiac injuries are at significantly increased risk for

  12. Penetrating cardiac injuries in blunt chest wall trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Sirohi, Parmendra

    2012-08-01

    The present photocase illustrates the possible mechanism of direct cardiac injuries from broken sharp jagged fractured ends of ribs in blunt force trauma to the chest in run over traffic mishaps. We propose that the projecting fractured ends of the ribs penetrate the underlying thoracic organs due to the transient phenomenon of deformation of chest cavity under pressure in run over traffic mishaps. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  13. Carotid Artery Dissection and Cerebral Infarction Secondary to Blunt Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Burcu Gökçe; Â. Kemal Erdemoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic carotid artery dissection may appear after blunt head or neck trauma. Patients were either asymptomatic or clinically symptoms may include loss of consciousness, hemiparesis, aphasia and Horner syndrome, these typically occurring after an interval of hours to days. Patients were either asymptomatic or clinically symptoms may include headache, transient ischemic attack, stroke, Horner Syndrome and loss of consciousness, these typically occurring after an interval of hours to days. Pr...

  14. An animal model of emotional blunting in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Y Pietersen

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is often associated with emotional blunting--the diminished ability to respond to emotionally salient stimuli--particularly those stimuli representative of negative emotional states, such as fear. This disturbance may stem from dysfunction of the amygdala, a brain region involved in fear processing. The present article describes a novel animal model of emotional blunting in schizophrenia. This model involves interfering with normal fear processing (classical conditioning in rats by means of acute ketamine administration. We confirm, in a series of experiments comprised of cFos staining, behavioral analysis and neurochemical determinations, that ketamine interferes with the behavioral expression of fear and with normal fear processing in the amygdala and related brain regions. We further show that the atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine, but not the typical antipsychotic haloperidol nor an experimental glutamate receptor 2/3 agonist, inhibits ketamine's effects and retains normal fear processing in the amygdala at a neurochemical level, despite the observation that fear-related behavior is still inhibited due to ketamine administration. Our results suggest that the relative resistance of emotional blunting to drug treatment may be partially due to an inability of conventional therapies to target the multiple anatomical and functional brain systems involved in emotional processing. A conceptual model reconciling our findings in terms of neurochemistry and behavior is postulated and discussed.

  15. CT scanning for diagnosing blunt ureteral and ureteropelvic junction injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Peter

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blunt ureteral and ureteropelvic (UPJ injuries are extremely rare and very difficult to diagnose. Many of these injuries are missed by the initial trauma evaluation. Methods Trauma registry data was used to identify all blunt trauma patients with ureteral or UPJ injuries, from 1 April 2001 to 30 November 2006. Demographics, injury information and outcomes were determined. Chart review was then performed to record initial clinical and all CT findings. Results Eight patients had ureteral or UPJ injuries. Subtle findings such as perinephric stranding and hematomas, and low density retroperitoneal fluid were evident on all initial scans, and prompted delayed excretory scans in 7/8 cases. As a result, ureteral and UPJ injuries were diagnosed immediately for these seven patients. These findings were initially missed in the eighth patient because significant associated visceral findings mandated emergency laparotomy. All ureteral and UPJ injuries have completely healed except for the case with the delay in diagnosis. Conclusion Most blunt ureteral and UPJ injuries can be identified if delayed excretory CT scans are performed based on initial CT findings of perinephric stranding and hematomas, or the finding of low density retroperitoneal fluid.

  16. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...

  17. Treatment options for acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Olaf J.; Issa, Yama; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Schepers, Nicolien J.; Bruno, Marco J.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2014-01-01

    This Review covers the latest developments in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. The Atlanta Classification of acute pancreatitis has been revised, proposing several new terms and abandoning some of the old and confusing terminology. The 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification and the

  18. [Identifying the severe acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo Tizón, Anais; Targarona Modena, Javier; Málaga Rodríguez, Germán; Barreda Cevasco, Luis

    2011-01-01

    To compare patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis without any additional complications during their hospital stay (Group A) versus patients with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis with additional complications during their hospital stay (Group B). Data obtained from a pre-existing base from hospitalized patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the specialized unit of "Unidad de Pancreatitis Aguda Grave del Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins" between 2000 and 2010. Data included patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, of ages 18 and over. Data from 215 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis was included. Patients from Group A represented 32% (68) and from Group B 68% (147). Group A had a average of 39 hospitalized days and Group B had an average of 56 days (p=0.01). From Group A 22% had more than 50% of necrosis while 43% of Group B had this extension of necrosis (p pancreatitis, based on the presence of necrosis, behave likewise. It is an extended necrosis, described as more than 50% of pancreatic necrosis, and not the presence itself which will determine additional complications during the course of disease and a greater mortality.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, I; Milic, S; Orlic, L; Poropat, G; Jakopcic, I; Franjic, N; Klanac, A; Kristo, N; Stimac, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on the course of acute pancreatitis determined by disease severity, the presence of local and systemic complications and survival rate. 609 patients admitted to our hospital in the period from January 1, 2008 up to June 31, 2015 with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were analyzed. The diagnosis and the severity of acute pancreatitis were made according to the revised Atlanta classification criteria from 2012. Of 609 patients with acute pancreatitis, 110 fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome had statistically significantly higher incidence of moderately severe (38.2% vs. 28.5%; p=0.05) and severe (22.7% vs. 12.8%; p=0.01) acute pancreatitis in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome, while patients without metabolic syndrome had higher incidence of mild acute pancreatitis in comparison to those patients with metabolic syndrome (58.7% vs. 39.1%; pacute pancreatitis. Comparing survival rates, patients suffering from metabolic syndrome had a higher death rate compared to patients without metabolic syndrome (16% vs. 4.5%; pacute pancreatitis, as well as higher mortality rate. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Early management of acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Nicolien J.; Besselink, Marc G. H.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bruno, Marco J.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to

  1. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Ooijen (Baan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe specific aim of the present study was to investigate whether eicosanoids play a role in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Because of the limited number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the hospital each year, as well as the practical difficulties encountered in

  2. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  3. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  4. Gastrointestinal injuries following blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirdan, L B; Uba, A F; Chirdan, O O

    2008-09-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) injuries in children following blunt abdominal trauma is rare; early diagnosis and treatment is important for good outcome. The purpose of this report is to describe the management problems encountered in children with GI injuries following blunt abdominal trauma. From January 1996 June 2006, 168 children were treated at our centre for abdominal trauma. Twenty three had GI injuries, 19 were due to blunt trauma while four were due to penetrating trauma. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of the 19 children that had GI injuries as a result of blunt abdominal trauma to document the presentation, clinical features, diagnosis and outcome. There were 19 patients, 14 were boys, and five were girls. The median age at presentation was nine years (range 1.5 15 years). Road traffic accident was responsible for injuries in 10, fall from heights in six and assault in two children. In one child the cause of injury was not recorded. Most children presented late and at presentation over 80% had abdominal signs. Diagnosis was mainly by physical examination supported by plain abdominal x-ray in 15 children. All 19 children had laparotomy. There were a total of 23 injuries. Gastric and duodenal injuries accounted for one each. Most of the injuries were in the jejunum and ileum (10 perforations, two contusions with one mesenteric haematoma and one mesenteric tear). There was one caecal perforation and six colonic injuries, one of which was associated with intraperitoneal rectal injury. Five children had other associated injuries (three splenic injuries, one renal injury, one bladder contusion associated with long bone fractures and one severe closed head injury). Treatment included segmental resection with end to end anastomosis, wedge resection with anastomosis, exteriorizations stomas, simple excision of the perforation and closure in two layers (gastric perforation). The total mortality was four (21.1%), two of them due to associated injuries

  5. Swinging heart in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, Steffen; Sundermann, Henrike

    2013-08-01

    Pleural effusions and ascites are not uncommon in acute pancreatitis; however, pericardial effusions complicated by cardiac tamponade are extremely rare and definite treatment has yet to be established. This case report illustrates the findings in a 57-year-old patient, who was diagnosed of an acute alcoholic pancreatitis. The clinical course was complicated by recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis, and eventually, the patient developed acute circulatory failure that was caused by cardiac tamponade. The patient was successfully treated by an emergency pericardiocentesis; however, although the patient was treated with intrapericardial triamcinolone and octreotide, pericardial effusion reoccurred. Eventually, a pancreaticopericardial fistula was diagnosed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography, and after successful stent placement in a disrupted pancreatic duct, the clinical recovery was uneventful. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a successful endoscopic treatment of a pancreaticopericardial fistula complicated by cardiac tamponade in a patient with acute pancreatitis.

  6. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jorg M

    2008-03-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in dogs and cats. Clinical diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is challenging because the disease is usually mild or subclinical and because its clinical signs are often the same as those of complicating or concurrent diseases. Obtaining a detailed history, performing a thorough physical examination, and conducting tests that are sensitive and specific for pancreatitis are crucial in diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Initial management of an acute episode of chronic pancreatitis largely involves supportive and dietary measures, while long-term management of chronic pancreatitis is based on dietary modification. Management of complications and concurrent diseases is crucial in animals with chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  8. Acute Pancreatitis: Etiology, Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shirin; Golembioski, Adam; Wilson, Stephen L; Thompson, Errington C

    2017-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a fascinating disease. In the United States, the two most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made with a combination of history, physical examination, computed tomography scan, and laboratory evaluation. Differentiating patients who will have a benign course of their pancreatitis from patients who will have severe pancreatitis is challenging to the clinician. C-reactive protein, pro-calcitonin, and the Bedside Index for Severity of Acute Pancreatitis appeared to be the best tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of severe pancreatitis. Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is indicated for patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis. For patients who are going to have a prolonged hospitalization, enteral nutrition is preferred. Total parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated for patients with pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention for infected pancreatic necrosis should be delayed as long as possible to improve patient outcomes.

  9. Evaluation of pancreatic scintigram in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Yukihiro; Ueda, Noriyuki; Takasago, Noritsugu; Minemoto, Hiromasa; Namiki, Masayoshi

    1981-01-01

    The classification of accumulative patterns with the pancreatic scintigram findings of chronic pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas were compared with endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) findings and Pancreozymin-Secretin test (P-S test). I) The frequency of pancreatic cancer was 93%, whilst, the chronic pancreatitis was 88% in the abnormal pancreatic scintigram. II) In the scintigram the type II (localyzed defect shadows) of pancreatic cancer was comparatively high and it is proportional to evidence. derived from ERP. Localized diagnostic certainty is helpful, although the two tests are related. The P-S test is only restricted to the carcinoma of head, whilst, scintigram is more useful to detect the carcinoma of the body and tail of the pancreas. III) As for the chronic pancreatitis, there are various accumulative patterns. This is resemblance to that of ERP findings, but in the P-S normal test, it showed discrepancy in part of the result. Particularly, in the type I (slightly generalized low uptake with density silhouette) and type II. Therefore in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis, it is essential to have both the P-S test and scintigram. (author)

  10. Clinical trials to reduce pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery-review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahata, Yuji; Kawai, Manabu; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic fistula is one of severe postoperative complications that occur after pancreatic surgery, such as pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and distal pancreatectomy (DP). Because pancreatic fistula is associated with a higher incidence of life-threatening complications. In order to evaluate procedure or postoperative management to reduce pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery, we summarized some randomized controlled trials (RCTs) regarding pancreaticoenterostomy during PD, pancreatic duct stent during PD, procedure to resect pancreatic parenchyma during DP, and somatostatin and somatostatin analogues after pancreatic surgery. At first, we reviewed nine RCTs to compare pancreaticogastrostomy (PG) with pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ) during PD. Next, we reviewed five RCTs, to evaluate the impact of pancreatic duct stent during PD. Regarding DP, we reviewed six RCTs to evaluate appropriate procedure to reduce pancreatic fistula after DP. Finally, we reviewed eight RCTs to evaluate the impact of somatostatin and somatostatin analogues after pancreatic surgery to reduce pancreatic fistula. The best way to prevent pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery remains still controversial. However, several RCTs clarify a useful procedure to reduce in reducing the incidence of pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery. Further RCTs to study innovative approaches remain a high priority for pancreatic surgeons to prevent pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery.

  11. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  12. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  13. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J., E-mail: christiane.bruns@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, D-81377, Munich (Germany)

    2010-08-19

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  14. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  15. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Walter Jauch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Contrast-enhanced sonography in pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickes, Steffen [Department of Internal Medicine, AMEOS Hospital GmbH, Halberstadt (Germany); Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)], E-mail: rickes@medkl.salvator-kh.de; Rauh, Peter; Uhle, Christine; Ensberg, Daniel [Department of Internal Medicine, AMEOS Hospital GmbH, Halberstadt (Germany); Moenkemueller, Klaus; Malfertheiner, Peter [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Contrast-enhanced sonography is a widely available imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. With this procedure, pancreatic tumours can be differentiated better. Furthermore, contrast-enhanced sonography produces good results in the staging of acute pancreatitis severity, especially in the detection of pancreatic necrosis. In this review article the value of contrast-enhanced sonography in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases will be described and discussed.

  17. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation for chronic pancreatitis. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R.L.; Braasch, J.W.; O' Bryan, E.M.; Watkins, E. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    A patient who underwent 95% pancreatectomy with autotransplantation of the body and tail of the gland to the femoral area for chronic pancreatitis is presented. The pain resolved, and the patient's blood glucose level remained within normal limits. High levels of insulin were found in the iliac vein on the transplanted side. Patency of the graft was demonstrated by technetium scan and arteriography and followed by a color-coded Doppler imaging system. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation offers a method of relieving pain with preservation of endocrine function in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  18. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  19. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed

  20. Comparison of regional pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic morphology in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation. The predrain......The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation...

  1. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  2. Chronic pancreatitis: complications and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, M V; Keogh, G W; Wilson, J S

    1999-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by progressive and irreversible loss of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine function. In the majority of cases, particularly in Western populations, the disease is associated with alcohol abuse. The major complications of chronic pancreatitis include abdominal pain, malabsorption, and diabetes. Of these, pain is the most difficult to treat and is therefore the most frustrating symptom for both the patient and the physician. While analgesics form the cornerstone of pain therapy, a number of other treatment modalities (inhibition of pancreatic secretion, antioxidants, and surgery) have also been described. Unfortunately, the efficacy of these modalities is difficult to assess, principally because of the lack of properly controlled clinical trials. Replacement of pancreatic enzymes (particularly lipase) in the gut is the mainstay of treatment for malabsorption; the recent discovery of a bacterial lipase (with high lipolytic activity and resistance to degradation in gastric and duodenal juice) represents an important advance that may significantly increase the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy by replacing the easily degradable porcine lipase found in existing enzyme preparations. Diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis is difficult to control and its course is often complicated by hypoglycaemic attacks. Therefore, it is essential that caution is exercised when treating this condition with insulin. This paper reviews recent research and prevailing concepts regarding the three major complications of chronic pancreatitis noted above. A comprehensive discussion of current opinion on clinical issues relating to the other known complications of chronic pancreatitis such as pseudocysts, venous thromboses, biliary and duodenal obstruction, biliary cirrhosis, and pancreatic cancer is also presented.

  3. [Surgical treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ordaz, José Luis; Toledo-Toral, Carlos; Franco-Guerrero, Norma; Tun-Abraham, Mauro; Souza-Gallardo, Luis Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A pancreatic pseudocyst is the collection of pancreatic secretions surrounded by fibrous tissue caused by pancreatic disease that affects the pancreatic duct. Clinical presentation is variable. Management includes percutaneous, endoscopic or surgical drainage and resection. Review of a cohort of patients with pancreatic pseudocyst in a third level hospital. An analysis was performed on the demographic data, aetiology, clinical presentation, radiological and laboratory findings, type of surgical procedure, complications, recurrence and mortality. The statistical analysis was performed using Chi squared and Student t tests, with a p<0.05. A total of 139 patients were included, of whom 58% were men and 42% were women, with median age of 44.5 years. Chronic pancreatitis was the most common aetiology, present in 74 patients (53%). The main complaint was abdominal pain in 73% of patients. Median size was 18cm (range 7-29) and the most frequent location was body and tail of the pancreas. Internal surgical drainage was selected in 111 (80%) patients, of whom 96 were cystojejunostomy, 20 (14%) had external surgical drainage, and 8 (6%) resection. Complications were, pancreatic fistula (12%), haemorrhage (4%), infection (4%), and other non-surgical complications (4%). Complication rate was higher if the cause was chronic pancreatitis or if the management was external surgical drainage. Recurrence rate was 6%, and a mortality rate of 1%. Surgical management is a viable option for the management of pancreatic pseudocyst with a low complication and recurrence rate. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture: therapeutic options and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yu-Yun; Lu, Ming-Shian; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Chu, Jaw-Ji; Lin, Pyng Jing

    2009-09-01

    Cardiac rupture following blunt thoracic trauma is rarely encountered by clinicians, since it commonly causes death at the scene. With advances in traumatology, blunt cardiac rupture had been increasingly disclosed in various ways. This study reviews our experience of patients with suspected blunt traumatic cardiac rupture and proposes treatment protocols for the same. This is a 5-year retrospective study of trauma patients confirmed with blunt traumatic cardiac rupture admitted to a university-affiliated tertiary trauma referral centre. The following information was collected from the patients: age, sex, mechanism of injury, initial effective diagnostic tool used for diagnosing blunt cardiac rupture, location and size of the cardiac injury, associated injury and injury severity score (ISS), reversed trauma score (RTS), survival probability of trauma and injury severity scoring (TRISS), vital signs and biochemical lab data on arrival at the trauma centre, time elapsed from injury to diagnosis and surgery, surgical details, hospital course and final outcome. The study comprised 8 men and 3 women with a median age of 39 years (range: 24-73 years) and the median follow-up was 5.5 months (range: 1-35 months). The ISS, RTS, and TRISS scores of the patients were 32.18+/-5.7 (range: 25-43), 6.267+/-1.684 (range: 2.628-7.841), and 72.4+/-25.6% (range: 28.6-95.5%), respectively. Cardiac injuries were first detected using focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) in 4 (36.3%) patients, using transthoracic echocardiography in 3 (27.3%) patients, chest CT in 1 (9%) patient, and intra-operatively in 3 (27.3%) patients. The sites of cardiac injury comprised the superior vena cava/right atrium junction (n=4), right atrial auricle (n=1), right ventricle (n=4), left ventricular contusion (n=1), and diffuse endomyocardial dissection over the right and left ventricles (n=1). Notably, 2 had pericardial lacerations presenting as a massive haemothorax, which initially masked

  5. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck [Kwandong Univ., Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts.

  6. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts

  7. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as acute pancreatitis during pregnancy: clinical and radiologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Dinushi; Kandavar, Ramprasad; Palacios, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Only seven cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosed during pregnancy have been reported. In this article, we describe a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting clinically as acute pancreatitis in a pregnant patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) revealed a pancreatic mass with an inflammatory component and multiple hyperintense metastatic lesions in the liver. The patient was initially treated for biliary pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer was not suspected given her young age and absence of risk factors. A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in a pregnant patient requires a high index of suspicion, and pancreatitis can be a mode of presentation.

  8. Headache in traumatic brain injuries from blunt head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Hoyle, John; Atabaki, Shireen; Tunik, Michael G; Lichenstein, Richard; Miskin, Michelle; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    To determine the risk of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in children with headaches after minor blunt head trauma, particularly when the headaches occur without other findings suggestive of TBIs (ie, isolated headaches). This was a secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of children 2 to 18 years with minor blunt head trauma (ie, Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 14-15). Clinicians assessed the history and characteristics of headaches at the time of initial evaluation, and documented findings onto case report forms. Our outcome measures were (1) clinically important TBI (ciTBI) and (2) TBI visible on computed tomography (CT). Of 27 495 eligible patients, 12 675 (46.1%) had headaches. Of the 12 567 patients who had complete data, 2462 (19.6%) had isolated headaches. ciTBIs occurred in 0 of 2462 patients (0%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0%-0.1%) in the isolated headache group versus 162 of 10 105 patients (1.6%; 95% CI: 1.4%-1.9%) in the nonisolated headache group (risk difference, 1.6%; 95% CI: 1.3%-1.9%). TBIs on CT occurred in 3 of 456 patients (0.7%; 95% CI: 0.1%-1.9%) in the isolated headache group versus 271 of 6089 patients (4.5%; 95% CI: 3.9%-5.0%) in the nonisolated headache group (risk difference, 3.8%; 95% CI: 2.3%-4.5%). We found no significant independent associations between the risk of ciTBI or TBI on CT with either headache severity or location. ciTBIs are rare and TBIs on CT are very uncommon in children with minor blunt head trauma when headaches are their only sign or symptom. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Flexion/extension cervical spine views in blunt cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Sadaf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To examine the contribution of flexion and extension radiographs in the evaluation of ligamentous injury in awake adults with acute blunt cervical spine trauma, who show loss of cervical lordosis and neck pain. Methods: All patients who presented to our emer-gency department following blunt trauma were enrolled in this study, except those with schiwora, neurological defi-cits or fracture demonstrated on cross-table cervical spine X-rays, and those who were either obtunded or presented after cervical spine surgery. Adequacy of flexion and exten-sion views was checked by the neurosurgery and radiology team members. All these patients underwent cross-table cervical spine view followed by flexion/extension views based on the loss of lordosis on cross-table imaging and the presence of neck pain. Results: A total of 200 cases were reviewed, of whom 90 (45% underwent repeat X-rays because of either inadequate exposure or limited motion. None of the patients with loss of lordosis on cross-table view had positive flexion and extension views of cervical spine for instability. Conclusions: Our results show that in patients who underwent acute radiographic evaluation of blunt cervical spine trauma, flexion and extension views of the cervical spine are unlikely to yield positive results in the presence of axial neck pain and/or loss of cervical lordosis. We can also hypothesize that performing flexion and extension views will be more useful once the acute neck pain has settled. Key words: X-rays; Cervical vertebrae; Lordosis

  10. Blunted Diurnal Cortisol Activity in Healthy Adults with Childhood Adversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya I. Kuras

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Childhood adversity, such as neglect, or physical, emotional, or sexual abuse, is prevalent in the U.S. and worldwide, and connected to an elevated incidence of disease in adulthood. A pathway in this relationship might be altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis functioning, as a result of differential hippocampal development in early life. A blunted diurnal cortisol slope is a precursor for many disorders. While studies have focused on HPA reactivity in relation to childhood adversity, there has been markedly less research on basal HPA functioning in those with low-to-moderate adversity. Based on previous research, we hypothesized that adults with low-to-moderate childhood adversity would have altered HPA axis functioning, as evidenced by a blunted diurnal cortisol slope and altered cortisol awakening response (CAR. Healthy adults aged 18–65 (n = 61 adults; 31 males and 30 females completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Participants provided at-home saliva samples on two consecutive days at wake-up, and 30 min, 1, 4, 9, and 13 h later; samples were averaged over the 2 days. We found that low-to-moderate childhood adversity predicted lower morning cortisol (β = -0.34, p = 0.007, R2 = 0.21, as well as a blunted cortisol slope (β = 2.97, p = 0.004, R2 = 0.22, but found no association with CAR (β = 0.19, p = 0.14, R2 = 0.12. Overall, we found that in healthy participants, low-to-moderate adversity in childhood is associated with altered basal HPA activity in adulthood. Our findings indicate that even low levels of childhood adversity may predispose individuals to disease associated with HPA dysregulation in later life.

