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Sample records for blue pigment glaukothalin

  1. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez del Rio, M.; Gutierrez-Leon, A.; Castro, G.R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solis, C.; Sanchez-Hernandez, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytan, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as anil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue. (orig.)

  2. Fe K-edge XANES of Maya blue pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rio, M. Sanchez del; Sodo, A.; Eeckhout, S.G.; Neisius, T.; Martinetto, P.; Dooryhee, E.; Reyes-Valerio, C.

    2005-01-01

    The utilization of techniques used in Materials Science for the characterization of artefacts of interest for cultural heritage is getting more and more attention nowadays. One of the products of the ancient Maya chemistry is the 'Maya blue' pigment, made with natural indigo and palygorskite. This pigment is different from any other pigment used in other parts of the world. It is durable and acid-resistant, and still keeps many secrets to scientists even though it has been studied for more than 50 years. Although the pigment is basically made of palygorskite Si 8 (Mg 2 Al 2 )O 20 (OH) 2 (OH 2 ) 4 .4H 2 O and an organic colourant (indigo: C 16 H 10 N 2 O 2 ), a number of other compounds have been found in previous studies on archaeological samples, like other clays and minerals, iron nanoparticles, iron oxides, impurities of transition metals (Cr, Mn, Ti, V), etc. We measured at the ESRF ID26 beamline the Fe K-edge XANES spectra of the blue pigment in ancient samples. They are compared to XANES spectra of Maya blue samples synthesized under controlled conditions, and iron oxides usually employed as pigments (hematite and goethite). Our results show that the iron found in ancient Maya blue pigment is related to the Fe exchanged in the palygorskite clay. We did not find iron in metallic form or goethite in archaeological Maya blue

  3. Microanalysis study of archaeological mural samples containing Maya blue pigment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez del Rio, M. [ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France)]. E-mail: srio@esrf.fr; Martinetto, P. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Somogyi, A. [ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Reyes-Valerio, C. [INAH, Mexico DF (Mexico); Dooryhee, E. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Peltier, N. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Alianelli, L. [INFM-OGG c/o ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Moignard, B. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Pichon, L. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Calligaro, T. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Dran, J.-C. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France)

    2004-10-08

    Elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence and particle induced X-ray emission is applied to the study of several Mesoamerican mural samples containing blue pigments. The most characteristic blue pigment is Maya blue, a very stable organo-clay complex original from Maya culture and widely used in murals, pottery and sculptures in a vast region of Mesoamerica during the pre-hispanic time (from VIII century) and during the colonization until 1580. The mural samples come from six different archaeological sites (four pre-hispanic and two from XVI century colonial convents). The correlation between the presence of some elements and the pigment colour is discussed. From the comparative study of the elemental concentration, some conclusions are drawn on the nature of the pigments and the technology used.

  4. Microanalysis study of archaeological mural samples containing Maya blue pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez del Rio, M.; Martinetto, P.; Somogyi, A.; Reyes-Valerio, C.; Dooryhee, E.; Peltier, N.; Alianelli, L.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.

    2004-01-01

    Elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence and particle induced X-ray emission is applied to the study of several Mesoamerican mural samples containing blue pigments. The most characteristic blue pigment is Maya blue, a very stable organo-clay complex original from Maya culture and widely used in murals, pottery and sculptures in a vast region of Mesoamerica during the pre-hispanic time (from VIII century) and during the colonization until 1580. The mural samples come from six different archaeological sites (four pre-hispanic and two from XVI century colonial convents). The correlation between the presence of some elements and the pigment colour is discussed. From the comparative study of the elemental concentration, some conclusions are drawn on the nature of the pigments and the technology used

  5. Combustion synthesis of cobalt pigments: Blue and pink

    OpenAIRE

    Mimani, T; Ghosh, Samrat

    2000-01-01

    Idiochromatic blue cobalt aluminate (CoAl2O4) and purple pyroborate Co2B2O5 were prepared by solution combustion method using corresponding metal nitrates, boric acid and carbohydrazide mixtures. Allochromatic Co2+ doped in Al2O3/ZnAl2O4 and Mg2B2O5 pigments having the same colour intensity as idiochromatic pigments were obtained similarly. All the pigments are voluminous, homogeneously coloured with a large surface area. The products are characterized by their characteristic colours, XRD, IR...

  6. Effects of blue light on pigment biosynthesis of Monascus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Xue, Chunmao; Chen, Mianhua; Wu, Shufen; Li, Zhenjing; Wang, Changlu

    2016-04-01

    The influence of different illumination levels of blue light on the growth and intracellular pigment yields of Monascus strain M9 was investigated. Compared with darkness, constant exposure to blue light of 100 lux reduced the yields of six pigments, namely, rubropunctatamine (RUM), monascorubramine (MOM), rubropunctatin (RUN), monascorubrin (MON), monascin (MS), and ankaflavin (AK). However, exposure to varying levels of blue light had different effects on pigment production. Exposure to 100 lux of blue light once for 30 min/day and to 100 lux of blue light once and twice for 15 min/day could enhance RUM, MOM, MS, and AK production and reduce RUN and MON compared with non-exposure. Exposure to 100 lux twice for 30 min/day and to 200 lux once for 45 min/day decreased the RUM, MOM, MS, and AK yields and increased the RUN and MON. Meanwhile, the expression levels of pigment biosynthetic genes were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. Results indicated that gene MpPKS5, mppR1, mppA, mppB, mmpC, mppD, MpFasA, MpFasB, and mppF were positively correlated with the yields of RUN and MON, whereas mppE and mppR2 were associated with RUM, MOM, MS, and AK production.

  7. Raman analysis of cobalt blue pigment in blue and white porcelain: A reassessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaochenyang; Ma, Yanying; Chen, Yue; Li, Yuanqiu; Ma, Qinglin; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Changsui; Yang, Yimin

    2018-02-01

    Cobalt blue is a famous pigment in human history. In the past decade it is widely reported that the cobalt aluminate has been detected in ancient ceramics as blue colorant in glaze, yet the acquired Raman spectra are incredibly different from that of synthesised references, necessitating a reassessment of such contradictory scenario with more accurate analytic strategies. In this study, micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in association with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were performed on under-glaze cobalt pigments from one submerged blue and white porcelain shard dated from Wanli reign (1573-1620 CE) of Ming dynasty (1365-1644 CE) excavated at Nan'ao I shipwreck off the southern coast of China. The micro-structural inspection reveals that the pigment particles have characteristics of small account, tiny size, heterogeneously distribution, and more importantly, been completely enwrapped by well-developed anorthite crystals in the glaze, indicating that the signals recorded in previous publications are probably not from cobalt pigments themselves but from outside thickset anorthite shell. The further spectromicroscopic analyses confirm this presumption when the accurate spectra of cobalt aluminate pigment and surrounding anorthite were obtained separately with precise optical positioning. Accordingly, we reassess and clarify the previous Raman studies dedicated to cobalt blue pigment in ancient ceramics, e.g. cobalt blue in celadon glaze, and in turn demonstrate the superiority and necessity of coupling spectroscopic analysis with corresponding structure observation, especially in the characterization of pigments from complicated physico-chemical environment like antiquities. Thus, this study promotes a better understanding of Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt blue pigments in art and archaeology field.

  8. Raman and infrared studies of synthetic Maya Blue pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Layra; Manciu, Felicia; Ramirez, Alejandra; Chianelli, Russell

    2008-10-01

    A fascinating aspect of Maya pigments is that despite the environmentally harsh humidity and high temperatures they resist fading and they have unprecedented stability. In this investigation, we address the question of how organic dye binds to inorganic palygorskite to form a pigment similar to Maya Blue. We also address how such binding might be affected by varying the proportion of dye relative to that of the mineral, and by varying the length of heating time used in preparation of the pigment. Our analysis by Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopies proves the partial elimination of the selection rules for the centrosymmetric indigo, and shows the disappearance of the indigo N-H bonding, as the organic molecules incorporate into palygorskite material. Infrared data confirm the loss of zeolitic water and a partial removal of structural water after the heating process. Evidence of bonding between palygorskite and indigo through oxygen is revealed by both spectroscopic measurements.

  9. Organic/Inorganic Complex Pigments: Ancient Colors Maya Blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polette-Niewold, L.A.; Manciu, F.S.; Torres, B.; Alvarado, M.; Jr.; Chianelli, R.R.

    2009-06-04

    Maya Blue is an ancient blue pigment composed of palygorskite clay and indigo. It was used by the ancient Maya and provides a dramatic background for some of the most impressive murals throughout Mesoamerica. Despite exposure to acids, alkalis, and chemical solvents, the color of the Maya Blue pigment remains unaltered. The chemical interaction between palygorskite and indigo form an organic/inorganic complex with the carbonyl oxygen of the indigo bound to a surface Al{sup 3+} in the Si-O lattice. In addition indigo will undergo an oxidation to dehydroindigo during preparation. The dehydro-indigo molecule forms a similar but stronger complex with the Al{sup 3+}. Thus, Maya Blue varies in color due to the mixed indigo/dehydroindigo complex. The above conclusions are the result of application of multiple techniques (X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis/thermal gravimetric analysis, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, infrared and Raman spectroscopy) to the characterization of the organic/inorganic complex. A picture of the bonding of the organic molecule to the palygorskite surface forming a surface complex is developed and supported by the results of density functional theory calculations. We also report that other organic molecules such as thioindigo form similar organic/inorganic complexes thus, opening an entirely new class of complex materials for future applications.

  10. Melanocytes Sense Blue Light and Regulate Pigmentation through Opsin-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzetti, Claire; Sormani, Laura; Debayle, Delphine; Bernerd, Françoise; Tulic, Meri K; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Rocchi, Stéphane; Passeron, Thierry

    2018-01-01

    The shorter wavelengths of the visible light spectrum have been recently reported to induce a long-lasting hyperpigmentation but only in melano-competent individuals. Here, we provide evidence showing that OPN3 is the key sensor in melanocytes responsible for hyperpigmentation induced by the shorter wavelengths of visible light. The melanogenesis induced through OPN3 is calcium dependent and further activates CAMKII followed by CREB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38, leading to the phosphorylation of MITF and ultimately to the increase of the melanogenesis enzymes: tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase. Furthermore, blue light induces the formation of a protein complex that we showed to be formed by tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase. This multimeric tyrosinase/tyrosinase-related protein complex is mainly formed in dark-skinned melanocytes and induces a sustained tyrosinase activity, thus explaining the long-lasting hyperpigmentation that is observed only in skin type III and higher after blue light irradiation. OPN3 thus functions as the sensor for visible light pigmentation. OPN3 and the multimeric tyrosinase/tyrosinase-related protein complex induced after its activation appear as new potential targets for regulating melanogenesis but also to protect dark skins against blue light in physiological conditions and in pigmentary disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Phototoxicity of Blue Light on the Functional Properties of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    The phototoxic effect of blue light on isolated pigment epithelium will be investigated. The emphasis will be on functional changes rather than a...integrity of the barrier system and the transport system and the transport systems known to operate in the pigment epithelium. The effects of blue ... light on leucine transport across the isolated bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) have been continued to determine if Vitamin E and melatonin

  12. Antimicrobial effect of blue light using Porphyromonas gingivalis pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ayaka; Sasaki, Haruka; Toyama, Toshizo; Araki, Mitsunori; Fujioka, Jun; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Hamada, Nobushiro; Yoshino, Fumihiko

    2017-07-12

    The development of antibiotics cannot keep up with the speed of resistance acquired by microorganisms. Recently, the development of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has been a necessary antimicrobial strategy against antibiotic resistance. Among the wide variety of bacteria found in the oral flora, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is one of the etiological agents of periodontal disease. aPDT has been studied for periodontal disease, but has risks of cytotoxicity to normal stained tissue. In this study, we performed aPDT using protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), an intracellular pigment of P. gingivalis, without an external photosensitizer. We confirmed singlet oxygen generation by PpIX in a blue-light irradiation intensity-dependent manner. We discovered that blue-light irradiation on P. gingivalis is potentially bactericidal. The sterilization mechanism seems to be oxidative DNA damage in bacterial cells. Although it is said that no resistant bacteria will emerge using aPDT, the conventional method relies on an added photosensitizer dye. PpIX in P. gingivalis is used in energy production, so aPDT applied to PpIX of P. gingivalis should limit the appearance of resistant bacteria. This approach not only has potential as an effective treatment for new periodontal diseases, but also offers potential antibacterial treatment for multiple drug resistant bacteria.

  13. X-ray structure of a blue complex pigment from the blue flowers of Centaurea cyanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiono, M.; Matsugaki, N.; Takeda, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The blue pigment of the cornflower, named protocyanin, has long been investigated, but its precise structure has remained unclear. Our recent research demonstrated the components of protocyanin to be anthocyanin (AN), flavone glycoside (FL), Fe 3+ , Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ions and we succeeded in the reconstruction of protocyanin. In this study, we revealed the X-ray structure of protocyanin. The crystal structure of the reconstructed protocyanin was determined at a resolution of 1.05 A. The refined molecule has pseudo threefold symmetry and four metal ions, Fe 3+ , Mg 2+ and two Ca 2+ , align along the pseudo three-fold axis. The four metals are coordinated to six AN molecules and six FL molecules. The inner Fe 3+ and Mg 2+ ions are each coordinated to three AN molecules respectively, while the outer two Ca 2+ ions are each coordinated to three FL molecules . Both AN and FL molecules are self-associated with each other as AN-AN and FL-FL in pair and this hydrophobic association also exists between AN and FL molecules. Protocyanin is a tetra-metal (Fe 3+ , Mg 2+ , 2Ca 2+ ) nuclear complex of twelve molecules of anthocyanin and flavone glycoside, a new type of supramolecular pigment. (author)

  14. Production of actinorhodin-related ''blue pigments'' by Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, LV; FernandezMoreno, MA; Herrema, JK; Malpartida, F; Hopwood, DA; Dijkhuizen, L

    The genetically well-known strain Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) produces the pH indicator (red/blue) antibiotic actinorhodin, but not all the ''blue pigment'' produced by this strain is actinorhodin. When the organism was subjected to various nutrient limitations (ammonium, nitrate, phosphate, or

  15. New blue pigment produced by Pantoea agglomerans and its production characteristics at various temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Akimoto, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    A bacterium capable of producing a deep blue pigment was isolated from the environment and identified as Pantoea agglomerans. The pigment production characteristics of the bacterium under various conditions were studied. The optimal agar plate ingredients for pigment production by the bacterium were first studied: the optimal ingredients were 5 g/liter glucose, 10 g/liter tryptic soy broth, and 40 g/liter glycerol at pH 6.4. Bacterial cells grew on the agar plate during the incubation, while the pigment spread into the agar plate, meaning that it is water soluble. Pigment production was affected by the initial cell density. Namely, at higher initial cell densities ranging from 10(6.3) to 10(8.2) CFU/cm(2) on the agar plate, faster pigment production was observed, but no blue pigment was produced at a very high initial density of 10(9.1) CFU/cm(2). Thus, the cell population of 10(8.2) CFU/cm(2) was used for subsequent study. Although the bacterium was capable of growing at temperatures above and below 10°C, it could produce the pigment only at temperatures of ≥10°C. Moreover, the pigment production was faster at higher temperatures in the range of 10 to 20°C. Pigment production at various temperature patterns was well described by a new logistic model. These results suggested that the bacterium could be used in the development of a microbial temperature indicator for the low-temperature-storage management of foods and clinical materials. To our knowledge, there is no other P. agglomerans strain capable of producing a blue pigment and the pigment is a new one of microbial origin.

  16. Eggshell pigmentation in the blue tit : Male quality matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badas, E. P.; Martinez, J.; Rivero-de Aguilar, J.; Stevens, M.; van der Velde, M.; Komdeur, J.; Merino, S.

    Many passerines lay protoporphyrin-pigmented eggs, and the degree of spotting seems to be related to female condition and environmental characteristics. However, most studies have ignored the relationship between the male's quality and eggshell pigmentation. Because ornaments can act as honest

  17. Marennine, Promising Blue Pigments from a Widespread Haslea Diatom Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastineau, Romain; Turcotte, François; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard; Morançais, Michèle; Fleurence, Joël; Windarto, Eko; Semba Prasetiya, Fiddy; Arsad, Sulastri; Jaouen, Pascal; Babin, Mathieu; Coiffard, Laurence; Couteau, Céline; Bardeau, Jean-François; Jacquette, Boris; Leignel, Vincent; Hardivillier, Yann; Marcotte, Isabelle; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Tremblay, Réjean; Deschênes, Jean-Sébastien; Badawy, Hope; Pasetto, Pamela; Davidovich, Nikolai; Hansen, Gert; Dittmer, Jens; Mouget, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    In diatoms, the main photosynthetic pigments are chlorophylls a and c, fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin. The marine pennate diatom Haslea ostrearia has long been known for producing, in addition to these generic pigments, a water-soluble blue pigment, marennine. This pigment, responsible for the greening of oysters in western France, presents different biological activities: allelopathic, antioxidant, antibacterial, antiviral, and growth-inhibiting. A method to extract and purify marennine has been developed, but its chemical structure could hitherto not be resolved. For decades, H. ostrearia was the only organism known to produce marennine, and can be found worldwide. Our knowledge about H. ostrearia-like diatom biodiversity has recently been extended with the discovery of several new species of blue diatoms, the recently described H. karadagensis, H. silbo sp. inedit. and H. provincialis sp. inedit. These blue diatoms produce different marennine-like pigments, which belong to the same chemical family and present similar biological activities. Aside from being a potential source of natural blue pigments, H. ostrearia-like diatoms thus present a commercial potential for aquaculture, cosmetics, food and health industries. PMID:24879542

  18. Marennine, Promising Blue Pigments from a Widespread Haslea Diatom Species Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Gastineau

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In diatoms, the main photosynthetic pigments are chlorophylls a and c, fucoxanthin, diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin. The marine pennate diatom Haslea ostrearia has long been known for producing, in addition to these generic pigments, a water-soluble blue pigment, marennine. This pigment, responsible for the greening of oysters in western France, presents different biological activities: allelopathic, antioxidant, antibacterial, antiviral, and growth-inhibiting. A method to extract and purify marennine has been developed, but its chemical structure could hitherto not be resolved. For decades, H. ostrearia was the only organism known to produce marennine, and can be found worldwide. Our knowledge about H. ostrearia-like diatom biodiversity has recently been extended with the discovery of several new species of blue diatoms, the recently described H. karadagensis, H. silbo sp. inedit. and H. provincialis sp. inedit. These blue diatoms produce different marennine-like pigments, which belong to the same chemical family and present similar biological activities. Aside from being a potential source of natural blue pigments, H. ostrearia-like diatoms thus present a commercial potential for aquaculture, cosmetics, food and health industries.

  19. Blue light effect on retinal pigment epithelial cells by display devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jiyoung; Yun, Jieun; Yoon, Yeo Dae; Park, Sang-Il; Seo, Young-Jun; Park, Won-Sang; Chu, Hye Yong; Park, Keun Hong; Lee, Myung Yeol; Lee, Chang Woo; Oh, Soo Jin; Kwak, Young-Shin; Jang, Young Pyo; Kang, Jong Soon

    2017-05-22

    Blue light has high photochemical energy and induces cell apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Due to its phototoxicity, retinal hazard by blue light stimulation has been well demonstrated using high intensity light sources. However, it has not been studied whether blue light in the displays, emitting low intensity light, such as those used in today's smartphones, monitors, and TVs, also causes apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells. We attempted to examine the blue light effect on human adult retinal epithelial cells using display devices with different blue light wavelength ranges, the peaks of which specifically appear at 449 nm, 458 nm, and 470 nm. When blue light was illuminated on A2E-loaded ARPE-19 cells using these displays, the display with a blue light peak at a shorter wavelength resulted in an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, the reduction of cell viability and induction of caspase-3/7 activity were more evident in A2E-loaded ARPE-19 cells after illumination by the display with a blue light peak at a shorter wavelength, especially at 449 nm. Additionally, white light was tested to examine the effect of blue light in a mixed color illumination with red and green lights. Consistent with the results obtained using only blue light, white light illuminated by display devices with a blue light peak at a shorter wavelength also triggered increased cell death and apoptosis compared to that illuminated by display devices with a blue light peak at longer wavelength. These results show that even at the low intensity utilized in the display devices, blue light can induce ROS production and apoptosis in retinal cells. Our results also suggest that the blue light hazard of display devices might be highly reduced if the display devices contain less short wavelength blue light.

  20. New Blue Pigment Produced by Pantoea agglomerans and Its Production Characteristics at Various Temperatures ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Akimoto, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    A bacterium capable of producing a deep blue pigment was isolated from the environment and identified as Pantoea agglomerans. The pigment production characteristics of the bacterium under various conditions were studied. The optimal agar plate ingredients for pigment production by the bacterium were first studied: the optimal ingredients were 5 g/liter glucose, 10 g/liter tryptic soy broth, and 40 g/liter glycerol at pH 6.4. Bacterial cells grew on the agar plate during the incubation, while ...

  1. The Convergent Evolution of Blue Iris Pigmentation in Primates Took Distinct Molecular Paths

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Wynn K; Zhang, Sidi; Hayakawa, Sachiko; Imai, Hiroo; Przeworski, Molly

    2013-01-01

    How many distinct molecular paths lead to the same phenotype? One approach to this question has been to examine the genetic basis of convergent traits, which likely evolved repeatedly under a shared selective pressure. We investigated the convergent phenotype of blue iris pigmentation, which has arisen independently in four primate lineages: humans, blue-eyed black lemurs, Japanese macaques, and spider monkeys. Characterizing the phenotype across these species, we found that the variation wit...

  2. 5-Hydroxyaloesaponarin II, a minor blue pigment in an actinorhodin-negative mutant of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Herrema, Jan K.; Kruizinga, Wim; Kellogg, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Blue pigmentation in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is attributed to synthesis of the polyketide actinorhodin and its lactone derivative γ-actinorhodin, Therefore, actinorhodin-negative mutants show pigmentation other than blue. When the B22 mutant of S.coelicolor A3(2) [defective in the actVI-ORF1

  3. Establishment of a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, G; Cai, S J; Gong, X; Wang, L L; Li, H H; Wang, L M

    2016-06-24

    To establish a blue-light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fourth-generation human RPE cells were randomly divided into two groups. In group A, cells were exposed to blue light (2000 ± 500 lux) for 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h, and cell culture was stopped after 12 h. In group B, cells were exposed to blue light at the same intensity and time periods, but cell culture was stopped after 24 h. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to determine the most suitable illuminating time with apoptotic index. Flow cytometry was used to determine apoptotic ratio of RPEs. In group A, the apoptotic index of cells that received 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light was higher than that of control. The apoptotic index of cells receiving 9 and 12 h was higher than that of 6 h (P = 0.000). In group B, the apoptotic index and RPE cell apoptosis ratio of cells exposed to 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light were higher than that of 3 h (P = 0.000); and cells receiving 9 and 12 h had higher values than that of 6 h. This study demonstrated that the best conditions to establish a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro are 2000 ± 500 lux light intensity for 6 h, with 24 h of cell culture post-exposure.

  4. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace—gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS—GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC—ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ≥1 mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5 mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9 mg pigment/cm2 skin.

  5. Localization and seasonal variation of blue pigment (sandercyanin) in walleye (Sander vitreus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Wayne; Schmitz, Mark; Blazer, Vicki S.; Ehlinger, Tim; Berges, John

    2015-01-01

    Several fish species, including the walleye (Sander vitreus), have “yellow” and “blue” color morphs. In S. vitreus, one source of the blue color has been identified as a bili-binding protein pigment (sandercyanin), found in surface mucus of the fish. Little is known about the production of the pigment or about its functions. We examined the anatomical localization and seasonal variation of sandercyanin in S. vitreus from a population in McKim Lake, northwestern Ontario, Canada. Skin sections were collected from 20 fish and examined histologically. Mucus was collected from 306 fish over 6 years, and the amount of sandercyanin was quantified spectrophotometrically. Sandercyanin was found solely on dorsal surfaces of the fish and was localized to novel cells in the epidermis, similar in appearance to secretory sacciform cells. Sandercyanin concentrations were significantly higher in fish collected in summer versus other seasons. Yellow and blue morphs did not differ in amounts of sandercyanin, suggesting that the observed blue color, in fact, arises from lack of yellow pigmentation in blue morphs. The function of the sandercyanin remains unclear, but roles in photoprotection and countershading are consistent with available data.

  6. Multianalytical characterization of a blue pigment used in art-crafts from Central Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Experimental, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)], E-mail: corina@fisica.unam.mx; Mondragon, M.A. [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, UNAM, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Juriquilla, Queretaro 76230 (Mexico); Isaac-Olive, K.; Gleason, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Departamento de Fisica Experimental, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Pina, C. [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble-Cedex 9 (France); Rocha, M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Escuela de Ingenieria, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Lopez-Aguilar, F. [Division de Posgrado, Escuela Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2008-04-15

    We report a preliminary characterization of a blue pigment because its color has been associated to objects found from Aztec and Precolumbian times. The pigment was examined before and after its purification by a variety of techniques: Particle Induced X-ray emission (PIXE), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersion spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The relationship of the chemical composition, the spectroscopic signals and the color are discussed.

  7. Multiple pigment cell types contribute to the black, blue, and orange ornaments of male guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Verena A; Koch, Iris; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) highly depends on the size and number of their black, blue, and orange ornaments. Recently, progress has been made regarding the genetic mechanisms underlying male guppy pigment pattern formation, but we still know little about the pigment cell organization within these ornaments. Here, we investigate the pigment cell distribution within the black, blue, and orange trunk spots and selected fin color patterns of guppy males from three genetically divergent strains using transmission electron microscopy. We identified three types of pigment cells and found that at least two of these contribute to each color trait. Further, two pigment cell layers, one in the dermis and the other in the hypodermis, contribute to each trunk spot. The pigment cell organization within the black and orange trunk spots was similar between strains. The presence of iridophores in each of the investigated color traits is consistent with a key role for this pigment cell type in guppy color pattern formation.

  8. Carotenoid metabolic profiling and transcriptome-genome mining reveal functional equivalence among blue-pigmented copepods and appendicularia

    KAUST Repository

    Mojib, Nazia

    2014-06-01

    The tropical oligotrophic oceanic areas are characterized by high water transparency and annual solar radiation. Under these conditions, a large number of phylogenetically diverse mesozooplankton species living in the surface waters (neuston) are found to be blue pigmented. In the present study, we focused on understanding the metabolic and genetic basis of the observed blue phenotype functional equivalence between the blue-pigmented organisms from the phylum Arthropoda, subclass Copepoda (Acartia fossae) and the phylum Chordata, class Appendicularia (Oikopleura dioica) in the Red Sea. Previous studies have shown that carotenoid–protein complexes are responsible for blue coloration in crustaceans. Therefore, we performed carotenoid metabolic profiling using both targeted and nontargeted (high-resolution mass spectrometry) approaches in four different blue-pigmented genera of copepods and one blue-pigmented species of appendicularia. Astaxanthin was found to be the principal carotenoid in all the species. The pathway analysis showed that all the species can synthesize astaxanthin from β-carotene, ingested from dietary sources, via 3-hydroxyechinenone, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin, adonirubin or adonixanthin. Further, using de novo assembled transcriptome of blue A. fossae (subclass Copepoda), we identified highly expressed homologous β-carotene hydroxylase enzymes and putative carotenoid-binding proteins responsible for astaxanthin formation and the blue phenotype. In blue O. dioica (class Appendicularia), corresponding putative genes were identified from the reference genome. Collectively, our data provide molecular evidences for the bioconversion and accumulation of blue astaxanthin–protein complexes underpinning the observed ecological functional equivalence and adaptive convergence among neustonic mesozooplankton.

  9. Purification and low temperature spectroscopy of gecko visual pigments green and blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, D; Imai, H; Okano, T; Fukada, Y; Crescitelli, F; Yoshizawa, T; Shichida, Y

    1995-01-24

    We purified two kinds of visual pigments, gecko green and gecko blue, from retinas of Tokay geckos (Gekko gekko) by two steps of column chromatography, and investigated their photobleaching processes by means of low temperature spectroscopy. Absorption maxima of gecko green and blue solubilized in a mixture of 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1- propanesulfonate (CHAPS) and phosphatidylcholine were 522 and 465 nm, respectively, which are close to those observed in the photoreceptor cells. Low temperature spectroscopy identified six intermediates in the photobleaching process of gecko green; batho (lambda max = 569 nm), BL (lambda max = 519 nm), lumi (507 nm), meta I (approximately 486 nm), meta II (approximately 384 nm), and meta III intermediates (approximately 500 nm). In contrast to the high similarity in amino acid sequence between gecko green and iodopsin [Kojima, D., et al. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 89, 6841-6845], the batho-green did not revert thermally to original gecko green but converts to the next intermediate. The photobleaching process of gecko blue was investigated by low temperature spectroscopy, and three intermediates, meta I (lambda max = approximately 470 nm), meta II (lambda max = approximately 370 nm) and meta III (lambda max = approximately 475 nm), were identified. A comparative study on the thermal behavior of meta intermediates revealed that the thermal stability of meta II intermediate of both of the gecko visual pigments is lower than that of metarhodopsin II. The result supports the idea that both the gecko visual pigments are cone-type ones.

  10. Blue-light filtering alters angiogenic signaling in human retinal pigmented epithelial cells culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Natalia; Siblini, Aya; Esposito, Evangelina; Bravo-Filho, Vasco; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Aldrees, Sultan; Logan, Patrick; Arias, Lluis; Burnier, Miguel N

    2017-11-02

    Light exposure and more specifically the spectrum of blue light contribute to the oxidative stress in Age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The purpose of the study was to establish whether blue light filtering could modify proangiogenic signaling produced by retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells under different conditions simulating risk factors for AMD. Three experiments were carried out in order to expose ARPE-19 cells to white light for 48 h with and without blue light-blocking filters (BLF) in different conditions. In each experiment one group was exposed to light with no BLF protection, a second group was exposed to light with BLF protection, and a control group was not exposed to light. The ARPE-19 cells used in each experiment prior to light exposure were cultured for 24 h as follows: Experiment 1) Normoxia, Experiment 2) Hypoxia, and Experiment 3) Lutein supplemented media in normoxia. The media of all groups was harvested after light exposure for sandwich ELISA-based assays to quantify 10 pro-angiogenic cytokines. A significant decrease in angiogenin secretion levels and a significant increase in bFGF were observed following light exposure, compared to dark conditions, in both normoxia and hypoxia conditions. With the addition of a blue light-blocking filter in normoxia, a significant increase in angiogenin levels was observed. Although statistical significance was not achieved, blue light filters reduce light-induced secretion of bFGF and VEGF to near normal levels. This trend is also observed when ARPE-19 cells are grown under hypoxic conditions and when pre-treated with lutein prior to exposure to experimental conditions. Following light exposure, there is a decrease in angiogenin secretion by ARPE-19 cells, which was abrogated with a blue light - blocking filter. Our findings support the position that blue light filtering affects the secretion of angiogenic factors by retinal pigmented epithelial cells under normoxic, hypoxic, and lutein

  11. Imaging, photophysical properties and DFT calculations of manganese blue (barium manganate(VI) sulphate)--a modern pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accorsi, Gianluca; Verri, Giovanni; Acocella, Angela; Zerbetto, Francesco; Lerario, Giovanni; Gigli, Giuseppe; Saunders, David; Billinge, Rachel

    2014-12-18

    Manganese blue is a synthetic barium manganate(VI) sulphate compound that was produced from 1935 to the 1990s and was used both as a blue pigment in works of art and by conservators in the restoration of paintings. The photophysical properties of the compound are described as well as the setup needed to record the spatial distribution of the pigment in works of art.

  12. Distribution and amount of pigment within the ciliary body and iris of dogs with blue and brown irides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, Kim M; Haines, Deborah K; Calvarese, Sara T; Esson, Doug W; Chandler, Heather L

    2010-03-01

    Compare the amount and distribution of pigment in normal canine eyes with blue and brown irides. Eighteen mixed-breed dogs euthanized for population control. Intact globes were removed immediately following euthanasia. Iris color was noted, and globes were evaluated histologically to determine the distribution of pigment. High magnification (x400) digital images were taken of the dorsal and ventral ciliary processes (CP) of 13 eyes with blue irides and 13 eyes with brown irides. Low magnification (x20) images were taken of the dorsal and ventral portions of the ciliary body (CB) of 14 eyes with blue irides and 14 eyes with brown irides. The images were digitally analyzed to determine the percent of the CP and CB that were pigmented in the high and low magnification images, respectively. Eyes with brown irides contained abundant melanin pigment around the CB musculature. This pigment was absent in eyes with blue irides, and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.001) when digitally analyzed using the low magnification images. Iris color did not have a significant (P = 0.34) impact on the amount of melanin within the CP, as determined using the high magnification images. Compared to eyes with brown irides, eyes with blue irides lack pigment around the CB musculature, but contain comparable amounts of pigment in the CP.

  13. Identification of Genes for Synthesis of the Blue Pigment, Biliverdin IXα, in the Blue Coral Heliopora coerulea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yuki; Yasuda, Nina; NagaI, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Heliopora coerulea is the only species in the subclass Octocorallia that has a crystalline aragonite skeleton. The skeleton has been reported to contain the blue pigment, biliverdin IXα, which is formed by heme oxygenase (HO) during heme decomposition. There is little information regarding gene expression in H. coerulea; therefore, the biosynthesis pathway for biliverdin IXα is poorly understood. To identify the genes related to heme synthesis and degradation, metatranscripts of H. coerulea and its symbiont Symbiodinium spp. were sequenced and separated from the host- and symbiont-derived sequences. From the metatranscriptome analyses, all genes for heme synthesis and three HOs were isolated from the host and symbiont. From our phylogenetic and amino acid analysis, we noted that one of the HO isoforms in the host coral was predicted to possess HO activity. However, biliverdin reductase, which reduces biliverdin to bilirubin, was not identified in the present study. Similarly, biliverdin reductase was not identified in the transcripts of the red coral Corallium rubrum, a species that also belongs to Octocorallia. However, genes related to heme synthesis and HO were found in C. rubrum. We speculate that Heliopora coerulea can produce biliverdin and accumulate it in the skeleton, while red corals and other Octocorallia species cannot. Further information from molecular studies of H. coerulea will provide insights into the synthesis of biliverdin IXα, the blue pigment in the hard crystalline aragonite skeleton, and will be fundamental to future ecological and physiological studies.

  14. Introducing the "Human Element" in Chemistry by Synthesizing Blue Pigments and Creating Cyanotypes in a First-Year Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizot, Olivier; Audureau, Eric; Briend, Jean-Yves; Hagel, Gaetan; Boulc'h, Florence

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present two concrete applications of the concept of the human element to chemistry education; starting with a course and experimental project on blue pigment synthesis and concluding with cross-disciplinary lessons and experiments on blue photography. In addition to the description of the content of these courses, we explore…

  15. A study on eggshell pigmentation: biliverdin in blue-shelled chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R; Xu, G Y; Liu, Z Z; Li, J Y; Yang, N

    2006-03-01

    Biliverdin is an important pigment in the eggshell of chickens and other avian species. Determination of the biosynthesis site for biliverdin is essential for understanding the biochemical process and genetic basis of eggshell pigmentation. Either blood or the shell gland could be the biosynthesis site of eggshell biliverdin. A segregation population with full-sib sisters genotyped Oo and oo, which laid blue-shelled eggs and light brown eggs, respectively, was constructed in a native Chinese chicken breed. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry and HPLC were used to determine the biliverdin concentration in eggshells, blood, bile, excreta, and shell gland of both groups of chickens. Biliverdin content was significantly different between egg shells of blue-shelled and brown-shelled chickens (P < 0.01). Blood and bile were tested 3 to 4 h before oviposition, and excreta was tested randomly. Results showed no significant difference in biliverdin concentration in blood, bile, and excreta between the 2 groups. In the shell gland, the biliverdin contents for the blue-shelled and brown-shelled chickens were 8.25 +/- 2.55 and 1.29 +/- 0.12 nmol/g, respectively, which showed a significant difference (P < 0.01). Our results demonstrated that blood is not the biosynthesis site of the shell biliverdin. Biliverdin is most likely synthesized in the shell gland and then deposited onto the eggshell of chickens.

  16. Experimental and theoretical spectroscopic studies of dye modification in synthetic Maya Blue pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Layra; Manciu, Felicia; Ramirez, Alejandra; Chianelli, Russell

    2009-03-01

    Maya pigments are hybrid organic/inorganic materials with multiple technology applications that possess unprecedented stability with respect to harsh environment conditions. In this investigation, we address the question of how the organic indigo dye modifies as it binds to the inorganic palygorskite clay to form a pigment similar to Maya Blue after a heating treatment is applied. Both infrared and Raman spectroscopic data demonstrate the disappearance of nitrogen-hydrogen (N-H) bonding, as the indigo molecule incorporates into the inorganic palygorskite material. This effect suggests a transformation of the dye from indigo to dehydroindigo. Furthermore, the Raman and infrared absorption results demonstrate partial elimination of the selection rules for the centrosymmetric indigo, which provides further evidence for this conversion. Theoretical spectroscopic studies are also addressed in this investigation to confirm the transformation of the dye into dehydroindigo.

  17. Simultaneous identification of historical pigments Prussian blue and indigo in paintings by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauk, Volodymyr; Havlíček, Vladimír; Papoušková, Barbora; Sulovský, Petr; Lemr, Karel

    2013-08-01

    A new analytical protocol for identification of Prussian blue (PB) and indigo was proposed. Pigments useful for dating of artworks were detected by flow injection analysis/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry after alkalization of their suspensions in water, decomposition of PB to iron (III) hydroxide and hexacyanoferrate (II) and reduction of indigo to soluble leucoindigo using sodium dithionite. Limits of detection (PB 47 pg, indigo 59 pg) complied with requirements for analysis of microsamples of historical paintings. Potential of the developed method was proven in analysis of blue samples of two oil paintings from the 20(th) century. Further, PB was confirmed in a microsample from a painting of 'Crucifixion', St. Sebestian church on St. Hill in Mikulov, Czech Republic. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Blue-black rule: a simple dermoscopic clue to recognize pigmented nodular melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argenziano, G; Longo, C; Cameron, A; Cavicchini, S; Gourhant, J-Y; Lallas, A; McColl, I; Rosendahl, C; Thomas, L; Tiodorovic-Zivkovic, D; Zaballos, P; Zalaudek, I

    2011-12-01

    Dermoscopy improves melanoma recognition, but most criteria were described in the context of superficial spreading melanoma. To test whether pigmented nodular melanoma could be recognized dermoscopically by the presence of a combination of blue and black colour within the lesion. Dermoscopic images of histopathologically diagnosed pigmented nodular tumours with no (or only minimal) flat component were evaluated for the presence of standard melanoma criteria and for the presence of a new feature named blue-black (BB) colour. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated for standard criteria and BB feature in relation to the diagnosis of melanoma and to diagnosis of malignancy. Of 283 lesions, 160 were malignant, including 78 (27·6%) melanomas, and 123 were benign. The BB feature and the standard criteria had 78·2% and 43·6% sensitivity for melanoma, respectively, whereas a combined method based on the presence of either the BB feature or one (or more) of the standard criteria reached 84·6% sensitivity, with 80·5% specificity and 93·2% negative predictive value. Sensitivity values for malignant lesions were only 24·4%, 56·9% and 60% for standard criteria, BB feature and the combined method, respectively. However, the combined method gave 91·9% specificity and 90·6% positive predictive value for malignancy. Using a method based on the BB feature or one of the standard melanoma criteria, only 9·4% of positive pigmented nodular lesions were found to be benign and only 6·8% of negative lesions were found to be melanoma histopathologically. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. A new blue-pigmented hasleoid diatom, Haslea provincialis, from the Mediterranean Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gastineau, Romain; Hansen, Gert; Davidovich, Nikolaï

    2016-01-01

    Haslea provincialis Gastineau, Hansen & Mouget, sp. nov., is a new, morphologically semicryptic blue diatom discovered on the French shores of the Mediterranean Sea. Like H. ostrearia and H. karadagensis, H. provincialis shares the capacity to synthesize a marennine-like blue pigment. Sexual repr...... in environments from which H. ostrearia has already been reported (mostly based on the presence of the blue cell vacuoles). Possible species misidentifications and the impact of the complex geological history of the Mediterranean Sea on blue diatom diversification are also discussed....

  20. Multiple pigment cell types contribute to the black, blue, and orange ornaments of male guppies (Poecilia reticulata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena A Kottler

    Full Text Available The fitness of male guppies (Poecilia reticulata highly depends on the size and number of their black, blue, and orange ornaments. Recently, progress has been made regarding the genetic mechanisms underlying male guppy pigment pattern formation, but we still know little about the pigment cell organization within these ornaments. Here, we investigate the pigment cell distribution within the black, blue, and orange trunk spots and selected fin color patterns of guppy males from three genetically divergent strains using transmission electron microscopy. We identified three types of pigment cells and found that at least two of these contribute to each color trait. Further, two pigment cell layers, one in the dermis and the other in the hypodermis, contribute to each trunk spot. The pigment cell organization within the black and orange trunk spots was similar between strains. The presence of iridophores in each of the investigated color traits is consistent with a key role for this pigment cell type in guppy color pattern formation.

  1. Butterfly wing colors : glass scales of Graphium sarpedon cause polarized iridescence and enhance blue/green pigment coloration of the wing membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Giraldo, Marco A.; Leertouwer, Hein L.

    2010-01-01

    The wings of the swordtail butterfly Graphium sarpedon nipponum contain the bile pigment sarpedobilin, which causes blue/green colored wing patches. Locally the bile pigment is combined with the strongly blue-absorbing carotenoid lutein, resulting in green wing patches and thus improving camouflage.

  2. Blue pigment in Hypocrea caerulescens sp. nov. and two additional new species in sect. Trichoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaklitsch, Walter M; Stadler, Marc; Voglmayr, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Three new species of Hypocrea/Trichoderma sect. Trichoderma (Hypocreaceae, Hypocreales, Ascomycota, Fungi) are described from recent collections in southern Europe and the Canary Islands. They have been characterized by morphological and molecular methods, including microscopic examination of the teleomorph in thin sections, the anamorph, growth rate experiments and phylogenetic analyses based on a part of the translation elongation factor 1-alpha encoding gene (tef1) containing the two last introns and a part of the rpb2 gene, encoding the second largest RNA polymerase subunit. Analyses involving tef1 did not unequivocally resolve the sister clade relationship of Hypocrea caerulescens relative to the Koningii and Viride clades, while analyses based on rpb2 clearly suggest a close relationship with the former, although the phenotype of H. caerulescens is similar to H. viridescens, particularly by its warted conidia and a coconut-like odor in CMD culture. Hypocrea hispanica and T. samuelsii however are clearly related to the Viride clade by both phylogenetic markers, despite their morphological similarity to H. koningii and its relatives. An apparently specific blue pigment is formed in CMD cultures by Hypocrea caerulescens but could not be obtained by extraction with organic solvents.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Nanoscale Cobalt Blue Pigment for Ceramic Inkjet Printing by Sol-Gel Self-Propagating Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Qi; Zhu, Haixiang; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Yanxiang; Zhu, Zhigang; Wu, Jianqing; Shih, Weiheng

    2017-01-01

    Cobalt blue pigments were prepared by self-propagating combustion followed by sol-gel method using aluminum nitrate and cobalt nitrate as the raw material. X ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fiber optic spectrometer and colorimetric analysis were used to investigate the effect of reaction temperature, metal ion concentration and dispersant upon the gel formation. The results show that the formation of gel network could be promoted by increasing the concentration of m...

  4. Dietary blue pigments derived from genipin, attenuate inflammation by inhibiting LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression via the NF-κB inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Xiang, Yaozu; Cui, Yuan-Lu; Lin, Ke-Ming; Zhang, Xin-Fang

    2012-01-01

    The edible blue pigments produced by gardenia fruits have been used as value-added colorants for foods in East Asia for 20 years. However, the biological activity of the blue pigments derived from genipin has not been reported. The anti-inflammatory effect of blue pigments was studied in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage in vitro. The secretions of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) were inhibited in concentration-dependent manner by blue pigments. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (Real-time RT-PCR) analyses demonstrated that the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was inhibited, moreover, ELISA results showed that the productions of IL-6 and TNF-α were inhibited. Cell-based ELISA revealed the COX-2 protein expression was inhibited. The proteome profiler array showed that 12 cytokines and chemokines involved in the inflammatory process were down-regulated by blue pigments. Blue pigments inhibited the nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation induced by LPS, and this was associated with decreasing the DNA-binding activity of p65 and p50. Furthermore, blue pigments suppressed the degradation of inhibitor of κB (IκB) α, Inhibitor of NF-κB Kinase (IKK) α, IKK-β, and phosphorylation of IκB-α. The anti-inflammatory effect of blue pigments in vivo was studied in carrageenan-induced paw edema and LPS-injecting ICR mice. Finally, blue pigments significantly inhibited paw swelling and reduced plasma TNF-α and IL-6 production in vivo. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of blue pigments might be the results from the inhibition of iNOS, COX-2, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression through the down-regulation of NF-κB activation, which will provide strong scientific evidence for the edible blue pigments to be developed as a new health-enhancing nutritional food

  5. Dietary blue pigments derived from genipin, attenuate inflammation by inhibiting LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression via the NF-κB inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang-Song Wang

    Full Text Available The edible blue pigments produced by gardenia fruits have been used as value-added colorants for foods in East Asia for 20 years. However, the biological activity of the blue pigments derived from genipin has not been reported.The anti-inflammatory effect of blue pigments was studied in lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage in vitro. The secretions of nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E(2 (PGE(2 were inhibited in concentration-dependent manner by blue pigments. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (Real-time RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, interleukin (IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α was inhibited, moreover, ELISA results showed that the productions of IL-6 and TNF-α were inhibited. Cell-based ELISA revealed the COX-2 protein expression was inhibited. The proteome profiler array showed that 12 cytokines and chemokines involved in the inflammatory process were down-regulated by blue pigments. Blue pigments inhibited the nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB activation induced by LPS, and this was associated with decreasing the DNA-binding activity of p65 and p50. Furthermore, blue pigments suppressed the degradation of inhibitor of κB (IκB α, Inhibitor of NF-κB Kinase (IKK α, IKK-β, and phosphorylation of IκB-α. The anti-inflammatory effect of blue pigments in vivo was studied in carrageenan-induced paw edema and LPS-injecting ICR mice. Finally, blue pigments significantly inhibited paw swelling and reduced plasma TNF-α and IL-6 production in vivo.These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of blue pigments might be the results from the inhibition of iNOS, COX-2, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression through the down-regulation of NF-κB activation, which will provide strong scientific evidence for the edible blue pigments to be developed as a new health-enhancing nutritional

  6. Characterization of indigoidine biosynthetic genes in Erwinia chrysanthemi and role of this blue pigment in pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverchon, Sylvie; Rouanet, Carine; Expert, Dominique; Nasser, William

    2002-02-01

    In the plant-pathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi production of pectate lyases, the main virulence determinant, is modulated by a complex network involving several regulatory proteins. One of these regulators, PecS, also controls the synthesis of a blue pigment identified as indigoidine. Since production of this pigment is cryptic in the wild-type strain, E. chrysanthemi ind mutants deficient in indigoidine synthesis were isolated by screening a library of Tn5-B21 insertions in a pecS mutant. These ind mutations were localized close to the regulatory pecS-pecM locus, immediately downstream of pecM. Sequence analysis of this DNA region revealed three open reading frames, indA, indB, and indC, involved in indigoidine biosynthesis. No specific function could be assigned to IndA. In contrast, IndB displays similarity to various phosphatases involved in antibiotic synthesis and IndC reveals significant homology with many nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). The IndC product contains an adenylation domain showing the signature sequence DAWCFGLI for glutamine recognition and an oxidation domain similar to that found in various thiazole-forming NRPS. These data suggest that glutamine is the precursor of indigoidine. We assume that indigoidine results from the condensation of two glutamine molecules that have been previously cyclized by intramolecular amide bond formation and then dehydrogenated. Expression of ind genes is strongly derepressed in the pecS background, indicating that PecS is the main regulator of this secondary metabolite synthesis. DNA band shift assays support a model whereby the PecS protein represses indA and indC expression by binding to indA and indC promoter regions. The regulatory link, via pecS, between indigoidine and virulence factor production led us to explore a potential role of indigoidine in E. chrysanthemi pathogenicity. Mutants impaired in indigoidine production were unable to cause systemic invasion of potted Saintpaulia ionantha

  7. The Phototoxicity of ’Blue Light’ on the Functional Properties of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-15

    radiation did not affect any of the transport systems studied. Ascorbate, morin or vitamin E did not ameliorate the effect of blue light on transport...whereas melatonin did provide protection by forming an effective light filter. The combination of ethanol and exposure to blue light may constitute a

  8. ANOMALOUS BLUE COLOURING OF MOZZARELLA CHEESE INTENTIONALLY CONTAMINATED WITH PIGMENT PRODUCING STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sechi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2010 a large outbreak of anomalous blue coloration of mozzarella cheese was recorded in Italy and some northern European countries. Official laboratory analysis and health authorities linked the outbreak to the contamination of processing water with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, although several expert raised the question of how to unequivocally link the blue coloring to the presence of the micro-organism. In an attempt to set-up a method to determine whether a given Pseudomonas spp. strain is responsible of the defect, an in vitro system for the evaluation of blue colouring of mozzarella cheese intentionally contaminated with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens. was developed The system is aimed to ascertain whether P. fluorescens strains, isolated from mozzarella cheese with anomalous blue coloration, are able to reproduce the blue coloration under controlled experimental condition. 96 trials of experimental inoculation of mozzarella cheese in different preservation liquids, were conducted using various suspension of Pseudomonas spp. (P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, P. fluorescens CFBP 3150, one P. fluorescens field strain isolated from blue-colored mozzarella cheese and P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145 as positive control at different concentrations and incubated at different temperatures. Growth curve of all Pseudomonas spp. strains tested demonstrated that after three days of incubation the concentration was generally higher than 106 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB, and higher than 105 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in preservation liquid. All mozzarella cheeses inoculated with the field strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens showed the characteristic anomalous blue coloration, which is often associated with Pseudomonas fluorescens contamination of water used during mozzarella cheesemaking. With the proposed system, which enabled a considerable amount of samples to be analysed under controlled experimental

  9. Non-destructive characterization of oriental porcelain glazes and blue underglaze pigments using μ-EDXRF, μ-Raman and VP-SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, M.L.; Muralha, V.S.F.; Mirao, J.; Veiga, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The study of ancient materials with recognized cultural and economic value is a challenge to scientists and conservators, since it is usually necessary an approach through non-destructive techniques. Difficulties in establishing a correct analytical strategy are often significantly increased by the lack of knowledge on manufacture technologies and raw materials employed combined with the diversity of decay processes that may have acted during the lifetime of the cultural artefacts. A non-destructive characterization was performed on the glaze and underglaze pigments from a group of Chinese porcelain shards dated from the late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) excavated at the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha in Coimbra (Portugal). Chemical analysis was performed using micro-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF). Mineralogical characterization was achieved by Raman microscopy (μ-Raman) and observation of small-surface crystallization dark spots with a metallic lustre in areas with high pigment concentration was done by variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). Cobalt aluminate was identified as the blue underglaze pigment and a comparison of blue and dark blue pigments was performed by the ratio of Co, Mn, and Fe oxides, indicating a compositional difference between the two blue tonalities. Manganese oxide compounds were also identified as colouring agents in dark blue areas and surface migration of manganese compounds was verified. (orig.)

  10. Non-destructive characterization of oriental porcelain glazes and blue underglaze pigments using μ-EDXRF, μ-Raman and VP-SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, M. L.; Muralha, V. S. F.; Mirão, J.; Veiga, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    The study of ancient materials with recognized cultural and economic value is a challenge to scientists and conservators, since it is usually necessary an approach through non-destructive techniques. Difficulties in establishing a correct analytical strategy are often significantly increased by the lack of knowledge on manufacture technologies and raw materials employed combined with the diversity of decay processes that may have acted during the lifetime of the cultural artefacts. A non-destructive characterization was performed on the glaze and underglaze pigments from a group of Chinese porcelain shards dated from the late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) excavated at the Monastery of Santa Clara- a- Velha in Coimbra (Portugal). Chemical analysis was performed using micro-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF). Mineralogical characterization was achieved by Raman microscopy (μ-Raman) and observation of small-surface crystallization dark spots with a metallic lustre in areas with high pigment concentration was done by variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). Cobalt aluminate was identified as the blue underglaze pigment and a comparison of blue and dark blue pigments was performed by the ratio of Co, Mn, and Fe oxides, indicating a compositional difference between the two blue tonalities. Manganese oxide compounds were also identified as colouring agents in dark blue areas and surface migration of manganese compounds was verified.

  11. Non-destructive characterization of oriental porcelain glazes and blue underglaze pigments using μ-EDXRF, μ-Raman and VP-SEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, M.L. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, REQUIMTE-CQFB, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal); Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Departamento de Conservacao e Restauro, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal); Muralha, V.S.F. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Research Unit VICARTE, Vidro e Ceramica para as Artes, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal); Mirao, J. [Universidade de Evora, Laboratorio HERCULES, Evora (Portugal); Veiga, J.P. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciencia dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-03-15

    The study of ancient materials with recognized cultural and economic value is a challenge to scientists and conservators, since it is usually necessary an approach through non-destructive techniques. Difficulties in establishing a correct analytical strategy are often significantly increased by the lack of knowledge on manufacture technologies and raw materials employed combined with the diversity of decay processes that may have acted during the lifetime of the cultural artefacts. A non-destructive characterization was performed on the glaze and underglaze pigments from a group of Chinese porcelain shards dated from the late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) excavated at the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha in Coimbra (Portugal). Chemical analysis was performed using micro-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF). Mineralogical characterization was achieved by Raman microscopy (μ-Raman) and observation of small-surface crystallization dark spots with a metallic lustre in areas with high pigment concentration was done by variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). Cobalt aluminate was identified as the blue underglaze pigment and a comparison of blue and dark blue pigments was performed by the ratio of Co, Mn, and Fe oxides, indicating a compositional difference between the two blue tonalities. Manganese oxide compounds were also identified as colouring agents in dark blue areas and surface migration of manganese compounds was verified. (orig.)

  12. Effect of light on the content of photosynthetically active pigments in plants. Pt. 4. Chromatic adaption in blue-green algae Anabaena cylindrica and A. variabilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czeczuga, B.

    1986-07-15

    The photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, carotenoids and phycobiliprotein pigments) of two species of the genus Anabaena grown in white, red, yellow, green and blue light were examined. The highest concentration of the cells was observed in the sample with red light in case of the both species, and the smallest with blue light. The biggest amounts of chlorophyll a and carotenoids were included in the cells of samples with the yellow and the smallest in case of the red light. The ratio of two phycobiliproteins is as follows: - in Anabaena cylindrica: the highest amount of C-phycocyanin in the cells was observed in the case of the red light, and C-phycoerytherin was found in the blue light; - in Anabaena variabiles: the highest amount of C-phycocyanien in the cells was found in case of the yellow light, and allophycocyanin was found in the blue light.

  13. Blue pigment colors from wall painting churches in danger (Portugal 15th to 18th century): identification, diagnosis, and color evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Milene; Carvalho, Maria Luisa; Longelin, Stephane; Ribeiro, Isabel; Valadas, Sara; Mirão, José; Candeias, António Estevão

    2011-07-01

    Samples of blue wall paint layers from selected 15th to 18th century religious mural paintings from southern Portugal (Alentejo) have been analyzed using a multi-analytical methodology involving the combination of in situ visible spectro-colorimetry with microanalytical techniques such as optical and scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. In situ analyses and micro-sampling were carried out in nine different churches, many in an advanced state of deterioration. The objectives of this study were: (a) to identify and compare the pigments that were used in the blue paint layers across the Alentejo region and through time by analysis of the elemental and mineralogical composition and pictorial techniques, and (b) to correlate the data between the actual color of the paint layer and the state of conservation of the pigments. For the paintings dated from the 16th century forward, the results show a generalized use of smalt blue. To a lesser extent, natural azurite was used despite the geological richness of the region in copper and pyrite ores. In only one painting was an optical blue made of carbon black and lime found. The pigments, pure or mixed with red and yellow ochres, were coarsely ground and used in different concentrations to create three-dimensional effects. These parameters as well as the presence of iron oxides in underlayer paints influence the colorimetric coordinates in the more transparent smalt blue paint layers. The state of conservation of the pigments plays an important role in the alteration of the paint color. A clear example of this is the fading of the smalt blue in several paintings due to lixiviation processes.

