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Sample records for blue copper site

  1. Preferred sites and pathways for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1988-01-01

    of where and how electrons are transferred to and from the copper-ion have been investigated. One experimental approach developed in order to pursue these problems is that of reductively labeling several representative, yet structurally distinct blue single copper proteins; azurin, plastocyanin......, and stellacyanin with chromium ions. In all three cases, a substitution inert Cr(III)-adduct is formed when the oxidized protein is reduced by Cr(II)ag ions. In azurin, Cr(III) binds to the Glu-91 carboxylate approximately 10 A from the copper center. In both plastocyanin and stellacyanin the Cr(III) label is most...... probably also coordinated to carboxylate groups, present in plastocyanin, and in stellacyanin 12 A and 6 A, respectively, from the copper center. The salient feature emerging from examination of the three copper proteins is that a pi-facilitated electron transfer (E.T.) pathway may be operative; in azurin...

  2. Preferred sites and pathways for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1988-01-01

    probably also coordinated to carboxylate groups, present in plastocyanin, and in stellacyanin 12 A and 6 A, respectively, from the copper center. The salient feature emerging from examination of the three copper proteins is that a pi-facilitated electron transfer (E.T.) pathway may be operative; in azurin......, E.T. proceeds via an extended imidazole ring system, and in plastocyanin and stellacyanin via a weakly coupled pi-system. Therefore, a case emerges for suggesting that this is the common feature of the long-distance intramolecular E.T. in this class of metalloproteins. These pathways are most...... probably a regulatory alternative to the E.T. site recognized at the exposed, "Northern" imidazole coordinated to copper in all these proteins....

  3. Electronic structure of the perturbed blue copper site in nitrite reductase: Spectroscopic properties, bonding, and implications for the entatic/rack state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaCroix, L.B.; Shadle, S.E.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Solomon, E.I. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Wang, Y.; Averill, B.A. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1996-08-21

    Low-temperature optical absorption, circular dichroism, magnetic circular dichroism, and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectra have been measured for the green `blue` copper center (type 1) in Achromobacter cycloclastes nitrite reductase. Combined with density functional calculations, the results of these spectroscopies have been used to define the extremely `perturbed` electronic structure of this site relative to that of the prototypical `classic` site found in plastocyanin. Experimentally calibrated density functional calculations have been further used to determine the specific geometric distortions which generate the perturbed electronic structure. These studies indicate that the principal electronic structure changes in nitrite reductase, relative to plastocyanin, are a rotation of the Cu d{sub x(2)-y(2)} half-filled, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and an increase in the ligand field strength at the Cu center. These changes in Cu-ligand interactions result in the redistribution of absorption intensity in the charge transfer and ligand field transitions. Additionally, the new S(Met)-Cu interaction accounts for the unexpectedly high sulfur covalency in the HOMO. The increase in ligand field strength shifts all the d {yields} d transitions in nitrite reductase to nearly 1000 cm{sup -1} higher energy than their counterparts in plastocyanin, which accounts for the EPR spectral differences between the type 1 sites in these complexes. 97 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Web site blues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruca, R F

    1999-01-01

    So far, Rachel Soltanoff's instincts had been right. As CEO in this fictional case study, she had successfully navigated TradeRite Software's transition from a news service for stockbrokers to a $70 million provider of shrink-wrapped software geared toward both brokers and the growing day-trader market. Now a well-financed start-up, Stock-net.com, was testing a very competitive product that traders could download directly over the Web. And TradeRite's Web site was nothing more than a collection of elaborate marketing brochures. Rachel knew she needed to start selling over the Web. But the e-commerce consultants she had hired to set up her Web store were behind schedule, and their 21-year-old CEO had just resigned. Her product manager, Lisa Bandini, was working overtime to transform TradeRite's entire product line into Web-aware applications to match Stocknet's, and Rachel had $2.5 million to launch them. But the consultants said it would take $5 million just to rent e-commerce capabilities. Ace sales VP Brian Rockart thought the company had already wasted too much time and money--money from his budget--on its Web site. Marketing VP Rob Collins thought TradeRite should focus on its core stockbroker customers. Chief Technical Officer Joe Martinez doesn't want to go ahead without a pilot project. Should Rachel try to convince Brian, Rob, and the rest of the senior management team that e-commerce is the way to go? Four commentators offer advice.

  5. Functionally specified protein signatures distinctive for each of the different blue copper proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anishetty Sharmila

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins having similar functions from different sources can be identified by the occurrence in their sequences, a conserved cluster of amino acids referred to as pattern, motif, signature or fingerprint. The wide usage of protein sequence analysis in par with the growth of databases signifies the importance of using patterns or signatures to retrieve out related sequences. Blue copper proteins are found in the electron transport chain of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The signatures already existing in the databases like the type 1 copper blue, multiple copper oxidase, cyt b/b6, photosystem 1 psaA&B, psaG&K, and reiske iron sulphur protein are not specified signatures for blue copper proteins as the name itself suggests. Most profile and motif databases strive to classify protein sequences into a broad spectrum of protein families. This work describes the signatures designed based on the copper metal binding motifs in blue copper proteins. The common feature in all blue copper proteins is a trigonal planar arrangement of two nitrogen ligands [each from histidine] and one sulphur containing thiolate ligand [from cysteine], with strong interactions between the copper center and these ligands. Results Sequences that share such conserved motifs are crucial to the structure or function of the protein and this could provide a signature of family membership. The blue copper proteins chosen for the study were plantacyanin, plastocyanin, cucumber basic protein, stellacyanin, dicyanin, umecyanin, uclacyanin, cusacyanin, rusticyanin, sulfocyanin, halocyanin, azurin, pseudoazurin, amicyanin and nitrite reductase which were identified in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. ClustalW analysis of the protein sequences of each of the blue copper proteins was the basis for designing protein signatures or peptides. The protein signatures and peptides identified in this study were designed involving the active site region involving the amino acids

  6. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the blue copper site: Metal and ligand K-edge studies to probe the origin of the EPR hyperfine splitting in plastocyanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadle, S.E.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Schugar, H.J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Solomon, E.I.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectra for the oxidized blue copper protein plastocyanin and several Cu(II) model complexes have been measured at both the Cu K-edge and the ligand K-edges (Cl and S) in order to elucidate the source of the small parallel hyperfine splitting in the EPR spectra of blue copper centers. Assignment and analysis of a feature in the Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum at ∼8,987 eV as the Cu 1s → 4p + ligand-to-metal charge-transfer shakedown transition has allowed for quantitation of 4p mixing into the ground-state wave function as reflected in the 1s →3d (+4p) intensity at ∼8,979 eV. The results show that distorted tetrahedral (D 2d )CuCl 4 2- is characterized by z mixing, while plastocyanin has only Cu 4p xy mixing. Thus, the small parallel hyperfine splitting in the EPR spectra of D 2d CuCl 4 2- and of oxidized plastocyanin cannot be explained by 12% 4p z mixing into the 3d x 2 -y 2 orbital as had been previously postulated. Data collected at the Cl K-edge for CuCl 4 2- show that the intensity of the ligand pre-edge feature at ∼2,820 eV reflects the degree of covalency between the metal half-occupied orbital and the ligands. The data show that D 2d CuCl 4 2- is not unusually covalent. The source of the small parallel splitting in the EPR of D 2d CuCl 4 2- is discussed. Experiments at the S K-edge (∼2,470 eV) show that plastocyanin is characterized by a highly covalent Cu-S(cysteine) bond relative to the cupric-thiolate model complex [Cu(tet b)(o-SC 6 H 4 CO 2 )]·H 2 O. The XAS results demonstrate that the small parallel hyperfine splitting in the EPR spectra of blue copper sites reflects the high degree of covalency of the copper-thiolate bond. 34 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Cloning and expression analysis of a blue copper- binding protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper. Cloning and expression analysis of a blue copper- binding protein gene from Dasypyrum Villosum. Huagang He1*, Shanying Zhu1, Wenbing Wang1, Tongde Bie2 and Peidu Chen3. 1Jiangsu University. Zhenjiang 212013, P. R. China. 2Yangzhou Academy of Agricultural ...

  8. Site Management Guide (Blue Book)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department's postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE's postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site

  9. Site Management Guide (Blue Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department’s postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE’s postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site

  10. Determination of the Electron Self-Exchange Rates of Blue Copper Proteins by Super-WEFT NMR Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Lixin; Philipp, Else Astrid; Led, Jens J.

    2001-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR......Anabaena variabilis plastocyanin, blue copper proteins, electron self-exchange rates, electron transfer, super-WEFT NMR...

  11. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of amicyanin, a blue copper protein from Paracoccus denitrificans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, K.D.; Loehr, T.M.; Sanders-Loehr, J.; Husain, M.; Davidson, V.L.

    1988-01-01

    The copper binding site of amicyanin from Paracoccus denitrificans has been examined by resonance Raman spectroscopy. The pattern of vibrational modes is clearly similar to those of the blue copper proteins azurin and plastocyanin. Intense resonance-enhanced peaks are observed at 377, 392, and 430 cm-1 as well as weaker overtones and combination bands in the high frequency region. Most of the peaks below 500 cm-1 shift 0.5-1.5 cm-1 to lower energy when the protein is exposed to D 2 O. Based on the pattern of conserved amino acids, the axial type EPR spectrum, and the resonance Raman spectrum, it is proposed that the copper binding site in amicyanin contains a Cu(II) ion in a distorted trigonal planar geometry with one cysteine and two histidine ligands and an axial methionine ligand at a considerably longer distance. Furthermore, the presence of multiple intense Raman peaks in the 400 cm-1 region which are sensitive to deuterium substitution leads to the conclusion that the Cu-S stretch is coupled with internal ligand vibrational modes and that the sulfur of the cysteine ligand is likely to be hydrogen-bonded to the polypeptide backbone

  12. Synergistic Effects of Copper Sites on Apparent Stability of Multicopper Oxidase, Fet3p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Sedlák

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fet3p is a multicopper oxidase that contains three cupredoxin-like domains and four copper ions located in three distinct metal sites (T1 in domain 3; T2 and the binuclear T3 at the interface between domains 1 and 3. To probe the role of the copper sites in Fet3p thermodynamic stability, we performed urea-induced unfolding experiments with holo-, apo- and three partially-metallated (T1, T2 and T1/T2 sites depleted of copper forms of Fet3p. Using a combination of spectroscopic probes (circular dichroism, fluorescence intensity and maximum, 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS emission, oxidase activity and blue color, we reveal that all forms of Fet3p unfold in a four-state reaction with two partially-folded intermediates. Using phase diagrams, it emerged that Fet3p with all copper sites filled had a significantly higher stability as compared to the combined contributions of the individual copper sites. Hence, there is long-range inter-domain communication between distal copper sites that contribute to overall Fet3p stability.

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of a green copper site in a single-domain cupredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Magali; Biaso, Frédéric; Castelle, Cindy J; Bauzan, Marielle; Chaspoul, Florence; Lojou, Elisabeth; Sciara, Giuliano; Caffarri, Stefano; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Cupredoxins are widespread copper-binding proteins, mainly involved in electron transfer pathways. They display a typical rigid greek key motif consisting of an eight stranded β-sandwich. A fascinating feature of cupredoxins is the natural diversity of their copper center geometry. These geometry variations give rise to drastic changes in their color, such as blue, green, red or purple. Based on several spectroscopic and structural analyses, a connection between the geometry of their copper-binding site and their color has been proposed. However, little is known about the relationship between such diversity of copper center geometry in cupredoxins and possible implications for function. This has been difficult to assess, as only a few naturally occurring green and red copper sites have been described so far. We report herein the spectrocopic characterization of a novel kind of single domain cupredoxin of green color, involved in a respiratory pathway of the acidophilic organism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization coupled to bioinformatics analysis reveal the existence of some unusual features for this novel member of the green cupredoxin sub-family. This protein has the highest redox potential reported to date for a green-type cupredoxin. It has a constrained green copper site insensitive to pH or temperature variations. It is a green-type cupredoxin found for the first time in a respiratory pathway. These unique properties might be explained by a region of unknown function never found in other cupredoxins, and by an unusual length of the loop between the second and the fourth copper ligands. These discoveries will impact our knowledge on non-engineered green copper sites, whose involvement in respiratory chains seems more widespread than initially thought.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of a green copper site in a single-domain cupredoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Roger

    Full Text Available Cupredoxins are widespread copper-binding proteins, mainly involved in electron transfer pathways. They display a typical rigid greek key motif consisting of an eight stranded β-sandwich. A fascinating feature of cupredoxins is the natural diversity of their copper center geometry. These geometry variations give rise to drastic changes in their color, such as blue, green, red or purple. Based on several spectroscopic and structural analyses, a connection between the geometry of their copper-binding site and their color has been proposed. However, little is known about the relationship between such diversity of copper center geometry in cupredoxins and possible implications for function. This has been difficult to assess, as only a few naturally occurring green and red copper sites have been described so far. We report herein the spectrocopic characterization of a novel kind of single domain cupredoxin of green color, involved in a respiratory pathway of the acidophilic organism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization coupled to bioinformatics analysis reveal the existence of some unusual features for this novel member of the green cupredoxin sub-family. This protein has the highest redox potential reported to date for a green-type cupredoxin. It has a constrained green copper site insensitive to pH or temperature variations. It is a green-type cupredoxin found for the first time in a respiratory pathway. These unique properties might be explained by a region of unknown function never found in other cupredoxins, and by an unusual length of the loop between the second and the fourth copper ligands. These discoveries will impact our knowledge on non-engineered green copper sites, whose involvement in respiratory chains seems more widespread than initially thought.

  15. Direct electrochemistry of blue copper proteins at boron-doped diamond electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, James P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TA (United Kingdom); Foord, John S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: john.foord@chem.ox.ac.uk

    2005-05-05

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) is a promising electrode material for use in the spectro-electrochemical study of redox proteins and, in this investigation, cyclic voltammetry was used to obtain quasi-reversible electrochemical responses from two blue copper proteins, parsley plastocyanin and azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No voltammetry was observed at the virgin electrodes, but signals were observed if the electrodes were anodised, or abraded with alumina, prior to use. Plastocyanin, which has a considerable overall negative charge and a surface acidic patch which is important in forming a productive electron transfer complex with its redox partners, gave a faradaic signal at pre-treated BDD only in the presence of neomycin, a positively charged polyamine. The voltammetry of azurin, which has a small overall charge and no surface acidic patch, was obtained identically in the presence and absence of neomycin. Investigations were also carried out into the voltammetry of two site-directed mutants of azurin, M64E azurin and M44K azurin, each of which introduce a charge into the protein's surface hydrophobic patch. The oxidizing and cleaning effects of the BDD electrode pre-treatments were studied electrochemically using two inorganic probe ions, Fe(China){sub 6} {sup 3-} and Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6} {sup 3+}, and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). All of the electrochemical results are discussed in relation to the electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions to the protein/diamond electrochemical interaction.

  16. Adsorption of blue copper on a natural and electrochemically treated bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaji, M.; Mountassir, Y.; Benyaich, A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics and equilibrium studies of the adsorption of blue copper on a natural (NC) and electrochemically treated (EMC) bentonite, taken in different experimental conditions, were carried out. Changes of the dye uptake versus operating factors were evaluated using response surface methodology (RSM). The kinetics at 5-50 °C and pH model and the maximum uptake was around 21 mg/g. In the case of EMC, the Freundlich equation was rather fitting. Dye adsorption on both sorbents was a non-spontaneous process (2 adsorption and was the most influential factor in the case of EMC. For NC, the clay dose was rather the most important parameter.

  17. Determination of the electron self-exchange rates of blue copper proteins by super-WEFT NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Lixin; Philipp, Else; Led, Jens J. [University of Copenhagen, H.C. Orsted Institute, Department of Chemistry (Denmark)

    2001-03-15

    An NMR approach for determining the electron self-exchange (ESE) rate constants in blue copper proteins is presented. The approach uses the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of resonances in 1D {sup 1}H super-WEFT spectra of partly oxidized (paramagnetic) proteins. These spectra allow a more precise determination of the relevant paramagnetic linebroadenings than conventional 1D {sup 1}H spectra and, thus, permit a more detailed investigation of the applicability of the linebroadenings for determining the electron exchange rates. The approach was used to estimate the ESE rate constant of plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis. It was found that, although the rate constant can be determined accurately from a series of resonances, precise but erroneous constants are obtained from the resonances of the copper-bound residues, unless a narrow splitting of these resonances caused by the presence of two conformations is taken into account. As demonstrated here, this complication can be overcome by a correct analysis of the paramagnetic broadening of the combined double signals. Because of the high resolution and specific sensitivity of the approach it should be generally applicable to estimate electron transfer rates, k, if the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement R{sub 2p} of the resonances can be determined, and the conditions k<<>k>>R{sub 2p} are fulfilled, {delta}{omega}{sub p} being the frequency separation between corresponding diamagnetic and paramagnetic sites.

  18. Catalytic degradation of methylene blue by biosynthesised copper nanoflowers usingF. benghalensisleaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Meenakshi; Singh Bhadwal, Akhshay; Kumar, Nishant; Shrivastav, Archana; Raj Shrivastav, Braj; Pratap Singh, Manoj; Zafar, Fahmina; Mani Tripathi, Ravi

    2016-10-01

    This study reports the unprecedented, novel and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of three-dimensional (3D) copper nanostructure having flower like morphology using leaf extract of Ficus benghalensis . The catalytic activity of copper nanoflowers (CuNFs) was investigated against methylene blue (MB) used as a modal dye pollutant. Scanning electron micrograph evidently designated 3D appearance of nanoflowers within a size range from 250 nm to 2.5 μm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectra showed the presence of copper elements in the nanoflowers. Fourier-transform infrared spectra clearly demonstrated the presence of biomolecules which is responsible for the synthesis of CuNFs. The catalytic activity of the synthesised CuNFs was monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The MB was degraded by 72% in 85 min on addition of CuNFs and the rate constant ( k ) was found to be 0.77 × 10 -3 s -1 . This method adapted for synthesis of CuNFs offers a valuable contribution in the area of nanomaterial synthesis and in water research by suggesting a sustainable and an alternative route for removal of toxic solvents and waste materials.

  19. Active site modeling in copper azurin molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzuti, B; Swart, M; Sportelli, L; Guzzi, R

    Active site modeling in molecular dynamics simulations is investigated for the reduced state of copper azurin. Five simulation runs (5 ns each) were performed at room temperature to study the consequences of a mixed electrostatic/constrained modeling for the coordination between the metal and the

  20. Effects of Dietary Copper and Zinc Supplementation on Growth Performance, Tissue Mineral Retention, Antioxidant Status, and Fur Quality in Growing-Furring Blue Foxes (Alopex lagopus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Wu, Xuezhuang; Zhang, Tietao; Guo, Jungang; Gao, Xiuhua; Yang, Fuhe; Xing, Xiumei

    2015-12-01

    A 4×2 factorial experiment with four supplemental levels of copper (0, 20, 40, or 60 mg copper per kg dry matter) from copper sulfate and two supplemental levels of zinc (40 or 200 mg zinc per kg dry matter) from zinc sulfate was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary copper and zinc supplementation on growth performance, tissue mineral retention, antioxidant status, and fur quality in growing-furring blue foxes. One hundred and twenty healthy 15-week-old male blue foxes were randomly allocated to eight dietary treatments with 15 replicates per treatment for a 70-day trial from mid-September to pelting in December. The average daily gain and feed conversion ratio were increased with copper supplementation in the first 35 days as well as the overall period (P0.10) and feed intake (P>0.10) but improved feed conversion (Peffects on the digestibility of other nutrients. Fecal copper was increased with both copper (Pdietary zinc addition (Pdietary treatments (P>0.05). However, the level of copper in the liver was increased with copper supplementation (PDietary zinc addition tended to increase the activity of alkaline phosphatase (P=0.07). The activities of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and catalase tended to increase by copper (P=0.08) and zinc addition (P=0.05). Moreover, a copper×zinc interaction was observed for catalase in the experiment (Pdietary copper and zinc levels (Pdietary copper and zinc supplementation can improve growth by increasing feed intake and improving fat digestibility. Additionally, copper and zinc can enhance the antioxidant capacity of blue foxes. This study also indicates that additional zinc up to 200 mg/kg did not exert significant adverse effects on the copper metabolism of growing-furring blue foxes.

  1. The Blue Ribbon Commission and siting radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.

    2010-01-01

    On 21 September 2010, the NEA Secretariat was invited to address the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future. This paper is a summary of the remarks made. The successful siting of radioactive waste disposal facilities implies creating the conditions for continued ownership of the facility over time. Acceptance of the facility at a single point in time is not good enough. Continued ownership implies the creation of conscious, constructive and durable relationships between the (most affected) communities and the waste management facility. Being comfortable about the technical safety of the facility requires a degree of familiarity and control . Having peace of mind about the safety of the facility requires trust in the waste management system and its actors as well as some control over the decision making. Regulators are especially important players who need to be visible in the community. The ideal site selection process should be step- wise, combining procedures for excluding sites that do not meet pre-identified criteria with those for identifying sites where nearby and more distant residents are willing to discuss acceptance of the facility. The regional authorities are just as important as the local authorities. Before approaching a potential siting region or community, there should be clear results of national (and state) debates establishing the role of nuclear power in the energy mix, as well as information on the magnitude of the ensuing waste commitment and its management end-points, and the allocation of the financial and legal responsibilities until the closure of the project. Once the waste inventories and type of facilities have been decided upon, there should be agreement that all significant changes will require a new decision-making process. Any proposed project has a much better chance to move forward positively if the affected populations can participate in its definition, including, at the appropriate time, its technical details. A

  2. Neutron activation analysis of AD 1660-1930 European copper-coloured blue glass trade beads from Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, I.; Hancock, R.G.V.; Aufreiter, S.

    1995-01-01

    Blue glass trade beads from well-dated late seventeenth- to early twentieth-century sites and collections have been analysed non-destructively by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The beads display enough variations in their elemental contents to allow us to characterize the different chemistries. The implication of these results is that similar chemical analyses of blue beads from undated archaeological sites may be used to help date the sites, since each bead chemistry has a specific earliest period. (author)

  3. Acute toxicity, accumulation and tissue distribution of copper in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus acclimated to different salinities: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Camila De Martinez Gaspar; Barcarolli, Indianara Fernanda; de Menezes, Eliana Jaime; Giacomin, Marina Mussoi; Wood, Chris M; Bianchini, Adalto

    2011-01-17

    In vivo and in vitro studies were performed to evaluate acute toxicity, organ-specific distribution, and tissue accumulation of copper in Callinectes sapidus acclimated to two different experimental salinities (2 and 30 ppt). Blue crabs were quite tolerant to copper. Acute dissolved copper toxicity (96-h LC(50) and its corresponding 95% confident interval) was higher at salinity 2 ppt (5.3 (3.50-8.05) μM Cu) than at 30 ppt (53.0 (27.39-102.52) μM Cu). The difference between salinities can be completely explained based on the water chemistry because it disappeared when 96-h LC(50) values were expressed as the free Cu(2+) ion (3.1 (1.93-4.95) μM free Cu at 2 ppt versus 5.6 (2.33-13.37) μM free Cu at 30 ppt) or the Cu(2+) activity (1.4 (0.88-2.26) μM Cu activity at 2 ppt versus 1.7 (0.71-4.07) μM Cu activity at 30 ppt). The relationships between gill Cu burden and % mortality were very similar at 2 and 30 ppt, in accord with the Biotic Ligand Model. In vivo experiments showed that copper concentration in the hemolymph is not dependent on metal concentration in the surrounding medium at either experimental salinity. They also showed that copper flux into the gills is higher than into other tissues analyzed, and that anterior and posterior gills are similarly important sites of copper accumulation at both experimental salinities. In vitro experiments with isolated-perfused gills showed that there is a positive relationship between copper accumulation in this tissue and the metal concentration in the incubation media for both anterior and posterior gills. A similar result was observed at both low and high salinities. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that copper accumulation in posterior gills is also positively and strongly dependent on the incubation time with copper. Gill copper accumulation occurred at a lower rate in the first 2h of metal exposure, increasing markedly after this "steady-state" period. This finding was corroborated by a significant

  4. Determinants of the relative reduction potentials of type-1 copper sites in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Webb, Simon P; Ivanic, Joseph; Jensen, Jan H

    2004-06-30

    The relative Cu(2+)/Cu(+) reduction potentials of six type-1 copper sites (cucumber stellacyanin, P. aeruginosa azurin, poplar plastocyanin, C. cinereus laccase, T. ferrooxidans rusticyanin, and human ceruloplasmin), which lie in a reduction potential range from 260 mV to over 1000 mV, have been studied by quantum mechanical calculations. The range and relative orderings of the reduction potentials are reproduced very well compared to experimental values. The study suggests that the main structural determinants of the relative reduction potentials of the blue copper sites are located within 6 A of the Cu atoms. Further analysis suggests that the reduction potential differences of type-1 copper sites are caused by axial ligand interactions, hydrogen bonding to the S(Cys), and protein constraint on the inner sphere ligand orientations. The low reduction potential of cucumber stellacyanin is due mainly to a glutamine ligand at the axial position, rather than a methionine or a hydrophobic residue as in the other proteins. A stronger interaction with a backbone carbonyl group is a prime contributor to the lower reduction potential of P. aeruginosa azurin as compared to poplar plastocyanin, whereas the reverse is true for C. cinereus laccase and T. ferrooxidans rusticyanin. The lack of an axial methonine ligand also contributes significantly to the increased reduction potentials of C. cinereus laccase and human ceruloplasmin. However, in the case of C. cinereus laccase, this increase is attenuated by the presence of only one amide NH hydrogen bond to the S(Cys) rather than two in the other proteins. In human ceruloplasmin the reduction potential is further increased by the structural distortion of the equatorial ligand orientation.

  5. Seismic Characterization of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, D. C.; Matzel, E.; Cladouhos, T. T.

    2017-12-01

    All fluid injection activities have the potential to induce earthquakes by modifying the state of stress in the subsurface. In geothermal areas, small microearthquakes can be a beneficial outcome of these stress perturbations by providing direct subsurface information that can be used to better understand and manage the underground reservoir. These events can delineate the active portions of the subsurface that have slipped in response to pore fluid pressure changes or temperature changes during and after fluid injection. Here we investigate the seismic activity within the Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Plant located in Humboldt County, Nevada between December 2015 to May 2016. We compare the effectiveness of direct spatial-temporal cross-correlation templates with Matched Field Processing (MFP) derived templates and compare these results with earthquake detection results from a traditional STA/LTA algorithm. Preliminary results show significant clustering of microearthquakes, most probably influenced by plant operations. The significant increase in data availability that advanced earthquake detection methods can provide improves the statistical analyses of induced seismicity sequences, reveal critical information about the ongoing evolution of the subsurface reservoir, and better informs the construction of models for hazard assessments. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Seismic Characterization of the Blue Mountain Geothermal Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, D. C.; Matzel, E.; Cladouhos, T. T.

    2016-12-01

    In geothermal areas, seismic mapping is a key tool used to infer the subsurface fracture geometry. Traditional earthquake detection (e.g. STA/LTA) and location techniques are often employed to identify microearthquakes. However, most commonly used algorithms may miss events if the seismic signal of an earthquake is small relative to the background noise level or if a microearthquake occurs within the coda of a larger event. Advanced earthquake detection techniques can be applied in these regions to identify these missed events. For this application, known larger events are used as templates to identify nearby smaller events. Here we investigate the seismic activity within the Blue Mountain Geothermal Power Plant located in Humboldt County, Nevada between December 2015 to May 2016. We compare the effectiveness of direct spatial-temporal cross-correlation templates with Matched Field Processing (MFP) derived templates and compare these results with earthquake detection results from a traditional STA/LTA algorithm. Preliminary results show significant clustering of microearthquakes, most probably influenced by plant operations. The significant increase in data availability that advanced earthquake detection methods can provide improves the statistical analyses of induced seismicity sequences, reveal critical information about the ongoing evolution of the subsurface reservoir, and better informs the construction of models for hazard assessments. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Site-Specific Reactivity of Copper Chabazite Zeolites with Nitric Oxide, Ammonia, and Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Anita; Isaksen, Oliver L.; Rasmussen, Søren B.

    2018-01-01

    In-situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was applied to dilute copper chabazite (CHA) zeolites under gas flows relevant for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia (NH3-SCR). Under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, we observed differences in reactivity between...... differences in reactivity of copper sites has implications for the mechanistic understanding of NH3-SCR with Cu-zeolites....

  8. The Type 3 copper site is intact but labile in Type 2-depleted laccase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, P; Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1983-01-01

    We report results of experiments designed to characterize the Type 1 and Type 3 copper sites in Rhus laccase depleted of Type 2 copper (T2D). Use of the Lowry method for determining protein concentration yielded the value 5620 +/- 570 M-1 cm-1 for the extinction of the 615-nm absorption band of t...

  9. Health promotion site selection blues: barriers to participation and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniack, Martin; Morse, Tim; Henning, Robert; Seidner, Adam; Punnett, Laura

    2010-06-01

    To shed light on research-to-practice challenges in workplace health promotion research. More than 1200 companies serviced by a national insurer were assessed by measures, including management surveys, and insurance premium costs and risk profile. A 21-item Workplace Readiness Checklist was the core assessment tool. Quantitative and qualitative measures were used to identify 12 to 14 companies deemed most "ready for change." The four priority candidate companies decided against participation. A post hoc survey to evaluate reasons for non-participation identified factors such as time allocations, the deteriorating economic environment, and the participatory nature of the interventions proposed for half of the study sites. Differing priorities within management also seemed to interfere with participation. A highly structured process for determining corporate readiness for participatory health promotion produced contradictory results.

  10. Development of a copper-substituted, Prussian blue-impregnated, nonwoven cartridge filter to rapidly measure radiocesium concentration in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Akira; Kawamoto, Tohru; Miyazu, Susumu; Kondo, Yoshihiko; Tsuji, Hideki; Arita, Koichi; Hayashi, Seiji; Aoyama, Michio

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a cartridge filter incorporating a nonwoven fabric impregnated with Prussian blue copper analog (Cu-CF) to effectively concentrate and quantify radiocesium dissolved in seawater. The recovery ratio of the Cu-CF was >95% in laboratory experiments at a flow rate of 0.5 L min -1 through the filter and >93% in field experiments. Test measurements of 137 Cs concentrations in seawater using Cu-CF agreed with the results obtained by using a conventional coprecipitation method that employed ammonium phosphomolybdate (within the counting error of the detector). The proposed method can shorten the preconcentration and pretreatment times for radiocesium, to just 40 min in 20 L of seawater, which is much faster than the ∼1 week required by traditional ammonium phosphomolybdate methods. (author)

  11. Copper artifacts from prehistoric archeological sites in the dakotas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, W E; Neuman, R W

    1966-12-02

    Thirteen archeological specimens were analyzed spectrographlically, and within defined limits they were determined to be native copper. Twelve of the specimens show close elemental homogeneity and are believed to be of Lake Superior ore; the origin of the other specimen is deviolus.

  12. The effects of copper oxy chloride waste contamination on selected soil biochemical properties at disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaka, J.; Muunganirwa, M.

    2007-01-01

    A study was carried out at a sanitary waste disposal site for Kutsaga Tobacco Research Station, Zimbabwe, which uses large amounts of copper oxy chloride for sterilization of recycled float trays in flooded bench tobacco seedling production systems. Soil samples randomly collected from six stream bank zones (bands up the valley slope) varying in their distance ranges from the centre of both the wastewater-free and wastewater-affected paths [0-5 m (B1); 6-10 m (B2); 11-15 m (B3); 16-20 m (B4); 21-25 m (B5) and 26-30 m (B6)] in two sample depths (0-15; 15-30 cm) were analysed for metal copper, organic matter contents, and soil pH and subjected to agarized incubation for microbial counts. Results suggest that the repeated disposals of copper oxy chloride waste from tobacco float tray sanitation sinks into a creek amplify metal copper loads in the soil by 500 fold. The greatest concentrations of copper in both the topsoil and upper subsoil were recorded in the B3, B4 and B5 stream bank zones of the wastewater path. The concentration of copper was significantly lower in the middle of the waste-affected creek than that in the stream bank zones. This trend in the copper concentration coincided with the lowest acidity of the soil. Overloading the soil with copper, surprisingly, enhances the content of soil organic matter. The repeated release of copper oxy chloride waste into a stream causes an accelerated build-up of metal copper and soil acidity in the stream bank on-site while contamination is translocated to either underground water reserve or surface stream water flow in the middle of the wastewater path

  13. Hydrogen bonding of sulfur ligands in blue copper and iron-sulfur proteins: detection by resonance raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mino, Y.; Loehr, T.M.; Wada, K.; Matsubara, H.; Sanders-Loehr, J.

    1987-12-15

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the blue copper protein azurin from Alcaligenes denitrificans exhibits nine vibrational modes between 330 and 460 cm/sup -1/, seven of which shift 0.4-3.0 cm/sup -1/ to lower energy after incubation of the protein in D/sub 2/O. These deuterium-dependent shifts have been previously ascribed to exchangeable protons on imidazole ligands or to exchangeable protons on amide groups which are hydrogen bonded to the cysteine thiolate ligands (a feature common to all blue copper proteins of known structure). In order to distinguish between these two possibilities, a systematic investigation of Fe/sub 2/S/sub 2/(Cys)/sub 4/-containing proteins was undertaken. Extensive hydrogen bonding between sulfur ligands and the polypeptide backbone had been observed in the crystal structure of ferredoxin from Spirulina platensis. The resonance Raman spectrum of this protein is typical of a chloroplast-type ferredoxin and exhibits deuterium-dependent shifts of -0.3 to -0.5 cm/sup -1/ in the Fe-S modes at 283, 367, and 394 cm/sup -1/ and -0.6 to -0.8 cm/sup -1/ in the Fe-S modes at 328 and 341 cm/sup -1/. Considerably greater deuterium sensitivity is observed in the Raman spectra of spinach ferredoxin and bovine adrenodoxin, particularly for the symmetric stretching vibration of the Fe/sub 2/S/sub 2/ moiety at approx. 390 cm/sup -1/. This feature decreases of 9.8 and 1.1 cm/sup -1/, respectively, for the two oxidized proteins in D/sub 2/O and by 1.8 cm/sup -1/ for reduced adrenodoxin in D/sub 2/O. These results suggest that the bridging sulfido groups may be more extensively hydrogen bonded in spinach ferredoxin and adrenodoxin than in S. platensis ferredoxin, with a further increase in hydrogen-bond strength in the reduced form of adrenodoxin.

  14. Novel On-Site Cupric Oxide Recovery Process from Waste Containing Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuya; Kano, Kazunori; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Atsushi

    2013-05-01

    Although the copper-containing waste from semiconductor or printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing contains a high concentration of copper, it is usually transported and treated outside of the factories. We studied a novel treatment technology for on-site recycling in the factories. In this technology, cupric oxide with a low-chloride-content was obtained from waste with a high copper concentration, such as cupric chloride etchant waste and cupric sulfate plating waste. In the proposed method, copper-containing waste mixed with H2O2 solution is added to NaOH solution by stepwise addition. In laboratory experiments, we optimized the reaction conditions and obtained low-chloride-content CuO from actual cupric chloride etchant waste and cupric sulfate plating waste. Based on the laboratory experiments, we constructed the first practical plant at a PCB factory and obtained low-chloride-content CuO.

  15. Photoinactivation effect of eosin methylene blue and chlorophyllin sodium-copper against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, Cynthia S A; Leal, Cassia R B; Ramos, Carlos A N; Bogo, Danielle; Lima, Alessandra R; Arruda, Eduardo J; Oliveira, Samuel L; Caires, Anderson R L; Nascimento, Valter A

    2017-07-01

    The use of eosin methylene blue according to Giemsa as photosensitizer is presented for the first time in this paper. The present study evaluated the potential application of chlorophyllin sodium copper salt (CuChlNa) and eosin methylene blue according to Giemsa (EMB) as antimicrobial photosensitizers (aPS) for photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (gram-negative) bacteria. The experiments were performed using S. aureus stain ATCC 25923 and E. coli ATCC 25922 in which five aPS concentrations (0.0, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 μM for S. aureus and 0.0, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0, 40.0, and 50.0 μM for E. coli) were prepared and added in 2 mL of a saline solution containing the bacterial inoculum. After aPS incubation, the samples were divided into two groups, one kept in the dark and another submitted to the illumination. Then, the bacterial inactivation was determined 18 h after the incubation at 37 °C by counting the colony-forming units (CFU). The results revealed that both EMB and CuChlNa can be used as aPS for the photoinactivation of S. aureus, while only EMB was able to photoinactivate E. coli. Nevertheless, a more complex experimental setup was needed for photoinactivation of E. coli. The data showed that EMB and CuChlNa presented similar photoinactivation effects on S. aureus, in which bacterial growth was completely inhibited at photosensitizer (PS) concentrations over 5 μM, when samples were previously incubated for 30 min and irradiated by a light dose of 30 J cm -2 as a result of an illumination of 1 h at 8.3 mW cm -2 by using a red light at 625 nm with a 1 cm beam diameter and output power of 6.5 mW. In the case of E. coli, bacterial growth was completely inhibited only when combining a PS incubation period of 120 min with concentrations over 20 μM.

  16. Mineral formation on metallic copper in a 'future repository site environment'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amcoff, Oe.; Holenyi, K.

    1996-04-01

    Since reducing conditions are expected much effort has been concentrated on Cu-sulfides and CuFe-sulfides. However, oxidizing conditions are also discussed. A list of copper minerals are included. It is concluded that mineral formation and mineral transitions on the copper canister surface will be governed by kinetics and metastabilities rather than by stability relations. The sulfides formed are less likely to form a passivating layer, and the rate of sulfide growth will probably be governed by the rate of transport of reacting species to the canister surface. A series of tests are recommended, in an environment resembling the initial repository site conditions. 82 refs, 8 figs

  17. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is in...

  18. Aquatic assessment of the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site, Vershire, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Robert R.; Kiah, Richard G.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Besser, John M.; Coles, James F.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Argue, Denise M.; Levitan, Denise M.; Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    The Ely Mine, which operated from 1821 to 1905, and its area of downstream impact constitute the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site. The site was placed on the National Priorities List in 2001. The mine comprises underground workings, foundations from historical structures, several waste-rock piles, roast beds associated with the smelting operation, and slag piles resulting from the smelting. The mine site is drained by Ely Brook, which includes several tributaries, one of which drains a series of six ponds. Ely Brook empties into Schoolhouse Brook, which flows 3.3 kilometers and joins the Ompompanoosuc River.

  19. The Type 3 copper site is intact but labile in Type 2-depleted laccase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, P; Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1983-01-01

    We report results of experiments designed to characterize the Type 1 and Type 3 copper sites in Rhus laccase depleted of Type 2 copper (T2D). Use of the Lowry method for determining protein concentration yielded the value 5620 +/- 570 M-1 cm-1 for the extinction of the 615-nm absorption band...... as intensity perturbations at 280 and 615 nm. Comparison of difference spectra show that this 330-nm band derives from a Type 3 copper-bound peroxide and not from a reoxidized Type 3 site. Dioxygen reoxidation of ascorbate-reduced T2D laccase produced new difference bands at 330 nm (delta epsilon = 770 M-1 cm...... signal near 3,400 G were observed, originating from the Type 3 sites of separate T2D laccase molecules. Reoxidation by ferricyanide or by dioxygen as mediated by iron hexacyanide did not produce these changes. Thus the magnetism of the reoxidized Type 3 site in T2D laccase can be perturbed...

  20. Elucidating the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyun; Liu, Xinyi; Rooney, D. W.; Hu, P.

    2015-10-01

    The dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone is very important in the manufacture of nylon. Copper-based catalysts are the most popular catalysts for this reaction, and on these catalysts the reaction mechanism and active site are in debate. In order to elucidate the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts, density functional theory with dispersion corrections were performed on up to six facets of copper in two different oxidation states: monovalent copper and metallic copper. By calculating the surface energies of these facets, Cu(111) and Cu2O(111) were found to be the most stable facets for metallic copper and for monovalent copper, respectively. On these two facets, all the possible elementary steps in the dehydrogenation pathway of cyclohexanol were calculated, including the adsorption, dehydrogenation, hydrogen coupling and desorption. Two different reaction pathways for dehydrogenation were considered on both surfaces. It was revealed that the dehydrogenation mechanisms are different on these two surfaces: on Cu(111) the hydrogen belonging to the hydroxyl is removed first, then the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is subtracted, while on Cu2O(111) the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is removed followed by the subtraction of the hydrogen in the hydroxyl group. Furthermore, by comparing the energy profiles of these two surfaces, Cu2O(111) was found to be more active for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation than Cu(111). In addition, we found that the coordinatively unsaturated copper sites on Cu2O(111) are the reaction sites for all the steps. Therefore, the coordinatively unsaturated copper site on Cu2O(111) is likely to be the active site for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on the copper-based catalysts.

  1. Effect of the methionine ligand on the reorganization energy of the type-1 copper site of nitrite Reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Wijma, Hein J.; MacPherson, Iain

    2007-01-01

    Copper-containing nitrite reductase harbors a type-1 and a type-2 Cu site. The former acts as the electron acceptor site of the enzyme, and the latter is the site of catalytic action. The effect of the methionine ligand on the reorganization energy of the type-1 site was explored by studying...

  2. Pulse-radiolysis studies on the interaction of one-electron reduced species with blue oxidases. Reduction of native and type-2-copper-depleted Vietnamese-lacquer-tree and Japanese-lacquer-tree laccases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, P; Fielden, E M; Morpurgo, L; Agostinelli, E

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of one-electron reduced metronidazole (ArNO2.-) and O2.- with native and Type-2-copper-depleted Vietnamese- and Japanese-lacquer-tree laccases were studied in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 and 7.4 by using the technique of pulse radiolysis. On reaction with ArNO2.-, in the absence of O2, the holo- and the Type-2-copper-depleted proteins accept, with reduction of Type 1 copper, 2 and 1 reducing equivalents respectively. On reaction with O2.- of both holo- and Type-2-copper-depleted Vietnamese-lacquer-tree laccase, almost complete reduction of Type 1 copper was observed and, after completion of the reaction, some (less than 20%) reoxidation of Type 1 copper occurs. Reduction of Type 1 copper of the laccases by these one-electron donors occurs via a bimolecular step; however, the rate of reduction of Vietnamese-lacquer-tree laccase is over 10 times that of Japanese-lacquer-tree laccase. It is inferred that electrons enter the protein via Type 1 copper with, in the case of the holoprotein, subsequent rapid intramolecular transfer of 1 reducing equivalent within the protein. Furthermore it is suggested that intra-molecular electron transfer to Type 3 copper atoms is slow and, in the case of Type-2-copper-depleted protein, may not occur. This slow process may partially account for the variation of the catalytic activities of 'blue' oxidases. PMID:6089764

  3. Prussian blue analogue copper hexacyanoferrate : Synthesis, structure characterization and its applications as battery electrode and CO2 adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Ojwang, Dickson Odhiambo

    2017-01-01

    Prussian blue (PB) and Prussian blue analogues (PBAs) are compounds with potential applications in a large variety of fields such as gas storage, poison antidotes, electrochromism, electrochemistry and molecular magnets. The compounds are easy to synthesize, cheap, environmentally friendly and have been pursued for both fundamental research and industrial purposes. Despite the multifunctionality of PB and PBAs, they have complicated compositions, which are largely dependent on the synthesis m...

  4. Intracrystalline site preference of hydrogen isotopes in the water of crystallization of copper sulfate pentahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, I.; Matsuo, S.

    1981-01-01

    Difference in the isotopic partition at different sites of the water of crystallization of CuSO 4 .5H 2 O (the site preference) was estimated for the hydrogen isotopes. Fractional dehydration of CuSO 4 .5H 2 O under vacuum at 0 and 25 0 C was used to determine the isotopic ratio, the amount of dehydrated water, and the rate process of dehydration. The following results were obtained. (1) Two maxima occur in the isotopic ratio in the dehydration range, F < 0.8. (2) The dehydration occurs by the three sequential zeroth-order rate processes which have different rate constants for dehydration. The three different rate constants may be explained by the combination of the rate constants of dehydration of the water molecules dehydrated. The estimation of the difference in hydrogen isotope distribution for different sites, i.e., four of the five water molecules in the coordination sphere of copper ion (site A) and one bonded to the sulfate ion through hydrogen bonding (site B) was made. The site preference of hydrogen isotopes (delta D,%) was concluded to be -3.20 +- 0.52 for site A and +2.26 +- 2.09 for site B, where the delta D value was referred to the isotopic ratio of the mother liquor from which the crystal was formed

  5. Nature of Copper Active Sites in CuZSM-5: Theory and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Kozyra

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We report here a concise resume reporting the way of constructing the model of an active site composed of transition metal cation exchanged in zeolites. The main goal was to devise the model of CuZSM-5 capable of describing geometrical and electronic properties of metal sites and adsorption complexes with small molecules. The models were built up starting from simple ring structures encountered in ZSM-5 framework to fused rings’ model selected as the representative of α position for hosting the exchanged cation. Geometrical and electronic properties of the basal model, composed of the extended framework cluster with Cu+ or Cu2+ cation, and adsorption complexes with diatomic molecules were extracted from DFT calculations. The stress was put here on direct confirmation of structural changes on copper reduction/oxidation and adsorption. Electron donor/acceptor properties of the sites combined with electronic properties of adsorbed molecules led to the proposal for the mechanism of NO activation by Cu+ZSM-5: transfer of electrons from copper d orbitals to antibonding states of NO should cause large weakening of the bond, which was evidenced also by IR measurements.

  6. Spectroscopic and DFT Studies of Second Sphere Variants of the Type 1 Copper Site in Azurin: Covalent and Non-Local Electrostatic Contributions to Reduction Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadt, Ryan G.; Sun, Ning; Marshall, Nicholas M.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Lu, Yi; Solomon, Edward I.