  11. Blunted Diurnal Cortisol Activity in Healthy Adults with Childhood Adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuras, Yuliya I; Assaf, Naomi; Thoma, Myriam V; Gianferante, Danielle; Hanlin, Luke; Chen, Xuejie; Fiksdal, Alexander; Rohleder, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Childhood adversity, such as neglect, or physical, emotional, or sexual abuse, is prevalent in the U.S. and worldwide, and connected to an elevated incidence of disease in adulthood. A pathway in this relationship might be altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning, as a result of differential hippocampal development in early life. A blunted diurnal cortisol slope is a precursor for many disorders. While studies have focused on HPA reactivity in relation to childhood adversity, there has been markedly less research on basal HPA functioning in those with low-to-moderate adversity. Based on previous research, we hypothesized that adults with low-to-moderate childhood adversity would have altered HPA axis functioning, as evidenced by a blunted diurnal cortisol slope and altered cortisol awakening response (CAR). Healthy adults aged 18-65 ( n = 61 adults; 31 males and 30 females) completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Participants provided at-home saliva samples on two consecutive days at wake-up, and 30 min, 1, 4, 9, and 13 h later; samples were averaged over the 2 days. We found that low-to-moderate childhood adversity predicted lower morning cortisol (β = -0.34, p = 0.007, R 2 = 0.21), as well as a blunted cortisol slope (β = 2.97, p = 0.004, R 2 = 0.22), but found no association with CAR (β = 0.19, p = 0.14, R 2 = 0.12). Overall, we found that in healthy participants, low-to-moderate adversity in childhood is associated with altered basal HPA activity in adulthood. Our findings indicate that even low levels of childhood adversity may predispose individuals to disease associated with HPA dysregulation in later life.

  12. Behind armour blunt trauma--an emerging problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, L

    2001-02-01

    Behind Armour Blunt Trauma (BABT) is the non-penetrating injury resulting from the rapid deformation of armours covering the body. The deformation of the surface of an armour in contact with the body wall arises from the impact of a bullet or other projectile on its front face. The deformation is part of the retardation and energy absorbing process that captures the projectile. In extreme circumstances, the BABT may result in death, even though the projectile has not perforated the armour. An escalation of the available energy of bullets and the desire of armour designers to minimise the weight and bulk of personal armour systems will increase the risk of BABT in military and security forces personnel. In order to develop materials that can be interposed between the armour and the body wall to attenuate the transfer of energy into the body, it is essential that the mechanism of BABT is known. There is a great deal of activity within UK and NATO to unravel the interactions; the mechanism is likely to be a combination of stress (pressure) waves generated by the rapid initial motion of the rear of the armour, and shear deformation to viscera produced by gross deflection of the body wall. Physical and computer model systems are under development to characterise the biophysical processes and provide performance targets for materials to be placed between armours and the body wall in order to attenuate the injuries (trauma attenuating backings-TABs). The patho-physiological consequences of BABT are being clarified by research, but the injuries will have some of the features of blunt chest trauma observed in road traffic accidents and other forms of civilian blunt impact injury. The injuries also have characteristics of primary blast injury. An overview diagnosis and treatment is described.

  13. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  14. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  15. Pancreatic Metastasis from Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreas is an unusual location for metastases from other primary cancers. Rarely, pancreatic metastases from kidney or colorectal cancers have been reported. However, a variety of other cancers may also spread to the pancreas. We report an exceptional case of pancreatic metastasis from prostate cancer. Differences in management between primary and secondary pancreatic tumors make recognition of metastases to the pancreas an objective of first importance. Knowledge of unusual locations for metastatic spread will reduce diagnostic delay and lead to a timely delivery of an appropriate treatment.

  16. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  17. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  18. Pancreatic infection with Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, R; Serrano-Heranz, R

    1999-01-01

    Candida species other than C. albicans have been implicated as pathogens in intravascular (bloodstream, intravascular devices, endocarditis) and extravascular (arthritis, osteomielitis, endophtalmitis) infections. C. parapsilosis, however, is rarely implicated in intra-abdominal infections (peritonitis during peritoneal dialysis, complicating surgery or solid-organ transplantation). We describe a case of a 48-y-old male with acute pancreatitis who had a pancreatic abscess produced by primary C. parapsilosis infection. Although he received adequate treatment with antifungal medication and surgical drainage, the outcome was fatal. Because the clinical findings are indistinguishable from bacterial abscesses, Candida species should be considered in cases of complicated pancreatitis, in order to establish a prompt adequate treatment.

  19. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N

    1992-01-01

    A casual relation between pancreatic pressure and pain has been searched for decades but lack of appropriate methods for pressure measurements has hindered progress. During the 1980's the needle method has been used for direct intraoperative pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements and later...... for percutaneous sonographically-guided pressure measurements. Clinical and experimental evaluation of the method showed comparable results at intraoperative and percutaneous measurements and little week-to-week variation. Furthermore, comparable pressures in duct and adjacent pancreatic tissue were found, i.......e. the needle pressure mirrors the intraductal pressure. Comparisons of pain registrations, morphological and functional parameters with pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements have revealed a relation between pressure and pain which probably is causal. In patients with pain the high pressures previously...

  20. Routine Chest Computed Tomography and Patient Outcome in Blunt Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi, Nushin; Davoodabadi, Abdol Hossein; Atoof, Fatemeh; Razi, Seyed Ebrahim; Behnampour, Mehdi; Talari, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Computerized Tomography (CT) scan is gaining more importance in the initial evaluation of patients with multiple trauma, but its effect on the outcome is still unclear. Until now, no prospective randomized trial has been performed to define the role of routine chest CT in patients with blunt trauma. Objectives: In view of the considerable radiation exposure and the high costs of CT scan, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of performing the routine chest CT on the outcome as well as complications in patients with blunt trauma. Patients and Methods: After approval by the ethics board committee, 100 hemodynamically stable patients with high-energy blunt trauma were randomly divided into two groups. For group one (control group), only chest X-ray was requested and further diagnostic work-up was performed by the decision of the trauma team. For group two, a chest X-ray was ordered followed by a chest CT, even if the chest X-ray was normal. Injury severity, total hospitalization time, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission time, duration of mechanical ventilation and complications were recorded. Data were evaluated using t-test, Man-Whitney and chi-squared test. Results: No significant differences were found regarding the demographic data such as age, injury severity and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Thirty-eight percent additional findings were seen in chest CT in 26% of the patients of the group undergoing routine chest CT, leading to 8% change in management. The mean of in-hospital stay showed no significant difference in both groups with a P value of 0.098. In addition, the mean ICU stay and ventilation time revealed no significant differences (P values = 0.102 and 0.576, respectively). Mortality rate and complications were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Performing the routine chest CT in high-energy blunt trauma patients (with a mean injury severity of 9), although leading to the diagnosis of some occult injuries, has no impact on the outcome

  1. Blunt traumatic left atrial appendage rupture and cardiac herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Nguyen Huu; Anh, Pham Tho Tuan; Trung, Tran Minh; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old man sustained blunt thoracic trauma after a motor vehicle accident. He underwent an urgent operation. Operative findings included a large hematoma, a 4-cm tear in the left atrial appendage, and a long pleuropericardial rupture along the right phrenic nerve. We repaired the left atrial appendage without cardiopulmonary bypass, and closed the pericardial defect primarily. The patient recovered fully and was discharged on the 6th postoperative day. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; de Moya, Marc A.; Santos, Antonio; Asrani, Ashwin V.; Avery, Laura L.; Novelline, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI) suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI) at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG) and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an eleva...

  3. Isolated perforation of a duodenal diverticulum following blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metcalfe Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Only 10% of duodenal diverticula are symptomatic. We present the case of a man who fell from a height of 6 ft, landing on his abdomen and presenting 4 h later with severe back pain and a rigid abdomen. At laparotomy, a perforated retroperitoneal duodenal diverticulum was found and repaired with an omental patch. No other injury was noted. Not only is this perforation unusual, but the absence of other injuries sustained during this minor blunt trauma makes this case unique. This case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion when managing patients with back or abdominal pain following minor trauma.

  4. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor M. Gilliland

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL. The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016 addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC. We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1 patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2 patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3 enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN postoperatively; and, (4 a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of

  5. Groove Pancreatitis – A Mimic of Pancreatic and Periampullary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakami R Pradheepkumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Groove Pancreatitis (GP is a rare form of focal chronic pancreatitis involving the pancreatico-duodenal groove (PDG. GP was first described by Becker in 1973. Though, GP has been described so many years ago, it is still unfamiliar among most physicians because of lack of sufficient case studies and clinical similarity of GP to conventional pancreatitis. Imaging based differentiation of GP from other lesions, like pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma is also not possible in all the cases, unless there are typical findings favoring GP. Since, the line of treatment and outcome is totally different in these two conditions, appreciation of the fine differences between these two entities is very significant. Groove pancreatitis is symptomatically treated with medicines and only for patients with continuous and severe symptoms which are not amenable to medical treatment surgical management is considered. Radiological differentiation of GP from pancreatic and periampullary malignancies will help to avoid unnecessary surgery in the initial stages. We report two cases of GP, one of pure and other of segmental form where we found typical imaging features which pointed to the diagnosis of GP with a small discussion about the Computed tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI appearance of this entity as well as its differential diagnosis.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  7. The role of diagnostic radiology in pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmas, Nevra

    2001-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequent inflammatory and necrotic process of pancreas and peripancreatic field. To detect the presence of infected or sterile necrotic components and hemorrhage of the pancreatic paranchyma is important for therapeutic approach. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible exocrine dysfunction, progressive loss of pancreatic tissue and morphological changes of the pancreatic canal. Imaging modalities play a primary role in the management of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. CT and MR imaging confirm the diagnosis and detect the severity of disease. In chronic pancreatitis, MRCP after Secretin administration, Spiral CT and endoscopic US seems to replace diagnostic ERCP. However differentiation of pseudotumor of chronic pancreatitis from the pancreatic carcinoma is difficult with either imaging modalities

  8. The role of diagnostic radiology in pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmas, Nevra E-mail: elmas@med.ege.edu.tr

    2001-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequent inflammatory and necrotic process of pancreas and peripancreatic field. To detect the presence of infected or sterile necrotic components and hemorrhage of the pancreatic paranchyma is important for therapeutic approach. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible exocrine dysfunction, progressive loss of pancreatic tissue and morphological changes of the pancreatic canal. Imaging modalities play a primary role in the management of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. CT and MR imaging confirm the diagnosis and detect the severity of disease. In chronic pancreatitis, MRCP after Secretin administration, Spiral CT and endoscopic US seems to replace diagnostic ERCP. However differentiation of pseudotumor of chronic pancreatitis from the pancreatic carcinoma is difficult with either imaging modalities.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  10. Endoscopic transpapillary stenting or conservative treatment for pancreatic fistulas in necrotizing pancreatitis: multicenter series and literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.; Baal, M.C. van; Santvoort, H.C. van; Besselink, M.G.; Poley, J.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Bollen, T.L.; Gooszen, H.G.; Eijck, C.H. van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endoscopic transpapillary stenting (ETS) of the pancreatic duct facilitates ductal outflow and may reduce time to pancreatic fistula closure. However, data on the feasibility of ETS in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are scarce. BACKGROUND: Pancreatic fistulas often occur after

  11. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  12. Valsartan-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Burak; Sali, Mursel; Batman, Adnan; Yilmaz, Hasan; Korkmaz, Ugur; Celebi, Altay; Senturk, Omer; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is uncommon among patients treated with angiotensin II receptor antagonists. A 58-year-old man presented with nausea, vomiting and constant pain in the epigastrium that radiated to the flanks. He received treatment with valsartan (160 mg daily) for hypertension. The clinical, biochemical and radiological findings were compatible with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. After the patient achieved a clinical and biochemical recovery, the valsartan therapy was started again. Six weeks later, he returned to the hospital with an attack of pancreatitis. Subsequently, he returned with repeated attacks of pancreatitis twice, and the valsartan was discontinued. Ten months after the treatment, the patient had no complaints. When severe abdominal symptoms occur for no apparent reason during treatment with valsartan, a diagnosis of pancreatitis should be considered.

  13. Surgery for pancreatic cancer -- discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the bathroom and prevent falls at home. Wound care Your health care provider will explain how ... Kennedy EP, Yeo CJ. Pancreatic cancer: Clinical aspects, assessment, and management. In: Jarnagin WR, ed. Blumgart's Surgery ...

  14. Pancreatic scintigraphy in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shio, Hiroshi; Ueki, Jyuichi; Nomura, Kozi; Nakamura, Yoshifumi

    1983-01-01

    Pancreatic scintigraphy was performed on 67 diabetic patients (42 males and 25 females) in order to study exocrine pancreatic functions in primary diabetes. Relationships between visualization and the onset age, sex, morbid period, presence or absence of retinitis, good or poor control of blood glucose control and the therapeutic modality of diabetes were examined. Abnormality was detected in 34 cases (50.7%), being frequent among male patients in their 50s. The more serious the diabetes, i.e., with a longer morbid period, poorer blood glucose control and worse retinitis, the higher was the frequency of abnormality in pancreatic visualization. The frequency of abnormality was high in association with insulin treatment, oral tablets and single dietary treatment in that order. The more severe the hypoinsulinism, the higher was the frequency of abnormality. This technique can be used as a screening means for exocrine pancreatic function tests on diabetics. (Chiba, N.)

  15. Massive hemothorax after blunt transverse cervical artery injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Shinsuke; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Blunt injuries to the thyrocervical trunk or its branches are rare because these vessels are well protected and located deep in the neck. To the best of our knowledge, we describe the first case of a massive hemothorax after blunt injury to the transverse cervical artery. A 42-year-old man was brought to our Emergency Department after he fell from a height of 10 meters. On work-up, a massive left hemothorax with extravasation from the left transverse cervical artery and pelvic fractures were detected. Endovascular embolization was successfully performed. There was no evidence of direct injury to the neck, lung laceration, or significant vascular injury that might have caused the massive hemothorax. A shearing mechanism associated with sudden deceleration caused by the 10-meter fall might have caused the transverse cervical artery injury in our patient. Consideration of injury to the thyrocervical trunk or its branches by the emergency physician will result in more frequent consideration and more timely diagnosis when there is no chest injury and massive hemothorax. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Value of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Assessing Blunt Multitrauma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahvenjaervi, L.; Mattila, L.; Ojala, R.; Tervonen, O. [Oulu Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To find out if multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), using a dedicated trauma protocol, provides sufficient diagnostic information of the injuries of blunt multitrauma patients to enable the planning of treatment for all body compartments. Material and Methods: One-hundred-and-thirty-three patients exposed to high-energy trauma were referred and scanned with the standardized MDCT multitrauma protocol. The imaging protocol consisted of axial scanning of the head and helical scanning of the facial bones, cervical spine, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. The scanning times were 12 s for the head, 19-21 s for the facial bones and cervical spine (1 mm collimation), and 32-50 s for the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis (2 mm collimation). One-hundred-and-forty milliliters of non-iodinated contrast material (300 mg I/ml) was administered intravenously at 3 ml/s. Results: Ninety-nine of the patients (74%) had at least one finding consistent with trauma. The most frequent findings were in the thorax in 58 patients (44%). Nineteen false-negative findings and two false-positive findings were made. The overall sensitivity of MDCT was 94%, specificity 100%, and accuracy 97%. Conclusion: MDCT is accurate in the assessment of blunt multitrauma patients. The decision to treat the patient can be made on the basis of MDCT with a reasonable level of certainty.

  17. Thyroid gland rupture caused by blunt trauma to the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hirotaka; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2016-02-19

    Thyroid rupture following blunt trauma is extremely rare, and neck pain without swelling may be the only presenting symptom. However, hemorrhage and hematoma subsequently causes severe tracheal compression and respiratory distress. A 71-year-old Japanese woman visited our emergency room with a complaint of increasing right-sided neck pain at the thyroid cartilage level after she tripped and accidentally hit her neck against a pole 3 h back. On admission, her vital signs were stable. There was no swelling or subcutaneous emphysema. Laryngeal endoscopy revealed mild laryngeal edema, although there was no impairment in vocal fold mobility on either side. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed rupture of the right lobe of the thyroid gland accompanied by a large hematoma extending from the neck to the mediastinum. Under general anesthesia, the right lobe was resected and the hematoma was evacuated. Only a few isolated cases of thyroid rupture caused by blunt neck trauma have been reported in patients with normal thyroid glands and neck pain without swelling may be the only presenting symptom. When suspected, CT should be performed to confirm the diagnosis determine the optimal treatment.

  18. Pneumoscrotum as Complication of Blunt Thoracic Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftychios Lostoridis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pneumoscrotum is a rare clinical entity. It presents with swollen scrotal sac and sometimes with palpable crepitus. It has many etiologies. One of them is due to blunt trauma of the thoracic cage, causing pneumothorax and/or pneumomediastinum. Case Presentation. We report the case of an 82-year-old male who was transferred to the Emergency Department with signs of respiratory distress after a blunt chest trauma. A CT scan was obtained, and bilateral pneumothoraces with four broken ribs were disclosed. Subcutaneous emphysema expanding from the eyelids to the scrotum was observed, and a chest tube was inserted on the right side with immediate improvement of the vital signs of the patient. Discussion. Pneumoscrotum has three major etiologies: (a local introduction of air or infection from gas-producing bacteria, (b pneumoperitoneum, and (c air accumulation from lungs, mediastinum, or retroperitoneum. These sources account for most of the cases described in the literature. Treatment should be individualized, and surgical consultation should be obtained in all cases. Conclusion. Although pneumoscrotum itself is a benign entity, the process by which air accumulates in the scrotum must be clarified, and treatment must target the primary cause.

  19. Traumatic eye injuries as a result of blunt impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Chiara; Esposito, Luca; Bonora, Nicola; Limido, Jerome; Lacome, Jean-Luc; Rossi, Tommaso

    2013-06-01

    The detachment or tearing of the retina in the human eye as a result of a collision is a phenomenon that occurs very often. This research is aimed at identifying and understanding the actual dynamic physical mechanisms responsible for traumatic eye injuries accompanying blunt impact, with particular attention to the damage processes that take place at the retina. To this purpose, a numerical and experimental investigation of the dynamic response of the eye during an impact event was performed. Numerical simulation of both tests was performed with IMPETUS-FEA, a general non-linear finite element software which offers NURBS finite element technology for the simulation of large deformation and fracture in materials. Computational results were compared with the experimental results on fresh enucleated porcine eyes impacted with airsoft pellets. The eyes were placed in a container filled with 10 percent ballistic gelatin simulating the fatty tissue surrounding the eye. A miniature pressure transducer was inserted into the eye bulb through the optic nerve in order to measure the pressure of the eye during blunt-projectile impacts. Each test was recorded using a high speed video camera. The ocular injuries observed in the impacted eyes were assessed by an ophthalmologist in order to evaluate the correlation between the pressure measures and the risk of retinal damage.

  20. Post-eccentric exercise blunted hGH response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-S; Ugrinowitsch, C; Craig, B W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test if a previous acute concentric exercise bout blunts hGH response after an eccentric exercise bout. Nine healthy untrained male university students (25.4+/-0.5 yr, 176.5+/-1.2 cm, and 79.4+/-2.0 kg) performed a concentric exercise bout followed by an eccentric exercise bout one week later. Serum human growth hormone (hGH), creatine kinase (CK), and lactate were measured before, immediately and up to 32 h after both exercise bouts. Higher lactate values were observed immediately, 5 and 10 min after the concentric bout (70%, 119%, and 142%, respectively, phGH increased after both exercise bouts, however it reached significance only at immediately (207%), 5 min (256%), 10 min (276%), 20 min (300%), and 40 min (168%) after the concentric exercise bout (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that a previous concentric exercise bout may blunt the anabolic response expected after an eccentric exercise bout.

  1. Blunt Traumatic Extracranial Cerebrovascular Injury and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Foreman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic stroke occurs in a significant subset of patients with blunt traumatic cerebrovascular injury (TCVI. The patients are victims of motor vehicle crashes, assaults or other high-energy collisions, and suffer ischemic stroke due to injury to the extracranial carotid or vertebral arteries. Summary: An increasing number of patients with TCVI are being identified, largely because of the expanding use of computed tomography angiography for screening patients with blunt trauma. Patients with TCVI are particularly challenging to manage because they often suffer polytrauma, that is, numerous additional injuries including orthopedic, chest, abdominal, and head injuries. Presently, there is no consensus about optimal management. Key Messages: Most literature about TCVI and stroke has been published in trauma, general surgery, and neurosurgery journals; because of this, and because these patients are managed primarily by trauma surgeons, patients with stroke due to TCVI have been essentially hidden from view of neurologists. This review is intended to bring this clinical entity to the attention of clinicians and investigators with specific expertise in neurology and stroke.

  2. Critical evaluation of pancreatic masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John DeWitt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of a patient with a pancreatic mass on a CT or MRI requires consideration of the gender and age of the patient, presenting symptoms, quality of the imaging study performed and relevant medical history. CT is generally preferred over MRI for suspected pancreatic cancer but MRI is best considered for evaluation of ductal anatomy and possible cystic neoplasms. EUS should be considered when further characterization of morphology or tissue sampling is required.

  3. Radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klautke, G. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Rostock (Germany); Brunner, T.B. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology and Biology, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose and approach: to summarize the current knowledge on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The results of meta-analyses, phase III-studies, and phase II-studies using chemoradiation (CRT) and chemotherapy for resectable and non-resectable PDAC are reviewed. Results and conclusion: the role of CRT is undefined in the adjuvant setting but there may be a role as additive treatment after R1 resection. Locally advanced borderline resectable tumors may shrink down and be subject to potentially curative resections. In locally advanced clearly unresectable cancers the effect of CRT as well as chemotherapy is poorly defined and the sequence of chemotherapy and CRT should be re-evaluated. Patients with PDAC should always be treated within studies to identify optimal treatment results. (orig.)

  4. Radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Tadayoshi; Sugiyama, Akira; Nakata, Yoshinori (Tokyo Metropolitan Hospital of Komagome (Japan))

    1983-07-01

    Sixteen inoperable patients with progressive pancreatic carcinoma were treated by external irradiation. In Stage II and III of the carcinoma, irradiation with 6,000 to 7,000 rad prolonged the survival. Conformation radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy was most effective. Intraoperative irradiation was done in 38 patients, and was followed by postoperative irradiation in 15 of these patients. Study of complications and autopsy findings showed that intraoperative irradiation with 2,000 to 3,000 rad followed by conformation radiotherapy of 4,000 rad was adequate. This combined therapy was done in 12 Stage I - III patients. Their survival period was certainly prolonged by the combined intraoperative and postoperative irradiation, and the effect was equivalent to that of interstitial irradiation of /sup 125/I combined with external beam irradiation, and was better than that of pancreatico-duodenalectomy.