  14. Alteration of blue pigment in artificial iris in ocular prosthesis: effect of paint, drying method and artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Fernandes, Aline Úrsula Rocha; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Hadadd, Marcela Filié; Moreno, Amália; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves

    2011-02-01

    The artificial iris is the structure responsible for the dissimulation and aesthetics of ocular prosthesis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the color stability of artificial iris of microwaveable polymerized ocular prosthesis, as a function of paint type, drying method and accelerated aging. A total of 40 discs of microwaveable polymerized acrylic resin were fabricated, and divided according to the blue paint type (n = 5): hydrosoluble acrylic, nitrocellulose automotive, hydrosoluble gouache and oil paints. Paints where dried either at natural or at infrared light bulb method. Each specimen was constituted of one disc in colorless acrylic resin and another colored with a basic sclera pigment. Painting was performed in one surface of one of the discs. The specimens were submitted to an artificial aging chamber under ultraviolet light, during 1008 h. A reflective spectrophotometer was used to evaluate color changes. Data were evaluated by 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). All paints suffered color alteration. The oil paint presented the highest color resistance to artificial aging regardless of drying method. Copyright © 2010 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. "Batavia" (green) and cv. "Lollo Rossa" (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m(-2) s(-1) for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent.

  16. ceramic pigment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Co costs and environmental impact, most of the current research activities concerning Co-based blue pigments have been focused upon the minimization of the employed amount of Co in their formulation (thus reducing both the economic costs and the toxicity). Accordingly, several studies have been previously reported on ...

  17. The Protective Effect of Brown-, Gray-, and Blue-Tinted Lenses against Blue LED Light-Induced Cell Death in A2E-Laden Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Il; Jang, Young Pyo

    2017-01-01

    A2E-laden ARPE-19 cells were exposed to a blue light to induce cytotoxicity, in order to investigate the protective effects of various tinted ophthalmic lenses against photo-induced cytotoxicity in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells laden with A2E, known to be among the etiologies of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Different-colored tinted lenses with varying levels of tint and different filtering characteristics, such as polarized, blue-cut, and photochromatic lenses, were placed over the cells, and the protective efficacies thereof were evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase assay. When tinted lenses were placed over ARPE-19 cells, there were different reductions in cytotoxicity according to the colors and tint levels. The level of protection afforded by brown-tinted lenses was 6.9, 36.1, and 49% with a tint level of 15, 50, and 80%, respectively. For gray-tinted lenses, the protective effect was 16.3, 35, and 43.4% for the corresponding degree of tint, respectively. In the case of blue-tinted lenses, a protective effect of 20% was observed with 80% tinted lenses, but 15 and 50% tinted lenses provided no significant protection. In addition, photochromic lenses showed a protective effect but blue-cut lenses and polarized lenses provided no significant protection. Tinted lenses significantly reduced cytotoxicity in RPE cells irradiated with blue light. The protection was more efficient in lenses with a brown or gray tint than in blue-tinted lenses. Tinted glasses may provide significant protection against potential blue-light-induced photochemical and photo-oxidative damage in RPE cells. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Blue LED light exposure develops intracellular reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and subsequent cellular injuries in cultured bovine retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi-Ueda, T; Majima, H J; Watanabe, K; Ueda, T; Indo, H P; Suenaga, S; Hisamitsu, T; Ozawa, T; Yasuhara, H; Koide, R

    2013-10-01

    The effects of blue light emitter diode (LED) light exposure on retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE cells) were examined to detect cellular damage or change and to clarify its mechanisms. The RPE cells were cultured and exposed by blue (470 nm) LED at 4.8 mW/cm(2). The cellular viability was determined by XTT assay and cellular injury was determined by the lactate dehydrogenase activity in medium. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined by confocal laser microscope image analysis using dihydrorhodamine 123 and lipid peroxidation was determined by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal protein-adducts immunofluorescent staining (HNE). At 24 h after 50 J/cm(2) exposures, cellular viability was significantly decreased to 74% and cellular injury was significantly increased to 365% of control. Immediately after the light exposure, ROS generation was significantly increased to 154%, 177%, and 395% of control and HNE intensity was increased to 211%, 359%, and 746% of control by 1, 10, and 50 J/cm(2), respectively. These results suggest, at least in part, that oxidative stress is an early step leading to cellular damage by blue LED exposure and cellular oxidative damage would be caused by the blue light exposure at even lower dose (1, 10 J/cm(2)).

  19. Lipophilic pigments from cyanobacterial (blue-green algal) and diatom mats in Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, A. C.; Summons, R. E.; Cronin, S. E.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Lipophilic pigments were examined in microbial mat communities dominated by cyanobacteria in the intertidal zone and by diatoms in the subtidal and sublittoral zones of Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia. These microbial mats have evolutionary significance because of their similarity to lithfied stromatolites from the Proterozoic and Early Paleozoic eras. Fucoxanthin, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, beta-carotene, and chlorophylls a and c characterized the diatom mats, whereas cyanobacterial mats contained myxoxanthophyll, zeaxanthin, echinenone, beta-carotene, chlorophyll a and, in some cases, sheath pigment. The presence of bacteriochlorophyll a within the mats suggest a close association of photosynthetic bacteria with diatoms and cyanobacteria. The high carotenoids : chlorophyll a ratios (0.84-2.44 wt/wt) in the diatom mats suggest that carotenoids served a photoprotective function in this high light environment. By contrast, cyanobacterial sheath pigment may have largely supplanted the photoprotective role of carotenoids in the intertidal mats.

  20. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs.

  1. Early changes in gene expression induced by blue light irradiation of A2E-laden retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Burght, Barbro W; Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    investigated the differential gene expression in RPE cells that had accumulated the lipofuscin fluorophore A2E and were exposed to blue light (430 nm). Methods:  A2E-laden RPE cells were exposed to blue light (A2E/430 nm) at various time intervals. Cell death was quantified using Dead Red staining, and RNA...... irradiated with blue light were clearly distinguishable from the control samples. We found differential regulation of genes belonging to the following functional groups: transcription factors, stress response, apoptosis and immune response. Among the last mentioned were downregulation of four genes......). Conclusion:  This study demonstrates that blue light irradiation of A2E-laden RPE cells can alter the transcription of genes belonging to different functional pathways including stress response, apoptosis and the immune response. We suggest that these molecules may be associated to the pathogenesis of AMD...

  2. Retinal pigmented epithelial cells cytotoxicity and apoptosis through activation of the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway: role of indocyanine green, brilliant blue and implications for chromovitrectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando M Penha

    Full Text Available To investigate the in vitro effect of four vital dyes on toxicity and apoptosis in a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell line.ARPE-19 cells were exposed to brilliant blue (BriB, methyl blue (MetB, acid violet (AcV and indocyanine green (ICG. Balanced salt solution was used as control. Five different concentrations of each dye (1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.05 and 0.005 mg/mL and two exposure times (3 and 30 min were tested. Cell viability was determined by cell count and MTS assay and cell toxicity by LDH assay. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to access the apoptosis process.ICG significantly reduced cell viability after 3 minutes of exposure at all concentrations (p<0.01. BriB was safe at concentrations up to 0.25 mg/mL and MetB at concentrations up to 0.5 mg/mL, while AcV was safe up to 0.05 mg/ml, after 3 minutes of exposure. Toxicity was higher, when the cells were treated for 30 minutes. Expression of Bax, cytochrome c and caspase-9 was upregulated at the mRNA and protein level after ICG exposure, while Bcl-2 was downregulated. AcV and MetB were similar to control. However, BriB resulted in upregulation of Bcl-2, an antiapoptotic protein.The safest dye used on RPE cells was MetB followed by BriB and AcV. ICG was toxic at all concentrations and exposure times tested. Moreover, ICG was the only dye that induced apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. BriB significantly increased Bcl-2 protein levels, which might protect against the apoptosis process.

  3. Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells Cytotoxicity and Apoptosis through Activation of the Mitochondrial Intrinsic Pathway: Role Of Indocyanine Green, Brilliant Blue and Implications for Chromovitrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penha, Fernando M.; Pons, Marianne; Costa, Elaine Fiod; Barros, Nilana Meza Tenório; Rodrigues, Eduardo B.; Cardoso, Emmerson Badaró; Dib, Eduardo; Maia, Mauricio; Marin-Castaño, Maria E.; Farah, Michel Eid

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the in vitro effect of four vital dyes on toxicity and apoptosis in a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line. Methods ARPE-19 cells were exposed to brilliant blue (BriB), methyl blue (MetB), acid violet (AcV) and indocyanine green (ICG). Balanced salt solution was used as control. Five different concentrations of each dye (1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.05 and 0.005 mg/mL) and two exposure times (3 and 30 min) were tested. Cell viability was determined by cell count and MTS assay and cell toxicity by LDH assay. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to access the apoptosis process. Results ICG significantly reduced cell viability after 3 minutes of exposure at all concentrations (p<0.01). BriB was safe at concentrations up to 0.25 mg/mL and MetB at concentrations up to 0.5 mg/mL, while AcV was safe up to 0.05 mg/ml, after 3 minutes of exposure. Toxicity was higher, when the cells were treated for 30 minutes. Expression of Bax, cytochrome c and caspase-9 was upregulated at the mRNA and protein level after ICG exposure, while Bcl-2 was downregulated. AcV and MetB were similar to control. However, BriB resulted in upregulation of Bcl-2, an antiapoptotic protein. Conclusions The safest dye used on RPE cells was MetB followed by BriB and AcV. ICG was toxic at all concentrations and exposure times tested. Moreover, ICG was the only dye that induced apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. BriB significantly increased Bcl-2 protein levels, which might protect against the apoptosis process. PMID:23675521

  4. Anti-apoptotic effects of Curcuma longa L. extract and its curcuminoids against blue light-induced cytotoxicity in A2E-laden human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Il; Lee, Eun Hye; Kim, So Ra; Jang, Young Pyo

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the protective effect of the Curcuma longa L. extract (CLE) and its curcuminoids against blue light-induced cytotoxicity in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells laded with A2E. A2E has been concerned in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To perform this study, A2E-accumulated ARPE-19 cells were exposed to blue light to induce cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity and apoptotic gene expression levels were evaluated using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. Curcuma longa L. extract was found to exert a protective effect in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 15 μm, curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin exerted significant protective effects against blue light-induced cytotoxicity. Treatment with CLE and curcuminoids meaningfully reduced the mRNA levels of c-Abl and p53, which was known to be augmented in apoptotic RPE cells. Demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin were found to inhibit p38 expression, which is increased in blue light-irradiated A2E-accumulated RPE cells. Curcuma longa L. extract and its curcuminoids provided significant protection against photooxidative damage and apoptosis in the RPE cells. Our results suggest that curcuminoids may show potential in the treatment of AMD. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Chemistry and Artists' Colors: Part III. Preparation and Properties of Artists' Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orna, Mary Virginia

    1980-01-01

    Describes laboratory methods for synthesizing chrome yellow, prussian blue, and phthalalocyanine blue; reviews chemical properties of artists' pigments including chemical structure and light-scattering properties; and explains how pigments are classified. (CS)

  6. Identification of the pigment responsible for the blue fluorescence band in the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of green plants, and the potential use of this band in remotely estimating rates of photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappelle, E.W.; McMurtrey, J.E. III; Kim, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of vegetation is being investigated in this laboratory for use as a technique for the remote detection of the effects of environmental stress upon vegetation, as well as for plant identification. The fluorescence band with a maximum at 440 nm, in conjunction with the chlorophyll bands with maxima at 685 and 740 nm, has been found to be a critical band in the development of algorithms for detecting stress, and identifying plant types. The identification of the plant constituent responsible for this band is vital to understanding the mechanism underlying its fluorescence changes in response to environmental and physiological changes. The identification was achieved as follows: The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of pure plant pigments were determined. Fluorescence bands with maxima at 420 nm, 440 nm, 490 nm, and 525 nm were observed for vitamin K 1 , reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH), beta-carotene, and riboflavin, respectively. The LIF spectra of water extracts and acetone extracts of clover leaves were also measured. It was found that the blue fluorescence band was associated with the water extract. NADPH which is a water-soluble compound, and the water extract of clover had no fluorescence after oxidation by potassium ferricyanide, while the fluorescence of water insoluble vitamin K 1 was unchanged by the oxidizing agent. It was also found that the absorption maximum of NADPH was the same as the absorption maximum of the aqueous extract of clover. The above findings indicated that the compound responsible for the blue fluorescence at 440 nm is in the reduced state and is water-soluble. It was concluded that NADPH was responsible for the blue fluorescence at 440 nm. The strong linear relationship between the fluorescence at 440 nm and the rate of photosynthesis suggests the possible use of LIF measurements in the remote estimation of photosynthetic rates. (author)

  7. Prodigiosin-like pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, N N

    1975-05-01

    Prodigiosin, the bright red tripyrrole pigment from Serratia marcescens, has also been identified in Pseudomonas magnesiorubra, Vibrio psychroerythrus, and two Gram-negative rod-shaped mesophilic marine bacteria not members of the genus Serratia. Prodigiosin is sometimes bound to proteins; thus, extracts may require acid treatment before isolation of the pigment. Higher homologs of prodigiosin have been detected by mass spectroscopy. A mutant strain of S. marcescens produced nor-prodigiosin, in which the methoxy group of prodigiosin is replaced by a hydroxy group. Another mutant strain produced a blue tetrapyrrole pigment whose structure is a dimer of prodigiosin's rings A and B. Three novel biosynthetic analogs of prodigiosin have been obtained using a colorless mutant which does make rings A and B but not ring C and which can couple rings A and B with some added monopyrroles similar to ring C. The structures of three prodiginine (prodigiosin-like) pigments from streptomyces have been elucidated. All have the methoxytripyrrole aromatic nucleus of prodigiosin and all have an 11 carbon aliphatic side chain attached at carbon 2 of ring C. In two of the pigments the side chain is also linked to another carbon of ring C. The earlier literature about prodiginine pigments from actinomycetes has been interpreted and evaluated in light of the most recent findings. The structure elucidation of six prodiginine pigments from Actinomadurae (Nocardiae) has been completed. Only one, undecylprodiginine, is the same as from a streptomycete. For three of the six pigments, nine carbon side chains are observed and in four of them the side chain is attached to carbon 5 of ring A as well as carbon 2 of ring C so that a large ring is formed which includes the three pyrrole moieties. A section on identification summarized useful methods and presents information with which any known prodiginine pigment can be identified. The final step in the biosynthesis of prodigiosin was known to be

  8. [The effect of blue light on human retinal pigment epithelium cells α1D subunit protein expression and vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor secretion in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haihui; Cai, Shanjun; Gong, Xin; Wu, Zhipeng; Lyn, Jianping; Su, Gang; Xie, Bing

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of blue light on human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) α1D subunit protein expression and its relationship with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) secretion in vitro. The fourth generation cultured human RPE cells in vitro were randomly divided into 4 groups, group A (control), group B (exposure to blue light), group C (exposure to blue light+nifedipine), group D [exposure to blue light+(-)Bay K8644]. Cells were exposed to blue light (2 000 ± 500) lx for 6 hours, and cells culture completed 24 hours later. VEGF and bFGF concentration were assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analysis L-type calcium channel α1D subunit mRNA expression. Western blot was used to examine the protein expression of L-type calcium channel α1D subunit. Analysis of variance was used to compare the difference of α1D subunit mRNA and protein expression, VEGF and bFGF concentration between groups. Correlation analysis was used to show the relationship between α1D subunit protein expression and concentration of VEGF and bFGF. (1) There is significant statistically difference in the population mean of VEGF and bFGF concentration in four groups (F = 99.441, 21.310, P = 0.000,0.000) . VEGF and bFGF concentration in group B (3 281.51 ± 251.73, 1 346.81 ± 62.27) and group D (3 808.01 ± 94.01, 1 485.82 ± 108.97) was higher than it was in group A (2 401.09 ± 228.07, 1 232.42 ± 65.41) , which was statistically different (P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.019, 0.000). And it was higher in group D (3 808.01 ± 94.01, 1 485.82 ± 108.97) compared with group B (3 281.51 ± 251.73, 1 346.81 ± 62.27) (P = 0.000, 0.006). While, it was lower in group C (1 927.28 ± 143.11, 1 149.39 ± 62.99) than it was in group B (3 281.51 ± 251.73, 1 346.81 ± 62.27) (P = 0.000, 0.000) . (2) The mean of mRNA expression of α1D subunit between four groups was statistically significant (F

  9. New directions in phthalocyanine pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Diep VO

    1994-01-01

    Phthalocyanines have been used as a pigment in coatings and related applications for many years. These pigments are some of the most stable organic pigments known. The phthalo blue and green pigments have been known to be ultraviolet (UV) stable and thermally stable to over 400 C. These phthalocyanines are both a semiconductor and photoconductor, exhibiting catalytic activity and photostabilization capability of polymers. Many metal free and metallic phthalocyanine derivatives have been prepared. Development of the new classes of phthalocyanine pigment could be used as coating on NASA spacecraft material such as glass to decrease the optical degradation from UV light, the outside of the space station modules for UV protection, and coating on solar cells to increase lifetime and efficiency.

  10. [The correlation between the concentrations of VEGF and PEDF and Ca2+-PKC signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial cells cultured in vitro after exposuring to blue light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Cai, Shanjun; Wu, Zhipeng; Gong, Xin; Lyu, Jianping; Su, Gang; Wang, Lili

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), inositol triphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells after exposuring to blue light, and to explore the relationship with Ca2+-PKC signaling pathways, to evaluate the role of Ca2+-PKC signaling pathways of blue-light irradiation induced apoptosis in RPE cells. The fourth generation human RPE cells in vitro were exposured to blue light (2000±500 lux) for 6 hours, 24 hours prolongation of post-exposure culture. The concentrations of VEGF, PEDF, IP3 and DAG were assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cells were randomly divided into 6 groups, group A (control), group B (exposure to blue light), group C (exposure to blue light+PMA), group D (exposure to blue light+Calphostin C), group E (exposure to blue light+Nifedipine), group F (exposure to blue light+Calphostin C+Nifedipine). Flow cytometry was used to detect the apoptosis rate of human RPE cells in A, B and F group. Comparing with group A (584.38±10.66), the concentration of VEGF in group B (700.70±5.88), group C (698.21±6.66) and group E (648.30±4.91) was higher, the difference was statistically significant (P=0.002, 0.002, 0.016). Comparing with group B (700.70±5.88), the concentration of VEGF in Group D (623.87±3.12) and E (648.30±4.91) was lower (P=0.001, 0.002). Comparing with group A (75.96±1.70), the concentration of PEDF in Group B (71.82±1.67) and C (72.43±0.58) was lower (P=0.004, 0.011), but the concentration of PEDF in Group D (86.31±1.35) and E (93.72±1.24) was higher (P=0.000, 0.000). Comparing with group B (71.82±1.67), the concentration of PEDF in Group D (86.31±1.35) and E (93.72±1.24) was higher (P=0.000, 0.000). Comparing with group A (7.70±0.29), the ratio of VEGF to PEDF in Group B (9.85±0.34) and Croup C (9.64±0.02) was higher (P=0.008, 0.027) Comparing with group B, The ratio of VEGF to PEDF

  11. Encapsulation of ferro- and ferricyanide complexes inside ZSM-5 zeolite synthesized from rice straw: Implications for synthesis of Prussian blue pigment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ibraheem O.; Salama, Tarek M., E-mail: tm_salama@yahoo.com; Thabet, Mohamed S.; El-Nasser, Karam S.; Hassan, Ali M.

    2013-06-15

    Encapsulation of [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 4−} and [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} complexes in the intracrystalline pores of ZSM-5 zeolite, Fe{sup II}L/Z and Fe{sup III}L/Z respectively, by the zeolite synthesis method was reported. The modified zeolites were characterized by powder XRD, FT-IR and UV–vis spectroscopy. The nitrogen adsorption isotherms allow for the evaluation of pore structure of the complex-modified zeolites, whereas the thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) measurements provide insight into the decomposition products of the immobilized complexes. The modified zeolites exhibited smaller pore volumes and surface areas as compared with those of unpromoted ZSM-5, suggesting the inclusion of iron cyanides inside the interconnecting channels of ZSM-5. While the ferricyanide complex enhanced the formation of highly crystalline zeolite, the ferrocyanide one resulted in a lesser effect. The electronic spectra of the colloidal species developed when Fe{sup III}L/Z brought in contact with an aqueous solution of [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} exhibit absorptions attributed to CN{sup −} → iron charge-transfer. New bands at 294 and 319 nm due to d–d transitions of Fe{sup III} tetrahedral monomeric moieties were emitted concurrently under successive adsorption of [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sub aq}{sup 3−} over Fe{sup III}L/Z, along with a broad band at 555 nm assigned to polymeric [Fe{sup II}–C–N–Fe{sup III}] of Prussian blue (PB). The FT-IR spectra of Fe{sup III/II}L/Z devoted to the adsorption of an aqueous solution of [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} showed a band at 2092 cm{sup −1} assigned to the C–N stretch in the Fe{sup II}–CN–Fe{sup III} linkages. The vibrations attributable to Fe–O–Si bonding along with hydrocarbon and nitroprusside appeared only in the spectrum of Fe{sup III}L/Z, thus was found to be strong evidence for the mutual interaction between [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} and the latter sample. - Highlights: • We synthesized ferrous and ferric cyanide

  12. Pigmentos maculares Macular pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Canovas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A luteína e a zeaxantina são pigmentos amarelos que se localizam na mácula. Devido à sua localização, diminuem e filtram a quantidade de luz principalmente azul que chega aos fotorreceptores, atuam como antioxidantes e podem melhorar a qualidade visual. Esta é uma revisão do seu mecanismo de incorporação, ação, possíveis aplicações e conhecimento científico a respeito.Lutein and Zeaxanthin are yellow pigments located at the macula. Because of your location macular pigments decrease and filter the amount of blue light that reach photoreceptors, protect the outer retina from oxidative stress and may improve the vision quality. This is a review regarding incorporation mechanism, function and knowledge update.

  13. Natural pigments and sacred art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelekian, Lena, ,, Lady

    2010-05-01

    Since the dawn of mankind, cavemen has expressed himself through art. The earliest known cave paintings date to some 32,000 years ago and used 4 colours derived from the earth. These pigments were iron oxides and known as ochres, blacks and whites. All pigments known by the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans and Renaissance man were natural and it was not until the 18th century that synthetic pigments were made and widely used. Until that time all art, be it sacred or secular used only natural pigments, of which the preparation of many have been lost or rarely used because of their tedious preparation. As a geologist, a mineralogist and an artist specializing in iconography, I have been able to rediscover 89 natural pigments extracted from minerals. I use these pigments to paint my icons in the traditional Byzantine manner and also to restore old icons, bringing back their glamour and conserving them for years to come. The use of the natural pigments in its proper way also helps to preserve the traditional skills of the iconographer. In the ancient past, pigments were extremely precious. Many took an exceedingly long journey to reach the artists, and came from remote countries. Research into these pigments is the work of history, geography and anthropology. It is an interesting journey in itself to discover that the blue aquamarines came from Afghanistan, the reds from Spain, the greens Africa, and so on. In this contribution I will be describing the origins, preparation and use of some natural pigments, together with their history and provenance. Additionally, I will show how the natural pigments are used in the creation of an icon. Being a geologist iconographer, for me, is a sacrement that transforms that which is earthly, material and natural into a thing of beauty that is sacred. As bread and wine in the Eucharist, water during baptism and oil in Holy Union transmit sanctification to the beholder, natural pigments do the same when one considers an icon. The

  14. Finnish wallpaper pigments in the 18th-19th century: Presence of KFe3(CrO4)2(OH)6 and odd pigment mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Kepa; Knuutinen, Ulla; Vallejuelo, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz de; Irazola, Mireia; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Several Finish wallpapers from the 18th and 19th century were analysed by using Raman spectroscopy assisted with EDXRF instrumentation, in an attempt of determine the pigments used in their manufacture process as well as of trying to date some of the samples through pigment composition. All pigments present in samples were determined and surprisingly the unusual and strange iron (III) chromate yellow pigment was found. Besides, unusual mixtures were found to obtain fashionable colours, especially in blue and green areas, where more than one blue pigments were mixed with green and yellow pigments. Blue verditer, ultramarine blue, Prussian blue, chrome yellow, calcite, lead white, red and yellow iron oxide, gypsum and carbon black were identified. The presence of the risky and poisonous emerald green must be highlighted. The results were compared with those found in other wallpapers from Spain and France.

  15. Thermoluminescence (TL) of Egyptian Blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schvoerer, M.; Delavergne, M.-C.; Chapoulie, R.

    1988-01-01

    Egyptian Blue is a synthesized crystalline pictorial pigment with formula CaCuSi/sub 4/O/sub 10/. It has been used in Egypt and Mesopotamia from the 3rd millenium B.C. A preliminary experiment on a recently synthesized sample showed that this pigment is thermoluminescent after ..beta.. irradiation (/sup 90/Sr). As the signal intensity grows linearly with the administered dose within the temperature range commonly used in TL dating, we have been looking for this phenomenon from archaeological pigments. It was encountered with two samples found in excavation. From its intensity and stability we concluded that Egyptian Blue can be dated using TL. This first and positive result encouraged us to extend the method to other types of mineral pigments synthesized by early man, and to suggest that it may be used for direct dating of ancient murals.

  16. ceramic pigment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sintering process). The other samples show practically the same morphology, and the mean particle size of the obtained powders is in agreement with that for inorganic pigments used in most applications (i.e., between 0.1 and 10 μm [13]). 3.3 Optical spectroscopy (powders). Since Co2SiO4 mineral owes its violet colour to ...

  17. Phototrophic pigment production with microalgae: biological constraints and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, K.J.M.; Lamers, P.P.; Martens, D.E.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in naturally produced colorants, and microalgae represent a bio-technologically interesting source due to their wide range of colored pigments, including chlorophylls (green), carotenoids (red, orange and yellow), and phycobiliproteins (red and blue). However, the

  18. Pigment and terracotta analyses of Hellenistic figurines in Crete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, P.; Kallithrakas-Kontos, N.

    2003-01-01

    The results of the analyses performed on blue, black, brown, orange, white and purple pigments decorating Hellenistic figurines, excavated in a rock-cut tomb in the archaeological zone of Chania, Crete, Greece, are presented. Different spectroscopic techniques, such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence identified the compounds present in the chromatic layers. X-ray diffraction analysis gave complementary information and further support to the spectral assignments. Optical microscopy revealed the nature and sequence of the pigmented layer on the terracotta. Several precious pigments, such as Egyptian blue for the bluish areas, Tyrian purple for the purple ones, and the rare huntite for the white-pigmented areas were identified among the studied pigmented areas. The pigment analysis provides information on the technical aspects related to terracotta manufacture and preservation, and promotes historical indications on cultural and commercial changes among the Mediterranean civilisations

  19. Kingfisher feathers - colouration by pigments, spongy nanostructures and thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Tinbergen, Jan; Leertouwer, Hein L.; Wilts, Bodo D.

    2011-01-01

    The colours of the common kingfisher, Alcedo atthis, reside in the barbs of the three main types of feather: the orange breast feathers, the cyan back feathers and the blue tail feathers. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the orange barbs contain small pigment granules. The cyan and blue barbs contain spongy nanostructures with slightly different dimensions, causing different reflectance spectra. Imaging scatterometry showed that the pigmented barbs create a diffuse orange scattering a...

  20. The gecko visual pigments. The behavior of opsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescitelli, F

    1979-05-01

    The 521-pigment extracted out of the retina of the Tokay gecko has the typical stereospecificity of the vertebrate visual pigments. This is true for the pigment in the chloride-depleted, "blue-shifted" state as well as for the normal pigment with added chloride. While in the chloride-deficient state, pigment regeneration occurred with both 11-cis- and 9-cis-retinals and the regenerated photopigments were also in the blue-shifted, chloride-depleted state. As with the native pigment, these regenerated pigments were bathochromically shifted to their normal positions by the addition of chloride. Chloride-deficient opsin by itself also responded to chloride for the pigment regenerated with 11-cis-retinal from such chloride-treated opsin was in the normal 521-position. Regeneration was always rapid, reaching completion in less than 5 min, and was significantly faster than for cow rhodopsin regenerating under the same conditions. This rapid rate was found with or without chloride, with both 11-cis- and 9-cis-retinals and in the presence of the sulfhydryl poison, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (PMB). Like the native chloride-deficient pigment, the regenerated chloride-depleted photopigments responded to PMB by a blue shift beyond the position of the chloride-deficient state. The addition of chloride to these "poisoned" regenerated pigments caused a bathochromic shift of such magnitude as to indicate a repair of both the PMB and chloride-deficient blue shift. In this discussion the possible implications of these results to phylogenetic considerations are considered as well as to some molecular properties of the 521-pigment.

  1. Self-Normalized Photoacoustic Technique for the Quantitative Analysis of Paper Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Gómez y Gómez, Y. M.; Bautista-Ramírez, M. E.; Pescador-Rojas, J. A.; Martínez-Pérez, L.; Lomelí-Mejía, P. A.

    2018-03-01

    A self-normalized photoacoustic technique was applied for quantitative analysis of pigments embedded in solids. Paper samples (filter paper, Whatman No. 1), attached with the pigment: Direct Fast Turquoise Blue GL, were used for this study. This pigment is a blue dye commonly used in industry to dye paper and other fabrics. The optical absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 660 nm, was measured for this pigment at various concentrations in the paper substrate. It was shown that Beer-Lambert model for light absorption applies well for pigments in solid substrates and optical absorption coefficients as large as 220 cm^{-1} can be measured with this photoacoustic technique.

  2. Kingfisher feathers - colouration by pigments, spongy nanostructures and thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Tinbergen, Jan; Leertouwer, Hein L.; Wilts, Bodo D.

    2011-01-01

    The colours of the common kingfisher, Alcedo atthis, reside in the barbs of the three main types of feather: the orange breast feathers, the cyan back feathers and the blue tail feathers. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the orange barbs contain small pigment granules. The cyan and blue

  3. Co-deposition of Pigment Particles with Nickel through Electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yoon

    This research focuses on the synthesis of a nickel-pigment composite coating in an effort to produce coloured nickel electrodeposits via the codeposition approach. A blue pigment, Copper Phthalocyanine (CuPc) Blue was codeposited to create Ni-CuPc composite coatings. Top surface and cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images confirmed the codeposition of pigment particles within the nickel matrix throughout the entire coating thickness. The top surface of the Ni-CuPc composite coating showed an unexpected metallic copper colour. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates the presence of metallic copper confined to the top surface. It was speculated that this phenomenon is due to the galvanic displacement reaction between copper from the pigment and nickel from the matrix. Upon removing the copper surface layer the colour of the composite remained metallic silver despite the presence of the pigment particles.

  4. Early photolysis intermediates of gecko and bovine artificial visual pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J W; Liang, J; Ebrey, T G; Sheves, M; Livnah, N; Kuwata, O; Jäger, S; Kliger, D S

    1997-11-25

    Nanosecond laser photolysis measurements were conducted on digitonin extracts of artificial pigments prepared from the cone-type visual pigment, P521, of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) retina. Artificial pigments were prepared by regeneration of bleached gecko photoreceptor membranes with 9-cis-retinal, 9-cis-14-methylretinal, or 9-cis-alpha-retinal. Absorbance difference spectra were recorded at a sequence of time delays from 30 ns to 60 microseconds following excitation with a pulse of 477-nm actinic light. Global analysis showed the kinetic data for all three artificial gecko pigments to be best fit by two-exponential processes. These two-exponential decays correspond to similar decays observed after photolysis of P521 itself, with the first process being the decay of the equilibrated P521 BathoP521 BSI mixture to P521 Lumi and the second process being the decay of P521 Lumi to P521 Meta I. In spite of its large blue shift relative to P521, iso-P521 displays a normal chloride depletion induced blue shift. Iso-P521's early intermediates up to Lumi were also blue-shifted, with the P521 BathoP521 BSI equilibrated mixture being 15 nm blue-shifted and P521 Lumi being 8 nm blue-shifted relative to the intermediates formed after P521 photolysis. The blue shift associated with the iso-pigment is reduced or disappears entirely by P521 Meta I. Similar blue shifts were observed for the early intermediates observed after photolysis of bovine isorhodopsin, with the Lumi intermediate blue-shifted 5 nm compared to the Lumi intermediate formed after photolysis of bovine rhodopsin. These shifts indicate that a difference exists between the binding sites of 9- and 11-cis pigments which persists for microseconds at 20 degrees C.

  5. Overview of plant pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains are four major classes of biological pigments produced in plants. Chlorophylls are the primary pigments responsible for plant green and photosynthesis. The other three are accessary pigments and secondary metabolites that yield non-green colors and...

  6. Blue lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Caterina; Scope, Alon; Lallas, Aimilios; Zalaudek, Iris; Moscarella, Elvira; Gardini, Stefano; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Blue color is found in a wide range of malignant and benign melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions and in lesions that result from penetration of exogenous materials, such as radiation or amalgam tattoo or traumatic penetration of particles. Discriminating between different diagnostic entities that display blue color relies on careful patient examination and lesion assessment. Dermoscopically, the extent, distribution, and patterns created by blue color can help diagnose lesions with specificity and differentiate between benign and malignant entities. This article provides an overview of the main diagnoses whereby blue color can be found, providing simple management rules for these lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Monodisperse Hollow Tricolor Pigment Particles for Electronic Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Xianwei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A general approach has been designed to blue, green, and red pigments by metal ions doping hollow TiO 2. The reaction involves initial formation of PS at TiO2 core–shell nanoparticles via a mixed-solvent method, and then mixing with metal ions solution containing PEG, followed calcining in the atmosphere. The as-prepared hollow pigments exhibit uniform size, bright color, and tunable density, which are fit for electronic paper display.

  8. Characterization of pre-hispanic pigments by modern analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega A, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the study of mural painting pigments from two archaeological sites (The Great Temple in Mexico city and Cacaxtla) was performed to know their materials composition, identify their structural characteristics and properties by using modern analytical techniques. Blue, ochre, red and black pigments of Mexica culture (1325-1521 a.C. / late Post Classic period); blue, ochre, red, brown, pink, green and white of Olmeca- Xicalanca culture (700-900 a.C. / Epiclassic period) were studied. Data about materials used, technological evolution, mineralogical background, cultural interchange and origin was obtained. Environmental exposition of these paintings since their discovering has produced changes and damage on their materials. Therefore, stability of some pigments has been notorious, ''Maya Blue'' specially presents extraordinary resistance to diluted and concentrated acids and alkalis including boiling condition, acqua regia, solvents, oxidant and reducing agents, moderate heat and biocorrosi6n; for that reason its study was emphasized. ''Maya Blue'' pigment was synthesized in laboratory using the processes described by historic sources (with indigophera suffruticosa leaves and synthetic indigo) up to obtain a stable pigment including acqua regia action. Clay matrix sorbs nearly 0.4 weight percent of organic dye, which cover 79% of palygorskita surface area. (Author)

  9. Analytical Investigation Of Pigments, Ground Layer And Media Of Cartonnage Fragments From Greek Roman Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Hala. A. M.

    Some cartonnage fragments from Hawara, Fayoum Excavation were examined to identify pigments, media and grounds. It belonged to the Greek-Roman period. They were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersive X ray analysis (EDS) equipped with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). These techniques were used to identify the composition and morphology of grounds, nature of pigments and media used in cartonnage fragments. The coarse ground layer was composed of calcite and traces of quartz. The fine ground layer used under the pigments directly was composed of calcite only. Carbon black was used as black pigment while lead oxide as red pigment, showing the influence of Roman and Greek pigments on Egyptian art in these later periods. Blue colorant was identified as cuprorivaite and yellow pigment was goethite. Animal glue was used in the four pigments as medium colored.

  10. Genetic disorders of pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, Thierry; Mantoux, Frédéric; Ortonne, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    More than 127 loci are actually known to affect pigmentation in mouse when they are mutated. From embryogenesis to transfer of melanin to the keratinocytes or melanocytes survival, any defect is able to alter the pigmentation process. Many gene mutations are now described, but the function of their product protein and their implication in melanogenesis are only partially understood. Each genetic pigmentation disorder brings new clues in the understanding of the pigmentation process. According to the main genodermatoses known to induce hypo- or hyperpigmentation, we emphasize in this review the last advances in the understanding of the physiopathology of these diseases and try to connect, when possible, the mutation to the clinical phenotype.

  11. Solitary black pigment stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolpers, C.; Wosiewitz, U.

    1986-01-01

    Solitary pigment stones of the gall-bladder are rare (1.7%). 82,5% are radiopaque, 17.5% radiolucent. 64,8% of radiopaque solitary pigment stones have the structure of a cockade. Such cockades take years to develop. Solitary cholesterol stones with a nucleus of a radiopaque pigment stone should not be treated for litholysis. 8% of solitary cholesterol stones with a cross diameter below 15 mm. possess a radiolucent pigment stone nucleus. X-ray diagnosis for selecting litholytic treatment remains the safest method, especially if the radiologist compares his films regularly with the specimens after surgery. (orig.) [de

  12. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF PRUSSIAN BLUE FORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    This intense blue colored pigment is used in the preparation of paints, printing inks, laundry dye, etc. [1]. The micro-porous character of PB and its analogues find ... industrial applications such as in removal of heavy metal ions in wine production [4], electrochemical application as battery building [5], electronic switching and ...

  13. Molecular evolution of the cone visual pigments in the pure rod-retina of the nocturnal gecko, Gekko gekko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, S; Blow, N S

    2001-10-03

    We have isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a putative ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive visual pigment of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko). This clone has 57 and 59% sequence similarities to the gecko RH2 and MWS pigment genes, respectively, but it shows 87% similarity to the UV pigment gene of the American chameleon (Anolis carolinensis). The evolutionary rates of amino acid replacement are significantly higher in the three gecko pigments than in the corresponding chameleon pigments. The accelerated evolutionary rates reflect not only the transition from cones to rods in the retina but also the blue-shift in the absorption spectra of the gecko pigments.

  14. A FIVE YEAR RECORD OF PHYTOPLANKTON PIGMENT PATTERNS IN ESCAMBIA/PENSACOLA BAY, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytoplankton pigments were monitored quarterly at over 50 stations in Escambia/Pensacola Bay System (Pensacola, FL) from spring of 1996 to fall 2000. HPLC accessory pigments were used to analyze the phytoplankton community structure. HPLC data suggest a dominance of blue-green a...

  15. Blue nevus with a starburst pattern on dermoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga, Takeo; Nakajima, Kimiko; Tarutani, Masahito; Izumi, Miki; Tanaka, Masaru; Sano, Shigetoshi

    2012-10-01

    An 11-year-old girl presented to our department with a blue-gray papule approximately 4 mm in diameter. We suspected that it was a blue nevus or a pigmented Reed/Spitz nevus. On dermoscopic observation, the lesion showed homogeneous black-bluish pigmentation. This dermoscopic feature was suggestive of a blue nevus. However, near-circumferential streaks and a global feature of a "starburst pattern" were also observed, as is often found in a Reed/Spitz nevus. The lesion was excised and histological examination revealed spindle cells with melanin pigments diffusely present in the upper dermis and around hair follicles in the mid-dermis, but not in the epidermis. The melanocytic cells were arranged in a symmetrical wedge-shaped configuration. In addition, there was a diffuse fibrosis. Finally, we made a diagnosis of a blue nevus based on these findings.

  16. The importance of tattoo pigment in sentinel lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soran, Atilla; Menekse, Ebru; Kanbour-Shakir, Amal; Tane, Kaori; Diego, Emilia; Bonaventura, Marguerite; Johnson, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    The presence of pigment in axillary lymph nodes (LN) secondary to migration of tattoo ink can imitate the appearance of a blue sentinel lymph node (SLN) on visual inspection, causing the operator to either miss the true SLN or excise more than is needed. We present patients with tattoos ipsilateral to an early stage breast cancer who underwent a SLN biopsy. Patients were retrospectively reviewed from medical records and clinicopathologic data was collected. A total of 52 LNs were retrieved from 15 patients for sentinel mapping and 29 of them had tattoo pigmentation on pathologic evaluation. Of those 29 SLNs, 2 of them (6.9%) were pigmented, but did not contain either blue dye or Tc-99m (pseudopigmented SLN). Two (3.8%) SLNs were positive for metastasis; both of these had either blue dye or Tc99m uptake, and 1 demonstrated tattoo pigment in the node. In this cohort of patients with ipsilateral tattoos, removed more LNs lead to unnecessary excision which may important for increasing the risk of arm morbidity from SLN biopsy. However, the presence of tattoo pigment did not interfere with understaging for axillary mapping and it did not effect of pathological identification of SLNs positivity.

  17. Effects and Mechanism of Blue Light on Monascus in Liquid Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of light on Monascus and the underlying mechanism have received a great deal of interest for the industrial application of Monascus pigments. In this study, we have examined the effects of blue light on the culture morphology, mycelium growth, pigments, and citrinin yield of Monascus in liquid-state and oscillation fermentation, and explored the mechanism at a physiological level. It was found that blue light affected the colony morphology, the composition (chitin content, and permeability of the Monascus mycelium cell wall in static liquid culture, which indicates blue light benefits pigments secreting from aerial mycelium to culture medium. In liquid oscillation fermentation, the yields of Monascus pigments in fermentation broth (darkness 1741 U/g, blue light 2206 U/g and mycelium (darkness 2442 U/g, blue light 1900 U/g cultured under blue light and darkness are different. The total pigments produced per gram of Monascus mycelium under blue light was also higher (4663 U/g than that in darkness (4352 U/g. However, the production of citrinin (88 μg/g under blue light was evidently lower than that in darkness (150 μg/g. According to the degradation of citrinin caused by blue light and hydrogen peroxide, it can be concluded that blue light could degrade citrinin and inhibit the catalase activity of Monascus mycelium, subsequently suppressing the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, which is the active species that degrades citrinin.

  18. Effects and Mechanism of Blue Light on Monascus in Liquid Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Wenqing; Chen, Xiying; Cai, Junhui; Wang, Changlu; He, Weiwei

    2017-03-01

    The effect of light on Monascus and the underlying mechanism have received a great deal of interest for the industrial application of Monascus pigments. In this study, we have examined the effects of blue light on the culture morphology, mycelium growth, pigments, and citrinin yield of Monascus in liquid-state and oscillation fermentation, and explored the mechanism at a physiological level. It was found that blue light affected the colony morphology, the composition (chitin content), and permeability of the Monascus mycelium cell wall in static liquid culture, which indicates blue light benefits pigments secreting from aerial mycelium to culture medium. In liquid oscillation fermentation, the yields of Monascus pigments in fermentation broth (darkness 1741 U/g, blue light 2206 U/g) and mycelium (darkness 2442 U/g, blue light 1900 U/g) cultured under blue light and darkness are different. The total pigments produced per gram of Monascus mycelium under blue light was also higher (4663 U/g) than that in darkness (4352 U/g). However, the production of citrinin (88 μg/g) under blue light was evidently lower than that in darkness (150 μg/g). According to the degradation of citrinin caused by blue light and hydrogen peroxide, it can be concluded that blue light could degrade citrinin and inhibit the catalase activity of Monascus mycelium, subsequently suppressing the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, which is the active species that degrades citrinin.

  19. Plant Pigment Identification: A Classroom and Outreach Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Kathleen C. A.; Odendaal, Antoinette Y.; Carlson, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanins are a class of pigments responsible for the bright colors of many flowers, fruits, and vegetables typically resulting in shades of red, blue, and purple. Students were asked to perform an activity to enable them to identify which anthocyanin was present in one of several possible plant materials through a hands-on activity. Students…

  20. [Microbial sources of pigments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañizares-Villanueva, R O; Ríos-Leal, E; Olvera Ramírez, R; Ponce Noyola, T; Márquez Rocha, F

    1998-01-01

    Pigments from natural sources has been obtained since long time ago, and their interest has increased due to the toxicity problems caused by those of synthetic origin. In this way the pigments from microbial sources are a good alternative. Some of more important natural pigments, are the carotenoids, flavonoids (anthocyanins) and some tetrapirroles (chloropyls, phycobilliproteins). Another group less important are the betalains and quinones. The carotenoids are molecules formed by isoprenoids units and the most important used as colorant are the alpha and beta carotene which are precursors of vitamin A, and some xantophylls as astaxanthin. The pigment more used in the industry is the beta-carotene which is obtained from some microalgae and cyanobacteria. The astaxanthin another important carotenoid is a red pigment of great commercial value, and it is used in the pharmaceutical feed and acuaculture industries. This pigments is mainly obtained from Phaffia rhodozyma and Haematococcus pluvialis and other organisms. The phycobilliproteins obtained from cyanobacteria and some group of algae, have recently been increased on the food industries. In the last years it has been used as fluorescent marker in biochemical assays. Our research group have carried out studies about the factors that improve the production of these pigments obtained from different microbial species as well as the methods for their extraction and application.

  1. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  2. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today.

  3. Dermoscopy Clues in Pigmented Bowen's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gutiérrez-Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented tumors have similar clinical features that overlap and hamper diagnosis. Dermoscopy increases the diagnostic accuracy of doubtful melanocytic lesions and has been used as a noninvasive tool in the detection of pigmented lesions (PLs like melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, and pigmented Bowen's disease (pBD. Our objective was to show the dermoscopic features of 2 cases of pBD and compare with the findings reported in the literature. Two dermoscopic images of biopsy proven pBD were retrospectively analyzed for dermoscopic patterns. Both cases showed brown regular globules, structureless brown and blue pigmentation, glomerular vessels, hypopigmented regression-like areas, and keratosis. These findings were similar to the cases reported previously. The dermoscopic diagnosis of pBD is based on the absence of criteria for a melanocytic lesion in the presence of glomerular vessels, regular brown globules and keratosis. Although pBD is rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of PLs, especially melanoma.

  4. Effect of interfacial state between pigment and binder on the UV curing proficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dehai; Chen Xiaofang

    2004-01-01

    Effects of pigment modification to change pigment/binder interfacial characteristics and UV curing behavior were studied. The results show that the air absorbed on surface of the pigment plays an important role in hindering UV curing. In addition, there obviously exists the interface coupling effect between the pigment and the binder via the modifier of the pigment (reagent TEA). ESEM studies revealed that wetting property of the pigment was improved and binding between the pigment and the resin was strengthened after the pigment modification. EDS data showed an obvious enrichment of O-containing group of modification agent (-OH) in the interface and a shift of binding energy of the modifier was also detected. This may also contribute to the increase of curing proficiency due to the priority of the absorption of UV energy by the modifier TEA to that of pigment. The work demonstrated that the pigment modification could be used as a method to improve the UV curing efficiency. In the case of TEA, the curing rate of blue pigmented UV curable coating (125 μm) could be improved greatly (from 45s to 14s). The study have shown a promising application of various kinds of fillers as well as pigment in UV coatings. (authors)

  5. Pigments in Thermophilic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Somasundaram, T; Rao, Sanjay SR; Maheshwari, R

    1986-01-01

    UV and visible absorption spectra of thermophilic fungi were obtained by photoacoustic spectroscopy. Based on these data as well as on the chem. properties and IR spectra, it is suggested that the pigments may be hydroxylated polycyclic quinones.

  6. Chlorophyll: The wonder pigment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.R.

    Chlorophyll, the green plant pigment, a 'real life force' of living beings, besides synthesizing food, is a great source of vitamins, minerals and other phytochemicals. Adding chlorophyll rich food to our diet fortifies our body against health...

  7. The Assessment of Natural Pigmentation in Archaeological Wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharff, Annemette Bruselius

    2018-01-01

    , transmitted light microscopy of cross-sections dyed with Toluidine Blue O, and transmission electron microscopy of cross-sections. The results showed that it was difficult to detect any pigments by transmitted light microscopy of whole mounts of the fibres. Transmitted light microscopy of dyed cross......, the majority of the grains are eumel¬anin, whereas red and yellow wool contain mainly pheomelanin. Transmitted light microscopy of whole mounts of the fibres is commonly used for the detection of natural pigment grains. However, it can be difficult to detect the pigment grains exclusively by transmitted light...... patterned fragments were selected for analyses. Earlier dyestuff analyses of the red-brown yarns gave no results, and it was therefore necessary to test the yarns for natural pigmentation. Three different methods were used for the analy¬ses. Transmitted light microscopy of whole mounts of the fibres...

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ultramarine pigments: A new analytical method for the polysulfide radical anion S3- chromophore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleet, Michael E.; Liu, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Blue and mauve ultramarine artists' pigments and their heat-treated products have been investigated by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra are dominated by features of reduced sulfur and sulfate species. There is also a pre-peak at about 2468.0 eV which reflects the presence of the unpaired electron on the polysulfide radical anion (S 3 - ). Pre-peak intensity is directly proportional to the depth of blue coloration, and provides a new, independent method for estimating the proportion of ultramarine cage sites occupied by the blue chromophore. The occupancy of the polysulfide radical anion S 3 - is estimated to be 33% in an intense ultramarine blue pigment, 22% in a dark blue ultramarine pigment, and 1% in deep royal blue lazurite from Afghanistan. The more efficient development of color in lazurite is attributed to extensive annealing of the mineral structure in the natural environment.

  9. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvestin...

  10. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kuczynska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  11. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  12. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-16

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  13. Pickering emulsions stabilized by coloured organic pigment particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Olusanya, Samuel O

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of stabilizing emulsions of water and non-polar alkane with pure, coloured organic pigment particles is explored. Seven pigment types each possessing a primary colour of the rainbow were selected. Their solubility in water or heptane was determined using a spectrophotometric method and their surface energies were derived from the contact angles of probe liquids on compressed disks of the particles. As expected, most of the pigments are relatively hydrophobic but pigment orange is quite hydrophilic. At equal volumes of oil and water, preferred emulsions were water-in-oil (w/o) for six pigment types and oil-in-water (o/w) for pigment orange. The emulsion type is in line with calculated contact angles of the particles at the oil-water interface being either side of 90°. Their stability to coalescence increases with particle concentration. Emulsions are shown to undergo limited coalescence from which the coverage of drop interfaces by particles has been determined. In a few cases, close-packed primary particles are visible around emulsion droplets. At constant particle concentration, the influence of the volume fraction of water ( φ w ) on emulsions was also studied. For the most hydrophilic pigment orange, emulsions are o/w at all φ w , whereas they are w/o for the most hydrophobic pigments (red, yellow, green and blue). For pigments of intermediate hydrophobicity however (indigo and violet), catastrophic phase inversion becomes possible with emulsions inverting from w/o to o/w upon increasing φ w . For the first time, we link the pigment surface energy to the propensity of emulsions to phase invert transitionally or catastrophically.

  14. Identification of Pigments in Colored Layers of a Painting by Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, O. I.; Pankin, D. V.; Povolotckaia, A. V.; Borisov, E. V.; Beznosova, M. O.; Krivul'ko, T. A.; Kurochkin, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    Using the method of Raman spectroscopy the pigment composition is investigated of, and the brushwork technique used in, the original layer of a 19th century painting is established. It is an overdoor worked, presumably, by Antoine Jean-Etienne Faivre. It is established that the artist used the following pigments: cinnabar and dyes on the basis of goethite and hematite (for red, yellow-orange, and brown shades), ultramarine and Prussian blue (for blue shades), and Emerald green and a mixture of blue and yellow shades (to obtain a green color). It is determined that white lead was used a primer.

  15. Skin pigmentation evaluation in broilers fed natural and synthetic pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, M P; Hirschler, E M; Sams, A R

    2005-01-01

    Broiler carcass skin color is important in the United States and Mexico. This study evaluated the use of natural and synthetic pigments in broiler diets at commercial levels. Birds were fed natural or synthetic pigments at low or high levels, simulating US and Mexican commercial practices. Skin color was measured during live production (3 to 7 wk of age) and after slaughter and chilling. The natural pigments had consistently greater skin b* values (yellowness) than the synthetic pigments. The high levels produced greater skin b* values than the low levels, regardless of source. The synthetic pigments had a slower increase in skin b* but reached the same level as the natural low by 7 wk. There was no difference in skin a* values (redness) due to pigment source or level or the age of the bird. By 7 wk, all pigment sources approached plateau levels in the blood, but the synthetic pigment diet produced higher blood levels of yellow and red pigments than the natural pigment diets. Processing intensified skin yellowness and reduced skin redness. These data suggest that although synthetic pigments might have been absorbed better than natural ones, natural pigments were more efficient at increasing skin yellowness and there were only small differences between high and low levels for each pigment source. This finding may allow reduction in pigment use and feed cost to achieve the same skin acceptance by the consumer.

  16. Spectral tuning of Amazon parrot feather coloration by psittacofulvin pigments and spongy structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinbergen, Jan; Wilts, Bodo D; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2013-12-01

    The feathers of Amazon parrots are brightly coloured. They contain a unique class of pigments, the psittacofulvins, deposited in both barbs and barbules, causing yellow or red coloured feathers. In specific feather areas, spongy nanostructured barb cells exist, reflecting either in the blue or blue-green wavelength range. The blue-green spongy structures are partly enveloped by a blue-absorbing, yellow-colouring pigment acting as a spectral filter, thus yielding a green coloured barb. Applying reflection and transmission spectroscopy, we characterized the Amazons' pigments and spongy structures, and investigated how they contribute to the feather coloration. The reflectance spectra of Amazon feathers are presumably tuned to the sensitivity spectra of the visual photoreceptors.

  17. Pigmented nodular melanoma: the predictive value of dermoscopic features using multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzichetta, M A; Kittler, H; Stanganelli, I; Bono, R; Cavicchini, S; De Giorgi, V; Ghigliotti, G; Quaglino, P; Rubegni, P; Argenziano, G; Talamini, R

    2015-07-01

    Nodular melanoma (NM), representing 10-30% of all melanomas, plays a major role in global mortality related to melanoma. Nonetheless, the literature on dermoscopy of NM is scanty. To assess odds ratios (ORs) to quantify dermoscopic features of pigmented NM vs. pigmented superficial spreading melanoma (SSM), and pigmented nodular nonmelanocytic and benign melanocytic lesions. To assess the presence or absence of global patterns and dermoscopic criteria, digitized images of 457 pigmented skin lesions from patients with a histopathological diagnosis of NM (n = 75), SSM (n = 93), and nodular nonmelanocytic and benign melanocytic lesions (n = 289; namely, 39 basal cell carcinomas, 85 seborrhoeic keratoses, 81 blue naevi, and 84 compound/dermal naevi) were retrospectively collected and blindly evaluated by three observers. Multivariate analysis showed that ulceration (OR 4.07), homogeneous disorganized pattern (OR 10.76), and homogeneous blue pigmented structureless areas (OR 2.37) were significantly independent prognostic factors for NM vs. SSM. Multivariate analysis of dermoscopic features of NM vs. nonmelanocytic and benign melanocytic lesions showed that the positive correlating features leading to a significantly increased risk of NM were asymmetric pigmentation (OR 6.70), blue-black pigmented areas (OR 7.15), homogeneous disorganized pattern (OR 9.62), a combination of polymorphous vessels and milky-red globules/areas (OR 23.65), and polymorphous vessels combined with homogeneous red areas (OR 33.88). Dermoscopy may be helpful in improving the recognition of pigmented NM by revealing asymmetric pigmentation, blue-black pigmented areas, homogeneous disorganized pattern and abnormal vascular structures, including polymorphous vessels, milky-red globules/areas and homogeneous red areas. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Posthuman blues

    CERN Document Server

    Tonnies, Mac

    2013-01-01

    Posthuman Blues, Vol. I is first volume of the edited version of the popular weblog maintained by author Mac Tonnies from 2003 until his tragic death in 2009. Tonnies' blog was a pastiche of his original fiction, reflections on his day-to-day life, trenchant observations of current events, and thoughts on an eclectic range of material he culled from the Internet. What resulted was a remarkably broad portrait of a thoughtful man and the complex times in which he lived, rendered with intellige...