    2012-01-01

    The reduction potentials (E0) of type 1 (T1) or blue copper (BC) sites in proteins and enzymes with identical first coordination spheres around the redox active copper ion can vary by ~400 mV. Here, we use a combination of low temperature electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman, and S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopies to investigate a series of second sphere variants—F114P, N47S, and F114N in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin (Az)—which modulate hydrogen bonding to and protein derived dipoles nearby the Cu-S(Cys) bond. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations correlated to the experimental data allow for the fractionation of the contributions to tuning E0 into covalent and non-local electrostatic components. These are found to be significant, comparable in magnitude, and additive for active H-bonds, while passive H-bonds are mostly non-local electrostatic in nature. For dipoles, these terms can be additive to or oppose one another. This study provides a methodology for uncoupling covalency from non-local electrostatics, which, when coupled to X-ray crystallographic data, distinguishes specific local interactions from more long range protein/active interactions, while affording further insight into the second sphere mechanisms available to the protein to tune the E0 of electron transfer sites in biology. PMID:22985400

  7. Aquatic assessment of the Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund site, Corinth, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Argue, Denise M.; Seal, Robert R.; Kiah, Richard G.; Besser, John M.; Coles, James F.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Levitan, Denise M.; Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    The Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund site in Corinth, Orange County, Vermont, includes the Eureka, Union, and Smith mines along with areas of downstream aquatic ecosystem impairment. The site was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List in 2004. The mines, which operated from about 1847 to 1919, contain underground workings, foundations from historical structures, several waste-rock piles, and some flotation tailings. The mine site is drained to the northeast by Pike Hill Brook, which includes several wetland areas, and to the southeast by an unnamed tributary that flows to the south and enters Cookville Brook. Both brooks eventually drain into the Waits River, which flows into the Connecticut River. The aquatic ecosystem at the site was assessed using a variety of approaches that investigated surface-water quality, sediment quality, and various ecological indicators of stream-ecosystem health. The degradation of surface-water quality is caused by elevated concentrations of copper, and to a lesser extent cadmium, with localized effects caused by aluminum, iron, and zinc. Copper concentrations in surface waters reached or exceeded the USEPA national recommended chronic water-quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life in all of the Pike Hill Brook sampling locations except for the location farthest downstream, in half of the locations sampled in the tributary to Cookville Brook, and in about half of the locations in one wetland area located in Pike Hill Brook. Most of these same locations also contained concentrations of cadmium that exceeded the chronic water-quality criteria. In contrast, surface waters at background sampling locations were below these criteria for copper and cadmium. Comparison of hardness-based and Biotic Ligand Model (BLM)-based criteria for copper yields similar results with respect to the extent or number of stations impaired for surface waters in the affected area. However, the BLM

  8. Microbiome analysis across a natural copper gradient at a proposed Northern Canadian mine site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea eVan Rossum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the environmental persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of metals released by mining activities, mitigation methods are crucial to minimize impacts on aquatic environments. Bioremediation is one mitigation strategy used to reduce the potential for metal accumulation and toxicity in aquatic organisms. At a potential mine site in Yukon, Canada, elevated copper (Cu concentrations and low pH are found in a water course near a naturally mineralized area; however, Cu concentrations and acidity are greatly reduced downstream. Physicochemical processes do not appear to explain this natural remediation and it is suggested that unique microbial communities may be responsible through Cu immobilization. To investigate the role of microbes in sequestering or transforming Cu in the water, biofilm samples were collected from 5 sites along a natural copper gradient: upstream of Cu introduction, on a Cu-rich tributary, 30 m downstream of Cu introduction where Cu levels were reduced, and 2 and 7 km further downstream where Cu concentrations were low. Taxonomic profiles of microbial communities (microbiomes were compiled using DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Clear relationships between total Cu concentrations, pH and the microbiomes were evident. In the most Cu-affected samples, communities were dominated by bacteria from the Gallionellaceae family. Metagenomic sequencing profiled the genes present in microbiomes from the most Cu-contaminated sampling location and the area immediately upstream and showed that microbes in this area are well adapted to tolerate heavy metals. This study provides fundamental knowledge of microbial communities at a potential mine site and characterizes the genes likely involved in providing tolerance to an acidic and metals-rich environment. These results inform hypotheses for future experiments to support the development of bioremediation approaches that incorporate the use of native microorganisms at mining

  9. Copper binding to the N-terminal metal-binding sites or the CPC motif is not essential for copper-induced trafficking of the human Wilson protein (ATP7B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A.; La fontaine, Sharon; Mercer, Julian F. B.

    2006-01-01

    The Wilson protein (ATP7B) is a copper-translocating P-type ATPase that mediates the excretion of excess copper from hep-atocytes into bile. Excess copper causes the protein to traffic from the TGN (trans-Golgi network) to subapical vesicles. Using site-directed mutagenesis, mutations known or predicted to abrogate catalytic activity (copper translocation) were introduced into ATP7B and the effect of these mutations on the intracellular traf-ficking of the protein was investigated. Mutation of the critical aspartic acid residue in the phosphorylation domain (DKTGTIT) blocked copper-induced redistribution of ATP7B from the TGN, whereas mutation of the phosphatase domain [TGE (Thr-Gly-Glu)] trapped ATP7B at cytosolic vesicular compartments. Our findings demonstrate that ATP7B trafficking is regulated with its copper-translocation cycle, with cytosolic vesicular localization associated with the acyl-phosphate intermediate. In addition, mut-ation of the six N-terminal metal-binding sites and/or the trans-membrane CPC (Cys-Pro-Cys) motif did not suppress the consti-tutive vesicular localization of the ATP7B phosphatase domain mutant. These results suggested that copper co-ordination by these sites is not essential for trafficking. Importantly, copper-chelation studies with these mutants clearly demonstrated a requirement for copper in ATP7B trafficking, suggesting the presence of an additional copper-binding site(s) within the protein. The results presented in this report significantly advance our understanding of the regulatory mechanism that links copper-translocation activity with copper-induced intracellular trafficking of ATP7B, which is central to hepatic and hence systemic copper homoeostasis. PMID:16939419

  10. Isolation and Molecular Identification of Some Blue-Green Algae (Cyanobacteria from Freshwater Sites in Tokat Province of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunay Karan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Collected blue-green algae (cyanobacteria from freshwater sites throughout Tokat province and its outlying areas were isolated in laboratory environment and their morphological systematics were determined and also their species identifications were studied by molecular methods. Seven different species of blue-green algae collected from seven different sites were isolated by purifying in cultures in laboratory environment. DNA extractions were made from isolated cells and extracted DNAs were amplified by using PCR. Cyanobacteria specific primers were used to amplify 16S rRNA and phycocyanine gene regions using PCR. Phylogenetic identification of species were conducted by evaluation of obtained sequence analysis data by using computer software. According to species identification by sequence analysis, it was seen that molecular data supports morphological systematics.

  11. Influence of dietary copper concentrations on growth performance, serum lipid profiles, antioxidant defenses, and fur quality in growing-furring male blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Wu, X; Zhang, T; Cui, H; Guo, J; Guo, Q; Gao, X; Yang, F

    2016-03-01

    A 75-d experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of dietary Cu concentrations on growth performance, serum lipid profiles, antioxidant defenses, and fur quality in growing-furring male blue foxes. Seventy-five male blue foxes (5.78 ± 0.09 kg BW) were selected and randomly allocated to 1 of the following 5 dietary treatments: 1) control (basal diet without supplemental Cu; 7.78 mg Cu/kg), 2) 12.22 mg/kg supplemental Cu (Cu20), 3) 32.22 mg/kg supplemental Cu, 4) 72.22 mg/kg supplemental Cu (Cu80), and 5) 152.22 mg/kg supplemental Cu (Cu160). A dry feed that consisted of animal meals, soybean meal, extruded corn, and soybean oil was used as the basal diet and Cu was supplemented as reagent grade CuSO∙5HO. The results showed that Cu supplementation increased the ADG ( 0.10). Additionally, Cu supplementation linearly increased the concentration of fecal Cu, liver Cu, serum total protein, and albumin ( < 0.01). Foxes in the Cu160 group had higher serum Cu concentration than those in the control and Cu20 groups ( < 0.05). The concentration of serum cholesterol decreased with dietary Cu supplementation ( < 0.05). Serum high-density lipoprotein, on the contrary, tended to increase with Cu supplementation ( = 0.09). Copper supplementation increased the activity of glutathione peroxidase ( < 0.05) and tended to increase the activity of serum ceruloplasmin ( = 0.07). For fur quality, skin length in the Cu80 group was greater than that in the control and Cu20 groups. In addition, hair color tended to deepen with the increasing of dietary Cu concentrations ( = 0.08). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Cu supplementation can promote growth and increase fat digestibility and fur length. Additionally, dietary Cu supplementation can enhance antioxidant capacity and reduce serum cholesterol in growing-furring blue foxes.

  12. Ordered Assembly and Controlled Electron Transfer of the Blue Copper Protein Azurin at Gold (111) Single-Crystal Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2001-01-01

    or monolayers. In this orientation mode azurin molecules on Au(111) are oriented with the redox center (copper atom) facing the electrode surface. This is opposite to the orientation of azurin on bare gold which is via a surface disulfide group such as recently reported. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM......) with molecular resolution reveals that both well-ordered alkanethiol and protein adlayers are present. Adsorbed azurin molecules exhibit high stability and retain electron transfer (ET) function. Long-range interfacial ET between azurin and Au(111) across variable-length alkanethiol bridges was systematically...

  13. Structural characterization of a high affinity mononuclear site in the copper(II)-α-synuclein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolus, Marco; Bisaglia, Marco; Zoleo, Alfonso; Fittipaldi, Maria; Benfatto, Maurizio; Bubacco, Luigi; Maniero, Anna Lisa

    2010-12-29

    Human α-Synuclein (aS), a 140 amino acid protein, is the main constituent of Lewy bodies, the cytoplasmatic deposits found in the brains of Parkinson's disease patients, where it is present in an aggregated, fibrillar form. Recent studies have shown that aS is a metal binding protein. Moreover, heavy metal ions, in particular divalent copper, accelerate the aggregation process of the protein. In this work, we investigated the high affinity binding mode of truncated aS (1-99) (aS99) with Cu(II), in a stoichiometric ratio, to elucidate the residues involved in the binding site and the role of copper ions in the protein oligomerization. We used Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy on the Cu(II)-aS99 complex at pH 6.5, performing both multifrequency continuous wave experiments and pulsed experiments at X-band. The comparison of 9.5 and 95 GHz data showed that at this pH only one binding mode is present. To identify the nature of the ligands, we performed Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation, Hyperfine Sublevel Correlation Spectroscopy, and pulsed Davies Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance (Davies-ENDOR) experiments. We determined that the EPR parameters are typical of a type-II copper complex, in a slightly distorted square planar geometry. Combining the results from the different pulsed techniques, we obtained that the equatorial coordination is {N(Im), N(-), H(2)O, O}, where N(im) is the imino nitrogen of His50, N(-) a deprotonated amido backbone nitrogen that we attribute to His50, H(2)O an exchangeable water molecule, and O an unidentified oxygen ligand. Moreover, we propose that the free amino terminus (Met1) participates in the complex as an axial ligand. The MXAN analysis of the XAS k-edge absorption data allowed us to independently validate the structural features proposed on the basis of the magnetic parameters of the Cu(II)-aS99 complex and then to further refine the quality of the proposed structural model.

  14. Intracellular photoreceptive site for blue light-induced cell division in protonemata of the fern Adiantum [Pteridophyta]: Further analyses by polarized light irradiation and cell centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadota, A.; Fushimi, Y.; Wada, M.

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular localization of the photoreceptive site for blue light-induced cell division in single-celled protonemata of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. was investigated using polarized light irradiation and protonemal cell centrifugation. The response to irradiation with polarized blue light showed no dependence on the direction of light polarization. However, centrifugation of the protonemata followed by microbeam irradiation showed that the site of blue light perception could be displaced together with the nucleus. Centrifugal treatment changed the distribution of intracellular organelles at the time of light exposure and basipetally displaced the nucleus about 90μm. This treatment had no effect on the induction of cell division with blue light if the protonemata were centrifuged again acropetally after the light treatment. Microbeam (30×30 μm2) irradiation with blue light of the apical 45–75 βm region, the receptive site of blue light in non-centrifuged cell, did not induce cell division. However, cell division was induced by irradiation of the nucleus-containing region, indicating that the photoreceptive site was displaced together with the nucleus by the centrifugation. These results suggest that the blue light receptor regulating cell division in Adiantum protonemata is not likely to be located on the plasma membrane. (author)

  15. Cadmium, Chromium, and Copper Concentration plus Semen-Quality in Environmental Pollution Site, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Gao, Qiaoyan; Li, Mingcai; Li, Mengyang; Gao, Xueming

    2014-01-01

    The environmental pollution is one of the factors contributing to the decrease of sperm quality for human beings. The aim of this study was to assess cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), and copper (Cu) concentration of man in environmental pollution site, and explore relationships between men exposure to Cd, Cr, and Cu and semen-quality parameters in environmental pollution site. Ninety five men were recruited through pollution area and controls in 2011. We measured semen quality using Computer-aided Semen Quality Analysis, and Cd, Cr, and Cu levels in seminal plasma using Graphite Gurnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between Cd, Cr and Cu concentration in seminal plasma and semen quality. The mean of seminal plasma Cd, Cr, and Cu values in pollution area was higher than the controls. Seminal plasma Cr values displayed a significant negative correlation with total motility and normomorph sperm rate. Seminal plasma Cu values also displayed a negative correlation with normomorph sperm rate. Male reproductive health may be threatened by environmental pollution, and it may be influence local population diathesis.

  16. Identification and Quantification of Copper Sites in Zeolites by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Anita; Vennestrøm, Peter N. R.; Rasmussen, Søren Birk

    2017-01-01

    Recent quantitative electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) data on different copper species present in copper exchanged CHA zeolites are presented and put into context with the literature on other copper zeolites. Results presented herein were obtained using ex situ and in situ EPR...... on copper ion exchanged into a CHA zeolite with Si/Al = 14 ± 1 to obtain Cu/Al = 0.46 ± 0.02. The results shed light on the identity of different copper species present after activation in air. Since the EPR signal is quantifiable, the content of the different EPR active species has been elucidated and Cu2......+ in 2Al positions in the 6-membered rings (6mr) of the CHA structure has been characterized. Some copper species are found not to give an EPR signal at ambient or high temperatures. Fortunately, treatments with different gasses under in situ conditions are able to trigger an EPR signal and thus reveal...

  17. Coordination Environment of Copper Sites in Cu-CHA Zeolite Investigated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Anita; Stappen, Frederick N.; Vennestrøm, Peter N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cu-CHA combines high activity for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction with better hydrothermal stability and selectivity compared to other copper-substituted zeolites. At the same time Cu-CHA offers an opportunity for unraveling the coordination environment of the copper centers since...... of the EPR silent monomeric Cu2+ in copper-substituted zeolites is suggested to be copper species with an approximate trigonal coordination sphere appearing during the dehydration. After complete dehydration at 250 °C the majority of the EPR silent Cu2+ is suggested to exist as Cu2+–OH– coordinated to two...

  18. Geochemical Characteristics of TP3 Mine Wastes at the Elizabeth Copper Mine Superfund Site, Orange County, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R.; Briggs, Paul H.; Meier, Allen L.; Muzik, Timothy L.

    2003-01-01

    Remediation of the Elizabeth mine Superfund site in the Vermont copper belt poses challenges for balancing environmental restoration goals with issues of historic preservation while adopting cost-effective strategies for site cleanup and long-term maintenance. The waste-rock pile known as TP3, at the headwaters of Copperas Brook, is especially noteworthy in this regard because it is the worst source of surface- and ground-water contamination identified to date, while also being the area of greatest historical significance. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study of the historic mine-waste piles known as TP3 at the Elizabeth mine Superfund site near South Strafford, Orange County, VT. TP3 is a 12.3-acre (49,780 m2) subarea of the Elizabeth mine site. It is a focus area for historic preservation because it encompasses an early 19th century copperas works as well as waste from late 19th- and 20th century copper mining (Kierstead, 2001). Surface runoff and seeps from TP3 form the headwaters of Copperas Brook. The stream flows down a valley onto flotation tailings from 20th century copper mining operations and enters the West Branch of the Ompompanoosuc River approximately 1 kilometer downstream from the mine site. Shallow drinking water wells down gradient from TP3 exceed drinking water standards for copper and cadmium (Hathaway and others, 2001). The Elizabeth mine was listed as a Superfund site in 2001, mainly because of impacts of acid-mine drainage on the Ompompanoosuc River.

  19. Investigation of the Copper Binding Site And the Role of Histidine As a Ligand in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.R.; Bencze, K.Z.; Russ, K.A.; Wasiukanis, K.; Benore-Parsons, M.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 {angstrom}, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a Cu-O{sub 3}N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit.

  20. Differential Reactivity between Two Copper Sites in Peptidylglycine r-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Chufan; S Prigge; X Siebert; B Eipper; R Mains; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Peptidylglycine {alpha}-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) catalyzes the stereospecific hydroxylation of the C{alpha} of C-terminal glycine-extended peptides and proteins, the first step in the activation of many peptide hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters. The crystal structure of the enzyme revealed two nonequivalent Cu sites (Cu{sub M} and Cu{sub H}) separated by {approx}11 {angstrom}. In the resting state of the enzyme, Cu{sub M} is coordinated in a distorted tetrahedral geometry by one methionine, two histidines, and a water molecule. The coordination site of the water molecule is the position where external ligands bind. The Cu{sub H} has a planar T-shaped geometry with three histidines residues and a vacant position that could potentially be occupied by a fourth ligand. Although the catalytic mechanism of PHM and the role of the metals are still being debated, Cu{sub M} is identified as the metal involved in catalysis, while Cu{sub H} is associated with electron transfer. To further probe the role of the metals, we studied how small molecules such as nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}), azide (N{sub 3}{sup -}), and carbon monoxide (CO) interact with the PHM copper ions. The crystal structure of an oxidized nitrite-soaked PHMcc, obtained by soaking for 20 h in mother liquor supplemented with 300 mM NaNO{sub 2}, shows that nitrite anion coordinates Cu{sub M} in an asymmetric bidentate fashion. Surprisingly, nitrite does not bind Cu{sub H}, despite the high concentration used in the experiments (nitrite/protein > 1000). Similarly, azide and carbon monoxide coordinate Cu{sub M} but not Cu{sub H} in the PHMcc crystal structures obtained by cocrystallization with 40 mM NaN{sub 3} and by soaking CO under 3 atm of pressure for 30 min. This lack of reactivity at the Cu{sub H} is also observed in the reduced form of the enzyme: CO binds Cu{sub M} but not Cu{sub H} in the structure of PHMcc obtained by exposure of a crystal to 3 atm CO for 15 min in the presence of 5

  1. Geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of the Fry Canyon uranium/copper project site, southeastern Utah - Indications of contaminant migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otton, James K.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Horton, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The Fry Canyon uranium/copper project site in San Juan County, southeastern Utah, was affected by the historical (1957-68) processing of uranium and copper-uranium ores. Relict uranium tailings and related ponds, and a large copper heap-leach pile at the site represent point sources of uranium and copper to local soils, surface water, and groundwater. This study was designed to establish the nature, extent, and pathways of contaminant dispersion. The methods used in this study are applicable at other sites of uranium mining, milling, or processing. The uranium tailings and associated ponds sit on a bench that is as much as 4.25 meters above the level of the adjacent modern channel of Fry Creek. The copper heap leach pile sits on bedrock just south of this bench. Contaminated groundwater from the ponds and other nearby sites moves downvalley and enters the modern alluvium of adjacent Fry Creek, its surface water, and also a broader, deeper paleochannel that underlies the modern creek channel and adjacent benches and stream terraces. The northern extent of contaminated groundwater is uncertain from geochemical data beyond an area of monitoring wells about 300 meters north of the site. Contaminated surface water extends to the State highway bridge. Some uranium-contaminated groundwater may also enter underlying bedrock of the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone along fracture zones. Four dc-resistivity surveys perpendicular to the valley trend were run across the channel and its adjacent stream terraces north of the heap-leach pile and ponds. Two surveys were done in a small field of monitoring wells and two in areas untested by borings to the north of the well field. Bedrock intercepts, salt distribution, and lithologic information from the wells and surface observations in the well field aided interpretation of the geophysical profiles there and allowed interpretation of the two profiles not tested by wells. The geophysical data for the two profiles to the north of the

  2. Mineral formation on metallic copper in a `Future repository site environment`: Textural considerations based on natural analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amcoff, Oe. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Inst. of Earth Sciences

    1998-01-01

    Copper mineral formation in the Swedish `repository site environment` is discussed. Special attention is given to ore mineral textures (=the spatial relation among minerals), with examples given from nature. It is concluded: By analogy with observations from natural occurrences, an initial coating of Cu-oxide on the canister surface (because of entrapped air during construction) will probably not hinder a later sulphidation process. Early formation of Cu-sulphides on the canister surface may be accompanied by formation of CuFe-sulphides. The latter phase(s) may form through replacement of the Cu-sulphides or, alternatively, by means of reaction between dissolved copper and fine-grained iron sulphide (pyrite) in the surrounding bentonite. Should for some reason the bentonite barrier fail and the conditions become strongly oxidizing, we can expect crustifications and rhythmic growths of Cu(II)-phases, like malachite (Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}). A presence of Fe{sup 2} in the clay minerals making up the bentonite might prove to have an adverse effect on the canister stability, since, in this case, the bentonite might be expected to act as a sink for dissolved copper. The mode of mineral growth along the copper - bentonite interface remains an open question.

  3. Inulavosin and its benzo-derivatives, melanogenesis inhibitors, target the copper loading mechanism to the active site of tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hideaki; Menezes, José C J M D S; Santos, Sérgio M; Yokota, Sadaki; Kamat, Shrivallabh P; Cavaleiro, José A S; Motokawa, Tomonori; Kato, Tomomi; Mochizuki, Mayu; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Yuki; Tanaka, Yoshitaka

    2014-05-01

    Tyrosinase, a melanosomal membrane protein containing copper, is a key enzyme for melanin synthesis in melanocytes. Inulavosin inhibits melanogenesis by enhancing a degradation of tyrosinase in lysosomes. However, the mechanism by which inulavosin redirects tyrosinase to lysosomes is yet unknown. The analyses of structure-activity relationship of inulavosin and its benzo-derivatives reveal that the hydroxyl and the methyl groups play a critical role in their inhibitory activity. Intriguingly, the docking studies to tyrosinase suggest that the compounds showing inhibitory activity bind through hydrophobic interactions to the cavity of tyrosinase below which the copper-binding sites are located. This cavity is proposed to be required for the association with a chaperon that assists in copper loading to tyrosinase in Streptomyces antibioticus. Inulavosin and its benzo-derivatives may compete with the copper chaperon and result in a lysosomal mistargeting of apo-tyrosinase that has a conformational defect. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Seasonal and Diel Vocalization Patterns of Antarctic Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia in the Southern Indian Ocean: A Multi-Year and Multi-Site Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle C Leroy

    Full Text Available Passive acoustic monitoring is an efficient way to provide insights on the ecology of large whales. This approach allows for long-term and species-specific monitoring over large areas. In this study, we examined six years (2010 to 2015 of continuous acoustic recordings at up to seven different locations in the Central and Southern Indian Basin to assess the peak periods of presence, seasonality and migration movements of Antarctic blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia. An automated method is used to detect the Antarctic blue whale stereotyped call, known as Z-call. Detection results are analyzed in terms of distribution, seasonal presence and diel pattern of emission at each site. Z-calls are detected year-round at each site, except for one located in the equatorial Indian Ocean, and display highly seasonal distribution. This seasonality is stable across years for every site, but varies between sites. Z-calls are mainly detected during autumn and spring at the subantarctic locations, suggesting that these sites are on the Antarctic blue whale migration routes, and mostly during winter at the subtropical sites. In addition to these seasonal trends, there is a significant diel pattern in Z-call emission, with more Z-calls in daytime than in nighttime. This diel pattern may be related to the blue whale feeding ecology.

  5. Developing on-site paper colorimetric monitoring technique for quick evaluating copper ion concentration in mineral wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guokun; Peng, Jingji; Zheng, Hong; Yuan, Dongxing

    2018-05-01

    With the reinforce of the copper mining, the on-site monitoring of the accompanied effluent discharge is highly demanded for the emergency response to minimize the negative effect of the effluent on the surrounding ecosystem. On the basis of the specific interaction between Cu2+ and L-Cysteine (L-Cys), which was modified on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), and the aggregation dependent surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au NPs, we developed an easy-on-going paper colorimetric method for the quick evaluating the copper ion concentration in the waste water excreted from the copper mine. The color change of L-Cys modified Au NPs (L-Cys-Au NPs)immobilized on a filter paper was very sensitive to the Cu2+ concentration and free of interference from other metal ions typically in waste water. The proposed paper colorimetry has the LOD of 0.09 mg/L and the linear range of 0.1-10 mg/L, respectively, with the RSD (n = 5) was 6.6% for 1 mg/L Cu2+ and 3.5% for 5 mg/L Cu2+. The quantitative analysis results for the mineral wastewater is in good agreement the China National Environmental Protection Standards HJ485-2009, which indicates the current method could be developed to the on-site detection technique for the emergency response in monitoring Cu2+ in industrial wastewater or polluted water.

  6. SITE-94. CAMEO: A model of mass-transport limited general corrosion of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worgan, K.J.; Apted, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the technical basis for the CAMEO code, which models the general, uniform corrosion of a copper canister either by transport of corrodants to the canister, or by transport of corrosion products away from the canister. According to the current Swedish concept for final disposal of spent nuclear fuels, extremely long containment times are achieved by thick (60-100 mm) copper canisters. Each canister is surrounded by a compacted bentonite buffer, located in a saturated, crystalline rock at a depth of around 500 m below ground level. Three diffusive transport-limited cases are identified for general, uniform corrosion of copper: General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of sulphide to the canister surface under reducing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of oxygen to the canister surface under mildly oxidizing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of copper chloride away from the canister surface under highly oxidizing conditions. The CAMEO code includes general corrosion models for each of the above three processes. CAMEO is based on the well-tested CALIBRE code previously developed as a finite-difference, mass-transfer analysis code for the SKI to evaluate long-term radionuclide release and transport in the near-field. A series of scoping calculations for the general, uniform corrosion of a reference copper canister are presented

  7. Site selectivity in the growth of copper islands on Au (111)

    OpenAIRE

    Grillo, Federico; Fruchtl, Herbert Anton; Francis, Stephen Malcolm; Richardson, Neville V

    2011-01-01

    This work is supported by the European Union in the scope of the SURMOF project under which this work was undertaken (contract number STRP 032109) The room temperature deposition of copper onto a Au(111)-(22×√3) reconstructed surface has been investigated using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), up to a copper coverage of approximately 0.7 monolayer (ML). At extremely low coverage (~0.02 ML), preferential adsorption is observed to occur by displacement of gold atoms and incorporation of...

  8. Spectroscopic analysis of soil metal contamination around a derelict mine site in the Blue Mountains, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddini, A.; Raval, S.; Taplin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Abandoned mine sites pose the potential threat of the heavy metal pollution spread through streams and via runoff leading to contamination of soil and water in their surrounding areas. Regular monitoring of these areas is critical to minimise impacts on water resources, flora and fauna. Conventional ground based monitoring is expensive and sometimes impractical; spectroscopic methods have been emerged as a reliable alternative for this purpose. In this study, the capabilities of the spectroscopy method were examined for modelling soil contamination from around the abandoned silver-zinc mine located at Yerranderie, NSW Australia. The diagnostic characteristics of the original reflectance data were compared with models derived from first and second derivatives of the reflectance data. The results indicate that the models derived from the first derivative of the reflectance data estimate heavy metals significantly more accurately than model derived from the original reflectance. It was also found in this study that there is no need to use second derivative for modelling heavy metal soil contamination. Finally, the results indicate that estimates were of greater accuracy for arsenic and lead compared to other heavy metals, while the estimation for silver was found to be the most erroneous.

  9. Isotopic probing of molecular oxygen activation at copper(I) sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanci, Michael P; Smirnov, Valeriy V; Cramer, Christopher J; Gauchenova, Ekaterina V; Sundermeyer, Jörg; Roth, Justine P

    2007-11-28

    Copper-dioxygen (CuO2) adducts are frequently proposed as intermediates in enzymes, yet their electronic and vibrational structures have not always been understood. [Cu(eta1-O2)TMG3tren]+ (TMG3tren = 1,1,1-tris{2-[N2-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidino)]ethyl}amine) features end-on (eta1) O2 coordination in the solid state. Described here is an investigation of the compound's solution properties by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, density functional calculations, and oxygen isotope effects. The study yields two major findings. First, [Cu(eta1-O2)TMG3tren]+ is paramagnetic due to a triplet electronic structure; this is in contrast to other copper compounds where O2 is bound in a side-on manner. Second, the oxygen equilibrium isotope effect upon O2 binding to copper(I) (18O EIE [triple bond] K(16O16O)/K(16O18O) = 1.0148 +/- 0.0012) is significantly larger than those determined for iron and cobalt eta1-O2 adducts. This result is suggested to reflect greater ionic (CuII-O2-I) character within the valence bond description. A revised interpretation of the physical origins of the 18O EIEs upon O2 binding to redox metals is also advanced along with experimental data that should be used as benchmarks for interpreting 18O kinetic isotope effects upon enzyme reactions.

  10. Final site environmental statement: Blue Hills Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2. Related to the determination of the suitability of Site G for eventual construction. Docket Nos. 50-510 and 50-511

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The site suitability analysis is based on the assumption that the Blue Hills Station will employ two pressurized water reactors to produce outputs of approximately 2814 MWt each. Two steam turbine generators will use the heat produced to provide approximately 957 MWe (gross) each. The exhaust steam will be cooled by four low-profile round mechanical-draft cooling towers. Assuming construction of a nuclear station at site G, a summary of environmental impacts and adverse effects is presented

  11. Quantum Refinement Does Not Support Dinuclear Copper Sites in Crystal Structures of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lili; Caldararu, Octav; Rosenzweig, Amy C; Ryde, Ulf

    2018-01-02

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is one of the few enzymes that can activate methane. The metal content of this enzyme has been highly controversial, with suggestions of a dinuclear Fe site or mono-, di-, or trinuclear Cu sites. Crystal structures have shown a mono- or dinuclear Cu site, but the resolution was low and the geometry of the dinuclear site unusual. We have employed quantum refinement (crystallographic refinement enhanced with quantum-mechanical calculations) to improve the structure of the active site. We compared a number of different mono- and dinuclear geometries, in some cases enhanced with more protein ligands or one or two water molecules, to determine which structure fits two sets of crystallographic raw data best. In all cases, the best results were obtained with mononuclear Cu sites, occasionally with an extra water molecule. Thus, we conclude that there is no crystallographic support for a dinuclear Cu site in pMMO. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Copper(II) Binding Sites in N-Terminally Acetylated α-Synuclein: A Theoretical Rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Rafael; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Adrover, Miquel; Frau, Juan

    2017-08-03

    The interactions between N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein and Cu(II) at several binding sites have been studied with DFT calculations, specifically with the M06 hybrid functional and the ωB97X-D DFT-D functional. In previous experimental studies, Cu(II) was shown to bind several α-synuclein residues, including Met1-Asp2 and His50, forming square planar coordination complexes. Also, it was determined that a low-affinity binding site exists in the C-terminal domain, centered on Asp121. However, in the N-terminally acetylated protein, present in vivo, the Met1 site is blocked. In this work, we simplify the representation of the protein by modeling each experimentally found binding site as a complex between an N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein dipeptide (or several independent residues) and a Cu(II) cation, and compare the results with a number of additional, structurally analogous sites not experimentally found. This way of representing the binding sites, although extremely simple, allows us to reproduce experimental results and to provide a theoretical rationale to explain the preference of Cu(II) for certain sites, as well as explicit geometrical structures for the complexes formed. These results are important to understand the interactions between α-synuclein and Cu(II), one of the factors inducing structural changes in the protein and leading to aggregated forms of it which may play a role in neurodegeneration.

  13. Trends in body weight for 7-year boys from different environmental sites of copper mining region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Posłuszny

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The epidemic of the XXI century – a disease that threatens through development of other ailments, caused by pathological accumulation of adipose tissue in the body, beyond the physiological needs and adaptability – the obesity. A significant number of diseases are largely a consequence of obesity, and despite the fact that it mainly occurs in adults, that problem may start influencing our health from an early age. In childhood and adolescence the most common form is simple obesity, and frequency of occurrence shows significant growing trend, regardless of gender. The prevalence of obesity in early stages of life is associated with a significant probability of a continuation of or increase in adulthood, therefore one should look for the onset of obesity in childhood. The results of studies and projections show steady growth in the number of overweight and obese in populations of developing countries and developed economies, including Poland. Therefore it is important to continuously monitor body weight and degree of fatness of children and adolescents. Material and methods. The study was conducted in 2001 and 2002 in six rural primary schools from the Copper Mining Region and in all three primary schools from Polkowice. More measurements were made in 2008 and 2010. The total number of 7-year old boys was 277. The measurements covered Body height, Body weight, Lean Body Mass, Total Body Water and Total Body Fat. These data were collected with the use of anthropometer, body scale and FUTREX 5000, the optical body composition analyzer. Measurements were necessary to get the BMI. Results. Based on analysis, it was observed that the height and weight of 7-year-old boys from the Copper Mining Region has increased compared to the first series of tests. The BMI and amount of body fat have also increased. This situation was observed both in rural and urban environment. There was a difference in body fat percentage. Lower values were

  14. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  15. Breeding performance of blue tits (Cyanistes cæruleus ultramarinus) in relation to lead pollution and nest failure rates in rural, intermediate, and urban sites in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmia, Zahra; Scheifler, Renaud; Crini, Nadia; Maas, Samuel; Giraudoux, Patrick; Benyacoub, Slim

    2013-03-01

    The breeding parameters and the egg and nestling morphology of Cyanistes caeruleus populations from rural, intermediate, and urban sites in Algeria and the relationships of those variables with lead contamination were studied during three consecutive years. Breeding success was explained only by predation and vandalism rates. Predation was higher in the rural area, whereas vandalism was higher in the urban site. The other measured breeding parameters and egg characteristics were relatively insensitive to study site. The morphology of urban nestlings exhibited a trend toward smaller body size and mass compared to individuals from intermediate and rural sites. Although lead concentrations were higher in the tissues of urban birds than in intermediate and rural individuals, we did not detect a clear influence of this variable on nestling morphology. We conclude that urbanization influenced blue tit breeding parameters through predation and vandalism and nestling morphology through mechanisms other than lead pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a methodology based on metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions and mass spectrometry to determine the metal binding sites in copper metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jihyeon; Vachet, Richard W

    2003-03-01

    Efforts have been made to develop a method that uses metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) reactions and mass spectrometry (MS) to identify the binding site of copper in metalloproteins. This method uses MCO reactions to oxidize the amino acids in the metal-binding site and MS to identify the amino acids that have been oxidized. Several reaction conditions, including Cu(II)/ascorbate/O2, Cu(II)/O2/H2O2, and Cu(II)/ascorbate/O2/H2O2, have been tested at varying concentrations to find the optimum conditions for specific oxidation of only the amino acids bound to copper. For small peptides, such as angiotensin I (Agt I) and [Gln11]-amyloid-beta-protein fragment 1-16 (A beta(1-16)), the optimum conditions for specific modification involve the use of Cu(II)/ascorbate/O2. For a larger protein, azurin, the speed and specificity of the MCO reactions are enhanced by the presence of a relatively high concentration of ascorbate (100 mM) and a small concentration of H2O2 (1 mM). Optimized reaction conditions combined with MS/MS and MSn analysis on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer allow the copper-binding sites to be specifically identified. For Agt I and A beta(1-16), the amino acids bound to copper can be identified without any false positives. For azurin, four of the five amino acids bound to copper are identified with one false positive. This false positive, however, corresponds to the oxidation of Met44, which is probably due to its susceptibility to oxidation and its proximity to the only residue not identified (i.e., Gly45). The results altogether suggest that MCO reactions and MS provide a very promising approach for identifying the amino acid residues bound to copper in metalloproteins.

  17. Strategic influence on deep groundwater flow in the Knox Group Copper Ridge dolomite on the West Chestnut Ridge site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.R.; Ketelle, R.H.

    1987-10-01

    The Copper Ridge Dolomite of the Upper Cambrian Knox Group underlies a site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, under consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) for a belowground waste disposal facility. The Copper Ridge was studied for DOE to understand the influence of lithology on deep groundwater flow. Three facies types are distinguished which comprise laterally continuous 1 to 4-m-thick rock units interpreted to represent upward-shallowing depositional cycles having an apparently significant effect on groundwater flow at depth. Rock core observations indicate one of the recurring facies types is characterized by thin to medium-bedded, fine-grained dolostone with planar cryptalgal laminae and thin shaley partings. Distinctive fracturing in this facies type, that may have resulted from regional structural deformation, is considered to be responsible for weathering at depth and the development of stratabound pathways of preferred groundwater flow. In addition, geophysical data suggest that one occurrence of this weathered facies type coincides with an apparent geochemical interface at depth. Geophysical data also indicate the presence of several fluid invasion horizons, traceable outside the study area, which coincide with the unweathered occurrence of this fine-grained facies type. The subcropping of recurrent zones of preferred groundwater flow at the weathered/unweathered interface may define linear traces of enhanced aquifer recharge paralleling geologic strike. Vertical projection of these zones from the weathered/unweathered rock interface to the ground surface may describe areas of enhanced infiltration. Tests to determine the role of stratigraphic controls on groundwater flow are key components of future investigations on West Chestnut Ridge.

  18. Independent University Study to Assess the Performance of a Humate Amendment for Copper Detoxification at the H-12 Outfall at Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harmon, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-06

    The overarching objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the copper detoxification process that is in place at the Savannah River Site H-12 Outfall. The testing was performed in two phases; Phase 1 assessed the safety and potential for intrinsic toxicity of the humate amendment being used at the H-12 Outfall, Borregro HA-1, as well as an alternative amendment sodium humic acid. The second phase assessed the effectiveness of Borregro HA-1 in mitigating and reducing toxic effects of copper.

  19. Effect of chemical structure of S-nitrosothiols on nitric oxide release mediated by the copper sites of a metal organic framework based environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Edinbyrd, Kiara; Li, Tanping; Kumar, Revati

    2017-05-17

    The effect of chemical structure of different biologically compatible S-nitrosothiols on the solvation environment at catalytic copper sites in a metal organic framework (MOF) suspended in a solution of ethanol is probed using computational methods. The use of a copper based MOF as a storage vehicle and catalyst (copper sites of the MOF) in the controlled and sustained release of chemically stored nitric oxide (NO) from S-nitrosocysteine has been shown to occur both experimentally and computationally [J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2012, 134, 3330-3333; Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 23403]. Previous studies on a copper based MOF, namely HKUST-1, concluded that modifications in the R-group of s-nitrosothiols and/or organic linkers of MOFs led to a method capable of modulating NO release. In order to test the hypothesis that larger R-groups slow down NO release, four different RSNOs (R = cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine or glutathione) of varying size were investigated, which in turn required the use of a larger copper based MOF. Due to its desirable copper centers and more extensive framework, MOF-143, an analog of HKUST-1 was chosen to further explore both the effect of different RSNOs as well as MOF environments on NO release. Condensed phase classical molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to study the effect of the complex MOF environment as well as the chemical structure and size of the RSNO on the species on the catalytic reaction. The results indicate that in addition to the size of the RSNO species and the organic linkers within the MOF, the reaction rates can be modulated by the molecular structure of the RSNO and furthermore combining different RSNO species can also be used to tune the rate of NO release.

  20. Feasibility of determination of low-head hydroelectric power development at existing sites. Big Blue River Co-dependent Hydroelectric Development: feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, H. Steve; Feuerberg, Stan; Lawrence, John D.; Pal, Parimal C.; Trick, Dr., William T.

    1979-03-01

    The technical, economic, environmental, safety, and financial aspects of redeveloping 7 dam sites in Nebraska for hydroelectric power generation were studied. The Big Blue River Co-dependent Hydroelectric Development was found to be a technically feasible concept, for both redevelopment and in some cases rehabilitation of seven existing sites. The proposed redevelopment project will include seven installations with a recommended nominally rated redeveloped capacity of 3920 kW ranging from 120 kW at the northernmost site in Seward County to 1500 kW at Barneston. The average annual gross generation expected from the seven redeveloped sites totals 11,555,000 kWh. It is estimated that the total cost of redevelopment of these seven sites will be $14,090,000 at 1979 price levels, providing power at an average levelized cost of about 5.3 cents per kWh based on 7% cost of money, a mid-1983 commissioning date, and allowing for funds during construction and cost escalation over a 30-year period. Rehabilitation of original installations at Crete, Dewitt, Blue Springs and Barneston is technically feasible for a total installed capacity of 1415 kW with annual average gross generation of 6,675,000 kWh. The total cost of this rehabilitation is estimated as $3,372,000 at 1979 price levels, or about 2.4 cents per kWh, levelized on a similar basis. Rehabilitation of the Barneston site alone for an installed capacity of 760 kW and annual generation of 3,581,000 kWh is both technically and economically feasible. The total estimated cost of this alternative is $668,000, providing power at a cost of about 1.9 cents per kWh at 1979 price levels. The benefit-cost ratio for Barneston rehabilitation is estimated as 1.23.

  1. 3D local structure around copper site of rabbit prion-related protein: Quantitative determination by XANES spectroscopy combined with multiple-scattering calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, P. X.; Lian, F. L.; Wang, Y.; Wen, Yi; Chu, W. S.; Zhao, H. F.; Zhang, S.; Li, J.; Lin, D. H.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Prion-related protein (PrP), a cell-surface copper-binding glycoprotein, is considered to be responsible for a number of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The structural conversion of PrP from the normal cellular isoform (PrPC) to the post-translationally modified form (PrPSc) is thought to be relevant to Cu2+ binding to histidine residues. Rabbits are one of the few mammalian species that appear to be resistant to TSEs, because of the structural characteristics of the rabbit prion protein (RaPrPC) itself. Here we determined the three-dimensional local structure around the C-terminal high-affinity copper-binding sites using X-ray absorption near-edge structure combined with ab initio calculations in the framework of the multiple-scattering (MS) theory. Result shows that two amino acid resides, Gln97 and Met108, and two histidine residues, His95 and His110, are involved in binding this copper(II) ion. It might help us understand the roles of copper in prion conformation conversions, and the molecular mechanisms of prion-involved diseases.

  2. Mapping upland hardwood site quality and productivity with GIS and FIA in the Blue Ridge of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudia A. Cotton; Stephen R. Prisley; Thomas R. Fox

    2009-01-01

    The forested ecosystems of the southern Appalachians are some of the most diverse in North America due to the variability in climate, soils, and geologic parent material coupled with the complex topography found throughout the region. These same characteristics cause stands of upland hardwoods to be extremely variable with regard to site quality and productivity. Site...

  3. $^{111m}$Cd- and $^{199m}$Hg-derivatives of blue oxidases

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The rack-induced bonding concept (H.B.Gray & B.G.~Malmstroem, Comments Inorg. Chem, 2, 203, 1983) postulates that the bound metal ion in metalloproteins is forced to adopt a coordination geometry determined by the rigid peptide conformation of the protein. Alternatively, the metal ion could create its own favoured coordination geometry in a soft peptide conformation. In order to decide who is slave or master the changes of coordination and rigidity of metal sites in blue copper proteins due to metal and ligand exchange were studied by $^{111m}$Cd and $^{199m}$Hg $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$-perturbed angular correlation (PAC). To get a better understanding of the so called " Type 1 Copper Site " of the blue oxidases laccase (LAC) and ascorbate oxidase (AO) we concentrated our investigations on the small blue copper proteins azurin and plastocyanin. \\\\ \\\\In azurin~(Az), the metal ligand methionine 121~(M121) was replaced by several amino acids, e.g. asparagine~(N), glutamic acid~(E), via site directed mutagenesis. Di...

  4. Neutron activation analysis of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century European blue glass trade beads from the eastern Great Lakes area of North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, R.G.V.; Chafe, A.; Kenyon, I.

    1994-01-01

    Sixteenth- and seventeenth-century European blue glass trade beads from aboriginal sites in the eastern Great Lakes area of North America have been analysed non-destructively using low neutron dose instrumental neutron activation analysis, so that the beads could be returned to their keepers. Dark blue (cobalt-coloured) beads are readily separable from turquoise (copper-coloured) beads. Differences in the chemistries of the turquoise blue beads appear to be useful in separating glass beads from the two centuries. Low calcium, sixteenth-century turquoise beads tend to disintegrate by a leaching of the alkali metals. (Author)

  5. Blue lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Caterina; Scope, Alon; Lallas, Aimilios; Zalaudek, Iris; Moscarella, Elvira; Gardini, Stefano; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Blue color is found in a wide range of malignant and benign melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions and in lesions that result from penetration of exogenous materials, such as radiation or amalgam tattoo or traumatic penetration of particles. Discriminating between different diagnostic entities that display blue color relies on careful patient examination and lesion assessment. Dermoscopically, the extent, distribution, and patterns created by blue color can help diagnose lesions with specificity and differentiate between benign and malignant entities. This article provides an overview of the main diagnoses whereby blue color can be found, providing simple management rules for these lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. EPR of Cu(II) in sarcosine cadmium chloride: probe into dopant site - symmetry and copper-sarcosine interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pathinettam-Padiyan, D; Murugesan, R

    2000-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of Cu(II) doped sarcosine cadmium chloride single crystals have been investigated at room temperature. Experimental results reveal that the Cu(II) ion enters the lattice interstitially. The observed superhyperfine lines indicate the superposition of two sets of quintet structure with interaction of nitrogen atoms and the two isotopes of copper. The spin Hamiltonian parameters are evaluated by Schonland method and the electric field symmetry around the copper ion is rhombic. An admixture of d sub z sup 2 orbital with the d sub x sub sup 2 sub - sub y sub sup 2 ground state is observed. Evaluation of MO coefficients reveals that the in-plane interaction between copper and nitrogen is strong in this lattice.