  5. Radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadayoshi; Sugiyama, Akira; Nakata, Yoshinori

    1983-01-01

    Sixteen inoperable patients with porgressive pancreatic carcinoma were treated by external irradiation. In Stage II and III of the carcinoma, irradiation with 6,000 to 7,000 rad prolonged the survival. Conformation radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy was most effective. Intraoperative irradiation was done in 38 patients, and was followed by postoperative irradiation in 15 of these patients. Study of complications and autopsy findings showed that intraoperative irradiation with 2,000 to 3,000 rad followed by conformation radiotherapy of 4,000 rad was adequate. This combined therapy was done in 12 Stage I - III patients. Their survival period was certainly prolonged by the combined intraoperative and postoperative irradiation, and the effect was equivalent to that of interstitial irradiation of 125 I combined with external beam irradiation, and was better than that of pancreatico-duodenalectomy. (Ueda, J.)

  6. The artificially blunted leading edge concept for aerothermodynamic performance enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anurag

    An innovative aerothermodynamic performance enhancement concept for blunted geometries in hypervelocity flight is described. An Artificially Blunted Leading Edge (ABLE) is sought to be created by the use of a flow-through channel sized to choke at supersonic (in the normal direction) conditions. As a result, a normal shock stands off the channel but the high post-shock pressures have no wall to act on, leading to a reduction in wave drag. The effective blunt body flow structure can be effective at preventing the rise in heat transfer rates at channel entrance lips. In lifting flight, the flow in the channel creates suction at the lip, significantly enhancing lift for non-slender shapes. CFD studies using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations provide proof-of- concept for drag reduction for blunted slender geometries and L/D enhancements for sphere-cones. The ABLE flow mechanism's robustness and its effectiveness at off- design conditions is demonstrated. The computed sphere- cone L/D enhancements are also validated with experimental results from Aeroballistic Range tests. As opposed to straight channels, ABLE variants with curved channels that provide for better volumetric efficiency, reduced viscous drag penalties and better performance were designed and investigated. The channels curve outward and exhaust the flow close to the leading edge. Even while exhausting tangentially, the exhaust-mean flow interactions were shown to enhance or create lift. The force amplification due to such interactions can also be leveraged with the channel flow exhausting nearly normal to the surface. The potential of such thrust vectoring to reduce trim drag and augment directional control in the high-speed regime was demonstrated numerically. To evaluate the concept's effectiveness at improving cd or L/D values without paying any penalties in lift, enclosed volume and peak heating rates, Multidisciplinary Design Optimization techniques are used to characterize the design space

  7. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Zografos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship.

  8. Diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis with the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Rückert, Felix; Weiss, Christel; Ströbel, Philipp; Belle, Sebastian; Hirth, Michael; Wilhelm, Torsten J; Haas, Stephan L; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Schönberg, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Singer, Manfred V; Ebert, Matthias P; Pfützer, Roland H; Löhr, J Matthias

    We had developed the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria (U-AIP) to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis (AiP) within the M-ANNHEIM classification of chronic pancreatitis. In 2011, International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria (ICDC) to diagnose AiP have been published. We had applied the U-AIP long before the ICDC were available. The aims of the study were, first, to describe patients with AiP diagnosed by the U-AIP; second, to compare diagnostic accuracies of the U-AIP and other diagnostic systems; third, to evaluate the clinical applicability of the U-AIP. From 1998 until 2008, we identified patients with AiP using U-AIP, Japanese-, Korean-, Asian-, Mayo-HISORt-, Revised-Mayo-HISORt- and Italian-criteria. We retrospectively verified the diagnosis by ICDC and Revised-Japanese-2011-criteria, compared diagnostic accuracies of all systems and evaluated all criteria in consecutive patients with pancreatitis (2009 until 2010, Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, n = 84). We retrospectively validated our diagnostic approach in consecutive patients with a pancreatic lesion requiring surgery (Surgical-Cohort, n = 98). Overall, we identified 21 patients with AiP. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria and ICDC presented the highest diagnostic accuracies (each 98.8%), highest Youden indices (each 0.95238), and highest proportions of diagnosed patients (each n = 20/21, U-AIP/ICDC vs. other diagnostic systems, p Pancreatitis-Criteria revealed a satisfactory clinical applicability and offered an additional approach to diagnose AiP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Availability of tobacco products associated with use of marijuana cigars (blunts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipperman-Kreda, Sharon; Lee, Juliet P; Morrison, Chris; Freisthler, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    This study examines factors associated with availability of tobacco products for marijuana cigars (i.e., blunts) in 50 non-contiguous mid-sized California communities. The study is based on data collected in 943 tobacco outlets. Neighborhood demographics, community adult marijuana prevalence, medical marijuana policy and access to medical marijuana dispensaries and delivery services were included. Multilevel logistic regression analyses indicated that compared with small markets, availability of tobacco products associated with use of blunts was significantly higher in convenience stores, smoke/tobacco shops and liquor stores. None of the neighborhood demographics were associated with availability of blunt wrappers and only a small percent of Whites was positively associated with availability of blunt cigars, small cigars or cigarillos at the store. Controlling for outlet type and neighborhood demographics, higher city prevalence of adult marijuana use was associated with greater availability of blunt wrappers. Also, policy that permits medical marijuana dispensaries or private cultivation was positively associated with availability of tobacco products for blunts. Density of medical marijuana dispensaries and delivery services, however, was negatively associated with greater availability of these products at tobacco outlets. Results suggest that availability of tobacco products associated with blunts is similar in neighborhoods with different socioeconomic status and racial and ethnic composition. Results also suggest the important role that community norms that support marijuana use or legalization of medical marijuana and medical marijuana policy may play in increasing availability of tobacco products associated with blunts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Blunt-end vectors generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blunt-end cloning is a convenient way to clone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products generated by proof-reading DNA polymerase. However, it is a time consuming procedure to prepare the linearized blunt-end vector, which usually involves plasmid extraction and restriction enzyme digestion. Moreover, 5' ...

  11. The role of non-operative management (NOM) in blunt hepatic trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ayman Zaki Azzam

    2013-01-10

    Jan 10, 2013 ... Results: Blunt trauma was the mechanism of injury in 44 patients (60.2%) including road traffic acci- dents in 42.5%. The peak age was .... mechanism of blunt trauma was road traffic accidents in. 42.5% including drivers ... patients, perihepatic packing in 1 patient, right hepatic artery ligation with formal right ...

  12. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (ppancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  13. Primary Pancreatic Lymphoma with Severe Dilatation of Pancreatic Duct: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Tae Wook; Heo, Suk Hee; Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Choi, Yoo Duk [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Woong [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Primary pancreatic lymphoma is extremely rare and usually consists of a bulky tumor without internal necrosis and severe dilatation of the pancreatic duct. We report the unusual CT and MRI findings of a primary pancreatic lymphoma in a 27-years-old man, associated with severe dilatation of the pancreatic duct, common bile duct, and internal necrosis

  14. Risk of Pancreatic Cancer After a Primary Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkers, Anton P.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Ahmed Ali, Usama; Hagenaars, Julia C. J. P.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Eijck, Casper H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Acute pancreatitis may be the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of pancreatic cancer after a first episode of acute pancreatitis. Methods Between March 2004 and March 2007, all consecutive patients with a first episode of acute

  15. Cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation after blunt chest trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2017-06-17

    Cardiac tamponade due to aortic injury after blunt trauma is a rare and potentially fatal injury. Most aortic injuries caused by blunt trauma present as aortic dissection or rupture of the aortic isthmus. Several cases of delayed aortic injury have been reported. However, all of these injuries were observed in the descending aorta because they had been caused by a posterior rib fracture. We report the first case of cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation 2 weeks after blunt trauma. The patient was an 81-year-old man. In cases of blunt chest trauma, delayed ascending aortic injury causing cardiac tamponade is possible associated with various causes such as direct injury by fractured rib or delayed aortic perforation of initial blunt injury.

  16. Protein malnutrition blunts the increment of taurine transporter expression by a high-fat diet and impairs taurine reestablishment of insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Renato Chaves Souto; Camargo, Rafael Ludemann; Batista, Thiago Martins; Vettorazzi, Jean Franciesco; Borck, Patrícia Cristine; Dos Santos-Silva, Junia Carolina Rebelo; Boschero, Antonio Carlos; Zoppi, Cláudio Cesar; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães

    2017-09-01

    Taurine (Tau) restores β-cell function in obesity; however, its action is lost in malnourished obese rodents. Here, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the lack of effects of Tau in this model. C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet (CD) (14% protein) or a protein-restricted diet (RD) (6% protein) for 6 wk. Afterward, mice received a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 wk [CD + HFD (CH) and RD + HFD (RH)] with or without 5% Tau supplementation after weaning on their drinking water [CH + Tau (CHT) and RH + Tau (RHT)]. The HFD increased insulin secretion through mitochondrial metabolism in CH and RH. Tau prevented all those alterations in CHT only. The expression of the taurine transporter (Tau-T), as well as Tau content in pancreatic islets, was increased in CH but had no effect on RH. Protein malnutrition programs β cells and impairs Tau-induced restoration of mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis. This may be associated with modulation of the expression of Tau-T in pancreatic islets, which may be responsible for the absence of effect of Tau in protein-malnourished obese mice.-Branco, R. C. S., Camargo, R. L., Batista, T. M., Vettorazzi, J. F., Borck, P. C., dos Santos-Silva, J. C. R., Boschero, A. C., Zoppi, C. C., Carneiro, E. M. Protein malnutrition blunts the increment of taurine transporter expression by a high-fat diet and impairs taurine reestablishment of insulin secretion. © FASEB.

  17. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 2: Gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Schmidlin, F. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    1998-06-02

    Computed tomography plays an important role in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in adults. Current standard examination techniques enable detection of the majority of perforating or devascularizing bowel injuries, although diagnostic findings are often subtle and meticulous inspection is required. Computed tomography may demonstrate pancreatic contusions and lacerations and help in distinguishing minor traumatic lesions without involvement of the pancreatic duct (organ injury scale, grades I and II) from deep lacerations with ductal involvement (grades III and V). Computed tomography enables distinguishing renal contusions and minor cortical lacerations that can usually be managed conservatively (injuries of grades I-III) from corticomedullary lacerations and injuries of the major renal vessels (grades IV and V) that have a less favorable prognosis and more commonly require surgical repair. In addition, CT is well suited for the detection of active renal hemorrhage and guidance of transcatheter embolization treatment and delineation of preexisting benign or malignant pathologies that may predispose to posttraumatic hemorrhage. The radiologist`s awareness of the diagnostic CT findings of abdominal visceral injuries as well as their clinical and surgical implications are important prerequisites for optimal patient management. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 56 refs.

  18. Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome: complete pancreas transection secondary to acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez-del-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Garcés-Albir, Marina; Fernández-Moreno, María Carmen; Morera-Ocón, Francisco Javier; Villagrasa, Rosana; Sabater-Ortí, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis which is defined by a complete discontinuity of the pancreatic duct, such that a viable side of the pancreas remains isolated from the gastrointestinal tract. This pancreatic disruption is infrequently observed in the clinical practice and its diagnostic and therapeutic management are controversial. We present an extreme case of disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome with complete duct disruption and pancreatic transection following acute pancreatitis, as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic processes carried out.

  19. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured - A Retrospective Multicentre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients' outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury.

  20. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured – A Retrospective Multicentre Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanschen, Marc; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Khalil, Philipe N.; Wierer, Matthias; van Griensven, Martijn; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Biberthaler, Peter; Lefering, Rolf; Huber-Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients. Methods In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009), characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6), the revised injury severity score (RISC) allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6) (2.3% of patients). Results Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%). The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1) and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6) are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6) is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively) as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49) of the study collective. Conclusion Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients’ outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury. PMID:26136126

  1. Blunt Cardiac Injury in the Severely Injured - A Retrospective Multicentre Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Hanschen

    Full Text Available Blunt cardiac injury is a rare trauma entity. Here, we sought to evaluate the relevance and prognostic significance of blunt cardiac injury in severely injured patients.In a retrospective multicentre study, using data collected from 47,580 patients enrolled to TraumaRegister DGU (1993-2009, characteristics of trauma, prehospital / hospital trauma management, and outcome analysis were correlated to the severity of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of cardiac injury was assessed according to the abbreviated injury score (AIS score 1-6, the revised injury severity score (RISC allowed comparison of expected outcome with injury severity-dependent outcome. N = 1.090 had blunt cardiac trauma (AIS 1-6 (2.3% of patients.Predictors of blunt cardiac injury could be identified. Sternal fractures indicate a high risk of the presence of blunt cardiac injury (AIS 0 [control]: 3.0%; AIS 1: 19.3%; AIS 2-6: 19.1%. The overall mortality rate was 13.9%, minor cardiac injury (AIS 1 and severe cardiac injury (AIS 2-6 are associated with higher rates. Severe blunt cardiac injury (AIS 4 and AIS 5-6 is associated with a higher mortality (OR 2.79 and 4.89, respectively as compared to the predicted average mortality (OR 2.49 of the study collective.Multiple injured patients with blunt cardiac trauma are at high risk to be underestimated. Careful evaluation of trauma patients is able to predict the presence of blunt cardiac injury. The severity of blunt cardiac injury needs to be stratified according to the AIS score, as the patients' outcome is dependent on the severity of cardiac injury.

  2. The Burden of Systemic Adiposity on Pancreatic Disease: Acute Pancreatitis, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Pancreas Disease, and Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malli, Ahmad; Li, Feng; Conwell, Darwin L; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Hussan, Hisham; Krishna, Somashekar G

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic as recognized by the World Health Organization. Obesity and its related comorbid conditions were recognized to have an important role in a multitude of acute, chronic, and critical illnesses including acute pancreatitis, nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease, and pancreatic cancer. This review summarizes the impact of adiposity on a spectrum of pancreatic diseases.

  3. Lipolysis of visceral adipocyte triglyceride by pancreatic lipases converts mild acute pancreatitis to severe pancreatitis independent of necrosis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A; DeLany, James P; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-03-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis : Diagnostic and immunological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Heerde (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of a systemic fibro- inflammatory disease, characterized by infiltration with lymphoplasmacytic cells and extensive fibrosis, which leads to morphological changes (swelling, mass forming) and organ dysfunction. Often, but

  5. Acute pancreatitis complicating excessive intake of phenolphthalein.

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrianides, A. L.; Rosin, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A case is described in which a patient presented with acute pancreatitis following inadvertent ingestion of large quantities of phenolphthalein for the treatment of his chronic constipation. There was complete recovery and no sequelae from the acute attack of pancreatitis.

  6. Resectable pancreatic small cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana K. Andersen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary pancreatic small cell carcinoma (SCC is rare, with just over 30 cases reported in the literature. Only 7 of these patients underwent surgical resection with a median survival of 6 months. Prognosis of SCC is therefore considered to be poor, and the role of adjuvant therapy is uncertain. Here we report two institutions’ experience with resectable pancreatic SCC. Six patients with pancreatic SCC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (4 patients and the Mayo Clinic (2 patients were identified from prospectively collected pancreatic cancer databases and re-reviewed by pathology. All six patients underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and the literature on pancreatic SCC was reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 27-60. All six tumors arose in the head of the pancreas. Median tumor size was 3 cm, and all cases had positive lymph nodes except for one patient who only had five nodes sampled. There were no perioperative deaths and three patients had at least one postoperative complication. All six patients received adjuvant therapy, five of whom were given combined modality treatment with radiation, cisplatin, and etoposide. Median survival was 20 months with a range of 9-173 months. The patient who lived for 9 months received chemotherapy only, while the patient who lived for 173 months was given chemoradiation with cisplatin and etoposide and represents the longest reported survival time from pancreatic SCC to date. Pancreatic SCC is an extremely rare form of cancer with a poor prognosis. Patients in this surgical series showed favorable survival rates when compared to prior reports of both resected and unresectable SCC. Cisplatin and etoposide appears to be the preferred chemotherapy regimen, although its efficacy remains uncertain, as does the role of combined modality treatment with radiation.

  7. Severe Hyperlipidemia Induced Hemorrhagic Pancreatitis during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Koscica, Karen L.; Nwaubani, Uzoma; Nazir, Munir; Gimovsky, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background. We report a case of familial hyperlipidemia in pregnancy that resulted in hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Case. A patient at 27-week gestation was admitted for recurrent pancreatitis secondary to severe hyperlipidemia. With conservative care, the patient improved but on the fourth day of admission she experienced a sudden onset of hypotension and was diagnosed with hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Conclusion. Pancreatitis caused by hyperlipidemia is an uncommon event during pregnancy. A famil...

  8. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  9. Refinement of Canine Pancreatitis Model: Inducing Pancreatitis by Using Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    OpenAIRE

    Ruben, Dawn S; Scorpio, Diana G; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2009-01-01

    The causes and treatments of pancreatitis have been studied in diverse species, but the canine pancreatitis model has been used most often due to its similarities to the condition in humans. Although pancreatitis in dogs can be induced readily by numerous methods, managing these dogs can be difficult because they often develop severe abdominal pain, vomiting, inappetance, and lethargy. In an effort to study pancreatitis, we performed a pilot study to determine whether an endoscopic pancreatic...

  10. Biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis: a clinical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Chenggang; Li, Xin; Sun, Jintang; Zou, Peng; Gao, Shubo; Zhang, Peixun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical treatment features of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 21 cases of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis in the Department of General Surgery in our hospital during May 2005 to July 2011 was performed; the clinical treatment features were analyzed in terms of surgical option, onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery, length of stay in hos...

  11. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis Causing a Highway to the Colon with Subsequent Road Closure: Pancreatic Colonic Fistula Presenting as a Large Bowel Obstruction Treated with Pancreatic Duct Stenting

    OpenAIRE

    Cochrane, Justin; Schlepp, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Context. Colonic complications associated with acute pancreatitis have a low incidence but carry an increased risk of mortality with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic colonic fistula is most commonly associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or abscess formation and rarely forms spontaneously. Classic clinical manifestations for pancreatic colonic fistula include diarrhea, hematochezia, and fever. Uncommonly pancreatic colonic fistula presents as large bowel obstruction. Case. ...

  12. Drug-Intake Methods and Social Identity: The Use of Marijuana in Blunts among Southeast Asian Adolescents and Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Brian; Lee, Juliet P.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines why Southeast Asian American adolescents and emerging adults in two urban settings prefer to use "blunts," or hollowed-out cigars filled with marijuana, over other methods of drug intake. Rationales for preferring blunts were both instrumental and social. Blunts allowed users to more easily share marijuana, the preferred drug…

  13. CT scanning of blunt trauma to bowel and mesentery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federle, M.P.; Griffiths, B.G.; Donohue, J.H.; Minagi, H.

    1986-01-01

    In a 6-year period, 1,500 consecutive CT scans were performed for the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma. The patient population included 25 patients with a preoperative diagnosis of mesenteric or bowel injury. The preoperative diagnosis was proved correct in 23 cases. An additional 12 patients were diagnosed from CT findings as having bowel or mesenteric injuries, but did not undergo laparotomy. Of the patients who underwent operation, bowel wall thickening, intraperitoneal fluid, or both were noted on CT in all cases but one. Less frequently noted CT signs of bowel or mesenteric injury included extraluminal gas (seven cases) and extravasated contrast material (one). Both of these signs were regarded as indications for surgery, as were hematomas in the bowel wall or mesentery when accompanied by substantial amounts of intraperitoneal fluid. The importance of meticulous scanning technique and photography is emphasized. Potential sources of error in the assessment of bowel or mesenteric injuries are described

  14. A large ventricular septal defect complicating resuscitation after blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry D I De′Ath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A young adult pedestrian was admitted to hospital after being hit by a car. On arrival to the Accident and Emergency Department, the patient was tachycardic, hypotensive, hypoxic, and acidotic with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 3. Despite initial interventions, the patient remained persistently hypotensive. An echocardiogram demonstrated a traumatic ventricular septal defect (VSD with right ventricular strain and increased pulmonary artery pressure. Following a period of stabilization, open cardiothoracic surgery was performed and revealed an aneurysmal septum with a single large defect. This was repaired with a bovine patch, resulting in normalization of right ventricular function. This case provides a vivid depiction of a large VSD in a patient following blunt chest trauma with hemodynamic compromise. In all thoracic trauma patients, and particularly those poorly responsive to resuscitation, VSDs should be considered. Relevant investigations and management strategies are discussed.

  15. Electrophysiology of blunted emotional bias in psychopathic personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolan, Patrick L; Jaspers-Fayer, Fern; Asmaro, Deyar T; Douglas, Kevin S; Liotti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Diminished emotional capacity is a core characteristic of psychopathic personality. We examined behavioral and electrophysiological differences in attentional bias to emotional material in 34 healthy individuals rated high or low in psychopathic traits using the short form of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (18 high-trait, 16 low-trait). While performing an emotional Stroop task, high-trait participants displayed reduced emotional modulation of the late positive potential (LPP, 400-600 ms), and early anterior positivity (EAP, 200-300 ms) amplitudes. Results suggest blunted bias to affective content in psychopathic personality, characterized by diminished early capture to emotional salience (EAP) and dampened cognitive emotional processing (LPP). Copyright © 2013 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  16. Clinical and radiographic indications for aortography in blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, H B; Wohlmuth, D A; Appel, P L; Shoemaker, W C

    1987-08-01

    To determine which clinical and radiographic findings are valuable in selecting patients with blunt chest trauma for aortography, we analyzed the medical records and admission chest radiographs of 76 consecutive victims of blunt chest trauma with suspected thoracic aortic rupture during the past 7 years. All patients were evaluated by history, physical examination, chest radiography, and aortography; a total of 70 clinical and radiographic findings were independently assessed in each patient. The following occurred with significantly greater frequency in patients with thoracic aortic rupture than in those without: history of significant hypotension (mean arterial pressure less than 80 mm Hg) (p less than 0.04); the presence of upper extremity hypertension, bilateral lower extremity pulse pulse deficits, or an initial chest tube output greater than 750 ml of blood (p less than 0.05); and greater incidence of myocardial contusions, intra-abdominal injuries, and pelvic fractures compared with patients without thoracic aortic rupture (p less than 0.05). Mediastinal widening (equal to or greater than 8 cm) shown on anteroposterior chest radiography occurred in all patients with thoracic aortic rupture; however, its specificity was only 10.6%. Radiographic signs that were helpful in indicating the presence of thoracic aortic rupture included paratracheal stripe greater than 5 mm, rightward deviation of the nasogastric tube or central venous pressure line, blurring of the aortic knob, and an abnormal or absent paraspinous stripe. Upper rib fractures and mediastinal to thoracic cage width ratios at any level did not increase diagnostic accuracy for thoracic aortic rupture in the present series. Six patients in the series died, two of whom had thoracic aortic rupture.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Nonoperative management for patients with grade IV blunt hepatic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago Thiago

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The treatment of complex liver injuries remains a challenge. Nonoperative treatment for such injuries is increasingly being adopted as the initial management strategy. We reviewed our experience, at a University teaching hospital, in the nonoperative management of grade IV liver injuries with the intent to evaluate failure rates; need for angioembolization and blood transfusions; and in-hospital mortality and complications. Methods This is a retrospective analysis conducted at a single large trauma centre in Brazil. All consecutive, hemodynamically stable, blunt trauma patients with grade IV hepatic injury, between 1996 and 2011, were analyzed. Demographics and baseline characteristics were recorded. Failure of nonoperative management was defined by the need for surgical intervention. Need for angioembolization and transfusions, in-hospital death, and complications were also assessed Results Eighteen patients with grade IV hepatic injury treated nonoperatively during the study period were included. The nonoperative treatment failed in only one patient (5.5% who had refractory abdominal pain. However, no missed injuries and/or worsening of bleeding were observed during the operation. None of the patients died nor need angioembolization. No complications directly related to the liver were observed. Unrelated complications to the liver occurred in three patients (16.7%; one patient developed a tracheal stenosis (secondary to tracheal intubation; one had pleural effusion; and one developed an abscess in the pleural cavity. The hospital length of stay was on average 11.56 days. Conclusions In our experience, nonoperative management of grade IV liver injury for stable blunt trauma patients is associated with high success rates without significant complications.