  19. Mineral pigments at Huaca Tacaynamo (Chan Chan, Peru)

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, William E.; Piminchumo, Víctor; Suárez, Héctor; Jackson, John C.; McGeehin, John P.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction analyses of five samples of pigments from a recently excavated mural at the archaeological site of Huaca Tacaynamo, a part of the Chan Chan archaeological complex, northern Peru, show that minerals related to metal occurrences known to have been exploited by ancient Andeans were also used as pigments. These minerals include: atacamite [Cu2Cl(OH3)] for green; azurite [Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2] for blue; calcite [CaCO3] for white; cinnabar [HgS] for red; and goethite [HFeO2] for yellow....

  20. Raman af hvide pigmenter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeler, Nini Elisabeth Abildgaard; Nielsen, Ole Faurskov; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Et samspil mellem kunst og kemi. I et samarbejde mellem Statens Museum for Kunst og Kemisk Institut på KU er Ramanspek-troskopi brugt til at definere sammensætningen af blandinger af blyhvidt og calcit i maleriers hvide pigmenter.......Et samspil mellem kunst og kemi. I et samarbejde mellem Statens Museum for Kunst og Kemisk Institut på KU er Ramanspek-troskopi brugt til at definere sammensætningen af blandinger af blyhvidt og calcit i maleriers hvide pigmenter....

  1. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frausto-Reyes, C.; Ortiz-Morales, M.; Bujdud-Pérez, J. M.; Magaña-Cota, G. E.; Mejía-Falcón, R.

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIE L* a* b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 μm × 246 μm) that was the case for the lead white pigment.

  2. True bursal pigmented villonodular synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, Ibrahim Fikry; Kenan, Samuel; Steiner, German C.; Abdul-Quader, Mohammed

    2002-01-01

    We describe two cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis affecting true bursae. This study was also designed to discuss the term ''pigmented villonodular bursitis'', not confined to true synovial bursae, sometimes creating misunderstanding. (orig.)

  3. True bursal pigmented villonodular synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahab, Ibrahim Fikry [Department of Radiology, New York Methodist Hospital, Affiliated with New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Kenan, Samuel [Department of Orthopedics, New York University Medical Center, NY (United States); Steiner, German C. [Department of Pathology, Hospital for Joint Diseases/Orthopedic Institute, New York, NY (United States); Abdul-Quader, Mohammed [Department of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2002-06-01

    We describe two cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis affecting true bursae. This study was also designed to discuss the term ''pigmented villonodular bursitis'', not confined to true synovial bursae, sometimes creating misunderstanding. (orig.)

  4. Eggshell Biliverdin and Protoporphyrin Pigments in a Songbird: Are They Derived from Erythrocytes, Blood Plasma, or the Shell Gland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Rita; Boross, Nóra; Hámori, Susanne; Neuberger, Eszter; Nyiri, Zoltán

    Biliverdin and protoporphyrin pigments are deposited into the eggshell when the developing egg is in the shell gland. However, the site of synthesis of eggshell pigments is still uncertain, although it may influence the possible costs and potential functions of eggshell coloration in avian species. Eggshell pigments may be derived from red blood cells or be produced in other organs and then transferred to the shell gland, or they may be synthesized de novo in the shell gland. We studied in the canary (Serinus canaria) whether eggshell blue-green and brown pigmentations are associated with experimentally elevated anemia, female hematocrit level, immature erythrocyte percentage, and feces and plasma pigment levels during egg laying to find out the possible origin of eggshell pigments. We found no significant effects of hematocrit level or experimentally elevated anemia on intensity of eggshell blue-green and brown pigmentations; therefore, we consider it less likely that eggshell pigments are derived from erythrocytes. In addition, we found no significant associations between female feces biliverdin concentration during egg laying and intensity of eggshell blue-green pigmentation, suggesting that eggshell biliverdin may not originate from the spleen or liver. We found a negative association between plasma and feces protoporphyrin concentrations during egg laying and eggshell brown chroma. This result suggests that an increased production of protoporphyrin in the liver, which could have elevated plasma and feces protoporphyrin concentrations, could inhibit eggshell protoporphyrin pigmentation, probably through affecting enzymatic activities. We suggest that both pigments are produced de novo in the shell gland in the canary, but circulating pigment levels may influence shell gland pigment synthesis, thus connecting the physiological status of the female to eggshell coloration.

  5. Phototrophic pigment production with microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, K.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract

    Microalgal pigments are regarded as natural alternatives for food colorants. To facilitate optimization of microalgae-based pigment production, this thesis aimed to obtain key insights in the pigment metabolism of phototrophic microalgae, with the main focus on secondary

  6. Phototrophic pigment production with microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, K.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract

    Microalgal pigments are regarded as natural alternatives for food colorants. To facilitate optimization of microalgae-based pigment production, this thesis aimed to obtain key insights in the pigment metabolism of phototrophic microalgae, with the main  focus

  7. A third, ultraviolet-sensitive, visual pigment in the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, E R

    1994-06-01

    Numerous extraction and microspectrophotometric studies have shown that the nocturnal Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko), has two visual pigments: a "green" with lambda max at 521 nm and a "blue" at 467 nm. In addition, similar studies on other nocturnal gecko species have found only the same two classes of visual pigment. With the finding that some diurnal species of gecko have a third visual pigment class with lambda max peaking in the UV, doubts were raised concerning the presence of only two visual pigment classes in nocturnal forms. Therefore, a microspectrophotometric re-examination of the Tokay gecko was undertaken to look specifically for a UV visual pigment. A UV-absorbing pigment (364 nm lambda max) was found in approx. 20% of the thin outer segments of type C double rods, thought previously to contain only the 467 nm pigment. That this UV-absorbing pigment was truly a visual pigment was confirmed by its dichroism, behaviour following exposure to UV radiation and "nomogram" fit. It is suggested that this visual pigment had been seen in previous microspectrophotometric studies, but its similarity to known photoproducts peaking in the same spectral region resulted in a case of mistaken identity.

  8. Development of blue rose; Aoi bara wa sakuka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, T. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Yoshida, K.

    1998-06-01

    Precise crystalline structures of pigments in petals have been elucidated by structural analysis of the blue pigment in Commelinaceae petals using X-ray analysis. It is found that the Mg ion is coordinated with the oxygen atom on the B-nucleus in the base nucleus of delphinidin (belonging to anthocyanidine, a pigment obtained by separating sugar from anthocyanin by hydrolysis) to develop a blue color, and that the complex is a stable supermolecule in which 6 pigment molecules are associated regularly with 6 flavone molecules. The similar mechanisms are responsible for development of blue color for flowers, and widely occurring in nature. Biosynthesis of anthocyanin, beginning with phenylalanine, undergoes virtually common processes; cyclization of the flavonoide skeleton, reduction to the anthocyanidine nucleus, hydroxylation of the B-nucleus in the base nucleus and glycoside formation at the 3-site. It will be possible to shift rose color to blue, if anthocyanin belonging to anthocyanidine could be bio-synthesized by introducing the gene of enzyme for 3`, 5`-hydroxylation on the base nucleus, which the rose lacks. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Micro-Raman analysis of the pigments on painted pottery figurines from two tombs of the Northern Wei Dynasty in Luoyang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaojun; Han, Yunxia; Han, Ligang; Cheng, Yongjian; Ma, Yiqiang; Fang, Li

    2013-05-15

    The pigments on the painted pottery figurines from two tombs of Northern Wei Dynasty (AD 386-534) in Luoyang were analyzed by Raman microscopy. All the pigments were identified compared with the Raman spectra of standard pigments. The red pigments were identified as haematite, the blue pigment as lapis lazuli, the green pigment as malachite, the black pigment as carbon black and the white pigment as calcite. Similar pigments were used in the two tombs despite the pottery figurines were very different in artistic style. The use of lapis lazuli as blue pigment on Chinese painted pottery figurines was found for the first time. This pigment and the painted pottery figurine of Sogdians are of great archaeological significance because it demonstrated that the trade and cultural exchanges via the Silk Road had extended to Luoyang city in the Northern Wei Dynasty. The result also confirms that micro-Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method for the identification of pigments on ancient artworks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An investigation of multispectral imaging for the mapping of pigments in paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonghui; Berns, Roy S.; Taplin, Lawrence A.; Coddington, James

    2008-02-01

    Compared with colorimetric imaging, multispectral imaging has the advantage of retrieving spectral reflectance factor of each pixel of a painting. Using this spectral information, pigment mapping is concerned with decomposing the spectrum into its constituent pigments and their relative contributions. The output of pigment mapping is a series of spatial concentration maps of the pigments comprising the painting. This approach was used to study Vincent van Gogh's The Starry Night. The artist's palette was approximated using ten oil pigments, selected from a large database of pigments used in oil paintings and a priori analytical research on one of his self portraits, executed during the same time period. The pigment mapping was based on single-constant Kubelka-Munk theory. It was found that the region of blue sky where the stars were located contained, predominantly, ultramarine blue while the swirling sky and region surrounding the moon contained, predominantly, cobalt blue. Emerald green, used in light bluish-green brushstrokes surrounding the moon, was not used to create the dark green in the cypresses. A measurement of lead white from Georges Seurat's La Grande Jatte was used as the white when mapping The Starry Night. The absorption and scattering properties of this white were replaced with a modern dispersion of lead white in linseed oil and used to simulate the painting's appearance before the natural darkening and yellowing of lead white oil paint. Pigment mapping based on spectral imaging was found to be a viable and practical approach for analyzing pigment composition, providing new insight into an artist's working method, the possibility for aiding in restorative inpainting, and lighting design.

  11. Pigment Identification on "The Ecstasy of St. Theresa" Painting by Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, D.; Marmontelli, M.; De Benedetto, G. E.; Catalano, I. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Vona, F.

    A study of the pigments of "The Ecstasy of St. Theresa," a seventeenth century oil painting on canvas, was performed by Raman microscopy. Lazurite was identified in both Jesus Christ's and St. Theresa's mantles as the pigment responsible for the blue coloration. Litharge was identified inside the black bitumen layer. Usually the bitumen needed a lot of time to dry in the air when mixed with drying oil. Litharge was used by the artist to decrease the oil drying time. A complementary study, using micro-Raman and SEM, allowed us to identify red ochre as the pigment responsible for the red coloration in the altar on the left side of the painting.

  12. [Anaphylaxis to blue dyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner-Viviani, F; Chappuis, S; Bergmann, M M; Ribi, C

    2014-04-16

    In medicine, vital blue dyes are mainly used for the evaluation of sentinel lymph nodes in oncologic surgery. Perioperative anaphylaxis to blue dyes is a rare but significant complication. Allergic reactions to blue dyes are supposedly IgE-mediated and mainly caused by triarylmethanes (patent blue and isosulfane blue) and less frequently by methylene blue. These substances usually do not feature on the anesthesia record and should not be omitted from the list of suspects having caused the perioperative reaction, in the same manner as latex and chlorhexidine. The diagnosis of hypersensitivity to vital blue dyes can be established by skin test. We illustrate this topic with three clinical cases.

  13. Adaptive divergence in pigment composition promotes phytoplankton biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stomp, Maayke; Huisman, Jef; De Jongh, Floris; Veraart, Annelies J; Gerla, Daan; Rijkeboer, Machteld; Ibelings, Bas W; Wollenzien, Ute I A; Stal, Lucas J

    2004-11-04

    The dazzling diversity of the phytoplankton has puzzled biologists for decades. The puzzle has been enlarged rather than solved by the progressive discovery of new phototrophic microorganisms in the oceans, including picocyanobacteria, pico-eukaryotes, and bacteriochlorophyll-based and rhodopsin-based phototrophic bacteria. Physiological and genomic studies suggest that natural selection promotes niche differentiation among these phototrophic microorganisms, particularly with respect to their photosynthetic characteristics. We have analysed competition for light between two closely related picocyanobacteria of the Synechococcus group that we isolated from the Baltic Sea. One of these two has a red colour because it contains the pigment phycoerythrin, whereas the other is blue-green because it contains high contents of the pigment phycocyanin. Here we report theory and competition experiments that reveal stable coexistence of the two picocyanobacteria, owing to partitioning of the light spectrum. Further competition experiments with a third marine cyanobacterium, capable of adapting its pigment composition, show that this species persists by investing in the pigment that absorbs the colour not used by its competitors. These results demonstrate the adaptive significance of divergence in pigment composition of phototrophic microorganisms, which allows an efficient utilization of light energy and favours species coexistence.

  14. Sensitizing pigment in the fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, K.; Kirschfeld, K.

    1983-01-01

    The sensitizing pigment hypothesis for the high UV sensitivity in fly photoreceptors (R1-6) is further substantiated by measurements of the polarisation sensitivity in the UV. The quantum yield of the energy transfer from sensitizing pigment to rhodopsin was estimated by electrophysiological measurements of the UV sensitivity and the rhabdomeric absorptance (at 490 nm) in individual receptor cells. The transfer efficiency is >=0.75 in receptors with an absorptance in the rhabdomeres of 0.55-0.95. This result suggests that the sensitizing pigment is bound in some way to the rhodopsin. A ratio of two molecules of sensitizing pigment per one rhodopsin is proposed. (orig.)

  15. Pigmented villo nodular synovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disorder affecting joints. Methods : We reviewed 19 cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis out of 481 arthroscopic synovial biopsies over a period of ten years. A common presenting symptom was locking. Both diffuse and localized forms were diagnosed. Duration of symptoms varied from 5 months to3 years. We report our experience of patients treated by arthroscopic excision for localized villonodular synovitis and arthroscopic synovectomy for diffuse villonodular synovitis followed by intraarticular Yttrium. Results : In diffuse villonodular synovitis arthroscopic total synovectomy was done a using special angular and straight motorized shaver through different portals to reach all corners of the joint. Localized variety was treated by excising the pedicle attached to the synovium. In our series none of the patients with localized villonodular synovitis showed recurrence till date. Three cases of diffuse variety presented with effusion and swelling three to six months after treatment and were managed by arthoscopic synovial shaving. Two cases who showed recurrence after one year were subjected to intraarticular 90Y isotope injection. Conclusion : Arthroscopic synovectomy helps in reducing morbidity. Radiation and intraarticular Injection of 90 Y are alternative modes of treatment.

  16. Nonphotosynthetic Pigments as Potential Biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. Key Words: Biosignatures—Exoplanets—Halophiles—Pigmentation—Reflectance spectroscopy—Spectral models. Astrobiology 15, 341–361. PMID:25941875

  17. Primary orbital melanoma in association with cellular blue nevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawy, Tarek; Bakhoum, Mathieu F; Tetzlaff, Michael; Nasser, Qasiem J; Prieto, Victor G; Ivan, Doina; Sniegowski, Matthew C; Yin, Vivian T; Pan, Caroline; Durairaj, Vikram; Esmaeli, Bita

    2014-01-01

    To describe 3 cases of primary orbital melanoma associated with either known or subsequently discovered cellular blue nevus. The clinical records and surgical specimens of 3 patients who underwent orbital exenteration for primary orbital melanoma and who had a cellular blue nevus diagnosed before or after detection of the melanoma were retrospectively reviewed. All 3 patients presented with signs and symptoms of an orbital mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed invasive melanoma. One patient had a known history of congenital cellular blue nevus of the eyelid from which the orbital melanoma originated. The other 2 patients had no known history of cutaneous pigmentation or blue nevus. In these 2 patients, the cellular blue nevus was detected on pathologic review of the orbital exenteration specimen (1 patient) or surgical biopsy specimen (1 patient). All 3 patients underwent total body positron emission tomography/computed tomography, and in all 3 results were negative for other sites of disease involvement. In the 2 patients without a previously known nevus a total body skin check was negative for other primary melanoma lesions. All 3 patients underwent orbital exenteration followed by postoperative radiation therapy. Thorough evaluation of biopsy specimens of "primary" orbital melanoma is warranted to ensure identification of any associated blue nevus because blue nevi are precursor lesions for orbital melanoma, and the presence of a blue nevus would support a primary orbital melanoma rather than a metastatic lesion. Patients with a known blue nevus of the periocular skin and ocular adnexa should be monitored closely for signs of malignant transformation.

  18. Blue cures blue but be cautious

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methemoglobinemia is a disorder characterized by the presence of >1% methemoglobin (metHb in the blood. Spontaneous formation of methemoglobin is normally counteracted by protective enzyme systems, for example, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH methemoglobin reductase. Methemoglobinemia is treated with supplemental oxygen and methylene blue (1-2 mg/kg administered slow intravenously, which acts by providing an artificial electron acceptor for NADPH methemoglobin reductase. But known or suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is a relative contraindication to the use of methylene blue because G6PD is the key enzyme in the formation of NADPH through pentose phosphate pathway and G6PD-deficient individuals generate insufficient NADPH to efficiently reduce methylene blue to leukomethylene blue, which is necessary for the activation of the NADPH-dependent methemoglobin reductase system. So, we should be careful using methylene blue in methemoglobinemia patient before G6PD levels.

  19. Iris phenotypes and pigment dispersion caused by genes influencing pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael G; Hawes, Norman L; Trantow, Colleen M; Chang, Bo; John, Simon W M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous mutations altering mouse coat colors have been a classic resource for discovery of numerous molecular pathways. Although often overlooked, the mouse iris is also densely pigmented and easily observed, thus representing a similarly powerful opportunity for studying pigment cell biology. Here, we present an analysis of iris phenotypes among 16 mouse strains with mutations influencing melanosomes. Many of these strains exhibit biologically and medically relevant phenotypes, including pigment dispersion, a common feature of several human ocular diseases. Pigment dispersion was identified in several strains with mutant alleles known to influence melanosomes, including beige, light, and vitiligo. Pigment dispersion was also detected in the recently arising spontaneous coat color variant, nm2798. We have identified the nm2798 mutation as a missense mutation in the Dct gene, an identical re-occurrence of the slaty light mutation. These results suggest that dysregulated events of melanosomes can be potent contributors to the pigment dispersion phenotype. Combined, these findings illustrate the utility of studying iris phenotypes as a means of discovering new pathways, and re-linking old ones, to processes of pigmented cells in health and disease.

  20. Optimal methodologies for terahertz time-domain spectroscopic analysis of traditional pigments in powder form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Taewoo; Lee, Howon; Sim, Kyung Ik; Kim, Jonghyeon; Jo, Young Chan; Kim, Jae Hoon; Baek, Na Yeon; Kang, Dai-ill; Lee, Han Hyoung

    2017-05-01

    We have established optimal methods for terahertz time-domain spectroscopic analysis of highly absorbing pigments in powder form based on our investigation of representative traditional Chinese pigments, such as azurite [blue-based color pigment], Chinese vermilion [red-based color pigment], and arsenic yellow [yellow-based color pigment]. To accurately extract the optical constants in the terahertz region of 0.1 - 3 THz, we carried out transmission measurements in such a way that intense absorption peaks did not completely suppress the transmission level. This required preparation of pellet samples with optimized thicknesses and material densities. In some cases, mixing the pigments with polyethylene powder was required to minimize absorption due to certain peak features. The resulting distortion-free terahertz spectra of the investigated set of pigment species exhibited well-defined unique spectral fingerprints. Our study will be useful to future efforts to establish non-destructive analysis methods of traditional pigments, to construct their spectral databases, and to apply these tools to restoration of cultural heritage materials.

  1. Blue-Green Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with hepatitis C or hepatitis B. HIV/AIDS. Research on the effects of blue-green algae in people with HIV/AIDS has been inconsistent. Some early research shows that taking 5 grams of blue-green ...

  2. Blue eyes in lemurs and humans: same phenotype, different genetic mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Brenda J; Pedersen, Anja; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2009-01-01

    to and flanking the human eye-color-associated region in these lemurs, as well as other primates (human, chimpanzee, orangutan, macaque, ring-tailed lemur, mouse lemur). Aligned sequences indicated that this region is strongly conserved in both Eulemur macaco subspecies as well as the other primates (except blue......Almost all mammals have brown or darkly-pigmented eyes (irises), but among primates, there are some prominent blue-eyed exceptions. The blue eyes of some humans and lemurs are a striking example of convergent evolution of a rare phenotype on distant branches of the primate tree. Recent work...... on humans indicates that blue eye color is associated with, and likely caused by, a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs12913832) in an intron of the gene HERC2, which likely regulates expression of the neighboring pigmentation gene OCA2. This raises the immediate question of whether blue eyes in lemurs might...

  3. Dermatoscopy-guided therapy of pigmented basal cell carcinoma with imiquimod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husein-ElAhmed, Husein; Fernandez-Pugnaire, Maria Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Dermatoscopy is a non-invasive diagnostic tool used to examine skin lesions with an optical magnification. It has been suggested as a useful tool for monitoring therapeutic response in lentigo maligna patients treated with imiquimod. To examine the accuracy of dermatoscopy as a tool to monitor the therapeutic response of pigmented basal cell carcinoma treated with imiquimod. The authors designed a prospective study. Patients with pigmented basal cell carcinoma were included and data regarding the dermatoscopy features were collected following the Menzies criteria, prior to initiating the imiquimod treatment. Subsequent dermatoscopic evaluations were performed at weeks 4 and 8, following imiquimod discontinuation. Twenty lesions were included. The most common pigmented dermatoscopy features were large blue-grey ovoid nests (80%), followed by blue-grey globules (50%) and leaf-like areas (30%). No spoke wheel areas were observed. In 17 out of 20 patients, a response was noted during the first evaluation at 4 weeks, while the clearance was noted at the second check-up after 8 weeks. In two patients, the clearance was found at the initial evaluation at 4 weeks, while in one patient, the response remained unchanged. Blue-grey globules were the fastest to exhibit clearance (50% at week 4), followed by leaf-like areas (15%) and large blue-grey ovoid nests (6.25%). According to our results, dermatoscopic evaluation enhances the accuracy in the assessment of the clinical response to imiquimod in pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

  4. Spectral tuning of Amazon parrot feather coloration by psittacofulvin pigments and spongy structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinbergen, Jan; Wilts, Bodo D.; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2013-01-01

    The feathers of Amazon parrots are brightly coloured. They contain a unique class of pigments, the psittacofulvins, deposited in both barbs and barbules, causing yellow or red coloured feathers. In specific feather areas, spongy nanostructured barb cells exist, reflecting either in the blue or

  5. cis Retinol oxidation regulates photoreceptor access to the retina visual cycle and cone pigment regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinya; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2016-11-15

    This study explores the nature of the cis retinol that Müller cells in the retina provide to cones for the regeneration of their visual pigment. We report that the retina visual cycle provides cones exclusively with 11-cis chromophore in both salamander and mouse and show that this selectivity is dependent on the 11-cis-specific cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) present in Müller cells. Even though salamander blue cones and green rods share the same visual pigment, only blue cones but not green rods are able to dark-adapt in the retina following a bleach and to use exogenous 9-cis retinol for pigment regeneration, suggesting that access to the retina visual cycle is cone-specific and pigment-independent. Our results show that the retina produces 11-cis retinol that can be oxidized and used for pigment regeneration and dark adaptation selectively in cones and not in rods. Chromophore supply by the retinal Müller cells (retina visual cycle) supports the efficient pigment regeneration required for cone photoreceptor function in bright light. Surprisingly, a large fraction of the chromophore produced by dihydroceramide desaturase-1, the putative all-trans retinol isomerase in Müller cells, appears to be 9-cis retinol. In contrast, the canonical retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) visual cycle produces exclusively 11-cis retinal. Here, we used the different absorption spectra of 9-cis and 11-cis pigments to identify the isoform of the chromophore produced by the visual cycle of the intact retina. We found that the spectral sensitivity of salamander and mouse cones dark-adapted in the isolated retina (with only the retina visual cycle) was similar to that of cones dark-adapted in the intact eye (with both the RPE and retina visual cycles) and consistent with pure 11-cis pigment composition. However, in mice lacking the cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP), cone spectral sensitivity contained a substantial 9-cis component. Thus, the retina visual

  6. Gene regulation networks generate diverse pigmentation patterns in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nick W; Davies, Kevin M; Schwinn, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of pigmentation patterns observed in plants occurs due to the spatial distribution and accumulation of colored compounds, which may also be associated with structural changes to the tissue. Anthocyanins are flavonoids that provide red/purple/blue coloration to plants, often forming complex patterns such as spots, stripes, and vein-associated pigmentation, particularly in flowers. These patterns are determined by the activity of MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes, which activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, resulting in anthocyanin pigment accumulation. Recently, we established that the MBW complex controlling anthocyanin synthesis acts within a gene regulation network that is conserved within at least the Eudicots. This network involves hierarchy, reinforcement, and feedback mechanisms that allow for stringent and responsive regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. The gene network and mobile nature of the WDR and R3-MYB proteins provide exciting new opportunities to explore the basis of pigmentation patterning, and to investigate the evolutionary history of the MBW components in land plants.

  7. Lacquerware Pigment Identification with Fixed and Mobile Raman Microspectrometers: A Potential Technique to Differentiate Original/Fake Artworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Colomban

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available (FT Raman spectroscopy is used for the first time to identify pigments used in 19th & 20th century Japanese and Vietnamese Lacquerwares. IR spectroscopy is used to assess the Lacquer matrix. Different operative conditions and parameters were experimented with on a limited number of lacquerwares in order to determine the optimal procedure for the identification of pigments/dyes as potential chronological or technological markers. The test was then performed in the collector’s rooms with a mobile Raman set-up. Different pigments (vermilion, Prussian Blue, Naples Yellow, Phtalocyanine Blue, anatase, rutile, chalk, carbon black were identified despite a strong fluorescence and a rapid degradation of both pigments and binder under increasing laser power. Better spectra were obtained on older lacquerwares.

  8. Spectrometric Investigation of Pigments and Substrata in Wood Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiojdeanu, Catalina; Vasilescu, Angela; Manea, Mihaela; Constantin, Florin; Saliba, James

    2014-02-01

    A polychrome and gilded wooden artifact was found, in a heavily deteriorated state, in the stores of the Mdina Cathedral Museum, Malta. The object represents two zoomorphic angels holding a coat of arms. Stylistically, the artifact matches with parts of a late 16th century Organ balcony, currently exhibited at the same Museum. The present study aims to establish whether or not the newly recovered artifact might have formed part of the balcony ensemble by means of material identification techniques. The combined use of XRF, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy ensure a detailed characterization of the material used. In the case of pigments, for both artifacts the blue pigment was smalt, while cinnabar was used for red and flesh tones. The metallic decorative parts of the panels are gilded, confirmed by the presence of Au peaks in the X-ray spectra. The supporting structure of both artifacts was manufactured from poplar wood.

  9. Spectrometric investigation of pigments and substrata in wood paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiojdeanu, C.; Vasilescu, A.; Manea, M.; Constantin, F.; Saliba, James

    2014-01-01

    A polychrome and gilded wooden artifact was found, in a heavily deteriorated state, in the stores of the Mdina Cathedral Museum, Malta. The object represents two zoomorphic angels holding a coat of arms. Stylistically, the artifact matches with parts of a late 16th century Organ balcony, currently exhibited at the same Museum. The present study aims to establish whether or not the newly recovered artifact might have formed part of the balcony ensemble by means of material identification techniques. The combined use of XRF, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy ensure a detailed characterization of the material used. In the case of pigments, for both artifacts the blue pigment was smalt, while cinnabar was used for red and flesh tones. The metallic decorative parts of the panels are gilded, confirmed by the presence of Au peaks in the X-ray spectra. The supporting structure of both artifacts was manufactured from poplar wood. (author)

  10. Pigment production from a mangrove Penicillium | Chintapenta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mangrove Penicillium producing red pigment was cultured in an optimized medium that was designed by the authors previously and used in this study. The purpose of this study was to identify the pigment and also to study the effect of bio elements on pigment production. Pigment from the medium was efficiently extracted ...

  11. Pigment production from a mangrove Penicillium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-25

    Jun 25, 2014 ... A mangrove Penicillium producing red pigment was cultured in an optimized medium that was designed by the authors previously and used in this study. The purpose of this study was to identify the pigment and also to study the effect of bio elements on pigment production. Pigment from the medium was.

  12. Cellular Blue Nevus of Perilimbal Conjunctiva: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tiangeng; Mao, Chunjie; Xu, Dongbo; Yan, Hua

    2017-08-01

    Cellular blue nevus is an uncommon neoplasm in the conjunctiva. Here we present an unusual case of a cellular blue nevus that clinically resembled conjunctival melanoma. A 29-year-old Chinese male was found to have a giant pigmented lesion of the conjunctiva around the limbal area of right eye from birth. Excisional biopsy with no-touch technique, lamellar corneal transplantation, amniotic membrane transplantation and adjuvant cryotherapy were performed. Histopathology revealed a nodular, well-defined tumor, which was composed of heavily pigmented dendritic cells and less pigmented spindle cells. There was no recurrence during eight years follow-up. Cellular blue nevus of conjunctiva can be wrongly diagnosed as conjunctival melanoma due to atypia criteria. Therefore, it is important to understand its clinical and pathological characteristics to avoid an overtreatment. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  13. Oral pigmentation induced by Premarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérusse, R; Morency, R

    1991-07-01

    Pigmented lesions of the oral cavity are important entities. The wide range of their clinical differential diagnosis includes such diverse systemic conditions as Addison's disease, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, malignant melanoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, as well as specific oral lesions, such as amalgam tattoo or gingival melanosis. This paper reports a very rare cause of oral pigmentation, a melanic type, related to the use of Premarin.

  14. Analysis of Indian pigment gallstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautray, T.R.; Vijayan, V.; Panigrahi, S.

    2007-01-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission and particle induced γ-ray emission spectroscopic techniques have been carried out to analyse the elemental concentrations of human pigment gallstone samples from eastern region (Orissa) and southern region (Chennai) of India. It was observed that 18 minor/trace elements namely Na, Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb were present in the pigment gallstone samples of both the regions. Our study reveals that average concentration of all elements except Ni in south Indian pigment gallstone samples is higher than that of corresponding values in east Indian pigment gallstone samples whereas elements like Al, P, S, Cl and V did not show much variation between these two regions. Fourier transform infra-red analysis was carried out to identify the functional groups and the classification of the pigment type gallstones of both the regions. The thermal behaviour of pigment gallstones was carried out by thermogravimetry-derivative thermogravimetry analysis

  15. Drusenoid retinal pigment epithelium detachments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Hage Amaro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The authors make a review of drusenoid retinal pigment epithelium detachments(DPDs, a form of retinal pigment epithelium detachment(PED that evolves from confluent and large soft drusen.Drusenoidretinal pigment epithelial detachments are a recognized element of the "dry" AMD. Until now, no treatment is indicated in drusenoid PEDs. The authors describe the clinical characteristics of drusenoid retinal pigment epithelium detachments (DPEDs and make a review of the DPEDs related in the international literature. We related in this revision paper the multimodal advanced image exams in two cases of dusenoid retinal pigment epithelium detachments (DPEDs and the general characteristics of thisfinding associated with Dry Macular degeneration.Upon examination of the ocular fundusDPEDs emerge as well-circumscribed yellow or yellow–white elevations of the RPE that are usually found within the macula.They may show scalloped borders and a slightly irregular surface. When visualized using fluorescein angiography (FA,DPEDs are typically described as faint hyper-fluorescent in the early phase followed by a slow increase in fluorescence throughout the transit stage of the study without late leakage. With optical coherence tomography (OCT, drusenoid PEDs usually show a smooth contour of the detached hyperreflective RPE band that may have an undulating appearance.Drusenoid PEDs encompass far above the ground possibility type of "dry" AMD that develops in relationship with large confluent soft drusen.At this point no treatment is utilized in drusenoid retinal pigment epithelium detachment(DPEDs.

  16. Characterization of pre-hispanic pigments by modern analytical techniques; Caracterizacion de pigmentos prehispanicos por tecnicas analiticas modernas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega A, M

    2003-07-01

    In this work, the study of mural painting pigments from two archaeological sites (The Great Temple in Mexico city and Cacaxtla) was performed to know their materials composition, identify their structural characteristics and properties by using modern analytical techniques. Blue, ochre, red and black pigments of Mexica culture (1325-1521 a.C. / late Post Classic period); blue, ochre, red, brown, pink, green and white of Olmeca- Xicalanca culture (700-900 a.C. / Epiclassic period) were studied. Data about materials used, technological evolution, mineralogical background, cultural interchange and origin was obtained. Environmental exposition of these paintings since their discovering has produced changes and damage on their materials. Therefore, stability of some pigments has been notorious, ''Maya Blue'' specially presents extraordinary resistance to diluted and concentrated acids and alkalis including boiling condition, acqua regia, solvents, oxidant and reducing agents, moderate heat and biocorrosi6n; for that reason its study was emphasized. ''Maya Blue'' pigment was synthesized in laboratory using the processes described by historic sources (with indigophera suffruticosa leaves and synthetic indigo) up to obtain a stable pigment including acqua regia action. Clay matrix sorbs nearly 0.4 weight percent of organic dye, which cover 79% of palygorskita surface area. (Author)

  17. Quirks of dye nomenclature. 8. Methylene blue, azure and violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksey, C J

    2017-01-01

    Methylene blue was synthesized in 1877 and soon found application in medicine, staining for microscopy and as an industrial dye and pigment. An enormous literature has accumulated since its introduction. Early on, it was known that methylene blue could be degraded easily by demethylation; consequently, the purity of commercial samples often was low. Therefore, demethylation products, such as azures and methylene violet, also are considered here. The names and identity of the components, their varying modes of manufacture, analytical methods and their contribution to biological staining are discussed.

  18. Characteristic Elemental Composition of Oil Pigments using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Kim, Sun Ha; Sun, Gwang Min; Lim, Jong Myung; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Young Jin; Lim, Sung Jin; Song, Yu Na; Kim, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The principal aim of this study is to identify the applicability of instrumental neutron activation analysis as a non-destructive examination tool for the quantitative composition analysis associated with authentication, restoration, and conservation of art objects in the field of cultural heritage. Generally, the chemical composition of pigments are associated with the colors such as white, yellow, orange, red, green, blue and black, and it varies with raw materials of pigments. According to the colors of a different pigments, chemical compositions are as follows; for example, white pigments were used for a mixture of Pb(CO 3 ) 2 , PbSO 4 , PbO, Pb(OH) 2 , ZnO, ZnS, TiO 2 , BaSO 4 , CaCO 3 , Al 2 O 3 , As 2 S 3 , etc.; black pigments were series of carbon black, borne ash, MnO+Mn 2 O 3 , etc.; red pigments were Fe 2 O 3 , Pb 3 O 4 , HgS, PbMo 4 , CdS+CdSe, etc.; brown and yellow pigments were PbCrO 4 , ZnCrO 4 , CdS-ZnS, K 3 [Co(NO 2 ) 6 ], Pb(SbO 3 ) 2 , C 19 H 16 O 11 Mg, SrCrO 4 , etc.; green pigments were Cr 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O(OH) 4 , Cu(C 2 H 3 O 2 )-2Cu(OH) 2 ), Cr 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 -CoO, etc.; blue pigments were Fe 4 [Fe(CN) 6 ] 3 , CoO-Al 2 O 3 , Na 8 - 10 Al 6 Si 6 O 24 S 2-4 , etc. This first step is to obtain quantitative data on the concentrations of major, minor and trace elements in oil pigments and to explain pigment sources by statistical treatment as reported in many literatures. The determination of major, minor and micro elements in the subject materials are essential in many fields of basic science and technology as well as commercial and industrial fields. In particular, direct analysis of a sample offers a more effective investigation method in these fields. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has an inherent advantage of being a non-destructive, simultaneously multi-elemental analysis with high accuracy and sensitivity. In order to characterize the elemental contents of art objects, the quantitative analysis of oil pigment series was

  19. When cheese gets the blues: Pseudomonas fluorescens as the causative agent of cheese spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N H; Murphy, S C; Ralyea, R D; Wiedmann, M; Boor, K J

    2011-06-01

    A bacterial contamination of fresh, low-acid cheese that resulted in production of a blue fluorescent pigment on the surface of the cheese was determined to be caused by Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar IV, a gram-negative bacteria that produces a blue, nondiffusible pigment as well as the soluble pigment pyoverdin, which fluoresces under UV light. Ten isolates collected from contaminated cheese and environmental samples were initially identified as P. fluorescens using 16S rDNA sequencing, but only 8 of the isolates produced blue pigment and fluoresced under UV light when re-inoculated onto fresh, low-acid cheese. The Biolog Metabolic Fingerprint system (Biolog Inc., Hayward, CA) and the Analytical Profile Index (BioMerieux Vitek Inc., Hazelwood, MO) for nonenteric gram-negative species as well as EcoRI ribotyping did not differentiate between the isolates that produced blue color and those that did not. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis with the enzyme XbaI was able to distinguish between the isolates that produced pigment and those that did not and allowed for identification of a specific environmental site (i.e., an overhead cheese vat agitator system) as the likely source of product contamination. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Related allopolyploids display distinct floral pigment profiles and transgressive pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Elizabeth W; Berardi, Andrea E; Smith, Stacey D; Litt, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Both polyploidy and shifts in floral color have marked angiosperm evolution. Here, we investigate the biochemical basis of the novel and diverse floral phenotypes seen in allopolyploids in Nicotiana (Solanaceae) and examine the extent to which the merging of distinct genomes alters flavonoid pigment production. We analyzed flavonol and anthocyanin pigments from Nicotiana allopolyploids of different ages (N. tabacum, 0.2 million years old; several species from Nicotiana section Repandae, 4.5 million years old; and five lines of first-generation synthetic N. tabacum) as well as their diploid progenitors. Allopolyploid floral pigment profiles tend not to overlap with their progenitors or related allopolyploids, and allopolyploids produce transgressive pigments that are not present in either progenitor. Differences in floral color among N. tabacum accessions seems mainly to be due to variation in cyanidin concentration, but changes in flavonol concentrations among accessions are also present. Competition for substrates within the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway to make either flavonols or anthocyanins may drive the differences seen among related allopolyploids. Some of the pigment differences observed in allopolyploids may be associated with making flowers more visible to nocturnal pollinators. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  1. The visual pigment cyanide effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescitelli, F; Karvaly, B

    1989-12-01

    The visual pigment of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) with its in situ absorption maximum at 521 nm has its spectral position at 500 to 505 nm when chloride-deficient digitonin is used for the extraction. In this case the addition of chloride or bromide to the extract restores the maximum to 521 nm. This property, characteristic of gecko pigments in general, does not occur with any of the rhodopsins that have been tested. Simple salts of cyanide, a pseudohalogenoid with an ionic radius close to those of chloride and bromide and/or its hydrolysis product attacks both this gecko pigment and rhodopsins in the dark. This is seen as a slow thermal loss of photopigment if (sodium) cyanide is present at concentrations above 40 mM for the gecko pigment and 150 mM for the rhodopsins of the midshipman (Porichthys notatus) and of the frog (Rana pipiens). In all cases the loss of the photopigment is accompanied by the appearance of a spectral product with maximum absorption at about 340 nm. Cyanide addition has no effect on the photosensitivity of the native pigments and neither does it alter, as do chloride, bromide and other anions, the spectral absorbance curve. The spectral product at 340 nm also appears when the visual pigments are photolyzed in the presence of cyanide salts below the threshold concentrations given above. Incubation of digitonin-solubilized all-trans-retinal with (sodium) cyanide leads to a reaction product with absorption spectrum similar to that obtained with visual pigments under comparable conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Effect of newly developed pigments and ultraviolet absorbers on the color change of pigmented silicone elastomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit G Kheur

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The newly developed pigment led to increased color stability as compared to commercially available pigments. Addition of UV stabilizer, Chimassorb led to a further reduction in color change of the pigmented elastomer.

  3. Differential sensitivity of pigmented and non-pigmented marine bacteria to metals and antibiotics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    The response of pigmented and non-pigmented marine bacteria to metals and antibiotics was investigated. The two groups responded differently to heavy metals and antibiotics. Pigmented bacteria were more resistant to metals. Among the metals, Zn...

  4. Diversity and functional properties of bistable pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Hisao; Terakita, Akihisa

    2010-11-01

    Rhodopsin and related opsin-based pigments, which are photosensitive membrane proteins, have been extensively studied using a wide variety of techniques, with rhodopsin being the most understood G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Animals use various opsin-based pigments for vision and a wide variety of non-visual functions. Many functionally varied pigments are roughly divided into two kinds, based on their photoreaction: bistable and monostable pigments. Bistable pigments are thermally stable before and after photo-activation, but monostable pigments are stable only before activation. Here, we review the diversity of bistable pigments and their molecular characteristics. We also discuss the mechanisms underlying different molecular characteristics of bistable and monostable pigments. In addition, the potential of bistable pigments as a GPCR model is proposed.

  5. Inorganic pigments doped with tris(pyrazol-1-yl)borate lanthanide complexes: A photoluminescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheno, Giulia, E-mail: giulia.gheno@unive.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venezia (Italy); Bortoluzzi, Marco; Ganzerla, Renzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venezia (Italy); Enrichi, Francesco [CIVEN, Coordinamento Interuniversitario Veneto per le Nanotecnologie, Via delle Industrie 5, 30175 Marghera, Venezia (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    The inorganic pigments malachite, Egyptian blue, Ercolano blue and chrome yellow have been doped with the neutral homoleptic Ln(III) complex Ln(Tp){sub 3} (Ln=Eu, Tb; Tp=hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl)borate) in the presence of arabic gum or acrylic emulsion as binders, in order to obtain photoluminescent materials of interest for cultural heritage restoration. The doped pigments have shown emissions associated to f–f transitions in the visible range upon excitation with UV light. Thermal and UV-light ageings have been carried out. In all the cases the photoluminescent behaviour is maintained, but in the cases of acrylic-based paints emission spectra and lifetimes are strongly influenced by thermal treatments. The choice of binder and pigments influences the photoluminescent behaviour of the corresponding film paints. -- Highlights: • Inorganic pigments doped with photoluminescent lanthanide complexes. • Hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl)borate (Tp) as antenna-ligand for Eu(III) and Tb(III). • Emission associated to f–f transitions upon excitation with UV light. • Photoluminescence of paints influenced by the choice of binder and pigments. • Photoluminescence after ageing depending upon the type of binder.

  6. Iris pigmentation and AC thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, A F; Mukherjee, D; Chumlea, W C; Siervogel, R M

    1983-03-01

    Data from 160 White children were used to analyze possible associations between iris pigmentation and AC pure-tone thresholds. Iris pigmentation was graded from iris color using glass models of eyes, and AC thresholds were obtained under carefully controlled conditions. Analyses of variance using two groupings of iris color grades showed no evidence of an association between iris color grade and AC thresholds. Furthermore, inspection of arrays of the actual glass eye models, in conjunction with the order of mean thresholds at each test frequency, did not indicate the presence of an association between iris color grades and thresholds. It was concluded that while iris pigmentation may be related to some aspects of hearing ability, it does not appear to be related to AC thresholds in children.

  7. Standard guidelines of care: Lasers for tattoos and pigmented lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurangabadkar Sanjeev

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lasers have revolutionized the treatment of pigmentary disorders and have become the mainstay of therapy for many of them. Machines: Though different laser machines are used, Quality-switched (QS lasers are considered as the gold standard for treatment of pigmented lesions. Proper knowledge of the physics of laser machine, methodology, dosage schedules, etc., is mandatory. Physician Qualification: Laser may be administered by a dermatologist, who has received adequate background training in lasers during postgraduation or later at a center that provides education and training in lasers, or in focused workshops which provide such trainings. He should have adequate knowledge of the machines, parameters, cooling systems, and aftercare. Facility: The procedure may be performed in the physician′s minor procedure room. Indications: Epidermal lesions: Cafι au lait macules (CALM, lentigines, freckles, solar lentigo, nevus spilus, pigmented seborrheic keratosis, dermatosis papulosa nigra (DPN. Dermal lesions: Nevus of Ota, Blue nevus, Hori′s nevus (acquired bilateral nevus of Ota-like macules. Tattoos: Amateur, professional, cosmetic, medicinal, and traumatic. Mixed epidermal and dermal lesions: Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH, nevus spilus, periorbital and perioral pigmentation, acquired melanocytic nevi (moles, melasma and Becker′s Nevus. Contraindications: Absolute: Active local infection, photo-aggravated skin diseases and medical conditions, tattoo granuloma, allergic reactions to tattoo pigment, unstable vitiligo and psoriasis. Relative: Keloid and keloidal tendencies, patient on isotretinoin, history of herpes simplex, patient who is not co-operative or has unrealistic expectation. Patient selection: Proper patient selection is important. Investigations to identify any underlying cause for pigmentation are important; concurrent topical and systemic drug therapy may be needed. History of scarring, response to previous

  8. Blue Ocean Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a concept called the "blue ocean thinking strategy," developed by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors at INSEAD, an international graduate school of business in France. The "blue ocean" thinking strategy considers opportunities to create new markets for services, rather than focusing solely on…

  9. Identificação por microscopia Raman de pigmentos da pintura a óleo "Retrato de Murilo Mendes" de Cândido Portinari Identification of pigments from Candido Portinari's oil painting "Portrait of Murilo Mendes" by Raman microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Cappa de Oliveira

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work "ex situ"Raman microscopy was employed in the identification of some of the pigments present in the painting "Portrait of Murilo Mendes" by Cândido Portinari. In the investigated samples it was possible to identify unambiguously two pigments: Prussian blue and lapis-lazuli (or its synthetic analogue, ultramarine blue - the former is observed together with organic substances, possibly used as dispersants, what suggests a further use of a mass for recover the painting.

  10. Micro-analytical evidence of origin and degradation of copper pigments found in Bohemian Gothic murals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarcová, Silvie; Hradil, David; Hradilová, Janka; Kocí, Eva; Bezdicka, Petr

    2009-12-01

    Correct identification of pigments and all accompanying phases found in colour layers of historical paintings are relevant for searching their origin and pigment preparation pathways and for specification of their further degradation processes. We successfully applied the analytical route combining non-destructive in situ X-ray fluorescence analyses with subsequent laboratory investigation of micro-samples by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray powder micro-diffraction (micro-XRD) to obtain efficiently all the data relevant for mineralogical interpretations of the copper pigments origin. Cu salts (carbonates, chlorides, sulphates, etc.) used as pigments exist in a range of polymorphs with similar or identical composition. The efficiency of the micro-XRD for direct identification of such crystal phases present in micro-samples of colour layers was demonstrated in the presented paper. A new, until now unpublished, type of copper pigment--cumengeite, Pb(21)Cu(20)Cl(42)(OH)(40)--used as a blue pigment on a sacral wall painting in the Czech Republic was found by means of micro-XRD. Furthermore, azurite, malachite, paratacamite, atacamite and posnjakite were identified in fragments of colour layers of selected Gothic wall paintings. We found Cu-Zn arsenates indicating the natural origin of azurite and malachite; artificial malachite was distinguishable according to its typical spherulitic crystals. The corrosion of blue azurite to green basic Cu chloride was clearly evidenced on some places exposed to the action of salts and moisture-in a good agreement with the results of laboratory experiments, which also show that oxalic acid accelerates the corrosion of Cu pigments.

  11. Plastids of Marine Phytoplankton Produce Bioactive Pigments and Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Schoefs

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is acknowledged to be a very diverse source of bioactive molecules. These compounds play physiological roles that allow cells to deal with changes of the environmental constrains. For example, the diversity of light harvesting pigments allows efficient photosynthesis at different depths in the seawater column. Identically, lipid composition of cell membranes can vary according to environmental factors. This, together with the heterogenous evolutionary origin of taxa, makes the chemical diversity of phytoplankton compounds much larger than in terrestrial plants. This contribution is dedicated to pigments and lipids synthesized within or from plastids/photosynthetic membranes. It starts with a short review of cyanobacteria and microalgae phylogeny. Then the bioactivity of pigments and lipids (anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, anti-cancer, anti-obesity, anti-allergic activities, and cardio- neuro-, hepato- and photoprotective effects, alone or in combination, is detailed. To increase the cellular production of bioactive compounds, specific culture conditions may be applied (e.g., high light intensity, nitrogen starvation. Regardless of the progress made in blue biotechnologies, the production of bioactive compounds is still limited. However, some examples of large scale production are given, and perspectives are suggested in the final section.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanosized Fe2O3 Pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. R. Fouda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The work in this paper was devoted to investigating some nanosized iron oxide pigments prepared by microemulsion technique. The role of concentration of iron salt and surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide on the produced iron oxide was studied. The techniques employed to characterize the samples were thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscope, infrared spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The results revealed that the particle size of the prepared sample using 0.2 M iron sulfate and 3.2 wt% of surfactant was in the range 7–9 nm. Increasing the concentration of either iron salt or the surfactant increased the particle size of the obtained ferric oxide. The diffuse reflectance measurements showed that the charge transfer/electron pair transition absorption peak, which is closely related to the reddish color of the oxide, was shifted to a longer wavelength (blue shift by decreasing the dimension of the particles. The samples were tested as pigments. They showed different tints of red color and were found to be promising for applications as pigments in the field of paint manufacturing.

  13. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie T Manipadam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD is a rare cause of ACTH-independent Cushing′s syndrome and has characteristic gross and microscopic pathologic findings. We report a case of PPNAD in a 15-year-old boy, which was not associated with Carney′s complex. Bilateral adrenalectomy is the treatment of choice.

  14. Blue ocean strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades.

  15. Key factors for UV curable pigment dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magny, B.; Pezron, E.; Ciceron, P.H.; Askienazy, A.

    1999-01-01

    UV oligomers with good pigment dispersion are needed to allow good formulation flexibility and possibility to apply thinner films. Pigment dispersion mainly depends on three phenomena: the wetting of agglomerates, the breakage of agglomerates by mechanical stress and the stabilization of smaller agglomerates and primary particles against flocculation. It has been shown that oligomers with low viscosity and low surface tension induce a good pigment wetting. Examples of monomers and oligomers for good pigment dispersion are given

  16. Carotenoid pigments and the selectivity of psittacofulvin-based coloration systems in parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, K J; Nogare, M C

    2004-07-01

    Carotenoid pigments are commonly used as colorants of feathers and bare parts by birds. However, parrots (Aves: Psittaciformes) use a novel class of plumage pigments (called psittacofulvins) that, like carotenoids, are lipid-soluble and red, orange, or yellow in color. To begin to understand how and why parrots use these pigments and not carotenoids in their feathers, we must first describe the distribution of these two types of pigments in the diet, tissues, and fluids of these birds. Here, we studied the carotenoid content of blood in five species of parrots with red in their plumage to see if they show the physiological ability to accumulate carotenoids in the body. Although Scarlet (Ara macao) and Greenwing Macaws (Ara chloroptera) and Eclectus (Eclectus roratus), African Gray (Psittacus erithacus) and Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) Parrots all use psittacofulvins to color their feathers red, we found that they also circulated high concentrations of both dietary (lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin) and metabolically derived (anhydrolutein, dehydrolutein) carotenoids through blood at the time of feather growth, at levels comparable to those found in many other carotenoid-colored birds. These results suggest that parrots have the potential to use carotenoids for plumage pigmentation, but preferentially avoid depositing them in feathers, which is likely under the control of the maturing feather follicle. As there is no evidence of psittacofulvins in parrot blood at the tune of feather growth, we presume that these pigments are locally synthesized by growing feathers within the follicular tissue.

  17. Thermodynamically stable blue phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, F; Morris, S M; Terentjev, E M; Coles, H J

    2010-04-16

    We show theoretically that flexoelectricity stabilizes blue phases in chiral liquid crystals. Induced internal polarization reduces the elastic energy cost of splay and bend deformations surrounding singular lines in the director field. The energy of regions of double twist is unchanged. This in turn reduces the free energy of the blue phase with respect to that of the chiral nematic phase, leading to stability over a wider temperature range. The theory explains the discovery of large temperature range blue phases in highly flexoelectric "bimesogenic" and "bent-core" materials, and predicts how this range may be increased further.

  18. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  19. Swapping one red pigment for another.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are bright red and yellow pigments, which are produced in only one order of plants, the Caryophyllales, and replace the more familiar anthocyanin pigments. The evolutionary origin of betalain production is a mystery, but a new study has identified the first regulator of betalain production and discovered a previously unknown link between the two pigment pathways.

  20. Seperation, identification and analysis of pigment (melanin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine strains among 180 Streptomyces isolates produce a diffusible dark brown pigment on both peptone-yeast extract agar and synthetic tyrosine-agar. They also show the positive reaction to Ltyrosine or L-dopa substrates. The pigment has been referred to be as merely as dark brown watersoluble pigment, as melanoid or ...

  1. Early pre-Hispanic use of indigo blue in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splitstoser, Jeffrey C; Dillehay, Tom D; Wouters, Jan; Claro, Ana

    2016-09-01

    Archaeological research has identified the use of cultivated cotton (Gossypium barbadense) in the ancient Andes dating back to at least 7800 years ago. Because of unusual circumstances of preservation, 6000-year-old cotton fabrics from the Preceramic site of Huaca Prieta on the north coast of Peru retained traces of a blue pigment that was analyzed and positively identified as an indigoid dye (indigotin), making it the earliest known use of indigo in the world, derived most likely from Indigofera spp. native to South America. This predates by ~1500 years the earliest reported use of indigo in the Old World, from Fifth Dynasty Egypt [ca. 4400 BP (before present)]. Indigo is one of the most valued and most globally widespread dyes of antiquity and of the present era (it being the blue of blue jeans).

  2. Raman analysis of complex pigment mixtures in 20th century metal knight shields of the Order of the Elephant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Clara Bratt; Sanyova, Jana; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær

    2015-11-05

    The pigment composition of six painted metal knight shields of the Order of the Elephant dating from the second half of the 20th century belonging to the Danish royal collection were studied using Raman microscopy. By focusing a 785 nm laser with a 50× objective on particles in paint cross sections, it was possible to identify the following 20 compounds: hematite, goethite, chrome red/orange, chrome yellow, zinc chrome yellow, carbon black, toluidine red PR3, chlorinated para red PR4, dinitroaniline orange PO5, phthalocyanine blue PB15, indanthrone blue PB60, ultramarine, Prussian blue, lead white, anatase, rutile, calcium carbonate, barium sulphate, gypsum and dolomite. The components were frequently present in complex pigment mixtures. Additional information was obtained by elemental analysis with scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) to identify cobalt blue, zinc white and cadmium red, as well as to indicate the presence of zinc white in some pigment mixtures. The study allowed a comparison between the industrially applied preparation layers and the artistic paint layers applied by the heraldic painter. Differences in the choice of paint and pigment types were observed on the earliest knight shields, demonstrating a general delay of industrial materials into artist paints. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  4. New York Blue

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — New York Blue is used cooperatively by the Laboratory and Stony Brook University as part of the New York Center for Computation Sciences. Ranked as the 28th fastest...

  5. Pigment colors printing on cotton fabrics by surface coating induced by electron beam and thermal curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, Abdel Wahab M.; Zohdy, Maged H.; Said, Hossam M.; El-Din, Mahmoud S.; Noval, Dalia M.