  7. Two draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas jessenii strains isolated from a copper contaminated site in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Yanan; Wang, Dan; Brandt, Kristian Koefoed

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas jessenii C2 and Pseudomonas jessenii H16 were isolated from low-Cu and high-Cu industrially contaminated soil, respectively. P. jessenii H16 displayed significant resistance to copper when compared to P. jessenii C2. Here we describe genome sequences and interesting features...... of these two strains. The genome of P. jessenii C2 comprised 6,420,113 bp, with 5814 protein-coding genes and 67 RNA genes. P. jessenii H16 comprised 6,807,788 bp, with 5995 protein-coding genes and 70 RNA genes. Of special interest was a specific adaptation to this harsh copper-contaminated environment as P...

  8. Development of a regression model to predict copper toxicity to Daphnia magna and site-specific copper criteria across multiple surface-water drainages in an arid landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Barry A; Meyer, Joseph S

    2014-08-01

    The water effect ratio (WER) procedure developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency is commonly used to derive site-specific criteria for point-source metal discharges into perennial waters. However, experience is limited with this method in the ephemeral and intermittent systems typical of arid climates. The present study presents a regression model to develop WER-based site-specific criteria for a network of ephemeral and intermittent streams influenced by nonpoint sources of Cu in the southwestern United States. Acute (48-h) Cu toxicity tests were performed concurrently with Daphnia magna in site water samples and hardness-matched laboratory waters. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) for Cu in site water samples (n=17) varied by more than 12-fold, and the range of calculated WER values was similar. Statistically significant (α=0.05) univariate predictors of site-specific Cu toxicity included (in sequence of decreasing significance) dissolved organic carbon (DOC), hardness/alkalinity ratio, alkalinity, K, and total dissolved solids. A multiple-regression model developed from a combination of DOC and alkalinity explained 85% of the toxicity variability in site water samples, providing a strong predictive tool that can be used in the WER framework when site-specific criteria values are derived. The biotic ligand model (BLM) underpredicted toxicity in site waters by more than 2-fold. Adjustments to the default BLM parameters improved the model's performance but did not provide a better predictive tool compared with the regression model developed from DOC and alkalinity. © 2014 SETAC.

  9. A combined spectroscopic and molecular docking study on site selective binding interaction of Toluidine blue O with Human and Bovine serum albumins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selva Sharma, Arumugam [Department of Chemistry, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Anandakumar, Shanmugam [Department of Bioinformatics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Ilanchelian, Malaichamy, E-mail: chelian73@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India)

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation the interaction of a biologically active photodynamic therapeutic agent Toluidine blue O (TBO) with Serum albumins viz Human serum albumin (HSA) and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied using absorption, emission, circular dichroism spectroscopy and molecular docking experiments. The emission titration experiments between HSA/BSA and TBO revealed the existence of strong interactions between TBO and the proteins. The site competitive experiment of HSA and BSA showed that the primary binding site of TBO is located in site I of HSA/BSA involving hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction. To ascertain the results of site competitive experiments, molecular docking was utilized to characterize the binding models of TBO–HSA/BSA complexes. From the molecular docking studies, free energy calculations were undertaken to examine the energy contributions and the role of various amino acid residues of HSA/BSA in TBO binding. The existence of Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between the ligand and the protein was utilized to calculate the donor–acceptor distance of TBO and protein. The TBO induced conformational changes of HSA/BSA was established using synchronous emission, three dimensional emission and circular dichroism studies. - Highlights: • Site selective binding interaction of TBO with HSA and BSA were investigated. • TBO quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA/BSA by static quenching process. • Computational studies of TBO with HSA/BSA substantiate the experimental findings. • 3D and CD spectral studies of TBO–HSA/BSA revealed structural changes in protein. • The distance (r) between TBO and HSA/BSA were estimated from FRET theory.

  10. The potential for portable X-ray fluorescence determination of soil copper at ancient metallurgy sites, and considerations beyond measurements of total concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, M; Rogan, G; Wilson, S C; Grave, P; Kealhofer, L; Yukongdi, P

    2018-01-15

    Copper (Cu) at ancient metallurgy sites represents the earliest instance of anthropogenically generated metal pollution. Such sites are spread across a wide range of environments from Eurasia to South America, and provide a unique opportunity to investigate the past and present extent and impact of metalworking contamination. Establishing the concentration and extent of soil Cu at archaeometallurgy sites can enhance archaeological interpretations of site use but can also, more fundamentally, provide an initial indication of contamination risk from such sites. Systematic evaluations of total soil Cu concentrations at ancient metalworking sites have not been conducted, due in part to the limitations of conventional laboratory-based protocols. In this paper, we first review what is known about Cu soil concentrations at ancient metallurgy sites. We then assess the benefits and challenges of portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (pXRF) as an alternative, rapid technique for the assessment of background and contaminant levels of Cu in soils. We conclude that pXRF is an effective tool for identifying potential contamination. Finally, we provide an overview of some major considerations beyond total Cu concentrations, such as bioavailability assessments, that will need to be considered at such sites to move toward a complete assessment of environmental and human risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath secreted protein, MopE*, binds both reduced and oxidized copper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ve

    Full Text Available Under copper limiting growth conditions the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath secrets essentially only one protein, MopE*, to the medium. MopE* is a copper-binding protein whose structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure of MopE* revealed a unique high affinity copper binding site consisting of two histidine imidazoles and one kynurenine, the latter an oxidation product of Trp130. In this study, we demonstrate that the copper ion coordinated by this strong binding site is in the Cu(I state when MopE* is isolated from the growth medium of M. capsulatus. The conclusion is based on X-ray Near Edge Absorption spectroscopy (XANES, and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR studies. EPR analyses demonstrated that MopE*, in addition to the strong copper-binding site, also binds Cu(II at two weaker binding sites. Both Cu(II binding sites have properties typical of non-blue type II Cu (II centres, and the strongest of the two Cu(II sites is characterised by a relative high hyperfine coupling of copper (A(|| =20 mT. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography binding studies suggests that residues in the N-terminal part of MopE* are involved in forming binding site(s for Cu(II ions. Our results support the hypothesis that MopE plays an important role in copper uptake, possibly making use of both its high (Cu(I and low Cu(II affinity properties.

  12. Influence of fine-scale habitat structure on nest-site occupancy, laying date and clutch size in Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amininasab, Seyed Mehdi; Vedder, Oscar; Schut, Elske; de Jong, Berber; Magrath, Michael J. L.; Korsten, Peter; Komdeur, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Most birds have specific habitat requirements for breeding. The vegetation structure surrounding nest-sites is an important component of habitat quality, and can have large effects on avian breeding performance. We studied 13 years of Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus population data to determine whether characteristics of vegetation structure predict site occupancy, laying date and number of eggs laid. Measurements of vegetation structure included the density of English Oak Quercus robur, European Beech Fagus sylvatica, and other deciduous, coniferous and non-coniferous evergreen trees, within a 20-m radius of nest-boxes used for breeding. Trees were further sub-divided into specific classes of trunk circumferences to determine the densities for different maturity levels. Based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we reduced the total number of 17 measured vegetation variables to 7 main categories, which we used for further analyses. We found that the occupancy rate of sites and the number of eggs laid correlated positively with the proportion of deciduous trees and negatively with the density of coniferous trees. Laying of the first egg was advanced with a greater proportion of deciduous trees. Among deciduous trees, the English Oak appeared to be most important, as a higher density of more mature English Oak trees was associated with more frequent nest-box occupancy, a larger number of eggs laid, and an earlier laying start. Furthermore, laying started earlier and more eggs were laid in nest-boxes with higher occupancy rates. Together, these findings highlight the role of deciduous trees, particularly more mature English Oak, as important predictors of high-quality preferred habitat. These results aid in defining habitat quality and will facilitate future studies on the importance of environmental quality for breeding performance.

  13. A Purple Cupredoxin from Nitrosopumilus maritimus Containing a Mononuclear Type 1 Copper Center with an Open Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Tian, Shiliang; Marshall, Nicholas M.; Hemp, James; Mullen, Timothy; Nilges, Mark J.; Gao, Yi-Gui; Robinson, Howard; Stahl, David A.; Gennis, Robert B.; Lu, Yi

    2016-05-25

    Mononuclear cupredoxin proteins usually contain a coordinately saturated type 1 copper (T1Cu) center and function exclusively as electron carriers. Here we report a cupredoxin isolated from the nitrifying archaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, called Nmar1307, that contains a T1Cu center with an open binding site containing water. It displays a deep purple color due to strong absorptions around 413 nm (1880 M–1 cm–1) and 558 nm (2290 M–1 cm–1) in the UV–vis electronic spectrum. EPR studies suggest the protein contains two Cu(II) species of nearly equal population, one nearly axial, with hyperfine constant A∥ = 98 × 10–4 cm–1, and another more rhombic, with a smaller A∥ value of 69 × 10–4 cm–1. The X-ray crystal structure at 1.6 Å resolution confirms that it contains a Cu atom coordinated by two His and one Cys in a trigonal plane, with an axial H2O at 2.25 Å. Both UV–vis absorption and EPR spectroscopic studies suggest that the Nmar1307 can oxidize NO to nitrite, an activity that is attributable to the high reduction potential (354 mV vs SHE) of the copper site. These results suggest that mononuclear cupredoxins can have a wide range of structural features, including an open binding site containing water, making this class of proteins even more versatile.

  14. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today.

  15. Preparation and characterization of Cu2O-TiO2: Efficient photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuehua; Liang Dahui; Liu Manle; Liu Dingzhong

    2008-01-01

    A series of copper-deposited titania were prepared by photoreduction method under irradiation with a 125-W high-pressure mercury lamp. From XPS and AES results, the deposited-copper formed Ti-O-Cu bond on the surface of TiO 2 , and the Cu species on the surface of copper-deposited TiO 2 can be identified as Cu(I). The photocatalytic degradation activity of methylene blue for the Cu 2 O-TiO 2 series increased with increasing Cu 2 O-deposited content, and then decreased. The highest photocatalytic degradation activity of methylene blue was obtained for 0.16% Cu 2 O-TiO 2 . When copper-deposited content reached to 0.32%, the photocatalytic activity was lower than that of pure TiO 2 . It is shown that Cu 2 O on the surface of TiO 2 can trap electrons from the TiO 2 conduction band, and the electrons trapped on the Cu 2 O-TiO 2 site are subsequently transferred to the surrounding adsorbed O 2 , thereby avoiding electron-hole recombination, and enhancing the photocatalytic activity. Excess copper loading may screen the photocatalyst from the UV source, so the photocatalytic activity diminishes with increasing Cu 2 O

  16. Geochemical Characterization of Mine Waste, Mine Drainage, and Stream Sediments at the Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund Site, Orange County, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Kiah, Richard G.; Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Adams, Monique; Anthony, Michael W.; Briggs, Paul H.; Jackson, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund Site in the Vermont copper belt consists of the abandoned Smith, Eureka, and Union mines, all of which exploited Besshi-type massive sulfide deposits. The site was listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List in 2004 due to aquatic ecosystem impacts. This study was intended to be a precursor to a formal remedial investigation by the USEPA, and it focused on the characterization of mine waste, mine drainage, and stream sediments. A related study investigated the effects of the mine drainage on downstream surface waters. The potential for mine waste and drainage to have an adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems, on drinking- water supplies, and to human health was assessed on the basis of mineralogy, chemical concentrations, acid generation, and potential for metals to be leached from mine waste and soils. The results were compared to those from analyses of other Vermont copper belt Superfund sites, the Elizabeth Mine and Ely Copper Mine, to evaluate if the waste material at the Pike Hill Copper Mine was sufficiently similar to that of the other mine sites that USEPA can streamline the evaluation of remediation technologies. Mine-waste samples consisted of oxidized and unoxidized sulfidic ore and waste rock, and flotation-mill tailings. These samples contained as much as 16 weight percent sulfides that included chalcopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, and sphalerite. During oxidation, sulfides weather and may release potentially toxic trace elements and may produce acid. In addition, soluble efflorescent sulfate salts were identified at the mines; during rain events, the dissolution of these salts contributes acid and metals to receiving waters. Mine waste contained concentrations of cadmium, copper, and iron that exceeded USEPA Preliminary Remediation Goals. The concentrations of selenium in mine waste were higher than the average composition of eastern United States soils. Most mine waste was

  17. Site-SpecificCu Labeling of the Serine Protease, Active Site Inhibited Factor Seven Azide (FVIIai-N), Using Copper Free Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Troels E; Kristensen, Lotte K; Nielsen, Carsten H

    2018-01-01

    A method for site-specific radiolabeling of the serine protease active site inhibited factor seven (FVIIai) with64Cu has been applied using a biorthogonal click reaction. FVIIai binds to tissue factor (TF), a trans-membrane protein involved in hemostasis, angiogenesis, proliferation, cell migrati...

  18. Selenium and its redox speciation in rainwater from sites of Valparaiso region in Chile, impacted by mining activities of copper ores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Gregori Ida; Lobos, Maria G; Pinochet, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    The determination of the total concentration of selenium does not provide sufficient information about its toxicity and its bioavailability. The determination of its chemical forms is the basis for understanding the biogeochemical cycle in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and for detecting the species which might be toxic to biota. In this work we describe an analytical procedure to carry out the redox speciation of selenium present at ultratrace levels in rainwater from sites of Valparaiso region in Chile, impacted by mining activities of copper ores. A simple preconcentration step of the rainwater sample on a rotavapor system, in vacuum at low temperature permits the concentration of the different redox selenium species until levels quantifiable by sensitive techniques such as differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry or by spectrometric techniques, based on the hydride generation and detection by atomic absorption or atomic fluorescence spectrometry. These techniques coupled to redox chemical reactions allow the redox speciation of selenium. The results show that the open evaporation system can be used to concentrate water samples when the aim of the analysis is the determination of the total selenium concentration. On the contrary, to carry out its redox speciation only the preconcentration performed on rotavapor system, in vacuum can be used. When synthetic solutions containing different redox species of selenium, at ultratrace levels, were slowly evaporated on open system, Se(II) and Se(IV) were oxidized. The optimized procedure was then applied to the selenium determination and its redox speciation in rainwater samples collected in sites impacted by mining activities of copper ores. It was found that the amounts of total selenium in rainwater, as copper, from Puchuncavi valley decrease exponentially with the distance from the source, indicating that these elements in this region arise from the industrial complex Las Ventanas. In the redox

  19. Copper transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  20. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D and D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D and D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D and D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness

  1. Accumulation of lead, zinc, copper and cadmium by 12 wetland plant species thriving in metal-contaminated sites in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, H.; Ye, Z.H.; Wong, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    The concentrations of lead, zinc, copper and cadmium accumulated by 12 emergent-rooted wetland plant species including different populations of Leersia hexandra, Juncus effusus and Equisetum ramosisti were investigated in field conditions of China. The results showed that metal accumulation by wetland plants differed among species, populations and tissues. Populations grown in substrata with elevated metals contained significantly higher metals in plants. Metals accumulated by wetland plants were mostly distributed in root tissues, suggesting that an exclusion strategy for metal tolerance widely exists in them. That some species/populations could accumulate relatively high metal concentrations (far above the toxic concentration to plants) in their shoots indicates that internal detoxification metal tolerance mechanism(s) are also included. The factors affecting metal accumulation by wetland plants include metal concentrations, pH, and nutrient status in substrata. Mostly concentrations of Pb and Cu in both aboveground and underground tissues of the plants were significantly positively related to their total and/or DTPA-extractable fractions in substrata while negatively to soil N and P, respectively. The potential use of these wetland plants in phytoremediation is also discussed

  2. Accumulation of lead, zinc, copper and cadmium by 12 wetland plant species thriving in metal-contaminated sites in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, H.; Ye, Z.H.; Wong, M.H

    2004-11-01

    The concentrations of lead, zinc, copper and cadmium accumulated by 12 emergent-rooted wetland plant species including different populations of Leersia hexandra, Juncus effusus and Equisetum ramosisti were investigated in field conditions of China. The results showed that metal accumulation by wetland plants differed among species, populations and tissues. Populations grown in substrata with elevated metals contained significantly higher metals in plants. Metals accumulated by wetland plants were mostly distributed in root tissues, suggesting that an exclusion strategy for metal tolerance widely exists in them. That some species/populations could accumulate relatively high metal concentrations (far above the toxic concentration to plants) in their shoots indicates that internal detoxification metal tolerance mechanism(s) are also included. The factors affecting metal accumulation by wetland plants include metal concentrations, pH, and nutrient status in substrata. Mostly concentrations of Pb and Cu in both aboveground and underground tissues of the plants were significantly positively related to their total and/or DTPA-extractable fractions in substrata while negatively to soil N and P, respectively. The potential use of these wetland plants in phytoremediation is also discussed.

  3. Chemical Structure of TiO2 Nanotube Photocatalysts Promoted by Copper and Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yu Liao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs promoted by copper (5% (Cu-TNT and iron (5% (Fe-TNT were prepared for visible-light photocatalysis. By X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectroscopy, it is found that the enhanced photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB on Cu-TNT and Fe-TNT is associated with the predominant surface photoactive sites A2 ((Ti=OO4. By extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectroscopy, the dispersed copper and iron also cause increases in the Ti–O and Ti–(O–Ti bond distances by 0.01-0.02 and 0.04-0.05 Å, respectively. The decreased Ti–O bonding energy may lead to an increase of photoexcited electron transport. The copper- or-iron promoted TNT can thus enhance photocatalytic degradation of MB under the visible-light radiation.

  4. The met axial ligand determines the redox potential in Cu-A sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledesma, G.N.; Murgida, D.H.; Ly, H.K.

    2007-01-01

    The replacement of the axial methionine ligand in a native Cu-A protein rendered a series of stable mutants with spectroscopic features of a mixed valence center. The mutations resulted in minor perturbations of the electronic structure of this site but led to significant changes in the redox...... potential. This suggests that the axial ligand plays a role in tuning the redox potential Of Cu-A, resembling the behavior observed in blue copper sites....

  5. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  6. The anti-browning agent sulfite inactivates Agaricus bisporus tyrosinase through covalent modification of the copper-B site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, T.F.M.; Gruppen, H.; Sforza, S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Vincken, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfite salts are widely used as antibrowning agents in food processing. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism by which sulfite prevents enzymatic browning has remained unknown. Here, we show that sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO3 ) irreversibly blocks the active site of tyrosinase from the edible

  7. Posthuman blues

    CERN Document Server

    Tonnies, Mac

    2013-01-01

    Posthuman Blues, Vol. I is first volume of the edited version of the popular weblog maintained by author Mac Tonnies from 2003 until his tragic death in 2009. Tonnies' blog was a pastiche of his original fiction, reflections on his day-to-day life, trenchant observations of current events, and thoughts on an eclectic range of material he culled from the Internet. What resulted was a remarkably broad portrait of a thoughtful man and the complex times in which he lived, rendered with intellige...

  8. Supramolecular modeling of mono-copper enzyme active sites with calix[6]arene-based funnel complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Poul, Nicolas; Le Mest, Yves; Jabin, Ivan; Reinaud, Olivia

    2015-07-21

    Supramolecular bioinorganic chemistry is a natural evolution in biomimetic metallic systems since it constitutes a further degree of complexity in modeling. The traditional approach consisting of mimicking the first coordination sphere of metal sites proved to be very efficient, because valuable data are extracted from these examples to gain insight in natural systems mechanisms. But it does not reproduce several specific aspects of enzymes that can be mimicked by the implementation of a cavity embedding the labile active site and thus controlling the properties of the metal ion by noncovalent interactions. This Account reports on a strategy aimed at reproducing some supramolecular aspects encountered in the natural systems. The cavity complexes described herein display a coordination site constructed on a macrocycle. Thanks to a careful design of the cavity-based ligands, complexes orienting their labile site specifically toward the inside of the macrocycle were obtained. The supramolecular systems are based on the flexible calix[6]arene core that surrounds the metal ion labile site, thereby constraining exogenous molecules to pass through the conic funnel to reach the metal center. Such an architecture confers to the metal ion very unusual properties and behaviors, which in many aspects are biologically relevant. Three generations of calix[6]-based ligands are presented and discussed in the context of modeling the monocopper sites encountered in some enzymes. A wide range of phenomena are highlighted such as the impact that the size and shape of the access channel to the metal center have on the selectivity and rate of the binding process, the possible remote control of the electronics through small modifications operated on the cavity edges, induced-fit behavior associated with host-guest association (shoe-tree effect) that affects the redox properties of the metal ion and the electron exchange pathway, consequences of forbidden associative ligand exchange

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Grace O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here

  11. Copper hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-01-01

    . As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak...... hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common...

  12. Phototunable Magnetism in Copper Octacyanomolybdate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ohara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce copper molybdenum cyanides of general formula Cu2[Mo(CN8]·nH2O, which can serve as optofunctional magnetic devices. Their ground states generally stay paramagnetic down to temperatures of the K order but exhibit a spontaneous magnetization upon photoirradiation usually below a few tens of K. To interest us still further, such a ferromagnetic stateinduced by blue-laser irradiation is demagnetized step by step through further application of red or near-infrared laser pulses. We solve this intriguing photomagnetism. The ground-state properties are fully revealed by means of a group-theoretical technique. Taking account of experimental observations, we simulate applying pump laser pulses to a likely ground state and successfully reproduce both the magnetization and demagnetization dynamics. We monitor the photorelaxation process through angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Electrons are fully itinerant in any of the photoinduced steady states, forming a striking contrast to the initial equilibrium state of atomic aspect. The fully demagnetized final steady state looks completely different from the initial paramagnetism but bears good analogy to one of the possible ground states available with the Coulomb repulsion on Cu sites suppressed.

  13. 76 FR 22923 - Wellpoint, Inc. D/B/A/Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield Enterprise Provider Data Management Team...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    .../B/A/Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield Enterprise Provider Data Management Team Including On-Site... & Blue Shield, Enterprise Provider Data Management Team, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly... Of Kentucky, Enterprise Provider Data Management Team, Louisville, Kentucky TA-W-74,895B Wellpoint...

  14. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: A Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of 2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid and 2, 4 - pentanedione. The reaction of the prepared Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride formed diaquo bis( N – 2 – amino – 3 - methylbutyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) complex. The Schiff base is ...

  15. Surface plasmon effect in nanocrystalline copper/DLC composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composite films of nanocrystalline copper embedded in DLC matrix prepared by electrodeposition technique were studied for their optical properties. Particle size and metal volume fractions were tailored by varying the amount of copper containing salt in the electrolyte. Blue-shift of the surface plasmon resonance peak in ...

  16. Influence of diethyldithiocarbamate on cadmium and copper toxicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    Daphnia magna. Environ. Technol. Lett. 5 109-120. ROBERT W (1984) The toxicity and bioaccumulation of cadmium and copper as affected by humic acid. Aquat. Toxicol. 5 267-274. WHITTON B and SHEHATA F (1982) Influence of cobalt, nickel, copper and cadmium on blue green alga Anacystis nidulans. Environ. Pollut.

  17. Copper localization, elemental content, and thallus colour in the copper hyperaccumulator lichen Lecanora sierrae from California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, O.W.; Bennett, J.P.; Spratt, J.

    2011-01-01

    An unusual dark blue-green lichen, Lecanora sierrae, was discovered over 30 years ago by Czehura near copper mines in the Lights Creek District, Plumas County, Northern California. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy, Czehura found that dark green lichen samples from Warren Canyon contained 4% Cu in ash and suggested that its colour was due to copper accumulation in the cortex. The present study addressed the hypothesis that the green colour in similar material we sampled from Warren Canyon in 2008, is caused by copper localization in the thallus. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis of specimens of L. sierrae confirmed that copper localization took place in the cortex. Elemental analyses of L. sierrae and three other species from the same localities showed high enrichments of copper and selenium, suggesting that copper selenates or selenites might occur in these lichens and be responsible for the unusual colour. Copyright ?? 2011 British Lichen Society.

  18. Copper localization, elemental content, and thallus colour in the copper hyperaccumulator lichen Lecanora sierra from California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, O.W.; Bennett, J.P.; Spratt, J.

    2011-01-01

    An unusual dark blue-green lichen, Lecanora sierrae, was discovered over 30 years ago by Czehura near copper mines in the Lights Creek District, Plumas County, Northern California. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy, Czehura found that dark green lichen samples from Warren Canyon contained 4% Cu in ash and suggested that its colour was due to copper accumulation in the cortex. The present study addressed the hypothesis that the green colour in similar material we sampled from Warren Canyon in 2008, is caused by copper localization in the thallus. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis of specimens of L. sierrae confirmed that copper localization took place in the cortex. Elemental analyses of L. sierrae and three other species from the same localities showed high enrichments of copper and selenium, suggesting that copper selenates or selenites might occur in these lichens and be responsible for the unusual colour.

  19. [Blue blood: structure and evolution of hemocyanin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzen, B

    1989-05-01

    Hemocyanins are the oxygen-transporting proteins in arthropods and molluscs, the oxygen is bound by two copper atoms. Spectroscopic studies on the active site show similarities to the active site of a further group of copper-containing proteins, the tyrosinases. Arthropodan and molluscan hemocyanins form high-molecular aggregates which are markedly different in size and quaternary structure. There is only one tertiary structure of an arthropodan hemocyanin available, but from comparison of all amino acid sequences known so far from arthropodan hemocyanins, a common tertiary structure for all arthropodan hemocyanins can be deduced. Again, sequence comparison allows the construction of an evolutionary tree for some oxygen-binding copper proteins.

  20. Copper and Lead Corrosion in a Full Scale Home Plumbning system Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The corrosion of household or premise plumbing materials (such as copper, brass, and solder) and the metal release that results from that corrosion can cause numerous problems, ranging from elevated lead and copper levels to blue water and copper pinhole leaks. If left untreate...

  1. [Anaphylaxis to blue dyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner-Viviani, F; Chappuis, S; Bergmann, M M; Ribi, C

    2014-04-16

    In medicine, vital blue dyes are mainly used for the evaluation of sentinel lymph nodes in oncologic surgery. Perioperative anaphylaxis to blue dyes is a rare but significant complication. Allergic reactions to blue dyes are supposedly IgE-mediated and mainly caused by triarylmethanes (patent blue and isosulfane blue) and less frequently by methylene blue. These substances usually do not feature on the anesthesia record and should not be omitted from the list of suspects having caused the perioperative reaction, in the same manner as latex and chlorhexidine. The diagnosis of hypersensitivity to vital blue dyes can be established by skin test. We illustrate this topic with three clinical cases.

  2. Full-length cellular β-secretase has a trimeric subunit stoichiometry, and its sulfur-rich transmembrane interaction site modulates cytosolic copper compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Filip; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Bethge, Tobias; McGuire, Hugo; Scolari, Silvia; Herrmann, Andreas; Blunck, Rikard; Bowie, Derek; Multhaup, Gerd

    2017-08-11

    The β-secretase (BACE1) initiates processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) into Aβ peptides, which have been implicated as central players in the pathology of Alzheimer disease. BACE1 has been described as a copper-binding protein and its oligomeric state as being monomeric, dimeric, and/or multimeric, but the native cellular stoichiometry has remained elusive. Here, by using single-molecule fluorescence and in vitro cross-linking experiments with photo-activatable unnatural amino acids, we show that full-length BACE1, independently of its subcellular localization, exists as trimers in human cells. We found that trimerization requires the BACE1 transmembrane sequences (TMSs) and cytoplasmic domains, with residues Ala 463 and Cys 466 buried within the trimer interface of the sulfur-rich core of the TMSs. Our 3D model predicts that the sulfur-rich core of the trimeric BACE1 TMS is accessible to metal ions, but copper ions did not trigger trimerization. The results of functional assays of endogenous BACE1 suggest that it has a role in intracellular copper compartmentalization by transferring cytosolic copper to intracellular compartments, while leaving the overall cellular copper concentration unaltered. Adding to existing physiological models, our results provide novel insight into the atypical interactions between copper and BACE1 and into its non-enzymatic activities. In conclusion, therapeutic Alzheimer disease prevention strategies aimed at decreasing BACE1 protein levels should be regarded with caution, because adverse effects in copper homeostasis may occur. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of copper resistant bacteria from vineyard soils and mining waste for copper biosorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreazza, R; Pieniz, S; Okeke, B C; Camargo, F A O

    2011-01-01

    Vineyard soils are frequently polluted with high concentrations of copper due application of copper sulfate in order to control fungal diseases. Bioremediation is an efficient process for the treatment of contaminated sites. Efficient copper sorption bacteria can be used for bioremoval of copper from contaminated sites. In this study, a total of 106 copper resistant bacteria were examined for resistance to copper toxicity and biosorption of copper. Eighty isolates (45 from vineyard Mollisol, 35 from Inceptisol) were obtained from EMBRAPA (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária) experimental station, Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil (29°09'53.92″S and 51°31'39.40″W) and 26 were obtained from copper mining waste from Caçapava do Sul, RS, Brazil (30°29'43.48″S and 53'32'37.87W). Based on resistance to copper toxicity and biosorption, 15 isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Maximal copper resistance and biosorption at high copper concentration were observed with isolate N2 which removed 80 mg L(-1) in 24 h. Contrarily isolate N11 (Bacillus pumilus) displayed the highest specific copper biosorption (121.82 mg/L/OD unit in 24 h). GenBank MEGABLAST analysis revealed that isolate N2 is 99% similar to Staphylococcus pasteuri. Results indicate that several of our isolates have potential use for bioremediation treatment of vineyards soils and mining waste contaminated with high copper concentration.

  4. Blue cures blue but be cautious

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methemoglobinemia is a disorder characterized by the presence of >1% methemoglobin (metHb in the blood. Spontaneous formation of methemoglobin is normally counteracted by protective enzyme systems, for example, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH methemoglobin reductase. Methemoglobinemia is treated with supplemental oxygen and methylene blue (1-2 mg/kg administered slow intravenously, which acts by providing an artificial electron acceptor for NADPH methemoglobin reductase. But known or suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is a relative contraindication to the use of methylene blue because G6PD is the key enzyme in the formation of NADPH through pentose phosphate pathway and G6PD-deficient individuals generate insufficient NADPH to efficiently reduce methylene blue to leukomethylene blue, which is necessary for the activation of the NADPH-dependent methemoglobin reductase system. So, we should be careful using methylene blue in methemoglobinemia patient before G6PD levels.

  5. Determining the Amount of Copper(II) Ions in a Solution Using a Smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montangero, Marc

    2015-01-01

    When dissolving copper in nitric acid, copper(II) ions produce a blue-colored solution. It is possible to determine the concentration of copper(II) ions, focusing on the hue of the color, using a smartphone camera. A free app can be used to measure the hue of the solution, and with the help of standard copper(II) solutions, one can graph a…

  6. Blue-Green Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with hepatitis C or hepatitis B. HIV/AIDS. Research on the effects of blue-green algae in people with HIV/AIDS has been inconsistent. Some early research shows that taking 5 grams of blue-green ...

  7. Cloning and expression analysis of a blue copperbinding protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adifferentially expressed fragment EST145 was isolated by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. Using EST145 as the probe, a blue copper-binding protein gene designated as DvBCB was screened from Dasypyrum villosum cDNA Library. The DvBCB gene was 845 bp in length with an open reading frame ...

  8. Targeted oxidation of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase by singlet oxygen: identification of N-formylkynurenine tryptophan derivatives within the active-site gorge of its complex with the photosensitizer methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triquigneaux, Mathilde M; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Roth, Esther; Silman, Israel; Ashani, Yakov; Mason, Ronald P; Weiner, Lev; Deterding, Leesa J

    2012-11-15

    The principal role of AChE (acetylcholinesterase) is termination of impulse transmission at cholinergic synapses by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. The active site of AChE is near the bottom of a long and narrow gorge lined with aromatic residues. It contains a CAS (catalytic 'anionic' subsite) and a second PAS (peripheral 'anionic' site), the gorge mouth, both of which bind acetylcholine via π-cation interactions, primarily with two conserved tryptophan residues. It was shown previously that generation of (1)O(2) by illumination of MB (Methylene Blue) causes irreversible inactivation of TcAChE (Torpedo californica AChE), and suggested that photo-oxidation of tryptophan residues might be responsible. In the present study, structural modification of the TcAChE tryptophan residues induced by MB-sensitized oxidation was investigated using anti-N-formylkynurenine antibodies and MS. From these analyses, we determined that N-formylkynurenine derivatives were specifically produced from Trp(84) and Trp(279), present at the CAS and PAS respectively. Peptides containing these two oxidized tryptophan residues were not detected when the competitive inhibitors, edrophonium and propidium (which should displace MB from the gorge) were present during illumination, in agreement with their efficient protection against the MB-induced photo-inactivation. Thus the bound MB elicited selective action of (1)O(2) on the tryptophan residues facing on to the water-filled active-site gorge. The findings of the present study thus demonstrate the localized action and high specificity of MB-sensitized photo-oxidation of TcAChE, as well as the value of this enzyme as a model system for studying the mechanism of action and specificity of photosensitizing agents.

  9. Targeted oxidation of Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase by singlet oxygen: Identification of N-formylkynurenine tryptophan derivatives within the active-site gorge of its complex with the photosensitizer methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triquigneaux, Mathilde M.; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Roth, Esther; Silman, Israel; Ashani, Yakov; Mason, Ronald P.; Weiner, Lev; Deterding, Leesa J.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The principal role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is termination of impulse transmission at cholinergic synapses by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. The active site of AChE is near the bottom of a long and narrow gorge lined with aromatic residues. It contains a catalytic ‘anionic’ subsite (CAS) and a second peripheral ‘anionic’ site (PAS), the gorge mouth, both of which bind acetylcholine via π-cation interactions, primarily with two conserved tryptophans (Trps). It was earlier shown that generation of 1O2 by illumination of methylene blue (MB) causes irreversible inactivation of Torpedo californica AChE (TcAChE), and suggested that photo-oxidation of Trps might be responsible. In the present study, structural modification of the TcAChE Trps induced by MB-sensitized oxidation was investigated using anti-N-formylkynurenine antibodies and mass spectrometry. From these analyses, we determined that N-formylkynurenine derivatives were specifically produced from Trp 84 and Trp 279 – present at the CAS and PAS, respectively. Peptides containing these two oxidized Trp residues were not detected when the competitive inhibitors, edrophonium and propidium (which should displace MB from the gorge) were present during illumination, in agreement with their efficient protection against the MB-induced photo-inactivation. Thus, the bound MB elicited selective action of 1O2 on Trp residues facing onto the water-filled active-site gorge. Our findings thus demonstrate the localized action and high specificity of MB-sensitized photo-oxidation of TcAChE, as well as the value of this enzyme as a model system for studying the mechanism of action and specificity of photosensitizing agents. PMID:22888904

  10. Pain and functional improvement effects of methylene blue injection on the soft tissue around fusion site after traumatic thoracolumbar fixation: A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Yazdanpanah, Hamed; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Farrokhi, Farnaz; Mesbahi, Amir Reza

    2016-11-01

    Fractures of the thoracolumbar spine can cause pain, long-term reductions in quality of life (QOL), and neural deficits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methylene blue (MB) on preventing postoperative pain and improving QOL in patients with throracolumbar fractures undergoing posterior pedicle screw fixation. Fifty patients underwent standard posterior pedicular screw fixation for stabilization of the thoracolumbar fractures: 25 received 1ml of MB solution at a concentration of 0.5% and 25 received normal saline on the soft tissue around fusion site. Primary outcomes were the control of pain, evaluated at 48h, 2 and 6 months after surgery with the use of a visual analog scale (VAS), and the improvement of QOL, assessed 2 and 6 months postoperatively by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire. The mean VAS scores for pain were significantly lower in the MB group compared with the control group at 2 months (1.30±0.45 vs. 2.60±1.19, P<0.001) and 6 months (1.17±0.37 vs. 1.60±0.87; P=0.028) after treatment. At 2 months after the surgery, the mean ODI score was significantly lower in the MB-treated patients than the control group (20.4±10.92 vs. 34.8±15.11; P=0.001). The ODI score in the MB-treated patients was better than the control group at 6 months after the surgery (12.2±11.66 vs. 20.8±11.14; P=0.016). A single dose of MB on the soft tissue around fusion site shows promising results in terms of safety, reduction of postoperative pain, and functional results when compared with placebo 6 months after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Relatively high rates of G:C → A:T transitions at CpG sites were observed in certain epithelial tissues including pancreas and submaxillary gland of adult big blue® mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prtenjaca, Anita; Tarnowski, Heather E; Marr, Alison M; Heney, Melanie A; Creamer, Laura; Sathiamoorthy, Sarmitha; Hill, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    With few exceptions, spontaneous mutation frequency and pattern are similar across tissue types and relatively constant in young to middle adulthood in wild type mice. Underrepresented in surveys of spontaneous mutations across murine tissues is the diversity of epithelial tissues. For the first time, spontaneous mutations were detected in pancreas and submaxillary gland and compared with kidney, lung, and male germ cells from five adult male Big Blue® mice. Mutation load was assessed quantitatively through measurement of mutant and mutation frequency and qualitatively through identification of mutations and characterization of recurrent mutations, multiple mutations, mutation pattern, and mutation spectrum. A total of 9.6 million plaque forming units were screened, 226 mutants were collected, and 196 independent mutations were identified. Four novel mutations were discovered. Spontaneous mutation frequency was low in pancreas and high in the submaxillary gland. The submaxillary gland had multiple recurrent mutations in each of the mice and one mutant had two independent mutations. Mutation patterns for epithelial tissues differed from that observed in male germ cells with a striking bias for G:C to A:T transitions at CpG sites. A comprehensive review of lacI spontaneous mutation patterns in young adult mice and rats identified additional examples of this mutational bias. An overarching observation about spontaneous mutation frequency in adult tissues of the mouse remains one of stability. A repeated observation in certain epithelial tissues is a higher rate of G:C to A:T transitions at CpG sites and the underlying mechanisms for this bias are not known. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Blue Ocean Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a concept called the "blue ocean thinking strategy," developed by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors at INSEAD, an international graduate school of business in France. The "blue ocean" thinking strategy considers opportunities to create new markets for services, rather than focusing solely on…

  13. Effects of ionizing radiations on the optical properties of ionic copper-activated sol-gel silica glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Helou, Nissrine; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Capoen, Bruno; Ouerdane, Youcef; Boukenter, Aziz; Girard, Sylvain; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Studying the impact of radiations on doped silica glasses is essential for several technological applications. Herein, bulk silica glasses, activated with various concentrations of luminescent monovalent copper (Cu+), have been prepared using the sol-gel technique. Thereafter, these glasses were subjected to X- or γ-rays irradiation at 1 MGy(SiO2) accumulated dose. The effect of these ionizing radiations on the optical properties of these glasses, as a function of the Cu-doping content, were investigated using optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Before any irradiation, the glass with the lowest copper concentration exhibits blue and green luminescence bands under UV excitation, suggesting that Cu+ ions occupy both cubic and tetragonal symmetry sites. However, at higher Cu-doping level, only the green emission band exists. Moreover, we showed that the hydroxyl content decreases with increasing copper doping concentration. Both X and γ radiation exposures induced visible absorption due to HC1 color centers in the highly Cu-doped glasses. In the case of the lower Cu-doped glass, the Cu+ sites with a cubic symmetry are transformed into sites with tetragonal symmetry.

  14. Blue ocean strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades.

  15. [Subcloning of copper resistance promoters from Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Brown, N L

    1997-12-01

    There were two promoters, PpcoA and PpcoE, in the copper resistant determinant from Escherichia coli. Either of them contains the copper box. In order to confirm the importance of copper box in the copper resistance promoters and to study their characteristics, several fragments of both promoters were subcloned using pUCD615 as reporter vector into its SmaI site. The results of restriction endonuclease digestion and the results of reporter gene lux-luciferase activities indicated that both of the Ppco short-lux fusions didn't show any luciferase activities, which indicated that these two fragments (Ppco short) couldn't act as promoters, and thus confirming the copper box was essential to copper resistance. If there were no copper box in the Ppco promoters, there would be no copper resistance in the E. coli.

  16. Separation of copper-64 from copper phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglin, R.I.M.

    1979-01-01

    The separation of copper-64 from irradiated copper phthalocyanine by Szilard-Chalmers effect is studied. Two methods of separation are used: one of them is based on the dissolution of the irradiated dry compound in concentrated sulfuric acid following its precipitation in water. In the other one the compound is irradiated with water in paste form following treatment with water and hydrochloric acid. The influence of the crystal form of the copper phthalocyanine on the separation yield of copper-64 is shown. Preliminary tests using the ionic exchange technique for purification and changing of copper-64 sulfate to chloride form are carried out. The specific activity using the spectrophotometric technique, after the determination of the copper concentration in solution of copper-64, is calculated. (Author) [pt

  17. Thermodynamically stable blue phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, F; Morris, S M; Terentjev, E M; Coles, H J

    2010-04-16

    We show theoretically that flexoelectricity stabilizes blue phases in chiral liquid crystals. Induced internal polarization reduces the elastic energy cost of splay and bend deformations surrounding singular lines in the director field. The energy of regions of double twist is unchanged. This in turn reduces the free energy of the blue phase with respect to that of the chiral nematic phase, leading to stability over a wider temperature range. The theory explains the discovery of large temperature range blue phases in highly flexoelectric "bimesogenic" and "bent-core" materials, and predicts how this range may be increased further.

  18. Use of flux analysis to study the compartmentation of copper in copper tolerant and non-tolerant Mimulus guttatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Collins, J.C.; Thurman, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Compartmental flux analysis using 64 Cu and a stereological study have been used to estimate the amount and concentrations of copper in the cell wall, cytoplasm and vacuole of roots of non-tolerant and copper tolerant clones of Mimulus guttatus. The cell wall was not found to be a major site of copper accumulation in either clone compared with the cytoplasmic and vacuolar phases. The cytoplasmic concentrations of copper in the non-tolerant clone were significantly grater than those of the tolerant clone when grown in 2.0 and 10.0 μM external copper. At all external copper concentrations and for both clones vacuolar levels of copper were lower than the cytoplasmic ones. At 10.0 μM external copper the vacuolar concentrations of the non-tolerant clone were significantly higher than those of the tolerant clone

  19. Copper in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Yruela, Inmaculada

    2005-01-01

    Copper is an essential metal for normal plant growth and development, although it is also potentially toxic. Copper participates in numerous physiological processes and is an essential cofactor for many metalloproteins, however, problems arise when excess copper is present in cells. Excess copper inhibits plant growth and impairs important cellular processes (i.e., photosynthetic electron transport). Since copper is both an essential cofactor and a toxic element, involving a complex network o...

  20. The Yin and Yang of Copper During Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besold, Angelique N.; Culbertson, Edward M.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2017-01-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for both pathogens and the animal hosts they infect. However, copper can also be toxic in cells due to its redox properties and ability to disrupt active sites of metalloproteins, such as Fe-S enzymes. Through these toxic properties, copper is an effective antimicrobial agent and an emerging concept in innate immunity is that the animal host intentionally exploits copper toxicity in antimicrobial weaponry. In particular, macrophages can attack invading microbes with high copper and this metal is also elevated at sites of lung infection. In addition, copper levels in serum rise during infection with a wide array of pathogens. To defend against this toxic copper, the microbial intruder is equipped with a battery of copper detoxification defenses that promote survival in the host, including copper exporting ATPases and copper binding metallothioneins. However, it is important to remember that copper is also an essential nutrient for microbial pathogens and serves as important cofactor for enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase for respiration, superoxide dismutase for anti-oxidant defense and multi-copper oxidases that act on metals and organic substrates. We therefore posit that the animal host can also thwart pathogen growth by limiting their copper nutrients, similar to the well-documented nutritional immunity effects for starving microbes of essential zinc, manganese and iron micronutrients. This review provides both sides of the copper story and evaluates how the host can exploit either copper-the-toxin or copper-the-nutrient in antimicrobial tactics at the host-pathogen battleground.  PMID:26790881

  1. Electrochemical and morphological characterisation of polyphenazine films on copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia-Caridade, Carla; Romeiro, Andreia; Brett, Christopher M.A., E-mail: cbrett@ci.uc.pt

    2013-11-15

    The morphology of films of the phenazine polymers poly(neutral red) (PNR), poly(brilliant cresyl blue) (PBCB), poly(Nile blue A) (PNB) and poly(safranine T) (PST), formed by potential cycling electropolymerisation on copper electrodes, in order to reduce the corrosion rate of copper, has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The copper surface was initially partially passivated in sodium oxalate, hydrogen carbonate or salicylate solution, in order to inhibit copper dissolution at potentials where phenazine monomer oxidation occurs, and to induce better polymer film adhesion. SEM images were also taken of partially passivated copper in order to throw light on the different morphology and anti-corrosive behaviour of the polyphenazine films. Analysis of the morphology of the polymer-coated copper with best anti-corrosive behaviour after 72 h immersion in 0.1 M KCl, Cu/hydrogen carbonate/PNB, showed that the surface is completely covered by closely packed crystals. By contrast, images of PST films on copper partially passivated in oxalate solution, that had the least protective behaviour, showed large amounts of insoluble corrosion products after only 4 h immersion in 0.1 M KCl.

  2. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  3. New York Blue

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — New York Blue is used cooperatively by the Laboratory and Stony Brook University as part of the New York Center for Computation Sciences. Ranked as the 28th fastest...