  18. Blunt trauma induced splenic blushes are not created equal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burlew Clay

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, evidence of contrast extravasation on computed tomography (CT scan is regarded as an indication for intervention in splenic injuries. In our experience, patients transferred from other institutions for angioembolization have often resolved the blush upon repeat imaging at our hospital. We hypothesized that not all splenic blushes require intervention. Methods During a 10-year period, we reviewed all patients transferred with blunt splenic injuries and contrast extravasation on initial postinjury CT scan. Results During the study period, 241 patients were referred for splenic injuries, of whom 16 had a contrast blush on initial CT imaging (88% men, mean age 35 ± 5, mean ISS 26 ± 3. Eight (50% patients were managed without angioembolization or operation. Comparing patients with and without intervention, there was a significant difference in admission heart rate (106 ± 9 vs 83 ± 6 and decline in hematocrit following transfer (5.3 ± 2.0 vs 1.0 ± 0.3, but not in injury grade (3.9 ± 0.2 vs 3.5 ± 0.3, systolic blood pressure (125 ± 10 vs 115 ± 6, or age (38.5 ± 8.2 vs 30.9 ± 4.7. Of the 8 observed patients, 3 underwent repeat imaging immediately upon arrival with resolution of the blush. In the intervention group, 4 patients had ongoing extravasation on repeat imaging, 2 patients underwent empiric embolization, and 2 patients underwent splenectomy for physiologic indications. Conclusions For blunt splenic trauma, evidence of contrast extravasation on initial CT imaging is not an absolute indication for intervention. A period of observation with repeat imaging could avoid costly, invasive interventions and their associated sequelae.

  19. Blunt abdominal aortic injury: a Western Trauma Association multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhub, Sherene; Starnes, Benjamin W; Brenner, Megan L; Biffl, Walter L; Azizzadeh, Ali; Inaba, Kenji; Skiada, Dimitra; Zarzaur, Ben; Nawaf, Cayce; Eriksson, Evert A; Fakhry, Samir M; Paul, Jasmeet S; Kaups, Krista L; Ciesla, David J; Todd, S Rob; Seamon, Mark J; Capano-Wehrle, Lisa M; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2014-12-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is a rare injury. The objective of the current study was to examine the presentation and management of BAAI at a multi-institutional level. The Western Trauma Association Multi-Center Trials conducted a study of BAAI from 1996 to 2011. Data collected included demographics, injury mechanism, associated injuries, interventions, and complications. Of 392,315 blunt trauma patients, 113 (0.03%) presented with BAAI at 12 major trauma centers (67% male; median age, 38 years; range, 6-88; median Injury Severity Score [ISS], 34; range, 16-75). The leading cause of injury was motor vehicle collisions (60%). Hypotension was documented in 47% of the cases. The most commonly associated injuries were spine fractures (44%) and pneumothorax/hemothorax (42%). Solid organ, small bowel, and large bowel injuries occurred in 38%, 35%, and 28% respectively. BAAI presented as free aortic rupture (32%), pseudoaneurysm (16%), and injuries without aortic external contour abnormality on computed tomography such as large intimal flaps (34%) or intimal tears (18%). Open and endovascular repairs were undertaken as first-choice therapy in 43% and 15% of cases, respectively. Choice of management varied by type of BAAI: 89% of intimal tears were managed nonoperatively, and 96% of aortic ruptures were treated with open repair. Overall mortality was 39%, the majority (68%) occurring in the first 24 hours because of hemorrhage or cardiac arrest. The highest mortality was associated with Zone II aortic ruptures (92%). Follow-up was documented in 38% of live discharges. This is the largest BAAI series reported to date. BAAI presents as a spectrum of injury ranging from minimal aortic injury to aortic rupture. Nonoperative management is successful in uncomplicated cases without external aortic contour abnormality on computed tomography. Highest mortality occurred in free aortic ruptures, suggesting that alternative measures of early noncompressible torso hemorrhage

  20. The management of complex pancreatic injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    pancreatic injuries. Leakage of pancreatic exocrine secre- ... gland damage and the likelihood of duct injury is usually sufficient to ..... creatic function. The decision to resort to pancreaticoduo- denectomy is based upon the extent of the pancreatic injury, the size and vascular status of any duodenal injury, the integrity of the ...

  1. Specificity and sensitivity of serum canine pancreatic elastase-1 concentration in the diagnosis of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Caroline S; Watson, Penny D; Jones, Boyd R

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of serum canine pancreatic elastase-1 (cPE-1) for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs. The study was prospective, assessing dogs presenting with clinical signs similar to pancreatitis. Sixty-one dogs were recruited (49 with pancreatic disease and 12 with non-pancreatic disease). There was no significant difference in serum cPE-1 between dogs with pancreatic disease and non-pancreatic disease. However, there was a significant difference in serum cPE-1 between severe acute pancreatitis and non-pancreatic disease. A cut-off value for serum cPE-1 > 17.24 ng/ml resulted in sensitivity of 61.4% and specificity of 91.7% for diagnosis of all types of pancreatic disease. The sensitivity rose to 65.85% and 78.26% for the diagnosis of all types of acute pancreatitis and severe acute pancreatitis, respectively. Serum cPE-1 is more sensitive at diagnosing severe acute pancreatitis than chronic or mild acute pancreatitis, and has a high positive likelihood ratio. Dogs with chronic pancreatitis tended to have lower serum cPE-1 concentration, suggesting decreased exocrine function.

  2. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  3. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  4. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  5. Pancreatic carcinoma in fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes: An eastern India perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Pratim Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes (FCPD is a rare cause of diabetes (100-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We present 3 patients of FCPD with pancreatic cancer who had long duration of diabetes (19 years, 25 years, and 28 years, respectively, all of whom presented with anorexia, weight loss, and worsened glycemic control. Patient-1 in addition presented with deep venous thrombosis. All the 3 patients had evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Computerized tomography (CT abdomen revealed atrophic pancreas, dilated pancreatic ducts, and multiple calculi in the head, body, and tail of pancreas in all of them. Patient-1 had 38 mm × 38 mm × 32 mm mass in the tail of pancreas with multiple target lesions were seen in the right lobe of liver. Patient-2 had a mass in the tail of pancreas (46 × 34 × 31 mm encasing the celiac plexus and superior mesenteric artery infiltrating the splenic hilum and splenic flexure of colon. Patient-3 also had a mass in the tail of pancreas (33 × 31 × 22 mm, with multiple target lesions in the liver, suggestive of metastasis. All patients had elevated serum CA19-9 (828.8, 179.65, and 232 U/L, respectively; normal <40 U/L. Patients of FCPD with anorexia, weight loss, worsening of glycemic control should be evaluated to rule out pancreatic cancer. Studies are warranted to evaluate CA19-9 as a screening tool for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage in FCPD.

  6. The Key Genes of Chronic Pancreatitis which Bridge Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Can be Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Li, Rui; Wang, Heping; Li, Lisha; Li, Huiyu; Li, Yulin

    2018-04-01

    An important question in systems biology is what role the underlying molecular mechanisms play in disease progression. The relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer needs further exploration in a system view. We constructed the disease network based on gene expression data and protein-protein interaction. We proposed an approach to discover the underlying core network and molecular factors in the progression of pancreatic diseases, which contain stages of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer core network and key factors were revealed and then verified by gene set enrichment analysis of pathways and diseases. The key factors provide the microenvironment for tumor initiation and the change of gene expression level of key factors bridge chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Some new candidate genes need further verification by experiments. Transcriptome profiling-based network analysis reveals the importance of chronic pancreatitis genes and pathways in pancreatic cancer development on a system level by computational method and they can be therapeutic targets.

  7. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    .5 g protein/kg ideal body weight/d. Plasma gut peptide responses were monitored in 15 subjects. RESULTS: In comparison with basal fasting trypsin secretion rates (mean = 134 [standard error = 22] U/h), duodenal feeding with the polymeric and elemental formulae stimulated trypsin secretion (mean = 408...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double...... [standard error = 51] U/h; P standard error = 34] U/h) and mid-distal jejunal (mean = 119 [standard error = 16] U/h) did not. Stimulation was associated with an increase in plasma cholecystokinin, whereas distal jejunal feeding resulted in an increase...

  8. Pancreatic effects of GLP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    -dependent manner. But perhaps equally importantly, GLP-1’s glucose lowering effects are attributable to a strong inhibition of glucagon secretion, and, thereby, a reduction of hepatic glucose output. The effects of GLP-1 on insulin secretion are mediated by binding of the hormone to the receptor (GLP-1r......) on the pancreatic β-cell, which increases intracellular cAMP levels and sets in motion a plethora of events that lead to secretion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of GLP-1 on the α-cell may be indirect, involving paracrine intra-islet regulation by somatostatin and possibly also insulin, although GLP-1 also...... inhibits glucagon secretion in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Besides these acute effects on the endocrine pancreas, GLP-1 also appears to have a positive effect on β-cell mass. In the following we will review GLP-1’s pancreatic effects with particular focus on its effects on pancreatic islets...

  9. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    . Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...... are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby...... affect absorption of the drug. As stated above many factors can influence drug absorption and metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The factors may not have clinical relevance, but may explain inter-individual variations in responses to a given drug, in patients with chronic pancreatitis....

  10. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  11. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memis, Ahmet E-mail: ahmemis@yahoo.com; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices.

  12. [Usefulness of pancreatic scintilography in clinical diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graef, A; Arevila, N; Ibarrola, J L

    1977-01-01

    Our experience in pancreatic scintigraphy is presented in this paper. It was used as radioactive substance 75 semetionina. 21 patients with pancreatic pathology and 6 controls constituted the clinical material. The scintigraphy studies showed an homogenous distribution of the radioactive material in the control group. In 7 cases a defect of concentration was showed. The diagnosis of carcinoma were made with surgery in all of them. Similar findings were demonstrated in cases of pancreatic pseudocyst. Irregular distribution was noted in patients with pancreatitis. We concluded that in same instances pancreatic scintigraphy can be useful for differential diagnosis in the clinical field.

  13. ABDOMEN GROANS: A RARE CAUSE OF PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperparathyroidism and hypercalcaemia are considered to be a rare cause of acute pancreatitis. The relationship between hyperparathyroidism and pancreatic inflammatory disease remains controversial. (1 But it has been shown that surgical correction of parathyroid disease and normalization of serum calcium levels may ameliorate the acute pancreatitis. (2 A case of acute pancreatitis and hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid gland hyperplasia occurred in a 51- years-old woman is reported. After the excision of parathyroid gland the serum calcium levels and the function of the pancreas returned to normal. This suggests a cause and effect relationship between hyperparathyroidism and acute pancreatitis.

  14. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: All forms of commonly practiced enteral feeding techniques stimulate pancreatic secretion, and only intravenous feeding avoids it. In this study, we explored the possibility of more distal enteral infusions of tube feeds to see whether activation of the ileal brake mechanism can result...... in plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that enteral feeding can be given without stimulating pancreatic trypsin secretion provided it is delivered into the mid-distal jejunum. The mechanism may involve activation of the ileal brake mechanism....

  15. Acute Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Nationwide Matched-cohort Study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe

    2018-01-01

    . Pancreatic cancer risk was expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Cox models were stratified by age, sex, and year of pancreatitis diagnosis and adjusted for alcohol- and smoking-related conditions, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score. Results We...... included 41,669 patients diagnosed with incident acute pancreatitis and 208,340 comparison individuals. Patients with acute pancreatitis had an increased risk of pancreatic cancer compared with the age- and sex-matched general population throughout the follow-up period. The risk decreased over time......Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, findings from studies on this association are conflicting. We investigated the association between acute pancreatitis and increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods We conducted a nationwide, population...

  16. Compressibility and Leading-Edge Bluntness Effects for a 65 Deg Delta Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    A 65 deg. delta wing has been tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at mean aerodynamic chord Reynolds numbers from 6 million to 120 million at subsonic and transonic speeds. The configuration incorporated a systematic variation of the leading edge bluntness. The analysis for this paper is focused on the compressibility and bluntness effects primarily at a Reynolds number of 6 million from this data set. Emphasis is placed upon on the onset and progression of leading-edge vortex separation, and compressibility is shown to promote this separation. Comparisons with recent publications show that compressibility and Reynolds number have opposite effects on blunt leading edge vortex separation

  17. Right Atrium Laceration with Pericardial Tamponade: A Rare Presentation of Blunt Cardiac Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Hoseinikhah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac laceration from blunt thoracic trauma is not a common presentation. The rate of mortality due to this injury is very high since it is not diagnosed and treated immediately. In this study, we present the case of a 65-year-old man with blunt cardiac trauma, causing right atrial rupture and pericardial tamponade. Successful management of this patient was firstly done with initial pericardiocentesis. Then, the patient was immediately transferred to the operating room for tamponade relief and cardiac wall repair. We recommend that cardiac surgeon have  an important suspicious for cardiac involvement in Blunt chest wall trauma

  18. Prior blunt chest trauma may be a cause of single vessel coronary disease; hypothesis and review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Nielsen, PE; Sleight, P

    2006-01-01

    Prompted by a case where a patient (with no risk factors, and single vessel disease) developed angina pectoris after previous blunt chest trauma, we searched Medline for blunt chest trauma and myocardial ischaemia. We found 77 cases describing AMI after blunt chest trauma, but only one reporting ...... the situation and acute PCI must be considered preferable. It seems likely that lesser damage could lead to longer-term stenosis we suspect that this sequence is grossly under-reported. This could have medico-legal implications....

  19. Differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas vs. groove pancreatitis: Usefulness of the portal venous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, Kousei; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Kakihara, Daisuke; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Asayama, Yoshiki; Ushijima, Yasuhiro; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Masafumi; Takahata, Shunichi; Ito, Tetsuhide; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify if the portal venous phase is helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods: MDCT and MRI of groove pancreatic carcinomas (n = 7) and groove pancreatitis (n = 15) were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists independently. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images was subjectively assessed. The presence or absence of common bile duct (CBD) and main pancreatic duct (MPD) strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions was evaluated. Additionally, the appearance of groove pancreatic carcinoma and that of groove pancreatitis in the portal venous phase on dynamic MDCT and MRI were compared. Results: There were no significant differences in the signal intensity on T2-weighted images and in the presence or absence of CBD and MPD strictures, calcifications, and cystic lesions between groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis. However, patchy focal enhancement in the portal venous phase was more commonly observed in groove pancreatitis than groove pancreatic carcinoma (Reviewers 1 and 2: 14/15 [93.3%] vs. 1/7 [14.3%], P < 0.0001). In addition, peripheral enhancement was only seen in groove pancreatic carcinomas (Reviewer 1: 4/7 [57.1%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.005, and Reviewer 2: 3/7 [42.9%] vs. 0/15 [0%], P < 0.05). Conclusion: The portal venous phase may be helpful for the differential diagnosis of groove pancreatic carcinomas and groove pancreatitis.

  20. Down-regulation of BRCA1 in chronic pancreatitis and sporadic pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Carmela; Ramadani, Marco; Meyer, Stephan; Leder, Gerd; Krüger, Martin; Welte, Karl; Gansauge, Frank; Beger, Hans G

    2004-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are considered to be breast cancer susceptibility genes that may also contribute to pancreatic cancer development because family studies revealed mutation carriers to have an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. However, as demonstrated for breast and ovarian cancer, inactivation of BRCA in sporadic diseases is based on alteration in gene expression or functional alteration. To study a potential correlation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 to chronic pancreatitis and development of sporadic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we have analyzed the expression of these genes by quantitative PCR and performed immunohistochemical analyses in normal pancreatic tissues, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer specimens. BRCA1 expression was down-regulated in chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, in particular on the RNA level. Furthermore, our data indicate suppressed BRCA1 expression in pancreatic cancer on both the RNA and protein levels. Quantitative analysis of BRCA1 protein expression demonstrated regular staining in 50% of tumor specimens tested and reduced staining in 50% of tumor specimens tested. Correlation with the clinical outcome revealed a significantly better 1-year overall survival for patients with BRCA1-regular as compared with BRCA1-reduced or BRCA1-absent tumors. In contrast, no substantial differences in BRCA2 expression were found in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer samples. Our data demonstrate alteration of BRCA1 expression in chronic pancreatitis and sporadic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We, for the first time, provide evidence for a role of BRCA1 in pancreatic carcinogenesis of noninherited tumors and for clinical outcome.

  1. Restoring Mitochondrial Function: A Small Molecule-mediated Approach to Enhance Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Cholesterol Accumulated Pancreatic beta cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asalla, Suman; Girada, Shravan Babu; Kuna, Ramya S.; Chowdhury, Debabrata; Kandagatla, Bhaskar; Oruganti, Srinivas; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Kalivendi, Shasi Vardhan; Rao, Swetha Pavani; Row, Anupama; Ibrahim, A.; Ghosh, Partha Pratim; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2016-06-01

    Dyslipidemia, particularly the elevated serum cholesterol levels, aggravate the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. In the present study we explored the relationship between fasting blood sugar and serum lipid parameters in human volunteers which revealed a significant linear effect of serum cholesterol on fasting blood glucose. Short term feeding of cholesterol enriched diet to rodent model resulted in elevated serum cholesterol levels, cholesterol accumulation in pancreatic islets and hyperinsulinemia with modest increase in plasma glucose level. To explore the mechanism, we treated cultured BRIN-BD11 pancreatic beta cells with soluble cholesterol. Our data shows that cholesterol treatment of cultured pancreatic beta cells enhances total cellular cholesterol. While one hour cholesterol exposure enhances insulin exocytosis, overnight cholesterol accumulation in cultured pancreatic beta cells affects cellular respiration, and inhibits Glucose stimulated insulin secretion. We further report that (E)-4-Chloro-2-(1-(2-(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) hydrazono) ethyl) phenol (small molecule M1) prevents the cholesterol mediated blunting of cellular respiration and potentiates Glucose stimulated insulin secretion which was abolished in pancreatic beta cells on cholesterol accumulation.

  2. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we review important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of pancreatitis. Recent Findings The relative contribution of intra-pancreatic trypsinogen activation and NFκB activation, the two major early independent cellular events in the etiology of pancreatitis, have been investigated using novel genetic models. Trypsinogen activation has traditionally held the spotlight for many decades as it is believed to be the central pathogenic event of pancreatitis However, recent experimental evidence points to the role of trypsin activation in early acinar cell damage but not in the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis through NFκB activation. Further, chronic pancreatitis in the caerulein model develops independently of typsinogen activation. Sustained activation of the NFκB pathway, but not persistent intra-acinar expression of active trypsin, was shown to result in chronic pancreatitis. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling was shown to mediate downstream effects of pathologic rise in intracellular calcium. IL-6 was identified as a key cytokine mediating pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Summary Recent advances challenge the long-believed trypsin-centered understanding of pancreatitis. It is becoming increasingly clear that activation of intense inflammatory signaling mechanisms in acinar cells is crucial to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, which may explain the strong systemic inflammatory response in pancreatitis. PMID:23892538

  3. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile D. Balaban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until late stages and have significant limitations, there is an incresing interest in the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. In this article we review the utility and accuracy of different imaging methods in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, focusing on the role of advanced imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound.

  4. [Treatments for Pancreatic Cancer with Oligometastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Junji

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer, adenocarcinoma, generally rapidly progresses, and if a metastatic lesion is detected, chemotherapy is applied even in solitary metastasis. However, surgical resection for solitary metastasis have been reported to achieve long survival in some pancreatic cancer patients. In a prospective study of surgery for hepatic and lymph node oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer, long survival of 5 years or more was reported around 10%. Furthermore, longer survival and fewer rerecurrence were achieved with surgery in lung metastasis than in liver metastasis and loco-regional recurrence. Although there has been no establishment of concept or no consensus of treatment strategy for oligometastasis in pancreatic cancer, some patients with pancreatic cancer have long disease-free survival by surgery for oligometastasis. A population of pancreatic cancer patients who have benefits of surgery for oligometastasis should be identified, and it is necessary to establish treatments for oligometastasis as standard treatments in pancreatic cancer.

  5. Pancreatic function in domestic cats with pancreatic fluke infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J N; Mosley, J G; Vogler, G A; Austin, J L; Reber, H A

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-one of 290 cats (10.7%) from the area around St Louis, Mo, were infected with Eurytrema procyonis. In some cats, the pancreas was severely affected, with almost complete atrophy and fibrous replacement of the gland. Both bicarbonate and protein secretions were impaired, although clinically evident pancreatic insufficiency was not seen.

  6. Elevation of serum pancreatic amylase and distortion of pancreatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes mellitus has been shown to cause severe impairment in exocrine pancreatic function and cyto-architecture. Ocimum grattissimum has been reported to lower blood glucose levels in experimental diabetic animals. This study, therefore, aims to investigate if treatment with O. grattissimum can alleviate ...