    2005-01-01

    Cotton fabrics were coated from one surface with different pigment colors incorporated in formulations containing ethylene glycol (EG), methyl methacrylate (MMA) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) oligomer as a base material. The coated fabrics were exposed to various doses of accelerated electrons generated from the 1.5 MeV (25 kW) electron beam accelerator machine. In order to find the suitable conditions that afford the highest performance of pigment printing, the effect of irradiation dose and formulation composition on the color strength of the printed fabrics was investigated. The durability of the printed fabrics in terms of color fastness, tensile mechanical, crease resistance and water absorption was also studied. The results of pigment printing by electron beam irradiation was compared with the conventional thermal printing method with the same pigment colors involving the use of pastes containing binder and thickener systems. It was found that cotton fabrics printed with the pigment colors under the effect of electron beam irradiation displayed higher color strength than those fabrics printed by the conventional thermal fixation at equal pigment color ratios. In this regard, the color strength on cotton fabrics printed with the Imperon violet, blue and yellow pigment colors was 85.2, 75.4 and 91.3 in the case of printing with electron beam and 63.5, 46.0 and 50.2 in the case of thermal curing, respectively. The results showed that the pigment printing by electron beam or thermal curing improves the crease recovery and mechanical properties of cotton fabrics and exhibited comparable durability properties in terms of washing, rubbing and handling

  6. Raman analysis of ancient pigments on a tile from the Citadel of Algiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, L D; De Waal, D

    2008-12-15

    A micro-Raman spectroscopy study of a multi-coloured (yellow, blue, white, redish-brown and brown-black) tile shard from the Citadel of Algiers was undertaken. XRD and EDX were used as complementary techniques. The study shows that the heterogeneous three-shade yellow pigment on the tile is composed largely of the ancient ternary (Pb-Sn-Sb) pyrochlore oxide with a dominant Pb-O vibration at 127 cm(-1) consistent with the Pb2SnSbO6.5 structure as verified by XRD. The literature assignment of this band at 132 cm(-1) probably comes from a mixture of pigments. The redish-brown and the brown-black pigments are found to be Naples yellow (Pb2Sb2O7) and lead(II) stannate (Pb2SnO4), respectively, while cobalt blue (CoAl2O4) gives the blue colour and cassiterite (SnO2) is the origin of the white colour. The bulk of the tile body is composed mainly of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4) and Quartz (alpha-SiO2) with traces of calcite (CaCO3) and amorphous carbon. Micro-Raman spectroscopy proved to be very useful in the characterization of pigments as well as the tile body. These results further establish Raman spectroscopy as a technique of choice for the analysis of pigments on archaeological artifacts. The results obtained here could be used in the restoration and preservation programme of the Citadel itself which stands today as a symbol of pre-colonial Algerian heritage.

  7. Why is the tongue of blue-tongued skinks blue? Reflectance of lingual surface and its consequences for visual perception by conspecifics and predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramjan, Andran; Bauerová, Anna; Somerová, Barbora; Frynta, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Blue-tongued skinks of the genus Tiliqua (Scincidae) are characterized by their large blue melanin-pigmented tongues, often displayed during open-mouth threats, when the animal feels endangered. It is not clear whether this unusual coloration is a direct anti-predation adaptation or it may rather serve intraspecific communication, as ultraviolet-blue color is a frequent visual signal in a number of lizard species. We used spectrophotometry and visual modeling to compare blue tongues of Tiliqua gigas with tongues and skin coloration of other lizard species, and to examine their appearance through the eyes of both the conspecifics and avian predators. Our results show that (1) the tongue coloration is probably not substantially influenced by the amount of melanin in the skin, (2) lingual and oral tissues are UV-reflective in general, with blue colored tongues having chromatic qualities similar to UV-blue skin patches of other lizard species, (3) UV-blue tongues are more conspicuous than pink tongues, especially in the visual model of conspecifics. We hypothesize that blue tongues may possibly serve as a semantic (honest) signal analogous to UV-blue skin patches of other lizard species due to greater UV-bias in the vision of diurnal lizards. Regarding the social behavior and high aggressiveness in Tiliqua and their relatives, such signal might serve, e.g., in intraspecific long-distance communication between conspecifics in order to avoid aggression, and its anti-predation effect may only be a secondary function (exaptation).

  8. Availability and Utilization of Pigments from Microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Hasina; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Khatoon, Helena; Shariff, Mohamed

    2016-10-02

    Microalgae are the major photosynthesizers on earth and produce important pigments that include chlorophyll a, b and c, β-carotene, astaxanthin, xanthophylls, and phycobiliproteins. Presently, synthetic colorants are used in food, cosmetic, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. However, due to problems associated with the harmful effects of synthetic colorants, exploitation of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors becomes an attractive option. There are various factors such as nutrient availability, salinity, pH, temperature, light wavelength, and light intensity that affect pigment production in microalgae. This paper reviews the availability and characteristics of microalgal pigments, factors affecting pigment production, and the application of pigments produced from microalgae. The potential of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors is enormous as an alternative to synthetic coloring agents, which has limited applications due to regulatory practice for health reasons.

  9. Genetic Mapping and Biochemical Basis of Yellow Feather Pigmentation in Budgerigars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Thomas F; Fischer, Curt R; Wu, Ping; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Xie, Kathleen T; Kuo, James; Doctorov, Elizabeth; Zehnder, Ashley; Khosla, Chaitan; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2017-10-05

    Parrot feathers contain red, orange, and yellow polyene pigments called psittacofulvins. Budgerigars are parrots that have been extensively bred for plumage traits during the last century, but the underlying genes are unknown. Here we use genome-wide association mapping and gene-expression analysis to map the Mendelian blue locus, which abolishes yellow pigmentation in the budgerigar. We find that the blue trait maps to a single amino acid substitution (R644W) in an uncharacterized polyketide synthase (MuPKS). When we expressed MuPKS heterologously in yeast, yellow pigments accumulated. Mass spectrometry confirmed that these yellow pigments match those found in feathers. The R644W substitution abolished MuPKS activity. Furthermore, gene-expression data from feathers of different bird species suggest that parrots acquired their colors through regulatory changes that drive high expression of MuPKS in feather epithelia. Our data also help formulate biochemical models that may explain natural color variation in parrots. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of different light spectra on the pigmentation of stored elephant garlic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparini, Diego; Nguyen, Hieu Th; Ueda, Kota; Moritaka, Kyoshi; Kihara, Toshihiko; Kawano, Tomonori

    2018-05-01

    In the present study high-brightness light-emitting diodes were used to investigate the influence of different light spectra on garlic discoloration at different humidity levels and temperature. Many processes involved in the discoloration process of garlic/leek during storage under different conditions remain unanswered. For this reason in this study the ability of specific light spectra to enhance the production of desirable pigments has been evaluated in elephant garlic. It is well known that the pigments involved in the discoloration reaction are of great interest because of their potential ability to increase the nutritional value and health benefits of the food. In the present study, we show how the chlorophyll content of the sprout increases directly proportionally to the wavelength of the light tested; green/blue light delays the greening process of garlic young shoots whilst red/infra-red light irradiance conditions increase the greening process at different storage temperatures and humidity. Moreover different lights in the visible spectrum have been observed to stimulate and enhance the outer layer purple coloration. The use of different lights to modulate garlic pigmentation has been demonstrated and, in particular, the utilisation of red/green/blue lights and lower temperature resulted in higher red/pink pigments production supporting the hypothesis that this process involves more than one light to be fully performed and the low temperature is a condition that influences the formation of these products. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Colour changes due to the fading of Prussian blue in Danish Golden Age paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filtenborg, Troels Folke; Buti, David; Vila, Anna

    2016-01-01

    , mixed with lead white and calcium carbonate as a component of the paint in the affected areas. Due to its high tinting strength, Prussian blue was often used – mostly in moderate proportions - mixed with other compounds and pigments. It has been demonstrated by experimental studies that the durability...... of the colour changes dramatically when the pigment is mixed with certain whites. Among its virtues, the relatively modest price would seem to account for its frequent occurrence in Danish paintings from the mid-18th century onwards, though reservations about the permanence of the pigment are found in several...... written sources already a few decades after its first appearance on the market. It is therefore doubtful whether this awareness or the scepticism voiced in the literature was to any extent shared by 19th-century users of the pigment, or whether Danish suppliers of the period were in general concerned...

  12. Time resolved XANES illustrates a substrate-mediated redox process in Prussian blue cultural heritage materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, Claire; Moretti, Giulia; Lanquille, Marie-Angélique; Réguer, Solenn

    2016-01-01

    The pigment Prussian blue is studied in heritage science because of its capricious fading behavior under light exposure. We show here that XANES can be used to study the photosensitivity of Prussian blue heritage materials despite X-ray radiation damage. We used an original approach based on X-ray photochemistry to investigate in depth the redox process of Prussian blue when it is associated with a cellulosic substrate, as in cyanotypes and watercolors. By modifying cation and proton contents of the paper substrate, we could tune both rate and extent of Prussian blue reduction. These results demonstrate that the photoreduction and fading of Prussian blue is principally mediated by the substrate and its interaction with the oxygen of the environment. (paper)

  13. Ecological-friendly pigments from fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Nelson; Teixeira, Maria F S; De Conti, Roseli; Esposito, Elisa

    2002-01-01

    The dyestuff industry is suffering from the increases in costs of feedstock and energy for dye synthesis, and they are under increasing pressure to minimize the damage to the environment. The industries are continuously looking for cheaper, more environmentally friendly routes to existing dyes. The aim of this minireview is to discuss the most important advances in the fungal pigment area and its interest in biotechnological applications. Characteristic pigments are produced by a wide variety of fungi and the chemical composition of natural dyes are described. These pigments exhibit several biological activities besides cytotoxicity. The synthetic pigments authorized by the EC and in USA and the natural pigments available in the world market are discussed. The obstacle to the exploitation of new natural pigments sources is the food legislation, requesting costly toxicological research, manufacturing costs, and acceptance by consumers. The dislike for novel ingredients is likely to be the biggest impediment for expansion of the pigment list in the near future. If the necessary toxicological testing and the comparison with accepted pigments are made, the fungal pigments, could be acceptable by the current consumer. The potentiality of pigment production in Brazil is possible due to tremendous Amazonian region biodiversity.

  14. Natural Blue Food Colour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roda-Serrat, Maria Cinta

    In recent years, there has been a growing tendency to avoid the use of artificial colorants and additives in food products, especially after some studies linked their consumption with behavioural changes in children. However, the incorporation of colorants from natural origin remains a challenge...... for food technologists, as these are typically less vivid and less stable than their synthetic alternatives. Regarding blue colorants, phycocyanins from cyanobacteria are currently in the spotlight as promising new natural blue colorants. Phycocyanins are proteins which blue colour results from...... the presence of the chromophore phycocyanobilin (PCB), a covalently attached linear tetrapyrrole. The applications of phycocyanins as food colorants are however limited, as they show poor stability in certain conditions of pH, light and temperature. Cleavage of PCB from the protein followed by careful product...

  15. A Blue Lagoon Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2007-01-01

    We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$.......We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$....

  16. Borax methylene blue: a spectroscopic and staining study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, P T; Russo, A; Reynolds, C; Lillie, R D

    1978-07-01

    Borax methylene blue is quite stable at room temperatures of 22-25 C. At 30 C polychroming is slow; during 50 days in a water bath at this temperature the absorption peak moves from 665 to 656 nm. At 35 C, the absorption peak reaches 660 nm in 7 days, 654 nm in 14. At 60 C polychroming is rapid, the absorption peak reaching 640-620 nm in 3 days. When the pH of the borax methylene blue solutions, normally about 9.0, is adjusted to pH 6.5, the absorption peak remains at 665 nm even when incubated at 60 C for extended periods. When used as a blood stain 0.4 ml borax methylene blue (1% methylene blue in 1% borax), 4 ml acetone, 2 ml borax-acid phosphate buffer to bring the solution to pH 6.5, and distilled water to make 40 ml, with 0.2 ml 1% eosin added just before using, an excellent Nocht-Giemsa type stain is achieved after 30 minutes staining. The material plasmodia P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei stain moderate blue with dark red chromatin and green to black pigment granules. The study confirms Malachowski's 1891 results and explains Gautier's 1896-98 failure to duplicate it.

  17. Blue light dosage affects carotenoids and tocopherols in microgreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuolienė, Giedrė; Viršilė, Akvilė; Brazaitytė, Aušra; Jankauskienė, Julė; Sakalauskienė, Sandra; Vaštakaitė, Viktorija; Novičkovas, Algirdas; Viškelienė, Alina; Sasnauskas, Audrius; Duchovskis, Pavelas

    2017-08-01

    Mustard, beet and parsley were grown to harvest time under selected LEDs: 638+660+731+0% 445nm; 638+660+731+8% 445nm; 638+660+731+16% 445nm; 638+660+731+25% 445nm; 638+660+731+33% 445nm. From 1.2 to 4.3 times higher concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, carotenoids, α- and β-carotenes, lutein, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin was found under blue 33% treatment in comparison to lower blue light dosages. Meanwhile, the accumulation of metabolites, which were not directly connected with light reactions, such as tocopherols, was more influenced by lower (16%) blue light dosage, increasing about 1.3 times. Thus, microgreen enrichment of carotenoid and xanthophyll pigments may be achieved using higher (16-33%) blue light intensities. Changes in metabolite quantities were not the result of changes of other carotenoid concentration, but were more influenced by light treatment and depended on the species. Significant quantitative changes in response to blue light percentage were obtained for both directly and not directly light-dependent metabolite groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of accessory pigment composition on the absorption characteristics of dinoflagellate bloom in a coastal embayment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Vijayan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The light absorption properties of a dinoflagellate (Noctiluca scintillans Macartney bloom in Manila Bay were analysed during the onset of a whole-bay-scale bloom in March 2004. The chlorophyll a concentrations varied over a very wide range from 1.4 μg l−1 to extremely high values of 521 μg l−1. The chlorophyll specific absorption coefficients of phytoplankton (a*ph(λ varied significantly in shape and magnitude. The spectrally averaged values of a*ph(λ varied by two orders of magnitude within and outside the bloom patch. The total suspended solid concentration was high in the middle of the bay (≥4 mg l−1. The non-photosynthetic pigment (NPP index was∼0.6 at most of the stations, mainly due to the presence of photoprotective pigments like zeaxanthin, lutein and neoxanthin, which led to variations in the blue absorption maxima of the chlorophyll-specific absorption coefficients. The absorption properties of the accessory pigments were masked owing to the presence of overlapping pigment absorption bands. The fourth derivative of the absorption spectra was able to resolve these overlapping features and enhance the absorption characteristics of prominent accessory pigments.

  19. Optimal number of pigments in photosynthetic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesenko, Simon; Žnidarič, Marko

    2012-01-01

    We study excitation energy transfer in a simple model of a photosynthetic complex. The model, described by the Lindblad equation, consists of pigments interacting via dipole–dipole interaction. The overlapping of pigments induces an on-site energy disorder, providing a mechanism for blocking the excitation transfer. Based on the average efficiency as well as the robustness of random configurations of pigments, we calculate the optimal number of pigments that should be enclosed in a pigment–protein complex of a given size. The results suggest that a large fraction of pigment configurations are efficient as well as robust if the number of pigments is properly chosen. We compare the optimal results of the model to the structure of pigment–protein complexes as found in nature, finding good agreement. (paper)

  20. Pigmented xerodermoid - Report of three cases

    OpenAIRE

    Das Jayanta Kumar; Gangopadhyay Asok Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Pigmented xerodermoid, a rare genodermatosis, presents with clinical features and pathology similar to xeroderma pigmentosum, but at a later age. DNA repair replication is normal, but there is total depression of DNA synthesis after exposure to UV radiation. Two siblings in their teens and a man in his thirties with features of pigmented xerodermoid, e.g. photophobia, freckle-like lesions, keratoses, dryness of skin, and hypo- and hyper-pigmentation, are described. Although classically the on...

  1. Production of Monascus-like azaphilone Pigment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of biotechnological production of polyketide based colorants from filamentous fungi, in particular a method for preparing a biomass comprising a Monascus-like pigment composition from a nontoxigenic and non-pathogenic fungal source. The present invention...... further relates to use of the Monascus-like pigment composition as a colouring agent for food items and/or non-food items, and a cosmetic composition comprising the Monascus-like pigment composition....

  2. PRODUCTION OF MONASCUS-LIKE AZAPHILONE PIGMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of biotechnological production of polyketide based colorants from filamentous fungi, in particular a method for preparing a biomass comprising a Monascus-like pigment composition from a nontoxigenic and non-pathogenic fungal source. The present invention...... further relates to use of the Monascus-like pigment composition as a colouring agent for food items and/or non-food items, and a cosmetic composition comprising the Monascus-like pigment composition....

  3. Electron crystallography of organic pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, G

    1997-10-01

    The principle aim of this thesis is the detailing of the development and subsequent use of electron crystallographic techniques which employ the maximum entropy approach. An account is given of the electron microscope as a crystallographic instrument, along with the necessary theory involved. Also, an overview of the development of electron crystallography, as a whole, is given. This progresses to a description of the maximum entropy methodology and how use can be made of electron diffraction data in ab initio phasing techniques. Details are also given of the utilisation of image derived phases in the determination of structural information. Extensive examples are given of the use of the maximum entropy program MICE, as applied to a variety of structural problems. A particular area of interest covered by this thesis is regarding the solid state structure of organic pigments. A detailed structure review of both {beta}-naphthol and acetoacetanilide pigments was undertaken. Information gained from this review was used as a starting point for the attempted structural elucidation of a related pigment, Barium Lake Red C. Details are given of the synthesis, electron microscope studies and subsequent ab initio phasing procedures applied in the determination of structural information on Barium Lake Red C. The final sections of this thesis detail electron crystallographic analyses of three quite different structures. Common to all was the use of maximum entropy methods, both for ab initio phasing and use of image derived phases. Overall, it is shown that electron crystallographic structure analyses using maximum entropy methods are successful using electron diffraction data and do provide distinct structural information even when significant perturbations to the data exist. (author)

  4. Melanin pigmented solar absorbing surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallas, J.M.; Eisner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Selectivity enhancement is shown to result for melanin, a black biopolymer pigment, for sufficiently low sample density. The effect is proposed to follow from a consideration of the evanescent waves associated with the total internal reflection phenomenon. A relationship is discussed among powder density, pH and the paramagnetic properties of melanin; this relationship is shown to be consistent with, and offer support to an amino-acid side group proposed earlier as part of the melanin structure. A brief discussion is also presented on the optical properties of melanin and the relative importance of quinhydrone, a change transfer complex believed to exist in the polymeric structure of melanin.

  5. Effect of levulinic acid on pigment biosynthesis in Agmenellum quadruplicatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipe-Nolt, J A; Stevens, S E

    1979-01-01

    When levulinic acid was added to a growing culture of the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Agmenellum quadruplicatum PR-6, delta-aminoelevulinic acid accumulated in the medium and chlorophyll a synthesis and cell growth were inhibited, but there was a small amount of c-phycocyanin synthesis. The amount of delta-aminolevulinic acid produced in the treated culture did not fully account for the amount of pigment synthesized in the untreated control. Levulinic acid and either sodium nitrate or ammonium chloride were added to nitrogen-starved cultures of PR-6, and delta-aminolevulinic acid production and chlorophyll a and c-phycocyanin content were monitored. When ammonium chloride was added as a nitrogen source after nitrogen starvation, the cells recovered more rapidly than when sodium nitrate was added as a nitrogen source. In cultures recovering from nitrogen starvation, synthesis of c-phycocyanin occurred before synthesis of chlorophyll a. PMID:104956

  6. Generation of blue chrysanthemums by anthocyanin B-ring hydroxylation and glucosylation and its coloration mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Naonobu; Yoshioka, Satoshi; Kishimoto, Sanae; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Douzono, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Aida, Ryutaro

    2017-07-01

    Various colored cultivars of ornamental flowers have been bred by hybridization and mutation breeding; however, the generation of blue flowers for major cut flower plants, such as roses, chrysanthemums, and carnations, has not been achieved by conventional breeding or genetic engineering. Most blue-hued flowers contain delphinidin-based anthocyanins; therefore, delphinidin-producing carnation, rose, and chrysanthemum flowers have been generated by overexpression of the gene encoding flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H), the key enzyme for delphinidin biosynthesis. Even so, the flowers are purple/violet rather than blue. To generate true blue flowers, blue pigments, such as polyacylated anthocyanins and metal complexes, must be introduced by metabolic engineering; however, introducing and controlling multiple transgenes in plants are complicated processes. We succeeded in generating blue chrysanthemum flowers by introduction of butterfly pea UDP (uridine diphosphate)-glucose:anthocyanin 3',5'- O -glucosyltransferase gene, in addition to the expression of the Canterbury bells F3'5'H . Newly synthesized 3',5'-diglucosylated delphinidin-based anthocyanins exhibited a violet color under the weakly acidic pH conditions of flower petal juice and showed a blue color only through intermolecular association, termed "copigmentation," with flavone glucosides in planta. Thus, we achieved the development of blue color by a two-step modification of the anthocyanin structure. This simple method is a promising approach to generate blue flowers in various ornamental plants by metabolic engineering.

  7. Pigmented poroid neoplasm mimicking nodular melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Tsuyoshi; Ansai, Shin-ichi; Ueno, Takashi; Kawana, Seiji

    2010-06-01

    We reported the case of a 92-year-old woman with a pigmented and non-pigmented surface of the pedunculated nodule on her lower leg. Microscopic examination revealed that this nodule consisted of a component of small, dark, homogenous, poroid cells and cuticular cells in the dermis. The histopathological features of the lesion were consistent with poroid neoplasm. Immunohistochemistry showed that HMB-45 and Melan-A were positive in malanocytes and melanophages of the pigmented areas. Unlike most poroid neoplasms, this case showed pigmented lesion mimicked nodular melanoma.

  8. The "Blue Banana" Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faludi, A.K.F.

    2015-01-01

    This essay is about the “Blue Banana”. Banana is the name given subsequently by others to a Dorsale européenne (European backbone) identified empirically by Roger Brunet. In a background study to the Communication of the European Commission ‘Europe 2000’, Klaus Kunzmann and Michael Wegener put

  9. The Blue Baby Syndrome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 10. The Blue Baby Syndrome - Nitrate Poisoning in Humans. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 8 Issue 10 October 2003 pp 20-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Evidence of macular pigment in the central macula in albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Yulia; Fletcher, Emily; Strauss, Rupert W; Scholl, Hendrik P N

    2016-04-01

    Albinism represents a spectrum of disorders with diminished to absent amounts of melanin pigmentation including the posterior segment of the eye. Macular pigment (MP) consists of two main carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin, concentrated in the macula. MP serves as blue light absorbent, antioxidant, and may reduce chromatic aberration and glare. It remains unclear if albinos have detectable MP. The purpose was to investigate the distribution of MP in albino patients with psychophysical and imaging techniques. MP was measured at the eccentricity of 0.5° by heterochromatic flicker perimetry (QuantifEye(®); Tinsley Precision Instruments Ltd.) or by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (MPOD module, MultiColor Spectralis(®), Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) in four albino patients, who were also investigated with multimodal ophthalmic imaging. Visual acuity ranged from 20/32 to 20/125, nystagmus was present in three patients, and all patients showed typical foveal hypoplasia on fundus exam and optical coherence tomography. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) demonstrated various degrees of central FAF signal attenuation. Genetic testing was available in three patients and confirmed the diagnosis. Measurable amounts of MP were detected in all four patients and ranged from 0.05 to 0.24, which is below the normal range. We conclude that MP can be demonstrated and measured in albinos. Further studies are needed to investigate MP accumulation following carotenoid supplementation and its impact on visual performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Blue light and eye health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Leilei; Dai, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Blue light, with the wavelength between 400 nm and 500 nm, has caused public concern because of the injury to the retinal cells. Meanwhile, it is important in circadian rhythm regulation, scotopic vision and ocular growth. Is the blue light safe? Should it be eliminated from the daily life? Here we review the effect and safety of the blue light.

  12. The bioefficacy of microemulsified natural pigments in egg yolk pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, P Y; Gue, S Z; Leow, S K; Goh, L B

    2014-01-01

    1. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that microemulsified carotenoid products show improved bioavailability over corresponding regular preparations, leading to greater yolk pigmentation at lower dosages. 2. The first trial was conducted using a maize-soya bean basal diet supplemented with either 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 g/kg of microemulsified Red or non-microemulsified Red. The second trial involved feeding microemulsified Yellow or non-microemulsified Yellow using a similar dosage range. The layers were divided into 4 replicates of 8 layers each (32 layers per treatment). The 8 cages of layers were fed from a single feed trough. Feed and water were provided ad libitum throughout the trial. Each week, the eggs were collected. The whole liquid egg colour was determined by means of a commercially available yolk colour fan. Where required, HPLC-(high-performance liquid chromatography) based analysis of trans-capsanthin or trans-lutein equivalents using the Association of Analytical Communities method was carried out. Data were statistically analysed by one-way ANOVA method using Statgraphics. 3. Results showed that the colour and carotenoid content of the egg yolk increased with increasing amount of carotenoids in the diet. The colour of egg yolks from layers fed similar concentrations of microemulsified versus the regular preparation was significantly different. At the commercial recommended dose of one g/kg regular Yellow or Red product, the microemulsified pigmenter is able to provide the equivalent yolk colour at a 20-30% lower dose. 4. In conclusion, the trial results supported the hypothesis that a desired yolk colour score is achievable at a significantly lower inclusion rate when carotenoid molecules are emulsified using the microemulsion nanotechnology.

  13. Analysis of ancient pigments by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Jian; Xu Cunyi

    1999-01-01

    Raman microscopy can be applied for the spatial resolution, and non-destructive in situ analysis of inorganic pigments in pottery, manuscripts and paintings. Compared with other techniques, it is the best single technique for this purpose. An overview is presented of the applications of Raman microscopy in the analysis of ancient pigments

  14. Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) of Chlorophyll Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Jerry

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and discussion of typical results are provided for an experiment on the thin layer chromatography of chlorophyll pigments. The experiment works well in high school, since the chemicals used are the same as those used in paper chromatography of plant pigments. (JN)

  15. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food...

  16. Quantifying Abdominal Pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh Ziabari, Omid; Shingleton, Alexander W

    2017-06-01

    Pigmentation is a morphologically simple but highly variable trait that often has adaptive significance. It has served extensively as a model for understanding the development and evolution of morphological phenotypes. Abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster has been particularly useful, allowing researchers to identify the loci that underlie inter- and intraspecific variations in morphology. Hitherto, however, D. melanogaster abdominal pigmentation has been largely assayed qualitatively, through scoring, rather than quantitatively, which limits the forms of statistical analysis that can be applied to pigmentation data. This work describes a new methodology that allows for the quantification of various aspects of the abdominal pigmentation pattern of adult D. melanogaster. The protocol includes specimen mounting, image capture, data extraction, and analysis. All the software used for image capture and analysis feature macros written for open-source image analysis. The advantage of this approach is the ability to precisely measure pigmentation traits using a methodology that is highly reproducible across different imaging systems. While the technique has been used to measure variation in the tergal pigmentation patterns of adult D. melanogaster, the methodology is flexible and broadly applicable to pigmentation patterns in myriad different organisms.

  17. Pigmented skin disorders: Evaluation and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentary disorders are disturbances of human skin color. Minor changes in the cellular physiology of the skin can dramatically affect pigment production in positive or negative manner. In this these, associated diseases, therapeutical options and disease parameters for the pigmentation disorder

  18. Micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry on the characterization of the Persian pigments used in the pre-seventeenth century wall paintings of Masjid-i Jāme of Abarqū, central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holakooei, Parviz; Karimy, Amir-Hossein

    2015-01-05

    The pigments used in the wall paintings of the Masjid-i Jāme of Abarqū, central Iran, as less-known pigments used in the history of Persian painting, were investigated with micro-Raman spectroscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and polarised light microscopy (PLM). The results showed that the green, red, and blue pigments were atacamite, red lead, and smalt mixed with natural ultramarine blue respectively applied on a white substrate composed of white huntite. Moreover, the blue smalt was identified to be used on the white huntite and under the paint layer in order to delineate the design of the wall paintings and to act as a rough sketch for the subsequent use of the other pigments. Glushinskite, as a less-reported mineral in historical wall paintings, was identified by micro-Raman spectroscopy and hypothesised to be associated with the degradation of the white huntite binder. Furthermore, micro-Raman spectroscopy studies surprisingly revealed the mineral woodhouseite sparely mixed with the green pigment. This paper strongly suggests micro-Raman spectroscopy for identifying archaeological pigments and for diagnosing their deterioration products. Conducting scientific methods of analysis, the pigments identified in this study are reported for the first time to be used in Persian wall paintings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bilateral pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir H. Shah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a disorder resulting in a villous, nodular, or villonodular proliferation of the synovium, with pigmentation related to the presence of hemosiderin. These lesions are almost exclusively benign with rare reports of malignancy. Pigmented villonodular synovitis can occur in a variety of joints and at any age but most often occurs within the knee in the young adult. Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease entity, and bilateral synchronous or metachronous involvement of a joint is even more uncommon, with few reports previously described in the literature. We present a case of pigmented villonodular synovitis involving both the right and left knee in the same patient, with radiographic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, photograph and video intraoperative imaging, and pathologic correlation.

  20. Production of Monascus-like pigments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for producing one or more Monascus-like pigment composition from Penicillium species comprising: a) providing a cultivation medium comprising a high concentration of C-and N-sources and a high C/N molar ratio, b) adjusting pH to about 5 to 8, c) inoculating...... the cultivation medium with an inoculum of Penicillium to form a cultivation composition; d) cultivating the inoculated cultivation composition of (c); e) separating the one or more produced pigment compositions. The method of the invention may be used for producing Monascus-like pigment compositions for use...... as colouring agents in food items or non food items. The inventions further relates to Monascus-like pigment composition obtainable by a method of the inventions as well as use of the pigments....

  1. Pigment chromatic adaptation in Cyclotella caspia Grunow (Bacillariophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Seiji Abe

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The diatom Cyclotella caspia Grunow, isolated from surface waters of the Ubatuba region (São Paulo State, Brazil was submitted to different light spectral distributions for examination of its adaptative response. Growth rate and the photosynthetic pigments chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, carotenoids and phaeopigments were measured under white, blue and red light of the same intensity (8 and 20 µE.cm-2.s-1. Growth rate increased under blue light while red light increased chl a concentration. The relative proportion of chl a and carotenoids did not change, demonstrating the absence of complementary chromatic adaptation.A diatomácea Cyclotella caspia Grunow, isolada de águas superficiais da região de Ubatuba (Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, foi submetida a diferentes intervalos espectrais de luz com a finalidade de se examinar sua resposta adaptativa. Foram medidos a taxa de crescimento e os pigmentos fotossintéticos clorofila a, clorofila c, carotenóides e feopigmentos, sob luz branca, azul e vermelha de mesmas intensidades (8 e 20 µE.cm-2.s-1. A taxa de crescimento aumentou sob luz azul, sendo que a concentração de clorofila a aumentar sob luz vermelha. A proporção relativa de clα e carotenóides não variou, demonstrando a ausência de adapatação cromática complementar.

  2. Structure of plant bile pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenleber, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    Selective peptide cleavage has provided a general procedure for the study of the structure, including stereochemistry, of plant bile pigments. The information derived from the synthesis and spectral analysis of a series of 2,3-dihydrodioxobilins allows the determination of the trans relative stereochemistry for ring A of the ..beta../sub 1/-phycocyanobilin from C-phycocyanin as well as for ring A of phytochrome. A complete structure proof of the five phycoerythrobilins attached to the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of B-phycoerythrin is described. One of these tetrapyrroles is doubly-peptide linked to a single peptide chain through two thioethers at the C-3' and C-18' positions. The four remaining phycoerythrobilins are singly-linked to the protein through thioethers at the C-3' position and all possess the probable stereochemistry C-2(R), C-3(R), C-3'(R), and C-16(R).

  3. Synthesis and characterization of environmentally benign calcium-doped Pr2Mo2O9 pigments: Applications in coloring of plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Giable; Sandhya Kumari, L.; Vishnu, V.S.; Ananthakumar, S.; Reddy, M.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    A new class of environmentally benign rare earth pigments of general formula Pr 2-x Ca x Mo 2 O 9-δ (x ranges from 0 to 1.0) displaying colors ranging from green to yellow were synthesized by traditional solid-state route, as alternatives to lead, cadmium and chromium colorants. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy and CIE-L*a*b* 1976 color scales. The coloring mechanism is based on the strong absorptions of the pigments in the blue and red regions due to electronic transitions between 4f 2 →4f 1 5d 1 states of Pr 3+ . The designed pigments consist of non-toxic elements and further found to be thermally and chemically stable. The yellow-green pigments were found to be interesting alternatives to existing toxic pigments for coloration of plastics. - Graphical abstract: A new class of environmentally benign rare earth pigments of general formula Pr 2-x Ca x Mo 2 O 9-δ (x ranges from 0 to 1.0) displaying colors ranging from green to yellow were synthesized by traditional solid-state route, as alternatives to lead, cadmium and chromium colorants. The yellow-green pigments were found to be interesting alternatives to existing toxic pigments for coloration of plastics. Display Omitted

  4. Fungal and Bacterial Pigments: Secondary Metabolites with Wide Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsing Rao, Manik Prabhu; Xiao, Min; Li, Wen-Jun

    2017-01-01

    The demand for natural colors is increasing day by day due to harmful effects of some synthetic dyes. Bacterial and fungal pigments provide a readily available alternative source of naturally derived pigments. In contrast to other natural pigments, they have enormous advantages including rapid growth, easy processing, and independence of weather conditions. Apart from colorant, bacterial and fungal pigments possess many biological properties such as antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity. This review outlines different types of pigments. It lists some bacterial and fungal pigments and current bacterial and fungal pigment status and challenges. It also focuses on possible fungal and bacterial pigment applications. PMID:28690593

  5. Fungal and Bacterial Pigments: Secondary Metabolites with Wide Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manik Prabhu Narsing Rao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for natural colors is increasing day by day due to harmful effects of some synthetic dyes. Bacterial and fungal pigments provide a readily available alternative source of naturally derived pigments. In contrast to other natural pigments, they have enormous advantages including rapid growth, easy processing, and independence of weather conditions. Apart from colorant, bacterial and fungal pigments possess many biological properties such as antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity. This review outlines different types of pigments. It lists some bacterial and fungal pigments and current bacterial and fungal pigment status and challenges. It also focuses on possible fungal and bacterial pigment applications.

  6. Improvements in the wallpaper industry during the second half of the 19th century: Micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis of pigmented wallpapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, K.; Vandenabeele, P.; Rodríguez-Laso, M. D.; Moens, L.; Madariaga, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    Scientific studies of the pigments used in the manufacturing process of some pigmented wallpapers are presented in this work. Non-destructive micro-Raman spectroscopy was selected for this purpose, and provides important information about how the 19th century wallpaper industry incorporated new materials in their works and designs. At the same time, analysis can help to date the samples of uncatalogued wallpapers. Chrome yellow, burnt Sienna, Prussian blue, ultramarine blue, red lead, carbon black, calcium carbonate, red iron oxide and a red organic pigment were identified. According to the palette used, as well as to the manufacturing process, the wallpapers in this study can be dated to the second half of the 19th century.

  7. Inhibitory effect of 5-iodotubercidin on pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Il; Jeong, Hae Bong; Ro, Hyunju; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Kim, Chang Deok; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2017-09-02

    Melanin pigments are the primary contributors for the skin color. They are produced in melanocytes and then transferred to keratinocytes, eventually giving various colors on skin surface. Although many depigmenting and/or skin-lightening agents have been developed, there is still a growing demand on materials for reducing pigmentation. We attempted to find materials for depigmentation and/or skin-lightening using the small molecule compounds commercially available, and found that 5-iodotubercidin had inhibitory potential on pigmentation. When HM3KO melanoma cells were treated with 5-iodotubercidin, pigmentation was dramatically reduced. The 5-iodotubercidin decreased the protein level for pigmentation-related molecules such as MITF, tyrosinase, and TRP1. In addition, 5-iodotubercidin decreased the phosphorylation of CREB, while increased the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. These data suggest that 5-iodotubercidin inhibits melanogenesis via the regulation of intracellular signaling related with pigmentation. Finally, 5-iodotubercidin markedly inhibited the melanogenesis of zebrafish embryos, an in vivo evaluation model for pigmentation. Together, these data suggest that 5-iodotubercidin can be developed as a depigmenting and/or skin-lightening agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxicity of imine-iminium dyes and pigments: electron transfer, radicals, oxidative stress and other physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2014-08-01

    Although conjugation is well known as an important contributor to color, there is scant recognition concerning involvement of imine and iminium functions in the physiological effects of this class of dyes and pigments. The group includes the dyes methylene blue, rhodamine, malachite green, fuchsin, crystal violet, auramine and cyanins, in addition to the pigments consisting of pyocyanine, phthalocyanine and pheophytin. The physiological effects consist of both toxicity and beneficial aspects. The unifying theme of electron transfer-reactive oxygen species-oxidative stress is used as the rationale in both cases. Toxicity is frequently prevented or alleviated by antioxidants. The apparent dichotomy of methylene blue action as both oxidant and antioxidant is rationalized based on similar previous cases. This mechanistic approach may have practical benefit. This review is important in conveying, for the first time, a unifying mechanism for toxicity based on electron transfer-reactive oxygen species-oxidative stress arising from imine-iminium. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Control of downy mildew in greenhouse-grown cucumbers using blue photoselective polyethylene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuveni, R.; Raviv, M.

    1997-01-01

    Six types of polyethylene sheets with or without a blue pigment, having an absorption peak at the yellow part of the spectrum (580 nm), in combination with three levels of UV-B (280 to 320 nm) absorbance, were investigated for their effects on sporangial production and colonization of Pseudoperonospora cubensis on cucumbers in growth chambers. The effect of these photoselective sheets on the epidemiology of downy mildew in greenhouse-grown cucumbers has been investigated in several locations. The addition of the blue pigment to the films resulted in a significant inhibition of colonization and sporangial production of P. cubensis, whereas filtration of the UV spectrum enhanced the colonization but had no effect on the sporangial production. The appearance of the first symptom-bearing plants was delayed under the blue covers, and consequently, a significant reduction in the disease incidence of downy mildew was recorded under all blue sheets at each corresponding level of UV-B transmittance in five different field experiments through four seasons. Regardless of the differences in disease incidence, there were no significant differences among the yields that were obtained under the various sheets, probably due to the lower photosynthetically active radiation transmissivity of the blue films. The optimal features required for a desirable commercial sheet are discussed

  10. Effects of light quality on reproduction, growth and pigment content of Gracilaria birdiae (Rhodophyta: Gracilariales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Bonomi Barufi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gracilaria species are the main source of agar worldwide. Since laboratory cultivation is an important means of sustaining such production, this study aimed to assess the influence of two fundamental strategies of physiological algae adjustment, photoacclimation and photomorphogenesis, on G. birdiae physiology. Specifically, the effects of different spectral light qualities on reproduction, growth, and pigment content in two distinct photoperiods (8 and 14 hours were examined. Tetrasporophytes and gametophytes were submitted to different light qualities: white, green, red, and blue over the course of nine weeks. At the end of this period, chlorophyll a, allophycocyanin, phycocyanin, and phycoerythrin contents were analysed. Gametophytes showed reproductive structures only under monochromatic radiation. A stimulatory effect on tetrasporangium differentiation was mainly observed under red light, but this high fertility was negatively correlated with growth rate, i.e. algae cultivated under red light showed the lowest growth rate. However, while growth rates were higher in algae exposed to white light, they were similar to those observed in algae subjected to green light and 14 hours of daylight. PE was the predominant pigment, irrespective of light quality. Phycocyanin and phycoerythrin concentration increased when algae were cultivated under green and blue light. Therefore, considering future management prospects for G. birdiae mariculture, we suggest that red light could be utilized as a reproductive inductor to produce tetraspores. Furthermore, if the aim is to achieve high phycoerythrin content, continuous blue light could be applied during a short photoperiod. Indeed, the combination of different wavelengths could allow better economic resource exploitation.

  11. Extensive Pigmented Bowen's Disease of Genitalia

    OpenAIRE

    Şengezer, Mustafa; Şengezer, Naki; Deveci, Mustafa

    1993-01-01

    Genital bölgenin yaygın pigmente bowen hastalığı. Pigmente Bowen hastalığı oldukça nadirdir. Burada genital yörede yerleşimli yaygın bir bowen olgusu sunulmuş, klinik ve histolojik özellikleriyle pigmentasyon mekanizması ve tedavi yaklaşımları tartışılmıştır. Bowen hastalığı pigmente lezyonların ayrıca tanısında dikkate alınması gereken bir durumdur.

  12. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating.

  13. The role of light, temperature and wine bottle colour on pigment enhancement in white wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Daniel A; Smith, Trevor A; Ghiggino, Kenneth P; Scollary, Geoffrey R

    2012-12-15

    Pigmentation enhancement in a Chardonnay wine with high flavan-3-ol concentration was examined by irradiating the wine under controlled conditions. Heating the wine in darkness required temperatures in excess of 50°C before enhanced pigmentation became apparent. It was found that ultraviolet and, to a lesser extent, low wavelength visible light contributed to pigment production. The development of pigmentation depended on wine bottle glass colour: Flint>Arctic Blue>French Green>Antique Green. This is in agreement with the transmission characteristics of the bottles with even the darkest (Antique Green) allowing the transmission of some ultraviolet light. Riboflavin, when added to the wine, degraded rapidly when exposed to radiation <400 nm. The degradation of riboflavin and the onset of colour development depended on the actual amounts as well as the ratio of riboflavin to flavan-3-ol, suggesting that a complex series of reactions are occurring. A degradation product of riboflavin may be contributing to the increase in absorbance in the visible region observed during light exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Accumulation of pigment granules in lacrymal gland epithelium in practolol-treated beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchitani, M; Narama, I; Kohda, S

    1989-04-01

    A 6-month oral toxicity test of practolol was carried out in beagle dogs as a reference control for a newly developed beta blocker. No significant drug-induced changes were detected in any animals by various ophthalmological examinations such as ERG, tear flow, lysozymal activity in tears, etc. However, an unusual pathological change was detected in the lacrymal gland of all five dogs treated with practolol and not in control animals. Macroscopically, the lacrymal glands assumed a blackish brown to deep black colour on both the outside and the cut surface. Microscopically, fine, dark-brown pigment granules were present in the apical and supra-nuclear portion of the cytoplasm of predominantly serosal type epithelial cells. These pigments reacted positively to Schmorl's method for lipofuscin, but gave a negative PAS reaction for polysaccharide, Prussian blue for iron and Ziehl-Neelsen method for ceroid pigment. They were detected as membrane-bound electron-dense bodies by electron microscopy. Similar pigments were also deposited in the cytoplasm of the apocrine sweat gland. Although the mechanism of the accumulation of these granules is far from clear, concentration of practolol in the lacrymal gland is considered to be very closely related to the presence of these granules. A possible mechanism for ocular toxicity by practolol, involving this change, is discussed.

  15. Spinel Li2CoTi3O8 nanometer obtained for application as pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa de Camara, M. S.; Alves Pimentel, L.; Longo, E.; Nobrega Azevedo, L. da; Araujo Melo, D. M. de

    2016-01-01

    Pigments are used in ceramics, cosmetics, inks, and other applications widely materials. To this must be single and easily reproducible. Moreover, the pigments obtained in the nanoscale are more stable, reproducible and highlight color in small amounts compared with those obtained in micrometer scale. The mixed oxides with spinel structures AB 2 O 4 have important applications, including: pigments, refractories, catalytic and electronic ceramics. In this context, the aim of this work was the preparation of powder Li 2 CoTi 3 O 8 spinel phase with nanometer particle size of the polymeric precursor method (Pechini) and characterization by means of thermal analysis (TG/DTA) X-ray diffraction (XRD), refined by the Rietveld method, BET, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman and colorimetric coordinates. The pigment was obtained by heat treatment of 400 degree centigrade to 1000 degree centigrade after pyrolysis at 300 degree centigrade/1 h for removing the organic material. Li 2 CoTi 3 O 8 desired spinel phase was obtained from 500 degree centigrade, and presenting stability nanometer to about 1.300 degree centigrade. Spinel green phase introduced at temperatures in the range of 400 degree centigrade and 500 degree centigrade, and 600 degree centigrade at temperatures between blue and 1000 degree centigrade. (Author)

  16. Biomass and pigments production in photosynthetic bacteria wastewater treatment: effects of light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming

    2015-03-01

    This study is aimed at enhancing biomass and pigments production together with pollution removal in photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) wastewater treatment via different light sources. Red, yellow, blue, white LED and incandescent lamp were used. Results showed different light sources had great effects on the PSB. PSB had the highest biomass production, COD removal and biomass yield with red LED. The corresponding biomass, COD removal and biomass yield reached 2580 mg/L, 88.6% and 0.49 mg-biomass/mg-COD-removal, respectively. The hydraulic retention time of wastewater treatment could be shortened to 72 h with red LED. Mechanism analysis showed higher ATP was produced with red LED than others. Light sources could significantly affect the pigments production. The pigments productions were greatly higher with LED than incandescent lamp. Yellow LED had the highest pigments production while red LED produced the highest carotenoid/bacteriochlorophyll ratio. Considering both efficiency and energy cost, red LED was the optimal light source. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. STUDIES CONCERNIMG THE OBTAINMENT OF ASTAXANTHIN, AN IMPORTANT NATURAL PIGMENT USED IN COSMETIC, FOOD AND PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    G. RĂDULESCU; E. MOCANU; G. CARAENE; I. CIUHU; N. MĂNĂILĂ; G. SĂVOIU; C.M. EREMIA; R.I. DUMITRU

    2007-01-01

    Carotenoid pigments (CP) are natural compounds which impart to the tissues wherethey occur, a yellow, orange, red and even blue color. They are precursors ofvitamins A, B12, D3 and can not be biosynthesized by any animal taxonomic groupincluding man. In plants they avoid chlorophyll bleaching and destruction of somebiological active substances like citocroms, peroxidases, catalase, flavonoidicpigments, vitamins B12, E, K etc./1/. They are used in cosmetics, in aquaculture,poultry farming, in ...

  18. Color and shade parameters of ultramarine zeolitic pigments synthesized from kaolin waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Raquel Aranha de; Paz, Simone Patricia Aranha da; Angelica, Romulo Simoes; Neves, Roberto de Freitas; Pergher, Sibele Berenice Castella, E-mail: raquel_arn@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Grupo de Mineralogia e Geoquimica Aplicada

    2014-08-15

    Ultramarine pigments were successful synthesized from zeolite A obtained from kaolin waste. This waste has been used as an excellent source of silicon and aluminum for zeolite synthesis because of its high kaolinite concentrations and low contents of other accessory minerals. The cost is naturally less than the industrialized product. Color additives (Sulfur and Sodium Carbonate) were mixed with different proportions of zeolite A and further calcined for 5 h at 500 °C. They were characterized by XRD and XRF in addition to visual classification by color and shade. These products show colors from blue to green at different shades, both influenced by the amount of additives and cooling rate after calcination. Thus, a different quantity of the same additives in the same zeolitic matrix provides an increase in the color intensity. Cooling rate after calcination induces the color change which is substantially important in the pigments production. (author)

  19. Color and shade parameters of ultramarine zeolitic pigments synthesized from kaolin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Raquel Aranha de; Paz, Simone Patricia Aranha da; Angelica, Romulo Simoes; Neves, Roberto de Freitas; Pergher, Sibele Berenice Castella

    2014-01-01

    Ultramarine pigments were successful synthesized from zeolite A obtained from kaolin waste. This waste has been used as an excellent source of silicon and aluminum for zeolite synthesis because of its high kaolinite concentrations and low contents of other accessory minerals. The cost is naturally less than the industrialized product. Color additives (Sulfur and Sodium Carbonate) were mixed with different proportions of zeolite A and further calcined for 5 h at 500 °C. They were characterized by XRD and XRF in addition to visual classification by color and shade. These products show colors from blue to green at different shades, both influenced by the amount of additives and cooling rate after calcination. Thus, a different quantity of the same additives in the same zeolitic matrix provides an increase in the color intensity. Cooling rate after calcination induces the color change which is substantially important in the pigments production. (author)

  20. Pigment characterization of important golden age panel paintings of the 17th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pięta, Ewa; Proniewicz, Edyta; Szmelter-Fausek, Bożena; Olszewska-Świetlik, Justyna; Proniewicz, Leonard M

    2015-02-05

    Samples were obtained from two world-famous 17th century panel paintings of the Gdańsk school of panting: 'Seven Acts of Charity' (1607, in St. Mary's Church in Gdańsk, Poland) by Anton Möller and 'Angelic Concert' (1611, in Diocesan Museum in Pelplin, Poland) by Hermann Han. Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS), optical microscopy (OM), and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy studies of the samples were performed to characterize the pigments present in the individual painting layers (a rich palette of white, black, blue, red, and yellow pigments) and the pictorial techniques used by the artists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Blue ocean leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets.

  2. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  3. Pigmentation Disorders: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plensdorf, Scott; Livieratos, Maria; Dada, Nabil

    2017-12-15

    Pigmentation disorders are commonly diagnosed, evaluated, and treated in primary care practices. Typical hyperpigmentation disorders include postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, melasma, solar lentigines, ephelides (freckles), and café au lait macules. These conditions are generally benign but can be distressing to patients. Appropriate dermatologic history, skin examination, and skin biopsy, when appropriate, can help exclude melanoma and its precursors. In addition to addressing the underlying condition, hyperpigmentation is treated with topical agents, chemical peels, cryotherapy, light or laser therapy, or a combination of these methods. Café au lait macules are treated with surgical excision or laser therapy if treatment is desired. Hypopigmentation disorders include vitiligo, pityriasis alba, tinea versicolor, and postinflammatory hypopigmentation. Treatment of vitiligo depends on the distribution and extent of skin involvement, and includes topical corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors, ultraviolet A therapy (with or without psoralens), narrowband ultraviolet B therapy, and cosmetic coverage. Patients with stable, self-limited vitiligo may be candidates for surgical grafting techniques, whereas those with extensive disease may be candidates for depigmentation therapy to make skin tone appear more even. Other hypopigmentation disorders may improve or resolve with treatment of the underlying condition.

  4. New Directions in Phthalocyanine Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemark, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were the following: (1) investigation of the synthesis of new phthalocyanines; (2) characterization of the new phthalocyanines synthesized; (3) investigate the properties of the newly synthesized phthalocyanines with emphasis on UV protection of plastics and coatings; and (4) utilize quantum mechanics to evaluate the structural relationships with possible properties and synthetic approaches. The proposed research targeted the synthesis of phthalocyanines containing an aromatic bridge between two phthalocyanine rings. The goal was to synthesize pigments which would protect plastics when exposed to the photodegradation effects of the sun in space. The stability and extended conjugation of the phthalocyanines offer a unique opportunity for energy absorption and numerous radiative and non-radiative energy loss mechanisms. Although the original targeted phthalocyanines were changed early in the project, several new and unique phthalocyanine compounds were prepared. The basic goals of this work were met and some unique and unexpected outcomes of the work were the result of the integral use of quantum mechanics and molecular modeling with the synthetic effort.

  5. Eggshell spottiness reflects maternally transferred antibodies in blue tits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jeanne Holveck

    Full Text Available Blue-green and brown-spotted eggshells in birds have been proposed as sexual signals of female physiological condition and egg quality, reflecting maternal investment in the egg. Testing this hypothesis requires linking eggshell coloration to egg content, which is lacking for brown protoporphyrin-based pigmentation. As protoporphyrins can induce oxidative stress, and a large amount in eggshells should indicate either high female and egg quality if it reflects the female's high oxidative tolerance, or conversely poor quality if it reflects female physiological stress. Different studies supported either predictions but are difficult to compare given the methodological differences in eggshell-spottiness measurements. Using the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus as a model species, we aimed at disentangling both predictions in testing if brown-spotted eggshell could reflect the quality of maternal investment in antibodies and carotenoids in the egg, and at improving between-study comparisons in correlating several common measurements of eggshell coloration (spectral and digital measures, spotted surface, pigmentation indices. We found that these color variables were weakly correlated highlighting the need for comparable quantitative measurements between studies and for multivariate regressions incorporating several eggshell-color characteristics. When evaluating the potential signaling function of brown-spotted eggshells, we thus searched for the brown eggshell-color variables that best predicted the maternal transfer of antibodies and carotenoids to egg yolks. We also tested the effects of several parental traits and breeding parameters potentially affecting this transfer. While eggshell coloration did not relate to yolk carotenoids, the eggs with larger and less evenly-distributed spots had higher antibody concentrations, suggesting that both the quantity and distribution of brown pigments reflected the transfer of maternal immune compounds in egg yolks

  6. [Pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Mannagetta, J; Hutarew, G

    2012-09-01

    The oral mucosa contains melanocytes, even though one might not suspect this when examining white subjects. Drug-induced pigmentation is usually irregularly distributed over the oral mucosa; typical causes are contraceptives and tetracyclines. Localized traumatic pigmentation can be due to injuries contaminated by foreign material (dust). Not infrequently an amalgam tattoo can be seen, caused by introduction of amalgam during dental treatment with rotating instruments. Focal melanosis is harmless. Neoplastic pigmentation is rare. Melanotic nevi are small with indistinct borders. Malignant melanoma occurs predominantly on the maxilla or hard palate. Frequently it has already metastasized by the time of diagnosis. Verification by biopsy is essential if a lesion has suddenly appeared, is extensive, elevated, with irregular pigmentation and has no obvious cause.

  7. Pigmented xerodermoid - Report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Jayanta Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented xerodermoid, a rare genodermatosis, presents with clinical features and pathology similar to xeroderma pigmentosum, but at a later age. DNA repair replication is normal, but there is total depression of DNA synthesis after exposure to UV radiation. Two siblings in their teens and a man in his thirties with features of pigmented xerodermoid, e.g. photophobia, freckle-like lesions, keratoses, dryness of skin, and hypo- and hyper-pigmentation, are described. Although classically the onset of pigmented xerodermoid is said to be delayed till third to fourth decade of life, it seems the disease may appear earlier in the tropics. Early diagnosis and management could be life-saving.

  8. Pigment Production Analysis in Human Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkin, Amelia Soto; Paterson, Elyse K; Ruiz, Rolando; Ganesan, Anand K

    2016-05-25

    The human epidermal melanocyte is a highly specialized pigmented cell that serves to protect the epidermis from ultraviolet (UV) damage through the production of melanin, or melanogenesis. Misregulation in melanogenesis leading to either hyper- or hypo-pigmentation is found in human diseases such as malasma and vitiligo. Current therapies for these diseases are largely unsuccessful and the need for new therapies is necessary. In order to identify genes and or compounds that can alter melanogenesis, methods are required that can detect changes in pigment production as well as expression of key melanogenesis transcription factors and enzymes. Here we describe methods to detect changes in melanogenesis in a human melanoma cell line, MNT-1, by (1) analyzing pigment production by measuring the absorbance of melanin present by spectrophotometry, (2) analyzing transcript expression of potent regulators of melanogenesis by qunatitative reverse-transcription (RT)PCR and (3) analyzing protein expression of potent regulators of melanogenesis by Western blot (WB).