  4. Effects of fire and browsing on regeneration of blue oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    James W. Bartolome; Mitchel P. McClaran; Barbara H. Allen-Diaz; Jim Dunne; Lawrence D. Ford; Richard B. Standiford; Neil K. McDougald; Larry C. Forero

    2002-01-01

    Blue oaks (Quercus douglasii) are not regenerating well over much of California. The roles of fire and browsing in regeneration are probably significant, but poorly understood. We burned two foothill blue oak woodland sites which contained significant numbers of small trees between 40 and 70 cm tall, then compared height growth over 14 years among 48...

  5. Lights and shadows in the challenge of binding acyclovir, a synthetic purine-like nucleoside with antiviral activity, at an apical-distal coordination site in copper(II)-polyamine chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Toro, Inmaculada; Domínguez-Martín, Alicia; Choquesillo-Lazarte, Duane; Vílchez-Rodríguez, Esther; González-Pérez, Josefa María; Castiñeiras, Alfonso; Niclós-Gutiérrez, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Several nucleic acid components and their metal complexes are known to be involved in crucial metabolic steps. Therefore the study of metal-nucleic acid interactions becomes essential to understand these biological processes. In this work, the synthetic purine-like nucleoside acyclovir (acv) has been used as a model of guanosine recognition with copper(II)-polyamine chelates. The chemical stability of the N9-acyclic arm in acv offers the possibility to use this antiviral drug to deepen the knowledge of metal-nucleoside interactions. Cu(II) chelates with cyclam, cyclen and trien were used as suitable receptors. All these copper(II) tetraamine chelates have in common the potential ability to yield a Cu-N7(apical) bond assisted by an appropriate (amine)N-H⋯O6(acv) intra-molecular interligand interaction. A series of synthesis afforded the following compounds: [Cu(cyclam)(ClO4)2] (1), {[Cu(cyclam)(μ2-NO3)](NO3)}n (2), {[Cu(cyclam)(μ2-SO4)]·MeOH}n (3), {[Cu(cyclam)(μ2-SO4)]·5H2O}n (4), [Cu(cyclen)(H2O)]SO4·2H2O (5), [Cu(cyclen)(H2O)]SO4·3H2O (6), [Cu(trien)(acv)](NO3)2·acv (7) and [Cu(trien)(acv)]SO4·0.71H2O (8). All these compounds have been characterized by X-ray crystallography and FT-IR spectroscopy. Our results reveal that the macrochelates Cu(cyclen)(2+) and Cu(cyclam)(2+) are unable to bind acv at an apical site. In contrast, the Cu(trien)(2+) complex has proved to be an efficient receptor for acv in compounds (7) and (8). In the ternary complex [Cu(trien)(acv)](2+), the metal binding pattern of acv consists of an apical Cu-N7 bond assisted by an intra-molecular (primary amino)N-H⋯O6(acv) interligand interaction. Structural comparisons reveal that this unprecedented apical role of acv is due to the acyclic nature of trien together with the ability of the Cu(trien)(2+) chelate to generate five-coordinated (type 4+1) copper(II) complexes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Water contamination with heavy metals and trace elements from Kilembe copper mine and tailing sites in Western Uganda; implications for domestic water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Mwesigye R; Susan, Tumwebaze B

    2017-02-01

    The mining and processing of copper in Kilembe, Western Uganda, from 1956 to 1982 left over 15 Mt of cupriferous and cobaltiferous pyrite dumped within a mountain river valley, in addition to mine water which is pumped to the land surface. This study was conducted to assess the sources and concentrations of heavy metals and trace elements in Kilembe mine catchment water. Multi-element analysis of trace elements from point sources and sinks was conducted which included mine tailings, mine water, mine leachate, Nyamwamba River water, public water sources and domestic water samples using ICP-MS. The study found that mean concentrations (mg kg -1 ) of Co (112), Cu (3320), Ni (131), As (8.6) in mine tailings were significantly higher than world average crust and were being eroded and discharged into water bodies within the catchment. Underground mine water and leachate contained higher mean concentrations (μg L -1 ) of Cu (9470), Co (3430) and Ni (590) compared with background concentrations (μg L -1 ) in un contaminated water of 1.9, 0.21 and 0.67 for Cu, Co and Ni respectively. Over 25% of household water samples exceeded UK drinking water thresholds for Al of 200 μg L -1 , Co exceeded Winsconsin (USA drinking) water thresholds of 40 μg L -1 in 40% of samples while Fe in 42% of samples exceeded UK thresholds of 200 μg L -1 . The study however found that besides mining activities, natural processes of geological weathering also contributed to Al, Fe, and Mn water contamination in a number of public water sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hexavalent Molybdenum Reduction to Mo-Blue by a Sodium-Dodecyl-Sulfate-Degrading Klebsiella oxytoca Strain DRY14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. E. Halmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria with the ability to tolerate, remove, and/or degrade several xenobiotics simultaneously are urgently needed for remediation of polluted sites. A previously isolated bacterium with sodium dodecyl sulfate- (SDS- degrading capacity was found to be able to reduce molybdenum to the nontoxic molybdenum blue. The optimal pH, carbon source, molybdate concentration, and temperature supporting molybdate reduction were pH 7.0, glucose at 1.5% (w/v, between 25 and 30 mM, and 25°C, respectively. The optimum phosphate concentration for molybdate reduction was 5 mM. The Mo-blue produced exhibits an absorption spectrum with a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. None of the respiratory inhibitors tested showed any inhibition to the molybdenum-reducing activity suggesting that the electron transport system of this bacterium is not the site of molybdenum reduction. Chromium, cadmium, silver, copper, mercury, and lead caused approximately 77, 65, 77, 89, 80, and 80% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity, respectively. Ferrous and stannous ions markedly increased the activity of molybdenum-reducing activity in this bacterium. The maximum tolerable concentration of SDS as a cocontaminant was 3 g/L. The characteristics of this bacterium make it a suitable candidate for molybdenum bioremediation of sites cocontaminated with detergent pollutant.

  8. Corrosion of copper alloys in sulphide containing district heting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Copper and some copper alloys are prone to corrosion in sulphide containing geothermal water analogous to corrosion observed in district heating systems containing sulphide due to sulphate reducing bacteria. In order to study the corrosion of copper alloys under practical conditions a test...... was carried out at four sites in the Reykjavik District Heating System. The geothermal water chemistry is different at each site. The corrosion rate and the amount and chemical composition of deposits on weight loss coupons of six different copper alloys are described after exposure of 12 and 18 months......, respectively. Some major differences in scaling composition and the degree of corrosion attack are observed between alloys and water types....

  9. Enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of metal complexes to proteins: sortase-mediated coupling of copper-64 to a single-chain antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Brett M; Alt, Karen; Jeffery, Charmaine M; Price, Roger I; Jagdale, Shweta; Rigby, Sheena; Williams, Charlotte C; Peter, Karlheinz; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Donnelly, Paul S

    2014-06-10

    The enzyme-mediated site-specific bioconjugation of a radioactive metal complex to a single-chain antibody using the transpeptidase sortase A is reported. Cage amine sarcophagine ligands that were designed to function as substrates for the sortase A mediated bioconjugation to antibodies were synthesized and enzymatically conjugated to a single-chain variable fragment. The antibody fragment scFv(anti-LIBS) targets ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the glycoprotein receptor GPIIb/IIIa, which is present on activated platelets. The immunoconjugates were radiolabeled with the positron-emitting isotope (64)Cu. The new radiolabeled conjugates were shown to bind selectively to activated platelets. The diagnostic potential of the most promising conjugate was demonstrated in an in vivo model of carotid artery thrombosis using positron emission tomography. This approach gives homogeneous products through site-specific enzyme-mediated conjugation and should be broadly applicable to other metal complexes and proteins. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Natural Blue Food Colour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roda-Serrat, Maria Cinta

    In recent years, there has been a growing tendency to avoid the use of artificial colorants and additives in food products, especially after some studies linked their consumption with behavioural changes in children. However, the incorporation of colorants from natural origin remains a challenge...... for food technologists, as these are typically less vivid and less stable than their synthetic alternatives. Regarding blue colorants, phycocyanins from cyanobacteria are currently in the spotlight as promising new natural blue colorants. Phycocyanins are proteins which blue colour results from...... the presence of the chromophore phycocyanobilin (PCB), a covalently attached linear tetrapyrrole. The applications of phycocyanins as food colorants are however limited, as they show poor stability in certain conditions of pH, light and temperature. Cleavage of PCB from the protein followed by careful product...

  11. Aquatic Life Criteria - Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2007 Freshwater, 2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  12. Antwerp Copper Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadum, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    In addition to presenting a short history of copper paintings, topics detail artists’ materials and techniques, as well as aspects of the copper industry, including mining, preparation and trade routes....

  13. Intraoral blue (Jadassohn-Tieche) nevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, C D; Zoutendam, G L; Gombas, O F

    1978-05-01

    Blue nevus of the oral mucosa is a distinctly uncommon clincial entity. Careful review of the literature yielded thirty-one previously reported cases. The present article reports the occurrence of a blue nevus of the hard palate in a 58-year-old man. It is of interest since it is the smallest (1 by 1 mm.) intraoral blue nevus to be reported. A clinicopathologic study of the previous thirty-one cases and of our case suggests that this lesion has no age or sex predilection. The most common site of occurrence was the hard palate. There appears to be no tendency toward recurrence. A brief review of the historical background, clinical features, theories of possible origin, and differential diagnosis is presented. Excisional biopsy of localized areas of oral pibmentation, together with histopathologic study, is indicated to rule out melanoma.

  14. A Blue Lagoon Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2007-01-01

    We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$.......We consider a specific function of two variables whose graph surface resembles a blue lagoon. The function has a saddle point $p$, but when the function is restricted to any given straight line through $p$ it has a {\\em{strict local minimum}} along that line at $p$....

  15. Coordination of two high-affinity hexamer peptides to copper(II) and palladium(II) models of the peptide-metal chelation site on IMAC resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Pasquinelli, R.; Ataai, M.; Koepsel, R.R.; Kortes, R.A.; Shepherd, R.E.

    2000-03-20

    The coordination of peptides Ser-Pro-His-His-Gly-Gly (SPHHGG) and (His){sub 6} (HHHHHH) to [Pd{sup II}(mida)(D{sub 2}O)] (mida{sup 2{minus}} = N-methyliminodiacetate) was studied by {sup 1}H NMR as model reactions for Cu{sup II}(iminodiacetate)-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) sites. This is the first direct physical description of peptide coordination for IMAC. A three-site coordination is observed which involves the first, third, and fourth residues along the peptide chain. The presence of proline in position 2 of SPHHGG achieves the best molecular mechanics and bonding angles in the coordinated peptide and enhances the interaction of the serine amino nitrogen. Histidine coordination of H{sub 1}, H{sub 3}, and H{sub 4} of (His){sub 6} and H{sub 3} and H{sub 4} of SPHHGG was detected by {sup 1}H NMR contact shifts and H/D exchange of histidyl protons. The EPR spectra of SPHHGG and HHHHHH attached to the [Cu{sup II}(mida)] unit were obtained for additional modeling of IMAC sites. EPR parameters of the parent [Cu(mida)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] complex are representative: g{sub zz} = 2.31; g{sub yy} = 2.086; g{sub xx} = 2.053; A{sub {vert_bar}{vert_bar}} = 161 G; A{sub N} = 19G (three line, one N coupling). Increased rhombic distortion is detected relative to the starting aqua complex in the order of [Cu(mida)L] for distortion of HHHHHH > SPHHGG > (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. The lowering of symmetry is also seen in the decrease in the N-shf coupling, presumably to the imino nitrogen of mida{sup 2{minus}} in the order 19 G (H{sub 2}O), 16 G (SPHHGG) and 11 G (HHHHHH). Visible spectra of the [Cu(mida)(SPHHGG)] and [Cu(mida)(HHHHHH)] as a function of pH indicate coordination of one histidyl donor at ca. 4.5, two in the range of pH 5--7, and two chelate ring attachments involving the terminal amino donor for SPHHGG or another histidyl donor of HHHHHH in the pH domain of 7--8 in agreement with the [Pd{sup II}(mida)L] derivatives which form the two

  16. The "Blue Banana" Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faludi, A.K.F.

    2015-01-01

    This essay is about the “Blue Banana”. Banana is the name given subsequently by others to a Dorsale européenne (European backbone) identified empirically by Roger Brunet. In a background study to the Communication of the European Commission ‘Europe 2000’, Klaus Kunzmann and Michael Wegener put

  17. The Blue Baby Syndrome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 10. The Blue Baby Syndrome - Nitrate Poisoning in Humans. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 8 Issue 10 October 2003 pp 20-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Primary orbital melanoma in association with cellular blue nevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawy, Tarek; Bakhoum, Mathieu F; Tetzlaff, Michael; Nasser, Qasiem J; Prieto, Victor G; Ivan, Doina; Sniegowski, Matthew C; Yin, Vivian T; Pan, Caroline; Durairaj, Vikram; Esmaeli, Bita

    2014-01-01

    To describe 3 cases of primary orbital melanoma associated with either known or subsequently discovered cellular blue nevus. The clinical records and surgical specimens of 3 patients who underwent orbital exenteration for primary orbital melanoma and who had a cellular blue nevus diagnosed before or after detection of the melanoma were retrospectively reviewed. All 3 patients presented with signs and symptoms of an orbital mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed invasive melanoma. One patient had a known history of congenital cellular blue nevus of the eyelid from which the orbital melanoma originated. The other 2 patients had no known history of cutaneous pigmentation or blue nevus. In these 2 patients, the cellular blue nevus was detected on pathologic review of the orbital exenteration specimen (1 patient) or surgical biopsy specimen (1 patient). All 3 patients underwent total body positron emission tomography/computed tomography, and in all 3 results were negative for other sites of disease involvement. In the 2 patients without a previously known nevus a total body skin check was negative for other primary melanoma lesions. All 3 patients underwent orbital exenteration followed by postoperative radiation therapy. Thorough evaluation of biopsy specimens of "primary" orbital melanoma is warranted to ensure identification of any associated blue nevus because blue nevi are precursor lesions for orbital melanoma, and the presence of a blue nevus would support a primary orbital melanoma rather than a metastatic lesion. Patients with a known blue nevus of the periocular skin and ocular adnexa should be monitored closely for signs of malignant transformation.

  19. Biochemical characterization of P-type copper ATPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inesi, Giuseppe; Pilankatta, Rajendra; Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Copper ATPases, in analogy with other members of the P-ATPase superfamily, contain a catalytic headpiece including an aspartate residue reacting with ATP to form a phosphoenzyme intermediate, and transmembrane helices containing cation-binding sites [TMBS (transmembrane metal-binding sites)] for catalytic activation and cation translocation. Following phosphoenzyme formation by utilization of ATP, bound copper undergoes displacement from the TMBS to the lumenal membrane surface, with no H+ exchange. Although PII-type ATPases sustain active transport of alkali/alkali-earth ions (i.e. Na+, Ca2+) against electrochemical gradients across defined membranes, PIB-type ATPases transfer transition metal ions (i.e. Cu+) from delivery to acceptor proteins and, prominently in mammalian cells, undergo trafficking from/to various membrane compartments. A specific component of copper ATPases is the NMBD (N-terminal metal-binding domain), containing up to six copper-binding sites in mammalian (ATP7A and ATP7B) enzymes. Copper occupancy of NMBD sites and interaction with the ATPase headpiece are required for catalytic activation. Furthermore, in the presence of copper, the NMBD allows interaction with protein kinase D, yielding phosphorylation of serine residues, ATP7B trafficking and protection from proteasome degradation. A specific feature of ATP7A is glycosylation and stabilization on plasma membranes. Cisplatin, a platinum-containing anti-cancer drug, binds to copper sites of ATP7A and ATP7B, and undergoes vectorial displacement in analogy with copper. PMID:25242165

  20. Ecological modelling of a wetland for phytoremediating Cu, Zn and Mn in a gold–copper mine site using Typha domingensis (Poales: Typhaceae near Orange, NSW, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrahmanyam Sreenath

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An artificial wetland was computationally modelled using STELLA®, a graphical programming tool for an Au-Cu mine site in Central-west NSW, the aim of which was to offer a predictive analysis of a proposed wetland for Cu, Zn and Mn removal using Typha domingensis as the agent. The model considers the important factors that impact phytoremediation of Cu, Zn and Mn. Simulations were performed to optimise the area of the wetland; concentration of Cu, Zn and Mn released from mine (AMD; and flow rates of water for maximum absorption of the metals. A scenario analysis indicates that at AMD = 0.75mg/L for Cu, Zn and Mn, 12.5, 8.6, and 357.9 kg of Cu, Zn and Mn, respectively, will be assimilated by the wetland in 35 years, which would be equivalent to 61 mg of Cu/kg, 70 mg of Zn/kg and 2,886 mg of Mn/kg of T. domingensis, respectively. However, should Cu, Zn and Mn in AMD increase to 3 mg/L, then 18.6 kg of Cu and 11.8 kg of Zn, respectively, will be assimilated in 35 years, whereas no substantial increase in absorption for Mn would occur. This indicates that 91 mg of Cu, 96 mg of Zn and 2917 mg of Mn will be assimilated for every kg of T. domingensis in the wetland. The best option for Cu storage would be to construct a wetland of 50,000 m2 area (AMD = 0.367 mg/L of Cu, which would capture 14.1 kg of Cu in 43 years, eventually releasing only 3.9 kg of Cu downstream. Simulations performed for a WA of 30,000 m2 indicate that for AMD = 0.367 mg/L of Zn, the wetland captures 6.2 kg, releasing only 3.5 kg downstream after 43 years; the concentration of Zn in the leachate would be 10.2 kg, making this the most efficient wetland amongst the options considered for phytoremediating Zn. This work will help mine managers and environmental researchers in developing an effective environmental management plan by focusing on phytoremediation, with a view at extracting Cu, Zn and Mn from the contaminated sites.

  1. Influence of biochars, compost and iron grit, alone and in combination, on copper solubility and phytotoxicity in a Cu-contaminated soil from a wood preservation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oustriere, Nadège; Marchand, Lilian; Galland, William; Gabbon, Lunel; Lottier, Nathalie; Motelica, Mikael; Mench, Michel

    2016-10-01

    Two biochars, a green waste compost and iron grit were used, alone and in combination, as amendment to improve soil properties and in situ stabilize Cu in a contaminated soil (964mgCukg(-1)) from a wood preservation site. The pot experiment consisted in 9 soil treatments (% w/w): untreated Cu-contaminated soil (Unt); Unt soil amended respectively with compost (5%, C), iron grit (1%, Z), pine bark-derived biochar (1%, PB), poultry-manure-derived biochar (1%, AB), PB or AB+C (5%, PBC and ABC), and PB or AB+Z (1%, PBZ and ABZ). After a 3-month reaction period, the soil pore water (SPW) was sampled in potted soils and dwarf beans were grown for a 2-week period. In the SPW, all amendments decreased the Cu(2+) concentration, but total Cu concentration increased in all AB-amended soils due to high dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration. No treatment improved root and shoot DW yields, which even decreased in the ABC and ABZ treatments. The PBZ treatment decreased total Cu concentration in the SPW while reducing the gap with common values for root and shoot yields of dwarf bean plants. A field trial is underway before any recommendation for the PB-based treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Chemical Role for Trichloromethane: Room-Temperature Removal of Coordinated Solvents from Open Metal Sites in the Copper-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Sun; Bae, Jinhee; Lee, Eun Ji; Jeong, Nak Cheon

    2018-04-17

    Open coordination sites (OCSs) in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown potential in applications such as molecular separation, sorption, catalysis, and sensing. Thus, the removal of coordinated solvent has been viewed as an essential step that needs to be performed prior to the use of the MOFs in the above applications. To date, a thermal method that is normally performed by applying heat and vacuum has been the most commonly employed activation method despite its negative influence on the structural integrity of the MOFs. In this report, we demonstrate that commonly inert trichloromethane (TCM) can activate OCSs; the TCM treatment process serves as an alternative chemical route to activation that does not require the external thermal energy. On the basis of the Raman study, we suggest a possible mechanism for the chemical activation process where TCM may weakly coordinate to the OCSs and then spontaneously dissociate. In addition, we prove that the chemical activation behavior is substantially boosted when a small amount of external heat energy (55 °C, 2.6 meV) is supplied during the TCM treatment. Using an HKUST-1-polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) mixed matrix (MM), we also demonstrate that this chemical activation strategy is a safe way to activate thermally deformable MOF-polymer mixed matrices.

  3. Technical note 4. Corrosion of copper canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szakalos, Peter; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2012-06-01

    Objectives of the project: In this review assignment, SKB's treatment of copper corrosion processes or mechanisms in SR-Site shall be reviewed both for the anticipated oxic and anoxic repository environments. The reviewer(s) shall consider if corrosion and corrosion mechanisms of the copper canisters in different possible evolutionary repository environments have been properly described. The objectives of this initial review phase in the area of copper corrosion is to achieve a broad coverage of SR-Site and its supporting references and in particular identify the need for complementary information and clarifications to be delivered by SKB. Summary by the authors: It is expected that the inflow of ground water to the deposition holes and tunnels in the Forsmark repository will be very slow. Thus, it might take some few hundred years up to thousand years before the deposition holes are filled with ground water and it might take 6000 years or more before the bentonite buffer is fully water saturated and pressurized. The copper canisters will therefore meet to two completely different environments: 1. An initial period of several hundreds of years when copper is exposed to gaseous corrosion. 2. And then to aqueous corrosion. From a corrosion point of view the first 1000 years are the most critical for the copper canister since pure, or phosphorus alloyed copper, is not designed to cope with corrosion at elevated temperatures. The outer copper surface temperature is expected to reach 100 deg C within some decades after closure of the repository and then slowly cool down to around 50 deg C after 1000 years. The gaseous corrosion is treated in SKB's safety assessment as being only dependent on oxygen gas and thus easily estimated by an oxygen mass-balance calculation. This simple model has no scientific support since several corrosive trace gases, such as sulphurous and nitrous compounds, operates together with water molecules (moisture) and the corrosion product consists

  4. A facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II) ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Ting; Qu, Fei; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we developed a facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II) ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine. Polyethyleneimine is a cationic polymer that has no absorption in the wavelength range of 250–800 nm. When trace amounts of copper(II) ion was added to the colorless polyethyleneimine solution, copper(II) ion could react with the amino groups of the polyethyleneimine to form a dark blue cuprammonium complex whose absorption spectrum exhibit...

  5. Study of the Cys-His bridge electron transfer pathway in a copper-containing nitrite reductase by site-directed mutagenesis, spectroscopic, and computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristaldi, Julio C; Gómez, María C; González, Pablo J; Ferroni, Felix M; Dalosto, Sergio D; Rizzi, Alberto C; Rivas, María G; Brondino, Carlos D

    2018-03-01

    The Cys-His bridge as electron transfer conduit in the enzymatic catalysis of nitrite to nitric oxide by nitrite reductase from Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 (SmNir) was evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis, steady state kinetic studies, UV-vis and EPR spectroscopic measurements as well as computational calculations. The kinetic, structural and spectroscopic properties of the His171Asp (H171D) and Cys172Asp (C172D) SmNir variants were compared with the wild type enzyme. Molecular properties of H171D and C172D indicate that these point mutations have not visible effects on the quaternary structure of SmNir. Both variants are catalytically incompetent using the physiological electron donor pseudoazurin, though C172D presents catalytic activity with the artificial electron donor methyl viologen (k cat =3.9(4) s -1 ) lower than that of wt SmNir (k cat =240(50) s -1 ). QM/MM calculations indicate that the lack of activity of H171D may be ascribed to the N δ1 H…OC hydrogen bond that partially shortcuts the T1-T2 bridging Cys-His covalent pathway. The role of the N δ1 H…OC hydrogen bond in the pH-dependent catalytic activity of wt SmNir is also analyzed by monitoring the T1 and T2 oxidation states at the end of the catalytic reaction of wt SmNir at pH6 and 10 by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies. These data provide insight into how changes in Cys-His bridge interrupts the electron transfer between T1 and T2 and how the pH-dependent catalytic activity of the enzyme are related to pH-dependent structural modifications of the T1-T2 bridging chemical pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Blue light and eye health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Leilei; Dai, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Blue light, with the wavelength between 400 nm and 500 nm, has caused public concern because of the injury to the retinal cells. Meanwhile, it is important in circadian rhythm regulation, scotopic vision and ocular growth. Is the blue light safe? Should it be eliminated from the daily life? Here we review the effect and safety of the blue light.

  7. Critical review: Copper runoff from outdoor copper surfaces at atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Hedberg, Jonas F; Herting, Gunilla; Goidanich, Sara; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2014-01-01

    This review on copper runoff dispersed from unsheltered naturally patinated copper used for roofing and facades summarizes and discusses influencing factors, available literature, and predictive models, and the importance of fate and speciation for environmental risk assessment. Copper runoff from outdoor surfaces is predominantly governed by electrochemical and chemical reactions and is highly dependent on given exposure conditions (size, inclination, geometry, degree of sheltering, and orientation), surface parameters (age, patina composition, and thickness), and site-specific environmental conditions (gaseous pollutants, chlorides, rainfall characteristics (amount, intensity, pH), wind direction, temperature, time of wetness, season). The corrosion rate cannot be used to assess the runoff rate. The extent of released copper varies largely between different rain events and is related to dry and wet periods, dry deposition prior to the rain event and prevailing rain and patina characteristics. Interpretation and use of copper runoff data for environmental risk assessment and management need therefore to consider site-specific factors and focus on average data of long-term studies (several years). Risk assessments require furthermore that changes in copper speciation, bioavailability aspects, and potential irreversible retention on solid surfaces are considered, factors that determine the environmental fate of copper runoff from outdoor surfaces.

  8. Environmental concentrations of copper, chromium, and arsenic released from a chromated-copper-arsenate-(CCA-C-) treated wetland boardwalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Daniel Foster

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate environmental accumulation and mobility of total copper, chromium, and arsenic adjacent to a chromated-copper-arsenate-(CCA-C-) treated wetland boardwalk. The study was considered a severe test because it included a large volume of treated wood in a site with high annual rainfall. Soil and sediment samples were collected before...

  9. 40 CFR 141.86 - Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... copper in tap water. 141.86 Section 141.86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 141.86 Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water. (a) Sample site location. (1) By the... the water system can collect the number of lead and copper tap samples required in paragraph (c) of...

  10. Resonance Raman, infrared, and EPR investigation on the binuclear site structure of the heme-copper ubiquinol oxidases from Acetobacter aceti: effect of the heme peripheral formyl group substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubaki, M; Matsushita, K; Adachi, O; Hirota, S; Kitagawa, T; Hori, H

    1997-10-21

    Acetobacter aceti produces two different terminal ubiquinol oxidases (cytochromes a1 and o) depending on the culture conditions. Two types of oxidases share a common protein moiety but with different heme components at the binuclear center (heme A for cytochrome a1 and heme O for cytochrome o). We investigated the structure of the binuclear site of the two oxidases using resonance Raman, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR), and EPR spectroscopies to clarify the interactions of heme A formyl group with protein moiety. We found that the overall architecture and the electronic configuration at the binuclear center in the oxidized state seem to be well conserved irrespective of the heme peripheral group at position 8, except for the azide-inhibited state. In contrast, we observed great variations in the C-N stretching frequency and cyanide-binding affinity in the CN-reduced state, in addition to multiple C-O stretching bands in the CO-reduced state. Present and previous studies suggest that the conformational flexibility of the binuclear center in the reduced ligand-bound state may be a common feature among the heme-copper oxidase superfamily. In the CN-reduced state, a hydrogen bond network may be formed among the formyl group, water molecule(s), and the surrounding amino acid residue(s). This network may be very important to maintain proper orientations of the distal amino acid residues and/or the CuB1+ ion relative to the cyanide ion bound to the ferrous heme iron and could play a critical role for the high affinity in cyanide binding.

  11. Temperature and Copper Concentration Effects on the Formation of Graphene-Encapsulated Copper Nanoparticles from Kraft Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqi Leng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature and copper catalyst concentration on the formation of graphene-encapsulated copper nanoparticles (GECNs were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance, and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that higher amounts of copper atoms facilitated the growth of more graphene islands and formed smaller size GECNs. A copper catalyst facilitated the decomposition of lignin at the lowest temperature studied (600 °C. Increasing the temperature up to 1000 °C retarded the degradation process, while assisting the reconfiguration of the defective sites of the graphene layers, thus producing higher-quality GECNs.

  12. One-pot production of copper ferrite nanoparticles using a chemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, Naoki, E-mail: nnishida@rs.tus.ac.jp; Amagasa, Shota [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Kobayashi, Yoshio [The University of Electro-Communications, Department of Engineering Science (Japan); Yamada, Yasuhiro [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Copper ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized via the oxidation of precipitates obtained from the reaction of FeCl{sub 2}, CuSO{sub 4} and N{sub 2}H{sub 4} in the presence of gelatin. These copper ferrite particles were subsequently examined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The average size of the copper ferrite nanoparticles was less than 5 nm, and they exhibited superparamagnetic behavior as a result of their small size. The low temperature Mössbauer spectrum exhibited three sets of sextets, two corresponding to the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the copper spinel structure and one with small hyperfine magnetic field corresponding to the surface or defects of the nanoparticles. When the ratio of copper salt was increased, the tetrahedral site became preferable for copper, and metallic copper and copper ferrite were both present in a single nanoparticle.

  13. Remediation of copper in vineyards--a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, K A; Müller, T; Kandeler, E

    2012-08-01

    Viticulturists use copper fungicide to combat Downy Mildew. Copper, a non-degradable heavy metal, can accumulate in soil or leach into water sources. Its accumulation in topsoil has impacted micro and macro organisms, spurring scientists to research in situ copper removal methods. Recent publications suggest that microorganism assisted phytoextraction, using plants and bacteria to actively extract copper, is most promising. As vineyards represent moderately polluted sites this technique has great potential. Active plant extraction and chelate assisted remediation extract too little copper or risk leaching, respectively. However, despite interesting pot experiment results using microorganism assisted phytoextraction, it remains a challenge to find plants that primarily accumulate copper in their shoots, a necessity in vineyards where whole plant removal would be time consuming and financially cumbersome. Vineyard remediation requires a holistic approach including sustainable soil management, proper plant selection, increasing biodiversity and microorganisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  15. Material characterization of ancient Indian copper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    iron technology and possessed a different material cul- ture. The reoccupation of the site suggests its ..... where chloride ions are excluded, as in the present study, microstructural investigations on archaeological ... copper extraction and application remained almost simi- lar for a large period in Indian history based on the.

  16. Model of the PCB and mercury exposure of mink and great blue heron inhabiting the off-site environment downstream from the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacIntosh, D.L. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Public and Environmental Affairs); Suter, G.W. II; Hoffman, F.O. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This report presents a pair of wildlife exposure models developed for use in investigating the risks to wildlife of releases of mercury and PCBS. The species modeled are the great blue heron and mink The models may be used to estimate the exposure experienced by mink and herons, to help establish remedial action goals and to identify research needs. Because mercury and PCBs bioaccumulate through dietary uptake, the models simulate the food webs supporting the two species. Sources of contaminants include surface water, sediment, sediment pore water, and soil. The model are stochastic equilibrium models. Two types of variance in the input parameters are distinguished: stochastic variance among individual mink and herons and ignorance concerning true parameter values. The variance in the output due to stochastic parameters indicates the expected variance among the receptors. The variance due to ignorance indicates the extent to which the model outputs could be unpaved by additional sampling and measurement. The results of the models were compared to concentrations measured in great blue heron eggs and nestlings from colonies on the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. The predicted concentrations agreed well with the measured concentrations. In addition, the variances in measured values among individuals was approximately equal to the total stochastic variance predicted by the models.

  17. Model of the PCB and mercury exposure of mink and great blue heron inhabiting the off-site environment downstream from the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacIntosh, D.L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Public and Environmental Affairs; Suter, G.W. II; Hoffman, F.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-09-01

    This report presents a pair of wildlife exposure models developed for use in investigating the risks to wildlife of releases of mercury and PCBS. The species modeled are the great blue heron and mink The models may be used to estimate the exposure experienced by mink and herons, to help establish remedial action goals and to identify research needs. Because mercury and PCBs bioaccumulate through dietary uptake, the models simulate the food webs supporting the two species. Sources of contaminants include surface water, sediment, sediment pore water, and soil. The model are stochastic equilibrium models. Two types of variance in the input parameters are distinguished: stochastic variance among individual mink and herons and ignorance concerning true parameter values. The variance in the output due to stochastic parameters indicates the expected variance among the receptors. The variance due to ignorance indicates the extent to which the model outputs could be unpaved by additional sampling and measurement. The results of the models were compared to concentrations measured in great blue heron eggs and nestlings from colonies on the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. The predicted concentrations agreed well with the measured concentrations. In addition, the variances in measured values among individuals was approximately equal to the total stochastic variance predicted by the models.

  18. Model of the PCB and mercury exposure of mink and great blue heron inhabiting the off-site environment downstream from the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIntosh, D.L.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents a pair of wildlife exposure models developed for use in investigating the risks to wildlife of releases of mercury and PCBS. The species modeled are the great blue heron and mink The models may be used to estimate the exposure experienced by mink and herons, to help establish remedial action goals and to identify research needs. Because mercury and PCBs bioaccumulate through dietary uptake, the models simulate the food webs supporting the two species. Sources of contaminants include surface water, sediment, sediment pore water, and soil. The model are stochastic equilibrium models. Two types of variance in the input parameters are distinguished: stochastic variance among individual mink and herons and ignorance concerning true parameter values. The variance in the output due to stochastic parameters indicates the expected variance among the receptors. The variance due to ignorance indicates the extent to which the model outputs could be unpaved by additional sampling and measurement. The results of the models were compared to concentrations measured in great blue heron eggs and nestlings from colonies on the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. The predicted concentrations agreed well with the measured concentrations. In addition, the variances in measured values among individuals was approximately equal to the total stochastic variance predicted by the models

  19. Blue ocean leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets.

  20. Copper and silver halates

    CERN Document Server

    Woolley, EM; Salomon, M

    2013-01-01

    Copper and Silver Halates is the third in a series of four volumes on inorganic metal halates. This volume presents critical evaluations and compilations for halate solubilities of the Group II metals. The solubility data included in this volume are those for the five compounds, copper chlorate and iodate, and silver chlorate, bromate and iodate.

  1. The Hyrkkoelae native copper mineralization as a natural analogue for copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, N. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Engineering Geology and Geophysics

    1996-10-01

    The Hyrkkoelae U-Cu mineralization is located in southwestern Finland, near the Palmottu analogue site. The age of the mineralization is estimated to be between 1.8 and 1.7 Ga. Petrological and mineralogical studies have demonstrated that this mineralization has many geological features that parallel those of the sites being considered for nuclear waste disposal in Finland. A particular feature is the existence of native copper and copper sulfides in open fractures in the near-surface zone. This allows us to study the native copper corrosion process in analogous conditions as expected to dominate in the nuclear fuel waste repository. The occurrence of uranyl compounds at these fractures permits also considerations about the sorption properties of the engineered barrier material (metallic copper) and its corrosion products. From the study of mineral assemblages or paragenesis, it appears that the formation of copper sulfide (djurleite, Cu{sub 1.934}) after native copper (Cu{sup 0}) under anoxic (reducing) conditions is enhanced by the availability of dissolved HS{sup -} in the groundwater circulating in open fractures in the near-surface zone. The minimum concentration of HS{sup -}in the groundwater is estimated to be of the order of 10{sup -5} M ({approx} 10{sup -4} g/l) and the minimum pH value not lower than about 7.8 as indicated by the presence of calcite crystals in the same fracture. The present study is the first one that has been performed on findings of native copper in reducing, neutral to slightly alkaline groundwaters. Thus, the data obtained is of most relevance in improving models of anoxic corrosion of copper canisters. (orig.).

  2. Bioaccessibility and Solubility of Copper in Copper-Treated Lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micronized copper (MC)-treated lumber is a recent replacement for Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) and Ammonium Copper (AC)-treated lumbers; though little is known about the potential risk of copper (Cu) exposure from incidental ingestion of MC-treated wood. The bioaccessibility o...

  3. Remediation of copper in vineyards – A mini review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, K.A.; Müller, T.; Kandeler, E.

    2012-01-01

    Viticulturists use copper fungicide to combat Downy Mildew. Copper, a non-degradable heavy metal, can accumulate in soil or leach into water sources. Its accumulation in topsoil has impacted micro and macro organisms, spurring scientists to research in situ copper removal methods. Recent publications suggest that microorganism assisted phytoextraction, using plants and bacteria to actively extract copper, is most promising. As vineyards represent moderately polluted sites this technique has great potential. Active plant extraction and chelate assisted remediation extract too little copper or risk leaching, respectively. However, despite interesting pot experiment results using microorganism assisted phytoextraction, it remains a challenge to find plants that primarily accumulate copper in their shoots, a necessity in vineyards where whole plant removal would be time consuming and financially cumbersome. Vineyard remediation requires a holistic approach including sustainable soil management, proper plant selection, increasing biodiversity and microorganisms. - Highlights: ► We describe copper distribution and availability in vineyards. ► We explain the environmental impact of copper on organisms, plants and processes. ► We detail possible remediation methods within vineyards. ► Microbially assisted phytoremediation is the most promising remediation method. ► A solution requires an interdisciplinary approach between plants, soil and vines. - This review is significant because it highlights prospective remediation methods usable in copper contaminated vineyards.

  4. Instant BlueStacks

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A fast-paced, example-based approach guide for learning BlueStacks.This book is for anyone with a Mac or PC who wants to run Android apps on their computer. Whether you want to play games that are freely available for Android but not your computer, or you want to try apps before you install them on a physical device or use it as a development tool, this book will show you how. No previous experience is needed as this is written in plain English

  5. Activation of chick tendon lysyl oxidase in response to dietary copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, R B; Rucker, B R; Mitchell, A E; Cui, C T; Clegg, M; Kosonen, T; Uriu-Adams, J Y; Tchaparian, E H; Fishman, M; Keen, C L

    1999-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase (EC 1.4.3.13), a cuproenzyme, can account for 10-30% of the copper present in connective tissue. Herein, we assess the extent to which tissue copper concentrations and lysyl oxidase activity are related because the functional activity of lysyl oxidase and the copper content of chick tendon are both related to dietary copper intake. Chicks (1-d old) were fed diets (basal copper concentration, 0.4 microg/g diet) to which copper was added from 0 to 16 microg/g diet. Liver and plasma copper levels tended to normalize in chickens that consumed from 1 to 4 microg copper/g of diet, whereas tendon copper concentrations suggested an unusual accumulation of copper in chickens that consumed 16 microg copper/g diet. The molecular weight of lysyl oxidase was also estimated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF/MS). A novel aspect of these measurements was estimation of protein mass directly from the surface of chick tendons and aortae. Whether copper deficiency (0 added copper) or copper supplementation (16 microg copper/g of diet) caused changes in the molecular weight of protein(s) in tendon corresponding to lysyl oxidase was addressed. The average molecular weight of the peak corresponding to lysyl oxidase in tendon and aorta from copper-deficient birds was 28,386 Da +/- 86, whereas the average molecular weight of corresponding protein in tendon from copper-supplemented birds was 28,639 Da +/- 122. We propose that the shift in molecular weight is due in part to copper binding and the formation of lysyl tyrosyl quinone, the cofactor at the active site of lysyl oxidase.

  6. How Long Will I Be Blue? Prolonged Skin Staining Following Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Using Intradermal Patent Blue Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Metehan; Gumus, Hatice; Jones, Sue E; Jones, Peter A; Sever, Ali R; Weeks, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Blue dye used for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in breast cancer patients may cause prolonged skin discoloration at the site of injection. The aim of this study was to assess the duration of such skin discoloration. Patients and Methods 236 consecutive patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery and SLNB for breast cancer were reviewed prospectively from January 2007 to December 2009. Results Of the 236 patients, 2 had undergone bilateral surgery, and 41 had been examined in consecutive yearly reviews. Blue discoloration remained visible at the injection site after 12, 24, and > 36 months in 36.5, 23.6, and 8.6% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion The use of patent blue for identification of the sentinel lymph node in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery may result in prolonged discoloration of the skin at the injection site. PMID:24415970

  7. Intramolecular electron transfer in single-site-mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; Pascher, T

    1993-01-01

    . Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 6968-6972]. The RSSR- radical produced in the above reaction was reoxidized in a slower intramolecular electron-transfer process (30-70 s-1 at 298 K) concomitant with a further reduction of the Cu(II) ion. The temperature dependence of the latter rates was determined...... and used to derive information on the possible effects of the mutations. The substitution of residue Phe114, situated on the opposite side of Cu relative to the disulfide, by Ala resulted in a rate increase by a factor of almost 2. By assuming that this effect is only due to an increase in driving force......Single-site mutants of the blue, single-copper protein, azurin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reduced by CO2- radicals in pulse radiolysis experiments. The single disulfide group was reduced directly by CO2- with rates similar to those of the native protein [Farver, O., & Pecht, I. (1989) Proc...

  8. Blue phases as photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohley, Christian; Scharf, Toralf

    2003-12-01

    The Liquid Crystalline Blue Phases (LC BPs) and their diffraction patterns were investigated experimentally and theoretically. We stabilized Blue Phases and measured their diffraction pattern for different wavelengths of monochromatic light with the help of a conoscopic setup of a polarization microscope. Moreover, the diffraction patterns were calculated with the help of a 4x4 matrix method which allows amplitude and phase investigations.

  9. Posttranslational regulation of copper transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berghe, P.V.E.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal copper is an essential cofactor for many redox-active enzymes, but excessive copper can generate toxic reactive oxygen species. Copper homeostasis is maintained by highly conserved proteins, to balance copper uptake, distribution and export on the systemic and cellular level.

  10. Canine Copper-Associated Hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirksen, Karen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412424428; Fieten, Hille|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314112596

    2017-01-01

    Copper-associated hepatitis is recognized with increasing frequency in dogs. The disease is characterized by centrolobular hepatic copper accumulation, leading to hepatitis and eventually cirrhosis. The only way to establish the diagnosis is by histologic assessment of copper distribution and copper

  11. Acute Copper Sulfate Poisoning: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Chand Meena

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Copper sulfate ingestion is a relatively popular method for committing suicide in Indian subcontinent. It causes a high mortality rate, and so a growing concern has been raised to identify the severe alarming signs suggestive of poor prognosis and to improve treatment approaches. Case report: A 22-year-old unmarried man working as a painter was found unconscious at his friend residence. The patient developed hypotension, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis with hematemesis and melena, renal and hepatic failure, severe metabolic acidosis and intravascular hemolysis during admission at hospital. His signs were refractory to treatment with fluid replacement therapy, vasoactive drugs, antiemetic drugs, ranitidine, furosemide, methylene blue and 2,3 dimercaptopropane-1-sulphonate. He died six hours post-admission. In post-mortem examinations, there were multiple sub-pleural and sub-epicardial hemorrhages and the gastrointestinal mucosa was congested, hemorrhagic, and greenish blue in color. The liver, on histological examination, showed sub-massive hepatic necrosis. On toxicological analyses, copper sulfate was detected in preserved viscera and results for other heavy metals were negative. Conclusion: Hypotension, cyanosis, uremia and jaundice can be considered as signs of poor prognosis in copper sulfate poisoning. Copper sulfate ingestion is life-threatening due to its deleterious effects on the upper GI, kidneys, liver and blood. Having no time to waste, aggressive treatments should be immediately instituted and signs of poor prognosis should be kept in mind.

  12. Screening of oral premalignant lesions in smokers using toluidine blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanti Leosari

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A smoker is associated with the risk of developing oral premalignant lesions due to the cacinogenic contents in cigarette. Toluidine blue is a basic chromatic dye used in screening the presence of premalignant lesions due to its ability to detect acidic components in cells and tissues. Purpose: This study was purposed to observe the outcomes of toluidine blue staining on oral mucosa of smokers and non smokers and to find out whether quantity and duration of smoking affect the final results of toluidine blue staining. Methods: Forty male subjects, aged 20-60 years old were involved in this study, consisted of 10 heavy smokers, 10 moderate smokers, 10 light smokers and 10 non smokers. Subjects were instructed to rinse their mouths with mineral water for 20 seconds followed by acetic acid 1% for another 20 seconds. Toluidine blue stain was applied in excess and left on site for 1 minute. Subjects were instructed to rinse with acetic acid 1% and sufficient water consecutively for 20 seconds each. The areas of oral mucosa that stained blue were captured with intraoral camera and transferred to the computer unit. The staining procedure was repeated after 14 days. Results: Chi-square test showed that toluidine blue positive staining dominates the smokers group. Regression and correlation test indicate that Toluidine blue staining is more obvious in subjects who consume more cigarettes. Conclusion: It was concluded that oral mucosa of smokers absorbed more toluidine blue than that of non smokers and retention of toluidine blue is affected by quantity and duration of smoking.

  13. Copper resistance determinants in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, N L; Rouch, D A; Lee, B T

    1992-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element that is utilized in a number of oxygenases and electron transport proteins, but it is also a highly toxic heavy metal, against which all organisms must protect themselves. Known bacterial determinants of copper resistance are plasmid-encoded. The mechanisms which confer resistance must be integrated with the normal metabolism of copper. Different bacteria have adopted diverse strategies for copper resistance, and this review outlines what is known about bacterial copper resistance mechanisms and their genetic regulation.

  14. Using Xas And Sxrf to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular And Tissue Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralle, M.; Blackburn, N.J.; Lutsenko, S.