  7. Associated injuries, management, and outcomes of blunt abdominal aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestral, Charles; Dueck, Andrew D; Gomez, David; Haas, Barbara; Nathens, Avery B

    2012-09-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is very rare, and current literature is limited to case series of single-center experience. Through an analysis of the National Trauma Data Bank, the largest aggregation of United States trauma registry data, our aim was to characterize the associated injury pattern, contemporary management, and in-hospital outcomes of patients with BAAI. We used a nested case-control design. The overall cohort consisted of adult patients (age ≥ 16 years) severely injured (Injury Severity Score ≥ 16) after blunt trauma who were treated at a level 1 or 2 trauma center in years 2007 to 2009. Cases were patients with BAAI and were frequency-matched by age group and mechanism to randomly selected controls at a one-to-five ratio. Multivariable matched analysis (conditional logistic regression) was used to derive adjusted measures of association between BAAI and adjacent arterial, intra-abdominal, and bony injuries. We identified 436 patients with BAAI from 180 centers. The mean Injury Severity Score was 35 ± 14, and most patients were injured in motor vehicle crashes (84%). Multivariable analysis showed injury to the thoracic aorta, renal and iliac artery, small bowel, colon, liver, pancreas, and kidney, as well as lumbar spine fractures were independently associated with BAAI. A total of 394 patients (90%) were managed nonoperatively, and 42 (10%) underwent repair. Of these 42 patients, 29 (69%) underwent endovascular repair, with 11 patients undergoing open aortic repair and two extra-anatomic bypasses. Median time from admission to repair was 1 day (interquartile range, 1-2 days). Overall mortality was 29%. A total of 271 (69%) patients managed nonoperatively survived to hospital discharge. The index of suspicion for BAAI should be raised in severely injured patients by the presence of injuries to the lumbar spine, bowel, retroperitoneal organs, and adjacent major arteries. Although endovascular repair is the most common intervention, most

  8. The effect of pancreatic polypeptide and peptide YY on pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic exocrine secretion in the anesthetized dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMar, A.R.; Lake, R.; Fink, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and peptide YY (PYY) are inhibitors of pancreatic exocrine secretion in vivo but not in vitro, which suggests intermediate mechanisms of action. To examine the role of pancreatic blood flow in these inhibitory effects, xenon-133 gas clearance was used to measure pancreatic blood flow while simultaneously measuring pancreatic exocrine secretion. PP or PYY (400 pmol/kg/h) was administered during the intermediate hour of a 3-h secretin (125 ng/kg/h)/cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) (50 ng/kg/h) infusion. Exocrine secretion and pancreatic blood flow during the PP or PYY hours were compared with that observed in the first and third hours of the secretin/CCK-8 infusion. PP and PYY significantly inhibited secretin/CCK-8-induced pancreatic exocrine secretion. In addition, PYY (but not PP) significantly reduced pancreatic blood flow during secretin/CCK-8 stimulation. Nevertheless, there was no correlation between pancreatic blood flow and bicarbonate or protein outputs. It is concluded that changes in pancreatic blood flow do not mediate the inhibitory effects of PP or PYY on the exocrine pancreas

  9. Altered pancreatic growth and insulin secretion in WSB/EiJ mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie M Ho

    Full Text Available These data suggest that insulin secretion in WSB mice is blunted specifically in vivo, either due to a reduced insulin requirement and/or due to factors that are absent or destroyed in vitro. These studies also highlight the role of post-natal growth in determining adult β-cell mass. Mice are important animal models for the study of metabolic physiology and the genetics of complex traits. Wild-derived inbred mouse strains, such as WSB/EiJ (WSB, are unrelated to the commonly studied mouse strains and are valuable tools to identify novel genes that modify disease risk. We have previously shown that in contrast to C57BL/6J (B6 mice, WSB mice fed a high fat diet do not develop hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance, and had nearly undetectable insulin secretion in response to an intraperitoneal glucose challenge. As hyperinsulinemia may drive obesity and insulin resistance, we examined whether defects in β-cell mass or function could contribute to the low insulin levels in WSB mice. In young WSB mice, β-cell mass was similar to B6 mice. However, we found that adult WSB mice had reduced β-cell mass due to reduced pancreatic weights. Pancreatic sizes were similar between the strains when normalized to body weight, suggesting their pancreatic size is appropriate to their body size in adults, but overall post-natal pancreatic growth was reduced in WSB mice compared to B6 mice. Islet architecture was normal in WSB mice. WSB mice had markedly increased insulin secretion from isolated islets in vitro. These data suggest that insulin secretion in WSB mice is blunted specifically in vivo, either due to a reduced insulin requirement and/or due to factors that are absent or destroyed in vitro. These studies suggest that WSB mice may provide novel insight into mechanisms regulating insulin secretion and also highlight the role of post-natal growth in determining adult β-cell mass.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  11. Genetic aspects of chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disorder. A key characteristic of the condition is severe recurrent abdominal pain. The origin of CP is mixed, with about 70% of the cases being attributed to alcohol abuse even though 95% of all alcoholics never develop CP. Approximately half

  12. Detection of flail tricuspid valve many years after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulel, Okan; Demir, Serdar; Gol, Mehmet Kamil

    2008-01-01

    Posttraumatic tricuspid insufficiency is a rare clinical entity that is mostly associated with traffic accidents causing nonpenetrating chest wall injury. Here we report a patient with a flail tricuspid valve detected many years after blunt chest trauma at work place.

  13. Early detection of myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma by computed tomography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thung-Lip; Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Shih, Chen-Hsiang; Liang, Huai-Wen; Tsai, Hsing-Shan; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Hsu, Kwan-Lih

    2017-02-10

    Blunt cardiac trauma encompasses a wide range of clinical entities, including myocardial contusion, cardiac rupture, valve avulsion, pericardial injuries, arrhythmia, and even myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma is rare and may be life threatening. Differential diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction from cardiac contusion at this setting is not easy. Here we demonstrated a case of blunt chest trauma, with computed tomography detected myocardium enhancement defect early at emergency department. Under the impression of acute myocardial infarction, emergent coronary angiography revealed left anterior descending artery occlusion. Revascularization was performed and coronary artery dissection was found after thrombus aspiration. Finally, the patient survived after coronary stenting. Perfusion defects of myocardium enhancement on CT after blunt chest trauma can be very helpful to suggest myocardial infarction and facilitate the decision making of emergent procedure. This valuable sign should not be missed during the initial interpretation.

  14. Coronary artery rupture in blunt thoracic trauma: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Hmeidan, Jareer Heider; Arrowaili, Arief Ismael; Yousef, Raid Said; Alasmari, Sami; Kassim, Yasser M; Aldakhil Allah, Hamad Hamad; Aljenaidel, Abdullah Mohammed; Alabdulqader, Abdullah Abdulmohsen; Alrashed, Muath Hamad; Alkhinjar, Mulfi Ibrahim; Al-Shammari, Nawwaf Rahi

    2016-08-02

    Blunt thoracic trauma can rarely result in coronary artery injury. Blunt trauma can result in occlusion of any of the coronary arteries or can lead to its rupture and bleeding. Traumatic coronary artery occlusion can lead to myocardial infarction, while its rupture and bleeding can result in hemopericardium and cardiac tamponade, and can be rapidly fatal. Survival after coronary artery rupture in blunt thoracic trauma is exceedingly rare. We present a case of a young male who sustained a blunt thoracic trauma in a motor vehicle collision, that resulted in rupture of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery and subsequent cardiac tamponade. Prompt surgical intervention with pericardiotomy and ligation of the artery has resulted in survival of the patient. In cases of traumatic coronary artery rupture, early surgical intervention is crucial to avoid mortality. Ligation of the injured coronary is a viable option in selected cases, and can be the most expeditious option in patients in extremis.

  15. The effect of resuscitation strategy on the longitudinal immuno-inflammatory response to blunt trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Alexander; Nordestgaard, Ask Tybjærg; Kirial, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Resuscitation strategies following blunt trauma have been linked to immuno-inflammatory complications leading to systemic inflammatory syndrome (SIRS), sepsis and multiple organ failure (MOF). The effect of resuscitation strategy on longitudinal inflammation marker trajectories is...

  16. PANCREATIC ALPHA CELL DYSFUNCTION IN DIABETES MELLITUS AND ITS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butungeshwar Pradhan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetes mellitus has primarily centered around the insulin deficiency owing to pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction or loss and associated insulin resistance. Recently, numerous findings indicate that defect of glucagon secreting alpha-cell get involved with development and exacerbation of hyperglycaemia in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Aberrant α-cell responses exhibit both fasting and postprandial hyperglucagonaemia contributes to fasting and postprandial hyperglycaemia caused by inappropriate hepatic glucose production owing to blunted α-cell suppression. Thus, blockade of glucagon receptor or suppression of glucagon secretion from α-cell would be novel therapeutic target for control of hyperglycaemia. There have not been remarkable advances in developing new class of drugs, currently glucagon-like peptide-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and amylin agonist are available targeting alpha-cell dysfunction for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  17. Normal pancreatic exocrine function does not exclude MRI/MRCP chronic pancreatitis findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaade, Samer; Cem Balci, Numan; Momtahen, Amir Javad; Burton, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Abnormal pancreatic function tests have been reported to precede the imaging findings of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is increasingly accepted as the primary imaging modality for the detection of structural changes of early mild chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate MRI/MRCP findings in patients with symptoms consistent with chronic pancreatitis who have normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function test. A retrospective study of 32 patients referred for evaluation of chronic abdominal pain consistent with chronic pancreatitis and reported normal standard abdominal imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI). All patients underwent Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing and pancreatic MRI/MRCP at our institution. We reviewed the MRI/MRCP images in patients who had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing. MRI/MRCP images were assessed for pancreatic duct morphology, gland size, parenchymal signal and morphology, and arterial contrast enhancement. Of the 32 patients, 23 had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing, and 8 of them had mild to marked spectrum of abnormal MRI/MRCP findings that were predominantly focal. Frequencies of the findings were as follows: pancreatic duct stricture (n=3), pancreatic duct dilatation (n=3), side branch ectasia (n=4), atrophy (n=5), decreased arterial enhancement (n=5), decreased parenchymal signal (n=1), and cavity formation (n=1). The remaining15 patients had normal pancreatic structure on MRI/MRCP. Normal pancreatic function testing cannot exclude abnormal MRI/MRCP especially focal findings of chronic pancreatitis. Further studies needed to verify significance of these findings and establish MRI/MRCP imaging criteria for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  18. Acute Suppuration of the Pancreatic Duct in a Patient with Tropical Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane S. Deeb

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Pancreatic sepsis secondary to infected necrosis, pseudocyst, or pancreatic abscess is a well-known clinical entity. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct (ASPD in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal obstruction with septicemia is a rare complication that is seldom reported. It is our aim to report a case of ASPD with Klebsiella ornithinolytica, in the absence of pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis. Case Report: A 46-year-old Asian-Indian man with chronic tropical pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent epigastric pain that rapidly evolved into septic shock. A CT scan of abdomen revealed a dilated pancreatic duct with a large calculus. Broad-spectrum antibiotics, vasopressors and activated recombinant protein C were initiated. Emergency ERCP showed the papilla of Vater spontaneously expelling pus. Probing and stenting was instantly performed until pus drainage ceased. Repeat CT scan confirmed the absence of pancreatic necrosis or fluid collection, and decreasing ductal dilatation. Dramatic clinical improvement was observed within 36 hours after intervention. Blood cultures grew Klebsiella ornithinolytica. The patient completed his antibiotic course and was discharged. Conclusion: ASPD without pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis is an exceptional clinical entity that should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic sepsis. A chronically diseased pancreas and diabetes may have predisposed to the uncommon pathogen. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stones obstructing outflow played a major role in promoting bacterial growth, suppuration and septicemia. Immediate drainage of the pancreatic duct with endoscopic intervention is critical and mandatory.

  19. Dual drainage using a percutaneous pancreatic duct technique contributed to resolution of severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tatsunori; Kikuyama, Masataka; Yokoi, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Shinya

    2017-04-01

    A 66-year-old man was admitted for severe acute alcoholic pancreatitis with infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN). Abdominal computed tomography revealed an inflamed pancreatic head, a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD), and a large cavity with heterogeneous fluid containing gas adjacent to the pancreatic head, and extending to the pelvis. The cavity was drained percutaneously near the pancreatic head on admission; another tube was inserted into the pelvic cavity on hospital day 3. The drained fluid contained pus with high amylase concentration. Nasopancreatic drainage tube placement was unsuccessfully attempted on hospital day 9. On hospital day 23, percutaneous puncture of the MPD and placement of a pancreatic duct drainage tube was performed. Pancreatography revealed major extravasation from the pancreatic head. The IPN cavity receded; the percutaneous IPN drainage tube was removed on hospital day 58. On hospital day 83, the pancreatic drainage was changed to a transpapillary pancreatic stent, and the patient was discharged. Measuring the amylase concentration of peripancreatic fluid collections can aid in the diagnosis of pancreatic duct disruption; moreover, dual percutaneous necrotic cavity drainage plus pancreatic duct drainage may be essential for treating IPN. If transpapillary drainage tube placement is difficult, percutaneous pancreatic duct drainage may be feasible.

  20. Evisceration of the intestine following blunt force impact: Highlighting management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikki Singal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: Evisceration of the abdominal parts following traumatic injury with high velocity impact is a rare entity. We are reporting five cases of high velocity injury with different findings. Our objectives are to present the potential clinical impact of injury and requirement of early management. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted in the Department of Surgery at Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Maharishi Markandeshwar University, Mullana, from March 2010 to March 2013. A total of 150 cases were admitted, diagnosed with blunt and penetrating abdominal wall injury. We are presenting five cases diagnosed as eviscerated abdominal injury. Ultrasonography (USG and computed tomography was done which helped us in their management. Results: A total of five cases were admitted with evisceration of the abdominal parts. One case presented with a rare finding as the stomach and intestine were lying outside and on surgery, multiple perforations of the small intestine were seen. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT helped in the management of the patient. Conclusion: High velocity impact due to road side accidents can lead to severe abdominal organ injury or evisceration of the abdominal parts. It can cause morbidity and mortality, if not treated on time. USG and CT scans are the important diagnostic tools for diagnosing and preventing further complications. We came out with better prognosis as cases were operated on time. We treated the patients successfully without any mortality.

  1. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity in dysphoria during reward and punishment anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Jessica; Brinkmann, Kerstin

    2015-03-01

    Hyposensitivity to reward in depression and dysphoria has been found in behavioral and neuroimaging studies. For punishment responsiveness, some studies showed hyposensitivity to punishment while other studies demonstrated hypersensitivity. Only few studies have addressed the motivational question as to whether depressed individuals mobilize less effort in anticipation of a positive or a negative consequence. The present study aimed at investigating reward and punishment responsiveness in subclinical depression from an effort mobilization perspective. Working on a recognition memory task, one third of the participants could earn small amounts of money, one third could lose small amounts of money, and one third could neither earn nor lose money. Effort mobilization was operationalized as participants' cardiovascular reactivity during task performance. As expected, reactivity of cardiac pre-ejection period and heart rate was higher in both incentive conditions compared to the neutral condition for nondysphorics, while it was blunted across conditions for dysphorics. Moreover, the present study found that dysphorics show an altered behavioral response to punishment. These findings thus show that dysphorics present a reduced motivation to obtain a reward or to avoid a punishment in terms of reduced effort-related cardiac reactivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Perioperative management of tracheobronchial injury following blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh M Juvekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe tracheobronchial injury (TBI in a 17-year-old teenager following blunt trauma resulting from a road traffic accident. The patient presented to a peripheral hospital with swelling over the neck and face associated with bilateral pneumothorax for which bilateral intercostal drains were inserted and the patient was transferred to our institute. Fiber-optic videobronchoscopy (FOB was performed, the trachea and bronchi were visualized, and the site and extent of injury was assessed. Spontaneous respiration was maintained till assessment of the airway. Then the patient was anesthetized with propofol and paralyzed using succinylcholine and a double-lumen endobronchial tube was inserted; thereafter, the adequacy of controlled manual ventilation and air-leak through intercostal drains was assessed and the patient was transferred to operating room (OR for repair of the airway injury. The OR was kept ready during FOB to manage any catastrophe. This case describes the need for proper preparation and communication between health care team members to manage all possible scenarios of traumatic TBI.

  3. Conservative Management of Azygous Vein Rupture in Blunt Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian McDermott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of successful conservative management of acute traumatic rupture of the azygous vein. A 48-year-old male was involved in a motor vehicle collision. Primary survey revealed acute right intrathoracic haemorrhage. He remained haemodynamically stable with rapid infusion of warmed crystalloid solution and blood. Computed tomographic imaging showed a contained haematoma of the azygous vein. The patient was managed conservatively in the intensive care. Azygous vein laceration resulting from blunt thoracic trauma is a rare condition that carries a universally poor prognosis unless the appropriate treatment is instituted. Clinical features include acute hypovolaemic shock, widened mediastinum on chest radiograph, and a right-sided haemothorax. Haemodynamic collapse necessitates immediate resuscitative thoracotomy. Interest in this injury stems from the severity of the clinical condition, difficulty in diagnosis, the onset of a rapidly deteriorating clinical course all of which can be promptly reversed by timely and appropriate treatment. Although it is a rare cause of intramediastinal haemorrhage, it is proposed that a ruptured azygous vein should be considered in every trauma case causing a right-sided haemothorax or widened mediastinum. All cases described in the literature to date involved operative management. We present a case of successful conservative management of this condition.

  4. Blunt cardiac injuries in children: a postmortem study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorpio, R J; Wesson, D E; Smith, C R; Hu, X; Spence, L J

    1996-08-01

    We reviewed the records of the Chief Coroner for all pediatric (< 16 years of age) trauma fatalities in Ontario (pediatric population of 2 million) for the period January 1, 1988 through December 31, 1990. Forty-one (14.5%) of 282 patients for which complete autopsy data were available had sustained cardiac injuries. Nineteen patients (46%) died at the scene of the accident, 15 patients (37%) died in an emergency department, and seven patients (17%) died during hospitalization. Rupture of a cardiac chamber occurred in 16 cases; it was the main cause of death in eight cases and a contributing factor in the remainder. Cardiac contusion without chamber rupture was present in 25 cases, but in none of the cases was it the cause of death. Brain injury was the cause of death in 16 (64%) of the cases of cardiac contusion. Cardiac injuries are more common among children who die from blunt trauma than previous reports have suggested. However, because these injuries are often rapidly fatal, many patients die before they reach a hospital. With improvements in emergency medical services and the resulting reduction in transit time, more patients may reach trauma centers alive. A high index of suspicion and rapid diagnosis and treatment of these injuries can save the lives of some of these patients.

  5. Multidetector CT of blunt cervical spine trauma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, David; Letzing, Michael; Sliker, Clint W; Chokshi, Falgun H; Bodanapally, Uttam; Mirvis, Stuart E; Quencer, Robert M; Munera, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    A number of new developments in cervical spine imaging have transpired since the introduction of 64-section computed tomographic (CT) scanners in 2004. An increasing body of evidence favors the use of multidetector CT as a stand-alone screening test for excluding cervical injuries in polytrauma patients with obtundation. A new grading scale that is based on CT and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings, the cervical spine Subaxial Injury Classification and Scoring (SLIC) system, is gaining acceptance among spine surgeons. Radiographic measurements described for the evaluation of craniocervical distraction injuries are now being reevaluated with the use of multidetector CT. Although most patients with blunt trauma are now treated nonsurgically, evolution in the understanding of spinal stability, as well as the development of new surgical techniques and hardware, has driven management strategies that are increasingly favorable toward surgical intervention. It is therefore essential that radiologists recognize findings that distinguish injuries with ligamentous instability or a high likelihood of nonfusion that require surgical stabilization from those that are classically stable and can be treated with a collar or halo vest alone. The purpose of this article is to review the spectrum of cervical spine injuries, from the craniocervical junction through the subaxial spine, and present the most widely used grading systems for each injury type. ©RSNA, 2014.

  6. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathachai Kaewlai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4 in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7, eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P<0.001.

  7. Trauma attenuating backing improves protection against behind armor blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondén, Anders; Rocksén, David; Riddez, Louis; Davidsson, Johan; Persson, Jonas K; Gryth, Dan; Bursell, Jenny; Arborelius, Ulf P

    2009-12-01

    Body armor is used by military personnel, police officers, and security guards to protect them from fatal gunshot injuries to the thorax. The protection against high-velocity weapons may, however, be insufficient. Complementary trauma attenuating backings (TAB) have been suggested to prevent morbidity and mortality in high-velocity weapon trauma. Twenty-four Swedish landrace pigs, protected by a ceramid/aramid body armor without (n = 12) or with TAB (n = 12) were shot with a standard 7.62-mm assault rifle. Morphologic injuries, cardiorespiratory, and electroencephalogram changes as well as physical parameters were registered. The bullet impact caused a reproducible behind armor blunt trauma (BABT) in both the groups. The TAB significantly decreased size of the lung contusion and prevented hemoptysis. The postimpact apnea, desaturation, hypotension, and rise in pulmonary artery pressure were significantly attenuated in the TAB group. Moreover, TAB reduced transient peak pressures in thorax by 91%. Our results indicate that ordinary body armor should be complemented by a TAB to prevent thoracic injuries when the threat is high-velocity weapons.

  8. The Effect of Sarcopenia on Outcomes in Geriatric Blunt Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Mahdi; Bridgham, Kelly; Jaap, Kathryn; Erwin, Ryan; Widom, Kenneth; Rapp, Megan; Leonard, Diane; Baro, Susan; Dove, James; Hunsinger, Marie; Blansfield, Joseph; Shabahang, Mohsen; Torres, Denise; Wild, Jeffrey

    2017-11-01

    Elderly patients are at a higher risk of morbidity and mortality after trauma, which is reflected through higher frailty indices. Data collection using existing frailty indices is often not possible because of brain injury, dementia, or inability to communicate with the patient. Sarcopenia is a reliable objective measure for frailty that can be readily assessed in CT imaging. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of sarcopenia on the outcomes of geriatric blunt trauma patients. Left psoas area (LPA) was measured at the level of the third lumbar vertebra on the axial CT images. LPA was normalized for height (LPA mm2/m2) and after stratification by gender, sarcopenia was defined as LPA measurements in the lowest quartile. A total of 1175 patients consisting of 597 males and 578 females were studied. LPAs below 242.6 mm2/m2 in males and below 187.8 mm2/m2 in females were considered to be sarcopenic. We found sarcopenia in 149 males and 145 females. In multivariate analysis, sarcopenia was associated with a higher risk of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR]: 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-2.56) and a higher risk of discharge to less favorable destinations (OR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.05-1.97). Lastly, sarcopenic patients had an increased risk of prolonged hospitalization (hazard ratio: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.04-1.40).

  9. Non-invasive Respiratory Support in Blunt Chest Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Lobus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To optimize the results of treatment in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF due to lung contusion, by using the methods of non-invasive mask respiratory support. Materials and methods. The study covered 31 patients with severe blunt chest injury, multiple costal fractures, and hypoxemic ARF. The patients underwent assisted ventilation (AV in the CPAP+PSV mode through a facial or nasal mask. Physiological parameters were recorded during non-invasive mask ventilation (NIMV in the stepwise fashion. A control group comprised 25 patients with the similar severity of injury and ARF who were given conventional AV.Results. In 67.7% of the study group patients, NIMV was effective in improving oxygenation and external respiration, without exerting negative hemodynamic effects. Endotracheal intubation and AV could be avoided in these patients. Comparison of the study and control groups revealed a significant reduction in the incidence of secondary pneumonias in the NIMV group and in the duration of treatment. Mask ventilation could decrease mortality from 44% in the control group to 9.7% in the NIMV group.Conclusion. NIMV applied to patients with hypoxemic ARF in the presence of lung contusion improves pulmonary function and, in the bulk of patients, allows endotracheal intubation and AV and consequently their associated complications. When mask ventilation is employed, management of patients becomes shorter and simpler and mortality rates substantially decrease. 

  10. Use of Chest Computed Tomography in Stable Patients with Blunt Thoracic Trauma: Clinical and Forensic Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Makbule Ergin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the medical and forensic importance of thorax computed tomography in stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Material and Methods: Fifty patients with blunt chest injury were retrospectively evaluated with chest radiography and thorax computed tomography in the first 24 hours after trauma. Patient demographics, thoracic lesions, management options, and forensic assessment were rewieved. Results: The most common lesion of the study was ri...

  11. Cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascending aortic perforation after blunt chest trauma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu, Dae Woong; Lee, Mi Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac tamponade due to aortic injury after blunt trauma is a rare and potentially fatal injury. Most aortic injuries caused by blunt trauma present as aortic dissection or rupture of the aortic isthmus. Several cases of delayed aortic injury have been reported. However, all of these injuries were observed in the descending aorta because they had been caused by a posterior rib fracture. Case presentation We report the first case of cardiac tamponade associated with delayed ascendi...