  9. Changes of the laser-induced blue, green and red fluorescence signatures during greening of etiolated leaves of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stober, F.; Lichtenthaler, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    The UV-laser-induced blue, green and red fluorescence-emission spectra were used to characterize the pigment status of etiolated leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during a 48 h greening period under white light conditions. Upon UV-light excitation (337 nm) leaves not only show a fluorescence emission in the red spectral region between 650 and 800nm (chlorophyll fluorescence with maxima near 690nm and 735 nm), but also in the blue and green regions between 400 to 570 nm with maxima or shoulders near 450 nm (blue) and 530 nm (green). During greening of etiolated leaves the chlorophyll-fluorescence ratio F690/F735 strongly correlated with the total chlorophyll content and the ratio of the chlorophylls to the carotenoids (a+b/x+c). The ratio of the blue to the green fluorescence F450/F530 was also correlated with the total chlorophyll content and the ratio of chlorophylls to total carotenoids (a+b/x+c). Consequently, there also existed a correlation between the chlorophyll-fluorescence ratio F690/F735 and the ratio of the blue to green fluorescence F450/F530. In contrast, the ratios of the blue to red fluorescences F450/F690 and F450/F735 did not show clear relations to the pigment content of the investigated plants. The particular shape of the UV-laser-induced-fluorescence emission spectra of wheat leaves as well as the dependencies of the fluorescence ratios on the pigment content are due to a partial and differential reabsorption of the emitted fluorescences by the photosynthetic pigments

  10. Preparation, characterization and application of some anti- corrosive molybdate pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Ghaffar, M.A.; El-Sawy, S.M.; Ahmed, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Some molybdate pigments of single and mixed metal ions, namely, zinc, calcium and zinc-calcium molybdates were prepared, characterized and evaluated according to international standard methods. The evaluated pigments were incorporated in some paint formulations. The physicomechanical, chemical and corrosion protective properties of the paint films were measured; this was done in comparison with a commercial imported molybdate pigment. It was found that, the prepared pigments under investigation are fine white crystalline powders of suitable pigment properties. They can be successfully used as environmentally acceptable anti corrosive pigments. They can replace satisfactorily the similar commercial imported pigment and possess adequate or superior properties against corrosion

  11. Microbial Production of Food Grade Pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Dufossé

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The controversial topic of synthetic dyes in food has been discussed for many years. The scrutiny and negative assessment of synthetic food dyes by the modern consumer have raised a strong interest in natural colouring alternatives. Nature is rich in colours (minerals, plants, microalgae, etc., and pigment-producing microorganisms (fungi, yeasts, bacteria are quite common. Among the molecules produced by microorganisms are carotenoids, melanins, flavins, quinones, and more specifically monascins, violacein or indigo. The success of any pigment produced by fermentation depends upon its acceptability on the market, regulatory approval, and the size of the capital investment required to bring the product to market. A few years ago, some expressed doubts about the successful commercialization of fermentation-derived food grade pigments because of the high capital investment requirements for fermentation facilities and the extensive and lengthy toxicity studies required by regulatory agencies. Public perception of biotechnology-derived products also had to be taken into account. Nowadays some fermentative food grade pigments are on the market: Monascus pigments, astaxanthin from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, Arpink Red from Penicillium oxalicum, riboflavin from Ashbya gossypii, b-carotene from Blakeslea trispora. The successful marketing of pigments derived from algae or extracted from plants, both as a food colour and a nutritional supplement, reflects the presence and importance of niche markets in which consumers are willing to pay a premium for »all natural ingredients«.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of Micrococcus luteus Cartenoid pigment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Z. Majeed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartenoids are group of pigments, with enormous types different structurally and functionally, have colors range from red to yellow found in a wide variety of plants, fungi, algae and bacteria. The animals took from food because they cannot make it, on contrary, the plants and microbes produce them due to subjection to environment. The aim of the study is to isolate and characterize the cartenoid pigment from Micrococcus luteus. The pigment extraction was done by acetone, and then was characterized with UltraViolet-Visible spectroscopy (UV–Vis and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Then, it was tested for antibacterial activity against five different bacterial isolates and antifungal activity tests against six different fungal isolates by well diffusion method. The results found that, the extracted pigment having antibacterial activity and antifungal activity and having the ability to absorb UVA rays within the range of 300-500 nm. There was no significant difference in antimicrobial effect of pigment, even when the extraction and isolation were done by two culture mediums (Nutrient Broth and Luria Bertani Broth. There were considerable inhibition percentages of adhesion after subjection to Cartenoid pigment ranged between (5.71, 23.84 % for Klebsiella spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa respectively and all the 11 isolate changed from Biofilm producer to non-producer. The isolated compound can be used against different bacterial and fungal infections. So they had a great future in medicine, cosmetics and as a sun protecting agent.

  13. Proton beam modification of lead white pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.; Gutiérrez, P.C.; Miserque, F.; Thomé, L.

    2013-01-01

    Pigments and paint materials are known to be sensitive to particle irradiation. Occasionally, the analysis of paintings by PIXE can induce a slight or dark stain depending on the experimental conditions (beam current, dose, particle energy). In order to understand this discoloration, we have irradiated various types of art white pigments – lead white (hydrocerussite and basic lead sulfate), gypsum, calcite, zinc oxide and titanium oxide – with an external 3 MeV proton micro-beam commonly used for PIXE experiments. We have observed various sensitivities depending on the pigment. No visible change occurs for calcite and titanium oxide, whereas lead white pigments are very sensitive. For the majority of the studied compounds, the discoloration is proportional to the beam current and charge. The damage induced by proton beam irradiation in lead white pigments was studied by micro-Raman and XPS spectroscopies. Structural modifications and dehydration were detected. Damage recovery was investigated by thermal treatment and UV-light irradiation. The discoloration disappeared after one week of UV illumination, showing that PIXE experiments could be safely undertaken for pigments and paintings

  14. Proton beam modification of lead white pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, L., E-mail: lucile.beck@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France (C2RMF), Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Gutiérrez, P.C. [Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France (C2RMF), Palais du Louvre – Porte des Lions, 14 quai François Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Miserque, F. [CEA, DEN, DPC/SCCME/LECA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thomé, L. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3 et Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 108, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2013-07-15

    Pigments and paint materials are known to be sensitive to particle irradiation. Occasionally, the analysis of paintings by PIXE can induce a slight or dark stain depending on the experimental conditions (beam current, dose, particle energy). In order to understand this discoloration, we have irradiated various types of art white pigments – lead white (hydrocerussite and basic lead sulfate), gypsum, calcite, zinc oxide and titanium oxide – with an external 3 MeV proton micro-beam commonly used for PIXE experiments. We have observed various sensitivities depending on the pigment. No visible change occurs for calcite and titanium oxide, whereas lead white pigments are very sensitive. For the majority of the studied compounds, the discoloration is proportional to the beam current and charge. The damage induced by proton beam irradiation in lead white pigments was studied by micro-Raman and XPS spectroscopies. Structural modifications and dehydration were detected. Damage recovery was investigated by thermal treatment and UV-light irradiation. The discoloration disappeared after one week of UV illumination, showing that PIXE experiments could be safely undertaken for pigments and paintings.

  15. Anion channels and the stimulation of anthocyanin accumulation by blue light in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, B.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Activation of anion channels by blue light begins within seconds of irradiation in seedlings and is related to the ensuing growth inhibition. 5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) is a potent, selective, and reversible blocker of these anion channels in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that 20 microM NPPB blocked 72% of the blue-light-induced accumulation of anthocyanin pigments in seedlings. Feeding biosynthetic intermediates to wild-type and tt5 seedlings provided evidence that NPPB prevented blue light from up-regulating one or more steps between and including phenylalanine ammonia lyase and chalcone isomerase. NPPB was found to have no significant effect on the blue-light-induced increase in transcript levels of PAL1, CHS, CHI, or DFR, which are genes that encode anthocyanin-biosynthetic enzymes. Immunoblots revealed that NPPB also did not inhibit the accumulation of the chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, or flavanone-3-hydroxylase proteins. This is in contrast to the reduced anthocyanin accumulation displayed by a mutant lacking the HY4 blue-light receptor, as hy4 displayed reduced expression of the above enzymes. Taken together, the data indicate that blue light acting through HY4 leads to an increase in the amount of biosynthetic enzymes but blue light must also act through a separate, anion-channel-dependent system to create a fully functional biosynthetic pathway.

  16. Studying the stabilization of vegetable pigments using 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inanejshvili, Zh.A.; Prokof'eva, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    With the help of labeled cathine tea-leaf substance it has been discovered that the later forms a specific complex with the red beet pigment. This obviously appears to be the reason for the pigment stability. An increase of the labeled cathine substance portion taken to stabilize the red pigment leads to lowering down the portion of the labeled pigment taking part in the reaction. The results from the experiment can be practically used in food industry for plant pigments

  17. Pigment Production from Immobilized Monascus sp. Utilizing Polymeric Resin Adsorption

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Patrick J.; Wang, Henry Y.

    1984-01-01

    Pigment production by the fungus Monascus sp. was studied to determine why Monascus sp. provides more pigment in solid culture than in submerged culture. Adding a sterilized nonionic polymeric adsorbent resin directly to the growing submerged culture did not enhance the pigment production, thus indicating that pigment extraction is probably not a factor. Monascus cells immobilized in hydrogel were studied and exhibited decreased pigment production as a result of immobilization. This result is...

  18. Instant BlueStacks

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A fast-paced, example-based approach guide for learning BlueStacks.This book is for anyone with a Mac or PC who wants to run Android apps on their computer. Whether you want to play games that are freely available for Android but not your computer, or you want to try apps before you install them on a physical device or use it as a development tool, this book will show you how. No previous experience is needed as this is written in plain English

  19. Quantum mechanical model for Maya Blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María E.; Peña, Brisa; Contreras, César; Montero, Ana L.; Chianelli, Russell; Alvarado, Manuel; Olivas, Ramón; Rodríguez, Luz M.; Camacho, Héctor; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A.

    This work is about Maya Blue (MB), a pigment developed by Mesoamerican civilizations between the 5th and 16th centuries from an aluminosilicate mineral (palygorskite) and an organic dye (indigo). Two different supramolecular quantum-mechanical models afford explanations for the unusual stability of MB based on the oxidation of the indigo molecule during the heating process and its interaction with palygorskite. A model considering indigo derivatives attached to several aluminates shows the principal features of the experimental visible spectrum of MB within the TD-DFT methodology. Another model of an indigo oxidized species confined within an inorganic supramolecular cavity system, that involves about 170 atoms, was calculated after a large configuration interaction of single excited determinants within the NDOL approximation (Montero-Cabrera et al., J Chem Phys, 2007, 127, 145102). It allows a correct reproduction and interpretation of the corresponding spectrum. This second methodology provides the most satisfactory results, being able to manage very big molecular systems at a QM level. Structural explanation for the unusual stability of MB is also provided.

  20. Blue phases as photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohley, Christian; Scharf, Toralf

    2003-12-01

    The Liquid Crystalline Blue Phases (LC BPs) and their diffraction patterns were investigated experimentally and theoretically. We stabilized Blue Phases and measured their diffraction pattern for different wavelengths of monochromatic light with the help of a conoscopic setup of a polarization microscope. Moreover, the diffraction patterns were calculated with the help of a 4x4 matrix method which allows amplitude and phase investigations.

  1. Comparison of Riboflavin and Toluidine Blue O as Photosensitizers for Photoactivated Disinfection on Endodontic and Periodontal Pathogens In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik Krarup; Garcia, Javier; Væth, Michael; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Photoactivated disinfection has a strong local antimicrobial effect. In the field of dentistry it is an emerging adjunct to mechanical debridement during endodontic and periodontal treatment. In the present study, we investigate the effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and blue LED light for activation, and compare it to photoactivated disinfection with the widely used combination of toluidine blue O and red light. Riboflavin is highly biocompatible and can be activated with LED lamps at hand in the dental office. To date, no reports are available on the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin/blue light on oral microorganisms. Planktonic cultures of eight organisms frequently isolated from periodontal and/or endodontic lesions (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherischia coli, Lactobacillus paracasei, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Propionibacterium acnes) were subjected to photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light and toluidine blue O/red light, and survival rates were determined by CFU counts. Within the limited irradiation time of one minute, photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light only resulted in minor reductions in CFU counts, whereas full kills were achieved for all organisms when using toluidine blue O/red light. The black pigmented anaerobes P. gingivalis and P. intermedia were eradicated completely by riboflavin/blue light, but also by blue light treatment alone, suggesting that endogenous chromophores acted as photosensitizers in these bacteria. On the basis of our results, riboflavin cannot be recommended as a photosensitizer used for photoactivated disinfection of periodontal or endodontic infections.

  2. Effect of accessory pigment composition on the absorption characteristics of a dinoflagellate bloom in a coastal embayment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Vijayan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The light absorption properties of a dinoflagellate (Noctiluca scintillans Macartney bloom in Manila Bay were analysed during the onset of a whole-bay-scale bloom in March 2004. The chlorophyll a concentrations varied over a very wide range from 1.4 µg l-1 to extremely high values of 521 µg l-1. The chlorophyll specific absorption coefficients of phytoplankton (a*ph(λ varied significantly in shape and magnitude. The spectrally averaged values of a*ph(λ varied by two orders of magnitude within and outside the bloom patch. The total suspended solid concentration was high in the middle of the bay (≥4 mg l-1. The non-photosynthetic pigment (NPP index was ~0.6 at most of the stations, mainly due to the presence of photoprotective pigments like zeaxanthin, lutein and neoxanthin, which led to variations in the blue absorption maxima of the chlorophyll-specific absorption coefficients. The absorption properties of the accessory pigments were masked owing to the presence of overlapping pigment absorption bands. The fourth derivative of the absorption spectra was able to resolve these overlapping features and enhance the absorption characteristics of prominent accessory pigments.

  3. Betalain: a particular class of antioxidant pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gharras, Hasna

    2011-10-01

    We have analyzed the stability of betalains in juices prepared from Moroccan yellow cactus pears (Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill.) as a function of temperature and pH. The experiments were carried out at temperatures ranging from 80 to 100 degrees C with juices at pH 3.5, 5 and 6.5. The degree of pigment retention decreased when the temperature increased. The degradation constant rates were determined for thermal degradation rates of pseudo-first order. The Arrhenius plot obtained for the degradation of betaxanthin from the yellow fruits was not linear. Regardless of the temperature of treatment, the lowest degradation was obtained for pH 5. When some stabilizers were tested for the protection of pigments, the results showed that ascorbic acid was a better protective agent at pH 3.5, increasing the protection by 40%. The inhibitive action of betalain pigments extracted from cactus pears towards corrosion of stainless steel in phosphoric acid was investigated using electrochemical polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. It was found that the presence of natural pigments reduces the corrosion rate of the tested metal, especially on addition of the red pigments (97%). The inhibition efficiency increases as the pigment concentration of extracts increases. It was also found that the pigments tested act as mixed inhibitors. The inhibitive action of the extracts is discussed in term of adsorption and that such adsorption follows a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The calculated values of the free energy of adsorption indicated that the adsorption process is spontaneous.

  4. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zargar, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We report a case of iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn and discuss the importance of an accurate diagnosis for prevention of amblyopia.Methods: We describe a case of an abnormal red reflex seen on a newborn exam.Results: A full-term female born via normal spontaneous vaginal delivery without any complications was seen in the newborn nursery. She was noted to have an abnormal eye exam. Pupils were large with circular dark excrescences of the iris pigment epithelium. She was referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist where she was noted to fixate and follow faces. No afferent pupillary defect was seen. OD red reflex was normal whereas OS red reflex was blocked mostly by dark excrescences. A 2– dark brown lesion was seen in the OD iris and a 3–5 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OS iris, consistent with a pupillary iris pigment epithelial cyst. Central visual axis was clear OU. Glaucoma was not present and patching was not performed. Observations and clinical photographs were recommended with follow-up in three months.Conclusion: Iris pigment epithelial cysts are uncommonly seen in children. The primary care provider first seeing a newborn must be aware of lesions obscuring a red reflex with appropriate follow-up. Follow-up in three months with IOP measurements is recommended. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in children may be a cause of amblyopia, thus prompt evaluation is important for prognostic purposes and the prevention of amblyopia.

  5. Multiscale Pigment Analysis of Medieval Illuminated Manuscripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Erica; Manukyan, Khachatur; Wiescher, Michael; Gura, David

    2017-09-01

    Three medieval illuminated manuscripts (codd. Lat. b. 1; Lat. b. 2; Lat. e. 4), housed at the University of Notre Dame's Hesburgh Library, vary in style, pigments, scribes, and regions, despite all three being Psalters used in the Late Middle Ages. XRF and Raman spectroscopy, which provided the elemental and molecular composition of the pigments, respectively, were used to analyze the pigments' compositions in an attempt to narrow further the manuscripts' possible origins. This experimental investigation emphasizes the importance of understanding the history of the manuscript through their pigments. Codd. Lat. b. 1 and Lat. b. 2 are Latinate German Psalters from the fifteenth century likely used in Katharinenkloster in Nuremberg. While there are visible differences in style within each Psalter, the variations in some of the pigment compositions, such as the inconstant presence of zinc, suggest different admixtures. Cod. Lat. e. 4 is a Latinate English Psalter from the fourteenth century, and it was written by two scribes and illuminated by two distinct painters. It is currently being tested to determine whether there are any correlations between the scribes and painters. These physical analyses will clarify the origins and provenances of the manuscripts.

  6. Inadvertent polychlorinated biphenyls in commercial paint pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dingfei; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2010-04-15

    A polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) that was not produced as part of the Aroclor mixtures banned in the 1980s was recently reported in air samples collected in Chicago, Philadelphia, the Arctic, and several sites around the Great Lakes. In Chicago, the congener 3,3'-dichlorobiphenyl or PCB11 was found to be the fifth most concentrated congener and ubiquitous throughout the city. The congener exhibited strong seasonal concentration trends that suggest volatilization of this compound from common outdoor surfaces. Due to these findings and also the compound's presence in waters that received waste from paint manufacturing facilities, we hypothesized that PCB11 may be present in current commercial paint. In this study we measured PCBs in paint sold on the current retail market. We tested 33 commercial paint pigments purchased from three local paint stores. The pigment samples were analyzed for all 209 PCB congeners using gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). More than 50 PCB congeners including several dioxin-like PCBs were detected, and the PCB profiles varied due to different types of pigments and different manufacturing processes. PCB congeners were detected in azo and phthalocyanine pigments which are commonly used in paint but also in inks, textiles, paper, cosmetics, leather, plastics, food and other materials. Our findings suggest several possible mechanisms for the inadvertent production of specific PCB congeners during the manufacturing of paint pigments.

  7. Fish pigmentation and the melanocortin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Laura; Suarez-Bregua, Paula; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel; Braasch, Ingo; Rotllant, Josep

    2017-09-01

    The melanocortin system is a complex neuroendocrine signaling mechanism involved in numerous physiological processes in vertebrates, including pigmentation, steroidogenesis and metabolic control. This review focuses at one of its most fascinating function in fish, its regulatory role in the control of pigmentation, in which the melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r), its agonist α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-Msh), and the endogenous antagonist agouti signaling protein (Asip1) are the main players. Functional control of Mc1r, which is highly expressed in fish skin and whose activation stimulates melanin production and melanosome dispersion in fish melanophores, is considered a key mechanism for vertebrate pigment phenotypes. The α-Msh peptide, the most documented Mc1r agonist involved in pigmentation, is produced in the pituitary gland, activating melanin synthesis by binding to Mc1r in fish melanophores. Finally, Asip1 is the putative factor for establishing the evolutionarily conserved dorso-ventral pigment pattern found across vertebrates. However, we are just starting to understand how other melanocortin system components are acting in this complex regulatory network. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cellular Blue Nevus Diagnosed following Excision of Melanoma: A Challenge in Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nives Jonjić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 41-year-old woman with a history of nodular melanoma (NM, associated with an indurated dome-shaped blue-black nodule with a diameter of 1.2 cm in the gluteal region, is presented. Clinical diagnosis of the lesion, present from birth, was blue nevus. Recently, the nodule has been showing a mild enlargement and thus complete resection was performed. Histological analysis revealed a pigmented lesion with an expansive pattern of extension into the dermis and the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The lesion displayed an alveolar pattern as well as a pigmented dendritic cell pattern. The histology was consistent with cellular blue nevus (CBN; however, the history of NM which was excised one year earlier, as well as the clinical information about the slow growing lesion, included a differential diagnosis of CBN, borderline melanocytic tumor, and malignant blue nevus. Additional immunohistochemical (HMB-45, p16, and Ki-67 and molecular (BRAF V600E mutation analyses were performed on both lesions: the CBN-like and the previously excised NM. Along with lesion history and histological analyses, p16 staining and BRAF were useful diagnostic tools for confirming the benign nature of CBN in this case.

  9. Blue moons and Martian sunsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Kurt; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-03-20

    The familiar yellow or orange disks of the moon and sun, especially when they are low in the sky, and brilliant red sunsets are a result of the selective extinction (scattering plus absorption) of blue light by atmospheric gas molecules and small aerosols, a phenomenon explainable using the Rayleigh scattering approximation. On rare occasions, dust or smoke aerosols can cause the extinction of red light to exceed that for blue, resulting in the disks of the sun and moon to appear as blue. Unlike Earth, the atmosphere of Mars is dominated by micron-size dust aerosols, and the sky during sunset takes on a bluish glow. Here we investigate the role of dust aerosols in the blue Martian sunsets and the occasional blue moons and suns on Earth. We use the Mie theory and the Debye series to calculate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of dust aerosols most commonly found on Mars. Our findings show that while wavelength selective extinction can cause the sun's disk to appear blue, the color of the glow surrounding the sun as observed from Mars is due to the dominance of near-forward scattering of blue light by dust particles and cannot be explained by a simple, Rayleigh-like selective extinction explanation.

  10. The melanocortin system regulates body pigmentation and social behaviour in a colour polymorphic cichlid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Peter D; Maguire, Sean M; Harris, Rayna M; Rodriguez, Agosto A; DeAngelis, Ross S; Flores, Stephanie A; Hofmann, Hans A

    2017-03-29

    The melanocortin system is a neuroendocrine system that regulates a range of physiological and behavioural processes. We examined the extent to which the melanocortin system simultaneously regulates colour and behaviour in the cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni We found that yellow males are more aggressive than blue males, in line with previous studies. We then found that exogenous α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) increases yellowness of the body and dispersal of xanthophore pigments in both morphs. However, α-MSH had a morph-specific effect on aggression, with only blue males showing an increase in the rate of aggression. Exogenous agouti signalling peptide (ASIP), a melanocortin antagonist, did not affect coloration but reduced the rate of aggression in both colour morphs. Blue males had higher cortisol levels than yellow males. Neural gene expression of melanocortin receptors ( mcr ) and ligands was not differentially regulated between colour morphs. In the skin, however, mc1r and pro-opiomelanocortin ( pomc ) β were upregulated in blue males, while asip 1 was upregulated in yellow males. The effects of α-MSH on behaviour and body coloration, combined with morph-specific regulation of the stress response and the melanocortin system, suggest that the melanocortin system contributes to the polymorphism in behaviour and coloration in A. burtoni . © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Simultaneous identification of historical pigments Prussian blue and indigo in paintings by electrospray mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pauk, V.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Papoušková, B.; Sulovský, P.; Lemr, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 8 (2013), s. 927-930 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/1150 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mass spectrometry * electrospray * historical painting Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.709, year: 2013

  12. Platelet-Rich Plasma Increases Pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Cagri A; Ertas, Nilgun Markal

    2017-11-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous solution of plasma containing 4 to 7 times the baseline concentration of human platelets. Platelet-rich plasma has been widely popular in facial rejuvenation to attenuate wrinkles and has been practically used. The authors have been encountering various patients of increased hiperpigmentation following PRP applications that were performed to attenuate the postinflammatory hiperpigmentation especially after laser treatment. The authors have been using PRP for facial rejuvenation in selected patients and in 1 patient the authors have encountered increased pigmentation over the pigmented skin lesions that were present before the application. The authors recommend that the PRP might increase pigmentation especially in the face region and precautions might be taken before and after the application. Platelet-rich plasma should not be used for the treatment of post inflammatory hiperpigmentation.

  13. Nanomechanical analysis of pigmented human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Michal; Zadlo, Andrzej; Pilat, Anna; Olchawa, Magdalena; Gkogkolou, Paraskevi; Burda, Kvetoslava; Böhm, Markus; Sarna, Tadeusz

    2013-09-01

    Based on hitherto measurements of elasticity of various cells in vitro and ex vivo, cancer cells are generally believed to be much softer than their normal counterparts. In spite of significant research efforts on the elasticity of cancer cells, only few studies were undertaken with melanoma cells. However, there are no reports concerning pigmented melanoma cells. Here, we report for the first time on the elasticity of pigmented human melanoma cells. The obtained data show that melanin significantly increases the stiffness of pigmented melanoma cells and that the effect depends on the amount of melanin inside the cells. The dramatic impact of melanin on the nanomechanical properties of cells puts into question widely accepted paradigm about all cancer cells being softer than their normal counterparts. Our findings reveal significant limitations of the nanodiagnosis approach for melanoma and contribute to better understanding of cell elasticity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  15. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  16. Gingival pigmentation beneath a metallic crown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Hirayasu, R.; Sakai, H.; Hashimoto, N.

    1988-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies and energy dispersive X-ray analysis disclosed that the essential cause of gingival discoloration following the placement of a metallic crown, was marked deposition of melanin pigment. Deposition of melanin pigment was observed in epithelial cells, on basement membranes, and in fibroblasts, macrophages and among intercellular ground substance of the proprial layer. Brown or dark brown colored granules were observed in the deep portion of the proprial layer. Some metallic elements as silver and sulfur were detected. It was presumed that these materials were dental metals accidentally implanted in gingival tissues during the therapeutic procedure. The deposition of melanin pigment closely corresponded with mucosal tissue where these materials were present in the deep portion of the proprial layer. These findings suggested that these materials influenced the physiological metabolism of melanin and induced its pathological deposition in the proprial tissue. (author)

  17. Effects of ozone on plant pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouchi, I.; Odaira, T.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of ozone on plants were studied, with emphasis on leaf bleaching, chlorosis, and appearance of reddish flecks on leaves. Leaves were analyzed with emphasis on ozone-induced destruction of chlorophyll and the formation of red anthrocyanin pigments. Leaves were exposed to 20 pphm to O/sub 3/. Pigments in Brassica pekinensis, morning glory, Zelkova serrata, and Prunus yedonensis were analyzed. Exposure to O/sub 3/ decreased the amount of chlorophyll, lowered the ratio of chlorophyll a to chlorophyll b, and caused anthrocyanin to form. From these results and from symptoms of O/sub 3/ injury to broad leaves (such as early appearance of yellow or red pigments in the leaves and premature fall of leaves), and published microscopic observations of chloroplast, it was deduced that O/sub 3/ accelerated the senescence of leaves and of the plant itself. 15 references.

  18. Methylene blue prevents retinal damage in an experimental model of ischemic proliferative retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Funes, Manuel; Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Fernández, Juan C; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Inserra, Pablo I F; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; López-Costa, Juan J; Dorfman, Verónica B; Martínez, Alfredo; Loidl, César F

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia induces retinal lesions, generating ischemic proliferative retinopathy, which may result in blindness. Previously, we showed that the nitrergic system was involved in the physiopathology of perinatal asphyxia. Here we analyze the application of methylene blue, a well-known soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, as a therapeutic strategy to prevent retinopathy. Male rats (n = 28 per group) were treated in different ways: 1) control group comprised born-to-term animals; 2) methylene blue group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery; 3) perinatal asphyxia (PA) group comprised rats exposed to perinatal asphyxia (20 min at 37°C); and 4) methylene blue-PA group comprised animals born from pregnant rats treated with methylene blue (2 mg/kg) 30 and 5 min before delivery, and then the pups were subjected to PA as above. For molecular studies, mRNA was obtained at different times after asphyxia, and tissue was collected at 30 days for morphological and biochemical analysis. Perinatal asphyxia produced significant gliosis, angiogenesis, and thickening of the inner retina. Methylene blue treatment reduced these parameters. Perinatal asphyxia resulted in a significant elevation of the nitrergic system as shown by NO synthase (NOS) activity assays, Western blotting, and (immuno)histochemistry for the neuronal isoform of NOS and NADPH-diaphorase activity. All these parameters were also normalized by the treatment. In addition, methylene blue induced the upregulation of the anti-angiogenic peptide, pigment epithelium-derived factor. Application of methylene blue reduced morphological and biochemical parameters of retinopathy. This finding suggests the use of methylene blue as a new treatment to prevent or decrease retinal damage in the context of ischemic proliferative retinopathy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. UV-B affects the immune system and promotes nuclear abnormalities in pigmented and non-pigmented bullfrog tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Fanali, Lara Zácari; De Oliveira, Classius

    2018-03-01

    Ultra-Violet (UV) radiation is a stressor of the immune system and causes DNA damage. Leukocytes can change in response to environmental changes in anurans, making them an important biomarker of stressful situations. The initial barrier against UV in ectothermic animals is melanin-containing cells in skin and in their internal organs. Here, we tested the effects of UV exposure on immune cells and DNA integrity in pigmented and non-pigmented tadpoles of Lithobates catesbeianus. We used an inflammation model with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Escherichia coli to test synergic effects of UV and LPS. We tested the following hypotheses: 1) DNA damage caused by UV will be more pronounced in non-pigmented than in pigmented animals; 2) LPS increases leukocytes in both pigmented and non-pigmented animals by systemic inflammation; 3) The combined LPS and UV exposure will decrease the number of leukocytes. We found that the frequency of immune cells differed between pigmented and non-pigmented tadpoles. UV exposure increased mast cells and DNA damage in erythrocytes in both pigmented and non-pigmented tadpoles, while leukocytes decreased after UV exposure. Non-pigmented tadpoles experienced DNA damage and a lower lymphocyte count earlier than pigmented tadpoles. UV altered immune cells likely as a consequence of local and systemic inflammation. These alterations were less severe in pigmented than in non-pigmented animals. UV and LPS increased internal melanin in pigmented tadpoles, which were correlated with DNA damage and leukocytes. Here, we described for the first time the effects of UV and LPS in immune cells of pigmented and non-pigmented tadpoles. In addition, we demonstrated that internal melanin in tadpoles help in these defenses, since leukocyte responses were faster in non-pigmented animals, supporting the hypothesis that melanin is involved in the initial innate immune response. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pseudoepitheliomatous Hyperplasia in a Red Pigment Tattoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia

    2015-01-01

    Red pigment tattoos are known to cause pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in the skin, frequently simulating squamous cell carcinoma or keratoacanthoma. Herein, the authors present two additional cases of red pigment tattoo pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in which they noted a lichenoid tissue reaction. They reviewed the previously published cases and observed a lichenoid reaction in the histopathological images similar to hypertrophic lichen planus. The authors suggest that these reactions might best be referred to as “lichenoid reaction with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia” or “hypertrophic lichen planus-like reaction.” Accordingly, recognition of an inflammatory component may allow additional treatment options. PMID:26705448

  1. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR THE DYE AND PIGMENT ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This risk assessment calculates the maximum loadings of constituents found in dyes and pigment industries waste streams which can be disposed in different types of waste management units without causing health benchmarks to be exceeded at plausible receptor locations. The assessment focuses on potential risks from volatilization and leaching to groundwater of constituents disposed in surface impoundments and landfills with either clay liners or composite liners. This product will be used by EPA decision makers to assist in determining whether certain waste streams generated by the dyes and pigments industries should be designated as hazardous.

  2. Identifying the optical phenomena responsible for the blue appearance of veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, Spencer R.; Baranoski, Gladimir V. G.

    2017-09-01

    Blue in nature is often associated with beauty. It can be observed all around us, from captivating blue eyes to iridescent blue butterfly wings. While colours in nature are often the result of pigmentation, the majority of natural blue is produced by structural coloration. The colour of the sky, for example, is primarily caused by Rayleigh scattering. In this paper, we examine a single occurrence of blue in nature, specifically the blue appearance of veins near the surface of human skin. The most comprehensive investigation of this coloration to date showed that it arises from a combination of the scattering properties of skin and the absorptance of venous blood. However, that work only considered broad optical properties of these mediums and did not identify the source of the colour. In this paper, we employ in silico experiments, performed using first-principles light interaction models for skin and blood, to investigate the net effect of skin and vein optical properties on their aggregate reflectance across the visible range. We show that the contribution of skin to the distinct appearance of veins primarily results from Rayleigh scattering occurring within the papillary dermis, a sublayer of the skin. The results of this paper, in addition to addressing an old open scientific question, may have practical implications for performing non-invasive measurements of the physiological properties of skin and blood.

  3. Sensitivity to Ethephon Degreening Treatment Is Altered by Blue LED Light Irradiation in Mandarin Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lili; Yuan, Ziyi; Xie, Jiao; Yao, Shixiang; Zeng, Kaifang

    2017-08-02

    Although citrus fruits are not climacteric, exogenous ethylene is widely used in the degreening treatment of citrus fruits. Irradiation with blue light-emitting diode (LED) light (450 nm) for 10 h can promote the formation of good coloration of ethephon-degreened fruit. This study evaluated the effect of blue LED light irradiation on the pigments contents of ethephon-degreened fruit and evaluated whether the blue LED light irradiation could influence the sensitivity of mandarin fruit to ethylene. The results indicated that blue light can accelerate the color change of ethephon-degreened fruit, accompanied by changes in plastid ultrastructure and chlorophyll and carotenoid contents. Ethephon-induced expressions of CitACS1, CitACO, CitETR1, CitEIN2, CitEIL1, and CitERF2 were enhanced by blue LED light irradiation, which increased the sensitivity to ethylene in ethephon-degreened fruits. These results indicate that blue LED light-induced changes in sensitivity to ethylene in mandarin fruit may be responsible for the improved coloration of ethephon-degreened mandarin fruits.

  4. Pigment reduction in nevus of Ota following leech therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Rastogi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nevus of Ota is a congenital blue-gray color nevus afflicting unilaterally, the area near the eyes. It poses a huge cosmetic concern besides being a potential threat for developing melanoma sometime in the course of the disease. The treatment options are neither many nor promising besides they are too expensive. We have treated a case of nevus of Ota with leech therapy where leech was applied upon the lesion for five times spanned in a period of 2 months. The results in terms of change in the color of lesion were evaluated with the help of serial photographs following every treatment session to mark the level of color changes in the lesion. A substantial reduction in color of the nevus was reported following the completion of the therapy. The results were demonstrated with the photographs. Although, recommended as the classical Ayurvedic management for skin diseases, leech therapy is not reported earlier in such conditions. It proposes a novel approach to deal with such congenital pigment lesions where other options are not promising.

  5. Photometry of faint blue stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, D.; Hill, P.W.; Brown, A.

    1977-01-01

    Photometry on the uvby system is given for 61 faint blue stars. The stars are classified by means of the Stromgren indices, using criteria described in a previous paper (Kilkenny and Hill (1975)). (author)

  6. Ecology of blue straggler stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni; Beccari, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The existence of blue straggler stars, which appear younger, hotter, and more massive than their siblings, is at odds with a simple picture of stellar evolution. Such stars should have exhausted their nuclear fuel and evolved long ago to become cooling white dwarfs. They are found to exist in globular clusters, open clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, OB associations and as field stars. This book summarises the many advances in observational and theoretical work dedicated to blue straggler stars. Carefully edited extended contributions by well-known experts in the field cover all the relevant aspects of blue straggler stars research: Observations of blue straggler stars in their various environments; Binary stars and formation channels; Dynamics of globular clusters; Interpretation of observational data and comparison with models. The book also offers an introductory chapter on stellar evolution written by the editors of the book.

  7. Kingfisher feathers--colouration by pigments, spongy nanostructures and thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Tinbergen, Jan; Leertouwer, Hein L; Wilts, Bodo D

    2011-12-01

    The colours of the common kingfisher, Alcedo atthis, reside in the barbs of the three main types of feather: the orange breast feathers, the cyan back feathers and the blue tail feathers. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the orange barbs contain small pigment granules. The cyan and blue barbs contain spongy nanostructures with slightly different dimensions, causing different reflectance spectra. Imaging scatterometry showed that the pigmented barbs create a diffuse orange scattering and the spongy barb structures create iridescence. The extent of the angle-dependent light scattering increases with decreasing wavelength. All barbs have a cortical envelope with a thickness of a few micrometres. The reflectance spectra of the cortex of the barbs show oscillations when measured from small areas, but when measured from larger areas the spectra become wavelength independent. This can be directly understood with thin film modelling, assuming a somewhat variable cortex thickness. The cortex reflectance appears to be small but not negligible with respect to the pigmentary and structural barb reflectance.

  8. Growth, photosynthetic pigments and production of essential oil of long-pepper under different light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Vandimilli A; Pacheco, Fernanda V; Avelar, Rafaella P; Alvarenga, Ivan C A; Pinto, José Eduardo B P; Alvarenga, Amauri A DE

    2017-01-01

    Piper hispidinervum C. DC. is popularly known as long-pepper and it owns a commercial value due to the essential oil it produces. Long-pepper oil is rich in safrole and eugenoln components that have insecticidal, fungicidal and bactericidal activity. It has been establish that to medicinal plants light influences not only growth but also essential oil production. The growth, the content of photosynthetic pigments and the essential oil production of Piper hispidinervum at greenhouses with different light conditions was evaluated. The treatments were characterized by cultivation of plants for 180 days under different light conditions, produced by shading greenhouses with 50% and 30% of natural incident irradiance, two colored shading nets red (RN) and blue (BN) both blocking 50% of the incident radiation and one treatment at full-sun (0% of shade). The results showed that the treatments of 50% shade and RN and BN were the ones which stimulated the greater growth. Blue and red light also had the best production of photosynthetic pigments. Essential oil yielded more under full sun therefore this is the most indicated condition to produce seedlings for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

  9. Growth, photosynthetic pigments and production of essential oil of long-pepper under different light conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VANDIMILLI A. LIMA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Piper hispidinervum C. DC. is popularly known as long-pepper and it owns a commercial value due to the essential oil it produces. Long-pepper oil is rich in safrole and eugenoln components that have insecticidal, fungicidal and bactericidal activity. It has been establish that to medicinal plants light influences not only growth but also essential oil production. The growth, the content of photosynthetic pigments and the essential oil production of Piper hispidinervum at greenhouses with different light conditions was evaluated. The treatments were characterized by cultivation of plants for 180 days under different light conditions, produced by shading greenhouses with 50% and 30% of natural incident irradiance, two colored shading nets red (RN and blue (BN both blocking 50% of the incident radiation and one treatment at full-sun (0% of shade. The results showed that the treatments of 50% shade and RN and BN were the ones which stimulated the greater growth. Blue and red light also had the best production of photosynthetic pigments. Essential oil yielded more under full sun therefore this is the most indicated condition to produce seedlings for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

  10. Identification of lapis-lazuli pigments in paint layers by PIGE measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, N.; Migliori, A.; Mando, P.A.; Calvo del Castillo, H.

    2004-01-01

    Lapis-lazuli is a semi-precious stone used in the past to produce a blue pigment. Its main component is lazurite, 3Na 2 O·3Al 2 O 3 ·6SiO 2 ·2Na 2 S. The possibility of using PIXE to identify this pigment in canvas and wood painting is severely limited by the strong absorption of low-energy X-rays in the protective varnish and - when, as typical, the pigment is mixed with lead white - by the overlapping of Pb M lines with S K α . In this work we discuss the possibility of identifying lapis-lazuli by detecting sodium with PIGE. PIXE and PIGE measurements have been performed on samples containing lapis-lazuli mixed to lead white in different percentage, covered with polymeric foils to simulate the presence of varnish. At a percentage of lapis-lazuli below 50%, Na X-rays are hardly detectable even with the thinner foil; on the contrary the characteristic γ-rays are clearly detected down to about 1%. A first application has been successfully performed on the 'Madonna dei fusi' by Leonardo da Vinci, in the framework of an extensive scientific investigation on the painting techniques used by the Renaissance genius

  11. Physicochemical characterization of pigments and supports in mural paints: Mayapan, Yucatan case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva V, Y.; Peraza L, C.A.; Bautista M, J.P.; Arenas A, J.

    2006-01-01

    The present work is focused in the study of pigments and supports located in mural paintings belonging to the archaeological site of Mayapan. The raw materials utilized by the pre hispanic are revealed by means of the use of different techniques of characterization such as Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM and TEM, respectively), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The pigments analyzed cover the following colors: yellow, blue, white, orange, black, red, olive and aqua green. In general, the elements O, Ca and C were the main elements present, as well as quantities of Si and Fe were very significant in all the cases. The manufacture techniques for the production of pigments and supports coincided with all those reported in literature for the Maya culture; however, influence from the Central Altiplane could be appreciated. The results obtained by XRD show the phases of calcite (CaCO 3 ) and dolomite ferroan (Ca(Mg,Fe)(CO 3 ) 2 ) in all the support. The analyses by FTIR indicated the presence of some agglutinating, but it has not been identified yet. (Author)

  12. Identification of lapis-lazuli pigments in paint layers by PIGE measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, N. E-mail: grassi@fi.infn.it; Migliori, A.; Mando, P.A.; Calvo del Castillo, H

    2004-06-01

    Lapis-lazuli is a semi-precious stone used in the past to produce a blue pigment. Its main component is lazurite, 3Na{sub 2}O{center_dot}3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}6SiO{sub 2}{center_dot}2Na{sub 2}S. The possibility of using PIXE to identify this pigment in canvas and wood painting is severely limited by the strong absorption of low-energy X-rays in the protective varnish and - when, as typical, the pigment is mixed with lead white - by the overlapping of Pb M lines with S K{sub {alpha}}. In this work we discuss the possibility of identifying lapis-lazuli by detecting sodium with PIGE. PIXE and PIGE measurements have been performed on samples containing lapis-lazuli mixed to lead white in different percentage, covered with polymeric foils to simulate the presence of varnish. At a percentage of lapis-lazuli below 50%, Na X-rays are hardly detectable even with the thinner foil; on the contrary the characteristic {gamma}-rays are clearly detected down to about 1%. A first application has been successfully performed on the 'Madonna dei fusi' by Leonardo da Vinci, in the framework of an extensive scientific investigation on the painting techniques used by the Renaissance genius.

  13. Semiquantitative and quantitative measurements for EDXRF in elemental chemical composition of pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Elizabeth Cristina Soares da

    2005-02-01

    X-Ray fluorescence technique is largely used in the characterization of art and archaeological objects for restoration and conservation, allowing a multi-elemental, simultaneous and non destructive analysis. In this work it was used a portable XRF equipment of XRF that consists of a 238 Pu source ( 13,6 and 17,2 keV; 95 mCi) and a SI-PIN detector coupled to a 8 k multichannel analyser. The results were collected by a palmtop computer and later analysed in a PC, through the program AXIL-QXAS. The acquisition time for each measurement was 500 s. The measurements were accomplished in a wood sculpture (Santa Luzia image, number 164) from the collection of the Museu de Etnologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo (MAE-USP), in the following regions: (STL1) inferior side of the wood base exposed without finishing, (STL2) frontal inferior base of the pedestal (dark blue) (STL3), inferior part of the frontal dress (gold), (STL4) medium part of the dress (clear blue) (STL5) mantle (red), (STL6) back central lock of the hair in the backs (black), (STL7) right cheek (flesh-coloured) and (STL8) mantle (gold). The elements found in the STL1 region were: Al, Ca, Fe and a high concentration of Zn. In the region STL2 were found Al, C, Fe, Zn and the key element Cu. In the region STL3 - Ca, Zn and the key element Au. In the region STL4 it was found Zn and the key element Cu. In the region STL5 the key element S and Hg. In the region STL6 were found Fe, Ca, S and Hg. In the region STL 7 were found Al, Cu, Hg and Zn. In the region STL8 were found Ca, Al and Au, with high concentration. It was concluded that the possible pigments would be: STL2 and STL4 - CuCO 3 . Cu(OH) 2 + ZnO; STL3 and STL8 - Au; STL5 - HgS, STL6 - HgS mixed with other oxides, possibly of Fe and Mn, and STL 7 - HgS + ZnO. Standard samples of wood painted with pigments of the colors white, blue, red, rose, flesh color and green were also made. Through the XRF method it was verified that the white pigment is TiO 2 , the

  14. Two cysteine substitutions in the MC1R generate the blue variant of the Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) and prevent expression of the white winter coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våge, Dag Inge; Fuglei, Eva; Snipstad, Kristin; Beheim, Janne; Landsem, Veslemøy Malm; Klungland, Helge

    2005-10-01

    We have characterized two mutations in the MC1R gene of the blue variant of the arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) that both incorporate a novel cysteine residue into the receptor. A family study in farmed arctic foxes verified that the dominant expression of the blue color phenotype cosegregates completely with the allele harboring these two mutations. Additionally to the altered pigment synthesis, the blue fox allele suppresses the seasonal change in coat color found in the native arctic fox. Consequently, these findings suggest that the MC1R/agouti regulatory system is involved in the seasonal changes of coat color found in arctic fox.

  15. Neoplasia versus hyperplasia of the retinal pigment epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Steffen; Larsen, J.N.B.; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, retinal pigment epithelium, adenoma, tumor-like hyperplasia, histology, immunohistochemistry, tumor, neoplasm, ultrasonography......ophthalmology, retinal pigment epithelium, adenoma, tumor-like hyperplasia, histology, immunohistochemistry, tumor, neoplasm, ultrasonography...

  16. Skin Pigmentation Kinetics after Exposure to Ultraviolet A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnbak, M.H.; Philipsen, P.A.; Wiegell, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Scandinavians and 12 Indians/Pakistanis after 6 and 12 exposures on the back using broadband UVA and UVA1 with equal sub-minimal melanogenic doses (individually predetermined). Pigmentation was measured by skin reflectance at 555 and 660 urn. The UV dose to minimal pigmentation was higher in dark......Multiple exposures to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are the norm in nature and phototherapy. However, studies of the kinetics of pigmentation following UVA exposure have included only fair-skinned persons. The aim of this study was to investigate steady-state pigmentation and fading in 12......-fold, respectively. The absolute increase in pigmentation was independent of pre-exposure pigmentation; therefore the percentage increase in pigmentation was higher in fair-skinned subjects. The absolute increase in pigmentation was higher and it took 2-3 days longer to reach steady-state after 12 UV exposures...

  17. Photoacclimation in microphytobenthos and the role of xanthophyll pigments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwe, Maria A.; Brotas, Vanda; Consalvey, Mireille; Forster, Rodney M.; Gillespie, David; Jesus, Bruno; Roggeveld, Jan; Gieskes, Winfried W. C.

    2008-01-01

    Estuarine microphytobenthos are frequently exposed to excessively high irradiances. Photoinhibition in microalgae is prevented by various photophysiological responses. We describe here the role of the xanthophyll pigments in photoacclimation. The pigment composition of the microphytobenthos was

  18. Photoaging of retinal pigment epithelial melanosomes: The effect of photobleaching on morphology and reactivity of the pigment granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadlo, Andrzej; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Sarna, Michal; Kozinska, Anna; Pilat, Anna; Kaczara, Patrycja; Sarna, Tadeusz

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of age-related changes in antioxidant and photoprotective properties of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) melanosomes, the effect of in vitro photoaging of bovine RPE melanosomes was examined employing an array of complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, saturation recovery EPR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to determine melanin content of control and photobleached melanosomes, and to monitor changes in their morphology. Methylene blue (MB), TEMPO choline, dysprosium(III) ions and singlet oxygen were employed as molecular probes to characterize the efficiency of control and photobleached melanosomes to interact with different reagents. EPR oximetry, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, iodometric assay of lipid hydroperoxides and time-resolved singlet oxygen phosphorescence were used to analyze the efficiency of photobleached and untreated melanosomes to inhibit MB-photosensitized oxidation of liposomal lipids. The obtained results revealed that, compared to untreated melanosomes, moderately photobleached melanosomes protected unsaturated lipids less efficiently against photosensitized peroxidiation, while weakly photobleached melanosomes were actually better antioxidant and photoprotective agents. The observed changes could be attributed to two effects - modification of the melanosome morphology and oxidative degradation of the melanin functional groups induced by different degree of photobleaching. While the former increases the accessibility of melanin nanoaggregates to reagents, the latter reduces the efficiency of melanin to interact with chemical and physical agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gingival pigmentation reduction: A novel therapeutic modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H V Mahesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the present clinical study was to compare the effectiveness of radiofrequency de-epithelialization and conventional (slicing method in reducing gingival pigmentation on long term basis by split mouth design. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 maxillary gingival units from 4 subjects aged between 15-30 years were considered for this clincal study and the selected gingival units were made plaque free and clinically healthy before subjectiing these sites to one of the procedures. The selected sites were abraded by either the conventional (slicing method (14 gingival units of 21, 22, 23, 24 or by radiofrequency (14 gingival units of 11, 12, 13, 14. After the procedure periodontal dressing was applied to protect the operated area. After 1 week periodontal dressing was removed and the area was irrigated with saline. Follow up examination was done on 30th, 60th and 90 th days to evaluate the recurrence of pigmentation, if any. Results: It was obsereved that, sites operated with conventional (slicing method, showed higher mean pigmentation than the sites treated with the radioablation during the follow up period of 90 days. Conclusion: When used judiciously, radiofrequency can be clinically valuable, safe and effective method to reduce pigmentation of gingiva.

  20. Gingival Pigmentation Reduction: A Novel Therapeutic Modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, H V; Harish, M R; Shashikumar, B M; Ramya, K S

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The objective of the present clinical study was to compare the effectiveness of radiofrequency de-epithelialization and conventional (slicing) method in reducing gingival pigmentation on long term basis by split mouth design. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 maxillary gingival units from 4 subjects aged between 15-30 years were considered for this clincal study and the selected gingival units were made plaque free and clinically healthy before subjectiing these sites to one of the procedures. The selected sites were abraded by either the conventional (slicing) method (14 gingival units of 21, 22, 23, 24) or by radiofrequency (14 gingival units of 11, 12, 13, 14). After the procedure periodontal dressing was applied to protect the operated area. After 1 week periodontal dressing was removed and the area was irrigated with saline. Follow up examination was done on 30th, 60th and 90th days to evaluate the recurrence of pigmentation, if any. Results: It was obsereved that, sites operated with conventional (slicing) method, showed higher mean pigmentation than the sites treated with the radioablation during the follow up period of 90 days. Conclusion: When used judiciously, radiofrequency can be clinically valuable, safe and effective method to reduce pigmentation of gingiva. PMID:23060709

  1. The mechanism of gingiva metallic pigmentations formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Joska, L.; Venclíková, Z.; Poddaná, M.; Benada, Oldřich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2009), s. 1-7 ISSN 1432-6981 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR9124 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : pigmentation * gingiva * electrochemistry Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.233, year: 2009

  2. Production of Monascus-like pigments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for producing one or more Monascus-like pigment composition from Penicillium species comprising: a) providing a cultivation medium comprising a high concentration of C-and N-sources and a high C/N molar ratio, b) adjusting pH to about 5 to 8, c) inoculati...

  3. Water permeability of pigmented waterborne coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkers, P.A.J.; Huinink, H.P.; Erich, S.J.F.; Reuvers, N.J.W.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Coatings are used in a variety of applications. Last decades more and more coating systems are transforming from solvent to waterborne coating systems. In this study the influence of pigments on the water permeability of a waterborne coating system is studied, with special interest in the possible

  4. Fluorescent pigment distinguishes between sibling snail species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Keiichi; Wiwegweaw, Amporn; Asami, Takahiro

    2008-12-01

    Traditional taxonomy of shell-bearing molluscs does not generally use soft-body coloration. However, the land snails Bradybaena pellucida and B. similaris have been distinguished only on the basis of the color of the soft-body visible through the shell. Thus, the taxonomic status of the two species has traditionally been questionable. We found that dense spots of pigments embedded in the dorsal mantle are responsible for the yellow coloration of B. pellucida . Similar spots in B. similaris are white and less densely aggregated in whorls further from the apex, and the brown color of the hepatopancreas is visible through the shell. The yellow pigments of B. pellucida seep out with mucus from the body in natural and laboratory conditions. The two species became externally indistinguishable after 30 days of laboratory feeding, because the yellow spots disappeared in B. pellucida and the color of the hepatopancreas changed from dark brown to pale brown in both species. Irradiation with ultraviolet A demonstrated that the yellow pigment of B. pellucida fluoresces. Adult specimens of the two species were distinct in penial microsculpture, with F(1) hybrids intermediate in form. Populations of the two species differed significantly in allelic frequencies at four allozyme loci. Therefore, B. pellucida and B. similaris are morphologically and genetically distinct. The fluorescent yellow pigment distinguishes B. pellucida from B. similaris under natural conditions despite its environmental dependence.

  5. INHERITANCE OF PIGMENTATION PATTERNS IN TALINUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biologia Plantarum42, 621-624. Maekawa, M. 1996. Recent information on anthocyanin pigmentation. Rice Genetics. Newsletter13, 25-26. Mustapha, Y. 2007. Inheritance of flower colour in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp). International Journal of Pure and Applied. Sciences1(1), 10-19. Nya, E.J. and Eka M.J. 2007.

  6. "Dry-column" chromatography of plant pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woeller, F. H.; Lehwalt, M. F.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    Separation of plant pigments which can be accomplished on thin-layer silica plates with mixture of petroleum ether, halocarbon, acetone, and polar solvent can be readily translated into dry-column technique that yields reproducible chromatograms after elution in fashion of liquid chromatography with fluorimeter as detector. Best solvent system was found to be mixture of petroleum ether, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethyl acetate.

  7. Renal cell carcinoma with melanin pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Jayaprakash; Chandrika; Laxman, Prabhu

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma has been steadily increasing. There are several morphological types of renal cell carcinoma. Recognizing histologic patterns of renal cell carcinoma is important for correct diagnosis and subsequent medical care for the patient. Melanotic tumors in the kidney are very rare. Here, we present an unusual case of renal cell carcinoma with melanin pigment. PMID:20877613

  8. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    formation of photo-electrons; this can cause a variety of chemical reactions leading to mutations. Upon irradiation, the cells begin to synthsise carotenoids and quantity of carotenoids produced depends on the intensity of UV radiation. Concerning UV effect on the photosynthetic pigments of plants and algae, some studies ...

  9. Flower pigment analysis of Melastoma malabathricum | Janna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study is to analyse the colour pigment, anthocyanin, that can be detected in flower and their stability in extracted form. All the analysed results will be used in the next study for the production of new food colouring material. From the observation, it shows that S3 flower developmental stage contains the ...

  10. New applications for polychromatic effect pigments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maile, F. J.; Filip, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 2 (2016), s. 35-38 ISSN 1468-1412 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02652S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : pigments * texture * appearance * effect * polychromatic Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/RO/filip-0458988.pdf

  11. Quantitative X-ray analysis of pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, M. Marrocos de

    1987-01-01

    The 'matrix-flushing' and the 'adiabatic principle' methods have been applied for the quantitative analysis through X-ray diffraction patterns of pigments and extenders mixtures, frequently used in paint industry. The results obtained have shown the usefulness of these methods, but still ask for improving their accuracy. (Author) [pt

  12. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result of bio-test, using the resulting pigment mutant of C. reinhardtii 124y-1 showed that mutagenic activity was observed significantly in both Tekeli River and Pavlodar Oil Refinery in Kazakhstan; the waste water of the Pavlodar Oil Refinery had high-toxicity while the water of the Tekeli River had medium-toxicity.

  13. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... genic pollution of the natural environment. Therefore, detection of mutagenic compounds in .... offers many advantages such as less pollution, simple operation and sterile cultivation condition ..... UV radiation on photothynsis and pigment composition of the alpine snow alga Chlamydomonas nivalis and the.

  14. Generation and characterization of pigment mutants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compared to the wild CC-124, these mutants are characterized by a decrease in chlorophyll a & b content and an increase in carotenoids. The lowest decrease in chlorophyll a was 3 to 4 folds, while the highest increase in carotenoids was 2 to 4 folds. The result of bio-test, using the resulting pigment mutant of C. reinhardtii ...

  15. Pigments produced by the bacteria belonging to the genus Arthrobacter

    OpenAIRE

    Sutthiwong , Nuthathai; Caro , Yanis; Fouillaud , Mireille; Laurent , Philippe; Valla , A.; Dufossé , Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Poster communication, 7th International Congress of Pigments in Food – New technologies towards health, through colors, Novara, Italy, June 18-21, 2013.; International audience; Since several decades, pigments have been used as a taxonomic tool for the identification and classification of bacteria. Nowadays, pigment producing microorganisms have been also widely interested in scientific disciplines because of their biotechnological potential. With the growing interest in microbial pigments be...