    2009-06-05

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu K{sub {alpha}}-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10--20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections {mu}-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  15. Using XAS and SXRF to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular and Tissue Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralle, Martina; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2007-02-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu Kα-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10-20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections μ-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  16. Simultaneous Platinum and Copper Ion Attachment to a Human Copper Chaperone Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Cvitkovic, John; Yu, Corey; Dmitriev, Oleg; Kaminski, George; Bernholc, Jerry

    2015-03-01

    Cisplatin is a potent anti-cancer drug based on a platinum ion. However, its effectiveness is decreased by cellular resistance, which involves cisplatin attaching to copper transport proteins. One of such proteins is Atox1, where cisplatin attaches to the copper binding site. Surprisingly, it was shown that both cisplatin and copper can attach to Atox1 at the same time. To study this double metal ion attachment, we use the KS/FD DFT method, which combines Kohn-Sham DFT with frozen-density DFT to achieve efficient quantum-mechanical description of explicit solvent. Calculations have so far investigated copper ion attachment to CXXC motifs present in Atox1. The addition of the platinum ion and the competition between the two metals is currently being studied. These calculations start from a molecular mechanics (MM) structural model, in which glutathione groups provide additional ligands to the Pt ion. Our goals are to identify possible Cu-Pt structures and to determine whether copper/platinum attachment is competitive, independent, or cooperative. Results will be compared to the 1H, N1 5 -HSQC NMR experiments, in which binding of copper and cisplatin to Atox1 produces distinct secondary chemical shift signatures, allowing for kinetic studies of simultaneous metal binding.

  17. Micromachining with copper lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Martyn R. H.; Bell, Andy; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Rutterford, Graham; Chudzicki, J.; Kearsley, Andrew J.

    1997-04-01

    In recent years the copper laser has undergone extensive development and has emerged as a leading and unique laser for micromachining. The copper laser is a high average power (10 - 250 W), high pulse repetition rate (2 - 32 kHz), visible laser (511 nm and 578 nm) that produces high peak power (typically 200 kW), short pulses (30 ns) and very good beam quality (diffraction limited). This unique set of laser parameters results in exceptional micro-machining in a wide variety of materials. Typical examples of the capabilities of the copper laser include the drilling of small holes (10 - 200 micrometer diameter) in materials as diverse as steel, ceramic, diamond and polyimide with micron precision and low taper (less than 1 degree) cutting and profiling of diamond. Application of the copper laser covers the electronic, aerospace, automotive, nuclear, medical and precision engineering industries.

  18. Sliding Friction of Copper

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Tung

    1963-01-01

    .... With less clean surfaces, the coefficient of friction obtained was about 0.4. Since the degree of cleanliness cannot be controlled quantitatively, the friction - load curve of sliding copper pairs in air exhibits a bifurcation characteristic...

  19. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  20. Blue moons and Martian sunsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Kurt; Chakrabarty, Rajan; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-03-20

    The familiar yellow or orange disks of the moon and sun, especially when they are low in the sky, and brilliant red sunsets are a result of the selective extinction (scattering plus absorption) of blue light by atmospheric gas molecules and small aerosols, a phenomenon explainable using the Rayleigh scattering approximation. On rare occasions, dust or smoke aerosols can cause the extinction of red light to exceed that for blue, resulting in the disks of the sun and moon to appear as blue. Unlike Earth, the atmosphere of Mars is dominated by micron-size dust aerosols, and the sky during sunset takes on a bluish glow. Here we investigate the role of dust aerosols in the blue Martian sunsets and the occasional blue moons and suns on Earth. We use the Mie theory and the Debye series to calculate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of dust aerosols most commonly found on Mars. Our findings show that while wavelength selective extinction can cause the sun's disk to appear blue, the color of the glow surrounding the sun as observed from Mars is due to the dominance of near-forward scattering of blue light by dust particles and cannot be explained by a simple, Rayleigh-like selective extinction explanation.

  1. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  2. Alternative Anode Reaction for Copper Electrowinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a project funded by the Department of Energy, with additional funding from Bechtel National, to develop a copper electrowinning process with lower costs and lower emissions than the current process. This new process also includes more energy efficient production by using catalytic-surfaced anodes and a different electrochemical couple in the electrolyte, providing an alternative oxidation reaction that requires up to 50% less energy than is currently required to electrowin the same quantity of copper. This alternative anode reaction, which oxidizes ferric ions to ferrous, with subsequent reduction back to ferric using sulfur dioxide, was demonstrated to be technically and operationally feasible. However, pure sulfur dioxide was determined to be prohibitively expensive and use of a sulfur burner, producing 12% SO{sub 2}, was deemed a viable alternative. This alternate, sulfur-burning process requires a sulfur burner, waste heat boiler, quench tower, and reaction towers. The electrolyte containing absorbed SO{sub 2} passes through activated carbon to regenerate the ferrous ion. Because this reaction produces sulfuric acid, excess acid removal by ion exchange is necessary and produces a low concentration acid suitable for leaching oxide copper minerals. If sulfide minerals are to be leached or the acid unneeded on site, hydrogen was demonstrated to be a potential reductant. Preliminary economics indicate that the process would only be viable if significant credits could be realized for electrical power produced by the sulfur burner and for acid if used for leaching of oxidized copper minerals on site.

  3. Green synthesis of colloidal copper oxide nanoparticles using Carica papaya and its application in photocatalytic dye degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Manikandan, Perumal; Malarvizhi, Viswanathan; Fathima, Tajudeennasrin; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2014-03-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles were synthesized by treating 5 mM cupric sulphate with Carica papaya leaves extract. The kinetics of the reaction was studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry. An intense surface Plasmon resonance between 250-300 nm in the UV-vis spectrum clearly reveals the formation of copper oxide nanoparticles. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) exhibited that the green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles are rod in shape and having a mean particle size of 140 nm, further negative zeta potential disclose its stability at -28.9 mV. The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results examined the occurrence of bioactive functional groups required for the reduction of copper ions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra confirmed the copper oxide nanoparticles crystalline nature. Furthermore, colloidal copper oxide nanoparticles effectively degrade the Coomassie brilliant blue R-250 dye beneath the sunlight.

  4. Photometry of faint blue stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilkenny, D.; Hill, P.W.; Brown, A.

    1977-01-01

    Photometry on the uvby system is given for 61 faint blue stars. The stars are classified by means of the Stromgren indices, using criteria described in a previous paper (Kilkenny and Hill (1975)). (author)

  5. Ecology of blue straggler stars

    CERN Document Server

    Carraro, Giovanni; Beccari, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    The existence of blue straggler stars, which appear younger, hotter, and more massive than their siblings, is at odds with a simple picture of stellar evolution. Such stars should have exhausted their nuclear fuel and evolved long ago to become cooling white dwarfs. They are found to exist in globular clusters, open clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group, OB associations and as field stars. This book summarises the many advances in observational and theoretical work dedicated to blue straggler stars. Carefully edited extended contributions by well-known experts in the field cover all the relevant aspects of blue straggler stars research: Observations of blue straggler stars in their various environments; Binary stars and formation channels; Dynamics of globular clusters; Interpretation of observational data and comparison with models. The book also offers an introductory chapter on stellar evolution written by the editors of the book.

  6. Waddenfonds Tidal Texel Demonstration project. BlueTEC Texel Tidal Project: Environmental measurement and performance analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsoni, L.; Nauw, J.J.; Smit, M.; Ober, S.; Nichols, C.; Kenkhuis, J.; Schmidt, C.; Buatois, A.; de Haas, P.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the BlueTEC project, this report starts by introducing theBlueTEC tidal energy platform and reviewing the patterns of circulation of theMarsdiep inlet. The energy resource assessment and the site selection for theplatform's deployment are reported. This document analyses di?erent

  7. Blue Tongue Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anupama

    thromboses and necrosis of infected tissues (Erasmus,. 1975) (Figure 1). In sheep, the onset of the disease is .... the skin to the local lymph nodes (Hemati et al., 2009), the sites of initial virus replication (MacLachlan, 2004). .... effects and provide protection against challenge with virulent virus of the same serotype. Animals ...

  8. Characteristics of Alcian-blue Dye Adsorption of Natural Biofilm Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Sukandar; Guntur

    2018-01-01

    In this study, natural biofilm matrices formed on stones have been used for the adsorption of Alcian blue dye. Alcian blue is a member of polyvalent basic dyes that largely used from laboratory until industrial dying purposes. The adsorption of the dye onto the biofilm matrix has been carried out at different experimental conditions such as adsorption isotherm and kinetic of adsorption. The electric charge properties of biofilm matrix and its changes related to the adsorption of Alcian blue have been also investigated. Moreover, the results of Alcian blue adsorption to the biofilm were compared to those onto the acidic and neutral resin. The kinetics of adsorption result showed that the adsorption of the Alcian blue dye reached to a maximum adsorption amount within 60 minutes. The adsorption amount of Alcian blue to biofilm increased monotonously, and the maximum adsorption amount was greater compared to the resins. On the contrary, Alcian blue did not attach to the neutral resin having no electric charge. It seems that Alcian blue attached to the acidic resins due to electrostatic attractive force, and the same seems to be the case for adsorption of Alcian blue to biofilm. The adsorption of Alcian blue to the biofilm and acidic resins fitted to Langmuir type indicates that the binding of Alcian blue to the biofilm and acidic resins occurred in a monolayer like form. The maximum adsorption amount of Alcian blue on the biofilm (0.24 mmol/dry-g) was greater than those of acidic resin (0.025 mmol/dry-g). This indicates that the biofilm has many more sites for Alcian blue attachment than acidic resins. According to the result of this study, the biofilm matrix can be a good adsorbent for dye such as Alcian blue or other dyes that causing hazards in nature.

  9. XANES investigation of Chinese faience excavated from Peng State Cemetery site in Western Zhou Period (BC1046–BC771)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Wentao; Yang, Yimin [Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100044 (China); Department of Scientific History and Archaeometry, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Jian, E-mail: jzhu@ucas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100044 (China); Department of Scientific History and Archaeometry, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Gu, Zhou [Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100044 (China); Department of Scientific History and Archaeometry, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xie, Yaoting [Institute of Archaeology of Shanxi Province, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Zhang, Jing [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Lihua [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We analyzed faience of Peng State archaeological cemetery site in Western Zhou Dynasty (BC1046–BC771). • We investigated the chemical composition and oxidation state by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), respectively. • The coloring element in both beads is copper in +2 valence, and the color divergence of these two beads may originate from different local chemical environments of Cu{sup 2+}. • Chinese faience in this period is the earliest glaze with copper colorant. - Abstract: As a special kind of glazed ceramic, faience has an important role to play in the technological trajectory that eventually leads to the development of ancient glass. In China, faience products first emerged in early Western Zhou Dynasty (1046BC–771BC), and their great significance as well as brilliant colors varying between blue and green attracted a lot of scholars. However, scientific researches on the color source of Chinese faience in view of microstructure characterization are quite few. In the present work, analyses by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) were carried out on two faience beads with relatively blue and green color, respectively, both of which were excavated from Peng State archaeological cemetery site in Western Zhou Dynasty. The results show that the coloring element in both beads is copper with +2 valence, and the color divergence of these two beads may originate from different local chemical environments of Cu{sup 2+}. It is suggested that the faience in this period is the earliest glaze with copper colorant in China.

  10. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  11. Electrical conduction in composites containing copper core-copper ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composites of nanometre-sized copper core-copper oxide shell with diameters in the range 6.1 to 7.3 nm dispersed in a silica gel were synthesised by a technique comprising reduction followed by oxidation of a suitably chosen precursor gel. The hot pressed gel powders mixed with nanometre-sized copper particles ...

  12. [Acute blue urticaria following subcutaneous injection of patent blue dye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, A; Vial-Dupuy, A; Lebrun-Vignes, B; Francès, C; Soria, A; Barete, S

    2015-11-01

    Patent blue (PB) is a lymphatic vessel dye commonly used in France for sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer, and less frequently in melanoma, and which may induce hypersensitivity reactions. We report a case of acute blue urticaria occurring within minutes of PB injection. Ten minutes after PB injection for sentinel lymph node detection during breast cancer surgery, a 49-year-old woman developed generalised acute blue urticaria and eyelid angioedema without bronchospasm or haemodynamic disturbance, but requiring discontinuation of surgery. Skin testing using PB and the anaesthetics given were run 6 weeks after the episode and confirmed PB allergy. PB was formally contra-indicated. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to PB have been reported for between 0.24 and 2.2% of procedures. Such reactions are on occasion severe, chiefly involving anaphylactic shock. Two mechanisms are probably associated: non-specific histamine release and/or an IgE-mediated mechanism. Skin tests are helpful in confirming the diagnosis of PB allergy. Blue acute urticaria is one of the clinical manifestations of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to patent blue dye. Skin tests must be performed 6 weeks after the reaction in order to confirm the diagnosis and formally contra-indicate this substance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal structures of E. coli laccase CueO at different copper concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xu; Wei Zhiyi; Zhang Min; Peng Xiaohui; Yu Guangzhe; Teng Maikun; Gong Weimin

    2007-01-01

    CueO protein is a hypothetical bacterial laccase and a good laccase candidate for large scale industrial application. Four CueO crystal structures were determined at different copper concentrations. Low copper occupancy in apo-CueO and slow copper reconstitution process in CueO with exogenous copper were demonstrated. These observations well explain the copper dependence of CueO oxidase activity. Structural comparison between CueO and other three fungal laccase proteins indicates that Glu106 in CueO constitutes the primary counter-work for reconstitution of the trinuclear copper site. Mutation of Glu106 to a Phe enhanced CueO oxidation activity and supported this hypothesis. In addition, an extra α-helix from Leu351 to Gly378 covers substrate biding pocket of CueO and might compromises the electron transfer from substrate to type I copper

  14. Selective observation of the Cu(I)-amicyanin metal site by paramagnetic NMR on partially oxidised samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, Jesus; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Canters, Gerard W.

    1997-01-01

    The relaxation enhancement caused by paramagnetic copper(II) is used to observe selectively the metal site of copper(I)-amicyanin by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The paramagnetic effect is communicated to the diamagnetic protein through the electron self-exchange reaction in partially oxidised samples, and can be used for the selective detection of protons around the metal. Relaxation-selective NMR pulse sequences, like super-WEFT and WEFT-NOESY, are used to achieve the desired selection of the signals. The spectra obtained show well-resolved signals corresponding to protons within a radius of∼7 A from the metal, including almost all protons from the coordinated residues. A significant increase in resolution as well as selection of the most relevant part of the protein (close to the active centre) are the principal advantages of this technique, which can be used to obtain specific information about the metal site in blue copper proteins, to assist in the assignment of their NMR spectra and to determine functional properties like the electron self-exchange rate

  15. Mechanisms of copper ion mediated Huntington's disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H Fox

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is caused by a dominant polyglutamine expansion within the N-terminus of huntingtin protein and results in oxidative stress, energetic insufficiency and striatal degeneration. Copper and iron are increased in the striata of HD patients, but the role of these metals in HD pathogenesis is unknown. We found, using inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectroscopy, that elevations of copper and iron found in human HD brain are reiterated in the brains of affected HD transgenic mice. Increased brain copper correlated with decreased levels of the copper export protein, amyloid precursor protein. We hypothesized that increased amounts of copper bound to low affinity sites could contribute to pro-oxidant activities and neurodegeneration. We focused on two proteins: huntingtin, because of its centrality to HD, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, because of its documented sensitivity to copper, necessity for normoxic brain energy metabolism and evidence for altered lactate metabolism in HD brain. The first 171 amino acids of wild-type huntingtin, and its glutamine expanded mutant form, interacted with copper, but not iron. N171 reduced Cu(2+in vitro in a 1:1 copper:protein stoichiometry indicating that this fragment is very redox active. Further, copper promoted and metal chelation inhibited aggregation of cell-free huntingtin. We found decreased LDH activity, but not protein, and increased lactate levels in HD transgenic mouse brain. The LDH inhibitor oxamate resulted in neurodegeneration when delivered intra-striatially to healthy mice, indicating that LDH inhibition is relevant to neurodegeneration in HD. Our findings support a role of pro-oxidant copper-protein interactions in HD progression and offer a novel target for pharmacotherapeutics.

  16. Green synthesis of copper nanoparticles for the efficient removal (degradation) of dye from aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Tanur; Ahmaruzzaman, M

    2015-12-01

    The present work reports the utilization of a common household waste material (fish scales of Labeo rohita) for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles. The method so developed was found to be green, environment-friendly, and economic. The fish scale extracts were acting as a stabilizing and reducing agents. This method avoids the use of external reducing and stabilizing agents, templates, and solvents. The compositional abundance of gelatin may be envisaged for the effective reductive as well as stabilizing potency. The mechanisms for the formation of nanoparticles have also been presented. The synthesized copper nanoparticles formed were predominantly spherical in nature with an average size of nanoparticles in the range of 25-37 nm. The copper nanoparticles showed characteristic Bragg's reflection planes of fcc which was supported by both selected area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction pattern and showed surface plasmon resonance at 580 nm. Moreover, the energy dispersive spectroscopy pattern also revealed the presence of only elemental copper in the copper nanoparticles. The prepared nanoparticles were used for the remediation of a carcinogenic and noxious textile dye, Methylene blue, from aqueous solution. Approximately, 96 % degradation of Methylene blue dye was observed within 135 min using copper nanoparticles. The probable mechanism for the degradation of the dye has been presented, and the degraded intermediates have been identified using the liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique. The high efficiency of nanoparticles as photocatalysts has opened a promising application for the removal of hazardous dye from industrial effluents contributing indirectly to environmental cleanup process.

  17. Brazing copper to dispersion-strengthened copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryding, D.G.; Allen, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source that will produce intense x-ray beams, which will allow the study of smaller samples and faster reactions and processes at a greater level of detail that has been possible to date. The beam is produced by using third-generation insertion devices in a 7 GeV electron/positron storage ring that is 1100 meters in circumference. The heat load from these intense high power devices is very high and certain components must sustain total heat loads of 3 to 15 kW and heat fluxes of 30 W/mm{sup 2}. Because the beams will cycle on and off many times, thermal shock and fatigue will be a problem. High heat flux impinging on a small area causes a large thermal gradient that results in high stress. GlidCop{reg_sign}, a dispersion strengthened copper, is the desired material because of its high thermal conductivity and superior mechanical properties as compared to copper and its alloys. GlidCop is not amenable to joining by fusion welding, and brazing requires diligence because of high diffusivity. Brazing procedures were developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  18. A novel non-blue laccase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens: secretory expression and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Xu, Wen-Qi; Pan, Xin-Ru; Lu, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Laccases are copper-containing enzymes which possess a promising potential in many industrial and environmental applications. Here we describe the cloning, extracellular expression and characterization of a novel non-blue laccase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant enzyme was secreted into the culture supernatant with high activity. It lacks the absorption band at 610 nm typical for blue laccases. However, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum proved the existence of type 1 copper center that was not detectable in the UV-visible spectrum. Metal content analysis revealed that the enzyme contains two copper ions, one iron ion and one zinc ion per protein molecular, suggesting that it is a novel non-blue laccase. The pH and temperature optima of the recombinant laccase were 6.6 and 60°C, respectively, and it was stable at pH 9.0 for 10 days. The enzyme activity was slightly activated by NaCl with concentration up to 200 mM. The purified laccase showed high efficiency in decolorizing reactive black 5 and indigo carmine, achieving more than 93% decolorization after 1h. The extreme robustness of the recombinant B. amyloliquefaciens laccase offers several advantages over most fungal laccases in various industrial applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of copper-plasma deposition on weathering properties of wood surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascón-Garrido, P.; Mainusch, N.; Militz, H.; Viöl, W.; Mai, C.

    2016-03-01

    Thin layers of copper micro-particles were deposited on the surfaces of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) micro-veneers using atmospheric pressure plasma to improve the resistance of the surfaces to weathering. Three different loadings of copper were established. Micro-veneers were exposed to artificial weathering in a QUV weathering tester for 0, 24, 48, 96 and 144 h following the standard EN 927-6 [1]. Mass losses after each exposure showed significant differences between copper coated and untreated micro-veneers. Tensile strength was assessed at zero span (z-strength) and finite span (f-strength) under dry conditions (20 °C, 65% RH). During 48 h, micro-veneers lost their z-strength progressively. In contrast, copper coating at highest loading imparts a photo-protective effect to wood micro-veneers during 144 h exhibiting z-strength retention of 95%. F-strength losses were similar in all copper treated and untreated micro-veneers up to 96 h. However, after 144 h, copper coated micro-veneers at highest loading showed significantly greater strength retention of 56%, while untreated micro-veneers exhibited only 38%. Infrared spectroscopy suggested that copper coating does not stabilize lignin. Inductively Coupled Plasma revealed that micro-veneers coated with the highest loading exhibited the lowest percentage of copper loss. Blue stain resistance of copper coated Scots pine following the guidelines of EN 152 [2] was performed. Additional test with different position of the coated surface was also assessed. Copper coating reduced fungal growth when coated surface is exposed in contact with vermiculite. Spores of Aureobasidium pullulans were not able to germinate on the copper coated surface positioned uppermost.

  20. Blue-emitting laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K.; Ishibashi, A.

    This paper reviews the recent results of blue-emitting laser diodes. These devices are based on ZnMgSSe alloy II-VI semiconductors. Recently we have achieved room temperature continuous-wave operation of ZnMgSSe blue lasers for the first time. ZnMgSSe alloys offer a wide range of band-gap energy from 2.8 to 4.5 eV, while maintaining lattice matching to GaAs substrates. These characteristics make ZnMgSSe suitable for cladding layers of blue lasers. In this article, the feasibilities of ZnMgSSe will be reviewed. The laser structures and characteristics will be also mentioned.

  1. Coping with copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ines Marques; Jacquiod, Samuel Jehan Auguste; Brejnrod, Asker Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Copper has been intensively used in industry and agriculture since mid-18(th) century and is currently accumulating in soils. We investigated the diversity of potential active bacteria by 16S rRNA gene transcript amplicon sequencing in a temperate grassland soil subjected to century-long exposure...

  2. and copper(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    characterization of several imidazolate-bridged binuclear copper(II) complexes have been reported 1–17. ... of the desired complex formed were collected, washed with ethanol and dried in vacuo at room temperature. .... 16. Sigel H (ed.) 1981 Metal ions in biological system (New York: Marcel Dekker) vol 13, p. 259. 17.

  3. Microanalysis study of archaeological mural samples containing Maya blue pigment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez del Rio, M. [ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France)]. E-mail: srio@esrf.fr; Martinetto, P. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Somogyi, A. [ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Reyes-Valerio, C. [INAH, Mexico DF (Mexico); Dooryhee, E. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Peltier, N. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP166 F-30842 Grenoble (France); Alianelli, L. [INFM-OGG c/o ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Moignard, B. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Pichon, L. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Calligaro, T. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Dran, J.-C. [C2RMF, 6 Rue des Pyramides, F-75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France)

    2004-10-08

    Elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence and particle induced X-ray emission is applied to the study of several Mesoamerican mural samples containing blue pigments. The most characteristic blue pigment is Maya blue, a very stable organo-clay complex original from Maya culture and widely used in murals, pottery and sculptures in a vast region of Mesoamerica during the pre-hispanic time (from VIII century) and during the colonization until 1580. The mural samples come from six different archaeological sites (four pre-hispanic and two from XVI century colonial convents). The correlation between the presence of some elements and the pigment colour is discussed. From the comparative study of the elemental concentration, some conclusions are drawn on the nature of the pigments and the technology used.

  4. Microanalysis study of archaeological mural samples containing Maya blue pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez del Rio, M.; Martinetto, P.; Somogyi, A.; Reyes-Valerio, C.; Dooryhee, E.; Peltier, N.; Alianelli, L.; Moignard, B.; Pichon, L.; Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.

    2004-01-01

    Elemental analysis by X-ray fluorescence and particle induced X-ray emission is applied to the study of several Mesoamerican mural samples containing blue pigments. The most characteristic blue pigment is Maya blue, a very stable organo-clay complex original from Maya culture and widely used in murals, pottery and sculptures in a vast region of Mesoamerica during the pre-hispanic time (from VIII century) and during the colonization until 1580. The mural samples come from six different archaeological sites (four pre-hispanic and two from XVI century colonial convents). The correlation between the presence of some elements and the pigment colour is discussed. From the comparative study of the elemental concentration, some conclusions are drawn on the nature of the pigments and the technology used

  5. Early pre-Hispanic use of indigo blue in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splitstoser, Jeffrey C; Dillehay, Tom D; Wouters, Jan; Claro, Ana

    2016-09-01

    Archaeological research has identified the use of cultivated cotton (Gossypium barbadense) in the ancient Andes dating back to at least 7800 years ago. Because of unusual circumstances of preservation, 6000-year-old cotton fabrics from the Preceramic site of Huaca Prieta on the north coast of Peru retained traces of a blue pigment that was analyzed and positively identified as an indigoid dye (indigotin), making it the earliest known use of indigo in the world, derived most likely from Indigofera spp. native to South America. This predates by ~1500 years the earliest reported use of indigo in the Old World, from Fifth Dynasty Egypt [ca. 4400 BP (before present)]. Indigo is one of the most valued and most globally widespread dyes of antiquity and of the present era (it being the blue of blue jeans).

  6. Determination of trace elements in tailpipe fish produced in artificial farms and from white and blue nile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Zeinb Khalil Elsaim

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an analytical protocol of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of 13 trace elements, potassium (K), antimony (Sb), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), bromine (Br), rubidium (Rb), strontium (Sr), mercury (Hg), chromium (Cu), manjense (Mn), and calcium (Ca), in tilapa fish. A total of 70 samples covering 35 fish samples collected from different states includes Eldamazine for blue nile samples and the Mawrada market for the white nile samples and 5 artificial fish farms samples were collected from Om badda in Omdurman and Bahry state for three farms Alsamraband Aldorshab and from Alshagra state in Khartoum, during may to June 2016. The trace elements detected in all samples, and the concentration in part million (ppm). The concentrations of trace elements followed the sequence of, K, Ca, Fe, Zn, Cu, Sr, Rb, Pb, but Cr, Hg and Ni were observed in one fish fram (farm A). The analysis included two tissues (flesh and gills), because most people in Sudan consume the flesh and gills, specially in the small fishes, consider as good indicators for the trace elements, and toxic compounds in general. The analysis indicated that the white nile fishes have higher l eves of most of the trace elements compared to the blue nile, e.g. Fe (560±186) in the white nile, whereas in the blue nile, (188±63). On the other hand , the artificial tilapia farms showed significant variations in the trace elements concentrations. The analysis revealed that a higher concentrations of most of the trace elements in gill tissues than flesh, e.g. Fe (1673±1453) in the flesh, and (9768±1175) in the gills. These results indicated that the gill accumulated higher levels of heavy metals than other organs, because they acted as a depot tissue. In addition, the post hoc test was performed following (Dunnett tests), using the blue nile group as a control group, since it has the lowest trace elements concentrations, among the river nile fishes in

  7. Blue light emitting thiogallate phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Robert C.; Smith, David C.; King, Christopher N.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    A crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor of the formula RGa.sub.2 S.sub.4 :Ce.sub.x where R is selected from the group consisting of calcium, strontium, barium and zinc, and x is from about 1 to 10 atomic percent, the phosphor characterized as having a crystalline microstructure on the size order of from about 100 .ANG. to about 10,000 .ANG. is provided together with a process of preparing a crystalline blue emitting thiogallate phosphor by depositing on a substrate by CVD and resultant thin film electroluminescent devices including a layer of such deposited phosphor on an ordinary glass substrate.

  8. Presenilin promotes dietary copper uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Southon

    Full Text Available Dietary copper is essential for multicellular organisms. Copper is redox active and required as a cofactor for enzymes such as the antioxidant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1. Copper dyshomeostasis has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the presenilin genes encoding PS1 and PS2 are major causes of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. PS1 and PS2 are required for efficient copper uptake in mammalian systems. Here we demonstrate a conserved role for presenilin in dietary copper uptake in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. Ubiquitous RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the single Drosophila presenilin (PSN gene is lethal. However, PSN knockdown in the midgut produces viable flies. These flies have reduced copper levels and are more tolerant to excess dietary copper. Expression of a copper-responsive EYFP construct was also lower in the midgut of these larvae, indicative of reduced dietary copper uptake. SOD activity was reduced by midgut PSN knockdown, and these flies were sensitive to the superoxide-inducing chemical paraquat. These data support presenilin being needed for dietary copper uptake in the gut and so impacting on SOD activity and tolerance to oxidative stress. These results are consistent with previous studies of mammalian presenilins, supporting a conserved role for these proteins in mediating copper uptake.

  9. Quenching characteristics of bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt in aqueous solution and copper sulfate plating solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Toshiaki; Hirakawa, Chieko; Takeshita, Michinori; Terasaki, Nao

    2018-04-01

    Bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt (BCS) is generally used to detect Cu(I) through a color reaction. We newly found BCS fluorescence in the visible blue region in an aqueous solution. However, the fluorescence mechanism of BCS is not well known, so we should investigate its fundamental information. We confirmed that the characteristics of fluorescence are highly dependent on the molecular concentration and solvent properties. In particular, owing to the presence of the copper compound, the fluorescence intensity extremely decreases. By fluorescence quenching, we observed that a copper compound concentration of 10-6 mol/L or less could easily be measured in an aqueous solution. We also observed BCS fluorescence in copper sulfate plating solution and the possibility of detecting monovalent copper by fluorescence reabsorption.

  10. Cooperative binding of copper(I) to the metal binding domains in Menkes disease protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P Y; Bonander, N; Møller, L B

    1999-01-01

    spectroscopy, and their copper(I) binding properties have been determined. Structure prediction derived from far-UV CD indicates that the secondary structure is similar in the three proteins and dominated by beta-sheet. The tryptophan fluorescence maximum is blue-shifted in the constructs containing two...... and six MBDs relative to the monomer, suggesting more structurally buried tryptophan(s), compared to the single MBD construct. Copper(I) binding has been studied by equilibrium dialysis under anaerobic conditions. We show that the copper(I) binding to constructs containing two and six domains...... is cooperative, with Hill coefficients of 1.5 and 4, respectively. The apparent affinities are described by K(0.5), determined to be 65 microM and 19 microM for constructs containing two and six domains, respectively. Our data reveal a unique regulation of Menkes protein upon a change in copper(I) concentration...

  11. Copper uptake across rainbow trout gills: mechanisms of apical entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosell, Martin Hautopp; Wood, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Copper, Homeostasis, sodium uptake, copper/sodium interactions, gill, rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss......Copper, Homeostasis, sodium uptake, copper/sodium interactions, gill, rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss...

  12. Synthesis and crystal structure of copper (II) uracil ternary polymeric complex with 1,10-phenanthroline along with the Hirshfeld surface analysis of the metal binding sites for the uracil ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Yogesh Prakash; Nethaji, Munirathinam

    2015-02-01

    The study of models for "metal-enzyme-substrate" interaction has been a proactive area of research owing to its biological and pharmacological importance. In this regard the ternary copper uracil complex with 1,10-phenanthroline represents metal-enzyme-substrate system for DNA binding enzymes. The synthesis of the complex, followed by slow evaporation of the reaction mixture forms two concomitant solvatomorph crystals viz., {[Cu(phen)(μ-ura)(H2O)]n·H2O (1a)} and {[Cu(phen)(μ-ura)(H2O)]n·CH3OH (1b)}. Both complexes are structurally characterized, while elemental analysis, IR and EPR spectra were recorded for 1b (major product). In both complexes, uracil coordinates uniquely via N1 and N3 nitrogen atom acting as a bidentate bridging ligand forming a 1-D polymer. The two solvatomorphs were quantitatively analyzed for the differences with the aid of Hirshfeld surface analysis.

  13. Substantial Research Secures the Blue Future for our Blue Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Abdel Maksoud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Earth, the blue planet, is our home, and seas and oceans cover more than 70% of its surface. As the earth’s population rapidly increases and available resources decrease, seas and oceans can play a key role in assuring the long-term survival of humankind. Renewable maritime energy has huge potential to provide a considerable part of the earth’s population with decarbonised electricity generation systems. Renewable maritime energy is very flexible and can be harvested above the water’s free surface by using offshore wind turbines, on the water’s surface by using wave energy converters or below the water’s surface by using current or tidal turbines. The supposed conflict between environmental protection measures and economic interests is neither viable nor reasonable. Renewable maritime energy can be the motor for considerable substantial economic growth for many maritime regions and therefore for society at large. The fastest growing sector of renewable maritime energy is offshore wind. The annual report of the European Wind Energy Association from the year 2015 confirms the growing relevance of the offshore wind industry. In 2015, the total installed and grid-connected capacity of wind power was 12,800 MW in the EU and 6,013.4 MW in Germany. 38% of the 2015 annual installation in Germany was offshore, accounting for a capacity of 2,282.4 MW. However, there are a limited number of available installation sites in shallow water, meaning that there is an urgent need to develop new offshore structures for water depths greater than 50m. The persistent trend towards deeper waters has encouraged the offshore wind industry to look for floating wind turbine structures and larger turbines. Floating wind turbine technologies are at an early stage of development and many technical and economic challenges will still need to be faced. Nonetheless, intensive research activities and the employment of advanced technologies are the key factors in

  14. The Blue Revolution in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponte, Stefano; Kelling, Ingrid; Jespersen, Karen Sau

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine the upgrading trajectories of selected aquaculture value chains in four Asian countries and the links between upgrading and three factors of value chain governance: coordination mechanisms; types of drivers; and domestic regulation. We find instances of improving produ...... of upgrading the "blue revolution" in Asia...

  15. Blue Ocean vs. Five Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Burke (Andrew); A.J. van Stel (André); A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe article reports on the authors' research in the Netherlands which focused on a profit model in Dutch retail stores and a so-called blue-ocean approach which requires a new market that attracts consumers and increases profits. Topics include the competitive strategy approach to

  16. Mobilizing investors for blue growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van den Sander W.K.; Stuiver, Marian; Bolman, Bas C.; Wijnen, Roland; Selnes, Trond; Dalton, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    The European Union's Blue Growth Strategy is a long term strategy to support sustainable growth in the marine and maritime sectors, aiming to contribute to innovation and economic growth (European Commission, 2012). The EU sees the financial sector as a key partner to bring about transition to

  17. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations. (paper)

  18. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  19. Effect of lipiodol and methylene blue on the thoracoscopic preoperative positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan-Yu; Yu, Hua-Long; Liu, Shi-He; Jiang, Gang; Wang, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the site-specific accuracy of mixture of lipiodol and methylene blue (MLM) (0.6 ml, 1:5) and pure methylene blue (0.5 ml) on the rabbit lungs. In this study, CT-guided percutaneous injection of MLM and methylene blue. Compare the staining degree by biopsy of lung tissue. Use 4 points system to evaluate the site-specific accuracy at 6h and 24 h after injection. For MLM, evaluate its radiopacity by radiation. When evaluate the positioning, 2 points mean acceptable, 3 points mean excellent. The results indicated that the staining range of MLM is obvious less than that of methylene blue (0.6 vs. 1.0 cm, Pmethylene blue (2.8 vs. 2.2, P = 0.01). About the staining abilities which are evaluated as excellent, MLM group accounts for 81%, methylene blue group accounts for 38% (P = 0.011). About the radiopacity which are evaluated as acceptable or excellent, MLM group accounts for 62%. With good direct vision, the suitable positioning rate of MLM can be 100%, which is better than that of methylene blue. In conclusion, percutaneous injection of MLM can be used to lung positioning. The result shows that use MLM is better than only using methylene blue. But it is necessary to do the investigation in human beings in order to confirm the feasibility of its clinical application.

  20. Seasonal and geographic variation of southern blue whale subspecies in the Indian Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Samaran

    Full Text Available Understanding the seasonal movements and distribution patterns of migratory species over ocean basin scales is vital for appropriate conservation and management measures. However, assessing populations over remote regions is challenging, particularly if they are rare. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus spp are an endangered species found in the Southern and Indian Oceans. Here two recognized subspecies of blue whales and, based on passive acoustic monitoring, four "acoustic populations" occur. Three of these are pygmy blue whale (B.m. brevicauda populations while the fourth is the Antarctic blue whale (B.m. intermedia. Past whaling catches have dramatically reduced their numbers but recent acoustic recordings show that these oceans are still important habitat for blue whales. Presently little is known about the seasonal movements and degree of overlap of these four populations, particularly in the central Indian Ocean. We examined the geographic and seasonal occurrence of different blue whale acoustic populations using one year of passive acoustic recording from three sites located at different latitudes in the Indian Ocean. The vocalizations of the different blue whale subspecies and acoustic populations were recorded seasonally in different regions. For some call types and locations, there was spatial and temporal overlap, particularly between Antarctic and different pygmy blue whale acoustic populations. Except on the southernmost hydrophone, all three pygmy blue whale acoustic populations were found at different sites or during different seasons, which further suggests that these populations are generally geographically distinct. This unusual blue whale diversity in sub-Antarctic and sub-tropical waters indicates the importance of the area for blue whales in these former whaling grounds.

  1. Seasonal and Geographic Variation of Southern Blue Whale Subspecies in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaran, Flore; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Branch, Trevor A.; Gedamke, Jason; Royer, Jean-Yves; Dziak, Robert P.; Guinet, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the seasonal movements and distribution patterns of migratory species over ocean basin scales is vital for appropriate conservation and management measures. However, assessing populations over remote regions is challenging, particularly if they are rare. Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus spp) are an endangered species found in the Southern and Indian Oceans. Here two recognized subspecies of blue whales and, based on passive acoustic monitoring, four “acoustic populations” occur. Three of these are pygmy blue whale (B.m. brevicauda) populations while the fourth is the Antarctic blue whale (B.m. intermedia). Past whaling catches have dramatically reduced their numbers but recent acoustic recordings show that these oceans are still important habitat for blue whales. Presently little is known about the seasonal movements and degree of overlap of these four populations, particularly in the central Indian Ocean. We examined the geographic and seasonal occurrence of different blue whale acoustic populations using one year of passive acoustic recording from three sites located at different latitudes in the Indian Ocean. The vocalizations of the different blue whale subspecies and acoustic populations were recorded seasonally in different regions. For some call types and locations, there was spatial and temporal overlap, particularly between Antarctic and different pygmy blue whale acoustic populations. Except on the southernmost hydrophone, all three pygmy blue whale acoustic populations were found at different sites or during different seasons, which further suggests that these populations are generally geographically distinct. This unusual blue whale diversity in sub-Antarctic and sub-tropical waters indicates the importance of the area for blue whales in these former whaling grounds. PMID:23967221

  2. Synergy and Diffusion with a Borax-Copper Hydroxide Groundline Preservative: 20 Year Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Bill Abbott; Mike West

    2014-01-01

    A groundline remedial treatment containing 3.1% copper hydroxide (2% elemental copper) and 40% sodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax) was applied to unseasoned pine posts prior to placement in a test site in southern Mississippi. The soundness of the posts was periodically evaluated using a push test. After 3.5, 6.5, 10, 15 and 20 years, sections were taken from two...

  3. Multilevel cycle of anthropogenic copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T E; van Beers, D; Bertram, M; Fuse, K; Gordon, R B; Gritsinin, A; Kapur, A; Klee, R J; Lifset, R J; Memon, L; Rechberger, H; Spatari, S; Vexler, D

    2004-02-15

    A comprehensive contemporary cycle for stocks and flows of copper is characterized and presented, incorporating information on extraction, processing, fabrication and manufacturing, use, discard, recycling, final disposal, and dissipation. The analysis is performed on an annual basis, ca. 1994, at three discrete governmental unit levels--56 countries or country groups that together comprise essentially all global anthropogenic copper stocks and flows, nine world regions, and the planet as a whole. Cycles for all of these are presented and discussed, and a "best estimate" global copper cycle is constructed to resolve aggregation discrepancies. Among the most interesting results are (1) transformation rates and recycling rates in apparently similar national economies differ by factors of two or more (country level); (2) the discard flows that have the greatest potential for copper recycling are those with low magnitude flows but high copper concentrations--electronics, electrical equipment, and vehicles (regional level); (3) worldwide, about 53% of the copper that was discarded in various forms was recovered and reused or recycled (global level); (4) the highest rate of transfer of discarded copper to repositories is into landfills, but the annual amount of copper deposited in mine tailings is nearly as high (global level); and (5) nearly 30% of copper mining occurred merely to replace copper that was discarded. The results provide a framework for similar studies of other anthropogenic resource cycles as well as a basis for supplementary studies in resource stocks, industrial resource utilization, waste management, industrial economics, and environmental impacts.

  4. and copper(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    that the imidazolate-bridged complex is stable over the pH-range 7⋅15–10⋅0. .... copper(II) complex. The observed room temperature magnetic moments are around. 1⋅79 BM, in agreement with a one-spin (S = 1/2) system. 3.2 EPR studies .... (SK) thanks the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research, New Delhi for an.

  5. Copper Pyrimidine based MOFs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cl..Cu.. interactions but restricted ..Cu..N N..Cu interacations. Supramolecular isomers of Br and I are reported for the first time in this paper. [Cu2I(pdz)X2]. Figure S18. Self assembly of the simultaneous presence of tecton {Cu(sol)3X} and {Cu(pdz)(sol)2X} result in [Cu2I(pdz)X2]. 1. Table S3. Copper Pyrimidine based MOFs ...

  6. Fluorescence-based determination of the copper concentration in drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hötzer, Benjamin; Scheu, Timo; Jung, Gregor; Castritius, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    Copper is a heavy metal, which is used in heat and electrical conductors and in a multitude of alloys in the technical context. Moreover, it is a trace element that is essential for the life of organisms but can cause toxic effects in elevated concentrations. Maximum limits in water and beverages exist. Here, the decrease of the fluorescence lifetime of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by Förster resonance energy transfer is used to measure the copper ion concentration in drinking water. Therefore, a system is developed that is based on a GFP sample in a predefined concentration. The GFP mutant can be excited with blue light. For binding of copper ions, a His-tag is included in the GFP. After measuring the fluorescence lifetime of pure GFP, the copper determination of the sample is performed by lifetime measurement. Therefore, the lifetime can be assigned to the copper concentration of the GFP-doped drinking water sample. In summary, a method for the quantification of copper ions based on changes of the fluorescence lifetime of GFP is developed, and the measurement of the copper concentration in water samples is performed.

  7. Bioaccumulation of metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in suspended cultures of blue mussels exposed to different environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maar, Marie; Larsen, Martin Mørk; Tørring, Ditte; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf

    2018-02-01

    Farming of suspended mussels is important for generating high protein food and animal feed or for removing nutrients in eutrophic systems. However, the harvested mussels must not be severely contaminated by pollutants posing a potential health risk for the consumers. The present study estimated the bioaccumulation of cadmium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc in suspended blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in the Limfjorden, Denmark, based on observations and modelling. Modelling was used to assess the suitability of suspended blue mussels as animal feed and food products at sea water metal concentrations corresponding to Good Ecological Status (GES) in the European Union Water Framework Directive (WFD) and in future climate change scenarios (higher metal concentrations and higher temperatures). For this purpose, GES is interpreted as good chemical status for the metals using the Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) defined in the WFD priority substance daughter directives. Observations showed that suspended mussels were healthy with respect to metal pollution and generally less polluted than benthic mussels due to the smaller contact with the contaminated sediment. The model results showed that the WFD targets for Cd, Ni and Pb are not protective with respect to marine mussel production and probably should be reduced for marine waters. Climate changes may increase the metal contamination of mussels, but not to any critical level at the relatively unpolluted study sites. In conclusion, WFD targets should be revised to assure that the corresponding body burdens of metals in mussels are below the safety limits according to the EU Directives and the Norwegian classification for animal feed and food production.

  8. Native copper as a natural analogue for copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, N.

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the occurrence of native copper as found in geological formations as a stability analogue of copper canisters that are planned to be used for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in the Finnish bedrock. A summary of several publications on native copper occurrences is presented. The present geochemical and geohydrological conditions in which copper is met with in its metallic state show that metallic copper is stable in a wide range of temperatures. At low temperatures native copper is found to be stable where groundwater has moderate pH (about 7), low Eh (< +100 mV), and low total dissolved solids, especially chloride. Microscopical and microanalytical studies were carried out on a dozen of rock samples containing native copper. The results reveal that the metal shows no significant alteration. Only the surface of copper grains is locally coated. In the oldest samples there exist small corrosion cracks; the age of the oldest samples is over 1,000 million years. A review of several Finnish groundwater studies suggests that there are places in Finland where the geohydrological conditions are favourable for native copper stability. (orig.)

  9. Application of INEPT 109Ag and 15N NMR spectroscopy for the study of metal-ligand interaction of silver analogues of Copper(I) model compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Stein, G.C. van; Brevard, C.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the presence of copper (in its reduced state) at active sites in protein it has become very important to study copper(I) model complexes by spectroscopic techniques.We now report that if copper(I) in model complexes can be substituted by silver(I) with retention of the structural features

  10. Uso do Blue Rayon para extração/concentração de compostos policíclicos em amostras ambientais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummrow Fábio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a review about the use of Blue rayon in the extraction and concentration of environmental contaminants in the aquatic environment. Blue rayon is an adsorbent composed of fibers covalently linked with copper phthalocyanine trisulphonate that has the ability to selectively adsorb polycyclic compounds. Blue rayon can be used in situ, in columns or in flasks. This method showed to be efficient in the extraction of important classes of environmental contaminants like the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, aromatic amines and phenylbenzotriazoles (PBTAs and can be an important tool in monitoring studies for the evaluation of water quality.

  11. 21 CFR 133.106 - Blue cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blue cheese. 133.106 Section 133.106 Food and... CONSUMPTION CHEESES AND RELATED CHEESE PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.106 Blue cheese. (a) Description. (1) Blue cheese is the food prepared by the procedure set...