  12. Sternal fractures and delayed cardiac tamponade due to a severe blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huai-min; Chen, Qiu-lin; Zhang, Er-yong; Hu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Sternal fractures caused by blunt chest trauma are associated with an increased incidence of cardiac injury. Reports of the incidence of cardiac injury associated with sternal fracture range from 18% to 62%. Delayed cardiac tamponade is a rare phenomenon that appears days or weeks after injury. Moreover, after nonpenetrating chest trauma, cardiac tamponade is very rare and occurs in less than 1 of 1000. This case describes a patient who had delayed cardiac tamponade 17 days after a severe blunt chest trauma.

  13. Isolated tear in left atrial appendage due to blunt trauma chest: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Salooja, Manpreet S.; Singla, Manender; Srivastava, Anupam; Mukherjee, Kishore C.

    2013-01-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is associated with a high mortality rate. Motor vehicle accidents account for most cardiac ruptures, but crush injury is relatively rare. We describe a case of a 72-year-old man who had the left atrial appendage ruptured through blunt trauma due to a fall from scooter. Simple suture repair of the atrial appendage was achieved after clamping the base of the left atrium to control the bleeding. He recovered without complication. Traumatic injury to left atrial ap...

  14. Characteristics of female patients with sexual dysfunction who also had a history of blunt perineal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munarriz, Ricardo; Talakoub, Lily; Somekh, Nir N; Lehrfeld, Todd; Chudnovsky, Aleksander; Flaherty, Elizabeth; Goldstein, Irwin

    2002-01-01

    Perineal trauma can occur in both genders, however, data supporting the relationship between sexual dysfunction and blunt perineal trauma in women is lacking. This study reviewed the patient characteristics of women with sexual dysfunction who also had a history of blunt perineal trauma. A neurogenic form of sexual dysfunction has been implicated, with primary complaints of orgasm disorder and abnormalities noted on genital sensory testing. Further research in this area is needed.

  15. The Houdini effect--an unusual case of blunt abdominal trauma resulting in perforative appendicitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Kelly, F

    2012-03-01

    We present a unique case of perforative appendicitis that occurred in an adult following blunt abdominal trauma. This case represents the first such reported case from Ireland. It also represents a modern practical example of Laplace\\'s theory of the effect of increased pressure on colonic wall tension leading to localized perforation, and serves to highlight not only the importance in preoperative imaging for blunt abdominal trauma, but also the importance of considering appendiceal perforation.

  16. Issues in hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, John; Singh, Vijay P; Pitchumoni, C S; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2014-03-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well-established but underestimated cause of acute pancreatitis and recurrent acute pancreatitis. The clinical presentation of HTG-induced pancreatitis (HTG pancreatitis) is similar to other causes. Pancreatitis secondary to HTG is typically seen in the presence of one or more secondary factors (uncontrolled diabetes, alcoholism, medications, pregnancy) in a patient with an underlying common genetic abnormality of lipoprotein metabolism (familial combined hyperlipidemia or familial HTG). Less commonly, a patient with rare genetic abnormality (familial chylomicronemic syndrome) with or without an additional secondary factor is encountered. The risk of acute pancreatitis in patients with serum triglycerides >1000 and >2000 mg/dL is ∼ 5% and 10% to 20%, respectively. It is not clear whether HTG pancreatitis is more severe than when it is due to other causes. Clinical management of HTG pancreatitis is similar to that of other causes. Insulin infusion in diabetic patients with HTG can rapidly reduce triglyceride (TG) levels. Use of apheresis is still experimental and better designed studies are needed to clarify its role in the management of HTG pancreatitis. Diet, lifestyle changes, and control of secondary factors are key to the treatment, and medications are useful adjuncts to the long-term management of TG levels. Control of TG levels to 500 mg/dL or less can effectively prevent recurrences of pancreatitis.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of traumatic pancreatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Akihiko; Isayama, Kenji; Nakatani, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of traumatic pancreatic injury in the acute stage is difficult to establish blood tests and abdominal findings alone. Moreover, to determine treatment strategies, it is important not only that a pancreatic injury is diagnosed but also whether a pancreatic ductal injury can be found. At our center, to diagnose isolated pancreatic injuries, we actively perform endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in addition to abdominal CT at the time of admission. For cases with complications such as abdominal and other organ injuries, we perform a laparotomy to ascertain whether a pancreatic duct injury is present. In regard to treatment options, for grade III injuries to the pancreatic body and tail, we basically choose distal pancreatectomy, but we also consider the Bracy method depending on the case. As for grade III injuries to the pancreatic head, we primarily choose pancreaticoduodenectomy, but also apply drainage if the situation calls for it. However, pancreatic injuries are often complicated by injuries of other regions of the body. Thus, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic injury should be based on a comprehensive decision regarding early prioritization of treatment, taking hemodynamics into consideration after admission, and how to minimize complications such as anastomotic leak and pancreatic fistulas. (author)

  18. Differential roles of inflammatory cells in pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerle, Julia; Dummer, Annegret; Sendler, Mathias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; van den Brandt, Cindy; Teller, Steffen; Aghdassi, Ali; Nitsche, Claudia; Lerch, Markus M

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis per 100,000 of population ranges from 5 to 80. Patients suffering from hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis die in 10-24% of cases. 80% of all cases of acute pancreatitis are etiologically linked to gallstone disease immoderate alcohol consumption. As of today no specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Elevated C-reactive protein levels above 130,mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis or other infectious complications. However, as premature intracellular protease activation is known to be the primary event in acute pancreatitis. Severe acute pancreatitis is characterized by an early inflammatory immune response syndrome (SIRS) and a subsequent compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) contributing to severity as much as protease activation does. CARS suppresses the immune system and facilitates nosocomial infections including infected pancreatic necrosis, one of the most feared complications of the disease. A number of attempts have been made to suppress the early systemic inflammatory response but even if these mechanisms have been found to be beneficial in animal models they failed in daily clinical practice. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoulis, P G

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in both dogs and cats. Ante-mortem diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis can be challenging. The clinical picture of dogs and cats with pancreatitis varies greatly (from very mild to severe or even fatal) and is characterised by non-specific findings. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry profile and urinalysis should always be performed in dogs and cats suspected of having pancreatitis, although findings are not-specific for pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase activities and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) concentrations have no or only limited clinical value for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in either dogs or cats. Conversely, serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) concentration is currently considered to be the clinicopathological test of choice for the diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis. Abdominal radiography is a useful diagnostic tool for the exclusion of other diseases that may cause similar clinical signs to those of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasonography can be very useful for the diagnosis of pancreatitis, but this depends largely on the clinician's experience. Histopathological examination of the pancreas is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of pancreatitis, but it is not without limitations. In clinical practice, a combination of careful evaluation of the animal's history, serum PLI concentration and abdominal ultrasonography, together with pancreatic cytology or histopathology when indicated or possible, is considered to be the most practical and reliable means for an accurate diagnosis or exclusion of pancreatitis compared with other diagnostic modalities. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  20. Validation of ‘Moderately Severe Acute Pancreatitis’ in patients with Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleswan Joshi Lakhey

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that moderately severe acute pancreatitis exists as a separate group different from mild acute pancreatitis and severe acute pancreatitis with no mortality as in mild acute pancreatitis. Keywords: moderately severe acute pancreatitis; Atlanta classification; outcome.

  1. Exploring the possible mechanisms of blunted cardiac reactivity to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindle, Ryan C; Whittaker, Anna C; Bibbey, Adam; Carroll, Douglas; Ginty, Annie T

    2017-03-01

    Blunted cardiovascular reactivity to acute psychological stress has been linked to a range of adverse health and behavioral outcomes. However, the origins of blunted reactivity remain unclear. The current study aimed to explore the following possibilities: different appraisals of task stressfulness and/or difficulty, diminished task effort, or reduced physiological capacity to respond. Individuals characterized, via pre-screening, as blunted (n=17) or exaggerated (n=16) heart rate (HR) reactors to acute psychological stress (socially evaluative mental arithmetic) were exposed to a psychological stress, cold pressor and exercise tasks during a follow-up testing session while HR and blood pressure (BP) were measured. At follow-up, groups again mounted significantly different HR reactions to psychological stress, despite reporting similar levels of subjective stress and difficulty, and achieving similar tasks scores (measure of task effort) at both testing sessions. In response to the cold pressor and exercise blunted and exaggerated reactors displayed similar HR and BP responses. Results indicated that blunted reactors do not differ from exaggerated reactors on appraisals of task stressfulness or difficulty, or objective task effort, and do possess the physiological capacity to respond to other laboratory challenges. Other sources of blunted stress reactivity remain to be explored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Probiotics enhance pancreatic glutathione biosynthesis and reduce oxidative stress in experimental acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Trulsson, Lena M.; van Minnen, L. Paul; Rijkers, Ger T.; Timmerman, Harro M.; Franzen, Lennart E.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Soderholm, Johan D.; Sandstrom, Per A.

    2008-01-01

    Factors determining severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) are poorly understood. Oxidative stress causes acinar cell injury and contributes to the severity, whereas prophylactic probiotics ameliorate experimental pancreatitis. Our objective was to study how probiotics affect oxidative stress,

  3. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Costa, D. W.; Boerma, D.; van Santvoort, H. C.; Horvath, K. D.; Werner, J.; Carter, C. R.; Bollen, T. L.; Gooszen, H. G.; Besselink, M. G.; Bakker, O. J.

    2014-01-01

    Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing pancreatitis. General

  4. Roux-en-Y drainage of a pancreatic fistula for disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome after acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Erik G; Scaife, Courtney L; Mulvihill, Sean J; Glasgow, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    After acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), a pancreatic fistula may occur from disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome (DPDS) where a segment of the pancreas is no longer in continuity with the main pancreatic duct. To study the outcome of patients treated using Roux-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy for DPDS after ANP. Between 2002 and 2011, patients treated for DPDS in the setting of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or magnetic resonance cholangiopanreatography (MRCP) documented main pancreatic duct disruption with Roux-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy. In all, seven patients with DPDS were treated. The median age was 62 years (range 49-78) and five were men. The cause of ANP was gallstones (2), alcohol (1), ERCP (1) and idiopathic (3). Pancreatic necrosectomy was done in six patients. Time from onset of pancreatitis to fistula drainage was 270 days (164-365). Pancreatic fistulae arose from DPDS in the head/neck (4) and body/tail (3). Patients had a median fistula output of 140 ml (100-200) per day before surgery. The median operative time was 142 min (75-367) and estimated blood loss was 150 ml (25 to 500). Patients began an oral diet on post-operative day 4 (3-6) and were hospitalized for a median of 7 days (5-12). The median follow-up was 264 days (29-740). Subsequently, one patient required a distal pancreatectomy. After surgery, three patients required oral hypoglycaemics. No patient developed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Internal surgical drainage using Roux-en-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy is a safe and definitive treatment for patients with DPDS. © 2011 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  5. Assessment value of quantitative indexes of pancreatic CT perfusion scanning for malignant degree of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Xia Lei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the assessment value of the quantitative indexes of pancreatic CT perfusion scanning for malignant degree of pancreatic cancer. Methods: A total of 58 patients with space-occupying pancreatic lesions were divided into 20 patients with pancreatic cancer and 38 patients with benign pancreatic lesions after pancreatic CT perfusion. Patients with pancreatic cancer received palliative surgery, and the cancer tissue and para-carcinoma tissue specimens were collected during operation. The differences in pancreatic CT perfusion scanning parameter values and serum tumor marker levels were compared between patients with pancreatic cancer and patients with benign pancreatic lesions, mRNA expression levels of malignant molecules in pancreatic cancer tissue and para-carcinoma tissue were further determined, and the correlation between pancreatic CT perfusion scanning parameter values and malignant degree of pancreatic cancer was analyzed. Results: CT perfusion scanning BF, BV and Per values of patients with pancreatic cancer were lower than those of patients with benign pancreatic lesions; serum CA19-9, CEA, CA125 and CA242 levels were higher than those of patients with benign pancreatic lesions (P<0.05; mRNA expression levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin in pancreatic cancer tissue samples were higher than those in paracarcinoma tissue samples, and mRNA expression levels of P53 and Bax were lower than those in para-carcinoma tissue samples (P<0.05; CT perfusion scanning parameters BF, BV and Per values of patients with pancreatic cancer were negatively correlated with CA19-9, CEA, CA125 and CA242 levels in serum as well as mRNA expression levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin in pancreatic cancer tissue, and positively correlated with mRNA expression levels of P53 and Bax in pancreatic cancer tissue (P<0.05. Conclusions: Pancreatic CT perfusion scanning is a reliable way to judge the malignant degree of pancreatic cancer and plays a

  6. Transgastric Local Pancreatic Hypothermia: A Novel, Rapid Multimodal Therapy for Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0327 TITLE: Transgastric Local Pancreatic Hypothermia: A Novel, Rapid Multimodal Therapy for Acute Pancreatitis ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0327 Transgastric Local Pancreatic Hypothermia: A Novel, Rapid Multimodal Therapy for Acute... Pancreatitis 5b. GRANT NUMBER PR110417 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Betty Diamond 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Dr. Vijay P. Singh 5e. TASK

  7. Is pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in celiac disease related to structural alterations in pancreatic parenchyma?

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Surinder S.; Dambalkar, Arvind; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Nada, Ritambhra; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Satyavati; Bhasin, Deepak K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) has been reported in a number of patients with celiac disease (CD), it is not clear if this is primarily a functional or a structural defect. We studied pancreatic structural abnormalities by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in adult CD patients with EPI. Methods Pancreatic exocrine function was prospectively assessed in 36 recently diagnosed CD patients (mean age: 29.8 years) by measuring fecal elastase. Pancreatic structural changes wer...

  8. Necrotizing Pancreatitis with Hypertriglyceridemia Development Results: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižbrahim Yetim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia is a relatively rare clinical entity. Acute pancreatic necrosis is a life threatening form of acute pancreatitis in which early recognition and treatment is important. Necrotising pancreatitis should be treated immediately. We presented a case of pancreatic necrosis due to hypert¬riglyceridemia which required surgical intervention. We performed necrosectomy. After surgery the patient recovered. We presented the case in order to mention necrotising pancreatitis arising from hypertriglyceridemia and requiring surgical exploration.

  9. Incidence of pancreatic cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weble, Tanja Cruusberg; Bjerregaard, Jon Kroll; Kissmeyer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    standardization. We used absolute numbers from the Cancer Registry and the Pancreatic Cancer Database, including distribution of topography of cancers registered in 2012-2013, to compare registration in the two data sources. RESULTS: The incidence rates of pancreatic cancer among Danish men increased until 1968......BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to monitor the evolution of the incidence of pancreatic cancer in Denmark over 70 years. We also compared registrations of pancreatic cancer in a nationwide population-based database, the Danish Cancer Registry, and a clinical database, the Danish Pancreatic...... Cancer Database, in 2012-2013. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Registrations of pancreatic cancer from the Danish Cancer Registry over 1943-2012 were used to calculate age-specific incidence rates per 100 000 person years by sex and age in 5-year period, weighted by the Segi World Standard Population for age...

  10. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis

  11. Bone mineral metabolism, bone mineral density, and body composition in patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Anne Birgitte; Rosenfalck, A M; Hansen, B

    2000-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D homeostasis seem to be abnormal in patients with exocrine pancreatic dysfunction resulting from cystic fibrosis. Only a few studies have evaluated and described bone mineral metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic insufficiency....

  12. Prevalence of autoimmune pancreatitis and other benign disorders in pancreatoduodenectomy for presumed malignancy of the pancreatic head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Heerde (Marc); K. Biermann (Katharina); P.E. Zondervan (Pieter); G. Kazemier (Geert); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); C.J. Pek (Chulja); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); H.R. van Buuren (Henk)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Occasionally patients undergoing resection for presumed malignancy of the pancreatic head are diagnosed postoperatively with benign disease. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease that mimics pancreatic cancer. We aimed to determine the prevalence of benign disease

  13. Are pancreatic calcifications specific for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis? A multidetector-row CT analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campisi, A. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo, via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Brancatelli, G. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo, via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 200 Lothrop street, 15213, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Radiology Unit, La Maddalena hospital, 90146, Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: gbranca@yahoo.com; Vullierme, M.-P.; Levy, P.; Ruzniewski, P. [Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Paris, F-75018 (France); AP-HP, Hopital Beaujon, Department of Radiology, Clichy F-92100 (France); Vilgrain, V. [Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Paris, F-75018 (France); AP-HP, Hopital Beaujon, Department of Radiology, Clichy F-92100 (France); INSERM, U773, Centre de recherche biomedicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris F-75018 (France)

    2009-09-15

    Aim: To retrospectively establish the most frequently encountered diagnoses in patients with pancreatic calcifications and to investigate whether the association of certain findings could be helpful for diagnosis. Materials and methods: One hundred and three patients were included in the study. The location and distribution of calcifications; presence, nature, and enhancement pattern of pancreatic lesions; pancreatic atrophy and ductal dilatation were recorded. Differences between patients with chronic pancreatitis and patients with other entities were compared by using Fisher's exact test. Results: Patients had chronic pancreatitis (n = 70), neuroendocrine tumours (n = 14), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (n = 11), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 4), serous cystadenoma (n = 4). Four CT findings had a specificity of over 60% for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis: parenchymal calcifications, intraductal calcifications, parenchymal atrophy, and cystic lesions. When at least two of these four criteria were used in combination, 54 of 70 (77%) patients with chronic pancreatitis could be identified, but only 17 of 33 (51%) patients with other diseases. When at least three of these four criteria were present, a specificity of 79% for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis was achieved. Conclusion: Certain findings are noted more often in chronic pancreatitis than in other pancreatic diseases. The presence of a combination of CT findings can suggest chronic pancreatitis and be helpful in diagnosis.

  14. Characteristic findings in images of extra-pancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujinaga, Yasunari, E-mail: fujinaga@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Kadoya, Masumi [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Kawa, Shigeyuki [Center of Health, Safety and Environmental Management, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Hamano, Hideaki [Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Ueda, Kazuhiko; Momose, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Sachie; Hatta, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Yukiko [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a unique form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by a variety of extra-pancreatic involvements which are frequently misdiagnosed as lesions of corresponding organs. The purpose of this study was to clarify the diagnostic imaging features of extra-pancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed diagnostic images of 90 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis who underwent computer-assisted tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or gallium-67 scintigraphy before steroid therapy was initiated. Results: AIP was frequently (92.2%) accompanied by a variety of extra-pancreatic lesions, including swelling of lachrymal and salivary gland lesions (47.5%), lung hilar lymphadenopathy (78.3%), a variety of lung lesions (51.2%), wall thickening of bile ducts (77.8%), peri-pancreatic or para-aortic lymphadenopathy (56.0%), retroperitoneal fibrosis (19.8%), a variety of renal lesions (14.4%), and mass lesions of the ligamentum teres (2.2%). Characteristic findings in CT and MRI included lymphadenopathies of the hilar, peri-pancreatic, and para-aortic regions; wall thickening of the bile duct; and soft tissue masses in the kidney, ureters, aorta, paravertebral region, ligamentum teres, and orbit. Conclusions: Recognition of the diagnostic features in the images of various involved organs will assist in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and in differential diagnoses between autoimmune pancreatitis-associated extra-pancreatic lesions and lesions due to other pathologies.

  15. Extrapancreatic necrosis without pancreatic parenchymal necrosis: a separate entity in necrotising pancreatitis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Olaf J.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar; Besselink, Marc G. H.; Boermeester, Marja A.; van Eijck, Casper; Dejong, Kees; van Goor, Harry; Hofker, Sijbrand; Ahmed Ali, Usama; Gooszen, Hein G.; Bollen, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    In the revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis, the term necrotising pancreatitis also refers to patients with only extrapancreatic fat necrosis without pancreatic parenchymal necrosis (EXPN), as determined on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT). Patients with EXPN are thought to have a better

  16. Pancreatitis of ectopic pancreatic tissue: a rare cause of gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwir, Saleh; Glessing, Brooke; Amin, Khalid; Jensen, Eric; Mallery, Shawn

    2017-08-01

    Inflammation in ectopic pancreatic tissue can clinically present with pain or obstructive symptoms, depending on the location of the ectopic tissue. We present a rare case of gastric outlet obstruction secondary to pancreatitis of ectopic pancreatic tissue in the pylorus. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  17. Value of ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanthi, Shri Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in an age group including from teenagers to young adults, in a male dominant proportion, resulting in great economic and social impact. Within the complex of trauma, blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is frequent event and presents difficulty in the evaluation and management since the clinical examination shows low sensitivity and specificity. The detection of hemo peritoneum is one of the methods of evaluation of possible indirect intra-abdominal injuries, initially using direct diagnostic abdominal paracentesis and posteriorly the diagnostic peritoneal lavage, that despite the effectiveness, have drawbacks such as invasiveness and the inability of hemo peritoneum quantification and the lesion staging, resulting in non-therapeutic laparotomies. Imaging methods provide useful information in the investigation of abdominal injuries, such as conventional and contrast radiology, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), which is the best effective method, but has its own drawbacks, such as cost, accessibility, use of ionizing radiation and contrast media and the displacement of the patient to the machine. US presents itself as an alternative in the initial evaluation of these patients as noninvasive method, with lack of harmfulness, low cost, fast answer and portability. Nevertheless, this method also has its limitations, as in cases of abdominal injuries without free fluid. This study was conducted in order to establish the performance of the US in this setting, allowing to rationalise the use of CT. For this purpose we studied 163 patients treated in the ER of HC/FMUSP, with the completion of consecutive US and CT. The population fits the usual profile of trauma victims, with 83% male, 56% in the age group between 20 and 39 years and in 73% of cases victims of traffic accidents. They were brought to the service in an average time of 51 minutes, mainly stable and with satisfactory level of consciousness. US took on

  18. PREVALENCIA DE PANCREATITIS AGUDA EN EL EMBARAZO

    OpenAIRE

    Ríos-Cruz,Daniel; Valerio-Ureña,Joaquín; Santiago-Pérez,Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia y características de la pancreatitis aguda durante el embarazo en el Hospital de Alta Especialidad de Veracruz, México. Material y Métodos: Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, descriptivo de todas las pacientes embarazadas diagnosticadas con pancreatitis agudas de enero tratadas en este Hospital. Resultados: Se revisaron 4.478 expedientes de mujeres gestantes, de las cuales 6 presentaron pancreatitis aguda durante su embarazo, esto corresponde a una de cad...

  19. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Gupta; Seema Ahmed; Lemuel Shaffer; Paula Cavens; Josef Blankstein

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term an...