  16. Effect of zircon-based tricolor pigments on the color, microstructure, flexural strength and translucency of a novel dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun; Wang, Fu; Gao, Jing; Sun, Xiang; Deng, Zai-Xi; Wang, Hui; Jin, Lei; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of zircon-based tricolor pigments (praseodymium zircon yellow, ferrum zircon red, and vanadium zircon blue) on the color, thermal property, crystalline phase composition, microstructure, flexural strength, and translucency of a novel dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. The pigments were added to the glass frit, milled, pressed, and sintered. Ninety monochrome samples were prepared and the colors were analyzed. The effect of the pigments on thermal property, crystalline phase composition, and microstructure were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Addition of the pigments resulted in the acquisition of subtractive primary colors as well as tooth-like colors, and did not demonstrate significant effects on the thermal property, crystalline phase composition, microstructure, and flexural strength of the experimental glass-ceramic. Although significant differences (p zircon-based pigment colored ceramics, the translucencies of the latter were sufficient to fabricate dental restorations. These results indicate that the zircon-based tricolor pigments can be used with dental lithium disilicate glass-ceramic to produce abundant and predictable tooth-like colors without significant adverse effects, if mixed in the right proportions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Pigment patterns in adult fish result from superimposition of two largely independent pigmentation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceinos, Rosa M; Guillot, Raúl; Kelsh, Robert N; Cerdá-Reverter, José M; Rotllant, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Dorso-ventral pigment pattern differences are the most widespread pigmentary adaptations in vertebrates. In mammals, this pattern is controlled by regulating melanin chemistry in melanocytes using a protein, agouti-signalling peptide (ASIP). In fish, studies of pigment patterning have focused on stripe formation, identifying a core striping mechanism dependent upon interactions between different pigment cell types. In contrast, mechanisms driving the dorso-ventral countershading pattern have been overlooked. Here, we demonstrate that, in fact, zebrafish utilize two distinct adult pigment patterning mechanisms - an ancient dorso-ventral patterning mechanism, and a more recent striping mechanism based on cell-cell interactions; remarkably, the dorso-ventral patterning mechanism also utilizes ASIP. These two mechanisms function largely independently, with resultant patterns superimposed to give the full pattern. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Acute blue urticaria following subcutaneous injection of patent blue dye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, A; Vial-Dupuy, A; Lebrun-Vignes, B; Francès, C; Soria, A; Barete, S

    2015-11-01

    Patent blue (PB) is a lymphatic vessel dye commonly used in France for sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer, and less frequently in melanoma, and which may induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of acute blue urticaria occurring within minutes of PB injection. Ten minutes after PB injection for sentinel lymph node detection during breast cancer surgery, a 49-year-old woman developed generalised acute blue urticaria and eyelid angioedema without bronchospasm or haemodynamic disturbance, but requiring discontinuation of surgery. Skin testing using PB and the anaesthetics given were run 6 weeks after the episode and confirmed PB allergy. PB was formally contra-indicated. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to PB have been reported for between 0.24 and 2.2% of procedures. Such reactions are on occasion severe, chiefly involving anaphylactic shock. Two mechanisms are probably associated: non-specific histamine release and/or an IgE-mediated mechanism. Skin tests are helpful in confirming the diagnosis of PB allergy. Blue acute urticaria is one of the clinical manifestations of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to patent blue dye. Skin tests must be performed 6 weeks after the reaction in order to confirm the diagnosis and formally contra-indicate this substance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. 21 CFR 73.1350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.1350 Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a...-based pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable...

  20. 21 CFR 73.3128 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.3128 Section... pigments. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive is formed by depositing titanium or iron... pigments listed in paragraph (a) of this section may be used as a color additive in contact lenses in...

  1. 21 CFR 73.350 - Mica-based pearlescent pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mica-based pearlescent pigments. 73.350 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.350 Mica-based pearlescent pigments. (a... pearlescent pigments may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in...

  2. Effect of pigment concentration on fastness and color values of thermal and UV curable pigment printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysal, Gulcin; Kalav, Berdan; Karagüzel Kayaoğlu, Burçak

    2017-10-01

    In the current study, it is aimed to determine the effect of pigment concentration on fastness and colour values of thermal and ultraviolet (UV) curable pigment printing on synthetic leather. For this purpose, thermal curable solvent-based and UV curable water-based formulations were prepared with different pigment concentrations (3, 5 and 7%) separately and applied by screen printing technique using a screen printing machine. Samples printed with solvent-based formulations were thermally cured and samples printed with water-based formulations were cured using a UV curing machine equipped with gallium and mercury (Ga/Hg) lamps at room temperature. The crock fastness values of samples printed with solvent-based formulations showed that increase in pigment concentration was not effective on both dry and wet crock fastness values. On the other hand, in samples printed with UV curable water-based formulations, dry crock fastness was improved and evaluated as very good for all pigment concentrations. However, increasing the pigment concentration affected the wet crock fastness values adversely and lower values were observed. As the energy level increased for each irradiation source, the fastness values were improved. In comparison with samples printed with solvent-based formulations, samples printed with UV curable water-based formulations yielded higher K/S values at all pigment concentrations. The results suggested that, higher K/S values can be obtained in samples printed with UV curable water-based formulations at a lower pigment concentration compared to samples printed with solvent-based formulations.

  3. Blue and Red LED Illumination Improves Growth and Bioactive Compounds Contents in Acyanic and Cyanic Ocimum basilicum L. Microgreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobiuc, Andrei; Vasilache, Viorica; Pintilie, Olga; Stoleru, Toma; Burducea, Marian; Oroian, Mircea; Zamfirache, Maria-Magdalena

    2017-11-30

    Microgreens are an excellent source of health-maintaining compounds, and the accumulation of these compounds in plant tissues may be stimulated by exogenous stimuli. While light quality effects on green basil microgreens are known, the present paper aims at improving the quality of acyanic (green) and cyanic (red) basil microgreens with different ratios of LED blue and red illumination. Growth, assimilatory and anthocyanin pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence, total phenolic, flavonoids, selected phenolic acid contents and antioxidant activity were assessed in microgreens grown for 17 days. Growth of microgreens was enhanced with predominantly blue illumination, larger cotyledon area and higher fresh mass. The same treatment elevated chlorophyll a and anthocyanin pigments contents. Colored light treatments decreased chlorophyll fluorescence ΦPSII values significantly in the green cultivar. Stimulation of phenolic synthesis and free radical scavenging activity were improved by predominantly red light in the green cultivar (up to 1.87 fold) and by predominantly blue light in the red cultivar (up to 1.73 fold). Rosmarinic and gallic acid synthesis was higher (up to 15- and 4-fold, respectively, compared to white treatment) in predominantly blue illumination. Red and blue LED ratios can be tailored to induce superior growth and phenolic contents in both red and green basil microgreens, as a convenient tool for producing higher quality foods.

  4. Blue and Red LED Illumination Improves Growth and Bioactive Compounds Contents in Acyanic and Cyanic Ocimum basilicum L. Microgreens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Lobiuc

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Microgreens are an excellent source of health-maintaining compounds, and the accumulation of these compounds in plant tissues may be stimulated by exogenous stimuli. While light quality effects on green basil microgreens are known, the present paper aims at improving the quality of acyanic (green and cyanic (red basil microgreens with different ratios of LED blue and red illumination. Growth, assimilatory and anthocyanin pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence, total phenolic, flavonoids, selected phenolic acid contents and antioxidant activity were assessed in microgreens grown for 17 days. Growth of microgreens was enhanced with predominantly blue illumination, larger cotyledon area and higher fresh mass. The same treatment elevated chlorophyll a and anthocyanin pigments contents. Colored light treatments decreased chlorophyll fluorescence ΦPSII values significantly in the green cultivar. Stimulation of phenolic synthesis and free radical scavenging activity were improved by predominantly red light in the green cultivar (up to 1.87 fold and by predominantly blue light in the red cultivar (up to 1.73 fold. Rosmarinic and gallic acid synthesis was higher (up to 15- and 4-fold, respectively, compared to white treatment in predominantly blue illumination. Red and blue LED ratios can be tailored to induce superior growth and phenolic contents in both red and green basil microgreens, as a convenient tool for producing higher quality foods.

  5. Damage threshold in adult rabbit eyes after scleral cross-linking by riboflavin/blue light application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseli, Hans Peter; Körber, Nicole; Karl, Anett; Koch, Christian; Schuldt, Carsten; Penk, Anja; Liu, Qing; Huster, Daniel; Käs, Josef; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Francke, Mike

    2015-10-01

    Several scleral cross-linking (SXL) methods were suggested to increase the biomechanical stiffness of scleral tissue and therefore, to inhibit axial eye elongation in progressive myopia. In addition to scleral cross-linking and biomechanical effects caused by riboflavin and light irradiation such a treatment might induce tissue damage, dependent on the light intensity used. Therefore, we characterized the damage threshold and mechanical stiffening effect in rabbit eyes after application of riboflavin combined with various blue light intensities. Adult pigmented and albino rabbits were treated with riboflavin (0.5 %) and varying blue light (450 ± 50 nm) dosages from 18 to 780 J/cm(2) (15 to 650 mW/cm(2) for 20 min). Scleral, choroidal and retinal tissue alterations were detected by means of light microscopy, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Biomechanical changes were measured by shear rheology. Blue light dosages of 480 J/cm(2) (400 mW/cm(2)) and beyond induced pathological changes in ocular tissues; the damage threshold was defined by the light intensities which induced cellular degeneration and/or massive collagen structure changes. At such high dosages, we observed alterations of the collagen structure in scleral tissue, as well as pigment aggregation, internal hemorrhages, and collapsed blood vessels. Additionally, photoreceptor degenerations associated with microglia activation and macroglia cell reactivity in the retina were detected. These pathological alterations were locally restricted to the treated areas. Pigmentation of rabbit eyes did not change the damage threshold after a treatment with riboflavin and blue light but seems to influence the vulnerability for blue light irradiations. Increased biomechanical stiffness of scleral tissue could be achieved with blue light intensities below the characterized damage threshold. We conclude that riboflavin and blue light application increased the biomechanical stiffness of scleral tissue at

  6. UV-A/Blue-Light responses in algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Horst; Hermsmeier, Dieter

    1994-01-01

    All life on earth depends on light. A variety of photoreceptors capture the light for a wide range of reactions. Photosynthetic organisms absorb the light necessary for energy transformation and charge separation facilitating photosynthesis. In addition to the bulk pigments there is a great diversity of photoreceptors present in minute concentrations that control development, metabolism and orientation of plants and microorganisms. Based on its spectral absorbance, the well-studied phytochrome system acts in the RL (red light) region as well as in the UV-A/BL (blue light) region where the above mentioned reactions are mediated by a variety of photoreceptors whose natures are largely unknown. Phyllogenetically the UV-A/BL photoreceptors seem to be more ancient pigments that eventually were replaced by the phytochrome system. However, there are many reports that suggest a coaction between the UV-A/BL receptors and the phytochrome system. In several cases the UV-A/BL activation is the prerequisite for the phytochrome reaction. Historically it was the German botanist Julius Sachs who first discovered in 1864 that phototropism in plants was due to BL reactions. It took over 70 years until Bunning (1937) and Galston and Baker (1949) rediscovered the BL response. Since then, an ever-increasing attention has been paid to this effect. In this contribution, the general aspect of UV-A/BL responses and especially the responsiveness of algae will be covered.

  7. Wing-Pigments of Butterflies as Reviewed from the Systematic and Taxonomic Points of View

    OpenAIRE

    梅鉢, 幸重; Yoshishige, UMEBACHI; 金沢大学理学部生物学教室; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Kanazawa University

    1988-01-01

    Wing-pigments of butterflies are reviewed especially from the standpoint of distribution. The pigments include pteridine pigments, ommochromes, papiliochromes, tetrapyrrolic pigments, flavonoids, and others. Chemistry and biochemistry of these pigments are briefly described, and their distributions are described in detail, especially in the Pieridae, Papilionidae, Nymphalidae, and Satyridae. Interestingly, some pigments are characteristic of some taxonomic groups such as family, subsfamily, a...

  8. The synthesis, characterization and optical properties of Si4+ and Pr4+ doped Y6 MoO12 compounds: environmentally benign inorganic pigments with high NIR reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Giable; Reddy, M.L.P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Much interest has attended roofing materials with high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance, so that interiors stay cool, thereby reducing the demand for air conditioned buildings. The heat producing region of the infrared radiations ranges from 700-1100 nm. Replacing conventional pigments with 'cool pigments' that absorb less NIR radiation can provide coatings similar in color to that of conventional roofing materials, but with higher solar reflectance. NIR reflective pigments have been used in the military, construction, plastics and ink industries. Complex inorganic pigments based on mixed metal oxides (eg., chromium green, cobalt blue, cadmium stannate, lead chromate, cadmium yellow and chrome titanate yellow), which have been used in camouflage, absorb visible light but reflect the NIR portion of incident radiation. However, many of these pigments are toxic and there is a need to develop novel colored, NIR-reflecting inorganic pigments that are less hazardous to the environment. In this work, a series of NIR reflective colored pigments of formula Y 6-x M x MoO 12+δ (where M Si 4+ or Pr 4+ and x ranges from 0 to 1.0) were synthesized by traditional solid-state route and applied to asbestos cement roofing material so as to evaluate their use as 'cool pigments'. The phase purity of the calcined pigment samples were determined using powder X-ray diffraction. The diffuse reflectance of the powdered pigment samples were measured using a UV-Vis-NIR Spectrometer. The Lab color coordinates were evaluated by CIE 1976 color scale. Replacing Si 4+ for Y 3+ in Y 6 MoO 12 changed the color from light-yellow to dark-yellow and the band gap decreased from 2.60 to 2.45 eV due to O 2p -Mo 4d charge transfer transitions. In contrast, replacing Pr 4+ for Y 3+ changed the color from light yellow to dark brown and the band gap shifted from 2.60 to 1.90 eV. The coloring mechanism is based on the introduction of an additional 4f 1 electron energy level of Pr 4

  9. Introduction of a rod pigment aromatic cluster does not improve the structural stability of the human green cone pigment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbers, M.E.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Bovee-Geurts, P.H.M.; Grip, W.J. de

    2007-01-01

    In the course of our studies on the structure/function relationship of visual pigments, we have expressed the human green cone pigment in the baculovirus/insect cell expression system. Purification of the human green cone pigment, however, has so far proven to be severely hampered by the low thermal

  10. PIGMENT CONTENT AND COMPOSITION IN AUTOTROPHIC AND HETEROTROPHIC LEAF TISSUES OF AMARANTH SPECIES A. TRICOLOR L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Gins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present there is numerous evidence of the antioxidant positive role in the defensive reaction that is capable to protect not only plants, but also humans against oxidative stress. Plant pigments such as natural dyes from leaves, flowers and fruits are known to have high antioxidant activity. Amaranth species A. tricolor L. cultivar ‘Early Splendor’ is a convenient model for the comparative studying of the formation processes of differently colored pigment composition in leaf tissues that differs in the ability to photosynthesize. Leaves of amaranth cultivar ‘Valentina’ were as a standard. The aim of the experiment was a comparative studying of the pigments content: amaranthine, chlorophyll a and b, carotenoids in the cauline leaves of amaranth cultivars ‘Valentina’ and ‘Early Splendor’, as well as in the red and green areas of the leaves. Analysis of the aqueous extract of red Early Splendor amaranth apical leaves showed the presence of betacyanin pigment - amaranthine, in the absorption spectrum in which peak was seen in the green region at 540 nm. In addition to the antioxidant amaranthine there are  also antioxidants which might be phenolic glycosides, and ascorbic acid in the extract, the total content of which is almost twice as small as in the leaves of amaranth cauline of this cultivar. Yellow fraction was found in the ethanolic extract of red leaves. Its absorption spectrum had peaks in the blue region at 445 nm and 472 nm and a shoulder at 422 nm that indicated the presence of betaxanthin, betalamic acid or carotenoids. Water-soluble antioxidants - amaranthine and ascorbic acid were found in  auline leaves of studied species. Their content in the leaves of Valentina cultivar was higher than in the leaves of cultivar ‘Early Splendor’, and the maximum level of photosynthetic pigments was found in ‘Early Splendor’ leaves. The obtained results showed that the amaranth is a promising source of pigments with the

  11. Bacterial communities in pigmented biofilms formed on the sandstone bas-relief walls of the Bayon Temple, Angkor Thom, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumi, Asako; Li, Xianshu; Osuga, Yu; Kawashima, Arata; Gu, Ji-Dong; Nasu, Masao; Katayama, Yoko

    2013-01-01

    The Bayon temple in Angkor Thom, Cambodia has shown serious deterioration and is subject to the formation of various pigmented biofilms. Because biofilms are damaging the bas-reliefs, low reliefs engraved on the surface of sandstone, information about the microbial community within them is indispensable to control biofilm colonization. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of biofilm samples from the pigmented sandstone surfaces showed that the bacterial community members in the biofilms differed clearly from those in the air and had low sequence similarity to database sequences. Non-destructive sampling of biofilm revealed novel bacterial groups of predominantly Rubrobacter in salmon pink biofilm, Cyanobacteria in chrome green biofilm, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in signal violet biofilm, Chloroflexi in black gray biofilm, and Deinococcus-Thermus, Cyanobacteria, and Rubrobacter in blue green biofilm. Serial peeling-off of a thick biofilm by layers with adhesive sheets revealed a stratified structure: the blue-green biofilm, around which there was serious deterioration, was very rich in Cyanobacteria near the surface and Chloroflexi in deep layer below. Nitrate ion concentrations were high in the blue-green biofilm. The characteristic distribution of bacteria at different biofilm depths provides valuable information on not only the biofilm formation process but also the sandstone weathering process in the tropics.

  12. Pigment Pattern Formation in the Guppy, Poecilia reticulata, Involves the Kita and Csf1ra Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Verena A.; Fadeev, Andrey; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Males of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) vary tremendously in their ornamental patterns, which are thought to have evolved in response to a complex interplay between natural and sexual selection. Although the selection pressures acting on the color patterns of the guppy have been extensively studied, little is known about the genes that control their ontogeny. Over 50 years ago, two autosomal color loci, blue and golden, were described, both of which play a decisive role in the formation of the guppy color pattern. Orange pigmentation is absent in the skin of guppies with a lesion in blue, suggesting a defect in xanthophore development. In golden mutants, the development of the melanophore pattern during embryogenesis and after birth is affected. Here, we show that blue and golden correspond to guppy orthologs of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor a (csf1ra; previously called fms) and kita. Most excitingly, we found that both genes are required for the development of the black ornaments of guppy males, which in the case of csf1ra might be mediated by xanthophore–melanophore interactions. Furthermore, we provide evidence that two temporally and genetically distinct melanophore populations contribute to the adult camouflage pattern expressed in both sexes: one early appearing and kita-dependent and the other late-developing and kita-independent. The identification of csf1ra and kita mutants provides the first molecular insights into pigment pattern formation in this important model species for ecological and evolutionary genetics. PMID:23666934

  13. Blue-emitting laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Ishibashi, A.

    This paper reviews the recent results of blue-emitting laser diodes. These devices are based on ZnMgSSe alloy II-VI semiconductors. Recently we have achieved room temperature continuous-wave operation of ZnMgSSe blue lasers for the first time. ZnMgSSe alloys offer a wide range of band-gap energy from 2.8 to 4.5 eV, while maintaining lattice matching to GaAs substrates. These characteristics make ZnMgSSe suitable for cladding layers of blue lasers. In this article, the feasibilities of ZnMgSSe will be reviewed. The laser structures and characteristics will be also mentioned.

  14. Prevalence and clinical features of pigmented oral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassona, Yazan; Sawair, Faleh; Al-Karadsheh, Omar; Scully, Crispian

    2016-09-01

    To examine the relative prevalence, types, and clinical features of pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa in 1275 patients attending a university hospital for dental care. Patients attending dental clinics at The University of Jordan Hospital over a 1-year period were examined for the presence of oral pigmentations. Histopathological examination was performed on focally pigmented lesions with a suspicious or uncertain clinical diagnosis. A total of 386 (30.2%) patients were found to have oral pigmentations. Of these, racial pigmentation (39.9%) and smokers' melanosis (32.9%) were the most common causes of oral pigmentations. Other causes included amalgam tattoo (18.9%), focal melanotic macules (5.7%), postinflammatory pigmentation (1.6%), pigmentation due to medications or systemic disease (0.52%), heavy metal deposits (0.26%), and oral nevus (0.26%). Gingivae and buccal mucosae were the most common sites for oral pigmentations. Pigmentations of the oral mucosa are common. Gingivae and buccal mucosae are the most common sites for oral pigmentations. Proper history and recognition of clinical features are important for effective management. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. The effect of blue light on periodontal biofilm growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Carla R; Song, Xiaoqing; Polymeri, Angeliki; Goodson, J Max; Wang, Xiaoshan; Soukos, Nikolaos S

    2015-11-01

    We have previously shown that blue light eliminates the black-pigmented oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella melaninogenica. In the present study, the in vitro photosensitivity of the above black-pigmented microorganisms and four Fusobacteria species (Fusobacterium nucleatum ss. nucleatum, F. nucleatum ss. vincentii, F. nucleatum ss. polymorphum, Fusobacterium periodonticum) was investigated in pure cultures and human dental plaque suspensions. We also tested the hypothesis that phototargeting the above eight key periodontopathogens in plaque-derived biofilms in vitro would control growth within the dental biofilm environment. Cultures of the eight bacteria were exposed to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 80 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 4.8 J/cm2. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of bacteria was performed to demonstrate the presence and amounts of porphyrin molecules within microorganisms. Suspensions of human dental plaque bacteria were also exposed once to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 50 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 12 J/cm2. Microbial biofilms developed from the same plaque were exposed to 455 nm blue light at 50 mW/cm2 once daily for 4 min (12 J/cm2) over a period of 3 days (4 exposures) in order to investigate the cumulative action of phototherapy on the eight photosensitive pathogens as well as on biofilm growth. Bacterial growth was evaluated using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. The selective phototargeting of pathogens was studied using whole genomic probes in the checkerboard DNA-DNA format. In cultures, all eight species showed significant growth reduction (p blue light treatment suppressed biofilm growth in vitro. This may introduce a new avenue of prophylactic treatment for periodontal diseases.

  16. Comparative study on the incidence and outcomes of pigmented versus non pigmented keratomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Sengupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the incidence, outcomes and establish factors determining visual prognosis of keratomycosis due to pigmented fungi in comparison with nonpigmented fungi. Materials and Methods: All culture-proven cases of fungal keratitis from January 2006 to August 2008 were drawn from a computerized database and cases with adequate documentation were analyzed for predisposing factors, clinical characteristics, microbiology and treatment methods. Outcomes of keratitis due to pigmented and nonpigmented fungi were compared using t-test and χ2 test. Results: Of 373 cases of keratomycosis during the study period, pigmented fungi were etiological agents in 117 eyes (31.3% and nonpigmented fungi in 256 eyes (68.7%. Eyes with nonpigmented keratitis had significantly larger ulcers (14.96 mm 2 and poorer vision (1.42 logMAR at presentation compared to those with keratomycosis due to pigmented fungi (P=0.01. The characteristic macroscopic pigmentation was seen in only 14.5% in the pigmented keratitis group. Both groups responded favorably to medical therapy (78.1% vs. 69.1% with scar formation (P=0.32 and showed a significant improvement in mean visual acuity compared with that at presentation (P<0.01. Visual improvement in terms of line gainers and losers in the subgroup of eyes that experienced healing was also similar. Location of the ulcer was the only factor that had significant predictive value for visual outcome (P=0.021. Conclusion: Incidence of keratomycosis due to pigmented fungi may be increasing as compared to previous data. These eyes have similar response to medical therapy and similar visual outcome compared to nonpigmented keratitis. Central ulcers have a poor visual outcome.

  17. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Smith, David C.; King, Christopher N.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  18. Opsins in onychophora (velvet worms) suggest a single origin and subsequent diversification of visual pigments in arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Lars; Henze, Miriam J; Kohler, Martin; Kelber, Almut; Bleidorn, Christoph; Leschke, Maren; Nickel, Birgit; Meyer, Matthias; Kircher, Martin; Sunnucks, Paul; Mayer, Georg

    2012-11-01

    Multiple visual pigments, prerequisites for color vision, are found in arthropods, but the evolutionary origin of their diversity remains obscure. In this study, we explore the opsin genes in five distantly related species of Onychophora, using deep transcriptome sequencing and screening approaches. Surprisingly, our data reveal the presence of only one opsin gene (onychopsin) in each onychophoran species, and our behavioral experiments indicate a maximum sensitivity of onychopsin to blue-green light. In our phylogenetic analyses, the onychopsins represent the sister group to the monophyletic clade of visual r-opsins of arthropods. These results concur with phylogenomic support for the sister-group status of the Onychophora and Arthropoda and provide evidence for monochromatic vision in velvet worms and in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda. We conclude that the diversification of visual pigments and color vision evolved in arthropods, along with the evolution of compound eyes-one of the most sophisticated visual systems known.

  19. Expression and activity analysis reveal that heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 is associated with blue egg formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z P; Liu, R F; Wang, A R; Li, J Y; Deng, X M

    2011-04-01

    Biliverdin is responsible for the coloration of blue eggs and is secreted onto the eggshell by the shell gland. Previous studies confirmed that a significant difference exists in biliverdin content between blue eggs and brown eggs, although the reasons are still unknown. Because the pigment is derived from oxidative degradation of heme catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO), this study compared heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 (HMOX1), the gene encoding HO expression and HO activity, in the shell glands of the Dongxiang blue-shelled chicken (n = 12) and the Dongxiang brown-shelled chicken (n = 12). Results showed that HMOX1 was highly expressed at the mRNA (1.58-fold; P 0.05). Taken together, these results show that blue egg formation is associated with high expression of HMOX1 in the shell gland of Dongxiang blue-shelled chickens, and suggest that differential expression of HMOX1 in the 2 groups of chickens is most likely to arise from an alteration in the trans-acting factor.

  20. Effect of vital dyes on retinal pigmented epithelial cell viability and apoptosis: implications for chromovitrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penha, Fernando M; Pons, Marianne; Costa, Elaine Fiod; Rodrigues, Eduardo B.; Maia, Mauricio; Marin-Castaño, Maria E; Farah, Michel Eid

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate in vitro effect of vital dyes on toxicity and apoptosis in a human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line. Methods ARPE-19 cells were exposed to brilliant blue-BriB, evans blue-EB, bromophenol blue-BroB, indocyanine green-ICG, infracyanine green-IfCG, light green-LG, fast green-FG, indigo carmine-IC and congo red-CR. BSS was used as the control. Five different concentrations and two times were tested. Cell viability was determined by MTS assay and apoptosis by Bax expression on western blot. Results All dyes significantly reduced cell viability after 3 minutes of exposure at all concentrations (pdyes exposure, except BriB; ICG had the highest Bax expression (pdye was BriB followed by LG, IfCG, FG, CR, IC, BroB, RB and ICG. ICG was toxic at all concentrations and exposure times tested. Moreover, BriB was the only dye that did not induce apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells. PMID:24022718

  1. Animal pigment bilirubin discovered in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirone, Cary; Quirke, J Martin E; Priestap, Horacio A; Lee, David W

    2009-03-04

    The bile pigment bilirubin-IXalpha is the degradative product of heme, distributed among mammals and some other vertebrates. It can be recognized as the pigment responsible for the yellow color of jaundice and healing bruises. In this paper we present the first example of the isolation of bilirubin in plants. The compound was isolated from the brilliant orange-colored arils of Strelitzia nicolai, the white bird of paradise tree, and characterized by HPLC-ESMS, UV-visible, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as comparison with an authentic standard. This discovery indicates that plant cyclic tetrapyrroles may undergo degradation by a previously unknown pathway. Preliminary analyses of related plants, including S. reginae, the bird of paradise, also revealed bilirubin in the arils and flowers, indicating that the occurrence of bilirubin is not limited to a single species or tissue type.

  2. UVR: sun, lamps, pigmentation and vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, C M; Philipsen, P A; Wulf, H C

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has important and significant consequences on human health. Recently, there has been renewed interest in the beneficial effects of UVR. This perspective gives an introduction to the solar spectrum, UV lamps, UV dosimetry, skin pigment and vitamin D. The hea......Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has important and significant consequences on human health. Recently, there has been renewed interest in the beneficial effects of UVR. This perspective gives an introduction to the solar spectrum, UV lamps, UV dosimetry, skin pigment and vitamin D....... The health benefits of UVR exposure through vitamin D production or non-vitamin D pathways will be discussed in this themed issue in the following articles....

  3. Iris color and intraocular pressure: the Blue Mountains Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert; Rochtchina, Elena; Lee, Anne; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul

    2003-03-01

    To assess the relationship between iris color and intraocular pressure (IOP). Population-based, cross-sectional study. The Blue Mountains Eye Study examined 3,654 largely Caucasian participants, aged 49 to 97 years, from 1992 to 1994. Information was collected about glaucoma risk factors, and Goldmann applanation IOP measurements were taken. Iris color was assessed by comparing the undilated appearance of each eye with three standard photographs. Participants who had previous cataract or glaucoma surgery and those using glaucoma medications were excluded. Mean IOP measurements increased with increasing grades of iris pigmentation. After simultaneous adjustment for variables associated with IOP, mean measurements were 15.92 mm Hg for blue iris color, 16.04 mm Hg for hazel or green, 16.11 mm Hg for tan-brown, and 16.49 mm Hg for dark brown (P for trend = .001). This study demonstrates a modest but statistically significant association between increasing iris color and IOP. Copyright 2003 by Elsevier Science Inc.

  4. Sequences associated with human iris pigmentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Frudakis, Tony; Thomas, Matthew; Gaskin, Zach; Venkateswarlu, K; Chandra, K Suresh; Ginjupalli, Siva; Gunturi, Sitaram; Natrajan, Sivamani; Ponnuswamy, Viswanathan K; Ponnuswamy, K N

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether and how common polymorphisms are associated with natural distributions of iris colors, we surveyed 851 individuals of mainly European descent at 335 SNP loci in 13 pigmentation genes and 419 other SNPs distributed throughout the genome and known or thought to be informative for certain elements of population structure. We identified numerous SNPs, haplotypes, and diplotypes (diploid pairs of haplotypes) within the OCA2, MYO5A, TYRP1, AIM, DCT, and TYR genes and the CYP1A2...

  5. The analysis of pigments on rock surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fankhauser, B.; O'Connor, S.; Pittelkow, Y.

    1997-01-01

    A limestone slab of roof fall coated with a red pigment was recovered from a Rockshelter in the Napier Ranges of the Kimberley region, Western Australia. Next to the roof fall fragment in the same stratigraphic layer was a piece of ochre. Three questions were presented: (1) is the red substance an ochre? (2) is the piece of ochre identical to the red substance on the roof fall? and (3) are the layers of pigment on the top and bottom of the limestone slab the same? In addition, as an extension from these questions, a general method was developed for the in situ analysis of ochre pigments on substrates to determine likely compositions and ochre sources. The analysis of the red pigment presented an analytical problem because the substance was intimately associated with the rock slab and therefore the analysis had to be done in situ. Not only was the red layer thin, but on a micro level it was uneven. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) penetrated the red layer, simultaneously analysing this layer and the rock substrate to different degrees depending upon the thickness of the red layer. Determining if the substance was actually ochre involved a comparison of elemental analyses between the background (slab) and background with red coating. Coatings of other ochres with known elemental concentrations on the same limestone background gave a comparison of the effect of simultaneously analysing a thin layer and background with different compositions. Three graphical methods useful for insitu analysis are demeonstrated. The find dates (around 40,000 BP) add to a growing body of data in support of the widespread use of ochre accompanying the earliest documented use of widely separated and environmentally diverse regions of Australia by Aboriginal people

  6. The gecko visual pigment: a pH indicator with a salt effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescitelli, F

    1981-12-01

    1. Unlike rhodopsin, the extracted 521-pigment of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) is pH-sensitive and changes its spectral absorbance in the pH range of 4.5-7.3. The colour change is reversible and pH can be employed to adjust the spectral maximum anywhere between 490 nm and its native location at 521 nm.2. The hypsochromic shift with increasing acidity is opposite to that expected for the protonation of the Schiff base nitrogen and suggests an action on the secondary system of interacting charges that have long been postulated to adjust vertebrate visual pigment colour within the visible spectrum.3. Chloride ions modulate this pH effect in a systematic and significant manner. For the pigment extracted in the chloride-deficient state the colour change occurs in the pH range of 6.0-7.0, the midpoint being close to 6.5, suggesting the possible participation of the imidazole group of histidine as the functional moiety. With added NaCl the colour shifts to the region below pH 6.2.4. The modulating action of chloride is postulated to be a conformational change of the opsin leading to a shift of the secondary interacting site from one functional group to another or else to a change in pK of a single group due to the conformational alteration of the electrostatics of the system.5. At pH values between 7.5 and 9.0 a different mechanism becomes apparent. In this region a decrease occurs in the photopigment density as well as a shift in absorbance toward the blue. This alkaline effect is readily reversed either by adding NaCl or else by lowering the pH. Along with the other protective effects of chloride these ions serve to reduce or prevent this alkaline loss in density.6. Associated with this reversible photopigment loss is a reversible appearance of a product with a maximum at about 366 nm. The spectrum of this product is like that produced by the addition of 11-cis retinal to the extract. Acidification of the alkaline preparation leads to a restitution of the photopigment

  7. Effect of light quality on the accumulation of photosynthetic pigments, proteins and mycosporine-like amino acids in the red alga Porphyra leucosticta (Bangiales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbee, Nathalie; Figueroa, Félix L; Aguilera, José

    2005-08-01

    The effect of different light qualities (white, blue, green, yellow and red light) on photosynthesis, measured as chlorophyll fluorescence, and the accumulation of photosynthetic pigments, proteins and the UV-absorbing mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) was studied in the red alga Porphyra leucosticta. Blue light promoted the highest accumulation of nitrogen metabolism derived compounds i.e., MAAs, phycoerythrin and proteins in previously N-starved algae after seven days culture in ammonium enriched medium. Similar results were observed in the culture under white light. In contrast, the lowest photosynthetic capacity i.e., lowest electron transport rate and lowest photosynthetic efficiency as well as the growth rate were found under blue light, while higher values were found in red and white lights. Blue light favored the accumulation of the MAAs porphyra-334, palythine and asterina-330 in P. leucosticta. However, white, green, yellow and red lights favored the accumulation of shinorine. The increase of porphyra-334, palythine and asterina-330 occurred in blue light simultaneous to a decrease in shinorine. The accumulation of MAAs and other nitrogenous compounds in P. leucosticta under blue light could not be attributed to photosynthesis and the action of a non-photosynthetic blue light photoreceptor is suggested. A non-photosynthetic photoreceptor could be also involved in the MAAs interconversion pathways in P. leucosticta.

  8. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  9. Tetrapyrrole pigments in the geologic record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louda, J.W.; Baker, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is a synthesis of our ongoing studies on the fossilization of biotic tetrapyrrole pigments and is directed at revealing the utility of such study in assessing pre-, syn- and post-depositional processes. Diagenesis is found to become fated during oxic or anoxic deposition as to pigment destruction or fossilization, respectively. The progress of organic maturation has been followed in suited of oceanic sediments as well as shales and petroleum crudes from various basins in the US and Canada. Early catagenesis is witnessed by the release (ex kerogen.) of large quantities, re bitumen, of C28 to C34 V=O porphyrins. As catagenesis continues pigment concentration decreases, due to dilution, and higher C number porphyrins (C34-C45+) are added. Once the source is depleted or divorced from the bitumen, maturation leads to dealkylation which ends in the destruction of all tetrapyrrole structure. These changes are in concert with a shift from DPEP to ETIO dominance and parallel overall organic maturation in strict fashions. Organic source and paleoenvironment may also be addressed through porphyrin studies. Patterns of tetrapyrroles can differentiate the more allochthonous nature of black shale OM in the N. Atlantic from the autochthonous materials in these sequences in the margins of N.W. Africa and the S. Atlantic (high yield, DPEP).

  10. Treatment of gingival pigmentation : A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Deepak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A smile expresses a feeling of joy, success, sensuality, affection and courtesy, and reveals self confidence and kindness. The harmony of the smile is determined not only by the shape, the position and the color of the teeth but also by the gingival tissues. Gingival health and appearance are essential components of an attractive smile. Gingival pigmentation results from melanin granules, which are produced by melanoblasts. The degree of pigmentation depends on melanoblastic activity. Although melanin pigmentation of the gingiva is completely benign and does not present a medical problem, complaints of ′black gums′ are common particularly in patients having a very high smile line (gummy smile. For depigmentation of gingiva different treatment modalities have been reported like- Bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap, cryotherapy, electrosurgery and laser. In the present case series bur abrasion, scraping, partial thickness flap (epithelial excision cryotherapy and electrosurgery have been tried for depigmentation, which are simple, effective and yield good results, along with good patient satisfaction. The problems encountered with some of these techniques have also been discussed.

  11. The Blue Revolution in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponte, Stefano; Kelling, Ingrid; Jespersen, Karen Sau

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine the upgrading trajectories of selected aquaculture value chains in four Asian countries and the links between upgrading and three factors of value chain governance: coordination mechanisms; types of drivers; and domestic regulation. We find instances of improving produ...... of upgrading the "blue revolution" in Asia...

  12. Blue Ocean vs. Five Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Burke (Andrew); A.J. van Stel (André); A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe article reports on the authors' research in the Netherlands which focused on a profit model in Dutch retail stores and a so-called blue-ocean approach which requires a new market that attracts consumers and increases profits. Topics include the competitive strategy approach to

  13. Mobilizing investors for blue growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van den Sander W.K.; Stuiver, Marian; Bolman, Bas C.; Wijnen, Roland; Selnes, Trond; Dalton, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    The European Union's Blue Growth Strategy is a long term strategy to support sustainable growth in the marine and maritime sectors, aiming to contribute to innovation and economic growth (European Commission, 2012). The EU sees the financial sector as a key partner to bring about transition to

  14. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations. (paper)

  15. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  16. Pickering emulsions stabilized by coloured organic pigment particles† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc03085h Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusanya, Samuel O.

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of stabilizing emulsions of water and non-polar alkane with pure, coloured organic pigment particles is explored. Seven pigment types each possessing a primary colour of the rainbow were selected. Their solubility in water or heptane was determined using a spectrophotometric method and their surface energies were derived from the contact angles of probe liquids on compressed disks of the particles. As expected, most of the pigments are relatively hydrophobic but pigment orange is quite hydrophilic. At equal volumes of oil and water, preferred emulsions were water-in-oil (w/o) for six pigment types and oil-in-water (o/w) for pigment orange. The emulsion type is in line with calculated contact angles of the particles at the oil–water interface being either side of 90°. Their stability to coalescence increases with particle concentration. Emulsions are shown to undergo limited coalescence from which the coverage of drop interfaces by particles has been determined. In a few cases, close-packed primary particles are visible around emulsion droplets. At constant particle concentration, the influence of the volume fraction of water (φ w) on emulsions was also studied. For the most hydrophilic pigment orange, emulsions are o/w at all φ w, whereas they are w/o for the most hydrophobic pigments (red, yellow, green and blue). For pigments of intermediate hydrophobicity however (indigo and violet), catastrophic phase inversion becomes possible with emulsions inverting from w/o to o/w upon increasing φ w. For the first time, we link the pigment surface energy to the propensity of emulsions to phase invert transitionally or catastrophically. PMID:28626551

  17. Interaction between Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaf pigment and rice proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Xu, Yuan; Zhou, Sumei; Qian, Haifeng; Zhang, Hui; Qi, Xiguang; Fan, Meihua

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the interaction of Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaf (VBTL) pigment and rice proteins. In the presence of rice protein, VBTL pigment antioxidant activity and free polyphenol content decreased by 67.19% and 68.11%, respectively, and L(∗) of the protein-pigment complex decreased significantly over time. L(∗) values of albumin, globulin and glutelin during 60-min pigment exposure decreased by 55.00, 57.14, and 54.30%, respectively, indicating that these proteins had bound to the pigment. A significant difference in protein surface hydrophobicity was observed between rice proteins and pigment-protein complexes, indicating that hydrophobic interaction is a major binding mechanism between VBTL pigment and rice proteins. A significant difference in secondary structures between proteins and protein-pigment complexes was also uncovered, indicating that hydrogen bonding may be another mode of interaction between VBTL pigment and rice proteins. Our results indicate that VBTL pigment can stain rice proteins with hydrophobic and hydrogen interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pigment identification on "Pietà" of Barletta, example of Renaissance Apulian sculpture: a Raman microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, D; Catalano, I M; Monno, A

    2006-08-01

    A study of the original painting layer of the "Pietà" of Barletta, a polychrome statue, important example of Renaissance Apulian sculpture, was performed by mu-Raman spectroscopy. Vermilion was identified in the original layer of the blood drops on Jesus knee. Lazurite was identified as the original blue pigment on Our Lady's veil and lace, currently a yellow ochre-like color. The use of lazurite demonstrates the historical-artistic importance of this polychrome statue, and supports the hypothesis that this artwork was probably commissioned by Our Lady's devotees to itinerant artists inspired by the more precious Vesperbilder model.

  19. Origins of adult pigmentation: diversity in pigment stem cell lineages and implications for pattern evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parichy, David M; Spiewak, Jessica E

    2015-01-01

    Teleosts comprise about half of all vertebrate species and exhibit an extraordinary diversity of adult pigment patterns that function in shoaling, camouflage, and mate choice and have played important roles in speciation. Here, we review studies that have identified several distinct neural crest lineages, with distinct genetic requirements, that give rise to adult pigment cells in fishes. These lineages include post-embryonic, peripheral nerve-associated stem cells that generate black melanophores and iridescent iridophores, cells derived directly from embryonic neural crest cells that generate yellow-orange xanthophores, and bipotent stem cells that generate both melanophores and xanthophores. This complexity in adult chromatophore lineages has implications for our understanding of adult traits, melanoma, and the evolutionary diversification of pigment cell lineages and patterns. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Blue Diatoms: Global Phenomenon of ˝Greening˝ in Shellfish and Record of Planktonic Haslea Species in the South Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Mejdandžić

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are unicellular, photoautotrophic eukaryotic microorganisms, often forming colonies and can be found in most aquatic and moist terrestrial habitats. All known diatoms today have specific golden-brown pigment fucoxanthin that masks chlorophylls in diatom plastid, but one genus represents an exception, having the additional specific pigment marennine due to whom the cells appear blue. Blue diatoms from genus Haslea cause a global phenomenon of ˝greening˝ in shellfish (mostly oysters affecting them in both positive and negative ways. In this study, historical and recent review regarding blue diatoms and physiological and behavioural effect of marennine as well as challenges in shellfish farming from diatom perspective is addressed. This study is also a first record of blue Haslea diatom in the South Adriatic Sea during BIOTA (Bio-tracing Adriatic Water Masses cruise in March 2016. Investigated blue diatom was cultured in laboratory and morphologically analysed with light microscopy. Diatom investigations are very important for better understanding of the ecology of specific marine area, but also for the economy, aquaculture and tourism. The emergence of green coloured flesh of shellfish in the Adriatic Sea has not been recorded yet, but this finding of the blue diatom from genus Haslea does not rule out this possibility in the future.

  1. Ozone Sensitivity and Catalase Activity in Pigmented and Non-Pigmented Strains of Serratia Marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ondarza, José

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ozone exposure rapidly leads to bacterial death, making ozone an effective disinfectant in food industry and health care arena. However, microbial defenses may moderate this effect and play a role in the effective use of oxidizing agents for disinfection. Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen, expressing genes differentially during infection of a human host. A better understanding of regulatory systems that control expression of Serratia’s virulence genes and defenses is therefore valuable. Objective: Here, we investigated the role of pigmentation and catalase in Serratia marcescens on survival to ozone exposure. Method: Pigmented and non-pigmented strains of Serratia marcescens were cultured to exponential or stationary phase and exposed to 5 ppm of gaseous ozone for 2.5 – 10 minutes. Survival was calculated via plate counts. Catalase activity was measured photometrically and tolerance to hydrogen peroxide was assayed by disk-diffusion. Results: Exposure of S. marcescens to 5 ppm gaseous ozone kills > 90% of cells within 10 minutes in a time and concentration-dependent manner. Although pigmented Serratia (grown at 28°C) survived ozonation better than unpigmented Serratia (grown at 35°C), non-pigmented mutant strains of Serratia had similar ozone survival rates, catalase activity and H2O2 tolerance as wild type strains. Rather, ozone survival and catalase activity were elevated in 6 hour cultures compared to 48 hour cultures. Conclusion: Our studies did not bear out a role for prodigiosin in ozone survival. Rather, induction of oxidative stress responses during exponential growth increased both catalase activity and ozone survival in both pigmented and unpigmented S. marcescens. PMID:28567147

  2. Carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium requires Ca2+ and calcineurin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Dana M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inside bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus retinal pigment epithelial cells, pigment granules move in response to extracellular signals. During the process of aggregation, pigment motility is directed toward the cell nucleus; in dispersion, pigment is directed away from the nucleus and into long apical processes. A number of different chemicals have been found to initiate dispersion, and carbachol (an acetylcholine analog is one example. Previous research indicates that the carbachol-receptor interaction activates a Gq-mediated pathway which is commonly linked to Ca2+ mobilization. The purpose of the present study was to test for involvement of calcium and to probe calcium-dependent mediators to reveal their role in carbachol-mediated dispersion. Results Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion was blocked by the calcium chelator BAPTA. In contrast, the calcium channel antagonist verapamil, and incubation in Ca2+-free medium failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion. The calcineurin inhibitor cypermethrin blocked carbachol-induced dispersion; whereas, two protein kinase C inhibitors (staurosporine and bisindolylmaleimide II failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusion A rise in intracellular calcium is necessary for carbachol-induced dispersion; however, the Ca2+ requirement is not dependent on extracellular sources, implying that intracellular stores are sufficient to enable pigment granule dispersion to occur. Calcineurin is a likely Ca2+-dependent mediator involved in the signal cascade. Although the pathway leads to the generation of diacylglycerol and calcium (both required for the activation of certain PKC isoforms, our evidence does not support a significant role for PKC.

  3. Ozone Sensitivity and Catalase Activity in Pigmented and Non-Pigmented Strains of Serratia Marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ondarza, José

    2017-01-01

    Ozone exposure rapidly leads to bacterial death, making ozone an effective disinfectant in food industry and health care arena. However, microbial defenses may moderate this effect and play a role in the effective use of oxidizing agents for disinfection. Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen, expressing genes differentially during infection of a human host. A better understanding of regulatory systems that control expression of Serratia 's virulence genes and defenses is therefore valuable. Here, we investigated the role of pigmentation and catalase in Serratia marcescens on survival to ozone exposure. Pigmented and non-pigmented strains of Serratia marcescens were cultured to exponential or stationary phase and exposed to 5 ppm of gaseous ozone for 2.5 - 10 minutes. Survival was calculated via plate counts. Catalase activity was measured photometrically and tolerance to hydrogen peroxide was assayed by disk-diffusion. Exposure of S. marcescens to 5 ppm gaseous ozone kills > 90% of cells within 10 minutes in a time and concentration-dependent manner. Although pigmented Serratia (grown at 28°C) survived ozonation better than unpigmented Serratia (grown at 35°C), non-pigmented mutant strains of Serratia had similar ozone survival rates, catalase activity and H 2 O 2 tolerance as wild type strains. Rather, ozone survival and catalase activity were elevated in 6 hour cultures compared to 48 hour cultures. Our studies did not bear out a role for prodigiosin in ozone survival. Rather, induction of oxidative stress responses during exponential growth increased both catalase activity and ozone survival in both pigmented and unpigmented S. marcescens .

  4. Effects of Light Intensity and Color on the Biomass, Extracellular Red Pigment, and Citrinin Production of Monascus ruber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liling; Dai, Yang; Chen, Wanping; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2016-12-21

    Light is a crucial environmental signal for fungi. In this work, the effects of different light intensities and colors on biomass, Monascus pigments (MPs) and citrinin production of Monascus ruber M7 were investigated. We have demonstrated that low intensity of blue light (500 lx) decreased Monascus biomass, increased MPs accumulation via upregulation of MpigA, MpigB, and MpigJ genes expression, but had no significant influence on citrinin production. High intensity of blue light (1500 lx) decreased citrinin accumulation but had no significant influence on biomass and MPs production after 14 days cultivation. Low intensity of green light (500 lx) stimulated citrinin production via upregulation of pksCT, mrl1, mrl2, and ctnA genes expression. One putative red light photoreceptor and two putative green light photoreceptors were identified in M. ruber M7. These observations will not only guide the practical production of Monascus but also contribute to our understanding light effects on Monascus.

  5. 21 CFR 133.106 - Blue cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blue cheese. 133.106 Section 133.106 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.106 Blue cheese. (a) Description. (1) Blue cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set...

  6. Analytical Raman spectroscopic discrimination between yellow pigments of the Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2011-10-01

    The Renaissance represented a major advance in painting techniques, subject matter, artistic style and the use of pigments and pigment mixtures. However, most pigments in general use were still mineral-based as most organic dyes were believed to be fugitive; the historical study of artists' palettes and recipes has assumed importance for the attribution of art works to the Renaissance period. Although the application of diagnostic elemental and molecular spectroscopic techniques play vital and complementary roles in the analysis of art works, elemental techniques alone cannot definitively provide the data needed for pigment identification. The advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the definitive diagnostic characterisation of yellow pigments that were in use during the Renaissance is demonstrated here in consideration of heavy metal oxides and sulphides; these data will be compared with those obtained from analyses of synthetic yellow pigments that were available during the eighteenth and nineteenth Centuries which could have been used in unrecorded restorations of Renaissance paintings.

  7. 75 FR 65525 - Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,327] Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of Wellpoint, Inc., Green Bay, WI; Notice... former workers of Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division...

  8. Atmospheric effects in the remote sensing of phytoplankton pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, H. R.; Clark, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    The accuracy with which relevant atmospheric parameters must be estimated to derive photoplankton pigment concentrations of a given accuracy, from measurements of the ocean's apparent spectral radiance at satellite altitudes, is examined. A phytoplankton pigment algorithm is developed which relates the pigment concentration (c) to the three ratios of upwelling radiance just beneath the sea surface which can be formed from wavelengths (lambda) 440, 520 and 550 nm.

  9. Blue light hazards for ocular lesions; Risques oculaires du rayonnement bleu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarini, J.P. [INSERM, Fondation Ophtalmologique A. de Rothschild, 75 - Paris (France); CES, Agents physique, AFSSET (France)

    2009-10-15

    The blue light range (400-500 nm) of visible radiation stimulates specifically cones and rods of the retina. The carried energy by these wavelengths is absorbed and transferred to specific pigments. Their energy is sufficient to produce free radicals and singlet form of oxygen. Intense sources, rich in blue light radiation, may induce, in the retina, photo-toxic lesions either limited or short-lived or photothermal lesions more or less definitive. Repeated photo-toxic lesions should be the root for the age-related maculo-pathy (A.R.M.) also called late macular degeneration (A.M.D.). As a consequence, the attention should be drawn on the potential risk linked to modern lighting as 'daylight' lamp, compact fluorescent lamps, energy saving (C.F.L.) and light-emitting diodes (L.E.D.) for which a specific vigilance should be enforced. (author)

  10. Pigment analyses of a portrait and paint box of Turkish artist Feyhaman Duran (1886-1970): The EDXRF, FT-IR and micro Raman spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Sevim; Akyuz, Tanil; Emre, Gulder; Gulec, Ahmet; Basaran, Sait

    2012-04-01

    The samples obtained from nine different places of Ataturk portrait (oil on canvas, 86 cm × 136 cm) by Feyhaman Duran (1886-1970), one of the famous Turkish painters of the 20th century, together with five pigment samples (two different white, two different yellow and blue), obtained as powders from artist's paint box, were analysed by EDXRF, FT-IR and micro-Raman spectroscopic methods, in order to characterise the pigments used by the artist. Informative Raman signals were not obtained from most of the samples of the portrait, due to huge fluorescence caused by the presence of impurities and organic materials in the samples, however the Raman spectrum of the sample from skin coloured part of the portrait and the pigment samples obtained from the paint box of the artist were found to be very informative to shed light on the determination of the pigments used. Analysis revealed the presences of chrome yellow (PbCrO4), strontium yellow (SrCrO4) and Cadmium yellow (CdS) as yellow, chromium oxides (Cr2O3 and Cr2O3·2H2O) as green, natural red ochre as red, brown ochre as brown and ivory black or bone black (C + Ca3(PO4)2) and manganese oxides (Mn2O3 and MnO2) as black pigments, in the composition of the Ataturk portrait. Lead white (2PbCO3·Pb(OH)2), calcite (CaCO3), barite (BaSO4), zinc white (ZnO) and titanium white (TiO2) were used as extenders to lighten the colours and/or as for ground level painting. Powder pigment samples, obtained from the paint box of artist, were found to be mixed pigments rather than pure ones.

  11. Aging of the hair follicle pigmentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2009-07-01

    Skin and hair phenotypes are powerful cues in human communication. They impart much information, not least about our racial, ethnic, health, gender and age status. In the case of the latter parameter, we experience significant change in pigmentation in our journey from birth to puberty and through to young adulthood, middle age and beyond. The hair follicle pigmentary unit is perhaps one of our most visible, accessible and potent aging sensors, with marked dilution of pigment intensity occurring long before even subtle changes are seen in the epidermis. This dichotomy is of interest as both skin compartments contain melanocyte subpopulations of similar embryologic (i.e., neural crest) origin. Research groups are actively pursuing the study of the differential aging of melanocytes in the hair bulb versus the epidermis and in particular are examining whether this is in part linked to the stringent coupling of follicular melanocytes to the hair growth cycle. Whether some follicular melanocyte subpopulations are affected, like epidermal melanocytes, by UV irradiation is not yet clear. A particular target of research into hair graying or canities is the nature of the melanocyte stem compartment and whether this is depleted due to reactive oxygen species-associated damage, coupled with an impaired antioxidant status, and a failure of melanocyte stem cell renewal. Over the last few years, we and others have developed advanced in vitro models and assay systems for isolated hair follicle melanocytes and for intact anagen hair follicle organ culture which may provide research tools to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of hair follicle pigmentation. Long term, it may be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some of these aging-associated changes in the hair follicle that impinge particularly on the melanocyte populations.

  12. Aging of the Hair Follicle Pigmentation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2009-01-01

    Skin and hair phenotypes are powerful cues in human communication. They impart much information, not least about our racial, ethnic, health, gender and age status. In the case of the latter parameter, we experience significant change in pigmentation in our journey from birth to puberty and through to young adulthood, middle age and beyond. The hair follicle pigmentary unit is perhaps one of our most visible, accessible and potent aging sensors, with marked dilution of pigment intensity occurring long before even subtle changes are seen in the epidermis. This dichotomy is of interest as both skin compartments contain melanocyte subpopulations of similar embryologic (i.e., neural crest) origin. Research groups are actively pursuing the study of the differential aging of melanocytes in the hair bulb versus the epidermis and in particular are examining whether this is in part linked to the stringent coupling of follicular melanocytes to the hair growth cycle. Whether some follicular melanocyte subpopulations are affected, like epidermal melanocytes, by UV irradiation is not yet clear. A particular target of research into hair graying or canities is the nature of the melanocyte stem compartment and whether this is depleted due to reactive oxygen species-associated damage, coupled with an impaired antioxidant status, and a failure of melanocyte stem cell renewal. Over the last few years, we and others have developed advanced in vitro models and assay systems for isolated hair follicle melanocytes and for intact anagen hair follicle organ culture which may provide research tools to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of hair follicle pigmentation. Long term, it may be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some of these aging-associated changes in the hair follicle that impinge particularly on the melanocyte populations. PMID:20927229

  13. The Physics of the Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2009-03-01

    In looking at the commonalities between music and science, one sees that the musician's palette is based on the principles of physics. The pitch of a musical note is determined by the frequency of the sound wave. The scales that musicians use to create and play music can be viewed as a set of rules. What makes music interesting is how musicians develop those rules and create ambiguity with them. I will discuss the evolution of western musical scales in this context. As a particular example, ``Blue'' notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale. The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting. Live keyboard demonstrations will be used. Beyond any redeeming entertainment value the talk will emphasize the serious connections between science and art in music. Nevertheless tips will be accepted.

  14. Development of waste-based ceramic pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa, G.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the preparation of ceramic pigments using industrial wastes as primary sources. In this context, the use of Al-rich sludge generated in the wastewater treatment unit of an anodising or surface coating industrial plant, and a galvanizing sludge from the Cr/Ni plating process, will be detailed. The ceramic pigments reported here were prepared using typical solid state reactions involving the metal rich sludge. The main focus will be on the synthesis of chrome-tin orchid cassiterite (Sn,CrO2, chrome-tin red malayaite Ca(Cr,SnSiO5, victoria green garnet Ca3Cr2Si3O12, and chrome alumina pink/green corundum (Cr,Al2O3 pigments. The pigments were fully characterised and then were tested in a standard ceramic glaze after. Typical working conditions and colour development will be reported.