  12. Catalytic monolayer voltammetry and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy of copper nitrite reductase on cysteamine-modified Au(111) electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Welinder, A.C.; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electrocatalysis of the redox metalloenzyme blue copper nitrite reductase from Achromobacter xylosoxidans (AxCuNiR) on single-crystal Au(111)-electrode surfaces modified by a self-assembled monolayer of cysteamine. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and in situ...

  13. Accumulation of cadmium and copper by the terrestrial snail Arianta arbustorum L. : Kinetics and budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, B.; Dallinger, R. (Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Abt. Zoophysiologie)

    1989-01-01

    Specimens of the terrestrial gastropod Arianta arbustorum were fed on cadmium- or copper-enriched agar plates with the aim of performing an input/output analysis and of studying the distribution of these metals in several organs of the snails. After a feeding period of 20 days about 45% of cadmium were lost. 36% accumulated in the hepatopancreas, where a cadmium concentration of more than 500 {mu}g/g was measured. The efficiency of cadmium assimilation decreased from about 90% at the beginning to about 55% after 20 days. Copper was distributed more evenly than cadmium, but the main site of copper storage seemed to be the foot/mantle tissues, where 49% of the ingested copper were found. The efficiency of copper assimilation always exceeded 95%. The patterns of distribution and assimilation of copper and cadmium are discussed in relation to differences in the cytological and biochemical detoxification mechanisms which exist for these metals in molluscs. (orig.).

  14. 75 FR 65525 - Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,327] Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of Wellpoint, Inc., Green Bay, WI; Notice... former workers of Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division...

  15. Copper substrate as a catalyst for the oxidation of chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhiting; Zhou, Feng; Parobek, David; Shenoy, Ganesh J.; Muldoon, Patrick; Liu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    We report the catalytic effect of copper substrate on graphene–oxygen reaction at high temperature. Previous studies showed that graphene grown on copper are mostly defect-free with strong oxidation resistance. We found that a freshly prepared copper-supported graphene sample can be completely oxidized in trace amount of oxygen (<3 ppm) at 600 °C within 2 h. Both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) suggest that upon ambient air exposure, oxygen molecules diffuse into the space between graphene and copper, resulting in the formation of copper oxide which acts as catalytic sites for the graphene-oxygen reaction. This result has important implications for the characterization, processing, and storage of copper-supported graphene samples. - Graphical abstract: The copper substrate enhances the thermel oxidation of single-layer graphene. - Highlights: • A copper-supported graphene can be oxidized in Ar (O 2 <3 ppm, 600 °C, 2 h). • O 2 intercalates between graphene and copper upon exposure to air. • The copper foil should not be considered as an inert substrate

  16. Jet-printed copper metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cheong Min

    Macroelectronics is a technology for making electronic circuits over very large areas at low cost. Flat panel displays, sensor arrays, and thin film solar cells are examples of macroelectronics. Crucial to the success of this new technology is the development of inexpensive electronic processes, materials, and devices. Direct printing techniques, which eliminate processing steps and save device and process materials, are the key to high volume and high throughput manufacturing. Copper metallization has been receiving increasing attention in both microelectronics and macroelectronics. Copper has high conductivity, density, melting point, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity. However, copper is also hard to dry etch. For these reasons we have developed and demonstrated a directly printed copper source/drain metallization technique and applied it to the fabrication of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors (TFTs). The maximum process temperature of 200°C is compatible with conventional active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) technology. In this dissertation, we show the process of depositing copper films by jet printing. We discuss the preparation and the properties of the copper precursor material used in the jet printing. We survey the conversion process from copper precursor to copper under varying processing conditions. The resulting copper film is probed for its physical, electrical, and mechanical properties. To demonstrate the feasibility of the jet printing technique, we print copper source/drain contacts for a-Si:H TFTs. The photolithography-free TFT fabrication process uses the printed xerographic toner technique developed earlier in this laboratory. We show that functional TFTs can be made with printed copper source and drain contacts. The jet printing of copper contacts represents a further step toward an all-printed thin film transistor technology.

  17. The Physics of the Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2009-03-01

    In looking at the commonalities between music and science, one sees that the musician's palette is based on the principles of physics. The pitch of a musical note is determined by the frequency of the sound wave. The scales that musicians use to create and play music can be viewed as a set of rules. What makes music interesting is how musicians develop those rules and create ambiguity with them. I will discuss the evolution of western musical scales in this context. As a particular example, ``Blue'' notes are very harmonic notes that are missing from the equal temperament scale. The techniques of piano blues and jazz represent the melding of African and Western music into something totally new and exciting. Live keyboard demonstrations will be used. Beyond any redeeming entertainment value the talk will emphasize the serious connections between science and art in music. Nevertheless tips will be accepted.

  18. Thermoluminescence (TL) of Egyptian Blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schvoerer, M.; Delavergne, M.-C.; Chapoulie, R.

    1988-01-01

    Egyptian Blue is a synthesized crystalline pictorial pigment with formula CaCuSi/sub 4/O/sub 10/. It has been used in Egypt and Mesopotamia from the 3rd millenium B.C. A preliminary experiment on a recently synthesized sample showed that this pigment is thermoluminescent after ..beta.. irradiation (/sup 90/Sr). As the signal intensity grows linearly with the administered dose within the temperature range commonly used in TL dating, we have been looking for this phenomenon from archaeological pigments. It was encountered with two samples found in excavation. From its intensity and stability we concluded that Egyptian Blue can be dated using TL. This first and positive result encouraged us to extend the method to other types of mineral pigments synthesized by early man, and to suggest that it may be used for direct dating of ancient murals.

  19. Blue breath holding is benign.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life t...

  20. Galaxies on the Blue Edge

    OpenAIRE

    Cabanela, J. E.; Dickey, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    We have successfully constructed a catalog of HI-rich galaxies selected from the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner Catalog of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS I) based solely on optical criteria. We identify HI-rich candidates by selecting the bluest galaxies at a given apparent magnitude, those galaxies on the "blue edge" of POSS I color-magnitude parameter space. Subsequent 21-cm observations on the upgraded Arecibo 305m dish detected over 50% of the observed candidates. The detecte...

  1. Blue light regulated shade avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuskamp, Diederik H; Keller, Mercedes M; Ballaré, Carlos L; Pierik, Ronald

    2012-04-01

    Most plants grow in dense vegetation with the risk of being out-competed by neighboring plants. These neighbors can be detected not only through the depletion in light quantity that they cause, but also through the change in light quality, which plants perceive using specific photoreceptors. Both the reduction of the red:far-red ratio and the depletion of blue light are signals that induce a set of phenotypic traits, such as shoot elongation and leaf hyponasty, which increase the likelihood of light capture in dense plant stands. This set of phenotypic responses are part of the so called shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). This addendum discusses recent findings on the regulation of the SAS of Arabidopsis thaliana upon blue light depletion. Keller et al. and Keuskamp et al. show that the low blue light attenuation induced shade avoidance response of seedling and rosette-stage A. thaliana plants differ in their hormonal regulation. These studies also show there is a regulatory overlap with the R:FR-regulated SAS.

  2. 76 FR 53898 - Proposed Administrative Settlement Agreement and Order on Consent; In Re: Ely Copper Mine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed Administrative Settlement Agreement and Order on Consent; In Re: Ely Copper Mine Superfund Site, Located in Vershire, VT AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of New Trinuclear Copper Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiladi, Reza A.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Siegler, Maxime A.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes our approach towards modelling the copper cluster active sites of nitrous oxide reductase and the multicopper oxidases/oxygenases. We have synthesized two mesitylene-based trinucleating ligands, MesPY1 and MesPY2, which employ bis(2-picolyl)amine (PY1) and bis(2-pyridylethyl)amine (PY2) tridentate copper chelates, respectively. Addition of cuprous salts to these ligands leads to the isolation of tricopper(I) complexes [(Mes-PY1)CuI3(CH3CN)3](ClO4)3·0.25Et2O (1) and [(Mes-PY2)CuI3](PF6)3 (3) Each of the three copper centers in 1 is most likely four-coordinate, with ligated acetonitrile as the fourth ligand; by contrast, the copper centers in 3 are three-coordinate, as determined by X-ray crystallography The synthesis of [(Mes-PY1)CuII3(CH3CN)2(CH3OH)2](ClO4)6·(CH3OH) (2) was accomplished by addition of three equivalents of the copper(II) salt, Cu(ClO4)2·6H2O, to the ligand. The structure of 2 shows that two of the copper centers are tetracoordinate (with MeCN solvent ligation), but have additional weak axial (fifth ligand) interactions with the perchlorate anions; the third copper is unique in that it is coordinated by two MeOH solvent molecules, making it overall five-coordinate. For complexes 2 and 3, one copper ion center is located on the opposite side of the mesitylene plane as the other two. These observations, although in the solid state, must be taken into account for future studies where intramolecular tricopper(I)/O2 (or other small molecules of interest) interactions in solution are desirable. PMID:22773847

  4. Nickel, copper and cobalt coalescence in copper cliff converter slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of various additives on coalescence of nickel, copper and cobalt from slags generated during nickel extraction. The analyzed fluxes were silica and lime while examined reductants were pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon compound. Slag was settled at the different holding temperatures for various times in conditions that simulated the industrial environment. The newly formed matte and slag were characterized by their chemical composition and morphology. Silica flux generated higher partition coefficients for nickel and copper than the addition of lime. Additives used as reducing agents had higher valuable metal recovery rates and corresponding partition coefficients than fluxes. Microstructural studies showed that slag formed after adding reductants consisted of primarily fayalite, with some minute traces of magnetite as the secondary phase. Addition of 5 wt% of pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon alloys favored the formation of a metallized matte which increased Cu, Ni and Co recoveries. Addition of copper-silicon alloys with low silicon content was efficient in copper recovery but coalescence of the other metals was low. Slag treated with the ferrosilicon facilitated the highest cobalt recovery while copper-silicon alloys with silicon content above 10 wt% resulted in high coalescence of nickel and copper, 87 % and 72 % respectively.

  5. Spectrographic determination of impurities in copper and copper oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Lordello, A.R.

    1990-11-01

    An emission spectrographic method for the determination of Al, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ge, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Si, Sn and Zn in copper and copper oxide is described. Two mixtures (Graphite and ZnO: graphite and GeO sub(2)) were used as buffers. The standard deviation lies around 10%. (author)

  6. A study, using copper-64, of various aspects of the retention of copper supplied via the plant leaf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdan, J.; Bougie, B.; Chamel, A.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38

    1976-01-01

    Copper deposited in solution or in suspension on the surface of leaves is rapidly taken up by the plant; however, this uptake process ceases almost completely a few hours after application if the aqueous phase disappears. The amount of copper taken up by the plant increases with the copper concentration of the liquid applied. The uptake does not vary significantly as between nitrate and acetate, but is distinctly less with sulphate. It is only slightly affected by the choice of surfactant, although tween 80 has proved least efficient. The most satisfactory concentrations are 0.5 vol.% for vatsol and 0.1 vol.% for tween 20. The method of application of a given volume of liquid, in the form of one or several droplets, significantly affected the uptake in one experiment out of three. The greater part of the copper taken up by the plant (generally 85 to over 99%) is located in the part treated. By examining the deposition site with a scanning electron microscope, extracting the epicuticular wax, and studying the localization of the copper by secondary ion emission in the lamina treated, it was possible to show (with the help of acetate and oxide) that a large fraction of the copper fixed by the plant remains localized on the surface at least during the first 24 hours after deposition. (author)

  7. Gold, nickel and copper mining and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Nancy E; Pacey, Michael A; Darling, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    Ore mining occurs in all Canadian provinces and territories except Prince Edward Island. Ores include bauxite, copper, gold, iron, lead and zinc. Workers in metal mining and processing are exposed, not only to the metal of interest, but also to various other substances prevalent in the industry, such as diesel emissions, oil mists, blasting agents, silica, radon, and arsenic. This chapter examines cancer risk related to the mining of gold, nickel and copper. The human carcinogenicity of nickel depends upon the species of nickel, its concentration and the route of exposure. Exposure to nickel or nickel compounds via routes other than inhalation has not been shown to increase cancer risk in humans. As such, cancer sites of concern include the lung, and the nasal sinus. Evidence comes from studies of nickel refinery and leaching, calcining, and sintering workers in the early half of the 20th century. There appears to be little or no detectable risk in most sectors of the nickel industry at current exposure levels. The general population risk from the extremely small concentrations detectable in ambient air are negligible. Nevertheless, animal carcinogenesis studies, studies of nickel carcinogenesis mechanisms, and epidemiological studies with quantitative exposure assessment of various nickel species would enhance our understanding of human health risks associated with nickel. Definitive conclusions linking cancer to exposures in gold and copper mining and processing are not possible at this time. The available results appear to demand additional study of a variety of potential occupational and non-occupational risk factors.

  8. FTIR Spectroscopy Applied in Remazol Blue Dye Oxidation by Laccases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Hernández, J.; Zavala-Soto, M. E.; Bibbins-Martínez, M.; Delgado-Macuil, R.; Díaz-Godinez, G.; Rojas-López, M.

    2008-04-01

    We have used FTIR with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) technique to analyze the decolourization process of Remazol Blue dye (RB19) caused by the oxidative activity of laccase enzyme. It is known that laccases catalyze the oxidation of a large range of phenolic compounds and aromatic amines carrying out one-electron oxidations, although also radicals could be formed which undergo subsequent nonenzymatic reactions. The enzyme laccase is a copper-containing polyphenol oxidase (EC 1.10.3.2) which has been tested as a potential alternative in detoxification of environmental pollutants such as dyes present in wastewaters generated for the textile industry. In order to ensure degradation or avoid formation of toxic compounds it is important to establish the mechanism by which laccase oxidizes dyes. In this research individual ATR-FTIR spectra have been recorded for several reaction times between 0 to 236 hours, and the temporal dependence of the reaction was analyzed through the relative diminution of the intensity of the infrared band at 1127 cm-1 (associated to C-N vibration), with respect to the intensity of the band at 1104 cm-1 (associated to S = O) from sulphoxide group. Decolourization process of this dye by laccase could be attributed to its accessibility on the secondary amino group, which is a potential point of attack of laccases, abstracting the hydrogen atom. This decolourization process of remazol blue dye by laccase enzyme might in a future replace the traditionally high chemical, energy and water consuming textile operations.

  9. Evaluation of copper, aluminum bronze, and copper-nickel container material for the Yucca mountain project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kass, J.

    1990-01-01

    Copper, 70 percent aluminum bronze, and 70/30 copper-nickel were evaluated as potential waste-packaging materials as part of the Yucca Mountain Project. The proposed waste repository site is under a desert mountain in southern Nevada. The expected temperatures at the container surface are higher than at other sites, about 250C at the beginning of the containment period; they could fall below the boiling point of water during this period, but will be exposed to very little water, probably less than 5 l/a. Initial gamma flux will be 10 4 rad/h, and no significant hydrostatic or lithostatic pressure is expected. Packages will contain PWR or BWR fuel, or processed-glass waste. Three copper alloys are being considered for containers: oxygen-free copper (CDA 102); 7 percent aluminum bronze (CDA 613); and 70/30 copper-nickel (CDA 715). Phase separation due to prolonged thermal exposure could be a problem for the two alloys, causing embrittlement. The reduction of internal oxides present in pure copper by hydrogen could cause mechanical degradation. Corrosion and oxidation rates measured for the three materials in well water with and without gamma irradiation at flux rates about ten times higher than those expected were all quite small. The corrosion/oxidation rates for CDA715 show a marked increase under irradiation, but are still acceptable. In the presence of ammonia and other nitrogen-bearing species stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a concern. Welded U-bend specimens of all three materials have been tested for up to 10000 h in highly irradiated environments, showing no SCC. There was some alloy segregation in the Al bronze specimens. The investigators believe that corrosion and mechanical properties will not present problems for these materials at this site. Further work is needed in the areas of weld inspection, welding techniques, embrittlement of weld metal, the effects of dropping the containers during emplacement, and stress corrosion cracking. Other materials

  10. Copper and lead levels in two popular leafy vegetables grown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to determine the levels of two heavy metals, Lead (Pb) and Copper (Cu), in two popular leafy vegetables grown around Morogoro Municipality in Tanzania. Vegetable samples of Pumpkin leaves ( Cucurbita moschata) and Chinese cabbage ( Brassica chinensis) were collected from three sites and ...

  11. Studies of copper transport in mammalian cells using copper radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camakaris, J.; Voskoboinik, I.; Brooks, H.; Greenough, M. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Department of Genetics; Smith, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division; Mercer, J. [Deakin University, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Centre of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1998-12-31

    The trace element copper poses a major problem for all organisms. It is essential as a number of vital enzymes require it. Copper deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, osteoporosis and weakening of arteries. However Cu is also highly toxic and homeostatic mechanisms have evolved to maintain Cu at levels which satisfy requirements but do not cause toxicity. Toxicity is mediated by the oxidative capacity of Cu and its ability to generate toxic free radicals. There are several acquired and inherited diseases due to either Cu toxicity or Cu deficiency. The study of these diseases facilitates identification of genes and proteins involved in copper homeostasis, and this in turn will provide rational therapeutic approaches. Using the copper radioisotopes {sup 64}Cu (t1/2 = 12.8 hr) and {sup 67}Cu (t1/2 = 61 hr) we have developed a number of systems for studying copper transport in mammalian cells. These include investigation of copper uptake, copper efflux and ligand blot assays for Cu-binding proteins. Our studies have focused on Menkes disease which is an inherited and usually lethal copper deficiency disorder in humans. We have demonstrated that the Menkes protein is directly involved as a copper efflux pump in mammalian cells. Using cells overexpressing the Menkes protein we have provided the first biochemical evidence that this functions as a Cu translocating (across the membrane) P-type ATPase (Voskoboinik et al., FEBS Letters, in press). These studies were carried out using purified plasma membrane vesicles. We are now carrying out structure- function studies on this protein using targeted mutations and assaying using the radiocopper vesicle assay. Recently we have commenced studies on the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in copper transport and relationship of this to Alzheimers disease

  12. Physical state of implanted W in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borders, J.A.; Cullis, A.G.; Poate, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and 4 He ion channeling measurements were combined to investigate the physical state of implanted W in copper. For 60 0 K implantations of 2 x 10 15 W cm -2 , W is found to be 100 percent substitutional and is still 90 percent substitutional for a dose of 10 16 W cm -2 . Implantation of 10 17 W cm -2 produces a thin disordered surface layer of W and Cu with the W occupying no regular lattice site. On annealing to 600 0 C, W precipitates are formed with dimensions of a few hundred A and certain preferred orientations in the Cu lattice. (auth)

  13. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solairaj Dhananasekaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB, Bromophenol Blue (BPB and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798 shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R2 values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes and pseudo second order kinetics (R2 values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents.

  14. The structural analysis of the pro-oxidant copper-binding site of denatured apo-H43R SOD1 and the elucidation of the origin of the acquisition of the pro-oxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Nobuhiro; Miura, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu

    2016-02-14

    The pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with mutations of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), which is a representative antioxidant enzyme. A previous study showed that the denatured apo-form of an ALS-linked mutant of human SOD1, His43 → Arg (H43R), obtains pro-oxidant activity as the reverse behavior of the native antioxidant activity by rebinding Cu(2+), which is considered to be closely related to the development of ALS. The Cu(2+)-binding site in denatured apo-H43R can be regarded as the center of the pro-oxidant activity, causing cellular oxidative stress. In the present study, the structure of the Cu(2+)-binding site of denatured apo-H43R was investigated to clarify the mechanism of the acquisition of the pro-oxidant activity. His residues constructing the Cu(2+)-binding site in denatured apo-H43R were experimentally assigned by absorption and fluorescence-based assays of SOD1 mutants, in which each of the seven His residues in H43R SOD1 is replaced with Ala. It was found that His120 is not involved with the Cu(2+)-binding site after denaturation, although the other His residues constructing the metal-binding site remain constant after denaturation. The disappearance of His120 from the Cu(2+)-binding site is therefore considered to be one of the important factors in obtaining the pro-oxidant activity. The mechanism of the acquisition of the pro-oxidant activity is discussed based on the results obtained.

  15. Development of blue rose; Aoi bara wa sakuka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, T. [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Yoshida, K.

    1998-06-01

    Precise crystalline structures of pigments in petals have been elucidated by structural analysis of the blue pigment in Commelinaceae petals using X-ray analysis. It is found that the Mg ion is coordinated with the oxygen atom on the B-nucleus in the base nucleus of delphinidin (belonging to anthocyanidine, a pigment obtained by separating sugar from anthocyanin by hydrolysis) to develop a blue color, and that the complex is a stable supermolecule in which 6 pigment molecules are associated regularly with 6 flavone molecules. The similar mechanisms are responsible for development of blue color for flowers, and widely occurring in nature. Biosynthesis of anthocyanin, beginning with phenylalanine, undergoes virtually common processes; cyclization of the flavonoide skeleton, reduction to the anthocyanidine nucleus, hydroxylation of the B-nucleus in the base nucleus and glycoside formation at the 3-site. It will be possible to shift rose color to blue, if anthocyanin belonging to anthocyanidine could be bio-synthesized by introducing the gene of enzyme for 3`, 5`-hydroxylation on the base nucleus, which the rose lacks. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  16. A resolution to the blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou population paradox?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Pointin

    Full Text Available We provide the strongest evidence to date supporting the existence of two independent blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou (Risso, 1827 populations in the North Atlantic. In spite of extensive data collected in conjunction with the fishery, the population structure of blue whiting is poorly understood. On one hand, genetic, morphometric, otolith and drift modelling studies point towards the existence of two populations, but, on the other hand, observations of adult distributions point towards a single population. A paradox therefore arises in attempting to reconcile these two sets of information. Here we analyse 1100 observations of blue whiting larvae from the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR from 1948-2005 using modern statistical techniques. We show a clear spatial separation between a northern spawning area, in the Rockall Trough, and a southern one, off the Porcupine Seabight. We further show a difference in the timing of spawning between these sites of at least a month, and meaningful differences in interannual variability. The results therefore support the two-population hypothesis. Furthermore, we resolve the paradox by showing that the acoustic observations cited in support of the single-population model are not capable of resolving both populations, as they occur too late in the year and do not extend sufficiently far south to cover the southern population: the confusion is the result of a simple observational artefact. We conclude that blue whiting in the North Atlantic comprises two populations.

  17. Copper (II) complexes with aroylhydrazones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper(II) complexes with aroylhydrazones ... The coordination chemistry of copper(II) with tridentate aroylhydrazones is briefly discussed in this article. ... EPR spectroscopy and variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements have been used to reveal the nature of the coordination geometry and magnetic ...

  18. The Bauschinger Effect in Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Brown, L .M.; Stobbs, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the Bauschinger effect in pure copper shows that by comparison with dispersion hardened copper the effect is very small and independent of temperature. This suggests that the obstacles to flow are deformable. A simple composite model based on this principle accounts for the data semi...

  19. 700 W blue fiber-coupled diode-laser emitting at 450 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balck, A.; Baumann, M.; Malchus, J.; Chacko, R. V.; Marfels, S.; Witte, U.; Dinakaran, D.; Ocylok, S.; Weinbach, M.; Bachert, C.; Kösters, A.; Krause, V.; König, H.; Lell, A.; Stojetz, B.; Löffler, A.; Strauss, U.

    2018-02-01

    A high-power blue laser source was long-awaited for processing materials with low absorption in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range like copper or gold. Due to the huge progress of GaN-based semiconductors, the performance of blue diode-lasers has made a major step forward recently. With the availability of unprecedented power levels at cw-operating blue diode-lasers emitting at 450 nm, it was possible to set up a high-power diode-laser in the blue spectral range to address these conventional laser applications and probably beyond that to establish completely new utilizations for lasers. Within the scope of the research project "BlauLas", funded within the German photonic initiative "EFFILAS" [8] by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), Laserline in cooperation with OSRAM aims to realize a cw fiber-coupled diode-laser exceeding 1 kW blue laser power. In this paper the conceptual design and experimental results of a 700 W blue fiber-coupled diode-laser are presented. Initially a close look had to be taken on the mounting techniques of the semiconductors to serve the requirements of the GaN laser diodes. Early samples were used for extensive long term tests to investigate degradation processes. With first functional laser-modules we set up fiber-coupled laser-systems for further testing. Besides adaption of well-known optical concepts a main task within the development of the laser system was the selection and examination of suitable materials and assembling in order to minimize degradation and reach adequate lifetimes. We realized R&D blue lasersystems with lifetimes above 5,000 h, which enable first application experiments on processing of various materials as well as experiments on conversion to white-light.

  20. Copper: From neurotransmission to neuroproteostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Opazo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper is critical for the Central Nervous System (CNS development and function. In particular, different studies have shown the effect of copper at brain synapses, where it inhibits Long Term Potentation (LTP and receptor pharmacology. Paradoxically, according to recent studies copper is required for a normal LTP response. Copper is released at the synaptic cleft, where it blocks glutamate receptors, which explain its blocking effects on excitatory neurotransmission. Our results indicate that copper also enhances neurotransmission through the accumulation of PSD95 protein, which increase the levels of AMPA receptors located at the plasma membrane of the post-synaptic density. Thus, our findings represent a novel mechanism for the action of copper, which may have implications for the neurophysiology and neuropathology of the CNS. These data indicate that synaptic configuration is sensitive to transient changes in transition metal homeostasis. Our results suggest that copper increases GluA1 subunit levels of the AMPA receptor through the anchorage of AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane as a result of PSD-95 accumulation. Here, we will review the role of copper on neurotransmission of CNS neurons. In addition, we will discuss the potential mechanisms by which copper could modulate neuronal proteostasis (neuroproteostasis in the CNS with focus in the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, which is particularly relevant to neurological disorders such Alzheimer’s disease (AD where copper and protein dyshomeostasis may contribute to neurodegeneration. An understanding of these mechanisms may ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to control metal and synaptic alterations observed in AD patients.

  1. An air-stable copper reagent for nucleophilic trifluoromethylthiolation of aryl halides

    KAUST Repository

    Weng, Zhiqiang

    2012-12-12

    A series of copper(I) trifluoromethyl thiolate complexes have been synthesized from the reaction of CuF2 with Me3SiCF 3 and S8 (see scheme; Cu red, F green, N blue, S yellow). These air-stable complexes serve as reagents for the efficient conversion of a wide range of aryl halides into the corresponding aryl trifluoromethyl thioethers in excellent yields. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Synthesis of TOPO-capped Nanocrystals of Copper Sulphide from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nearly mono-dispersed TOPO-capped copper sulphide nanocrystals of ca. 4.5 nm (diameter) have been synthesized from [Cu(S2CNMe(nHex))2]. The absorption spectrum of the (Cu2S) nanoparticles shows a large blue shift (2.09 eV) in relation to bulk Cu2S (1022 nm, 1.21 eV). The PL gives a broad spectrum with an ...

  3. Blue breath holding is benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life threatening event' deserve immense understanding and help, and it behoves investigators to exercise extreme care and self criticism in the presentation of new knowledge which may bear upon their management and their morale. PMID:2001115

  4. Influence of multiple water-quality characteristics on copper toxicity to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciera, K.L.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.R.; Klaine, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Water quality influences the bioavailability and toxicity of copper to aquatic organisms. Understanding the relationships between water-quality parameters and copper toxicity may facilitate the development of site-specific criteria for water quality and result in better protection of aquatic biota. Many studies have examined the influence of a single water-quality parameter on copper toxicity, but the interactions of several characteristics have not been well studied in low-hardness water. The goal of the present research was to examine the interactions among water-quality characteristics and their effects on copper toxicity to larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The effects of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, DOC source, pH, and hardness on acute copper toxicity were determined using a complete factorially designed experiment. Hardness, pH, DOC, and interaction of pH and DOC all significantly affected copper toxicity. A predictive model based on these data described 88% of the variability in copper toxicity. This model also explained 58% of the variability in copper toxicity for an independent dataset of South Carolina (USA) waters. The biotic ligand model underpredicted the acute copper toxicity to fathead minnows when compared with observed values.

  5. Combining -Omics to Unravel the Impact of Copper Nutrition on Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) Stem Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printz, Bruno; Guerriero, Gea; Sergeant, Kjell; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Guignard, Cédric; Renaut, Jenny; Lutts, Stanley; Hausman, Jean-Francois

    2016-02-01

    Copper can be found in the environment at concentrations ranging from a shortage up to the threshold of toxicity for plants, with optimal growth conditions situated in between. The plant stem plays a central role in transferring and distributing minerals, water and other solutes throughout the plant. In this study, alfalfa is exposed to different levels of copper availability, from deficiency to slight excess, and the impact on the metabolism of the stem is assessed by a non-targeted proteomics study and by the expression analysis of key genes controlling plant stem development. Under copper deficiency, the plant stem accumulates specific copper chaperones, the expression of genes involved in stem development is decreased and the concentrations of zinc and molybdenum are increased in comparison with the optimum copper level. At the optimal copper level, the expression of cell wall-related genes increases and proteins playing a role in cell wall deposition and in methionine metabolism accumulate, whereas copper excess imposes a reduction in the concentration of iron in the stem and a reduced abundance of ferritins. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis suggests a role for the apoplasm as a copper storage site in the case of copper toxicity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  6. Regulation of copper-dependent endocytosis and vacuolar degradation of the yeast copper transporter, Ctr1p, by the Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingxuan; Sitaram, Anand; Burd, Christopher G

    2007-10-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae high-affinity copper transporter, Ctr1p, mediates cellular uptake of Cu(I). We report that when copper (50 microm CuSO(4)) is added to the growth medium of copper-starved cells, Ctr1p is rapidly internalized by endocytosis, delivered to the lumen of the lysosome-like vacuole and slowly degraded by vacuolar proteases. Through analysis of the trafficking and degradation of Ctr1p mutants, two lysine residues in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of Ctr1p, Lys340 and Lys345, were found to be critical for copper-dependent endocytosis and degradation. In response to copper addition, Ctr1p was found to be ubiquitylated and a mutation in the Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase largely abolished ubiquitylation, endocytosis and degradation. In a strain lacking the Rsp5p accessory factors Bul1p and Bul2p, endocytosis and degradation of Ctr1p-green fluorescent protein were substantially diminished. Surprisingly, a Ctr1p mutant that lacks Lys340 and Lys345 was still ubiquitylated in a copper-dependent manner, indicating that ubiquitylation of Ctr1p on other sites is insufficient to drive copper-dependent endocytosis and degradation. This study demonstrates that copper regulates turnover of Ctr1p by stimulating Rsp5p-dependent endocytosis and degradation of Ctr1p in the vacuole.

  7. Effect of structure, size and copper doping on the luminescence properties of ZnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, Ch. Satya [Crystal Growth and Nanoscience Research Centre, Government College (A), Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh 533 105 (India); Mishra, R.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patel, Dinesh K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Casali Center for Applied Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 9190401 (Israel); Rao, K. Ramachandra, E-mail: drkrcr@gmail.com [Crystal Growth and Nanoscience Research Centre, Government College (A), Rajahmundry, Andhra Pradesh 533 105 (India); Sudarsan, V., E-mail: vsudar@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Vatsa, R.K. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Blue and green emission intensity form ZnS is sensitive to crystallographic form. • For ZnS nanoparticles, emission characteristics are not affected by copper doping. • Cu solubility poor in ZnS nanoparticles compared to corresponding bulk. - Abstract: Luminescence properties of wurtzite and cubic forms of bulk ZnS have been investigated in detail and compared with that of ZnS nanoparticles. Blue emission observed in both hexagonal and cubic forms of undoped bulk ZnS is explained based on electron–hole recombination involving electron in conduction band and hole trapped in Zn{sup 2+} vacancies where as green emission arises due to electron hole recombination from Zn{sup 2+} and S{sup 2−} vacancies. Conversion of wurtzite form to cubic form is associated with relative increase in intensity of green emission due to increased defect concentration brought about by high temperature heat treatment. Copper doping in ZnS, initially leads to formation of both Cu{sub Zn} and Cu{sub i} (interstitial copper) centers, and latter to mainly Cu{sub Zn} centers as revealed by variation in relative intensities of blue and green emission from the samples.

  8. Electronic properties of blue phosphorene/graphene and blue phosphorene/graphene-like gallium nitride heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minglei; Chou, Jyh-Pin; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2017-07-05

    Blue phosphorene (BlueP) is a graphene-like phosphorus nanosheet which was synthesized very recently for the first time [Nano Lett., 2016, 16, 4903-4908]. The combination of electronic properties of two different two-dimensional materials in an ultrathin van der Waals (vdW) vertical heterostructure has been proved to be an effective approach to the design of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. Therefore, we used density functional theory to investigate the structural and electronic properties of two BlueP-based heterostructures - BlueP/graphene (BlueP/G) and BlueP/graphene-like gallium nitride (BlueP/g-GaN). Our results showed that the semiconducting nature of BlueP and the Dirac cone of G are well preserved in the BlueP/G vdW heterostructure. Moreover, by applying a perpendicular electric field, it is possible to tune the position of the Dirac cone of G with respect to the band edge of BlueP, resulting in the ability to control the Schottky barrier height. For the BlueP/g-GaN vdW heterostructure, BlueP forms an interface with g-GaN with a type-II band alignment, which is a promising feature for unipolar electronic device applications. Furthermore, we discovered that both G and g-GaN can be used as an active layer for BlueP to facilitate charge injection and enhance the device performance.

  9. The assesment of flex blue implementation in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahala Maruli Lumbanraja

    2014-01-01

    Flex blue is a small power modular and light water cooled reactor. The reactor site is located at the bottom of the sea surface (off shore) and main control room on the ground. Hull that contains of the main reactor components is placed at a depth of 60-100 m in the bottom of the sea surface so that the safety and security system is quite high. NPP was developed by the DCNS-France to meet the electrical energy needs of the world. The purpose of this study was to study the pre-feasibility of Flex blue implementation in Indonesia based on technological factors, sea geographical conditions and regulatory. The methodology used is to study a variety of literature study on NPP Flex blue technology, geographic conditions, and regulatory systems in Indonesia. In this study, location of potential sites are on the east coast of the island of Sumatra, Java's northern coast, the coast of the Borneo island and surrounding coastal islands between the east of the Sumatra island, northern Java and Borneo, however in terms of regulation, this technology could not be implemented. (author)

  10. Copper Tolerance and Characterization of a Copper-Responsive Operon, copYAZ, in an M1T1 Clinical Strain of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christie A; Gordon, Lily D; Fang, Zhong; Holder, Robert C; Reid, Sean D

    2015-08-01

    Infection with Streptococcus pyogenes is associated with a breadth of clinical manifestations ranging from mild pharyngitis to severe necrotizing fasciitis. Elevated levels of intracellular copper are highly toxic to this bacterium, and thus, the microbe must tightly regulate the level of this metal ion by one or more mechanisms, which have, to date, not been clearly defined. In this study, we have identified two virulence mechanisms by which S. pyogenes protects itself against copper toxicity. We defined a set of putative genes, copY (for a regulator), copA (for a P1-type ATPase), and copZ (for a copper chaperone), whose expression is regulated by copper. Our results indicate that these genes are highly conserved among a range of clinical S. pyogenes isolates. The copY, copA, and copZ genes are induced by copper and are transcribed as a single unit. Heterologous expression assays revealed that S. pyogenes CopA can confer copper tolerance in a copper-sensitive Escherichia coli mutant by preventing the accumulation of toxic levels of copper, a finding that is consistent with a role for CopA in copper export. Evaluation of the effect of copper stress on S. pyogenes in a planktonic or biofilm state revealed that biofilms may aid in protection during initial exposure to copper. However, copper stress appears to prevent the shift from the planktonic to the biofilm state. Therefore, our results indicate that S. pyogenes may use several virulence mechanisms, including altered gene expression and a transition to and from planktonic and biofilm states, to promote survival during copper stress. Bacterial pathogens encounter multiple stressors at the host-pathogen interface. This study evaluates a virulence mechanism(s) utilized by S. pyogenes to combat copper at sites of infection. A better understanding of pathogen tolerance to stressors such as copper is necessary to determine how host-pathogen interactions impact bacterial survival during infections. These insights may

  11. Synthesis and structural studies of copper sulfide nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ajibade

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis and structural studies of copper sulfide nanocrystals from copper(II dithiocarbamate single molecule precursors. The optical studies of the as-prepared copper sulfide nanoparticles were carried out using UV–Visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The absorption spectra show absorption band edges at 287 nm and exhibit considerable blue shift that could be ascribed to the quantum confinement effects as a result of the small crystallite sizes of the nanoparticles and the photoluminescence spectra show emission curves that are red shifted with respect to the absorption band edges. The structural studies were carried out using powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The XRD patterns revealed the formation of hexagonal structure of covellite CuS with estimated crystallite sizes of 17.3–18.6 nm. The TEM images showed particles with almost spherical or rod shapes with average crystallite sizes of 3–9.8 nm. SEM images showed morphology with ball-like microsphere on the surfaces and EDS spectra confirmed the presence of CuS nanoparticles. Keywords: CuS, Dithiocarbamate, Nanoparticles, Electron microscopy, AFM

  12. EARLY DOWNHOME BLUES IN AMERICAN CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Muhni, Djuhertati Imam

    2012-01-01

    People's traditional music and the way people behave when performing it are symbolic expressions of broad cultural pattern and social organization . In other words music is a part of men's learned heritage . Hence this study is about music in a given culture, specifically blues in American culture . Allen Trachtenberg stated that blues songs are inheritance from the American past for negotiating black people's lives as Americans . In the experience of blues the African-Americans find themselv...

  13. The Red-Blue Transportation Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Vancroonenburg, Wim; Della Croce, Federico; Goossens, Dries; Spieksma, Frits

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the Red-Blue Transportation Problem (Red-Blue TP), a generalization of the transportation problem where supply nodes are partitioned into two sets and so-called exclusionary constraints are imposed. We encountered a special case of this problem in a hospital context, where patients need to be assigned to rooms. We establish the problem's complexity, and we compare two integer programming formulations. Furthermore, a maximization variant of Red-Blue TP is presented, for...

  14. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, G.J. van den; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendruiks, H.F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (< 1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver,

  15. Variable blue straggler stars in NGC 5466

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, H.C.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E.W.; Nemec, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Nine variable blue stragglers have been found in the globular cluster NGC 5466. The six dwarf Cepheids in this cluster coexist in the instability strip with other nonvariable stars. The three eclipsing binaries are among the hottest of the blue stragglers. The hypothesis is discussed that all blue stragglers in this cluster have undergone mass transfer in close binaries. Under this hypothesis, rotation and spin-down play important roles in controlling the evolution of blue stragglers in old clusters and in affecting some of their observational properties. 14 refs

  16. Morphological responses of wheat to blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C.; Bugbee, B.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light significantly increased tillering in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants grown at the same photosynthetic photon flux (PPF). Plants were grown under two levels of blue light (400-500 nm) in a controlled environment with continuous irradiation. Plants received either 50 micromoles m-2 s-1 of blue light or 2 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light from filtered metal halide lamps at a total irradiance of 200 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF (400-700 nm). Plants tillered an average of 25% more under the higher level of blue light. Blue light also caused a small, but consistent, increase in main culm development, measured as Haun stage. Leaf length was reduced by higher levels of blue light, while plant dry-mass was not significantly affected by blue light. Applying the principle of equivalent light action, the results suggest that tillering and leaf elongation are mediated by the blue-UV light receptor(s) because phytochrome photoequilibrium for each treatment were nearly identical.

  17. Why Blue-Collar Blacks Help Less

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Sandra Susan; Young, Kara Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Why are blue-collar blacks less likely to help jobseekers than jobholders from other ethnoracial groups or even than more affluent blacks? Drawing from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 97 black and Latino workers at one large, public sector employer, we find that blue-collar black workers both helped less proactively and rejected more requests for assistance than did blue-collar Latino and white-collar black workers. We attribute blue-collar blacks’ more passive engagement to their...

  18. Copper and the Prion Protein: Methods, Structures, Function, and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2007-05-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) arise from conversion of the membrane-bound prion protein from PrPC to PrPSc. Examples of the TSEs include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, scrapie in goats and sheep, and kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Although the precise function of PrPC in healthy tissues is not known, recent research demonstrates that it binds Cu(II) in an unusual and highly conserved region of the protein termed the octarepeat domain. This review describes recent connections between copper and PrPC, with an emphasis on the electron paramagnetic resonance elucidation of the specific copper-binding sites, insights into PrPC function, and emerging connections between copper and prion disease.

  19. Copper complexes as 'radiation recovery' agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, J.R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Copper and its compounds have been used for their remedial effects since the beginning of recorded history. As early as 3000 BC the Egyptians used copper as an antiseptic for healing wounds and to sterilise drinking water; and later, ca 1550 BC, the Ebers Papyrus reports the use of copper acetate, copper sulphate and pulverised metallic copper for the treatment of eye infections. These historical uses of copper and its compounds are particularly interesting in the light of modern evidence concerning the use of certain copper complexes for the treatment of radiation sickness and more recently as an adjunct to radiotherapy for cancer patients. (author)

  20. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  1. Gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium and copper radionuclides have a long history of use in nuclear medicine. Table 1 presents the nuclear properties of several gallium and copper isotopes that either are used in the routine practice of clinical nuclear medicine or exhibit particular characteristics that might make them useful in diagnostic or therapeutic medicine. This paper will provide some historic perspective along with an overview of some current research directions in gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry. A more extensive review of gallium radiopharmaceutical chemistry has recently appeared and can be consulted for a more in-depth treatment of this topic

  2. Pitting corrosion of copper. An equilibrium - mass transport study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, C. [Swedish Corrosion Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-08-01

    A mathematical model for the propagation of corrosion pits is described and used to calculate the potentials below which copper is immune to pitting. The model uses equilibrium data and diffusion coefficients and calculates the stationary concentration profiles of 26 aqueous species from the bulk water outside a corrosion pit to the site of the metal dissolution. Precipitation of oxides and salts of copper is considered. Studied conditions include water compositions from tap waters to seawater at the temperatures 25 deg C and 75 deg C. Carbonate and sulphate are aggressive towards copper because of complex formation with divalent copper. Carbonate is less aggressive in a corrosion pit than outside at the pH of the bulk. Carbonate carries acidity out from the pit, favours oxide formation and may prevent the initiation of acidic corrosion pits. The concentration profiles are used to estimate the maximum propagation rates for a corrosion pit. A high potential is found to be the most important factor for the rate of propagation. The levels of potential copper can sustain, as corrosion potentials are discussed in terms of the stability of cuprous oxide as a cathode material for oxygen reduction relative to non-conducting cupric phases.

  3. Prehistory of the Little Blue River Valley, Western Missouri: Archaeological Investigations at Blue Springs Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Lake project. The report discusses the geomorphology and vegetation of the Little Blue River valley, Late Quaternary bioclimatic change in Western...54 Aquatic Communities ............................... 58 IV. LATE QUATERNARY BIOCLIMATIC CHANGE IN WESTERN MISSOURI by Rolfe D...City District is presently constructing Blue Springs Lake on the East Fork of the Little Blue River in Jackson County, Missouri. The location of the

  4. A Molecular Mechanism for Copper Transportation to Tyrosinase That Is Assisted by a Metallochaperone, Caddie Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Yasuyuki; Bando, Naohiko; Oda, Kosuke; Noda, Masafumi; Higashikawa, Fumiko; Kumagai, Takanori; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    The Cu(II)-soaked crystal structure of tyrosinase that is present in a complex with a protein, designated “caddie,” which we previously determined, possesses two copper ions at its catalytic center. We had identified two copper-binding sites in the caddie protein and speculated that copper bound to caddie may be transported to the tyrosinase catalytic center. In our present study, at a 1.16–1.58 Å resolution, we determined the crystal structures of tyrosinase complexed with caddie prepared by altering the soaking time of the copper ion and the structures of tyrosinase complexed with different caddie mutants that display little or no capacity to activate tyrosinase. Based on these structures, we propose a molecular mechanism by which two copper ions are transported to the tyrosinase catalytic center with the assistance of caddie acting as a metallochaperone. PMID:21730070

  5. Activation of dioxygen by copper metalloproteins and insights from model complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, David A; Diaz, Daniel E; Liu, Jeffrey J; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2017-04-01

    Nature uses dioxygen as a key oxidant in the transformation of biomolecules. Among the enzymes that are utilized for these reactions are copper-containing metalloenzymes, which are responsible for important biological functions such as the regulation of neurotransmitters, dioxygen transport, and cellular respiration. Enzymatic and model system studies work in tandem in order to gain an understanding of the fundamental reductive activation of dioxygen by copper complexes. This review covers the most recent advancements in the structures, spectroscopy, and reaction mechanisms for dioxygen-activating copper proteins and relevant synthetic models thereof. An emphasis has also been placed on cofactor biogenesis, a fundamentally important process whereby biomolecules are post-translationally modified by the pro-enzyme active site to generate cofactors which are essential for the catalytic enzymatic reaction. Significant questions remaining in copper-ion-mediated O 2 -activation in copper proteins are addressed.

  6. Copper tailings in stucco mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Pavez

    Full Text Available Abstract This investigation addressed the evaluation of the use of copper tailings in the construction industry in order to reduce the impact on the environment. The evaluation was performed by a technical comparison between stucco mortars prepared with crushed conventional sand and with copper tailings sand. The best results were achieved with the stucco mortars containing tailings. The tailings presented a fine particles size distribution curve different from that suggested by the standard. The values of compressive strength, retentivity, and adherence in the stucco mortars prepared with copper tailings were much higher than those obtained with crushed sand. According to the results from this study, it can be concluded that the preparation of stucco mortars using copper tailings replacing conventional sand is a technically feasible alternative for the construction industry, presenting the benefit of mitigating the impact of disposal to the environment.

  7. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...