  20. Hedgehog signaling and therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, Fergal C

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the role that the hedgehog signaling pathway has in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis. METHOD: PubMed search (2000-2010) and literature based references. RESULTS: Firstly, in 2009 a genetic analysis of pancreatic cancers found that a core set of 12 cellular signaling pathways including hedgehog were genetically altered in 67-100% of cases. Secondly, in vitro and in vivo studies of treatment with cyclopamine (a naturally occurring antagonist of the hedgehog signaling pathway component; Smoothened) has shown that inhibition of hedgehog can abrogate pancreatic cancer metastasis. Thirdly, experimental evidence has demonstrated that sonic hedgehog (Shh) is correlated with desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer. This is important because targeting the Shh pathway potentially may facilitate chemotherapeutic drug delivery as pancreatic cancers tend to have a dense fibrotic stroma that extrinsically compresses the tumor vasculature leading to a hypoperfusing intratumoral circulation. It is probable that patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer will derive the greatest benefit from treatment with Smoothened antagonists. Fourthly, it has been found that ligand dependent activation by hedgehog occurs in the tumor stromal microenvironment in pancreatic cancer, a paracrine effect on tumorigenesis. Finally, in pancreatic cancer, cells with the CD44+CD24+ESA+ immunophenotype select a population enriched for cancer initiating stem cells. Shh is increased 46-fold in CD44+CD24+ESA+ cells compared with normal pancreatic epithelial cells. Medications that destruct pancreatic cancer initiating stem cells are a potentially novel strategy in cancer treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Aberrant hedgehog signaling occurs in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and therapeutics that target the transmembrane receptor Smoothened abrogate hedgehog signaling and may improve the outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  1. Emphysematous pancreatitis: The utility of CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerbi Omezzine, Saida [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Tahar Sfar, Mahdia 5100 (Tunisia)], E-mail: saidajerbi@topnet.tn; Hmida, Naceur; Adel Hamza, Hassine [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Tahar Sfar, Mahdia 5100 (Tunisia)

    2009-05-15

    Emphysematous pancreatitis is a rare variant of severe acute pancreatitis characterized by gas formation within and around the pancreas. Early radiology detection of retroperitoneal gas in patients with pancreatitis is important in view of the high morbidity and mortality associated with this condition. Computed tomography is the imaging modality of choice. It is both highly sensitive and specific in the detection of abnormal gas and is well-suited to reliably depict the anatomical location and extent of the gas.

  2. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Complicating Uteroplacental Apoplexy

    OpenAIRE

    Cheang, Chong-U; Ho, Sai-Wai; Tee, Yi-Torng; Su, Chi-Feng; Chen, Gin-Den

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Abruptio placentae induced by acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is very rare. We present a pregnant woman with a series of complications due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Case Report: Presented herein is a 21-year-old, nulliparous woman at 33 weeks' gestation. The initial episode of abdominal pain was thought to be acute appendicitis (which in actuality was identified to be acute pancreatitis) and was complicated with abruptio placentae, uteroplacental apoplexy, and intra...

  3. Diagnosis and management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Wilson, Jeremy S; Smith, Ross C

    2017-08-21

    In 2015, the Australasian Pancreatic Club (APC) published the Australasian guidelines for the management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (http://pancreas.org.au/2016/01/pancreatic-exocrine-insufficiency-guidelines). Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) occurs when normal digestion cannot be sustained due to insufficient pancreatic digestive enzyme activity. This may be related to a breakdown, at any point, in the pancreatic digestive chain: pancreatic stimulation; synthesis, release or transportation of pancreatic enzymes; or synchronisation of secretions to mix with ingested food. Main recommendations: The guidelines provide advice on diagnosis and management of PEI, noting the following: A high prevalence of PEI is seen in certain diseases and conditions, such as cystic fibrosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and pancreatic surgery. The main symptoms of PEI are steatorrhoea or diarrhoea, abdominal pain, bloating and weight loss. These symptoms are non-specific and often go undetected and untreated. PEI diagnosis is predominantly based on clinical findings and the presence of underlying disease. The likelihood of PEI in suspected patients has been categorised into three groups: definite, possible and unlikely. If left untreated, PEI may lead to complications related to fat malabsorption and malnutrition, and have an impact on quality of life. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) remains the mainstay of PEI treatment with the recommended adult initial enzyme dose being 25 000-40 000 units of lipase per meal, titrating up to a maximum of 75 000-80 000 units of lipase per meal. Adjunct acid-suppressing therapy may be useful when patients still experience symptoms of PEI on high dose PERT. Nutritional management by an experienced dietitian is essential. Changes in management as a result of these guidelines: These are the first guidelines to classify PEI as being definite, possible or unlikely, and provide a diagnostic algorithm to

  4. Acute Pancreatitis in Pediatric Patients: Demographics, Etiology, and Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Ricardo; Hagerott, Heidi E; Kulkarni, Sakil; Yasrebi, Mona; Lee, Edward Y

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this article is to provide updates on acute pancreatitis in children regarding the imaging findings, causes, and complications based on a review of the current studies in the pediatrics literature. We discuss the epidemiology of acute pancreatitis, the role of imaging and imaging findings in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, and the causes and complications of acute pancreatitis. The incidence of acute pancreatitis is increasing in children. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis because imaging findings can be used to establish the cause of acute pancreatitis, evaluate for complications of acute pancreatitis, and possibly predict the course of the disease.

  5. Pharmacological interventions for acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggia, Elisabetta; Koti, Rahul; Belgaumkar, Ajay P; Fazio, Federico; Pereira, Stephen P; Davidson, Brian R; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan

    2017-04-21

    In people with acute pancreatitis, it is unclear what the role should be for medical treatment as an addition to supportive care such as fluid and electrolyte balance and organ support in people with organ failure. To assess the effects of different pharmacological interventions in people with acute pancreatitis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2016, Issue 9), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trial registers to October 2016 to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We also searched the references of included trials to identify further trials. We considered only RCTs performed in people with acute pancreatitis, irrespective of aetiology, severity, presence of infection, language, blinding, or publication status for inclusion in the review. Two review authors independently identified trials and extracted data. We did not perform a network meta-analysis as planned because of the lack of information on potential effect modifiers and differences of type of participants included in the different comparisons, when information was available. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the binary outcomes and rate ratios with 95% CIs for count outcomes using a fixed-effect model and random-effects model. We included 84 RCTs with 8234 participants in this review. Six trials (N = 658) did not report any of the outcomes of interest for this review. The remaining 78 trials excluded 210 participants after randomisation. Thus, a total of 7366 participants in 78 trials contributed to one or more outcomes for this review. The treatments assessed in these 78 trials included antibiotics, antioxidants, aprotinin, atropine, calcitonin, cimetidine, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), gabexate, glucagon, iniprol, lexipafant, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), octreotide, oxyphenonium, probiotics, activated protein C, somatostatin, somatostatin plus omeprazole, somatostatin

  6. Exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis and autotaxin expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kadekar

    Full Text Available Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA. The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development.

  7. Severe Hyperlipidemia Induced Hemorrhagic Pancreatitis during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Koscica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We report a case of familial hyperlipidemia in pregnancy that resulted in hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Case. A patient at 27-week gestation was admitted for recurrent pancreatitis secondary to severe hyperlipidemia. With conservative care, the patient improved but on the fourth day of admission she experienced a sudden onset of hypotension and was diagnosed with hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Conclusion. Pancreatitis caused by hyperlipidemia is an uncommon event during pregnancy. A familiarity with the severe complications associated with this potentially life-threatening condition is important.

  8. Acute pancreatitis following medical abortion: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini Hashem

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pancreatitis rarely complicates pregnancy. Although most pregnant women with acute pancreatitis have associated gallstones, less common causes such as drugs have been reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who underwent medical abortion with mifepristone and gemeprost and received codeine as pain-relief during the induction of abortion. She developed a severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis which required 14 days of intensive care. Other possible etiological factors, i.e. gallstone, alcohol intake and hyperlipidemia, were excluded. Conclusions The reported case of acute pancreatitis was most likely drug-induced.

  9. Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fataneh Karandish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC constitutes 90% of pancreatic cancers. PDAC is a complex and devastating disease with only 1%–3% survival rate in five years after the second stage. Treatment of PDAC is complicated due to the tumor microenvironment, changing cell behaviors to the mesenchymal type, altered drug delivery, and drug resistance. Considering that pancreatic cancer shows early invasion and metastasis, critical research is needed to explore different aspects of the disease, such as elaboration of biomarkers, specific signaling pathways, and gene aberration. In this review, we highlight the biomarkers, the fundamental signaling pathways, and their importance in targeted drug delivery for pancreatic cancers.

  10. Diffuse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Characteristic imaging features

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    Choi, Young Jun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, Ji-Youn [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Hwan [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Se Jin [Department of Pathology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Moon-Gyu [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate imaging findings of diffuse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: We included 14 patients (4 men and 10 women; mean age, 64.5 years) with diffuse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma on the basis of retrospective radiological review. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed 14 CT scans in consensus with respect to the following: tumor site, peripheral capsule-like structure, dilatation of intratumoral pancreatic duct, parenchymal atrophy, and ancillary findings. Eight magnetic resonance (MR) examinations with MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and seven endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were also reviewed, focusing on peripheral capsule-like structure and dilatation of intratumoral pancreatic duct. Results: CT revealed tumor localization to the body and tail in 11 (79%) patients and peripheral capsule-like structure in 13 (93%). The intratumoral pancreatic duct was not visible in 13 (93%). Pancreatic parenchymal atrophy was not present in all 14 patients. Tumor invasion of vessels was observed in all 14 patients and of neighbor organs in 8 (57%). On contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images, peripheral capsule-like structure showed higher signal intensity in five patients (71%). In all 11 patients with MRCP and/or ERCP, the intratumoral pancreatic duct was not dilated. Conclusion: Diffuse pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has characteristic imaging findings, including peripheral capsule-like structure, local invasiveness, and absence of both dilatation of intratumoral pancreatic duct and parenchymal atrophy.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K.C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of acute viral hepatitis and acute pancreatitis is well described. This study was conducted to find out the frequency of pancreatic involvement in acute viral hepatitis in the Nepalese population. Methods: Consecutive patients of acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain between January 2005 and April 2010 were studied. Patients with history of significant alcohol consumption and gall stones were excluded. Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination, liver function test, ultrasound examination and confirmed by viral serology. Pancreatitis was diagnosed by clinical presentation, biochemistry, ultrasound examination and CT scan. Results: Severe abdominal pain was present in 38 of 382 serologically-confirmed acute viral hepatitis patients. Twenty five patients were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. The pancreatitis was mild in 14 and severe in 11 patients. The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 18 and hepatitis A virus in 7 patients. Two patients died of complications secondary to shock. The remaining patients recovered from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis occurred in 6.5 % of patients with acute viral hepatitis. Cholelithiasis and gastric ulcers are the other causes of severe abdominal pain. The majority of the patients recover with conservative management. Keywords: acute viral hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, pain abdomen, hepatitis E, hepatitis A, endemic zone

  12. Eurytrema procyonis and pancreatitis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnal, Kristin K; Barr, Stephen C; Hornbuckle, William E; Yeager, Amy E; Wade, Susan E; Frongillo, Marguerite F; Simpson, Kenneth W; Bowman, Dwight D

    2008-08-01

    A young adult male domestic shorthair cat was presented for physical examination, routine vaccinations, and a fecal examination. Physical examination revealed no significant abnormalities. Eggs of the raccoon pancreatic fluke Eurytrema procyonis were detected by fecal flotation. Results of a complete blood count and serum biochemistry panel were normal. Abdominal sonography revealed an enlarged hypoechoic pancreas with a hyperechoic rim, and a distended and thickened pancreatic duct. Serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) was increased. These findings supported the possibility of fluke-associated pancreatitis. Treatment with praziquantel/pyrantel/febantel was associated with resolution of sonographic abnormalities and normalization of PLI.

  13. Considerations for the grade IIIb pancreatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Ishii, Takayuki; Ootawa, Satoru; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Eisuke; Nishiya, Kei; Yokoyama, Kouya; Shimizu, Kimio; Ogawa, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic duct disruption accompanied by pancreatic trauma is very severe. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) is considered the main diagnostic modality. However, it is invasive and can be associated with significant complications. We diagnosed pancreatic trauma based on only Computed tomography (CT) scan data. We operated based on specific signs of pancreatic injuries on CT scans, such as edema or hematoma of the pancreatic parenchyma, fractures or lacerations of the pancreas, active hemorrhage and, in all cases, there were main pancreatic duct injuries. Certain drainage of the pancreatic juice is necessary for pancreatic duct disruption. The operation method was selected according to the location of the damage. If it is at all possible pancreas preserving surgery should be performed. It is necessary to select the operation according to the patient's age and general condition, the cause of the injury, the range of the injury, and the experience of the surgeon. When the main duct injury was not certain, ERP during the operation was very useful. We report on a method of endoscopically treating a pseudocyst, which has adhered to the stomach, secondary to pancreatic main duct disruption. Transgastric placement of a stent into the pseudocyst is possible in restricted cases. (author)

  14. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  15. Hipertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañas García, María Dolores; Marchán Carranza, Enrique; Galiana Gómez Del Pulgar, Jesús; Fernández de Bobadilla Pascual, Belén

    Hypertrigliceridemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is 5% in healthy patients and 4% during pregnancy with triglyceride levels >1,000mg/dl. During pregnancy there are changes in the lipid profile that increase between two and four times triglyceride levels. Its increase in excessive form produces an oxidative environment with injury of the endothelium and appearance of complications such as preeclampsia or pancreatitis. We present the case of a pregnant woman with pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoscopic Palliation for Pancreatic Cancer

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    Mihir Bakhru

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is devastating due to its poor prognosis. Patients require a multidisciplinary approach to guide available options, mostly palliative because of advanced disease at presentation. Palliation including relief of biliary obstruction, gastric outlet obstruction, and cancer-related pain has become the focus in patients whose cancer is determined to be unresectable. Endoscopic stenting for biliary obstruction is an option for drainage to avoid the complications including jaundice, pruritus, infection, liver dysfunction and eventually failure. Enteral stents can relieve gastric obstruction and allow patients to resume oral intake. Pain is difficult to treat in cancer patients and endoscopic procedures such as pancreatic stenting and celiac plexus neurolysis can provide relief. The objective of endoscopic palliation is to primarily address symptoms as well improve quality of life.

  17. Heterotopic pancreatic tissue in gallbladder

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    Aylhin Joana Lopez Marcano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The heterotopic pancreas (PH is the atypical presence of pancreatic tissue without any anatomic or vascular continuity with the pancreas. PH is a rare condition that can be observed at any level of the gastrointestinal tract and even in other organs. Histopathological characterization of PH allows surgeons to distinguish it from other lesions. Although it is usually a benign and asymptomatic disease, it can occasionally cause complications (obstruction, hemorrhage, inflammation, or malignant transformation. In conclusion, localization in the gallbladder in the few cases of PH is very rare. We present two cases in which, after cholecystectomy indicated by other causes, in the pathological study of the surgical specimen, type 2 pancreatic tissue was found according to the Heinrich classification. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(4.000: 250-253

  18. Pain Management in Pancreatic Cancer

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    Michael Erdek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A majority of pancreatic cancer patients present with pain at the time of diagnosis. Pain management can be challenging in light of the aggressive nature of this cancer. Apart from conventional pharmacotherapy, timely treatment with neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB has been shown to be of benefit. NCPB has demonstrated efficacious pain control in high quality studies with analgesic effects lasting one to two months. NCPB has also shown to decrease the requirements of narcotics, and thus decrease opioid related side effects. Another option for the control of moderate to severe pain is intrathecal therapy (IT. Delivery of analgesic medications intrathecally allows for lower dosages of medications and thus reduced toxicity. Both of the above mentioned interventional procedures have been shown to have low complication rates, and be safe and effective. Ultimately, comprehensive pancreatic cancer pain management necessitates understanding of pain mechanisms and delivery of sequential validated therapeutic interventions within a multidisciplinary patient care model.

  19. Drag and heat flux reduction mechanism of blunted cone with aerodisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Lang-quan; Yan, Li; Zhang, Tian-tian

    2017-09-01

    The major challenge among a number of design requirements for hypersonic vehicles is the reduction of drag and aerodynamic heating. Of all these techniques of drag and heat flux reduction, application of forward facing aerospike conceived in 1950s is an effective and simpler technique to reduce the drag as well as the heat transfer rate for blunt nosed bodies at hypersonic Mach numbers. In this paper, the flow fields around a blunt cone with and without aerodisk flying at hypersonic Mach numbers are computed numerically, and the numerical simulations are conducted by specifying the freestream velocity, static pressure and static temperatures at the inlet of the computational domain with a three-dimensional, steady, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation. An aerodisk is attached to the tip of the rod to reduce the drag and heat flux further. The influences of the length of rod and the diameter of aerodisk on the drag and heat flux reduction mechanism are analyzed comprehensively, and eight configurations are taken into consideration in the current study. The obtained results show that for all aerodisks, the reduction in drag of the blunt body is proportional to the extent of the recirculation dead air region. For long rods, the aerodisk is found not that beneficial in reducing the drag, and an aerodisk is more effective than an aerospike. The spike produces a region of recirculation separated flow that shields the blunt-nosed body from the incoming flow, and the recirculation region is formed around the root of the spike up to the reattachment point of the flow at the shoulder of the blunt body. The dynamic pressure in the recirculation area is highly reduced and thus leads to the decrease in drag and heat load on the surface of the blunt body. Because of the reattachment of the shear layer on the shoulder of the blunt body, the pressure near that point becomes large.

  20. Gastric, pancreatic, and ureteric duplication

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    Chattopadhyay Anindya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an 8-month-old, asymptomatic child who was incidentally detected to have two cystic structures in the abdomen. Surgical exploration revealed a gastric and pancreatic duplication cyst along with a blind-ending duplication of the right ureter. Excision of the duplications was relatively straightforward, and the child made an uneventful recovery. This constellation of duplications has not been reported before.

  1. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praznik Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of other regional tissues or other organ systems. The severe form of the disease occurs in 10-20% of cases, and usually requires prolonged hospitalization due to a frequent local and systemic complications. Additionally, considerable mortality despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances, makes this disease a serious health problem nowadays. The aim of this study was to conduct a review of randomized controlled trials to determine differences in the efficiency between standard methods of treatment for severe acute pancreatitis and new treatment ways in terms of decreased mortality. Search of the 'Medline' database of original scientific papers and systematic review articles was made, using a combination of the following keywords: acute pancreatitis, treatment, mortality. In total 914 papers were found, published in the last 13 years; 14 of 64 randomized controlled clinical trials met the selection criteria and were eligible for inclusion. From a total of 16 papers, the conservative treatment was related to 11, which includes some of the new treatment methods, while the effects of new methods of treatment have been the subject of research in the four studies. Combined endoscopic and surgical treatment was applied in only one study. The largest sample of 290 patients was included in the study with platelet activation factor antagonist, while the smallest sample of 22 patients was used in the study that compared total parenteral with enteral nutrition. Continuous regional arterial infusion of protease inhibitors in combination with antibiotics, intravenous supplementation of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide and the early, high-volume continuous veno-venous hemofiltration showed the best results in the treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Also, the use of low molecular weight heparin and enteral nutrition significantly reduced mortality.

  2. Plasma Sphingolipids in Acute Pancreatitis

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    Tomasz Konończuk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a prevalent gastrointestinal disorder associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and, in the case of severe AP, a mortality rate ranging from 36% to 50%. Standard clinical treatment of AP includes intensive hydration, analgesia, and management of complications. Unfortunately, the direct treatment of AP at the level of its molecular pathomechanism has not yet been established. Recent studies indicate that the sphingolipid signaling pathway may be one of the important factors contributing to the development of inflammation in pancreatic diseases. In the current study, we sought to investigate this promising route. We examined the plasma sphingolipid profile of 44 patients with acute pancreatitis, dividing them into three groups: mild, moderate and severe AP. Samples were collected from these groups at days 1, 3 and 7 following their hospital admission. We demonstrated significant changes in blood plasma sphingolipids in relation to the time course of AP. We also found an inhibition of de novo ceramide synthesis in mild and moderate AP. However, the most important and novel finding was a significant elevation in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P (a downstream metabolite of ceramide in mild AP, as well as a dramatic reduction in the lipid molecule content in the early stage (days 1 and 3 of severe AP. This strongly indicates that plasma S1P could serve as a prognostic marker of AP severity.

  3. Time-dependent solution for axisymmetric flow over a blunt body with ideal gas, CF4, or equilibrium air chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H. H., II; Spall, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A time-asymptotic method has been used to obtain steady-flow solutions for axisymmetric inviscid flow over several blunt bodies including spheres, paraboloids, ellipsoids, and spherically blunted cones. Comparisons with experimental data and results of other computational methods have demonstrated that accurate solutions can be obtained using this approach. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing with experimental data and for making engineering calculations for blunt reentry vehicles.

  4. Multislice Spiral Perfusion Computed Tomography to Assess Pancreatic Vascularity in Mild Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chunjiang; Xu, Xiangfeng

    This study aims to use perfusion computed tomography to compare pancreatic perfusion in mild acute pancreatitis (MAP) versus normal pancreas. This observational study included 39 patients with MAP and 18 patients with normal pancreatic function. Perfusion computed tomography parameters, including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time, and permeability surface area product, were compared. Both serum and urinary amylase levels were significantly higher in patients with MAP than in controls (all Ps Pancreatic perfusion seems to be poorer, and pancreatic vascular leakage may increase in MAP compared with normally functioned pancreas.

  5. Enteric duplication cyst of the pancreas associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Alexander S; Bluhm, David; Xiao, Shu-Yan; Waxman, Irving; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2014-05-01

    Pancreas-associated enteric duplication cysts are rare developmental anomalies that communicate with the main pancreatic duct and may be associated with recurrent acute and chronic abdominal pain in children. In adults, these lesions may masquerade as pancreatic pseudocysts or pancreatic cystic neoplasms. An adult patient with a pancreas-associated enteric duplication is described which represents the first reported instance of association with both chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The clinical spectrum of pancreas-associated enteric duplication cyst, including diagnostic and therapeutic options, is reviewed.

  6. Surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis

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    Stefanović Dejan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The principal indication for surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis is intractable pain. Depending upon the presence of dilated pancreatic ductal system, pancreatic duct drainage procedures and different kinds of pancreatic resections are applied. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to show the most appropriate procedure to gain the most possible benefits in dependence of type of pathohistological process in chronic pancreatitis. METHOD: Our study included 58 patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic genesis. The first group consisted of 30 patients with dilated pancreatic ductal system more than 10 mm. The second group involved 28 patients without dilated pancreatic ductal system. Pain relief, weight gain and glucose tolerance were monitored. RESULTS: All patients of Group I (30 underwent latero-lateral pancreaticojejunal - Puestow operation. 80% of patients had no pain after 6 month, 13.6% had rare pain and 2 patients, i.e. 6.4%, who continued to consume alcohol, had strong pain. Group II consisting of 28 patients was without dilated pancreatic ductal system. This group was subjected to various types of pancreatic resections. Whipple procedure (W was done in 6 patients, pylorus preserving Whipple (PPW in 7 cases, and duodenum preserving cephalic pancreatectomy (DPCP was performed in 15 patients. Generally, 89.2% of patients had no pain 6 month after the operation. An average weight gain was 1.9 kg in W group, 2.8 kg in PPW group and 4.1 kg in DPCP group. Insulin-dependent diabetes was recorded in 66.6% in W group, 57.1% in PPW group and 0% in DPCP group. CONCLUSION: According to our opinion, DPCP may be considered the procedure of choice for surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis in patients without dilatation of pancreas ductal system because of no serious postoperative metabolic consequences.