    Se presenta la preparación de pigmentos cerámicos empleando residuos industriales como fuente de materias primas. Se detallan el uso de barros ricos en aluminio obtenidos en los tratamientos de depuración de aguas de plantas industriales de anodizado y barros de galvanizados de chapados de Cr/Ni. Los pigmentos cerámicos se prepararon empleando reacción en estados sólido a partir del barro rico en metal. Los principales pigmentos estudiados son orquídea casiterita de cromo-estaño (Sn,CrO2, malayita rojo de cromo-estaño Ca(Sn,CrSiO3, granate verde victoria Ca3Cr2Si3O12, y corindón rosa/verde de cromo alúmina (Cr,Al2O3. Los pigmentos fueron caracterizados y ensayados después de ser vidriados en cerámicas estándares. Se presentan las condiciones de trabajo y el desarrollo de color.

  15. Brown seaweed pigment as a dye source for photoelectrochemical solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, Giuseppe; Citro, Ilaria; Di Marco, Gaetano; Armeli Minicante, Simona; Morabito, Marina; Genovese, Giuseppa

    2014-01-01

    Chlorophylls based-dyes obtained from seaweeds represent attractive alternatives to the expensive and polluting pyridil based Ru complexes because of their abundance in nature. Another important characteristic is that the algae do not subtract either cropland or agricultural water, therefore do not conflict with agro-food sector. This pigment shows a typical intense absorption in the UV/blue (Soret band) and a less intense band in the red/near IR (Q band) spectral regions and for these reasons appear very promising as sensitizer dyes for DSSC. In the present study, we utilized chlorophylls from samples of the brown alga Undaria pinnatifida as sensitizer in DSSCs. The dye, extracted by frozen seaweeds and used without any chemical purification, showed a very good fill factor (0.69). Even the photelectrochemical parameters if compared with the existent literature are very interesting.

  16. Comparison of Riboflavin and Toluidine Blue O as Photosensitizers for Photoactivated Disinfection on Endodontic and Periodontal Pathogens In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Krarup Nielsen

    Full Text Available Photoactivated disinfection has a strong local antimicrobial effect. In the field of dentistry it is an emerging adjunct to mechanical debridement during endodontic and periodontal treatment. In the present study, we investigate the effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and blue LED light for activation, and compare it to photoactivated disinfection with the widely used combination of toluidine blue O and red light. Riboflavin is highly biocompatible and can be activated with LED lamps at hand in the dental office. To date, no reports are available on the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin/blue light on oral microorganisms. Planktonic cultures of eight organisms frequently isolated from periodontal and/or endodontic lesions (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherischia coli, Lactobacillus paracasei, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Propionibacterium acnes were subjected to photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light and toluidine blue O/red light, and survival rates were determined by CFU counts. Within the limited irradiation time of one minute, photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light only resulted in minor reductions in CFU counts, whereas full kills were achieved for all organisms when using toluidine blue O/red light. The black pigmented anaerobes P. gingivalis and P. intermedia were eradicated completely by riboflavin/blue light, but also by blue light treatment alone, suggesting that endogenous chromophores acted as photosensitizers in these bacteria. On the basis of our results, riboflavin cannot be recommended as a photosensitizer used for photoactivated disinfection of periodontal or endodontic infections.

  17. Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Gmoser

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of pigments by edible filamentous fungi is gaining attention as a result of the increased interest in natural sources with added functionality in the food, feed, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and textile industries. The filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia, used for production of the Indonesian food “oncom”, is one potential source of pigments. The objective of the study was to evaluate the fungus’ pigment production. The joint effect from different factors (carbon and nitrogen source, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and MnCl2 on pigment production by N. intermedia is reported for the first time. The scale-up to 4.5 L bubble column bioreactors was also performed to investigate the effect of pH and aeration. Pigment production of the fungus was successfully manipulated by varying several factors. The results showed that the formation of pigments was strongly influenced by light, carbon, pH, the co-factor Zn2+ and first- to fourth-order interactions between factors. The highest pigmentation (1.19 ± 0.08 mg carotenoids/g dry weight biomass was achieved in a bubble column reactor. This study provides important insights into pigmentation of this biotechnologically important fungus and lays a foundation for future utilizations of N. intermedia for pigment production.

  18. Pigments and oligomers for inks - moving towards the best combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.; Smith, S.; Grierson, W.; Devine, E.

    1999-01-01

    The formulation of UV curable printing inks depends on several complex factors. If the individual components of the ink are not complementary, then performance problems can arise. One critical combination is that between the pigment and the oligomer. In a new approach to improve understanding of pigment/oligomer interactions, the resources of a pigment manufacturer and an oligomer manufacturer have been combined to investigate the problem. Initial screening of process yellow pigments and several oligomer types highlighted performance variations which were then examined in more detail

  19. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Chadwick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options.

  20. Blue breath holding is benign.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life t...

  1. Galaxies on the Blue Edge

    OpenAIRE

    Cabanela, J. E.; Dickey, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    We have successfully constructed a catalog of HI-rich galaxies selected from the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner Catalog of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS I) based solely on optical criteria. We identify HI-rich candidates by selecting the bluest galaxies at a given apparent magnitude, those galaxies on the "blue edge" of POSS I color-magnitude parameter space. Subsequent 21-cm observations on the upgraded Arecibo 305m dish detected over 50% of the observed candidates. The detecte...

  2. Predicting hair cortisol levels with hair pigmentation genes: A possible hair pigmentation bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, A. (Alexander); G. Noppe (Gerard); F. Liu; M.H. Kayser (Manfred); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractCortisol concentrations in hair are used to create hormone profiles spanning months. This method allows assessment of chronic cortisol exposure, but might be biased by hair pigmentation: dark hair was previously related to higher concentrations. It is unclear whether this association

  3. Blue light regulated shade avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuskamp, Diederik H; Keller, Mercedes M; Ballaré, Carlos L; Pierik, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    Most plants grow in dense vegetation with the risk of being out-competed by neighboring plants. These neighbors can be detected not only through the depletion in light quantity that they cause, but also through the change in light quality, which plants perceive using specific photoreceptors. Both the reduction of the red:far-red ratio and the depletion of blue light are signals that induce a set of phenotypic traits, such as shoot elongation and leaf hyponasty, which increase the likelihood of light capture in dense plant stands. This set of phenotypic responses are part of the so called shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). This addendum discusses recent findings on the regulation of the SAS of Arabidopsis thaliana upon blue light depletion. Keller et al. and Keuskamp et al. show that the low blue light attenuation induced shade avoidance response of seedling and rosette-stage A. thaliana plants differ in their hormonal regulation. These studies also show there is a regulatory overlap with the R:FR-regulated SAS.

  4. Photooxidative damage in retinal pigment epithelial cells via GRP78 and the protective role of grape skin polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Sun, Tao; Jiang, Yun; Wu, Lijiang; Cai, Xiangzhong; Sun, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiangjun

    2014-12-01

    Blue light induced oxidative damage and ER stress are related to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism of blue light-induced damage remained obscure. The objective of this work is to assess the photooxidative damage to retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) and oxidation-induced changes in expression of ER stress associated apoptotic proteins, and investigate the mechanism underlying the protective effects of grape skin extracts. To mimic lipofuscin-mediated photooxidation in vivo, ARPE-19 cells that accumulated A2E, one of lipofuscin fluorophores, were used as a model system to investigate the mechanism of photooxidative damage and the protective effects of grape skin polyphenols. Exposure of A2E containing ARPE-19 cells to blue light resulted in significant apoptosis and increases in levels of GRP78, CHOP, p-JNK, Bax, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3, indicating that photooxidative damage to RPE cells is mediated by the ER-stress-induced intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Cells in which GRP78 had been knocked down with shRNA were more vulnerable to photooxidative damage. Pre-treatment of blue-light-exposed A2E containing ARPE-19 cells, with grape skin extracts, inhibited apoptosis, in a dose dependent manner. Knockdown GRP78 blocked the protective effect of grape skin extracts.

  5. Zinc deficiency leads to lipofuscin accumulation in the retinal pigment epithelium of pigmented rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Julien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is associated with lipofuscin accumulation whereas the content of melanosomes decreases. Melanosomes are the main storage of zinc in the pigmented tissues. Since the elderly population, as the most affected group for AMD, is prone to zinc deficit, we investigated the chemical and ultrastructural effects of zinc deficiency in pigmented rat eyes after a six-month zinc penury diet. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adult Long Evans (LE rats were investigated. The control animals were fed with a normal alimentation whereas the zinc-deficiency rats (ZD-LE were fed with a zinc deficient diet for six months. Quantitative Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX microanalysis yielded the zinc mole fractions of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. The lateral resolution of the analysis was 100 nm. The zinc mole fractions of melanosomes were significantly smaller in the RPE of ZD-LE rats as compared to the LE control rats. Light, fluorescence and electron microscopy, as well as immunohistochemistry were performed. The numbers of lipofuscin granules in the RPE and of infiltrated cells (Ø>3 µm found in the choroid were quantified. The number of lipofuscin granules significantly increased in ZD-LE as compared to control rats. Infiltrated cells bigger than 3 µm were only detected in the choroid of ZD-LE animals. Moreover, the thickness of the Bruch's membrane of ZD-LE rats varied between 0.4-3 µm and thin, rangy ED1 positive macrophages were found attached at these sites of Bruch's membrane or even inside it. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In pigmented rats, zinc deficiency yielded an accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE and of large pigmented macrophages in the choroids as well as the appearance of thin, rangy macrophages at Bruch's membrane. Moreover, we showed that a zinc diet reduced the zinc mole fraction of melanosomes in the RPE and modulated the thickness of the Bruch's membrane.

  6. An algorithm for the characterization of digital images of pigmented lesions of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera-González, Laura Y.; Delgado-Atencio, José A.; Valdiviezo-Navarro, Juan C.; Cunill-Rodríguez, Margarita

    2014-09-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer in human in all over the world with an increase number of victims yearly. One traditional form of diagnosis melanoma is by using the so called ABCDE rule which stands for Asymmetry, Border, Color, Diameter and Evolution of the lesion. For melanoma lesions, the color as a descriptor exhibits heterogeneous values, ranging from light brown to dark brown (sometimes blue reddish or even white). Therefore, investigating on color features from digital melanoma images could provide insights for developing automated algorithms for melanoma discrimination from common nevus. In this research work, an algorithm is proposed and tested to characterize the color in a pigmented lesion. The developed algorithm measures the hue of different sites in the same pigmented area from a digital image using the HSI color space. The algorithm was applied to 40 digital images of unequivocal melanomas and 40 images of common nevus, which were taken from several data bases. Preliminary results indicate that visible color changes of melanoma sites are well accounted by the proposed algorithm. Other factors, such as quality of images and the influence of the shiny areas on the results obtained with the proposed algorithm are discussed.

  7. Byzantine wall paintings from Kastoria, northern Greece: spectroscopic study of pigments and efflorescing salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanidis, Andreas; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Strati, Aggeliki; Gkimourtzina, Amalia; Papoulidou, Androniki

    2011-02-01

    This study concerns the investigation of pigments and efflorescence phenomena on the wall paintings of Kastoria, a rural, non-metropolitan Byzantine town. A large number of representative samples were collected from the murals of three churches, dated to post-Byzantine era (14th-17th c. AD). The identified pigments for the red colour were hematite (Fe2O3), cinnabar (HgS) and minium (Pb3O4), while brown and yellow colours were attributed to mixtures of ochres (Fe-oxides and hydroxides) and lime. The utilization of admixtures of iron, lead and mercury compounds was also attested in order to render specific tones on the painted surfaces. Black and dark blue hues were prepared using black carbon and Mn in some cases. Grey colours were assigned to a mixture of black carbon and lime. Green colour is rather attributed to admixtures of Fe-rich minerals and lime and not to the commonly used green earths. Baryte (BaSO4) was also evidenced as a filler or extender. Phosphorous was detected and connected to proteinaceous material and Mo and Sb were traced which are probably affiliated to Fe-oxides. Regarding efflorescing salts, the determined compounds are: calcite, dolomite, gypsum, halite, nitratine, natron and mirabilite, all of which are related to temperature and humidity changes and moisture fluctuations inside the wall paintings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Improved Screening Method for the Selection of Wine Yeasts Based on Their Pigment Adsorption Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Caridi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to improve an existing low-cost and simple but consistent culturing technique for measuring the adsorption of grape skin pigments on yeasts, comprising: (i growing yeasts in Petri dishes on chromogenic grape-skin-based medium, (ii photographing the yeast biomass, (iii measuring its red, green, and blue colour components, and (iv performing the statistical analysis of the data. Twenty strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were grown on different lots of the chromogenic medium, prepared using grape skins from dark cultivars Greco Nero, Magliocco and Nero d’Avola. Microscale wine fermentation trials were also performed. Wide and significant differences among wine yeasts were observed. The chromogenic grape-skin-based medium can be prepared using any grape cultivar, thus allowing the specific selection of the most suitable strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for each grape must, mainly for red winemaking. The research provides a useful tool to characterize wine yeasts in relation to pigment adsorption, allowing the improvement of wine colour.

  9. Acclimatization of symbiotic corals to mesophotic light environments through wavelength transformation by fluorescent protein pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward G; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Sharon, Yoni; Tchernov, Dan; Wiedenmann, Joerg

    2017-07-12

    The depth distribution of reef-building corals exposes their photosynthetic symbionts of the genus Symbiodinium to extreme gradients in the intensity and spectral quality of the ambient light environment. Characterizing the mechanisms used by the coral holobiont to respond to the low intensity and reduced spectral composition of the light environment in deeper reefs (greater than 20 m) is fundamental to our understanding of the functioning and structure of reefs across depth gradients. Here, we demonstrate that host pigments, specifically photoconvertible red fluorescent proteins (pcRFPs), can promote coral adaptation/acclimatization to deeper-water light environments by transforming the prevalent blue light into orange-red light, which can penetrate deeper within zooxanthellae-containing tissues; this facilitates a more homogeneous distribution of photons across symbiont communities. The ecological importance of pcRFPs in deeper reefs is supported by the increasing proportion of red fluorescent corals with depth (measured down to 45 m) and increased survival of colour morphs with strong expression of pcRFPs in long-term light manipulation experiments. In addition to screening by host pigments from high light intensities in shallow water, the spectral transformation observed in deeper-water corals highlights the importance of GFP-like protein expression as an ecological mechanism to support the functioning of the coral- Symbiodinium association across steep environmental gradients. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Contemporary artists' spinel pigments: Non-invasive characterization by means of electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelin, Eva Mariasole; Bacci, Mauro; Bartolozzi, Giovanni; Cantisani, Emma; Picollo, Marcello

    2017-02-15

    The identification of artistic materials represents a fundamental step in supporting the conservation of cultural heritage objects. The importance of their appropriate characterization is particularly relevant in modern-contemporary art, since they could be affected by the occurrence of rapid changes in chemical formulation over time. This paper focuses on an investigation of a series of contemporary blue-green commercial acrylic paints constituted of spinel pigments, using non-invasive spectroscopic techniques. The spectroscopic and color measurements obtained make it possible to characterize the acrylic paints under investigation and to compare the results obtained with those reported in the literature and in spectral databases. To be more precise, the proposed UV-vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopic technique was sensitive enough to characterize the acrylic paints according to their d-d ligand field and the charge transfer (CT) electronic transitions involved in the spinel structures. In addition, an overview of this class of inorganic pigments is also given. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Stem Cell Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium: The Role of Pigmentation as Maturation Marker and Gene Expression Profile Comparison with Human Endogenous Retinal Pigment Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, A; Jacobs, J G; Catsburg, L A E; Ten Brink, J B; Koster, C; Schlingemann, R O; van Meurs, J; Gorgels, T G M F; Moerland, P D; Heine, V M; Bergen, A A

    2017-10-01

    In age-related macular degeneration (AMD) the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) deteriorates, leading to photoreceptor decay and severe vision loss. New therapeutic strategies aim at RPE replacement by transplantation of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived RPE. Several protocols to generate RPE have been developed where appearance of pigmentation is commonly used as indicator of RPE differentiation and maturation. It is, however, unclear how different pigmentation stages reflect developmental stages and functionality of PSC-derived RPE cells. We generated human embryonic stem cell-derived RPE (hESC-RPE) cells and investigated their gene expression profiles at early pigmentation (EP) and late pigmentation (LP) stages. In addition, we compared the hESC-RPE samples with human endogenous RPE. We used a common reference design microarray (44 K). Our analysis showed that maturing hESC-RPE, upon acquiring pigmentation, expresses markers specific for human RPE. Interestingly, our analysis revealed that EP and LP hESC-RPE do not differ much in gene expression. Our data further showed that pigmented hESC-RPE has a significant lower expression than human endogenous RPE in the visual cycle and oxidative stress pathways. In contrast, we observed a significantly higher expression of pathways related to the process adhesion-to-polarity model that is typical of developing epithelial cells. We conclude that, in vitro, the first appearance of pigmentation hallmarks differentiated RPE. However, further increase in pigmentation does not result in much significant gene expression changes and does not add important RPE functionalities. Consequently, our results suggest that the time span for obtaining differentiated hESC-RPE cells, that are suitable for transplantation, may be greatly reduced.

  12. Photoinduced changes in photosystem II pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, Atanaska S; Busheva, Mira C; Stoitchkova, Katerina V; Tzonova, Iren K, E-mail: katys@phys.uni-sofia.b

    2010-11-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus in higher plants performs two seemingly opposing tasks: efficient harvest of sunlight, but also rapid and harmless dissipation of excess light energy as heat to avoid deleterious photodamage. In order to study this process in pigment-protein supercomplexes of photosystem II (PSII), 77 K fluorescence and room temperature resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy were applied to investigate the changes in structure and spectral properties of the pigments in spinach PSII membranes. The high-light treatment results in a strong quenching of the fluorescence (being largest when the excitation is absorbed by carotenoids) and a red-shift of the main maximum. Decomposition of the fluorescence spectra into four bands revealed intensive quenching of F685 and F695 bands, possible bleaching of chlorophyll a, enhanced extent of light harvesting complexes (LHCII) aggregation and increased energy transfer to aggregated LHCII. The analysis of RR spectra revealed the predominant contribution of ss-carotene (ss-Car) upon 457.8 and 488 nm excitations and lutein (Lut) at 514.5 nm. During prolonged exposure to strong light no significant bleaching of ss-Car and weak photobleaching of Lut is observed. The results will contribute to the efforts to produce more efficient and robust solar cells when exposed to fluctuations in light intensity.

  13. Enamel ultrastructure in pigmented hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Lord, V; Robinson, C; Shore, R

    1992-10-01

    Hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a hereditary condition of enamel that is presumed to result from defects during the maturation stage of enamel development. This study characterized the enamel ultrastructure and enamel crystallite morphology, as well as the distribution of organic material in enamel affected with pigmented hypomaturation AI. Enamel exhibiting autosomal recessive pigmented hypomaturation AI was sectioned or fractured and examined using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Enamel samples were treated with 30% NaOCl or 8 M urea to remove organic components and determine the effect of deproteinization on crystallite morphology. These were compared with untreated normal enamel samples. The enamel crystallites in hypomaturation AI exhibited considerable variability in size and morphology. Examination of deproteinized tissue indicated that the AI crystallites had a thick coating, presumably of organic or partially mineralized material, which was not visible in normal enamel. The results of this investigation provide further evidence that hypomaturation AI is associated with the retention of organic material that is most probably enamel protein. Enamel protein retention is likely to be involved in the inhibition of normal crystallite growth resulting in the morphological crystallite abnormalities associated with this disorder.

  14. Bile pigments in pulmonary and vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin, are endogenously-derived substances generated during enzymatic heme degradation. These compounds have been shown to act as chemical antioxidants in vitro. Bilirubin formed in tissues circulates in the serum, prior to undergoing hepatic conjugation and biliary excretion. The excess production of bilirubin has been associated with neurotoxicity, in particular to the newborn. Nevertheless, clinical evidence suggests that mild states of hyperbilirubinemia may be beneficial in protecting against cardiovascular disease in adults. Pharmacological application of either bilirubin and/or its biological precursor biliverdin, can provide therapeutic benefit in several animal models of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. Furthermore, biliverdin and bilirubin can confer protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury and graft rejection secondary to organ transplantation in animal models. Several possible mechanisms for these effects have been proposed, including direct antioxidant and scavenging effects, and modulation of signaling pathways regulating inflammation, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and immune responses. The practicality and therapeutic-effectiveness of bile pigment application to humans remains unclear.

  15. Epigenetic’s role in fish pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cal Delgado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The agouti coat colour gene encodes a paracrine signalling molecule whose differential expression produces the characteristic dorsal-ventral pigment pattern observed in most mammals. We have recently demonstrated that this well-characterised mechanism from mammals also applies to fish with their much more complex pigment patterns. However, the developmental mechanism through which agouti acts to establish these colour differences remains unclear. The present study was undertaken to explore the molecular mechanisms that regulate agouti gene expression by in-vivo functional characterization of the agouti promoter and identification of possible putative regulatory elements that govern basal promoter activity. Specifically, the investigation was focused on the occurrence and role of CpG dinucleotides methylation in the agouti putative promoter sequence and on a possible epigenetic level of regulation of agouti expression. We report here expression analyses of eGFP expression from transgenic zebrafish containing an 8kb-agouti-Tol2-eGFP construct. eGFP expression was specifically found in the brain area and neural tube of Tol2 transposon vector transgenic embryos. Computer-based analysis revealed a putative CpG island immediately proximal to the translation start site. Global inhibition of methylation with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine promoted agouti production in association with decreasing CpG methylation. Taken together, these data identify a contributory role for DNA methylation in regulating agouti expression in zebrafish embryogenesis.

  16. Spontaneous Large Serous Retinal Pigment Epithelial Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voraporn Chaikitmongkol

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report cases of spontaneous retinal pigment epithelial (RPE tear complicating serous pigment epithelial detachment (PED. Methods: The records of 3 Asian patients with spontaneous giant RPE tear were reviewed retrospectively by including clinical presentation, angiography, optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence imaging, and visual outcome. Results: Three patients (4 eyes were included in this study, with a mean age of 48.3 (42–56 years, and a mean follow-up period of 7.75 (4–18 months. Fundus examination in all patients showed giant RPE tear associated with bullous PED. Two cases had a history of prior corticosteroid use, and 1 had no history of medication use. All 3 patients developed spontaneous resolution of subretinal fluid with no treatment. However, in patients who used corticosteroids, initial progression of the tear and subretinal fluid were observed despite ceasing medication. On subsequent follow-up, an incomplete RPE regeneration was demonstrated by fundus autofluorescence imaging, and choroidal neovascularization developed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Large PED with RPE tear is a rare manifestation. When the fovea is spared, visual prognosis is favorable. No specific treatment is required, but careful choroidal neovascularization monitoring should be performed.

  17. Acidulant and oven type affect total anthocyanin content of blue corn cookies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Walker, Chuck E; Faubion, Jon M

    2011-01-15

    Anthocyanins, pink to purple water-soluble flavonoids, are naturally occurring pigments with claimed health benefits. However, they are sensitive to degradation by high pH, light and temperature. Blue corn (maize) contains high levels of anthocyanins. Cookies are popular snacks and might serve as a vehicle to deliver antioxidants. A cookie formula with a high level of blue corn was developed with added acidulents and baked in ovens with different heat transfer coefficients. The best whole-grain blue corn flour/wheat pastry flour ratio (80:20 w/w), guar gum level (10 g kg(-1), flour weight basis) and water level (215 g kg(-1), flour weight basis) were determined based on response surface methodology analysis. The interactions of citric and lactic acids and glucono-δ-lactone with three oven types having different heat transfer coefficients (impingement oven 179 °C/4 min, reel oven 204 °C/10 min and convection oven 182 °C/4 min) influenced the total anthocyanin content (TAC) remaining in blue corn-containing cookies after baking. Cookies baked with citric acid in the convection oven retained the maximum TAC (227 ± 3 mg kg(-1)). By baking rapidly at lower temperatures and adding acidulents, it may be possible to increase residual natural source antioxidants in baked foods. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. The Application of Microencapsulated Phycocyanin as a Blue Natural Colorant to the Quality of Jelly Candy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, E. N.; Kurniasih, R. A.; Purnamayati, L.

    2018-02-01

    Phycocyanin is a blue color pigment which can be extracted from Spirulina sp. makes it potential to use as an alternative natural dye in the food product. The aim of this research was to determine the application of microencapsulated phycocyanin processed using spray dried method to the jelly candy. As a natural blue colorant, phycocyanin was expected to be safe for the consumer. The jelly candy was evaluated on the characteristics of its moisture, ash, Aw, pH, color appearance, and phycocyanin spectra with FTIR. The phycocyanin was microencapsulated using maltodextrin and Na-alginate as the coating materials (maltodextrin and Na-alginate in ratio 9:1.0 w/w). The spray drying process was operated with an inlet temperature of 80°C. The various concentrations of microencapsulated phycocyanin were added to the jelly candy such as 0%, 1%, 3%, 5% and jelly candy with brilliant blue used as comparison, each called PC, PS, PT, PL, and PB. The results showed that the various concentrations of phycocyanin added on the jelly product had significantly different on moisture content, Aw, and blue color. The FTIR spectra indicated that phycocyanin still persisted on the jelly candy. PL was the best jelly candy with the bluest color under PB.

  19. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solairaj Dhananasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB, Bromophenol Blue (BPB and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798 shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R2 values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes and pseudo second order kinetics (R2 values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents.

  20. Pigments Elementary Chemical Composition Study of a Gainsborough Attributed Painting Employing a Portable X-Rays Fluorescence System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appoloni, C. R.; Blonski, M. S.; Parreira, P. S.; Souza, L. A. C.

    2007-02-01

    The investigated painting, identified with the title "The woodman", is attributed to Thomas Gainsborough (XVIII century) and is under investigation at the Laboratory of Conservation Science (LACICOR), CECOR/EBA/UFMG. The measurements were carried out with a portable X-rays fluorescence (XRF) system constituted of a X-rays tube with Ag anode, a Si PIN — diode detector, nuclear electronic chain and a special designed mechanical system for the detector and X-ray tube positioning, that enables angular and XYZ movements of the excitation-detection system. The employed voltage and current intensity were 17 kV and 3 mA, respectively. The time of acquisition for each measurement was 500 s. XRF spectra were analyzed using the AXIL-WinQXAS software. Three measurements in each of the following regions of the painting were done: face, leaves, arm, sky and firewood. The carried out analysis indicated the following pigments: White (lead white and calcium sulfate, identified by the elements Pb, Ca and S), Blue (Prussian blue, identified by the key element Fe), Red (Vermilion, identified by the elements Hg and S) and Brown (mixture of Fe and Mn oxides, identified by the elements Fe and Mn). Elements belonging to modern pigments corresponding to the same colors were absent in the analyzed spectra.

  1. Differences in visible light-induced pigmentation according to wavelengths: a clinical and histological study in comparison with UVB exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duteil, Luc; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Maubert, Yves; Harmelin, Yona; Boukari, Fériel; Ambrosetti, Damien; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Passeron, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The visible light spectrum is wide, and it can be hypothesized that all the wavelengths between 400-700 nm do not induce the same photobiological effects on pigmentation. We assessed the potential pro-pigmenting effects of two single wavelengths located at both extremities of the visible spectrum: the blue/violet line (λ = 415 nm) and the red line (λ = 630 nm). We made colorimetric, clinical, and histological assessments with increasing doses of those lights on healthy volunteers. Then, we compared these irradiations to non-exposed and UVB-exposed skin. Colorimetric and clinical assessments showed a clear dose effect with the 415-nm irradiation, in both skin type III and IV subjects, whereas the 630 nm did not induce hyperpigmentation. When compared to UVB irradiation, the blue-violet light induced a significantly more pronounced hyperpigmentation that lasted up to 3 months. Histological examination showed a significant increase of keratinocyte necrosis and p53 with UVB, as compared to 415- and 630-nm exposures. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Structures and colour properties of new red wine pigments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Anders Eckart; Pardon, K.; Hayasaka, Y.

    2003-01-01

    the colour properties of the pigments were characterized; it could be demonstrated that the pyranoanthocyanins retained their red colour at pH 3.6 in model wine and were resistant to bisulfite-mediated bleaching. Finally, HPLC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of both anthocyanin-derived pigments in red...... wine....

  3. Free radical scavenging activities of pigment extract from Hibiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The macroporous resin adsorption method was used to purify the pigment from Hibiscus syriacus L. petals. Through the comparison of the adsorption and desorption rates of six types of macroporous resins including AB-8, S-8, NKA-9, DM-130, D101 and 860021 to the pigment, 860021 resin was selected as the most ...

  4. Skin Pigmentation Kinetics after Exposure to Ultraviolet A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnbak, M.H.; Philipsen, P.A.; Wiegell, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple exposures to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are the norm in nature and phototherapy. However, studies of the kinetics of pigmentation following UVA exposure have included only fair-skinned persons. The aim of this study was to investigate steady-state pigmentation and fading in 12...

  5. The role of pigmentation on the development of chloroquine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... administered and duration of therapy. It is concluded that the effect of chloroquine on pigmentation depends on total amount of drug used, which would predispose to retinal pathology. Keywords: Chloroquine, pigmentation, melanin, retinopathy, retinotoxic. West African Journal of Pharmacology and Drug Research Vol.

  6. Growth of cultured porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, A.K.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nicolini, Jair

    2003-01-01

    To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation.......To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation....

  7. Internal pigment cells respond to external UV radiation in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Nilsson Sköld, Helen; de Oliveira, Classius

    2016-05-01

    Fish and amphibians have pigment cells that generate colorful skins important for signaling, camouflage, thermoregulation and protection against ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, many animals also have pigment cells inside their bodies, on their internal organs and membranes. In contrast to external pigmentation, internal pigmentation is remarkably little studied and its function is not well known. Here, we tested genotoxic effects of UVR and its effects on internal pigmentation in a neotropical frog, Physalaemus nattereri We found increases in body darkness and internal melanin pigmentation in testes and heart surfaces and in the mesenterium and lumbar region after just a few hours of UVR exposure. The melanin dispersion in melanomacrophages in the liver and melanocytes in testes increased after UV exposure. In addition, the amount of melanin inside melanomacrophages cells also increased. Although mast cells were quickly activated by UVR, only longer UVR exposure resulted in genotoxic effects inside frogs, by increasing the frequency of micronuclei in red blood cells. This is the first study to describe systemic responses of external UVR on internal melanin pigmentation, melanomacrophages and melanocytes in frogs and thus provides a functional explanation to the presence of internal pigmentation. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Microscopic Analysis of Pigments Extracted from Spalting Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Gutierrez, Sarath M.; Robinson, Sara C.

    2017-01-01

    Pigments that are currently available in the market usually come from synthetic sources, or, if natural, often need mordants to bind to the target substrate. Recent research on the fungal pigment extracts from Scytalidium cuboideum, Scytalidium ganodermophthorum, Chlorociboria aeruginosa, and Chlorociboria aeruginascens have been shown to successfully dye materials, like wood, bamboo, and textiles, however, there is no information about their binding mechanisms. Due to this, a microscopic study was performed to provide information to future manufacturers interested in these pigments. The results of this study show that S. ganodermophthorum and C. aeruginosa form an amorphous layer on substrates, while S. cuboideum forms crystal-like structures. The attachment and morphology indicate that there might be different chemical and physical interactions between the extracted pigments and the materials. This possibility can explain the high resistance of the pigments to UV light and color fastness that makes them competitive against synthetic pigments. These properties make these pigments a viable option for an industry that demands natural pigments with the properties of the synthetic ones. PMID:29371533

  9. An Unexpectedly Complex Architecture for Skin Pigmentation in Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alicia R; Lin, Meng; Granka, Julie M; Myrick, Justin W; Liu, Xiaomin; Sockell, Alexandra; Atkinson, Elizabeth G; Werely, Cedric J; Möller, Marlo; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Kingsley, David M; Hoal, Eileen G; Liu, Xiao; Daly, Mark J; Feldman, Marcus W; Gignoux, Christopher R; Bustamante, Carlos D; Henn, Brenna M

    2017-11-30

    Approximately 15 genes have been directly associated with skin pigmentation variation in humans, leading to its characterization as a relatively simple trait. However, by assembling a global survey of quantitative skin pigmentation phenotypes, we demonstrate that pigmentation is more complex than previously assumed, with genetic architecture varying by latitude. We investigate polygenicity in the KhoeSan populations indigenous to southern Africa who have considerably lighter skin than equatorial Africans. We demonstrate that skin pigmentation is highly heritable, but known pigmentation loci explain only a small fraction of the variance. Rather, baseline skin pigmentation is a complex, polygenic trait in the KhoeSan. Despite this, we identify canonical and non-canonical skin pigmentation loci, including near SLC24A5, TYRP1, SMARCA2/VLDLR, and SNX13, using a genome-wide association approach complemented by targeted resequencing. By considering diverse, under-studied African populations, we show how the architecture of skin pigmentation can vary across humans subject to different local evolutionary pressures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-corrosion properties of coatings with manganese compounds pigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshina, M.; Nurislamova, E.

    2018-02-01

    Work investigates properties of corrosion-resistant coatings based on organic-aqueous emulsion and pigmented compounds of manganese, obtained by ceramic method. It is found that the inclusion of synthesized pigments in the composition of the coating increases their ability to inhibit underfilm corrosion of steel.

  11. Seasonal and interannual variations in pigments in the Adriatic Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    which lead to the higher chlorophyll production can be advected in the surface layer, together with dissolved colored substances, carried by the runoff, where both can increase pigment concentra- tions. This can explain relatively higher pigment in August in the Middle Adriatic. The influence of the Northern Italian waters ...

  12. Seasonal and interannual variability of phytoplankton pigment in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    seasonal cycle of phytoplankton pigment in the upper part of the euphotic zone is established for the offshore Laccadive Sea. ... Laccadive sea; Lakshadweep sea; CZCS; phytoplankton pigment; seasons; 1979-1981. Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. ...... ton dynamics and production in the Arabian Sea dur- ing the 1995 southwest ...

  13. Optimization of fermentation conditions for red pigment production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An extracellular pigment-producing ascomycetous filamentous fungi belonging to the genera Penicillium was obtained from soil and its optimal culture conditions investigated. The optimal culture conditions for pigment production were as follows; soluble starch 2% (670 units), peptone (880 units), pH 9.0 (900 units); ...

  14. Intraclutch variation in avian eggshell pigmentation: the anaemia hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, Greet; De Neve, Liesbeth; Lens, Luc

    2012-10-01

    Many passerine species lay eggs that are speckled with dark protoporphyrin pigmentation. Because protoporphyrin is mainly derived from the blood, we here formulate and test a new hypothesis that links an increase in anaemia along the laying sequence to within-clutch variation in egg pigmentation. More intense pigmentation is expected if pigments accumulate during enhanced red blood cell production in response to anaemia. Reduced pigmentation is expected if pigments are derived from the degradation of red blood cells that circulate in smaller numbers due to blood loss. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated anaemia in great tit (Parus major) females by infesting the nests with hen fleas (Ceratophyllus gallinae) prior to egg laying. Polychromatophil (i.e., immature red blood cells) percentage, as a measure of blood cell production, was positively correlated with parasite load confirming that female great tits experienced stronger anaemia when infested with haematophagous parasites during egg laying. We found a positive relationship between spot darkness and laying order that weakened under high parasite load. This result suggests that anaemia in females due to blood-sucking parasites led to diminished protoporphyrin from disintegrated red blood cells and hence a decreased deposition of protoporphyrin. However, the overall increase in pigment darkness along the laying sequence suggests that pigments also accumulate by enhanced red blood cell production caused by anaemia due to egg production itself.

  15. Analysis of basidiomycete pigments in situ by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, James P; Matthäus, Christian; Lenz, Claudius; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Popp, Jürgen

    2018-02-07

    Basidiomycetes, that is, mushroom-type fungi, are known to produce pigments in response to environmental impacts. As antioxidants with a high level of unsaturation, these compounds can neutralize highly oxidative species. In the event of close contact with other microbes, the enzymatically controlled pigment production is triggered and pigment secretion is generated at the interaction zone. The identification and analysis of these pigments is important to understand the defense mechanism of fungi, which is essential to counteract an uncontrolled spread of harmful species. Usually, a detailed analysis of the pigments is time consuming as it depends on laborious sample preparation and isolation procedures. Furthermore, the applied protocols often influence the chemical integrity of the compound of interest. A possibility to noninvasively investigate the pigmentation is Raman microspectroscopy. The methodology has the potential to analyze the chemical composition of the sample spatially resolved at the interaction zone. After the acquisition of a representative spectroscopic library, the pigment production by basidiomycetes was monitored for during response to different fungi and bacteria. The presented results describe a very efficient noninvasive way of pigment analysis which can be applied with minimal sample preparation. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Characterization of three novel pigment-producing Penicillium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal pigments are used in diverse industries such as food, pharmaceuticals, textile, among others. The need of new organic pigments involves the search for new microbial sources. In this study, three fungal strains isolated from Quercus sp and Larrea tridentata were morphological, physiological and molecularly ...

  17. Microscopic Analysis of Pigments Extracted from Spalting Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarath M. Vega Gutierrez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pigments that are currently available in the market usually come from synthetic sources, or, if natural, often need mordants to bind to the target substrate. Recent research on the fungal pigment extracts from Scytalidium cuboideum, Scytalidium ganodermophthorum, Chlorociboria aeruginosa, and Chlorociboria aeruginascens have been shown to successfully dye materials, like wood, bamboo, and textiles, however, there is no information about their binding mechanisms. Due to this, a microscopic study was performed to provide information to future manufacturers interested in these pigments. The results of this study show that S. ganodermophthorum and C. aeruginosa form an amorphous layer on substrates, while S. cuboideum forms crystal-like structures. The attachment and morphology indicate that there might be different chemical and physical interactions between the extracted pigments and the materials. This possibility can explain the high resistance of the pigments to UV light and color fastness that makes them competitive against synthetic pigments. These properties make these pigments a viable option for an industry that demands natural pigments with the properties of the synthetic ones.

  18. Changes in pigment, spectral transmission and element content of pink chicken eggshells with different pigment intensity during incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Li, Zhanming; Pan, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in pigment, spectral transmission and element content of chicken eggshells with different intensities of pink pigment during the incubation period. We also investigated the effects of the region (small pole, equator and large pole) and pink pigment intensity of the chicken eggshell on the percent transmission of light passing through the chicken eggshells. Method. Eggs of comparable weight from a meat-type breeder (Meihuang) were used, and divided based on three levels of pink pigment (light, medium and dark) in the eggshells. During the incubation (0-21 d), the values of the eggshell pigment (ΔE, L (∗), a (∗), b (∗)) were measured. The percent transmission of light for different regions and intensities of eggshell pigmentation was measured by using the visible wavelength range of 380-780 nm. Result. Three measured indicators of eggshell color, ΔE, L (∗) and a (∗), did not change significantly during incubation. Compared with other regions and pigment intensities, eggshell at the small pole and with light pigmentation intensity showed the highest percent transmission of light. The transmission value varied significantly (P pink pigment showed that the potassium content of the eggshells for all pigment levels decreased significantly during incubation. Conclusion. In summary, pigment intensity and the region of the eggshell influenced the percent transmission of light of eggshell. Differences in the spectral characteristics of different eggshells may influence the effects of photostimulation during the incubation of eggs. All of these results will be applicable for perfecting the design of light intensity for lighted incubation to improve productivity.

  19. Quantification of the efficiency for photo-bleached pigments using cellulose matrixes as substrate and digitalized gray scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, F. L. E.; Correia Lins, E. C. C.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-02-01

    The bleaching process is been objective of many studies since the beginning of the XX century. Heat has been used to activate the hydrogen peroxide; the aesthetic results were satisfactory, but associated with this process high incidence of hypersensitivity as well as radical endodontic treatment was observed making this technique clinically hard to implemented. Nowadays the dental bleaching is one of the most wanted aesthetic procedures by the population at the dental office. With the utilization of new light sources as LASER and LED a technique to evaluate the efficiency of photo-bleaching of many pigments is necessary. This work demonstrates a new method to quantify the breakage of pigments on a cellulose matrix using a blue LED system with 1W/cm2. We employed a computational analysis and digital spectroscopy. These matrixes were used because of its inert physical-chemical properties. The obtained results are within the expectative, where the groups irradiated with light presents more broken pigments that the group with no light, it was also possible to observe on this experiment that light acts decreasing the free energy of the reaction and that way speeding up the rate of bleaching.

  20. Clinical features of acute retinal pigment epitheltis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze of the clinical features of acute retinal pigment epitheltis(ARPE. METHODS: The clinical data of 36 ARPE patients(40 eyesattending this center from January 2008 to January 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Of them, 21 patients(58.3%were male(male:female=1:0.71. The mean age was 40.92±7.13 years old(range:17~60y. The mean best-corrected visual acuity(BCVAwas 0.50±0.26 with a range of 0.3~1.0. Thirty-two patients were unilateral cases. All the patients were examined for BCVA, funds photography, fluorescein fundus angiography(FFA, optical coherence tomography(OCT. FFA was shown as three types: type Ⅰ to multiple "black light" or "grape variety" fluorescent spot; Type Ⅱ for I lesions visible fluorescence leakage; Type Ⅲ lesions with choroid neovascularization(CNV. OCT was the following three forms: multiple RPE lesions layer reflection intermittent, proliferation(type Ⅰ; pigment epithelial detachment with limitations neural epithelium(type Ⅱ; types I and II with CNV(type Ⅲ.RESULTS: Ocular fundus showed that the lesions were multiple dark-gray spots with a dark circumscribed area at the macular or nearby in all 40 eyes. FFA showed: 21 eyes were type Ⅰ, 17 eyes were type Ⅱ and 2 eyes were type Ⅲ, BCVA between type Ⅰ and type Ⅱ was statistically significant(PP>0.05. OCT showed 21 eyes wwere type Ⅰ, 17 eyes were type Ⅱ and type Ⅲ 2 eyes. BCVA average between type Ⅰ and Ⅱ was statistically significant(PP>0.05.CONCLUSION: ARPE fundus demonstrated the multiple dark gray discrete lesions, the degree of visual impairment related with the presence of pigment epithelial barrier and lesion location. OCT and FFA characterized three types. FFA is shown as "black light" or "grape variety" fluorescent spot, and is the basis of diagnosis. OCT can display the lesions organization form of each layer clearly. It plays a more and more important role in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of ARPE.

  1. Blue breath holding is benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life threatening event' deserve immense understanding and help, and it behoves investigators to exercise extreme care and self criticism in the presentation of new knowledge which may bear upon their management and their morale. PMID:2001115

  2. Ultraviolet radiation effects on pigmentation in the cyanobacterium ''Phormidium uncinatum''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donkor, V.A.; Haeder, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    The Baikal strain of the cyanobacterium Phormidium uncinatum was found to possess the photosynthetic pigments chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin, while the Tuebingen strain of Phormidium contained, in addition to these, the biliprotein phycoerythrin. Sucrose gradient centrifugation of the pigment extracts resulted in a separation of the phycobiliproteins into several bands, which according to their absorption and fluorescence properties, were identified as monomers, trimers and hexamers. With increasing UV-B irradiation the heavier aggregates were broken down into smaller components. Photobleaching of these accessory pigments also occurred. FPLC gel filtration analyses of the pigments also showed loss of heavier aggregates of the phycobilins and bleaching of the pigments. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the sucrose gradient and FPLC fractions indicated loss of the biliproteins with increasing UV-B irradiation. The loss of the β- were more rapid than that of the α- subunits. Increasing levels of ultraviolet irradiation is therefore deleterious to these organism. (author)

  3. Light pigmentation phenotype is correlated with increased substantia nigra echogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Jost-Julian; Schirmer, Maria; Fricke, Christopher; Weise, David; Wagner, Justinus Aspasios; Simon, Jan; Classen, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study was undertaken to address the question of whether pigmentation may be mechanistically linked with Parkinson's disease. In a cross-sectional, observational study, 116 healthy subjects received transcranial sonography of the substantia nigra. Pigmentation phenotype was assessed using the Fitzpatrick skin phototype classification, and five additional phenotypic pigmentation traits as well as a photographic method (Melanin index) in a subgroup of 46 subjects. Lighter skin phototype was associated with larger echogenic substantia nigra area and increased prevalence of abnormally enlarged echogenic substantia nigra area. The strongest association of substantia nigra echogenicity and phenotypic pigmentation traits was found for hair color and facial tanning. Findings suggest an increasing prevalence of structural abnormality of substantia nigra with decreasing darkness of skin and thus may provide additional evidence in favor of a pathogenic link of pigmentation and Parkinson's disease. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Optimization and design of pigments for heat-insulating coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guang-Hai; Zhang Yue

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports that heat insulating property of infrared reflective coatings is obtained through the use of pigments which diffuse near-infrared thermal radiation. Suitable structure and size distribution of pigments would attain maximum diffuse infrared radiation and reduce the pigment volume concentration required. The optimum structure and size range of pigments for reflective infrared coatings are studied by using Kubelka—Munk theory, Mie model and independent scattering approximation. Taking titania particle as the pigment embedded in an inorganic coating, the computational results show that core-shell particles present excellent scattering ability, more so than solid and hollow spherical particles. The optimum radius range of core-shell particles is around 0.3 ∼ 1.6 μm. Furthermore, the influence of shell thickness on optical parameters of the coating is also obvious and the optimal thickness of shell is 100–300 nm. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  5. Pigmentation and behavior: potential association through pleiotropic genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aya

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of pigmentation variation within and among Drosophila species is largely attributed to genes in melanin biosynthesis pathway, which involves dopamine metabolism. Most of the genetic changes underlying pigmentation variations reported to date are changes at the expression levels of the structural genes in the pathway. Within D. melanogaster, changes in cis-regulatory regions of a gene, ebony, are responsible for the naturally occurring variation of the body pigmentation intensity. This gene is also known to be expressed in glia, and many visual and behavioral abnormalities of its mutants have been reported. This implies that the gene has pleiotropic functions in the nervous systems. In this review, current knowledge on pigmentation variation and melanin biosynthesis pathway are summarized, with some focus on pleiotropic features of ebony and other genes in the pathway. A potential association between pigmentation and behavior through such pleiotropic genes is discussed in light of cis-regulatory structure and pleiotropic mutations.

  6. Studies on the bio production of monascus red pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emam, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    there is an increasing interest on natural pigments to replace some currently used synthetic dyes, since the latter have been associated with toxic effects in foods. the red pigment of the fungus Monascus is widely used in all the world as food additives or pharmaceuticals. although pigment production by Monascus spp.in chemically defined media is well documented, very few information is available about the use of agro-industrial wastes. in this regard, the present study has been devoted to investigate the effect of different parameters on red pigment production by the local isolated strain of M. purpureu, in an attempt to maximize the production, and also to develop a potential fermentation process for the production of red pigment using potato processing wastewater (PPW,waters used to wash the potato slices prior to cooking in chips and crisp manufacture) as cheap production medium

  7. Heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae for pigment production: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianjun; Nagarajan, Dillirani; Zhang, Quanguo; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lee, Duu-Jong

    Pigments (mainly carotenoids) are important nutraceuticals known for their potent anti-oxidant activities and have been used extensively as high end health supplements. Microalgae are the most promising sources of natural carotenoids and are devoid of the toxic effects associated with synthetic derivatives. Compared to photoautotrophic cultivation, heterotrophic cultivation of microalgae in well-controlled bioreactors for pigments production has attracted much attention for commercial applications due to overcoming the difficulties associated with the supply of CO 2 and light, as well as avoiding the contamination problems and land requirements in open autotrophic culture systems. In this review, the heterotrophic metabolic potential of microalgae and their uses in pigment production are comprehensively described. Strategies to enhance pigment production under heterotrophic conditions are critically discussed and the challenges faced in heterotrophic pigment production with possible alternative solutions are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fly ash based zeolitic pigments for application in anticorrosive paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Ruchi; Tiwari, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the utilization of waste fly ash in anticorrosive paints. Zeolite NaY was synthesized from waste fly ash and subsequently modified by exchanging its nominal cation Na + with Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ions. The metal ion exchanged zeolite was then used as anticorrosive zeolitic pigments in paints. The prepared zeolite NaY was characterized using X-Ray diffraction technique and Scanning electron microscopy. The size, shape and density of the prepared fly ash based pigments were determined by various techniques. The paints were prepared by using fly ash based zeolitic pigments in epoxy resin and the percentages of pigments used in paints were 2% and 5%. These paints were applied to the mild steel panels and the anticorrosive properties of the pigments were assessed by the electrochemical spectroscopy technique (EIS).

  9. Chemical characterisation of zircon-cadmium sulfoselenide ceramic pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazulla Barreda, M. F.; Rodrigo Edo, M.; Blasco Roca, E.; Orduna Cordero, M.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper addresses the development of a methodology that allows the complete chemical characterisation of zircon cadmium sulfoselenide ceramic pigments including minor and major elements. To develop the methodology, five zircon-cadmium sulfoselenide pigments with different hues were selected, studying the different measurement process steps, from sample preparation to the optimisation of the measurement of the different components of the pigments by spectroscopic techniques (WD-XRF and elemental analysis by combustion and IR detection). The chemical characterisation method developed was validated with synthetic standards prepared from the mixture of certified reference materials and pure oxides because no certified referenced materials of this type of pigments were commercially available. The developed method can be used for a complete chemical characterization of zircon-cadmium sulfoselenide ceramic pigments with a very low uncertainty for all the elements analysed. (Author)

  10. Single Molecule Spectroscopy on Photosynthetic Pigment-Protein Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Jelezko, F; Schuler, S; Thews, E; Tietz, C; Wechsler, A; Wrachtrup, J

    2001-01-01

    Single molecule spectroscopy was applied to unravel the energy transfer pathway in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes. Detailed analysis of excitation and fluorescence emission spectra has been made for peripheral plant antenna LHC II and Photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Optical transitions of individual pigments were resolved under nonselective excitation of antenna chlorophylls. High-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy of individual plant antenna LHC II indicates that at low temperatures, the excitation energy is localized on the red-most Chl a pool absorbing at 680 nm. More than one pigment molecule is responsible for the fluorescence emission of the LHC II trimer. The spectral lines of single Chl a molecules absorbing at 675 nm are broadened because of the Foerster energy transfer towards the red-most pigments. Low-temperature spectroscopy on single PS I trimers indicates that two subgroups of pigments, which are present in the red antenna pool, differ by the strength of t...

  11. Apical atrophy of retinal pigment epithelial detachments in central serous chorioretinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Anders; Hamann, Steffen; Larsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    compatible with CSC. RESULTS: A juxtafoveal retinal pigment epithelial detachment with apical atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium with corresponding severe attenuation of the pigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium was observed in both patients. One of the patients presented with a serous...... neurosensory retinal detachment with smokestack leakage 7 years after first being seen. The other patient was never seen with a neurosensory detachment. CONCLUSION: Isolated pigment epithelial detachment with apical retinal pigment epithelial atrophy may represent a precursor stage of CSC....

  12. Elemental identification of blue paintings traces present in historic cemeteries in the São Martinho region, southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Thiago G.; Richter, Fábio Andreas; Castro, Elisiana Trilha; Gonçalves, Samantha; Spudeit, Daniel A.; Micke, Gustavo A.

    2018-03-01

    Cemeteries are of great significance in many communities, often being considered of invaluable historical, artistic, architectural and cultural significance and thus they need to be preserved. In this regard, understanding the historical aspects and the construction techniques used is essential for their protection. The purpose of this paper is to describe historical aspects of the funerary heritage present in the region of São Martinho in southern Brazil, along with an analysis of the blue paint found in cemeteries of German colonies in the region studied. FTIR analysis suggests that the binder is composed mostly of a protein resin and a small amount of lipid. The morphology of the pigment was investigated by SEM and EDS and the spectra revealed that the major elements present in the blue pigment are Na, Al, Si and S, with an overlap in the elemental mapping, indicative of ultramarine pigments. The GC-MS results are consistent with the type of binder identified by FTIR and indicate a mixture of oils, probably from vegetal sources, and proteins.

  13. Effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) exposure on retinal pigment epithelium in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaadane, Imene; Villalpando Rodriguez, Gloria Elisa; Boulenguez, Pierre; Chahory, Sabine; Carré, Samuel; Savoldelli, Michèle; Jonet, Laurent; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Martinsons, Christophe; Torriglia, Alicia

    2017-12-01

    Ageing and alteration of the functions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are at the origin of lost of vision seen in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The RPE is known to be vulnerable to high-energy blue light. The white light-emitting diodes (LED) commercially available have relatively high content of blue light, a feature that suggest that they could be deleterious for this retinal cell layer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of "white LED" exposure on RPE. For this, commercially available white LEDs were used for exposure experiments on Wistar rats. Immunohistochemical stain on RPE flat mount, transmission electron microscopy and Western blot were used to exam the RPE. LED-induced RPE damage was evaluated by studying oxidative stress, stress response pathways and cell death pathways as well as the integrity of the outer blood-retinal barrier (BRB). We show that white LED light caused structural alterations leading to the disruption of the outer blood-retinal barrier. We observed an increase in oxidized molecules, disturbance of basal autophagy and cell death by necrosis. We conclude that white LEDs induced strong damages in rat RPE characterized by the breakdown of the BRB and the induction of necrotic cell death. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  14. Fixed pigmented erythema due to cimetidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almamy Diabaté

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fixed pigmented erythema (EPF is pathognomonic of drug-induced toxicity. Antisecretory drugs are among the most commonly not responsible drugs. EPF secondary to cimetidine administration has rarely been described. We report an EPF case during a cimetidine-based treatment in Bouake. A 43-year-old patient, HIV negative, consults for an EPF located on both sides of the breasts, on the 5th day of an antiulcer treatment comprising compressed cimetidine and gastric dressing based on phosphatase d ‘aluminum. The diagnosis is made in front of the characteristic aspect of the lesion of EPF and the early reappearance of lesions recurring exactly in the same places, after the reintroduction of cimetidine. The discovery of an EPF imposes a strict etiological approach in search of the responsible drug. During anti-ulcer treatment, the practitioner should bear in mind the potential role of cimetidine.

  15. Knee tuberculosis masquerading as pigmented villonodular synovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Meena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB, once a disease confined to undeveloped or developing nations is currently in resurgence, which is attributable to pandemic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and immigration from endemic areas. Tuberculous arthritis is difficult to diagnose early because of its atypical insidious clinical manifestations and nonspecific imaging findings. TB is also known as the ′great mimicker′. Specifically, monoarticular tuberculosis of the knee may mimic pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS. The present report describes a young patient with tuberculous arthritis of knee joint. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate management was delayed due to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings, such as, hemosiderin deposits and a nodular mass around the knee joint, suggestive of a diffuse type of PVNS. Our findings suggest that the first step in the diagnosis of tuberculous knee arthritis is to have a high index of suspicion.

  16. Laser treatment for pigmented lesions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christina E; Nouri, Keyvan

    2006-03-01

    Just a few decades ago, before lasers were introduced into dermatologic practice, many cutaneous lesions were untreatable. Since the introduction of lasers in dermatology in the 1960s and its revolution by Anderson and Parrish in the 1980s based on the selective photothermolysis theory, lasers have become a main component of many dermatology practices. With the advent of these selective lasers and their constant technological advancements, many lesions can now be easily removed with a low incidence of complications, creating a high demand for laser surgery. Aims This paper will review current laser systems used for pigmented lesions. An English-language literature search and review through Medline from January 1994 to October 2004. Review of the latest techniques and lasers used in treating pigmentary disorders and possible future applications and treatment options. Laser technique and technology has greatly advanced producing more effacious treatment with minimal complications.