  8. Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Daleth

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The blue rubber nevus syndrome consists of multiple venous malformations in the skin and gastrointestinal tract associated with intestinal hemorrhage and iron deficiency anemia. Other organs may be involved. The causes of this syndrome are unknown. Its most common presentation is in the form of sporadic cases, but dominant autosomal inheritance has been described. It is a condition that affects both sexes equally, and its occurrence is rare in the black race. We present a case of this syndrome diagnosed in a 11-year-old patient. He had severe anemia and a venous swelling on the trunk. Similar lesions were found in the stomach, bowel, and on his foot. We emphasize the main clinical aspects: intestine, eyes, nasopharynx, parotids, lungs, liver, spleen, heart, brain, pleura, peritoneum, pericardium, skeletal muscles, bladder, and penis lesions, systemic complications that may occur to these patients which are thrombosis and calcification, as well as consumptive coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia that may occur within the nevi.

  9. Copper atomic-scale transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqing Xie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO4 + H2SO4 in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate. The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and −170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes (Ubias influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1G0 (G0 = 2e2/h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck’s constant or 2G0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors.

  10. The copper deposits of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B.S.; Burbank, W.S.

    1929-01-01

    The copper district of Keweenaw Point, in the northern peninsula of Michigan, is the second largest producer of copper in the world.  The output of the district since 1845 has been more than 7,500,000,000 pounds and showed a rather steady and consistent increase from the beginning of production to the end of the World War in 1918, since which there has been a marked decrease.

  11. Atmospheric corrosion effects on copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franey, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Studies have been performed on the naturally formed patina on various copper samples. Samples have been obtained from structures at AT and T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (40,2,1 and <1 yr) and the Statue of Liberty (100 yr). The samples show a distinct layering effect, that is, the copper base material shows separate oxide and basic sulfate layers on all samples, indicating that patina is not a homogeneous mixture of oxides and basic sulfates

  12. Genome Sequences of Two Copper-Resistant Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Copper-Fed Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthje, Freja L.; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two copper-resistant Escherichia coli strains were determined. These had been isolated from copper-fed pigs and contained additional putative operons conferring copper and other metal and metalloid resistances.......The draft genome sequences of two copper-resistant Escherichia coli strains were determined. These had been isolated from copper-fed pigs and contained additional putative operons conferring copper and other metal and metalloid resistances....

  13. Blue enhanced light sources: opportunities and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Natural daylight is characterized by high proportions of blue light. By proof of a third type of photoreceptor in the human eye which is only sensitive in this spectral region and by subsequent studies it has become obvious that these blue proportions are essential for human health and well being. In various studies beneficial effects of indoor lighting with higher blue spectral proportions have been proven. On the other hand with increasing use of light sources having enhanced blue light for indoor illumination questions are arising about potential health risks attributed to blue light. Especially LED are showing distinct emission characteristics in the blue. Recently the French agency for food, environmental and occupational health & safety ANSES have raised the question on health issues related to LED light sources and have claimed to avoid use of LED for lighting in schools. In this paper parameters which are relevant for potential health risks will be shown and their contribution to risk factors will quantitatively be discussed. It will be shown how to differentiate between photometric parameters for assessment of beneficial as well as hazardous effects. Guidelines will be discussed how blue enhanced light sources can be used in applications to optimally support human health and well being and simultaneously avoid any risks attributed to blue light by a proper design of lighting parameters. In the conclusion it will be shown that no inherent health risks are related to LED lighting with a proper lighting design.

  14. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  15. Blue jay attacks and consumes cedar waxwing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Saenz; Joshua B. Pierce

    2009-01-01

    Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) are known to be common predators on bird nests (Wilcove 1985, Picman and Schriml 1994). In addition to predation on eggs and nestlings, Blue Jays occasionally prey on fledgling and adult birds (Johnson and Johnson 1976, Dubowy 1985). A majority of reports involve predation on House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) and other small birds (...

  16. A facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we developed a facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine. Polyethyleneimine is a cationic polymer that has no absorption in the wavelength range of 250–800 nm. When trace amounts of copper(II ion was added to the colorless polyethyleneimine solution, copper(II ion could react with the amino groups of the polyethyleneimine to form a dark blue cuprammonium complex whose absorption spectrum exhibited two absorption peaks at 275 and 630 nm, respectively. The effects of parameters such as polyethyleneimine concentration, pH, temperature, reaction time, and the most suitable medium for the reaction were investigated. A linear relationship (R2 = 0.9997 between absorbance and the concentration of copper(II ion was found at the maximum absorption peak of 275 nm in the concentration range of 2–400 μM. The detection limit for copper(II ion was 566 nM. The response of polyethyleneimine toward different metal ions was investigated, and polyethyleneimine displayed a high selectivity for the copper(II ion among the metal ions examined. This biocompatible and sensitive sensor may find applications in copper(II ion detection in environmental and biological processes.

  17. Crystal Structures of Copper-depleted and Copper-bound Fungal Pro-tyrosinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujieda, Nobutaka; Yabuta, Shintaro; Ikeda, Takuya; Oyama, Takuji; Muraki, Norifumi; Kurisu, Genji; Itoh, Shinobu

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosinase, a dinuclear copper monooxygenase/oxidase, plays a crucial role in the melanin pigment biosynthesis. The structure and functions of tyrosinase have so far been studied extensively, but the post-translational maturation process from the pro-form to the active form has been less explored. In this study, we provide the crystal structures of Aspergillus oryzae full-length pro-tyrosinase in the holo- and the apo-forms at 1.39 and 2.05 Å resolution, respectively, revealing that Phe513 on the C-terminal domain is accommodated in the substrate-binding site as a substrate analog to protect the dicopper active site from substrate access (proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminal domain or deformation of the C-terminal domain by acid treatment transforms the pro-tyrosinase to the active enzyme (Fujieda, N., Murata, M., Yabuta, S., Ikeda, T., Shimokawa, C., Nakamura, Y., Hata, Y., and Itoh, S. (2012) ChemBioChem. 13, 193–201 and Fujieda, N., Murata, M., Yabuta, S., Ikeda, T., Shimokawa, C., Nakamura, Y., Hata, Yl, and Itoh, S. (2013) J. Biol. Inorg. Chem. 18, 19–26). Detailed crystallographic analysis and structure-based mutational studies have shown that the copper incorporation into the active site is governed by three cysteines as follows: Cys92, which is covalently bound to His94 via an unusual thioether linkage in the holo-form, and Cys522 and Cys525 of the CXXC motif located on the C-terminal domain. Molecular mechanisms of the maturation processes of fungal tyrosinase involving the accommodation of the dinuclear copper unit, the post-translational His-Cys thioether cross-linkage formation, and the proteolytic C-terminal cleavage to produce the active tyrosinase have been discussed on the basis of the detailed structural information. PMID:23749993

  18. Modelling the active site properties of dopamine b-hydroxylase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Dopamine b-hydroxylase (DbH) is a copper-containing glycoprotein that hydroxylates dopamine to norepinephrine 1,2. Based on spectroscopic studies the active site of the metalloenzyme is proposed to have two copper centres. The enzyme in the oxidized dicopper(II) form gets reduced to the dicopper(I) unit by ascorbate ...

  19. Use of copper radioisotopes in investigating disorders of copper metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camakaris, J.; Voskoboinik, I.; Brooks, H.; Greenough, M.; Smith, S.; Mercer, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Copper is an essential trace element for life as a number of vital enzymes require it. Copper deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, osteoporosis and weakening of arteries. However Cu is also highly toxic and homeostatic mechanisms have evolved to maintain Cu at levels which satisfy requirements but do not cause toxicity. Toxicity is mediated by the oxidative capacity of Cu and its ability to generate toxic free radicals. There are several acquired and inherited diseases due to either Cu toxicity or Cu deficiency. The study of these diseases facilitates identification of genes and proteins involved in copper homeostasis, and this in turn will provide rational therapeutic approaches. Our studies have focused on Menkes disease in humans which is an inherited and usually lethal copper deficiency. Using copper radioisotopes 64 Cu (t 1/2 = 12.8 hr) and 67 Cu (t 1/2 = 61 hr) we have studied the protein which is mutated in Menkes disease. This is a transmembrane copper pump which is responsible for absorption of copper into the body and also functions to pump out excess Cu from cells when Cu is elevated. It is therefore a vital component of normal Cu homeostasis. We have provided the first biochemical evidence that the Menkes protein functions as a P-type ATPase Cu pump (Voskoboinik et al., FEBS Letters, in press) and these data will be discussed. The assay involved pumping of radiocopper into purified membrane vesicles. Furthermore we have transfected normal and mutant Menkes genes into cells and are carrying out structure-function studies. We are also studying the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a Cu transport protein in order to determine how Cu regulates this protein and its cleavage products. These studies will provide vital information on the relationship between Cu and APP and processes which lead to Alzheimers disease

  20. Copper scandium zirconium phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Andrew David; Warner, Terence Edwin

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, with nominal formula Cu(2)ScZr(PO(4))(3), has a beige coloration and displays fast Cu(+) cation conduction at elevated temperatures. It adopts a NASICON-type structure in the space group R3c. The examined crystal was an obverse-reverse twin with approximately equal twin...... components. The [Sc(III)Zr(IV)(PO(4))(3)](2-) framework is composed of corner-sharing Sc/ZrO(6) octahedra and PO(4) tetrahedra. The Sc and Zr atoms are disordered on one atomic site on a crystallographic threefold axis. The P atom of the phosphate group lies on a crystallographic twofold axis. Nonframework...... Cu(+) cations occupy three positions. Two of the Cu(+) positions generate an approximately circular distribution around a site of 3 symmetry, referred to as the M1 site in the NASICON-type structure. The other Cu(+) position is situated close to the twofold symmetric M2 site, displaced...

  1. Sublethal concentrations of waterborne copper induce cellular stress and cell death in zebrafish embryos and larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P Hernandez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper is an essential ion that forms part of the active sites of many proteins. At the same time, an excess of this metal produces free radicals that are toxic for cells and organisms. Fish have been used extensively to study the effects of metals, including copper, present in food or the environment. It has been shown that different metals induce different adaptive responses in adult fish. However, until now, scant information has been available about the responses that are induced by waterborne copper during early life stages of fish. Here, acute toxicity tests and LC50 curves have been generated for zebrafish larvae exposed to dissolved copper sulphate at different concentrations and for different treatment times. We determined that the larvae incorporate and accumulate copper present in the medium in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in changes in gene expression. Using a transgenic fish line that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the hsp70 promoter, we monitored tissue-specific stress responses to waterborne copper by following expression of the reporter. Furthermore, TUNEL assays revealed which tissues are more susceptible to cell death after exposure to copper. Our results establish a framework for the analysis of whole-organism management of excess external copper in developing aquatic animals.

  2. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  3. Tapered photonic crystal fibers for blue-enhanced supercontinuum generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe; Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper

    2012-01-01

    Tapering of photonic crystal fibers is an effective way of shifting the blue edge of a supercontinuum spectrum down in the deep-blue. We discuss the optimum taper profile for enhancing the power in the blue edge....

  4. Crystal structure of a copper-transporting PIB-type ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Skjørringe, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Heavy-metal homeostasis and detoxification is crucial for cell viability. P-type ATPases of the class IB (PIB) are essential in these processes, actively extruding heavy metals from the cytoplasm of cells. Here we present the structure of a PIB-ATPase, a Legionella pneumophila CopA Cu......(+)-ATPase, in a copper-free form, as determined by X-ray crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. The structure indicates a three-stage copper transport pathway involving several conserved residues. A PIB-specific transmembrane helix kinks at a double-glycine motif displaying an amphipathic helix that lines a putative...... copper entry point at the intracellular interface. Comparisons to Ca(2+)-ATPase suggest an ATPase-coupled copper release mechanism from the binding sites in the membrane via an extracellular exit site. The structure also provides a framework to analyse missense mutations in the human ATP7A and ATP7B...

  5. Renal cortex copper concentration in acute copper poisoning in calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Fazzio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic value of renal cortex copper (Cu concentration in clinical cases of acute copper poisoning (ACP. A total of 97 calves that died due to subcutaneous copper administration were compiled in eleven farms. At least, one necropsy was conducted on each farm and samples for complementary analysis were taken. The degree of autolysis in each necropsy was evaluated. The cases appeared on extensive grazing calf breeding and intensive feedlot farms, in calves of 60 to 200 kg body weight. Mortality varied from 0.86 to 6.96 %, on the farms studied. The first succumbed calf was found on the farms between 6 and 72 hours after the susbcutaneous Cu administration. As discrepancies regarding the reference value arose, the local value (19.9 parts per million was used, confirming the diagnosis of acute copper poisoning in 93% of the analyzed kidney samples. These results confirm the value of analysis of the cortical kidney Cu concentration for the diagnosis of acute copper poisoning.

  6. Effects of an aged copper contamination on distribution of earthworms, reproduction and cocoon hatchability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmonsef, Hassan; Hornum, Hanne D; Jensen, John; Holmstrup, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Contaminated soil is a problem throughout the industrialized world, and a significant proportion of these sites are polluted with heavy metals such as copper. Ecological risk assessment of contaminated sites requires ecotoxicological studies with spiked soils as well as in-situ ecological observations. Here, we report laboratory and field assessment of copper toxicity for earthworms at a Danish site (Hygum) exclusively contaminated with an increasing gradient in copper from background to highly toxic levels (>1000mgkg -1 dry soil). More specifically, we report effects on field populations, body contents of copper, hatching of earthworm cocoons and reproduction of the common species Aporrectodea tuberculata. Abundance of earthworms and cocoons decreased significantly from about 400-150m -2 along the gradient as the soil copper concentration increased from ca. 50 to ca. 1000mgkg -1 . At lower concentrations, the population was dominated by endogeic species, whereas at high concentrations the population was dominated by epigeic species. At high copper contents the internal concentration of copper was in the range 100-160mgkg -1 dry tissue. Despite the high internal copper contents, hatchability of field collected cocoons was not impaired in any species. The EC50 reproduction value of A. tuberculata was about 220mg copper kg -1 dry soil in the first two exposure periods, but nearly doubled in the third period suggesting that an acclimation response had occurred. Also in the laboratory reproduction test, cocoon hatchability was not reduced, but rather slightly stimulated by copper. Based on these results we discuss the possibility that acute exposure in laboratory experiments is more detrimental than exposure in a field situation, perhaps because increased tolerance may be acquired through natural selection and genetic adaptation through increased use of defense mechanisms such as metallothioneins. Further, we discuss that the rather high tissue copper level of

  7. Copper metallurgy at the crossroads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habashi F.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper technology changed from the vertical to the horizontal furnace and from the roast reaction to converting towards the end of the last century. However, the horizontal furnace proved to be an inefficient and polluting reactor. As a result many attempts were made to replace it. In the past 50 years new successful melting processes were introduced on an industrial scale that were more energy efficient and less polluting. In addition, smelting and converting were conducted in a single reactor in which the concentrate was fed and the raw copper was produced. The standing problem in many countries, however, is marketing 3 tonnes of sulfuric acid per tonne of copper produced as well as emitting large amounts of excess SO2 in the atmosphere. Pressure hydrometallurgy offers the possibility of liberating the copper industry from SO2 problem. Heap leaching technology has become a gigantic operation. Combined with solvent extraction and electrowinning it contributes today to about 20% of copper production and is expected to grow. Pressure leaching offers the possibility of liberating the copper industry from SO2 problem. The technology is over hundred years old. It is applied for leaching a variety of ores and concentrates. Hydrothermal oxidation of sulfide concentrates has the enormous advantage of producing elemental sulfur, hence solving the SO2 and sulfuric acid problems found in smelters. Precipitation of metals such as nickel and cobalt under hydrothermal conditions has been used for over 50 years. It has the advantage of a compact plant but the disadvantage of producing ammonium sulfate as a co-product. In case of copper, however, precipitation takes place without the need of neutralizing the acid, which is a great advantage and could be an excellent substitute for electrowinning which is energy intensive and occupies extensive space. Recent advances in the engineering aspects of pressure equipment design open the door widely for increased

  8. Gold and gold-copper nanoparticles in 2-propanol: A radiation chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    The studies on the reduction of Au 3+ to gold nanoparticles in presence and absence of Cu 2+ under deoxygenated conditions in 2-propanol by radiolytic method have been carried out. On γ-radiolysis, preliminary yellow colored solution of Au 3+ changed to purple color owing to gold nanoparticles formation, which exhibits an absorption peak at around 540 nm. In the presence of Cu 2+ , absorption of gold-copper nanoparticles, which was also produced during γ-radiolysis, was red shifted in contrast to the system containing no Cu 2+ . Under DLS studies the sizes of gold nanoparticles in the absence and the presence of Cu 2+ were found to be larger (>400 nm). However, in presence of polyethylene glycol, a stabilizer the nanoparticle sizes became smaller, sizes measured for gold and gold-copper nanoparticles are 40 and 140 nm, respectively. Moreover, the change in UV-vis spectra in the Cu 2+ and Au 3+ mixed system highlights the formation of gold-copper nanoparticles in core-shell type arrangement. - Highlights: → Present radiation chemical study highlights high reactivity of Au ·2+ with Cu 2+ . → Absorption of gold-copper nanoparticles is blue shifted as compared to copper nanoparticles. → Change in UV-vis spectra with dose emphasizes core-shell type arrangement of Au-Cu nanoparticles.

  9. Plastic debris straps on threatened blue shark Prionace glauca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenero, Ana I; Barría, Claudio; Broglio, Elisabetta; García-Barcelona, Salvador

    2017-02-15

    Juveniles of blue shark Prionace glauca caught in pelagic longlines targeting tuna and swordfish in the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea were found entangled with plastic straps around their gill region. The plastic debris were identified as strapping bands and caused several degrees of injuries on the dorsal musculature and pectoral fins. They were also obstructing the gill slits probably causing breathing issues. These records were uploaded in the web site seawatchers.org, and highlight the potential of citizen science in revealing the occurrence of such problems which could help to measure the effects of plastic debris on marine life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phytotoxicity of methylene blue to rice seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Yu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methylene blue is widely used in various industrial branches. Due to insufficient treatment, its occurrence in wastewater is frequently detected, which may result in serious environment problems to aquatic organisms. Hydroponic experiments were conducted with rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L. cv. XZX 45 exposed to methylene blue to determine the effective concentration using relative growth rate and water use efficiency as response endpoints. Results showed that acute toxicity of methylene blue to rice seedlings was evident. Although a linear decrease in relative growth rate and water use efficiency was observed in rice seedlings with increasing methylene blue concentrations, relative growth rate of rice seedlings was more sensitive to change of methylene blue than water use efficiency. Using non-linear regression, EC-48 h values for 10%, 20% and 50% inhibition of the relative growth rate were estimated to be 1.54, 3.22 and 10.13 mg MB/L for rice seedlings exposed to methylene blue, respectively, while smaller EC were obtained for 96 h exposure. In conclusion, the toxic response of young rice seedlings to methylene blue is obvious and inhibitory effects are highly dependent on response endpoints and the duration of exposure period.

  11. Can greening of aquaculture sequester blue carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nesar; Bunting, Stuart W; Glaser, Marion; Flaherty, Mark S; Diana, James S

    2017-05-01

    Globally, blue carbon (i.e., carbon in coastal and marine ecosystems) emissions have been seriously augmented due to the devastating effects of anthropogenic pressures on coastal ecosystems including mangrove swamps, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows. The greening of aquaculture, however, including an ecosystem approach to Integrated Aquaculture-Agriculture (IAA) and Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) could play a significant role in reversing this trend, enhancing coastal ecosystems, and sequestering blue carbon. Ponds within IAA farming systems sequester more carbon per unit area than conventional fish ponds, natural lakes, and inland seas. The translocation of shrimp culture from mangrove swamps to offshore IMTA could reduce mangrove loss, reverse blue carbon emissions, and in turn increase storage of blue carbon through restoration of mangroves. Moreover, offshore IMTA may create a barrier to trawl fishing which in turn could help restore seagrasses and further enhance blue carbon sequestration. Seaweed and shellfish culture within IMTA could also help to sequester more blue carbon. The greening of aquaculture could face several challenges that need to be addressed in order to realize substantial benefits from enhanced blue carbon sequestration and eventually contribute to global climate change mitigation.

  12. Ground-contact durability of wood treated with borax-copper preservative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan T. Lebow; Bessie Woodward; Patricia K. Lebow

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of a borax-copper(BC) preservative to protect wood exposed in ground contact. Southern pine sapwood stakes were pressure-treated with 0.9%, 1.4%, 2.3%, and 4.7% BC solution concentrations and placed into the ground at test sites near Mississippi, or Madison, Wisconsin. Untreated stakes and stakes treated with 1% chromated copper...

  13. Infiltrating giant cellular blue naevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, A L; Monteiro, D A; De Pretto, O J

    2007-01-01

    Cellular blue naevi (CBN) measure 1-2 cm in diameter and affect the dermis, occasionally extending into the subcutaneous fat. The case of a 14-year-old boy with a giant CBN (GCBN) involving the right half of the face, the jugal mucosa and the lower eyelid with a tumour that had infiltrated the bone and the maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses is reported. Biopsies were taken from the skin, jugal mucosa and maxillary sinus. The following markers were used in the immunohistochemical evaluation: CD34, CD56, HMB-45, anti-S100, A-103, Melan A and MIB-1. The biopsy specimens showed a biphasic pattern affecting the lower dermis, subcutaneous fat, skeletal muscle, bone, jugal mucosa and maxillary sinus, but there was no histological evidence of malignancy. The tumour cells were CD34-, CD56-, HMB45+, anti-S100+ and A-103+. Melan A was focally expressed. No positive MIB-1 cells were identified. The present case shows that GCBN may infiltrate deeply, with no evidence of malignancy.

  14. The blue water footprint of electricity from hydropower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Mekonnen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydropower accounts for about 16% of the world's electricity supply. It has been debated whether hydroelectric generation is merely an in-stream water user or whether it also consumes water. In this paper we provide scientific support for the argument that hydroelectric generation is in most cases a significant water consumer. The study assesses the blue water footprint of hydroelectricity – the water evaporated from manmade reservoirs to produce electric energy – for 35 selected sites. The aggregated blue water footprint of the selected hydropower plants is 90 Gm3 yr−1, which is equivalent to 10% of the blue water footprint of global crop production in the year 2000. The total blue water footprint of hydroelectric generation in the world must be considerably larger if one considers the fact that this study covers only 8% of the global installed hydroelectric capacity. Hydroelectric generation is thus a significant water consumer. The average water footprint of the selected hydropower plants is 68 m3 GJ−1. Great differences in water footprint among hydropower plants exist, due to differences in climate in the places where the plants are situated, but more importantly as a result of large differences in the area flooded per unit of installed hydroelectric capacity. We recommend that water footprint assessment is added as a component in evaluations of newly proposed hydropower plants as well as in the evaluation of existing hydroelectric dams, so that the consequences of the water footprint of hydroelectric generation on downstream environmental flows and other water users can be evaluated.

  15. Magnetic Properties of selected Prussian Blue Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Manjita

    Prussian Blue Analogs (PBAs) of composition M[M(C,N)6 ] 2.xH2O are bimetallic cyanide complexes, where M and M are bivalent or trivalent transition metals and x is number of water molecule per unit cell. The PBAs form cubic framework structures, which consist mostly of alternating MIIIN6 and MIIC 6 octahedrals. However, occupancies of the octrahedrals are not perfect: they may be empty and the charges are balanced by the guest water molecules at the lattice site (C or N site) or the interstitial site (between the octahedrals) of the unit cell. Most (but not all) PBAs exhibit negative thermal expansion behavior, i.e. volume decrease with increasing temperature. Another area of interest in PBA research is the occurrence of unusual magnetic properties. Similar to other molecular magnets, large crystal-field splitting due to the octrahedral environment may result in a combination of low- or high-spin configurations of the localized magnetic moments, i.e. spin crossover effects may be found. My dissertation focuses on the magnetic properties of the selected 3d transition-metal PBAs, namely metal hexacyanochromates M3[Cr(C,N)6 ]2.xH2O, metal hexcyanoferrates M3[Fe(C,N)6]2.xH2O and metal hexcyanocobaltates M3[Co(C,N)6]2 .xH2O where M = Mn, Co, Ni and Cu. In particular, I analyzed the temperature and field dependencies of the bulk magnetic response of those PBAs. My results show that the magnetic susceptibility of all studied PBAs follows the Curie-Weiss behavior in the paramagnetic region up to room temperature; however, some of the compounds exhibit long-range magnetic order at lower temperatures (ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic). In particular, the data provide evidence for magnetic ground states for most of the metal hexacyanochromates and all of the metal hexacyanoferrates but none of the hexacyanocobaltates that were studied. For each of the compounds, my analysis provides a measure of the effective magnetic moment, which is then compared with the predicted

  16. Variation in metallothionein gene expression is associated with adaptation to copper in the earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisker, Karina Vincents; Holmstrup, Martin; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2013-03-01

    Evolution of resistance to heavy metals has been reported for several populations of soil living organisms occurring at metal contaminated sites. Such genetically based and heritable resistance contribute to the persistence of populations in contaminated areas. Here we report on molecular responses to experimental copper in populations of the earthworm, Dendrobaena octaedra, originating from copper contaminated soil near Gusum (Sweden) where heavy metal pollution has been present for several decades. We studied gene expression of six genes potentially involved in resistance to copper toxicity using F2-generations of D. octaedra populations, originating from reference sites and contaminated (High, Medium and Low) sites around Gusum. The main result was different expression patterns of genes encoding for two different isoforms (mt1 and mt2) of metallothionein proteins during experimental exposure to copper contaminated soil. Expression of mt1 showed a fast and significant upregulation in the High population and a slower, albeit significant, upregulation in Medium and Low populations. However, in the three reference populations no upregulation were seen. In comparison, a fast upregulation was also seen for the High population in the isoform mt2, whereas, gene expression of all other populations, including reference populations, showed slower upregulation in response to experimental copper. The results indicate that copper resistance in D. octaedra from contaminated areas is related to an increased expression of metallothioneins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pseudoazurin from Sinorhizobium meliloti as an electron donor to copper-containing nitrite reductase: influence of the redox partner on the reduction potentials of the enzyme copper centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Félix M; Marangon, Jacopo; Neuman, Nicolás I; Cristaldi, Julio C; Brambilla, Silvina M; Guerrero, Sergio A; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto C; Brondino, Carlos D

    2014-08-01

    Pseudoazurin (Paz) is the physiological electron donor to copper-containing nitrite reductase (Nir), which catalyzes the reduction of NO2 (-) to NO. The Nir reaction mechanism involves the reduction of the type 1 (T1) copper electron transfer center by the external physiological electron donor, intramolecular electron transfer from the T1 copper center to the T2 copper center, and nitrite reduction at the type 2 (T2) copper catalytic center. We report the cloning, expression, and characterization of Paz from Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 (SmPaz), the ability of SmPaz to act as an electron donor partner of S. meliloti 2011 Nir (SmNir), and the redox properties of the metal centers involved in the electron transfer chain. Gel filtration chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis together with UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies revealed that as-purified SmPaz is a mononuclear copper-containing protein that has a T1 copper site in a highly distorted tetrahedral geometry. The SmPaz/SmNir interaction investigated electrochemically showed that SmPaz serves as an efficient electron donor to SmNir. The formal reduction potentials of the T1 copper center in SmPaz and the T1 and T2 copper centers in SmNir, evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and by UV-vis- and EPR-mediated potentiometric titrations, are against an efficient Paz T1 center to Nir T1 center to Nir T2 center electron transfer. EPR experiments proved that as a result of the SmPaz/SmNir interaction in the presence of nitrite, the order of the reduction potentials of SmNir reversed, in line with T1 center to T2 center electron transfer being thermodynamically more favorable.

  18. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, J.B. Jr.; Myers, B.M.; Kost, L.J.; Kuntz, S.M.; LaRusso, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload

  19. Aqueous synthesis of PEGylated copper sulfide nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ke; Zeng, Jianfeng; Jing, Lihong; Qiao, Ruirui; Liu, Chunyan; Jiao, Mingxia; Li, Zhen; Gao, Mingyuan

    2015-06-01

    By integrating high imaging sensitivity and high resolution in a single modality, photoacoustic (PA) imaging emerges as a promising diagnostic tool for clinical applications. Benefiting from the absorption in the near-infrared region (NIR), copper sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) as a contrast agent are potentially useful for increasing the sensitivity of PA imaging. However, the aqueous synthesis of size-tunable, biocompatible and colloidally stable copper sulfide NPs remains challenging due to the intrinsic dipole-dipole interactions among particles. In this work, aqueous synthesis of PEGylated copper sulfide NPs with controllable size between 3 and 7 nm was developed. The particle size-dependent contrast enhancement effect of the copper sulfide NPs for PA imaging was carefully studied both in vitro and in vivo. Although the contrast enhancement effect of the copper sulfide NPs is proportional to particle size, the in vivo studies revealed that copper sulfide NPs smaller than 5 nm presented higher tumor imaging performance, especially at the tumor boundary site, which was further discussed in combination with the pharmacokinetic behaviors of differently sized particles.By integrating high imaging sensitivity and high resolution in a single modality, photoacoustic (PA) imaging emerges as a promising diagnostic tool for clinical applications. Benefiting from the absorption in the near-infrared region (NIR), copper sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) as a contrast agent are potentially useful for increasing the sensitivity of PA imaging. However, the aqueous synthesis of size-tunable, biocompatible and colloidally stable copper sulfide NPs remains challenging due to the intrinsic dipole-dipole interactions among particles. In this work, aqueous synthesis of PEGylated copper sulfide NPs with controllable size between 3 and 7 nm was developed. The particle size-dependent contrast enhancement effect of the copper sulfide NPs for PA imaging was carefully studied both in vitro and in

  20. Leaching of Copper Ore by Thiobacillus Ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, John; Biaha, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative laboratory exercise based upon the procedures copper manufacturers employ to increase copper production is described. The role of chemoautotrophic microorganisms in biogeologic process is emphasized. Safety considerations when working with bacteria are included. (KR)

  1. Electrochemical behaviour of alkaline copper complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cyanide- plating bath for copper has been developed using alkaline trisodium citrate and triethanolamine solutions5. The present investigation presents cyclic voltammetric studies on the electrochemical behaviour of alkaline copper complexes, ...

  2. Testing Corrosion Inhibitors for the Conservation of Archaeological Copper and Copper Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Faltermeier

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a synopsis of the Ph.D. research undertaken at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. The aim was to evaluate corrosion inhibitors for use in the conservation of copper and copper alloy archaeological artefacts. The objective of this work was to acquire an insight into the performance of copper corrosion inhibitors, when applied to archaeological copper.

  3. Copper tolerance of Trichoderma species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić-Petrović Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some Trichoderma strains can persist in ecosystems with high concentrations of heavy metals. The aim of this research was to examine the variability of Trichoderma strains isolated from different ecosystems, based on their morphological properties and restriction analysis of ITS fragments. The fungal growth was tested on potato dextrose agar, amended with Cu(II concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 10 mmol/l, in order to identify copper-resistant strains. The results indicate that some isolated strains of Trichoderma sp. show tolerance to higher copper concentrations. Further research to examine the ability of copper bioaccumulation by tolerant Trichoderma strains is needed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31080 i br. III 43010

  4. Mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulfide with iron was induced in a Fritsch P-6 planetary mill, using WC vial filled with argon and WC balls. Samples milled for specific intervals were analyzed by XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Most of the reaction takes place during the first 10 min...... of milling and only FeS and Cu are found after 60 min. The main chemical process is accompanied by phase transformations of the sulfide phases as a result of milling. Djurleite partially transformed to chalcocite and a tetragonal copper sulfide phase before reduction. The cubic modification of FeS was formed...... first, transforming to hexagonal during the later stages of the process. The formation of off-stoichiometric phases and the release of some elemental sulfur by copper sulfide are also probable....

  5. Laser sintering of copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenou, Michael; Saar, Amir; Ermak, Oleg; Kotler, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Copper nanoparticle (NP) inks serve as an attractive potential replacement to silver NP inks in functional printing applications. However their tendency to rapidly oxidize has so far limited their wider use. In this work we have studied the conditions for laser sintering of Cu-NP inks in ambient conditions while avoiding oxidation. We have determined the regime for stable, low-resistivity copper (< ×3 bulk resistivity value) generation in terms of laser irradiance and exposure duration and have indicated the limits on fast processing. The role of pre-drying conditions on sintering outcome has also been studied. A method, based on spectral reflectivity measurements, was used for non-contact monitoring of the sintering process evolution. It also indicates preferred spectral regions for sintering. Finally, we illustrated how selective laser sintering can generate high-quality, fine line (<5 µm wide) and dense copper circuits. (paper)

  6. Ab initio calculations of non-stoichiometric copper nitride, pure and with palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Armenta, Maria G.; Soto, Gerardo; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The most stable arrangement corresponds to the Cu 3 N-anti ReO 3 structure. → Formation energy of Cu 32 Vac 0 N 8 and Cu 24 Pd 8 Vac 0 N 8 are very similar. → The biggest volume in the compound is Cu 31 Pd 1 Vac 0 N 8/ . → Small amount introduction of extra metal atoms in copper nitride is possible. - Abstract: We present first principles calculations of copper nitride by using periodic density functional theory within a plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential scheme. The insertions of extra Cu and/or Pd atoms in the empty sites, vacancy reorganization, and substitution of Cu by Pd atoms were studied. We have used an equivalent reduced-symmetry 2 x 2 x 2 Cu 3 N-like cubic super-cell. Small Cu and/or Pd concentrations and vacancy rearrangements in the copper sub-lattice were conveniently calculated in these low-symmetry cells. We cover probable situations like: the occupation of the initially empty copper sites by (1) copper atoms, and by (2) palladium; (3) the relocation of vacancies in the copper sub-lattice; and (4) the substitution of small quantities of copper by palladium atoms in the copper sub-lattice. The equilibrium volumes and energies after relaxing the atomic positions are compared to those of intrinsic copper nitride. We found that the most stable arrangement corresponds to the ideal stoichiometric Cu 3 N. We also found that any deviation from this ideal configuration shift the semiconductor state to a metallic or semi-metallic one.

  7. Cover crops influence soil microorganisms and phytoextraction of copper from a moderately contaminated vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, K A; Schmidt, H P; Müller, T; Kandeler, E

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the ability of summer (Avena sativa [oat], Trifolium incarnatum [crimson clover], Chenopodium [goosefoot]) and winter (Vicia villosa [hairy vetch], Secale Cereale L. [Rye], Brassica napus L. partim [rape]) cover crops, including a mixed species treatment, to extract copper from an organic vineyard soil in situ and the microbial communities that may support it. Clover had the highest copper content (14.3mgCukg(-1) DM). However, it was the amount of total biomass production that determined which species was most effective at overall copper removal per hectare. The winter crop rye produced significantly higher amounts of biomass (3532kgDMha(-1)) and, therefore, removed significantly higher amounts of copper (14,920mgCuha(-1)), despite less accumulation of copper in plant shoots. The maximum annual removal rate, a summation of best performing summer and winter crops, would be 0.033kgCuha(-1)y(-1). Due to this low annual extraction efficiency, which is less than the 6kgCuha(-1)y(-1) permitted for application, phytoextraction cannot be recommended as a general method of copper extraction from vineyards. Copper concentration did not influence aboveground or belowground properties, as indicated by sampling at two distances from the grapevine row with different soil copper concentrations. Soil microorganisms may have become tolerant to the copper levels at this site. Microbial biomass and soil enzyme activities (arylsulfatase and phosphatase) were instead driven by seasonal fluxes of resource pools. Gram+ bacteria were associated with high soil moisture, while fungi seemed to be driven by extractable carbon, which was linked to high plant biomass. There was no microbial group associated with the increased phytoextraction of copper. Moreover, treatment did not influence the abundance, activity or community structure of soil microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Landscape Planning of Funiushan Copper Mine Wasteland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Pan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional governance of mine waste land is given priority to recovery engineering, and pays the limited attention to the vegetation selection and landscape design. Taking the Nanjing Funiu copper mine as an example, the engineering geological conditions, the hydrological and geological conditions, soil type, climatic conditions, plant resources, mining sites and the surrounding economic and population development were well understood through field investigation and review of literature, and the 127 soil samples were collected and analyzed for soil heavy metal pollution of the region. The landscape planning ideas and concrete plans were proposed in this paper in order to play an exemplary role in ecological management and landscape planning of mine waste land.

  9. Diagnostic efficiency of toluidine blue with Lugol's iodine in oral premalignant and malignant lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, Kamarthi; Prasad, Shiva; Ashok, L

    2010-01-01

    In vivo stains are prompt resources, which have emerged, in the recent years, to aid as clinical diagnostic tools in detecting early premalignant and malignant lesions. The aim of the study was to determine the diagnostic efficiency of toluidine blue with Lugol's iodine in oral premalignancies and malignancies and to evaluate the reliability of in vivo staining with toluidine blue and Lugol's iodine in the lesions at risk of malignancy. The study group comprised 30 subjects with clinically suspicious premalignant lesions and 30 subjects with clinically suspicious malignant lesions. All the lesions were stained consecutively with toluidine blue and Lugol's iodine and the dye retention were recorded with photographs. Depending on the retention of the dyes, the biopsy site was determined. The biopsy specimens were sent for histological confirmation and results were statistically analyzed. The overall diagnostic accuracy of Lugol's iodine when used consecutively with toluidine blue stain in distinguishing premalignant lesions and malignant lesions was 90%. As the degree of differentiation of malignant lesions progressed toward more severity, they failed to show the retention of Lugol's iodine and the result was highly significant statistically, with a P value Lugol's iodine when used with toluidine blue helped in delineating the inflammatory lesions and was the mean source in determining clinically the degrees of differentiation of malignant lesions as the poorly differentiated malignant lesions without glycogen content failed to show Lugol's iodine retention. Toluidine blue with Lugol's iodine can be used as a pretherapeutic assessment of the biologic aggressiveness of the disease.

  10. The Biology of blue-green algae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carr, Nicholas G; Whitton, B. A

    1973-01-01

    .... Their important environmental roles, their part in nitrogen fixation and the biochemistry of phototrophic metabolism are some of the attractions of blue-geen algae to an increasing number of biologists...

  11. Random lasing in blue phase liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Wei; Jau, Hung-Chang; Wang, Chun-Ta; Lee, Chun-Hong; Khoo, I C; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2012-10-08

    Random lasing actions have been observed in optically isotropic pure blue-phase and polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystals containing laser dyes. Scattering, interferences and recurrent multiple scatterings arising from disordered platelet texture as well as index mismatch between polymer and mesogen in these materials provide the optical feedbacks for lasing action. In polymer stabilized blue-phase liquid crystals, coherent random lasing could occur in the ordered blue phase with an extended temperature interval as well as in the isotropic liquid state. The dependence of lasing wavelength range, mode characteristics, excitation threshold and other pertinent properties on temperature and detailed make-up of the crystals platelets were obtained. Specifically, lasing wavelengths and mode-stability were found to be determined by platelet size, which can be set by controlling the cooling rate; lasing thresholds and emission spectrum are highly dependent on, and therefore can be tuned by temperature.

  12. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Protonation of Patented Blue V ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    XTreme.ws

    SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. Protonation of Patented Blue V in aqueous solutions: Theoretical and experimental studies. KATERYNA BEVZIUKa, ALEXANDER CHEBOTAREVa, MAKSYM FIZERb,. ANASTASIIA KLOCHKOVAa, KONSTANTIN PLIUTAa and DENYS SNIGURa*. aDepartment of Analytical Chemistry, ...

  13. Refining processes in the copper casting technology

    OpenAIRE

    Rzadkosz, S.; Kranc, M.; Garbacz-Klempka, A.; Kozana, J.; Piękoś, M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of technology of copper and alloyed copper destined for power engineering casts. The casts quality was assessed based on microstructure, chemical content analysis and strength properties tests. Characteristic deoxidising (Logas, Cup) and modifying (ODM2, Kupmod2) formulas were used for the copper where high electrical conductivity was required. Chosen examples of alloyed copper with varied Cr and Zr content were studied, and the optimal heat treatment parameter...

  14. Tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniukov, E; Yakimchuk, D; Kozlovsky, A; Shlimas, D; Zdorovets, M; Kadyrzhanov, K

    2016-01-01

    Simple method of tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes based on template synthesis was developed. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of the obtained nanostructures was carried out. Characterization of structural features was made by methods of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry analysis. Evaluation of wall thickness is made by methods of gas permeability. Electrical conductivity of nanotubes was define in the study of their current-voltage characteristics. The possibility to control of copper nanotubes physical properties by variation of the deposition parameters was shown. (paper)

  15. Soil and sediment concentrations of chromium, copper, and arsenic adjacent to a chromated copper arsenate-treated wetland boardwalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan Lebow; Daniel Foster

    2010-01-01

    Environmental accumulation of preservative adjacent to a chromated copper arsenate (type C)–treated wetland boardwalk was evaluated. The site is considered a realistic ‘‘worst case’’ because of the large volume of treated wood, low current speeds, high annual rainfall, and environmental sensitivity. Soil and sediment samples were collected before construction and 0.5,...

  16. Limits on carbon sequestration in arid blue carbon ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, Lisa M; Kauffman, J Boone; Crooks, Stephen; Fourqurean, James W; Glavan, Jane; Megonigal, J Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Coastal ecosystems produce and sequester significant amounts of carbon ("blue carbon"), which has been well documented in humid and semi-humid regions of temperate and tropical climates but less so in arid regions where mangroves, marshes, and seagrasses exist near the limit of their tolerance for extreme temperature and salinity. To better understand these unique systems, we measured whole-ecosystem carbon stocks in 58 sites across the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in natural and planted mangroves, salt marshes, seagrass beds, microbial mats, and coastal sabkha (inter- and supratidal unvegetated salt flats). Natural mangroves held significantly more carbon in above- and belowground biomass than other vegetated ecosystems. Planted mangrove carbon stocks increased with age, but there were large differences for sites of similar age. Soil carbon varied widely across sites (2-367 Mg C/ha), with ecosystem averages that ranged from 49 to 156 Mg C/ha. For the first time, microbial mats were documented to contain soil carbon pools comparable to vascular plant-dominated ecosystems, and could arguably be recognized as a unique blue carbon ecosystem. Total ecosystem carbon stocks ranged widely from 2 to 515 Mg C/ha (seagrass bed and mangrove, respectively). Seagrass beds had the lowest carbon stock per unit area, but the largest stock per total area due to their large spatial coverage. Compared to similar ecosystems globally, mangroves and marshes in the UAE have lower plant and soil carbon stocks; however, the difference in soil stocks is far larger than with plant stocks. This incongruent difference between stocks is likely due to poor carbon preservation under conditions of weakly reduced soils (200-350 mV), coarse-grained sediments, and active shoreline migration. This work represents the first attempt to produce a country-wide coastal ecosystem carbon accounting using a uniform sampling protocol, and was motivated by specific policy goals identified by the Abu Dhabi Global

  17. Blue emitting organic semiconductors under high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Guha, Suchismita

    2016-01-01

    This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure and inter......This review describes essential optical and emerging structural experiments that use high GPa range hydrostatic pressure to probe physical phenomena in blue-emitting organic semiconductors including π-conjugated polyfluorene and related compounds. The work emphasizes molecular structure...

  18. Blue Flag: a Symbol of Environmental Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Petroman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Blue Flag is a high standard symbol of environmental protection and it is awarded to the beaches and agreement ports by the Foundation of Education for the Environment. The beaches having been awarded this distinction warrant particular protection for their visitors, which is a particular point of tourism attractiveness: the result, they are preferred by tourists and, therefore, by tour operators selling tourism packages for the littoral. In 2009, Romanian beaches were not awarded any Blue Flags.

  19. Temporal assessment of copper speciation, bioavailability and toxicity in UK freshwaters using chemical equilibrium and biotic ligand models: Implications for compliance with copper environmental quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathouri, Maria; Korre, Anna

    2015-12-15

    Although significant progress has been made in understanding how environmental factors modify the speciation, bioavailability and toxicity of metals such as copper in aquatic environments, the current methods used to establish water quality standards do not necessarily consider the different geological and geochemical characteristics of a given site and the factors that affect copper fate, bioavailability potential and toxicity. In addition, the temporal variation in the concentration and bioavailable metal fraction is also important in freshwater systems. The work presented in this paper illustrates the temporal and seasonal variability of a range of water quality parameters, and Cu speciation, bioavailability and toxicity at four freshwaters sites in the UK. Rivers Coquet, Cree, Lower Clyde and Eden (Kent) were selected to cover a broad range of different geochemical environments and site characteristics. The monitoring data used covered a period of around six years at almost monthly intervals. Chemical equilibrium modelling was used to study temporal variations in Cu speciation and was combined with acute toxicity modelling to assess Cu bioavailability for two aquatic species, Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex. The estimated copper bioavailability, toxicity levels and the corresponding ecosystem risks were analysed in relation to key water quality parameters (alkalinity, pH and DOC). Although copper concentrations did not vary much during the sampling period or between the seasons at the different sites; copper bioavailability varied markedly. In addition, through the chronic-Cu BLM-based on the voluntary risk assessment approach, the potential environmental risk in terms of the chronic toxicity was assessed. A much higher likelihood of toxicity effects was found during the cold period at all sites. It is suggested that besides the metal (copper) concentration in the surface water environment, the variability and seasonality of other important water quality

  20. Electrical conduction in composites containing copper core–copper ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of Mott's small polaron hopping conduction model. ... sample exhibited a metallic conduction confirming the formation of a percolative chain of ..... value of εp. Also the oxide layer formation on the initially unoxidized copper particles will increase the resistivity level of the nanocomposite. This is borne out by results shown in ...