  7. The role of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic ducts secrete 2.5 l of alkaline, HCO3(-)-rich fluid daily which greatly contributes to the homeostasis of the pancreas. Ducts are also important in the pathophysiology of the pancreas; alteration of ductal function can lead to severe diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. The role of pancreatic ducts in the development of acute pancreatitis has only been uncovered recently. Pancreatitis inducing agents like bile acids and ethanol dose-dependently affect pancreatic ductal secretion; low concentrations stimulate, whereas high concentrations inhibit secretion. The majority of the review will focus on the central role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a critical protein in the regulation of ductal secretion, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis which is highlighted by numerous investigations. Downregulation of CFTR expression results in increased severity of acute pancreatitis in mice. Furthermore, human genetic studies have demonstrated statistically significant association of CFTR mutations with acute recurrent pancreatitis. Overall, the data support the involvement of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypovolemic shock complex: does the pancreatic perfusion increase or decrease at contrast-enhanced dynamic CT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hiroki; Tamada, Tsutomu; Kanki, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Akira; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate contrast enhancement effects of the pancreas at dynamic computed tomography (CT) to clarify whether pancreatic perfusion increases or decreases in severe trauma patients with hypovolemic shock. A total of 90 patients with (n=30) and without (n=60) blunt trauma and hypovolemic shock who underwent dynamic CT for abdomen was included. The measurement of CT attenuation values of the pancreas in the early phase and the late phase was performed to compare the contrast enhancement effects between patients with and without hypovolemic shock. The mean CT attenuation values of the pancreas in the early phase of dynamic CT in patients with hypovolemic shock [95.4±29.1 Hounsfield units (HU)] were significantly lower (P perfusion in patients with hypovolemic shock. The mean CT attenuation values of the pancreas in the late phase of dynamic CT in patients with hypovolemic shock (95.9±17.6 HU) were significantly higher (P perfusion in the early phase and delayed pancreatic enhancement in the late phase of contrast-enhanced dynamic CT was a common finding in patients with hypovolemic shock. © 2014.

  9. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

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    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  10. Utility of MRI for cervical spine clearance in blunt trauma patients after a negative CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ajay; Durand, David; Wu, Xiao; Geng, Bertie; Abbed, Khalid; Nunez, Diego B; Sanelli, Pina

    2018-02-15

    To determine the utility of cervical spine MRI in blunt trauma evaluation for instability after a negative non-contrast cervical spine CT. A review of medical records identified all adult patients with blunt trauma who underwent CT cervical spine followed by MRI within 48 h over a 33-month period. Utility of subsequent MRI was assessed in terms of findings and impact on outcome. A total of 1,271 patients with blunt cervical spine trauma underwent both cervical spine CT and MRI within 48 h; 1,080 patients were included in the study analysis. Sixty-six percent of patients with a CT cervical spine study had a negative study. Of these, the subsequent cervical spine MRI had positive findings in 20.9%; 92.6% had stable ligamentous or osseous injuries, 6.0% had unstable injuries and 1.3% had potentially unstable injuries. For unstable injury, the NPV for CT was 98.5%. In all 712 patients undergoing both CT and MRI, only 1.5% had unstable injuries, and only 0.42% had significant change in management. MRI for blunt trauma evaluation remains not infrequent at our institution. MRI may have utility only in certain patients with persistent abnormal neurological examination. • MRI has limited utility after negative cervical CT in blunt trauma. • MRI is frequently positive for non-specific soft-tissue injury. • Unstable injury missed on CT is infrequent.

  11. Blunt Traumatic Cardiac Rupture: Single-Institution Experiences over 14 Years

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    Jeong Hee Yun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is rare. However, such cardiac ruptures carry a high mortality rate. This study reviews our experience treating blunt traumatic cardiac rupture. Methods: This retrospective study included 21 patients who experienced blunt traumatic cardiac rupture from 1999 to 2015. Every patient underwent surgery. Several variables were compared between survivors and fatalities. Results: Sixteen of the 21 patients survived, and 5 (24% died. No instances of intraoperative mortality occurred. The most common cause of injury was a traffic accident (81%. The right atrium was the most common location of injury (43%. Ten of the 21 patients were suspected to have cardiac tamponade. Significant differences were found in preoperative creatine kinase–myocardial band (CK-MB levels (p=0.042 and platelet counts (p= 0.004 between the survivors and fatalities. The patients who died had higher preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale scores (p=0.007, worse Trauma and Injury Severity Scores (p=0.007, and higher Injury Severity Scores (p=0.004 than those who survived. Conclusion: We found that elevated CK-MB levels, a low platelet count, and multi-organ traumatic injury were prognostic factors predicting poor outcomes of blunt cardiac rupture. If a patient with blunt traumatic cardiac rupture has these factors, clinicians should be especially attentive and respond promptly in order to save the patient’s life.

  12. Non-operative management of blunt abdominal trauma: positive predictors

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    A. A. Pankratov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last years a non-operative management (NOM of blunt  abdominal  trauma has been included into the standard treatment guidelines  in leading  trauma  centers  all over the world.  The  success  of NOM is based  on  careful patient  selection. Nevertheless, the selection  criteria have not been clearly determined up to now.Aim: To identify predictors of successful NOM and to  create  a diagnostic  and  treatment algorithm for its implementation.Materials and methods: 209 patients  with abdominal  trauma  who underwent  laparoscopy  or NOM from January 2006 to September 2015 were included  in the  study. The hemoperitoneum volume  and  organ  injury rate evaluated   by  using  ultrasonography  and  computed  tomography scan, as well as hemoglobin level, blood  pressure,  and  peripheral  pulse  were analyzed. We performed  comparative  analysis of prognostic  values of various selection  criteria for NOM, such as: 1 Huang and McKenney ultrasound scoring systems for hemoperitoneum quantification; 2 hemodynamic parameters; 3 hemoglobin levels;  4 various combinations  of the  above mentioned factors; 5 Sonographic  Scoring for Operating  Room Triage in Trauma (SSORTT scoring system.Results: Positive prognostic  values of parameters included into the study varied from 88 to 91.7% when used separately or in combination with other scored factors. Furthermore, there was no  significant  difference  between positive  predictive value  of all combinations of factors  and McKenney ultrasound hemoperitoneum scoring system used alone.Conclusion: The proposed predictors  as  well as  diagnostic  and  treatment algorithm are easy-to-use  and available in clinical practice.

  13. Bilateral ureteropelvic disruption following blunt abdominal trauma: Case report

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    Kikuchi Hiroko

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ureteral injury occurs in less than 1% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, partly because the ureters are relatively well protected in the retroperitoneum. Bilateral ureteral injury is extremely rare, with only 10 previously reported cases. Diagnosis may be delayed if ureteric injury is not suspected, and delay of 36 hours or longer has been observed in more than 50% of patients with ureteric injury following abdominal trauma, leading to increased morbidity. Case presentation A 29-year-old man was involved in a highway motor vehicle collision and was ejected from the front passenger seat even though wearing a seatbelt. He was in a preshock state at the scene of the accident. An intravenous line and left thoracic drain were inserted, and he was transported to our hospital by helicopter. Whole-body, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT scan showed left diaphragmatic disruption, splenic injury, and a grade I injury to the left kidney with a retroperitoneal haematoma. He underwent emergency laparotomy. The left diaphragmatic and splenic injuries were repaired. Although a retroperitoneal haematoma was observed, his renal injury was treated conservatively because the haematoma was not expanding. In the intensive care unit, the patient's haemodynamic state was stable, but there was no urinary output for 9 hours after surgery. Anuresis prompted a review of the abdominal x-ray which had been performed after the contrast-enhanced CT. Leakage of contrast material from the ureteropelvic junctions was detected, and review of the repeat CT scan revealed contrast retention in the perirenal retroperitoneum bilaterally. He underwent cystoscopy and bilateral retrograde pyelography, which showed bilateral complete ureteral disruption, preventing placement of ureteral stents. Diagnostic laparotomy revealed complete disruption of the ureteropelvic junctions bilaterally. Double-J ureteral stents were placed bilaterally and ureteropelvic

  14. Canine and feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Steiner, Jörg M

    2012-09-01

    The diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats can be challenging. Several diagnostic tests have been evaluated over the years, but the majority have been shown to be of limited utility owing to poor performance or limited availability or because invasive procedures are required. Assays for the measurement of pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI for dogs and fPLI for cats) were first developed over a decade ago and now include Spec cPL and SNAP cPL for dogs and Spec fPL and SNAP fPL for cats. Owing to their high sensitivity and specificity for pancreatitis compared with those of other serum tests, concentrations of cPLI and fPLI have been demonstrated to be the serum tests of choice for evaluation of dogs and cats, respectively, suspected of having pancreatitis. False-positive and false-negative results can occur, and recognition of the limitations of pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity assays is important. As there is currently no gold standard for antemortem diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats, the combination of a complete history and physical examination, measurement of pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity, and ultrasonographic examination of the pancreas is the best approach for an accurate noninvasive diagnosis of pancreatitis. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  15. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleis, Stephanie E; Rizzo, Scott A; Phillips, Jeffery C; LeBlanc, Amy K

    2011-09-01

    A dog with lymphosarcoma was evaluated for vomiting, lethargy, and abdominal pain 48 h after treatment with L-asparaginase. Based on drug administration, clinical signs, bloodwork, and elevated canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity, L-asparaginase-associated pancreatitis was diagnosed. This is an acknowledged toxicity; however, its pathophysiology and incidence rate in veterinary patients are unknown and sparsely documented.

  16. Isolated Pancreatic Metastasis from Malignant Melanoma: Is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolated pancreatic metastasis from malignant melanoma (IPMMM) is rare because most melanoma patients already have a widespread disease at diagnosis. No adjuvant systemic treatment is known to be effi cient in this setting. Experience with pancreatic resection for IPMMM is limited and controversial. We report here ...

  17. Acute pancreatitis complicating choledochal cysts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthucumaru, Mathievathaniy; Ljuhar, Damir; Panabokke, Gayathri; Paul, Eldho; Nataraja, Ramesh; Ferguson, Peter; Dagia, Charuta; Clarnette, Tom; King, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    To analyse the characteristics of patients with choledochal cysts presenting with acute pancreatitis. Multicenter retrospective review of all paediatric patients (pancreatitis, one having had an ante-natally diagnosed choledochal cyst. Patients presenting with pancreatitis were older when compared to the non-pancreatitis group (5.1 vs. 1.2 years, P = 0.005). Nine out of 16 (53%) patients with Type IV-A cysts presented with pancreatitis compared to five (33%) of Type I fusiform and three (17%) of Type I cystic. There was however no statistically significant association between Todani types and the development of pancreatitis (Type I fusiform, P = 1.0; Type I cystic, P = 0.063; Type IV-A, P = 0.053). The rate of complications was similar in both groups. Pancreatitis was a common presentation in children with a choledochal cyst, however, there was no clear statistically significant association with Todani types and pancreatitis. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  18. Acute Pancreatitis: Demographics, aetiological factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The spectrum of aetiologies and outcomes of acute pancreatitis in South African settings is under-reported. We report our experience at a regional hospital and compare it with international norms. Patients and methods. Data were prospectively collected on all admissions of patients with acute pancreatitis to a ...

  19. Cytokines and organ failure in acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Anders Møller

    2012-01-01

    We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP).......We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP)....

  20. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heek, N. T.; Busch, O. R.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile

  1. Calcium influx pathways in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hug, M J; Pahl, C; Novak, I

    1996-01-01

    A number of agonists increase intracellular Ca2+ activity, [Ca2+]i, in pancreatic ducts, but the influx/efflux pathways and intracellular Ca2+ stores in this epithelium are unknown. The aim of the present study was to characterise the Ca2+ influx pathways, especially their pH sensitivity, in native...... pathways in pancreatic ducts cells....

  2. Peripancreatic fat necrosis mimicking pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, M.M.; Schima, W.; Turetschek, K.; Thurnher, S.A. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Fuegger, R. [Dept. of Surgery, University of Vienna (Austria); Oberhuber, G. [Dept. of Pathology, University of Vienna (Austria)

    2001-06-01

    A case of peripancreatic fat necrosis, after an episode of acute pancreatitis, which mimicked pancreatic cancer with lymph node metastases, is presented. We describe the imaging findings with helical CT scanning and with unenhanced and mangafodipir-enhanced MR imaging, with special emphasis on the differential diagnoses. (orig.)

  3. PANCREATIC PSEUDOCYST - A DIAGNOSTIC DILEMMA IN THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pancreatic pseudocyst is a local but serious complication of acute pancreatitis. The diagnosis is difficult in the tropics where a number of diseases exist which may mimic this condition and diagnostic facilities are few and often inaccessible. A case seen in the medical department of the University of Calabar Teaching ...

  4. Acute pancreatitis: recent advances through randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Sven M.; Hallensleben, Nora D. L.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Fockens, Paul; van Goor, Harry; Bruno, Marco J.; Besselink, Marc G.

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common GI conditions requiring acute hospitalisation and has a rising incidence. In recent years, important insights on the management of acute pancreatitis have been obtained through numerous randomised controlled trials. Based on this evidence, the treatment

  5. Prevention and Intervention Strategies in Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, M.G.H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common, costly, potentially lethal, and poorly understood disease, mostly caused by gallstones. In the past decade the incidence of acute pancreatitis in the Netherlands increased by 50% to over 3400 admissions in 2006, most likely due to an increase of gallstone disease.

  6. Differential diagnosis of small solid pancreatic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph Frank; Sahai, Anand Vasante; D'Onofrio, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is typically diagnosed at a late stage. Little is known about the incidental finding of early-stage PDAC. The aim of the current study was to determine the etiology of small solid pancreatic lesions (≤15 mm) to optimize clinical managem...

  7. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodewijkx, Piet J.; Besselink, Marc G.; Witteman, Ben J.; Schepers, Nicolien J.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Bakker, Olaf J.

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis poses unique nutritional challenges. The optimal nutritional support in patients with severe acute pancreatitis has been a subject of debate for decades. This review provides a critical review of the available literature. According to current literature, enteral nutrition

  8. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodewijkx, Piet J.; Besselink, Marc G.; Witteman, Ben J.; Schepers, Nicolien J.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821721; Bakker, Olaf J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314099050

    Severe acute pancreatitis poses unique nutritional challenges. The optimal nutritional support in patients with severe acute pancreatitis has been a subject of debate for decades. This review provides a critical review of the available literature. According to current literature, enteral nutrition

  9. Acute pancreatitis complicating excessive intake of phenolphthalein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrianides, A. L.; Rosin, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A case is described in which a patient presented with acute pancreatitis following inadvertent ingestion of large quantities of phenolphthalein for the treatment of his chronic constipation. There was complete recovery and no sequelae from the acute attack of pancreatitis. PMID:6463003

  10. Pancreatic Perfusion CT in Early Stage of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Tsuji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early intensive care for severe acute pancreatitis is essential for improving SAP mortality rates. However, intensive therapies for SAP are often delayed because there is no ideal way to accurately evaluate severity in the early stages. Currently, perfusion CT has been shown useful to predict prognosis of SAP in the early stage. In this presented paper, we would like to review the clinical usefulness and limitations of perfusion CT for evaluation of local and systemic complications in early stage of SAP.

  11. Estrogen-associated severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljenedil, Sumayah; Hegele, Robert A; Genest, Jacques; Awan, Zuhier

    Estrogen, whether therapeutic or physiologic, can cause hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis is a rare complication. We report 2 women who developed estrogen-associated severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis. The first patient developed pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia associated with in vitro fertilization cycles. Marked reduction in her triglyceride was achieved with dietary restrictions and fibrate. The second patient developed pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia during her pregnancies. She was noncompliant with the treatment; therefore, her triglyceride remained high after delivery. In both patients, no hypertriglyceridemia-associated genes mutations were identified, although the second patient had strong polygenic susceptibility to hypertriglyceridemia. Estrogen-induced severe hypertriglyceridemia with pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition. Screening in high-risk patients is crucial to prevent subsequent complications. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Iliac Artery and Vein Injury Without Pelvic Fracture Due To Blunt Trauma: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Cuneyt Cicek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Iliac vascular injuries have high morbidity and mortality rates. Penetrant abdominal and pelvic vascular injuries are more common compared to blunt traumas. Pelvic vascular injuries associated with blunt trauma are quite likely to occur in accompaniment with pelvic fracture. A 23 year old male patient was admitted to the emergency room due to a motorcycle accident. Shock picture was prevalent in the patient. Shaft fracture was present in left femur and flow was not detected in arterial and venous colour Doppler ultrasonography. Patient underwent emergency surgery. Left main iliac artery and vein were normal, however, external iliac vein was lacerated in two spots, and blood vessel wall integrity was damaged in one part of left external iliac artery. Clinical presentation and traumatic retroperitoneal hematoma management of iliac artery and venous injuries due to blunt trauma without pelvic fracture are discussed in the presented case.

  13. Budd-Chiari syndrome: puncturing occlusion of inferior vena cava with blunt wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xinwei; Wu Gang; Ding Pengxu; Gao Xuemei; Ma Nan; Wang Yanli; Guan Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the safety of puncturing occlusion of inferior vena cava with blunt wire for Budd-Chiari syndrome. Methods: Under the fluoroscopic guidance, occlusions of inferior vena cava were punctured with blunt wire for 63 patients with membranous occlusion of inferior vena cava and 33 with segmental occlusion of the inferior vena cava; including 15 patients with hepatic vein stenosis or occlusion. Results: 96 patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome were operated successfully. All occlusions of inferior vena cava were punctured with patent rate of 100% and no serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Puncturing occlusion of IVC with blunt guide wire is safe, efficient, no serious complication and simple economic method, worthy to be recommended. (authors)

  14. A Clinical Study of Blunt Ocular Trauma in a Tertiary Care Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha G Pai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze blunt eye injuries with respect to mode of injury, sites involved and outcome. Method: This was a retrospective study of 32 patients with blunt ocular trauma from 2010 to 2012 in a tertiary care centre. Patient data, mode and extent of injury, management and outcome was noted and analyzed. Result: The commonest age of presentation was 10-20 years (28.125% and the commonest mode of injury was road traffic accident (28.125%. The most commonly involved structure was conjunctiva (84.375%, followed by lid and adnexa (62.5%. Anterior segment involvement included corneal epithelial defect (7 cases, hyphaema (4 cases, iritis (3 cases and anterior dislocation of lens (1 case. Posterior segment involvement included vitreous haemorrhage (1 case and commotio retinae (2 cases. Conclusion: This study reinforces that blunt trauma can cause any extent of damage to ocular structures and the final visual outcome is dependent on the structures injured.

  15. Blunted cortisol response to stress in patients with eating disorders: Its association to bulimic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Leal, Francisco J; Ramos-Fuentes, María I; Rodríguez-Santos, Laura; Chimpén-López, Carlos; Fernández-Sánchez, Nieves; Zamora-Rodríguez, Francisco J; Beato-Fernández, Luis; Rojo-Moreno, Luis; Guisado-Macías, Juan A

    2018-05-01

    Clinical research on cortisol response to stress in patients with eating disorders has provided controversial and even contradictory results. As this might be the consequence of the inclusion in the studies of heterogeneous clinical populations, 3 highly selected samples were studied. Dexamethasone suppression test was performed on 15 restricting anorexia nervosa patients without history of bulimia nervosa (BN), 17 BN patients with normal weight and no history of anorexia nervosa, and 22 healthy controls. Three days later, the Trier Social Stress Test was applied, and 8 saliva samples were collected along the trial for cortisol assessment. When the patients were considered as a single group, a slightly blunted cortisol response to stress was observed, but when the 3 groups were considered separately, the blunted response was observed only in the BN patients. The results support the association between blunted cortisol response and bulimic features. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  16. Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia After a Blunt Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Dumlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic abdominal wall hernia is a rare result of blunt abdominal traumas in adults. Altough the detection of the injuries of the abdominal organs is the priority in blunt traumas, abdominal wall defect may also occur in these patients. These hernias can go undetected due to preservation of the skin overlying the hernia defect. Traumatic abdominal wall hernias can have high morbidity and mortality rates due to incarceration and perforation of tubular hollow organs, especially if there is any delay. The possibility of traumatic hernia should always be considered in cases with serious blunt trauma. Computed Tomography (CT scan examinations should be performed routinely due to their high diagnostic value if trumatic hernia is suspected. In this report, a traumatic abdominal wall hernia patient who was treated by surgery has been presented with the review of the current literature.

  17. Paediatric pancreatic problems: A five-year experience | Lahoti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Of the total 228 patients with various pancreatic problems, who presented to us, mostly with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic trauma, 64 needed surgical interventions. The total mortality rate encountered was a meagre 3.5%. Conclusion: Paediatric pancreatic disorders are not so infrequent; and a high index of ...

  18. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  19. Evaluation of three phases computed tomography scan findings in blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboub Pouraghaei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma is one of the important types of trauma and causes mortality in patients. Identifying the internal organ damage is necessary to proper management of trauma patients. Computed tomography (CT scan is a powerful non-invasive imaging technique to assess internal organ damages in blunt abdominal trauma. The aim of present study was to evaluate findings of CT scan with contrast in patient with blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: In this descriptive study, 290 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were studied who referred to emergency department of Imam-Reza Hospital of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in Tabriz, Iran, from June 2014 to June 2015. Abdominal and pelvic CT scan with contrast was done using 1 detector CT scan machine in three phases (arterial phase, portal-venous phase and a delayed phase. Patients’ demographic information, cause of trauma, and CT scan findings were collected. Results: Mean age of patients was 26.3 ± 8.15 years. Male to female ratio was 1 to 0.42. Most common causes of blunt abdominal trauma were traffic accidents in 65.5% of patients, fall from height in 24.1% patients, and fall of heavy objects in 10.4% patients. Among all the patients, 57.6% had a detectable damage based on CT scanning. Based on CT scan findings, most common injuries were spleen injury in 20.0% of patients, liver injury in 18.9% of patients, and kidney injury in 8.9%. Conclusion: Traffic accidents were the most common cause of blunt abdominal trauma. Spleen, liver, and kidney injury were the most common internal organ damages based on CT scan findings.

  20. Ultrasound surface probe as a screening method for evaluating the patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasr-Esfahani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt abdominal trauma is one of the causes of mortality in emergency department. Free fluid in the abdomen due to intra-abdominal blunt trauma can be determined by the surface probe of ultrasound. Since the importance of this free fluid in hemodynamic stable patients with blunt trauma is associated with the unknown outcome for surgeons, this study was performed to evaluate the role of ultrasound surface probe as a screening method in evaluating the patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Materials and Methods: A descriptive-analytical study was done on 45 patients with blunt abdominal trauma and hemodynamic stability. The patients were evaluated twice during the three-hours, including repeated ultrasound surface probe and clinical examinations. Computerized tomography was also performed. The patients were divided based on the amount of the free fluid in the abdomen during the evaluations into two groups: Fixed or increased, and decreased free fluid. The results of the different evaluated methods were compared using the sensitivity and specificity. Results: From 17 patients with CT abnormalities, free fluid increased in 14 patients (82.4%. Free fluid was decreased in three patients who were discharged well from the surgery service without any complication. Surface probe in prognosis detection had a sensitivity of 82.4% and specificity of 92.9%. The percentage of false positive and negative ultrasound compared with CT scan was 7.1% and 17.6%. Also, positive and negative predictive value of the ultrasound with surface probe was 87.5% and 89.7% respectively. Conclusion: The use of the ultrasound with surface probe in the diagnosis of free fluid in blunt abdominal trauma in hemodynamic stable patients can be considered as a useful screening method.