  17. Sequences associated with human iris pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frudakis, Tony; Thomas, Matthew; Gaskin, Zach; Venkateswarlu, K; Chandra, K Suresh; Ginjupalli, Siva; Gunturi, Sitaram; Natrajan, Sivamani; Ponnuswamy, Viswanathan K; Ponnuswamy, K N

    2003-12-01

    To determine whether and how common polymorphisms are associated with natural distributions of iris colors, we surveyed 851 individuals of mainly European descent at 335 SNP loci in 13 pigmentation genes and 419 other SNPs distributed throughout the genome and known or thought to be informative for certain elements of population structure. We identified numerous SNPs, haplotypes, and diplotypes (diploid pairs of haplotypes) within the OCA2, MYO5A, TYRP1, AIM, DCT, and TYR genes and the CYP1A2-15q22-ter, CYP1B1-2p21, CYP2C8-10q23, CYP2C9-10q24, and MAOA-Xp11.4 regions as significantly associated with iris colors. Half of the associated SNPs were located on chromosome 15, which corresponds with results that others have previously obtained from linkage analysis. We identified 5 additional genes (ASIP, MC1R, POMC, and SILV) and one additional region (GSTT2-22q11.23) with haplotype and/or diplotypes, but not individual SNP alleles associated with iris colors. For most of the genes, multilocus gene-wise genotype sequences were more strongly associated with iris colors than were haplotypes or SNP alleles. Diplotypes for these genes explain 15% of iris color variation. Apart from representing the first comprehensive candidate gene study for variable iris pigmentation and constituting a first step toward developing a classification model for the inference of iris color from DNA, our results suggest that cryptic population structure might serve as a leverage tool for complex trait gene mapping if genomes are screened with the appropriate ancestry informative markers.

  18. Clinicoepidemiological study of pigmented purpuric dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pigmented purpuric dermatoses (PPD are a group of vascular disorders with varied manifestations which cause concern and are resistant to treatment. The literature is still lacking in clinicoepidemiological studies. Aim: To study the epidemiology, etiological, host and environmental factors, clinical manifestations, its variations, and the type prevalent in this part of the world. Materials and Methods: All cases of PPD were selected for the study from Skin and Venereal Disease, Out Patient Department between January 2008 and June 2009. Their history, examination, hematological investigations, and, in a few, histopathology findings were also recorded and data obtained were evaluated statistically. Results: There were 100 cases of PPD of total 55 323 patients (0.18%. There were 79 males and 21 females between 11 and 66 years. They were working as police men, security guards, barber, chemist, teachers, students, farmers, businessmen, and housewives. In a majority, there was a history of prolonged standing in day-to-day work. Purpuric, brownish pigmented, lichenoid or atrophic lesions were seen depending upon the type of PPD on lower parts of one or both lower limbs. Blood investigations were normal. Schamberg′s disease was seen in ninety five, Lichen aureus in three, lichenoid dermatosis and Majocchi′s disease in one case each. Discussion: Three clinical types of PPD were diagnosed which may represent different features of the same disease. Cell-mediated immunity, immune complexes, capillary fragility, gravitational forces, venous hypertension, focal infection, clothing, contact allergy to dyes, and drug intake have been incriminating factors in the past. Patient′s occupation and environmental factors may also be considered contributory in precipitating the disease. Conclusions: The study revealed the problem of PPD in this geographical area, its magnitude, clinical presentation, the type prevalent, and possible aggravating

  19. The biogeochemistry of tetrapyrrole pigments, emphasizing chlorophyll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louda, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectra recorded on native geopigments and on in vitro derivatives, obtained with combinations of copper insertion and borohydride reduction reactions, allowed a sensitive chromophore identification' scheme to be developed. Quantitation of the Ni and VO geoporphyrins, as well as the benzo-forms of each, was tested and precisions at the level of 100 [+-] 5% found. An overall methodology for obtaining repeatable low-voltage mass spectra on geoporphyrin arrays is presented. Repeatabilities for the various mass spectral-derived indices were; %DPEP ([+-]2%), X ([+-]2%), A.I.([+-]5%) and % BENZ ([+-]10%). Quantitation of the metallobenzoporphyrins was much better ([+-]2%) with UV/VIS techniques. Tetrapyrrole geochemistry was investigated at all stages of organic evolution. Thus, viable and senescent/dead uni-algal cultures, sediment trap material, surface (<1m) sediments, deep ocean long cores (DSDP), oil shales and petroleum crudes were investigated. Results indicate that the chlorophylls can serve as sources for a variety of geoporphyrins. Early in diagenesis two competing reactions dictate further fossilization.' First is the loss of the carbomethoxy group. This produces pyropheophorbides which can either lead to the true DPEP series, via a sequence of defunctionaliation reactions or, via intramolecular cyclization (dehydration), to certain 13[sup 2], 17[sup 3]-cyclopheophorbide enols. The latter, following defunctionalization, give rise to DiDPEP and/or DPEP-type pigments with a 7-membered exocyclic ring. Second, chlorophyll nuclei which have undergone oxidative scission of the isocyclic ring can, through purpurins and chlorins, theoretically yield C28-C30 ETIO-series porphyrins. Bacteriochlorophyll-a was found to be a dominant pigment in several anoxic sediments and is suggested as an important and highly specific precursor for certain geoporphyrins (i.e 3-methyl-desethyl-DPEP).

  20. Electronic properties of blue phosphorene/graphene and blue phosphorene/graphene-like gallium nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minglei; Chou, Jyh-Pin; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2017-07-05

    Blue phosphorene (BlueP) is a graphene-like phosphorus nanosheet which was synthesized very recently for the first time [Nano Lett., 2016, 16, 4903-4908]. The combination of electronic properties of two different two-dimensional materials in an ultrathin van der Waals (vdW) vertical heterostructure has been proved to be an effective approach to the design of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. Therefore, we used density functional theory to investigate the structural and electronic properties of two BlueP-based heterostructures - BlueP/graphene (BlueP/G) and BlueP/graphene-like gallium nitride (BlueP/g-GaN). Our results showed that the semiconducting nature of BlueP and the Dirac cone of G are well preserved in the BlueP/G vdW heterostructure. Moreover, by applying a perpendicular electric field, it is possible to tune the position of the Dirac cone of G with respect to the band edge of BlueP, resulting in the ability to control the Schottky barrier height. For the BlueP/g-GaN vdW heterostructure, BlueP forms an interface with g-GaN with a type-II band alignment, which is a promising feature for unipolar electronic device applications. Furthermore, we discovered that both G and g-GaN can be used as an active layer for BlueP to facilitate charge injection and enhance the device performance.

  1. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  2. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  3. EARLY DOWNHOME BLUES IN AMERICAN CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Muhni, Djuhertati Imam

    2012-01-01

    People's traditional music and the way people behave when performing it are symbolic expressions of broad cultural pattern and social organization . In other words music is a part of men's learned heritage . Hence this study is about music in a given culture, specifically blues in American culture . Allen Trachtenberg stated that blues songs are inheritance from the American past for negotiating black people's lives as Americans . In the experience of blues the African-Americans find themselv...

  4. The Red-Blue Transportation Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Vancroonenburg, Wim; Della Croce, Federico; Goossens, Dries; Spieksma, Frits

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the Red-Blue Transportation Problem (Red-Blue TP), a generalization of the transportation problem where supply nodes are partitioned into two sets and so-called exclusionary constraints are imposed. We encountered a special case of this problem in a hospital context, where patients need to be assigned to rooms. We establish the problem's complexity, and we compare two integer programming formulations. Furthermore, a maximization variant of Red-Blue TP is presented, for...

  5. Photosensitivity and photodynamic events in black, red and blue tattoos are common: A 'Beach Study'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton Carlsen, K; Serup, J

    2014-02-01

    To find the prevalence of complaints in people having tattoos, with emphasis on chronic complaints, photosensitivity and photodynamic events. Individuals sunbathing from June to September 2011 at the beaches of Denmark were invited to participate as they are prone to report tattoos and sun habits reliably. Sun-related and non-sun-related problems in tattoos were determined along with participants' use of sunscreen. Skin type was categorized, as were motifs and colours associated with problems. Of 467 sunbathers, 146 (31.3%) had tattoos. A total of 144 sunbathers with 301 tattoos accepted inclusion. Complaints were experienced in 60/144 (42%), of which 31/60 (52%) were sun related, such as swelling (58%), itching/stinging/pain (52%) and redness (26%). Reactions independent of sun were 29/60 (48%), such as reactions to heat 12/29 (41%) and cold 1/29 (4%). Red, blue and black tattoos predominantly caused sun-related complaints followed by the remaining colours. By number, problems in black tattoos dominated as black was far more frequent. Complaints such as swelling, itching, stinging, pain and redness are common, predominantly in black and red tattoos, but also frequent in blue tattoos, thus, not confined to one specific colour or chemical entity or class of pigment. Symptoms may switch on and off in seconds, typically not of the weal-and-flare type. Photochemical reactions to pigment or pigment-breakdown products in situ in the skin with induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is presumed to be one causative mechanism. Another possible mechanism especially relevant in black may be induction of ROS due to effects of aggregation of carbon black nanoparticles. © 2013 The Authors Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. Variable blue straggler stars in NGC 5466

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, H.C.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E.W.; Nemec, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Nine variable blue stragglers have been found in the globular cluster NGC 5466. The six dwarf Cepheids in this cluster coexist in the instability strip with other nonvariable stars. The three eclipsing binaries are among the hottest of the blue stragglers. The hypothesis is discussed that all blue stragglers in this cluster have undergone mass transfer in close binaries. Under this hypothesis, rotation and spin-down play important roles in controlling the evolution of blue stragglers in old clusters and in affecting some of their observational properties. 14 refs

  7. Morphological responses of wheat to blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C.; Bugbee, B.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light significantly increased tillering in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants grown at the same photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). Plants were grown under two levels of blue light (400-500 nm) in a controlled environment with continuous irradiation. Plants received either 50 micromoles m-2 s-1 of blue light or 2 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light from filtered metal halide lamps at a total irradiance of 200 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF (400-700 nm). Plants tillered an average of 25% more under the higher level of blue light. Blue light also caused a small, but consistent, increase in main culm development, measured as Haun stage. Leaf length was reduced by higher levels of blue light, while plant dry-mass was not significantly affected by blue light. Applying the principle of equivalent light action, the results suggest that tillering and leaf elongation are mediated by the blue-UV light receptor(s) because phytochrome photoequilibrium for each treatment were nearly identical.

  8. Why Blue-Collar Blacks Help Less

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Sandra Susan; Young, Kara Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Why are blue-collar blacks less likely to help jobseekers than jobholders from other ethnoracial groups or even than more affluent blacks? Drawing from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 97 black and Latino workers at one large, public sector employer, we find that blue-collar black workers both helped less proactively and rejected more requests for assistance than did blue-collar Latino and white-collar black workers. We attribute blue-collar blacks’ more passive engagement to their...

  9. A XANES study of cobalt speciation state in blue-and-white glazes from 16th to 17th century Chinese porcelains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, M.O.; Silva, T.P.; Veiga, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Speciation of cobalt in ancient Chinese porcelain glazes studied by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. ► Blue pigmenting role of tetrahedral Co 2+ ions. ► Uncertainties in deducing a formal valence state for cobalt ions from the edge energy. - Abstract: The composition of cobalt blue pigments used in ancient blue-and-white Chinese glazes is known to have changed between the 14th and the 17th century and ratios of some main chemical components plus trace elements are relevant guide-lines to establish the porcelain manufacture period. Once archaeological findings of Chinese porcelains can contribute to set up dating processes, a study of blue-and-white porcelain shards recovered during recent excavations in Lisbon Old-City was carried out by non-destructive laboratory X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for chemical characterization, combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation to ascertain the formal valence and coordination of pigmenting cobalt ions. Following a preliminary extended X-ray absorption fine-structure study that revealed a coordination of divalent cobalt ions slightly above four, a detailed analysis of the near-edge region of Co 1s X-ray absorption spectra (XANES) was carried out on the blue-and-white glazes from those archaeological Chinese porcelain fragments. Pre-edge features and edge details are discussed in comparison with XANES spectra obtained from model compounds with well known crystal structure – Co 3 O 4 , CoAl 2 O 4 and Co 2 SiO 4 , plus a cobalt-based blue pigment (cerulean). Present chemical data validate the manufacture period of studied Chinese porcelains advanced by Art Historians on the single basis of stylistic features (late 16th and medium 17th century). Spectroscopic results confirm a coordination environment of pigmenting Co 2+ ions close to tetrahedral and substantiate the dual role of cobalt as network former plus modifier in the glaze of ancient Chinese porcelains.

  10. The retinal pigment epithelium undergoes massive apoptosis during early differentiation and pigmentation of the optic cup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pequignot, M O; Provost, A C; Sallé, S; Menasche, M; Saule, S; Jaïs, J-P; Abitbol, M

    2011-04-20

    The aim of our work was to study apoptosis during the development of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in mice between embryonic day (E) 10.5 and E12.5 and to examine a possible link between apoptosis and pigmentation. We collected mouse embryos at E10.5, E11.5, and E12.5 and labeled apoptotic cells in 5-µm paraffin sections, using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling technique. We counted the total number of cells and the number of apoptotic cells in the early developing RPE and calculated the percentage of apoptosis at each stage. In the C57BL/6J mouse, 17% of the RPE cells were apoptotic at E10.5 compared to 0.9% at E12.5. At E11.5, three-quarters of the RPE cells began to pigment, and apoptotic cells were located mostly in the nonpigmented part. In contrast, in the BALB/c mouse (tyrosinase-deficient) and pJ mouse (carrying mutations in the p gene) hypopigmented strains, the RPE contained significantly fewer apoptotic cells (7.5% and 10.1%, respectively) at E10.5 than controls. Subsequently at E11.5 and E12.5, the two hypopigmented strains displayed different apoptotic patterns; the BALB/c RPE had a similar percentage of apoptotic cells to controls (1.5% and 1.1%, respectively, for BALB/c versus 3.0% and 0.9%, respectively, for C57BL/6J), whereas the pJ RPE contained significantly more apoptosis (7.5% and 3.5%, respectively). Overall we observed differences in the evolution of the relative total number of RPE cells between the three strains. Apoptosis is a main event during the first stages of normal RPE development, indicating an essential role during RPE differentiation. Moreover, the early apoptotic pattern and possibly the whole early development of the RPE is different between hypopigmented and pigmented strains, as well as between BALB/c and pJ mice. This suggests the existence of regulatory and developmental differences with a more complex origin than just differing pigmentation levels.

  11. Pigment characterization and lovastatin content of Monascus purpureus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERNAWATI KASIM

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on characterization of pigment and lovastatin content of M. purpureus had been done. The aim of the research was to select 19 isolates of M. purpureus which produced the highest lovastatin content, and whether there was any correlation between pigment content and the lovastatin content. The isolates were grown on slant agar of bean sprout extract agar for 14 days. The spores suspension was inoculated to sterile cooked rice IR 42, then incubated for 14 days at 27-32oC. The fermented rice called “angkak”, dried in oven at 40-45oC for two weeks. The dried “angkak” was powdered to measure the content of the pigment and lovastatin. By using spectrophotometer the content of the yellow pigment and the red pigment at 390 nm and 500 nm wavelength respectively, could be detected. The content of lovastatin could be measured by using HPLC. The result showed that all the tested isolates could produce lovastatin compound, the yellow and the red pigment. The highest lovastatin content was 0.92% which produced by JmbA isolate. There was no correlation between the pigment and the lovastatin content.

  12. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreola, F.; Barbieri, L.; Bondioli, F.; Cannio, M.; Ferrari, A.M.; Lancellotti, I.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr 0.04 Sn 0.97 SiO 5 and green Ca 3 Cr 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr 2 O 3 . The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr 2 O 3

  13. Optimizing Angkak Pigments and Lovastatin Production By Monascus purpureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASIM DANURI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Angkak pigments and lovastatin had been reported very useful as natural coloring agents, as an agent to increase thrombocyte level in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, and also as a compound that was able to control blood cholesterol level. Three strains of fungus Monascus purpureus AKI, AKII, and 915 were selected to produce angkak pigments and lovastatin in potato dextrose agar (PDA medium. The best fungus strain, which is AKII, was then applied in three kinds of rice media (white rice IR-42, red rice BP-1804-IF-9, and a combination of 1:1 (w/w white IR-42 and red rice BP-1804-IF-9 for solid fermentation. The best medium and fermentation times were determined for the production of angkak pigments and lovastatin separately. Results showed that strains, media, and duration of fermentations gave significant effect on the amount of pigment produced. Strain AKII produced highest concentration of angkak pigments. The combination of rice (White IR-42 and red rice BP-1804-IF-9 produced the highest pigment than the individual white and red rie it self. The optimum duration of fermentation was 16 days for strains AKI and AKII, but only 15 days for strain 915. Therefore the strain AKII with media combination of rice and a fermentation time of 16 days were used to investigate the additional effect of various minerals. Addition of the mineral individually gave significant increased on angkak pigment production by AKII, where as the addition of minerals mixture in the forth tube did not.

  14. Editor's Highlight: Periodic Exposure to Smartphone-Mimic Low-Luminance Blue Light Induces Retina Damage Through Bcl-2/BAX-Dependent Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Hui; Wu, Man-Ru; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Lin, Fan-Li; Ho, Jau-Der; Kang, Jaw-Jou; Hsiao, George; Cheng, Yu-Wen

    2017-05-01

    Blue light-induced phototoxicity plays an important role in retinal degeneration and might cause damage as a consequence of smartphone dependency. Here, we investigated the effects of periodic exposure to blue light-emitting diode in a cell model and a rat retinal damage model. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells were subjected to blue light in vitro and the effects of blue light on activation of key apoptotic pathways were examined by measuring the levels of Bcl-2, Bax, Fas ligand (FasL), Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), and caspase-3 protein. Blue light treatment of RPE cells increased Bax, cleaved caspase-3, FasL, and FADD expression, inhibited Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL accumulation, and inhibited Bcl-2/Bax association. A rat model of retinal damage was developed with or without continuous or periodic exposure to blue light for 28 days. In this rat model of retinal damage, periodic blue light exposure caused fundus damage, decreased total retinal thickness, caused atrophy of photoreceptors, and injured neuron transduction in the retina. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Prehistory of the Little Blue River Valley, Western Missouri: Archaeological Investigations at Blue Springs Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Lake project. The report discusses the geomorphology and vegetation of the Little Blue River valley, Late Quaternary bioclimatic change in Western...54 Aquatic Communities ............................... 58 IV. LATE QUATERNARY BIOCLIMATIC CHANGE IN WESTERN MISSOURI by Rolfe D...City District is presently constructing Blue Springs Lake on the East Fork of the Little Blue River in Jackson County, Missouri. The location of the

  16. DNA damage in isolated rat hepatocytes exposed to C.I. pigment orange 5 and C.I. pigment yellow 12 by the alkaline comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P; Wallin, Håkan; Grunnet, N

    1998-01-01

    , and C.I. pigment orange 5 is a naphthol-azo pigment. The pigments are virtually insoluble in aqueous solutions, and they have not been tested extensively for toxicological effects. C.I. pigment orange 5 increased the levels of DNA damage at 5 microg/ml (P .../ml (P effect of incubation time (20, 40, and 80 min) of the same concentrations of the pigments was tested. The levels of DNA damage were increased up to 80 min. Both pigments produced DNA damage that was in the same range as the food carcinogen 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f......]quinoxaline. Our data indicate that both C.I. pigment orange 5 and C.I. pigment yellow 12 are genotoxic in hepatocytes with metabolizing capacities. However, further investigation of the metabolism and disposition are required for the evaluation of the safety of these pigments....

  17. The extraction of pigments from fresh Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liqun; Li, Pengcheng; Fan, Shoujin

    2008-05-01

    The pigments in Laminaria japonica was extracted with six organic solvents and analyzed in spectroscopy analysis. The extractions conditions were screened by an orthogonal test and the quantity of extracted pigments was determined spectroscopically. The results show that: (1) among the six organic solvents, acetone was the most effective one for the extraction; (2) the optimum extraction conditions were as follows: the ratio of S/M (solvent volume/ material weight) was 30 ml/g; fresh seaweed was extracted 2 times in 2 h; (3) the average total content of pigments was 1.85 mg/g (calculated with dry L. japonica).

  18. Visual pigments of the box jellyfish species Chiropsella bronzie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O*Connor, Megan; Garm, Anders Lydik; Marshall, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Box jellyfish (Cubomedusae) possess a unique visual system comprising 24 eyes of four morphological types. Moreover, box jellyfish display several visually guided behaviours, including obstacle avoidance and light-shaft attractance. It is largely unknown what kind of visual information box jellyf...... results strongly indicate that only one type of visual pigment is present in the upper and lower lens eyes with a peak absorbance of approximately 510 nm. Additionally, the visual pigment appears to undergo bleaching, similar to that of vertebrate visual pigments....

  19. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma mimicking a superficial spreading melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbún Acuña, Paula; Cullen Aravena, Roberto; Maturana Donaire, César; Ares Mora, Raúl; Porras Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-20

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of skin cancer, especially in elderly people. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a rare subtype and has been described in the literature as a nodular and hyperpigmented lesion; rarely, it can appear as an extensive pigmented plate, which may be clinically indistinguishable from superficial spreading melanoma and Bowen disease. Dermatoscopy has a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. When Menzies criteria are used; however, the final diagnosis is made by histopathology. The objective of the present report is to analyze the case of a patient with pigmented basal cell carcinoma simulating a superficial spreading melanoma.

  20. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Daleth

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The blue rubber nevus syndrome consists of multiple venous malformations in the skin and gastrointestinal tract associated with intestinal hemorrhage and iron deficiency anemia. Other organs may be involved. The causes of this syndrome are unknown. Its most common presentation is in the form of sporadic cases, but dominant autosomal inheritance has been described. It is a condition that affects both sexes equally, and its occurrence is rare in the black race. We present a case of this syndrome diagnosed in a 11-year-old patient. He had severe anemia and a venous swelling on the trunk. Similar lesions were found in the stomach, bowel, and on his foot. We emphasize the main clinical aspects: intestine, eyes, nasopharynx, parotids, lungs, liver, spleen, heart, brain, pleura, peritoneum, pericardium, skeletal muscles, bladder, and penis lesions, systemic complications that may occur to these patients which are thrombosis and calcification, as well as consumptive coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia that may occur within the nevi.

  1. A comparison of melanin bleaching and azure blue counterstaining in the immunohistochemical diagnosis of malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligora, C J; Fair, K P; Clem, M S; Patterson, J W

    1999-12-01

    Distinguishing heavily pigmented melanocytes from melanophages on routine hematoxylin and eosin slides can be difficult. Melanin bleaching with potassium permanganate solution is a traditional means of removing melanin from tissues and can be used before immunohistochemical staining to remove any pigment that might be confused with the brown chromogen diaminobenzidine. Azure B stains melanin granules green-blue, easily contrasts with diaminobenzidine, and may be used as a counterstain on unbleached sections after immunohistochemical staining. To our knowledge, studies comparing melanin bleaching with azure B counterstaining in the immunohistochemical evaluation of malignant melanomas have not been performed. Paraffin sections from 33 heavily pigmented malignant melanomas were bleached with a 3.0-g/L potassium permanganate solution, immunohistochemically stained for S-100 and HMB-45, and counterstained with hematoxylin. Unbleached sections were similarly stained for S-100 and HMB-45 and counterstained with azure B. To establish optimal permanganate concentrations, a variable number of sections were bleached with lower permanganate concentrations ranging from 0.125 to 2.5 g/L. S-100 antigenicity was preserved at all permanganate concentrations, whereas HMB-45 antigenicity was abolished at concentrations of 0.5 g/L and greater. At permanganate concentrations from 0.125 to 0.5 g/L, both antigenicities were preserved; however, melanin was incompletely removed. Complications of bleaching included tissue damage and loss of cytologic detail. Positive immunohistochemical staining was observed in azure B counterstained sections. Azure B stained melanin greenblue and was easily distinguished from the brown diaminobenzidine chromogen, regardless of the antibody tested. Neither tissue damage nor loss of cytologic detail was observed. We conclude that the use of azure B counterstaining is superior to permanganate bleaching in the histologic evaluation of heavily pigmented

  2. Gingival Pigmentation Affected by Smoking among Different Age Groups: A Quantitative Analysis of Gingival Pigmentation Using Clinical Oral Photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tomotaka; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Sugiyama, Seiichi; Hanioka, Takashi; Naito, Toru

    2017-08-04

    The presence of any age-related differences in gingival pigmentation associated with smoking, particularly in a young population, remains to be fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the age-related differences in smoking gingival pigmentation. Gingival pigmentation was analyzed using the gingival melanosis record (GMR) and Hedin's classification with frontal oral photographs taken at 16 dental offices in Japan. Participants were categorized into 10-year age groups, and their baseline photographs were compared. In addition, to evaluate the effect of smoking cessation on gingival pigmentation, subjects were divided into a former smoker group (stopped smoking) and current smoker group. A total of 259 patients 19 to 79 years of age were analyzed. People in their 30s showed the most widespread gingival pigmentation. In addition, subjects in their 20s showed a weak effect of smoking cessation on gingival pigmentation. These findings suggested that the gingival pigmentation induced by smoking was more remarkable in young people than in middle-aged people. This information may be useful for anti-smoking education, especially among young populations with a high affinity for smoking.

  3. The penetration depth and lateral distribution of pigment related to the pigment grain size and the calendering of paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelow, K.; Kristiansson, P.; Schueler, B.; Tullander, E.; Oestling, S.; Elfman, M.; Malmqvist, K.; Pallon, J.; Shariff, A.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of ink and newspaper has been investigated and the specific question of penetration of ink into the paper has been addressed with a nuclear microprobe using particle induced X-ray emission. The penetration depth of the newsprint is a critical factor in terms of increasing the quality of newsprint and minimising the amount of ink used. The objective of the experiment was to relate the penetration depth of pigment with the calendering of the paper. The dependence of the penetration depth on the pigment grain size was also studied. To study the penetration depth of pigment in paper, cyan ink with Cu as a tracer of the coloured pigment was used. For the study of the penetration depth dependence of pigment size, specially grounded Japanese ink with well-defined pigment grain size was used. This was compared to Swedish ink with pigment grains with normal size-distribution. The results show that the calendering of the paper considerably affects the penetration depth of ink

  4. Blue enhanced light sources: opportunities and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Natural daylight is characterized by high proportions of blue light. By proof of a third type of photoreceptor in the human eye which is only sensitive in this spectral region and by subsequent studies it has become obvious that these blue proportions are essential for human health and well being. In various studies beneficial effects of indoor lighting with higher blue spectral proportions have been proven. On the other hand with increasing use of light sources having enhanced blue light for indoor illumination questions are arising about potential health risks attributed to blue light. Especially LED are showing distinct emission characteristics in the blue. Recently the French agency for food, environmental and occupational health & safety ANSES have raised the question on health issues related to LED light sources and have claimed to avoid use of LED for lighting in schools. In this paper parameters which are relevant for potential health risks will be shown and their contribution to risk factors will quantitatively be discussed. It will be shown how to differentiate between photometric parameters for assessment of beneficial as well as hazardous effects. Guidelines will be discussed how blue enhanced light sources can be used in applications to optimally support human health and well being and simultaneously avoid any risks attributed to blue light by a proper design of lighting parameters. In the conclusion it will be shown that no inherent health risks are related to LED lighting with a proper lighting design.

  5. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  6. Blue jay attacks and consumes cedar waxwing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Saenz; Joshua B. Pierce

    2009-01-01

    Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) are known to be common predators on bird nests (Wilcove 1985, Picman and Schriml 1994). In addition to predation on eggs and nestlings, Blue Jays occasionally prey on fledgling and adult birds (Johnson and Johnson 1976, Dubowy 1985). A majority of reports involve predation on House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) and other small birds (...

  7. Early changes in staurosporine-induced differentiated RGC-5 cells indicate cellular injury response to nonlethal blue light exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Huang, Chen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Minshu

    2015-06-01

    Blue light has been previously demonstrated to induce injury of retinal cells. The cellular responses to nonlethal blue light exposure for each type of retinal cell are of particular interest but remain undetermined. Based on the doses of blue light reported in previous research to be nonlethal to retinal pigment epithelial cells, here we investigated whether and to what extent such doses of blue light are cytotoxic to staurosporine-differentiated RGC-5 cells. RGC-5 cells were differentiated for 24 hours using 200 nM staurosporine. The resulting cells were cultured and exposed to blue light at three different energy levels (1, 10, and 50 J cm(-2)). Cellular morphologies were investigated with an inverted microscope and cell viability was assessed with a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated by H2DCFDA. After loading of MitoTracker Green FM dye, the mitochondrial contents were analyzed using flow cytometry. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in the media were also measured. The level of lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA). Treatment of the cells for 24 hours with 200 nM staurosporine successfully induced the differentiation of RGC-5 cells. No morphological changes were observed in the ssdRGC-5 cells exposed to blue light at 50 J cm(-2), which was the highest energy level tested. Exposure of the ssdRGC-5 cells to this energy level of blue light did, however, decrease their numbers by approximately 72.1% compared to the numbers of such cells found after being left in the dark. Remarkably, the levels of ROS generation and mitochondrial contents were, respectively, increased to 142% and 118% of those of the control by a 10 J cm(-2) exposure of blue light. The LDH activities and MDA levels exhibited no obvious changes in the blue light-exposed ssdRGC-5 cells compared to the control cells. In vitro nonlethal blue light exposure led to cellular

  8. Spectral effects of LEDs on chlorophyll fluorescence and pigmentation in Phalaenopsis ‘Vivien’ and ‘Purple Star’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Fretté, Xavier; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    , which increased the light absorption in the green/yellow part of the spectrum. The permanent downregulation of PSII moved a substantial part of the thermal dissipation from the light regulated NPQ to non-regulated energy losses estimated by ΦNPQ and ΦNO and the difference found in the balance between......We examined the effect of light emitting diode (LED) lighting in greenhouse facilities on growth, chlorophyll fluorescence and pigmentation in Phalaenopsis 'Vivien' and 'Purple Star' under purpose-built LED arrays yielding c. 200μmolm-2s-1 at plant height for 14h per day and 24/18°Cday....../night temperature, respectively, from January to April 2013. The light treatments were (1) 40% blue in 60% red (40% B/R), (2) 0% blue in 100% red (0% B/R) and (3) white LEDs with 32% blue in white (32% B/W, control), with background daylight under shade screens. The plants were harvested twice for leaf growth...

  9. Oral amalgam pigmentations (tattoos): a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, B M; Johnson, W W; Schuman, N J

    1992-12-01

    Oral amalgam tattoos are typically asymptomatic, benign, solitary or multiple clinical lesions produced by inadvertent placement of dental silver amalgam restorative material into the oral soft tissues. Diffuse lesions often display a grayish brown discoloration while other tattoos present a darker blue-black contrast. One hundred sixty-eight biopsy reports that confirmed the diagnosis of amalgam tattoo were analyzed to find age, sex, and race of the patients and size, location, and duration of occurrence of the lesions. Among the 168 cases, 235 individual tissue specimens were identified. A majority of the specimens were taken from the buccal mucosa, gingiva, and alveolar mucosa. The most common site for the lesion was the mandibular arch. The size of the individual specimens ranged from 0.10 cm to 1.50 cm. Almost two thirds of the specimens were 0.40 cm or less.

  10. Neutrophils Compromise Retinal Pigment Epithelial Barrier Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehao Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that neutrophils and their secreted factors mediate breakdown of the integrity of the outer blood-retina-barrier by degrading the apical tight junctions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. The effect of activated neutrophils or neutrophil cell lysate on apparent permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants was evaluated by measuring [H] mannitol flux in a modified Ussing chamber. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 in murine peritoneal neutrophils, and the effects of neutrophils on RPE tight-junction protein expression were assessed by confocal microscopy and western blot. Our results revealed that basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophils decreased occludin and ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours and increased the permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants by >3-fold (P<.05. Similarly, basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophil lysate decreased ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours (P<.05 and increased permeability of explants by 75%. Further, we found that neutrophils prominently express MMP-9 and that incubation of explants with neutrophils in the presence of anti-MMP-9 antibody inhibited the increase in permeability. These data suggest that neutrophil-derived MMP-9 may play an important role in disrupting the integrity of the outer blood-retina barrier.

  11. Age-related hair pigment loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social animals that communicate disproportionately via potent genetic signals imbued in the skin and hair, including racial, ethnic, health, gender, and age status. For the vast majority of us, age-related hair pigment loss becomes the inescapable signal of our disappearing youth. The hair follicle (HF) pigmentary unit is a wonderful tissue for studying mechanisms generally regulating aging, often before this becomes evident elsewhere in the body. Given that follicular melanocytes (unlike those in the epidermis) are regulated by the hair growth cycle, this cycle is likely to impact the process of aging in the HF pigmentary unit. The formal identification of melanocyte stem cells in the mouse skin has spurred a flurry of reports on the potential involvement of melanocyte stem cell depletion in hair graying (i.e., canities). Caution is recommended, however, against simple extrapolation of murine data to humans. Regardless, hair graying in both species is likely to involve an age-related imbalance in the tissue's oxidative stress handling that will impact not only melanogenesis but also melanocyte stem cell and melanocyte homeostasis and survival. There is some emerging evidence that the HF pigmentary unit may have regenerative potential, even after it has begun to produce white hair fibers. It may therefore be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some aging-associated changes to maintain melanin production for longer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Electrical estimulation of retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Olga Lucia; Pu, Jin; Townend, John; Forrester, John V; Zhao, Min; McCaig, Colin; Lois, Noemi

    2010-08-01

    We investigated and characterized the effect of externally applied electric fields (EF) on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells by exposing primary cultures of human RPE cells (hRPE) and those from the ARPE19 immortalized cell line to various strengths of EF (EF-treated cells) or to no EF (control cells) under different conditions including presence or absence of serum and gelatin and following wounding. We evaluated changes in RPE cell behavior in response to EF by using a computer based image capture and analysis system (Metamorph). We found that RPE cells responded to externally applied EFs by preferential orientation perpendicular to the EF vector, directed migration towards the anode, and faster translocation rate than control, untreated cells. These responses were voltage-dependent. Responses were observed even at low voltages, of 50-300 mV. Furthermore, the migration of hRPE cell sheets generated by wounding of confluent monolayers of cells at early and late confluence could be manipulated by the application of EF, with directed migration towards the anode observed at both sides of the wounded hRPE. In conclusion, RPE cell behaviour can be controlled by an externally applied EF. The potential for externally applied EF to be used as a therapeutic strategy in the management of selected retinal diseases warrants further investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyketides, toxins and pigments in Penicillium marneffei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Emily W T; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-30

    Penicillium marneffei (synonym: Talaromyces marneffei) is the most important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus in China and Southeastern Asia. The HIV/AIDS pandemic, particularly in China and other Southeast Asian countries, has led to the emergence of P. marneffei infection as an important AIDS-defining condition. Recently, we published the genome sequence of P. marneffei. In the P. marneffei genome, 23 polyketide synthase genes and two polyketide synthase-non-ribosomal peptide synthase hybrid genes were identified. This number is much higher than those of Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum, important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungi in the Western world. Phylogenetically, these polyketide synthase genes were distributed evenly with their counterparts found in Aspergillus species and other fungi, suggesting that polyketide synthases in P. marneffei did not diverge from lineage-specific gene duplication through a recent expansion. Gene knockdown experiments and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector/electrospray ionization-quadruple time of flight-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that at least four of the polyketide synthase genes were involved in the biosynthesis of various pigments in P. marneffei, including melanin, mitorubrinic acid, mitorubrinol, monascorubrin, rubropunctatin, citrinin and ankaflavin, some of which were mycotoxins and virulence factors of the fungus.

  14. Polyketides, Toxins and Pigments in Penicillium marneffei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily W. T. Tam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Penicillium marneffei (synonym: Talaromyces marneffei is the most important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus in China and Southeastern Asia. The HIV/AIDS pandemic, particularly in China and other Southeast Asian countries, has led to the emergence of P. marneffei infection as an important AIDS-defining condition. Recently, we published the genome sequence of P. marneffei. In the P. marneffei genome, 23 polyketide synthase genes and two polyketide synthase-non-ribosomal peptide synthase hybrid genes were identified. This number is much higher than those of Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum, important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungi in the Western world. Phylogenetically, these polyketide synthase genes were distributed evenly with their counterparts found in Aspergillus species and other fungi, suggesting that polyketide synthases in P. marneffei did not diverge from lineage-specific gene duplication through a recent expansion. Gene knockdown experiments and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector/electrospray ionization-quadruple time of flight-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that at least four of the polyketide synthase genes were involved in the biosynthesis of various pigments in P. marneffei, including melanin, mitorubrinic acid, mitorubrinol, monascorubrin, rubropunctatin, citrinin and ankaflavin, some of which were mycotoxins and virulence factors of the fungus.

  15. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress.

  16. Expressions of visual pigments and synaptic proteins in neonatal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    related macular degeneration inhuman. Some animal species show drastic retinal changes when exposed to intense light (e.g. albino rats). Althoughbirds have a pigmented retina, few reports indicated its susceptibility to light damage. To know ...

  17. Clinicopathological and immunohistochemical study of oral amalgam pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Risueño-Mata, Presentación; Ricart-Vayá, José M; Baquero Ruíz de la Hermosa, Carmen; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Amalgam tattoo, the most common exogenous oral pigmentation, can sometimes be confused with melanotic lesions, being then biopsied. We present the clinicopathological characteristics of 6 biopsied cases (5 females and 1 male) of oral amalgam pigmentation. The most common location was the gingival mucosa, followed by the buccal and palatal mucosa. Morphology and distribution (stromal, perivascular, perineural, endomysial) of pigmentation was variable; there was only 1 case with fibrous capsular reaction and likewise only a single case of granulomatous foreign body reaction. Morphological variability is conditioned by the timing and amount of the pigment deposit, which is often associated with infiltration by mast cells (CD117+), as well as overexpression of metallothionein and HLA-DR at different tissue levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Pigmented Bowen's disease presenting with a "starburst" pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maione, Vincenzo; Errichetti, Enzo; Roussel, Sara Laurent; Lebbé, Celeste

    2016-10-01

    Pigmented Bowen's disease (pBD) is an uncommon in situ squamous cell carcinoma of the skin usually presenting as a dark scaly plaque involving chronically exposed sites, which is not uncommonly mistaken for other similar pigmented lesions, such as melanoma, pigmented basal cell carcinoma or seborrheic keratosis [1,2]. Dermoscopy has been proven to improve its diagnosis by showing several findings, i.e., gray/brownish dots in linear arrangement, scales, coiled vessels, focal/multifocal amorphous hypopigmentation and bluish structureless areas [1,2]. However, pBD may sometimes display dermoscopic features which are typical of other pigmented lesions, thus making its recognition quite troublesome despite the use of dermoscopy [1,2]. We report a case of pBD with a "starburst" pattern, discussing its dermoscopic differential diagnosis.

  19. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    traumatic left knee pain and swelling. Radiography and histology were in keeping with Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS). This case highlights the clinical presentation of this rare disorder and emphasizes its consideration as a differential ...

  20. Ion beam induced luminescence on white inorganic pigments for paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaranta, A.; Dran, J.C.; Salomon, J.; Tonezzer, M.; Scian, C.; Beck, L.; Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Della Mea, G.

    2008-01-01

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been used for studying the emission features and the radiation hardness of white pigments. In particular, ZnO, gypsum and basic lead sulphate pigments have been analyzed with a 3.0 MeV H + beam at the AGLAE Louvre laboratory. The same pigments mixed with different binders have been also analyzed on a canvas, in order to evaluate the contribution of the binders both to the IBIL spectra and to the radiation hardness. It turns out that the binder affects both the IBIL spectra and the radiation hardness of pigments when the emission bands are related to point defects, as occurs for ZnO

  1. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee: a case report | Sitati ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    traumatic left knee pain and swelling. Radiography and histology were in keeping with Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS). This case highlights the clinical presentation of this rare disorder and emphasizes its consideration as a differential ...

  2. The relationship between pyrethrins and the yellow pigmentation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various clones and varieties of Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium flowers originating from various localities were used in this study to establish the link between pyrethrins and the yellow pigments in pyrethrum. Pyrethrins content was determined using spectrophotometric, AOAC and HPLC analytical techniques.

  3. Organic coatings containing polyaniline and inorganic pigments as corrosion inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalendová, A.; Veselý, D.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 1 (2008), s. 105-116 ISSN 0300-9440 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : pigment * coating * corrosion Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.375, year: 2008

  4. Epiphytic marine pigmented bacteria : A prospective source of natural antioxidants

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pawar, R.T.; Mohandass, C.; Sivaperumal, E.; Sabu, E.; Rajasabapathy, R.; Jagtap, T.G.

    Awareness on antioxidants and its significance in human healthcare has increased many folds in recent time. Increased demand requisite on welcoming newer and alternative resources for natural antioxidants. Seaweed associated pigmented bacteria...

  5. Fungal polyketide azaphilone pigments as future natural food colorants?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mapari, Sameer Shamsuddin; Thrane, Ulf; Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    The recent approval of fungal carotenoids as food colorants by the European Union has strengthened the prospects for fungal cell factories for the production of polyketide pigments. Fungal production of colorants has the main advantage of making the manufacturer independent of the seasonal supply...... of raw materials, thus minimizing batch-to-batch variations. Here, we review the potential of polyketide pigments produced from chemotaxonomically selected non-toxigenic fungal strains (e.g. Penicillium and Epicoccum spp.) to serve as food colorants. We argue that the production of polyketide azaphilone...... pigments from such potentially safe hosts is advantageous over traditional processes that involve Monascus spp., which risks co-production of the mycotoxin citrinin. Thus, there is tremendous potential for the development of robust fungal production systems for polyketide pigments, both to tailor...

  6. Vision system for auto-detection of cashmere pigmented fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenwei; Dehghani, Abbas A.; Zhang, Liwei; King, Tim; Greenwood, Barry

    2003-05-01

    The traditional method for the evaluation of cashmere quality is subjective and low in accuracy. In this paper, a computer vision system is presented for the objective identification and classification of pigmented fibres, which consists of a web maker, an image acquisition system and a computer for image processing. The techniques of fibre preparation, image acquisition and the development of suitable algorithm together with software for removal of the background fibres and counting of pigmented fibres, are described in detail.

  7. Malayaite ceramic pigments prepared with galvanic sludge as colouring agent

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Gracia; Ribeiro, Manuel J.; Labrincha, Joao A.; Dondi, Michele; Matteucci, Francesco; Cruciani, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of chrome?-tin red malayaite Ca(Cr,Sn)SiO5 pigments are reported. The novel approach of using a galvanizing sludge from the Cr/Ni plating process as colouring agent is investigated. The ceramic pigments were prepared using common solid state reaction process, with optimisation of milling and firing conditions. Characterisation was done by x-?ray powder diffraction, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and application in standard ceramic glazes. The ceramic pigm...

  8. A simple test for flexirubin-type pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fautz, E.; Reichenbach, H.

    1980-01-01

    A new test for flexirubin-type pigments has been developed based on the incorporation of labelled biosynthetic precursors into the pigments and autoradiographic analysis of chromatograms. The test is simple enough to allow the screening of a large number of organisms, and it can be applied directly or in a modified form to discover colorless building blocks or structural variants not easily found with former methods. (Auth.)

  9. The power of pigments, calibrating chemoclines with chlorophylls and carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junium, C. K.; Uveges, B. T.

    2017-12-01

    Phototrophic organisms produce a diversity of pigments that serve a broad range of specific biochemical functions. Pigments are either directly associated with the photosynthetic apparatus, the most notable being chlorophyll a, or are accessory pigments such as the carotenoid lutein. Their functions can also be categorized into roles that are related to light harvesting (e.g. fucoxanthin) or for photoprotection (e.g. scytonemin). The abundances of these two classes of pigments from environmental samples can provide specific information about photointensity and how it relates to environmental changes. For example, a deepening of the chemo/nutricline can result in the increased production of light gathering relative to photoprotective pigments. Here we apply a relatively simple approach that utilizes the abundance of photosynthetic relative to photoprotective pigments to help constrain changes in the water column position of the chemocline. To test the efficacy of this approach we have utilized the sedimentary record of the anoxic Lake Kivu in the East African Rift. Recent Lake Kivu sediments are punctuated by a series of sapropels that may be associated with overturn of the lake, and release of carbon dioxide and sulfide during potential limnic eruptions. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes decrease significantly at the onset of sapropel deposition and suggest that 13C-depleted dissolved inorganic carbon was upwelled into surface waters and was accompanied by high concentrations of ammonium, that allowed for 15N-depletion during incomplete nitrogen utilization. The pigment record, specifically the ratio of the photoprotective carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin to chlorophyll a increases significantly at the onset of sapropel deposition. This suggests that the chemocline shallowed, displacing phototrophic communities toward the surface of the lake where light intensities required production of photoprotective pigments. This approach can easily be applied to a wide variety of

  10. Synthetic pigments for Japanese quail fed diets with sorghum

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, A.M.A.; Melo, T.V.; Miranda, D.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Corn is the major energy ingredient in diets, and many ingredients have been tested aiming to replace it. In this regard, sorghum stands out for its chemical profile similar to that of corn. However, because it is low in carotenoids, its inclusion in diets reduces the egg yolk color pigmentation, which can be corrected by the addition of synthetic pigments. This study aimed to evaluate the performance and egg quality of Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) supplemented with red (cantha...

  11. Tapered photonic crystal fibers for blue-enhanced supercontinuum generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe; Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper

    2012-01-01

    Tapering of photonic crystal fibers is an effective way of shifting the blue edge of a supercontinuum spectrum down in the deep-blue. We discuss the optimum taper profile for enhancing the power in the blue edge....

  12. The red pigment prodigiosin is not an essential virulence factor in entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Li, JingHua; Chen, Jie; Liu, XiaoYuan; Xiang, TingTing; Zhang, Lin; Wan, YongJi

    2016-05-01

    Although pigments produced by pathogenic microbes are generally hypothesized as essential virulence factors, the role of red pigment prodigiosin in the pathogenesis of entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens is not clear. In this study, we analyzed the pathogenicity of different pigmented S. marcescens strains and their non-pigmented mutants in silkworms. Each pigmented strain and the corresponding non-pigmented mutants showed very similar LD50 value (statistically no difference), but caused very different symptom (color of the dead larva). Our results clearly indicated that the red pigment prodigiosin is not an essential virulence factor in entomopathogenic S. marcescens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pigment from Streptomyces bellus MSA1 isolated from marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, M.; Merlyn Keziah, S.; Hemalatha, M.; Subathra Devi, C.

    2017-11-01

    The existing study is purposeful on the intracellular pigment extraction from actinomycetes isolated from Kovalam Beach regions of Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. Only one actinobacterial isolate showed pigmented growth out of total 4 isolates. Ethyl acetate as the solvent was used in cell disruption technique for the extraction of intracellular pigments. UV-Visible spectrophotometry, FT-IR spectroscopy, HPLC and GC-MS were used for the partial characterization of the pigment. The extracted pigment was applied for the preparation of lip balm and assessing its textile dyeing property. In addition, the extracted pigment was analysed for antioxidant, antibacterial activity, MTT assay and haemolytic activity. On optimization, dextrose and maltose were the best carbon sources. The finest nitrogen sources were found to be casein and peptone. The optimum temperature range was 35°C -40°C and optimal pH was found to be between 6.0 and 8.0. The obtained results showed potent antioxidant activity and found to be non-toxic to human erythrocytes.

  14. [Synthesis and characterization of mixed metal oxide pigments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Yue, Shi-juan; Liu, Cui-ge; Wei, Yong-ju; Meng, Tao; Jiang, Han-jie; Shi, Yong-zheng; Xu, Yi-zhuang; Yu, Jiang; Wu, Jin-guang

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, aluminum chloride and various soluble salts of doping ions were dissolved in water. In addition, urea and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) were also dissolved in the above aqueous solution under supersonic treatments. Then the solutions were heated to induce the hydrolysis of urea so that soluble aluminum and doping ions convert into insoluble hydroxide or carbonate gels. After calcinations, the obtained gels change to mixed metal oxide pigments whose color is related to type and concentrations of the doping ions. XRD characterization demonstrates that the diffraction patterns of the products are the same as that of alpha-alumina. Diffuse reflectance spectra of samples of the samples in UV-Vis regions show that the absorption bands for d-d transitions of the doping ions undergo considerable change as the coordinate environments change. In addition, L*, a* and b* values of the pigments were measured by using UV-Vis densitometer. SEM results indicate that the size of the pigment powders is in the range 200-300 nm. The pigments are quite stable since no evidence of dissolution was observed after the synthesized pigment is soaked for 24 hours. ICP test shows that very little amount of doped metal occurs in the corresponding filtrate. The above results suggest that these new kinds of mixed metal oxide pigments are stable, non-toxic, environmental friendly and they may be applicable in molten spinning process and provide a new chance for non-aqueous printing and dyeing industry.

  15. The Solvent Effectiveness on Extraction Process of Seaweed Pigment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warkoyo Warkoyo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Eucheuma cottonii seaweed is a species of seaweed cultured in Indonesian waters, because its cultivation is relatively easy and inexpensive. It has a wide variety of colors from green to yellow green, gray, red and brown, indicating photosynthetic pigments, such as chlorophyll and carotenoids. An important factor in the effectiveness of pigment extraction is the choice of solvent. The correct type of solvent in the extraction method of specific natural materials is important so that a pigment with optimum quality that is also benefical to the society can be produced. The target of this research is to obtain a high quality solvent type of carotenoid pigment. This research was conducted using a randomized block design with three (3 replications involving two factors namely solvent type (4 levels: aceton, ethanol, petroleum benzene, hexan & petroleum benzene and seaweed color (3 levels: brown, green and red. Research results indicated that each solvent reached a peak of maximal absorbance at  410-472 nm, namely carotenoids. The usage of acetone solvent gave the best pigment quality. Brown, green and red seaweed have pigment content of 1,28 mg/100 g; 0,98 mg/100 g; 1,35 mg/100 g and rendement of 6,24%; 4,85% and 6,65% respectively.

  16. The gecko visual pigment: the anion hypsochromic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescitelli, F; Karvaly, B

    1991-01-01

    The 521-pigment in the retina of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) readily responds to particular physical and chemical changes in its environment. When solubilized in chloride deficient state the addition of Class I anions (Cl-, Br-) induces a bathochromic shift of the absorption spectrum. Class II anions (NO3-, IO3-, N3-, OCN-, SCN-, SeCN-, N(CN)2-), which exhibit ambidental properties, cause an hypsochromic shift. Class III anions (F-, I-, NO2-, CN-, AsO3-, SO2(4-), S2O2(3-) have no spectral effect on the 521-pigment. Cations appear to have no influence on the pigment absorption and Class I anions prevent or reverse the hypsochromic shift caused by Class II anions. It is suggested that the spectral displacements reflect specific changes in the opsin conformation, which alter the immediate (dipolar) environment of the retinal chromophore. The protein conformation seems to promote excited-state processes most in the native 521-pigment state and least in the presence of Class II anions. This in turn suggests that the photosensitivity of the 521-pigment is controlled by the excited rather than by the ground-state properties of the pigment.

  17. Endothelial Cells Promote Pigmentation through Endothelin Receptor B Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzetti, Claire; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Ghorbel, Houda Hammami; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Ambrosetti, Damien; Bahadoran, Philippe; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Ballotti, Robert; Mahns, Andre; Passeron, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Findings of increased vascularization in melasma lesions and hyperpigmentation in acquired bilateral telangiectatic macules suggested a link between pigmentation and vascularization. Using high-magnification digital epiluminescence dermatoscopy, laser confocal microscopy, and histological examination, we showed that benign vascular lesions of the skin have restricted but significant hyperpigmentation compared with the surrounding skin. We then studied the role of microvascular endothelial cells in regulating skin pigmentation using an in vitro co-culture model using endothelial cells and melanocytes. These experiments showed that endothelin 1 released by microvascular endothelial cells induces increased melanogenesis signaling, characterized by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor phosphorylation, and increased tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase levels. Immunostaining for endothelin 1 in vascular lesions confirmed the increased expression on the basal layer of the epidermis above small vessels compared with perilesional skin. Endothelin acts through the activation of endothelin receptor B and the mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and p38, to induce melanogenesis. Finally, culturing of reconstructed skin with microvascular endothelial cells led to increased skin pigmentation that could be prevented by inhibiting EDNRB. Taken together these results demonstrated the role of underlying microvascularization in skin pigmentation, a finding that could open new fields of research for regulating physiological pigmentation and for treating pigmentation disorders such as melasma.

  18. Engineered pigments based on iridescent cellulose nanocrystal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, Raphael; Roussel, Francine; Coindeau, Stéphane; Belgacem, Naceur; Bras, Julien

    2015-05-20

    A simple method to produce biobased iridescent pigments from cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films is reported. The process consists of forming nanostructured films from a CNC liquid-crystalline suspension and an appropriate dry grinding. The features of the iridescent pigments are described; they have a flake-like morphology with a thickness of 25 μm. However, because of the presence of sulfate groups, thermal degradation and high redispersion in water occur, which affect the iridescent property of these biobased pigments. To overcome such limitations, two post-treatments are proposed. The sulfate ester groups are removed from the iridescent pigments with vacuum overdrying. The mass loss of iridescent pigment in water is reduced with an increase of the ionic strength in the aqueous medium by NaCl addition. These post-treatments have proven to be efficient and engineered pigments based on CNC films can be used to add anticounterfeiting features to packaging manufactured by classical paper techniques or extrusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of Minoan white pigments used on pottery from Palaikastro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swann, Charles P.; Ferrence, Susan; Betancourt, Phlip P.

    2000-01-01

    Previous analyses of Early Minoan (ca. 2200-2000 BC) and Middle Minoan (ca. 2000-1700 BC) white pigments from Crete have revealed a complex situation in which several different substances were used for the ornament on pottery. The technological situation and the nature of these pigments is still not fully understood. A high-magnesium paint has been tentatively identified as talc, and a high-calcium paint has been tentatively identified as calcium silicate, but the distribution of these pigments is still not known. A new program of analysis by PIXE at the Bartol Research Institute of the University of Delaware has examined several white pigments from Palaikastro, a site in Eastern Crete, with interesting results. Three different materials or mixtures of materials can be identified. None of the pigments is rich in magnesium. All of the paints tested contain substantial amounts of aluminum and silica, with a variable calcium content. One class is high in calcium, and the second is substantially lower in calcium, but both contain appreciable amounts of iron. The third substance is an iron free white pigment. The materials can be tentatively identified as mixtures of calcium silicates and aluminosilicates, probably with admixed quartz

  20. Production and chemical characterization of pigments in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Patrícia Nirlane da Costa; Grigoletto, Tahuana Luiza Bim; de Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo; Abreu, Lucas M; Guimarães, Luís Henrique Souza; Santos, Cledir; Galvão, Luciano Ribeiro; Cardoso, Patrícia Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Production of pigments by filamentous fungi is gaining interest owing to their use as food colourants, in cosmetics and textiles, and because of the important biological activities of these compounds. In this context, the objectives of this study were to select pigment-producing fungi, identify these fungi based on internal transcribed spacer sequences, evaluate the growth and pigment production of the selected strains on four different media, and characterize the major coloured metabolites in their extracts. Of the selected fungal strains, eight were identified as Aspergillus sydowii (CML2967), Aspergillus aureolatus (CML2964), Aspergillus keveii (CML2968), Penicillium flavigenum (CML2965), Penicillium chermesinum (CML2966), Epicoccum nigrum (CML2971), Lecanicillium aphanocladii (CML2970) and Fusarium sp. (CML2969). Fungal pigment production was influenced by medium composition. Complex media, such as potato dextrose and malt extract, favoured increased pigment production. The coloured compounds oosporein, orevactaene and dihydrotrichodimerol were identified in extracts of L. aphanocladii (CML2970), E. nigrum (CML2971), and P. flavigenum (CML2965), respectively. These results indicate that the selected fungal strains can serve as novel sources of pigments that have important industrial applications.