  1. Joining of alumina via copper/niobium/copper interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Robert A.; Chapman, Daniel R.; Danielson, David T.; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2000-03-15

    Alumina has been joined at 1150 degrees C and 1400 degrees C using multilayer copper/niobium/copper interlayers. Four-point bend strengths are sensitive to processing temperature, bonding pressure, and furnace environment (ambient oxygen partial pressure). Under optimum conditions, joints with reproducibly high room temperature strengths (approximately equal 240 plus/minus 20 MPa) can be produced; most failures occur within the ceramic. Joints made with sapphire show that during bonding an initially continuous copper film undergoes a morphological instability, resulting in the formation of isolated copper-rich droplets/particles at the sapphire/interlayer interface, and extensive regions of direct bonding between sapphire and niobium. For optimized alumina bonds, bend tests at 800 degrees C-1100 degrees C indicate significant strength is retained; even at the highest test temperature, ceramic failure is observed. Post-bonding anneals at 1000 degrees C in vacuum or in gettered argon were used to assess joint stability and to probe the effect of ambient oxygen partial pressure on joint characteristics. Annealing in vacuum for up to 200 h causes no significant decrease in room temperature bend strength or change in fracture path. With increasing anneal time in a lower oxygen partial pressure environment, the fracture strength decreases only slightly, but the fracture path shifts from the ceramic to the interface.

  2. Structure transitions between copper-sulphate and copper-chloride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Structure transitions between copper UPD adlayers on Au(111)–(1 × 1) in sulfuric acid and chloride containing electrolyte were investigated by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy. We demon- strate that co-adsorbed sulphate ions in the (√3 × √3)R30° UPD adlayer are replaced by chloride ions and,.

  3. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    A method was established for measuring the adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution to unmodified and modified peanut hulls at constant temperature and pH. Modification of the hulls was performed by oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. During the modification process, the hydrogen peroxide solubilizes the lignin component, making the surface more porous which increases the availability of binding sites, while simultaneously oxidizing the cellulose. The oxidation of alcohol groups creates more binding sites by creating functional groups such as COO-, which increases chelation to metal ions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms delignification of the peanut hulls by the disappearance of carboxyl peaks of the modified hulls, which were originally produced from the lignin content. Although, oxidation is not fully confirmed, it is not ruled out because the expected carboxylate peak (1680 cm-1) maybe overshadowed by a broad peak due to OH bending of water adsorbed to the hulls. Hulls adsorbed copper from solutions in the concentration range of 50-1000 ppm of CuCl2. Concentrations of pre- and post-adsorption solutions were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms were fit to known two and three-parameter models, evaluated and the binding mechanism was inferred. Maximum surface coverage was 3.5 +/- 0.6 mg Cu2+ /g hull for unmodified hulls and 11 +/- 1 mg Cu2+/g hull for modified hulls. The adsorption for the hulls is best described by the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer, homogeneous adsorption. With a free energy of adsorption of 10.5 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for unmodified hulls and 14.5 +/-0.4 kJ/mol for modified hulls, the process is categorized as chemisorption for both types of hulls. The adsorption for both hulls is also described by the Redlich-Peterson model, giving beta nearer to 1 than 0, which further suggests homogeneous adsorption described by the Langmuir model. After rinsing the hulls

  4. Olympic Dam copper-uranium-gold deposit, South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalor, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Olympic Dam copper-uranium-gold deposit was discovered in July 1975. It is located 650 km north-northwest of Adelaide on Roxby Downs Station in South Australia. The first diamond drill hole, RD1, intersected 38 m of 1.05% copper. A further eight holes were drilled with only marginal encouragement to November 1976, when RD10 cored 170 m of 2.12% copper and 0.06% of uranium oxide, thus confirming an economic discovery. The discovery of Olympic Dam is an excellent example applying broad-scale, scientifically based conceptual studies to area selection. Exploration management supported its exploration scientists in testing their ideas with stratigraphic drilling. Geologic modeling, supported by geophysical interpretations and tectonic studies, was used to site the first hole. The discovery also illustrates the persistence required in mineral exploration. The deposit appears to be a new type of stratabound sediment-hosted ore. It has an areal extent exceeding 20 km 2 with vertical thicknesses of mineralization up to 350 m. It is estimated to contain more than 2000 million MT of mineralized material with an average grade of 1.6% copper, 0.06% uranium oxide, and 0.6 g/MT gold. The deposit occurs in middle Proterozoic basement beneath 350 m of unmineralized, flat upper Proterozoic sediments. The sediments comprising the local basement sequence are predominantly sedimentary breccias controlled by a northwest-trending graben

  5. Effect of acrylonitrile on the electrode processes ivolving copper cations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor F. Vargalyuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of cyclic voltammetry and study of deposits morphology, it has been shown that acrylonitrile does not have significant effect on the mechanism of Cu2+ + 2ē → Cu0 reaction. This distinguishes acrylonitrile from the unsaturated polyfunctional organic substances (acrylic acid, acrylamide which forms stable complexes with Cu2+ ions. Acrylonitrile just inhibits cathodic process by adsorbing on the surface of electrode thus blocking its active sites. But the presence of acrylonitrile significantly changes the mechanism of the anodic process. It has been found that acrylonitrile interacts with surface copper atoms thus forming thermodynamically stable [Cu π-AN]0 π‑complexes. Ionization potential of these π‑complexes is more negative if compare to copper atoms. As the result acceleration of anodic process takes place in the low polarization area. However, since the chemisorption is a slow process the presence of acrylonitrile mainly affects dissolution of the first surface layers of copper atoms. Further ionization of copper atoms runs out directly and requires higher polarization.

  6. A copper vapor laser by using a copper-vapor-complex reaction at a low temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Toshiyuki; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser performance by using ametal-vapor-complex reaction (Cu+AlBr3) is reported. The laser operation is obtained at a low temperature without externalheating because of the AlBr3 vapors evaporating at a room temperature. The copper vapor laser using this metal-vapor-complex reaction has an advantage of deposition-free of a metallic copper to the laser tube wall, which is different from the copper halide and the organometallic copper lasers.

  7. Green synthesis of colloidal copper oxide nanoparticles using Carica papaya and its application in photocatalytic dye degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Manikandan, Perumal; Malarvizhi, Viswanathan; Fathima, Tajudeennasrin; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2014-01-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles were synthesized by treating 5 mM cupric sulphate with Carica papaya leaves extract. The kinetics of the reaction was studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry. An intense surface Plasmon resonance between 250-300 nm in the UV-vis spectrum clearly reveals the formation of copper oxide nanoparticles. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) exhibited that the green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles are rod in shape and having a mean particle size of 140 nm, further negative zeta potential disclose its stability at -28.9 mV. The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results examined the occurrence of bioactive functional groups required for the reduction of copper ions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra confirmed the copper oxide nanoparticles crystalline nature. Furthermore, colloidal copper oxide nanoparticles effectively degrade the Coomassie brilliant blue R-250 dye beneath the sunlight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 113Cd-NMR investigation of a cadmium-substituted copper, zinc-containing superoxide dismutase from yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Pauli; Bauer, Rogert; Danielsen, Eva

    1991-01-01

    113Cd nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate the metal binding sites of cadmium-substituted copper,zinc-containing superoxide dismutase from baker's yeast. NMR signals were obtained for 113Cd(II) at the Cu site as well as for 113Cd(II) at the Zn site. The two subunits...

  9. Growth of tropical tree species and absorption of copper in soil artificially contaminated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R F; Andreazza, R; Da Ros, C; Dellai, A; Jacques, R J S; Scheid, D

    2015-11-01

    Reclamation of copper contaminated sites using forest species may be an efficient alternative to reduce the negative impact. The aim of this study was to quantify the growth and evaluate the quality of seedlings of native species at different doses of copper in the soil. The experimental design was completely randomized, with seven replications in a factorial arrangement (3×9), using three indigenous species of plants (Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Mimosa scabrella and Apuleia leiocarpa) and nine doses of copper in the soil (0, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, 420 and 480 mg kg-1).The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse which the seedlings were grown for 180 days. The experimental units were plastic pots of 125 cm3 filled with Oxisol. The results indicated that the levels of copper applied to the soil decreased the quality of seedlings and growth of Apuleia leiocarpato a lesser extent compared with Mimosa scabrella and Anadenanthera macrocarpa. Anadenanthera macrocarpa was the forest species that resulted in the lowest copper translocation from roots to shoots. In addition, the Apuleia leiocarpa exhibited high resistance and tolerance for copper in the soil and also, it is highlighted an ability for copper phytoremediation.

  10. Growth of tropical tree species and absorption of copper in soil artificially contaminated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Reclamation of copper contaminated sites using forest species may be an efficient alternative to reduce the negative impact. The aim of this study was to quantify the growth and evaluate the quality of seedlings of native species at different doses of copper in the soil. The experimental design was completely randomized, with seven replications in a factorial arrangement (3×9, using three indigenous species of plants (Anadenanthera macrocarpa, Mimosa scabrella and Apuleia leiocarpa and nine doses of copper in the soil (0, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, 420 and 480 mg kg–1.The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse which the seedlings were grown for 180 days. The experimental units were plastic pots of 125 cm3 filled with Oxisol. The results indicated that the levels of copper applied to the soil decreased the quality of seedlings and growth of Apuleia leiocarpato a lesser extent compared with Mimosa scabrella and Anadenanthera macrocarpa. Anadenanthera macrocarpa was the forest species that resulted in the lowest copper translocation from roots to shoots. In addition, the Apuleia leiocarpa exhibited high resistance and tolerance for copper in the soil and also, it is highlighted an ability for copper phytoremediation.

  11. Sub-cellular damage by copper in the cnidarian Zoanthus robustus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A; Trompf, K; Seung, D; Nivison-Smith, L; Bowcock, H; Kresse, H; Holmes, S; Radford, J; Morrow, P

    2010-09-01

    Sessile organisms may experience chronic exposure to copper that is released into the marine environment from antifoulants and stormwater runoff. We have identified the site of damage caused by copper to the symbiotic cnidarian, Zoanthus robustus (Anthozoa, Hexacorallia). External changes to the zoanthids were apparent when compared with controls. The normally flexible bodies contracted and became rigid. Histological examination of the zoanthid tissue revealed that copper had caused sub-cellular changes to proteins within the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the tubular body. Collagen in the ECM and the internal septa increased in thickness to five and seven times that of controls respectively. The epithelium, which stained for elastin, was also twice as thick and tough to cut, but exposure to copper did not change the total amount of desmosine which is found only in elastin. We conclude that copper stimulated collagen synthesis in the ECM and also caused cross-linking of existing proteins. However, there was no expulsion of the symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and no effect on algal pigments or respiration (44, 66 and 110 microg Cu L(-1)). A decrease in net photosynthesis was observed only at the highest copper concentration (156 microg Cu L(-1)). These results show that cnidarians may be more susceptible to damage by copper than their symbiotic algae. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. on THICKNESS OF COPPER (|) OXIDE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-12-20

    Dec 20, 2006 ... semiconductor devices. The oxide is. Observed to be an attractive starting material for the production of solar cells for low cost terrestrial conversion of solar energy to electricity. Copper (I) oxide is one Of the earliest known photovoltaic materials and the first in which the photovOltaic effect was successfully ...

  13. A Study of Protection of Copper Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. A.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    Volatile treatment of high capacity boiler water with hydrazine and ammonia is studied. Ammonia comes from the decomposition of excess hydrazine injected to treat dissolved oxygen. Ammonia is also injected for the control of pH. To find an effect of such ammonia on the copper alloy, the relations between pH and iron, and ammonia and copper are studied. Since the dependence of corrosion of iron on pH differs from that of copper, a range of pH was selected experimentally to minimize the corrosion rates of both copper and iron. Corrosion rates of various copper alloys are also compared

  14. Chronic copper toxicity in a dairy herd

    OpenAIRE

    Perrin, David J.; Schiefer, H. Bruno; Blakley, Barry R.

    1990-01-01

    The addition of excessive copper to a commercially prepared dairy ration caused chronic copper toxicity in a dairy herd. A formulation error by a feed company resulted in copper levels of 800 to 1,000 mg/kg in the “as fed concentrate,” amounting to about 400-500 mg copper/kg of the whole ration. Five animals died with typical signs of acute copper toxicity, including intravascular hemolysis and methemoglobinemia. A further 39 cows died on the farm from a combination of debilitation and second...

  15. Comparison of Alcian Blue, Trypan Blue, and Toluidine Blue for Visualization of the Primo Vascular System Floating in Lymph Ducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Un Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primo vascular system (PVS, floating in lymph ducts, was too transparent to be observed by using a stereomicroscope. It was only detectable with the aid of staining dyes, for instance, Alcian blue, which was injected into the lymph nodes. Some dyes were absorbed preferentially by the PVS than the lymph wall. It remains a standing problem to know what dyes are absorbed better by the PVS than the lymph walls. Such information would be useful to unravel the biochemical properties of the PVS that are badly in need for obtaining large amount of PVS specimens. In the current work we tried two other familiar dyes which were used in PVS research before. We found that Trypan blue and toluidine blue did not visualize the PVS. Trypan blue was cleared by the natural washing. Toluidine blue did not stain the PVS, but it did leave stained spots in the lymph wall and its surrounding tissues, and it leaked out of the lymph wall to stain surrounding connective tissues. These completely different behaviors of the three dyes were found for the first time in the current work and provide valuable information to elucidate the mechanism through which some special dyes stained the PVS preferentially compared to the lymphatic wall.

  16. Copper Oxidation through Nucleation Sites of Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Birong; Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf; Shivayogimath, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nucleation defect-triggered oxidation of Cu covered by CVD graphene during postannealing in air. The results reveal that different growth conditions may induce imperfect nucleation of graphene, and cause creation of defects near the nucleation point such as pin holes and amorph...

  17. Controlling Copper Electrochemical Deposition (ECD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Michael; McDonald, Robert; Anderson, Marc; Kingston, Skip; Mui, Rudy

    2003-09-01

    The implementation of copper processing in semiconductor manufacturing has resulted in major process development and manufacturing challenges. A fundamental understanding of the copper plating processes used in manufacturing has been limited by the lack of in-line methods for direct measurement and control of process chemistry. Plating bath chemistry adjustments and change-out frequencies are currently determined using a combination of indirect electrochemical monitoring techniques, off-line analyses of wafer metrology and analytical lab measurements. There have been a number of industry reports of major process startup delays, yield management problems and reliability issues as a result of these difficulties. A new in-process mass spectrometry (IPMS) approach enables automated, real-time measurement of both the inorganic components and organic additives in the copper electroplating chemistry as they change during production. The tool is not only capable of real time direct quantification of the copper, chloride, pH, and organic additives in the plating bath, but can also monitor additive breakdown byproducts as they occur during the production process. These breakdown products, as well as changes in the original bath constituent composition can be expected to have a major impact on process performance. We are now in the process of measuring longer term plating bath stability and chemistry changes in prototype applications in semiconductor fab manufacturing environments. The first results demonstrate improved process understanding and the potential for greatly improved process control. We will discuss the technical challenges that were successfully addressed in developing the IPMS capability for application to the copper plating process and the initial process data subsequently obtained.

  18. Chemical analysis of copper and brass samples from Christian Island, Georgian Bay, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, R.G.V.; Farquhar, R.M.; Pavlish, L.A.; Finlayson, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    One hundred and eighty-seven metal samples, recovered from the fortified mission of Ste. Marie II and nearby villages in Christian Island, include 3 samples of native copper, 22 samples of European copper, 19 samples of brassy copper (≤ 8% Zn), 141 brass samples and 2 samples of lead. The European copper samples from 5 distinct chemical groups, possibly coming from 5 different copper kettles. The brassy copper samples are more difficult to group. When the brass samples are sorted by Ag and As, they from 2 major groupings: group 1 with high Ag and low As contents; group 2 with similar Ag and As contents through to low Ag and high As contents. Group 1 consisted of 11 chemical sub-groups and 6 outlier s, while group 2 contributed 14 sub-groups and 14 outlier s. This combines to give a total of 45 potentially unrelated brass chemistries, and leads to the possibility of as few as 20 different brass trading items (mainly kettles) from which the samples were cut. The small sub-sets of samples from the sites away from Ste. Marie II tended to fit within chemical groups found there, suggesting some possible inter-site contemporaneity. (author). 21 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Variations on the "Blue-Bottle" Demonstration Using Food Items That Contain FD&C Blue #1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Felicia A.; Peterson, Joshua P.; Campbell, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Erioglaucine dye (FD&C Blue #1) can be used instead of methylene blue in the classic "blue-bottle" demonstration. Food items containing FD&C Blue #1 and reducing species such as sugars can therefore be used at the heart of this demonstration, which simply requires the addition of strong base such as sodium hydroxide lye.

  20. 21 CFR 133.184 - Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roquefort cheese, sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. 133.184 Section 133.184 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION..., sheep's milk blue-mold, and blue-mold cheese from sheep's milk. (a) Description. (1) Roquefort cheese...

  1. "Blue-Collar Blues" uurib töösuhteid uutes oludes / Janar Ala

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ala, Janar, 1979-

    2009-01-01

    Tööproblemaatikat käsitlev näitus "Blue-Collar Blues" Tallinna Kunstihoones ja Tallinna Kunstihoone galeriis 31. jaanuarini 2010, kuraator Anders Härm. Lähemalt belgia-mehhiko kunstniku Francis Alys'e videost, austria kunstniku Oliver Ressleri ning venetsueela-saksa politoloogi Dario Azzelini videost "Viis tehast. Tööliste kontroll Venezuelas"

  2. Synthesis of Copper Nanoparticles Biologically by Conocarpus erectus L. Aqueous Leaves Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihab Edan Kadhim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Biologically, the nanoparticles of copper synthesized by aqueous leaves extract of Cono- carpus erectus L. The copper nanoparticles appear rapidly with change in color when the leaf extract mixed with CuSO4 (0.1mM. The copper nanoparticles were character- ized by UV Visible Absorption Spectrometer (UV-S, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR, and Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM. By using UV-S, the wave length was around 400 nm, while the size of copper nanoparticles was around 39 nm characterized by XRD and SEM. The technique of FTIR showed the presence of active sites for alcoholic, phenolic, amines and other compounds.

  3. Insights into the oxidative degradation of cellulose by a copper metalloenzyme that exploits biomass components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, R Jason; Sweeney, Matt D; Lo Leggio, Leila; Otten, Harm; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Johansen, Katja Salomon; Krogh, Kristian B R M; Jørgensen, Christian Isak; Tovborg, Morten; Anthonsen, Annika; Tryfona, Theodora; Walter, Clive P; Dupree, Paul; Xu, Feng; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2011-09-13

    The enzymatic degradation of recalcitrant plant biomass is one of the key industrial challenges of the 21st century. Accordingly, there is a continuing drive to discover new routes to promote polysaccharide degradation. Perhaps the most promising approach involves the application of "cellulase-enhancing factors," such as those from the glycoside hydrolase (CAZy) GH61 family. Here we show that GH61 enzymes are a unique family of copper-dependent oxidases. We demonstrate that copper is needed for GH61 maximal activity and that the formation of cellodextrin and oxidized cellodextrin products by GH61 is enhanced in the presence of small molecule redox-active cofactors such as ascorbate and gallate. By using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, the active site of GH61 is revealed to contain a type II copper and, uniquely, a methylated histidine in the copper's coordination sphere, thus providing an innovative paradigm in bioinorganic enzymatic catalysis.

  4. Serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels and urinary copper excretion in thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boosalis, M G; McCall, J T; Solem, L D; Ahrenholz, D H; McClain, C J

    1986-12-01

    Conflicting reports regarding copper status in thermal injury patients have been published. We determined serial serum-copper and serum-ceruloplasmin levels and 24-h urinary excretion of copper in 23 patients with second- and third-degree thermal burns. Throughout hospitalization, mean serum-copper concentration was significantly depressed; lowest levels were found in patients with greater than 40% total body surface area burns. Serum ceruloplasmin was also depressed, an unexpected finding because this protein is a positive acute-phase reactant poststress. Mean urinary excretion of copper was elevated, reaching 2.5 times the upper limit of normal 2 wk postburn. Depressed serum-copper levels paralleled the serum-ceruloplasmin levels rather than the increased urinary-copper losses. Further studies are required to determine the mechanism(s) of this altered copper metabolism and whether physiological or biochemical evidence of copper deficiency accompanies the observed hypocupremia.

  5. Variations of serum copper values in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukelić Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Copper is essential micronutrient and has an important role in the human body. The serum copper increases during pregnancy and is doubled at full term. Lower levels of serum copper in pregnancy are connected with some pathological conditions. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of serum copper in normal and pathological pregnancies, comparing them with values of serum copper in non-pregnant women, to determine if serum copper is lower in some pathological pregnancies and if this is of some importance. Methods. A total of 2170 plasma samples for copper analyses were made in the following groups: healthy non-pregnant women; healthy pregnant women from the 5th-40th gestational week, during the first delivery stage and during the first three postpartum weeks, in pregnant women with habitual abortion, imminent abortion, abortion in progress, missed abortion (9th-24th weeks, missed labour and premature rupture of membranes (29th-40th weeks. Levels of serum copper were determined by colorimetric technique of bathocuproin with disulphate as a chromogen. Results. Serum copper values in non-pregnant women range from 11.6-25.8 μmol/L. In healthy pregnant women, there is a constant trend of the increase of serum copper. The mean serum copper values revealed three significant peaks at the 22nd, 27th and 35th gestational week. Serum copper values in the patients with some pathological pregnancies in relation to the serum copper values of the healthy pregnant women were significantly lower. Conclusion. Serum copper values can be used as an indicator of some pathological pregnancies.

  6. Dyes adsorption blue vegetable and blue watercolor by natural zeolites modified with surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardon S, C. C.; Olguin G, M. T.; Diaz N, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work was carried out the dyes removal blue vegetable and blue watercolor of aqueous solutions, to 20 C, at different times and using a zeolite mineral of Parral (Chihuahua, Mexico) modified with hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide or dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide. The zeolite was characterized before and after of its adaptation with NaCl and later with HDTMABr and DTMABr. For the materials characterization were used the scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum; elementary microanalysis by X-ray spectroscopy of dispersed energy and X-ray diffraction techniques. It was found that the surfactant type absorbed in the zeolite material influences on the adsorption process of the blue dye. Likewise, the chemical structure between the vegetable blue dye and the blue watercolor, determines the efficiency of the color removal of the water, by the zeolites modified with the surfactants. (Author)

  7. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choveaux David L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369, containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds.

  8. Natural polymers supported copper nanoparticles for pollutants degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, Sajjad [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, P.O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Kamal, Tahseen, E-mail: tkkhan@kau.edu.sa [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research (CEAMR), King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Sher Bahadar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research (CEAMR), King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Omer, Muhammad [Institute of Chemical Sciences, University of Swat, Odigram, Swat, 19130, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Haider, Adnan [Department of Nano, Medical and Polymer Materials, College of Engineering, Yeungnam University, 280 Daehak-Ro, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Khan, Farman Ullah; Asiri, Abdullah M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research (CEAMR), King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Chitosan (CS) coating layer was applied on the surface of cellulose microfibers mat (CMM). • The CS coating layer was used to uptake the Copper (Cu) ions which were converted to nanoparticles. • The Cu/CS-CMM was demonstrated as catalyst in nitrophenols and cresyl blue reductions. • The rate constants for 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol and cresyl blue were 1.2 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, 2.1 × 10{sup −3} s {sup −1} and, 1.3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, respectively. • The used catalyst was easily recovered by just pulling the strip from solutions. - Abstract: In this report, chitosan (CS) was adhered on cellulose microfiber mat (CMM) to prepare CS-CMM. This was used as host for copper (Cu) nanoparticles preparation. After adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions from an aqueous solution of CuSO{sub 4}, the metal ions entrapped in CS coating layer was treated with sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) to prepare Cu nanoparticles loaded CS-CMM (Cu/CS-CMM). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of Cu/CS-CMM hybrid. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed to reveal the morphology of the prepared catalyst. The prepared Cu/CS-CMM was employed as a catalyst for the degradation of nitro-aromatic compounds of 2-nitrophenol (2NP) and 4-nitrophenol (4NP) as well as an organic cresyl blue (CB) dye. Remarkably, the turnover frequency in the case of 2NP and 4NP using Cu/CS-CMM reaches 103.3 and 88.6 h{sup −1}, outperforming previously reported Cu nanoparticles immobilized in hydrogel-based catalytic systems. The rate constants for 2NP, 4NP and CB were 1.2 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, 2.1 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} and, 1.3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, respectively. Besides, we discussed the separation of the catalyst from the reaction mixture and its re-usability.

  9. Uptake and internalisation of copper by three marine microalgae: comparison of copper-sensitive and copper-tolerant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jacqueline L; Angel, Brad M; Stauber, Jennifer L; Poon, Wing L; Simpson, Stuart L; Cheng, Shuk Han; Jolley, Dianne F

    2008-08-29

    Although it has been well established that different species of marine algae have different sensitivities to metals, our understanding of the physiological and biochemical basis for these differences is limited. This study investigated copper adsorption and internalisation in three algal species with differing sensitivities to copper. The diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was particularly sensitive to copper, with a 72-h IC50 (concentration of copper to inhibit growth rate by 50%) of 8.0 microg Cu L(-1), compared to the green algae Tetraselmis sp. (72-h IC50 47 microg Cu L(-1)) and Dunaliella tertiolecta (72-h IC50 530 microg Cu L(-1)). At these IC50 concentrations, Tetraselmis sp. had much higher intracellular copper (1.97+/-0.01 x 10(-13)g Cu cell(-1)) than P. tricornutum (0.23+/-0.19 x 10(-13)g Cu cell(-1)) and D. tertiolecta (0.59+/-0.05 x 10(-13)g Cu cell(-1)), suggesting that Tetraselmis sp. effectively detoxifies copper within the cell. By contrast, at the same external copper concentration (50 microg L(-1)), D. tertiolecta appears to better exclude copper than Tetraselmis sp. by having a slower copper internalisation rate and lower internal copper concentrations at equivalent extracellular concentrations. The results suggest that the use of internal copper concentrations and net uptake rates alone cannot explain differences in species-sensitivity for different algal species. Model prediction of copper toxicity to marine biota and understanding fundamental differences in species-sensitivity will require, not just an understanding of water quality parameters and copper-cell binding, but also further knowledge of cellular detoxification mechanisms.

  10. Complexing of Copper (II) by Four Types of Polyphenols of Nutritional Origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AL-Joubbeh, M.

    2009-01-01

    The complexing of Cu + + by quercetin, rutin, galangin and apigenin was carried out in order to determine the stoichiometry of each reaction. The coordination sites of copper in the four ligands were located and the stability constants were calculated. The effects of these compounds as antioxidants were investigated. All measurement were carried out in methanol/water solution at pH=6.41 and recorded using UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The stoichiometry, the coordination sites and the stability constants of the flavonoids and copper complexes were deduced from their optical absorption spectra.(author)

  11. A FT-IRAS study of the vibrational properties of CO adsorbed on Cu/Ru(001). II. The dispersion of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Paul, J.

    1987-08-01

    The dispersion of copper adsorbed on a Ru(001) substrate has been investigated by using Fourier transform-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRAS) and carbon monoxide as a molecular probe. Copper films evaporated at 85 K show a drastically different CO adsorption behavior compared to annealed films and exhibit a variety of adsorption sites. Characteristic C-O stretching frequencies allow us to identify small copper clusters of 1-4 atoms (2138-2123 cm-1), two-dimensional (2120-2110 cm-1) and three-dimensional (2098 cm-1) copper aggregates. After annealing to 250 K copper films at sub- and monolayer coverages form well-ordered small two- and three-dimensional copper aggregates. Formation of the epitaxial monolayer or islands of copper (2082 cm-1) requires a surprizingly mild annealing temperature of 350 K. Further annealing to 540 K results in increasing domain size of the copper islands or annealing of defect sites of the epitaxial monolayer. Multilayer coverages of copper evaporated at 85 K exhibit C-O stretching frequencies found for high-index copper single crystal surfaces, e.g., (211) and (755). This indicates a large number of surface steps and protruding copper atoms associated with rough films. Annealing to 540 K results in a smooth copper layer with preferential (111) orientation (2075 cm-1). The vibrational data presented here for Cu-Ru(001) agree well with previous reports of CO adsorption on copper single crystals, supported or evaporated films, and matrix-isolated clusters. They further allow us to determine the dispersion of supported Cu-Pt and Cu-Ni catalysts from data in the literature.

  12. Electrochemical in-situ impregnation of wood using a copper nail as source for copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Block, Thomas; Nymark, Morten

    2011-01-01

    A new method for copper impregnation of wood in structures was suggested and tested in laboratory scale with specimen of new pine sapwood. A copper nail and a steel screw were placed in the wood, and an electric direct current field was applied, so the copper nail was anode and the screw...... was cathode. At the anode, copper ions were generated. The copper ions were transported into the wood by electromigration (movement of ions in an applied electric field) towards the cathode, and a volume between the two electrodes was thereby impregnated. Copper also moved to a lesser degree in the opposite...

  13. Ammonia leaching of copper smelter dust and precipitation as copper sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, A.; Hevia, J. F.; Cifuentes, G.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of ammonia on the leaching of copper smelter dust and copper precipitation from these solutions as sulphide using sulfur and sulfur dioxide was studied. The precipitation was done in ammoniacal media because this solution produced more satisfactory results at room temperature that a sulphuric media. A solid was precipitated containing 60 % of copper of the dust smelter. The other waste generated contained around 80 % of the arsenic of the original copper smelter dust. Based on the preliminary results obtained in this work it will propose a procedure for the recovery of copper as sulphide from copper smelter dust with parallel confinement of arsenic. (Author) 14 refs.

  14. Symmetry in copper and silver cryptates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cryptand ligands imBT (1,4,7,10,13,16,21, 24-0ctaa2a-bicyclo [8.8.8]hexacosa- 4,6,13,15,21,23-hexaene) and amBT (1,4,7,10,13,16,21,24-Octaaza- bicyclo[8.8.8]hexacosane) form interesting disilver(I) and trisilver(l) cryptates, as well as a dicopper(I) and a well studied average valence dicopper(1.5) cryptate. Detailed structural and spectroscopic studies of the silver cryptates show that complex equilibria exist in solution, and the trisilver form appears to be thermodynamically favoured, the additional stabilisation apparently being due to argentophilic interactions. An optically pure form of the dicopper(I) imBT cryptate was successfully obtained, and is undergoing X-ray diffraction studies aimed at determining whether a copper-copper interaction exists, by direct examination of the electron density. Synthetic studies aimed at introducing substitution to the imBT and amBT ligands were complicated by competing reactions. A strategy to modify cryptand cavity size by incorporating asymmetric tetraamine caps succeeded, yielding dicopper(I) and disilver(I) cryptates with properties intermediate between cryptates incorporating the related symmetric caps. Manganese(II) cryptates of imBT and amBT were investigated as potential MRI contrast agents, the iminocryptate showing surprisingly high relaxivity, despite the fact that no water molecules were located in the crystal structure. The observation of high mass peaks in the FAB mass spectra of imBT and amBT cryptates suggests the presence of 6+4 Schiffbase condensation products, as well as the more abundant 3+2 products. It has not proved possible to isolate these molecules as yet, however initial studies aimed at a rational synthesis of the 6+4 condensation products were made, as these ligands could be of great interest for modelling the recently reported Cu z site. (author)

  15. Teknologi penyamakan kulit wet blue buaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Oetojo

    1992-08-01

    Full Text Available For this study it was used 12 pieces of grain salted crocodile skin of 11 up to 14 inch width. All of the crocodile skin were process up to pickling with the same way. Furthermore pickled crocodile skins were process up to pickling with the same way. Furthermore pickled crocodile skins and was done twice. The wet blue output from the research was visual investigated for the coulor using staning scale method. For comparition it was used pickled crocodile skins. Statistical analysis pints out that there is unsignify difference (P<0.05 the influence of the used of basic chrome sulphate to the colour of wet blue crocodile skins. Practical meaning of the research is, for tanning of crocodile skins to the wet blue, it is used 1.5% basic chromium sulphate.

  16. Canine Models for Copper Homeostasis Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper is an essential trace nutrient metal involved in a multitude of cellular processes. Hereditary defects in copper metabolism result in disorders with a severe clinical course such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease. In Wilson disease, copper accumulation leads to liver cirrhosis and neurological impairments. A lack in genotype-phenotype correlation in Wilson disease points toward the influence of environmental factors or modifying genes. In a number of Non-Wilsonian forms of copper metabolism, the underlying genetic defects remain elusive. Several pure bred dog populations are affected with copper-associated hepatitis showing similarities to human copper metabolism disorders. Gene-mapping studies in these populations offer the opportunity to discover new genes involved in copper metabolism. Furthermore, due to the relatively large body size and long life-span of dogs they are excellent models for development of new treatment strategies. One example is the recent use of canine organoids for disease modeling and gene therapy of copper storage disease. This review addresses the opportunities offered by canine genetics for discovery of genes involved in copper metabolism disorders. Further, possibilities for the use of dogs in development of new treatment modalities for copper storage disorders, including gene repair in patient-derived hepatic organoids, are highlighted.

  17. Time-averaged copper concentrations from continuous exposures predicts pulsed exposure toxicity to the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum: Importance of uptake and elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Brad M; Simpson, Stuart L; Chariton, Anthony A; Stauber, Jenny L; Jolley, Dianne F

    2015-07-01

    Intermittent, fluctuating and pulsed contaminant discharges result in organisms receiving highly variable contaminant exposures. Current water quality guidelines are predominantly derived using data from continuous exposure toxicity tests, and most frequently applied by regulators with the assumption that concentrations from a single sampling event will provide a meaningful approach to assessing potential effects. This study investigated the effect of single and multiple (daily) dissolved copper pulses on the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, including measurements of copper uptake and elimination to investigate the toxic mechanism. Copper pulses of between 0.5 and 24h and continuous exposures with equivalent 72-h time-averaged concentrations (TACs) resulted in similar biomass inhibition of P. tricornutum, with continuous exposures often being marginally more toxic. Rates of cell division generally recovered to control levels within 24h of the copper pulse removal. Upon resuspension in clean seawater, the extracellular copper per cell decreased rapidly, whereas the intracellular copper per cell decreased slowly. Negligible loss of copper from the total algal biomass indicated that P. tricornutum did not have an effective mechanism for eliminating copper from cells, rather the intracellular copper decreased as a result of dilution by cellular division as the algal growth rate recovered. The measurement of copper uptake after 72-h exposure and kinetics of elimination thereafter suggest that continuous exposures are marginally more toxic to P. tricornutum than pulsed copper exposures with equivalent TACs because slow internalization and saturation of algal membrane transport sites results in less copper uptake into pulse-exposed cells than continuously-exposed cells coupled with dilution of internalized copper via cellular division in the post-exposure period. In the case of P. tricornutum, the results indicate that water quality guidelines for copper based on

  18. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  19. Thermal conductivity of glass copper-composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Makoto; Terai, Ryohei; Haidai, Haruki

    1980-01-01

    Glass-metal composites are to be one of the answers for promoting thermal conduction in the glassy solids containing high-level radioactive wastes. In order to investigate the effect of metal addition on thermal conductivity of glasses, glass-copper composites were selected, and the conductivities of the composites were measured and discussed in regards to copper content and microstructure. Fully densified composites were successfully prepared by pressure sintering of the powder mixtures of glass and copper at temperatures above the yield points of the constituent glasses if the copper content was not so much. The conductivity was measured by means of a comparative method, in which the thermal gradient of the specimen was compared with that of quartz glass as standard under thermally steady state. Measurements were carried out at around 50 0 C. The thermal conductivity increased with increasing content of copper depending on the kind of copper powder used. The conductivities of the composites of the same copper content differed considerably each another. Fine copper powder was effective on increasing conductivity, and the conductivity became about threefold of that of glass by mixing the fine copper powder about 10 vol%. For the composites containing the fine copper powder less than 5 vol%, the conductivity obeyed so-called logarithmic rule, one of the mixture rules of conductivity, whereas for composites containing more than 5 vol%, the conductivity remarkably increased apart from the rule. This fact suggests that copper becomes continuous in the composite when the copper content increased beyond 5 vol%. For the composites containing coarse copper powder, the conductivity was increased not significantly, and obeyed an equation derived from the model in which conductive material dispersed in less conductive one. (author)

  20. Large Scale Density Estimation of Blue and Fin Whales: Utilizing Sparse Array Data to Develop and Implement a New Method for Estimating Blue and Fin Whale Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    to develop and implement a new method for estimating blue and fin whale density that is effective over large spatial scales and is designed to cope ...datasets, while collaborators at ARL Penn State provide the long- term data series and expertise in marine mammal biology, acoustic processing, ambient ...function of signal source level, SNR of detection, and sound propagation. Sound propagation characteristics and ambient noise dynamics are site

  1. Remediation of chromium and copper on water hyacinth (E. crassipes shoot powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarkar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tannery effluent characterization and removal efficiency of Chromium (Cr and Copper (Cu on water hyacinth has been observed by filtration process. The effluent was contaminated by deep blue color, acidic pH, higher value of total dissolve solid (TDS, electrical conductivity (EC, chemical oxygen demand (COD and lower value of dissolve oxygen (DO. After filtration, the effluent shows that the permissible limit of investigated metals. Adsorbent capacity of water hyacinth shoot powder for Cr and Cu ion was found to be 99.98% and 99.96% for standard solution (SS and 98.83% and 99.59% for tannery effluent (TE, respectively.

  2. Copper resistance of different ectomycorrhizal fungi such as Pisolithus microcarpus, Pisolithus sp., Scleroderma sp. and Suillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Environments contaminated with heavy metals negatively impact the living organisms. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have shown important role in these impacted sites. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the copper-resistance of ectomycorrhizal fungi isolates Pisolithus microcarpus - UFSC-Pt116; Pisolithus sp. - UFSC-PT24, Suillus sp. - UFSM RA 2.8 and Scleroderma sp. - UFSC-Sc124 to different copper doses in solid and liquid media. The copper doses tested were: 0.00, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 mmol L-1 in the solid medium and 0.00, 0.32, 0.64 and 0.96 mmol L-1 in the liquid medium. Copper was amended as copper sulphate in order to supplement the culture medium MNM at pH 4.8, with seven replicates to each fungus-dose combination. The fungal isolates were incubated for 30 days at 28 °C. UFSC-Pt116 showed high copper-resistance such as accessed by CL50 determinations (concentration to reduce 50% of the growth as while as UFSC-PT24 displayed copper-resistance mechanism at 0.50 mmol L-1 in solid medium. The UFSC-PT24 and UFSC-Sc124 isolates have increased copper-resistance in liquid medium. The higher production of extracellular pigment was detected in UFSC-Pt116 cultures. The UFSC-Pt116 and UFSC-PT24 isolates showed higher resistance for copper and produced higher mycelium biomass than the other isolates. In this way, the isolates UFSG-Pt116 and UFSC-PT24 can be important candidates to survive in copper-contaminated areas, and can show important role in plants symbiosis in these contaminated sites.

  3. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  4. A horizontally gene transferred copper resistance locus confers hyper-resistance to antibacterial copper toxicity and enables survival of community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Joanne; Thomas, Jamie; Riboldi, Gustavo P; Zapotoczna, Marta; Tarrant, Emma; Andrew, Peter W; Londoño, Alejandra; Planet, Paul J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Waldron, Kevin J; Morrissey, Julie A

    2018-03-09

    Excess copper is highly toxic and forms part of the host innate immune system's antibacterial arsenal, accumulating at sites of infection and acting within macrophages to kill engulfed pathogens. We show for the first time that a novel, horizontally gene transferred copper resistance locus (copXL), uniquely associated with the SCCmec elements of the highly virulent, epidemic, community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) USA300, confers copper hyper-resistance. These genes are additional to existing core genome copper resistance mechanisms, and are not found in typical S. aureus lineages, but are increasingly identified in emerging pathogenic isolates. Our data show that CopX, a putative P 1B-3 -ATPase efflux transporter, and CopL, a novel lipoprotein, confer copper hyper-resistance compared to typical S. aureus strains. The copXL genes form an operon that is tightly repressed in low copper environments by the copper regulator CsoR. Significantly, CopX and CopL are important for S. aureus USA300 intracellular survival within macrophages. Therefore, the emergence of new S. aureus clones with the copXL locus has significant implications for public health because these genes confer increased resistance to antibacterial copper toxicity, enhancing bacterial fitness by altering S. aureus interaction with innate immunity. © 2018 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comparison of availability of copper(II) complexes with organic ligands to bacterial cells and to chitin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, M.T.S.D.; Azenha, M.A.O. [Laquipai, Porto (Portugal). Faculdade de Ciencias do Porto; Cabral, J.P.S. [Inst. de Botanica e Centro de Citologia Experimental U.P., Porto (Portugal)

    1997-10-01

    Bacterial cells or chitin were exposed to solutions with 100 {micro}M total but only 5 {micro}M free copper, due to the presence of a proper concentration of proline, lysine, cysteine, or ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA). The influence of the nature and concentration of the particles and soluble ligands, on the sorption and on the desorption of the copper, at pH 6.50 and 25.0 C, was investigated. The metal sorbed by the particles and that left in the solution were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry, after different periods of contact between particles and solution. The interpretation of the results was based on the copper(II) speciation calculated through equilibrium approaches applied to homogeneous or heterogeneous systems. A significant fraction of copper bound to the organic ligands was displaced to the bacteria or chitin, and the extent of chemical reaction depended on the nature of both the soluble (or leaving) ligands and sites on the particle surface (or entering ligands), as expected by the equilibrium theory. But with chitin, the uptake of copper in the presence of cysteine or EDTA was higher than expected, which may be due to the adsorption of the soluble copper complexes on the particle surface. In consequence of a competition between soluble and particulate ligands (cells or chitin), the free copper(II) concentration decreased in the solution, even in the presence of very strong chelators. The results indicate that copper availability is not a simple function of the initial free copper concentration in the solution. Desorption of the previously fixed copper, originated by free soluble ligands indicated that the sorption of copper was quasireversible for both particles, though a larger dismissal of the equilibrium position occurred for the cells, probably due to their biological activity.

  6. Adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue onto activated carbon obtained from horse chestnut kernel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momčilović Milan Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Horse chestnut kernel was used as the precursor for the preparation of powdered activated carbon using phosphoric acid as the activating agent. Batch adsorption experiments for the adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue from aqueous solutions were carried out using the obtained carbon as adsorbent. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments were conducted. The equilibrium data were fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin theoretical isotherm models. The best results was obtained in the case of Langmuir model, which indicates that monolayer adsorption occurs on finite number of the active adsorption sites on the carbon surface. The kinetic data were fitted with pseudo-first, pseudo-second, Elovich and interparticle diffusion model. Pseudo-second order model and Elovich model showed the best results of the kinetic data. The increasing of the solution pH led to a higher uptake of methylene blue due to the fact that competitive adsorption of methylene blue cation and proton exists in acidic solutions. The adsorption capacity for methylene blue in equilibrium study was significant (168.93 mg g-1. Comparison of the adsorption capacities of methylene blue onto activated carbons derived from various alternative precursors proves chestnut kernel to be efficient and low-cost material which could be substantially deployed in the future.

  7. Engineering Copper Carboxylate Functionalities on Water Stable Metal–Organic Frameworks for Enhancement of Ammonia Removal Capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Jayraj N.; Garcia-Gutierrez, Erika Y.; Moran, Colton M.; Deneff, Jacob I.; Walton, Krista S.

    2017-02-02

    Functionalization of copper carboxylate groups on a series of UiO-66 metal organic framework (MOF) analogues and their corresponding impact on humid and dry ammonia adsorption behavior were studied. Relative locations of possible carboxylic acid binding sites for copper on the MOF analogues were varied on ligand and missing linker defect sites. Materials after copper incorporation exhibited increased water vapor and ammonia affinity during isothermal adsorption and breakthrough experiments, respectively. The introduction of copper markedly increased ammonia adsorption capacities for all adsorbents possessing carboxyl binding sites. In particular, the new MOF UiO-66-(COOCu)2 displayed the highest ammonia breakthrough capacities of 6.38 and 6.84 mmol g–1 under dry and humid conditions, respectively, while retaining crystallinity and porosity. Relative carboxylic acid site locations were also found to impact sorbent stability, as missing linker defect functionalized materials degraded under humid conditions after copper incorporation. Postsynthetic metal insertion provides a method for adding sites that are analogous to open metal sites while maintaining good structural stability.

  8. Functional understanding of the versatile protein copper metabolism MURR1 domain 1 (COMMD1) in copper homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedoseienko, Alina; Bartuzi, Paulina; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an important cofactor in numerous biological processes in all living organisms. However, excessive copper can be extremely toxic, so it is vital that the copper level within a cell is tightly regulated. The damaging effect of copper is seen in several hereditary forms of copper toxicity in

  9. Synergistic Effect of Copper and Cobalt in Cu-Co-O Composite Nanocatalyst for Catalytic Ozonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yuming; Wu, Lina; Wang, Guangli; Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Pingping; Feng, Cuiyun

    2013-01-01

    A novel Cu-Co-O composite nanocatalyst was designed and prepared for the ozonation of phenol. A synergistic effect of copper and cobalt was observed over the Cu-Co-O composite nanocatalyst, which showed higher activity than either copper or cobalt oxide alone. In addition, the Cu-Co-O composite revealed good activity in a wide initial pH range (4.11-8.05) of water. The fine dispersion of cobalt on the surface of copper oxide boosted the interaction between catalyst and ozone, and the surface Lewis acid sites on the Cu-Co-O composite were determined as the active sites. The Raman spectroscopy also proved that the Cu-Co-O composite was quite sensitive to the ozone. The trivalent cobalt in the Cu-Co-O composite was proposed as the valid state

  10. Iron, copper and zinc concentrations in human sweat and plasma; the effect of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruoma, O I; Reilly, T; MacLaren, D; Halliwell, B

    1988-09-30

    The effect of 30 or 40 min hard exercise on a cycle ergometer upon plasma concentrations of zinc, iron and copper in twelve healthy male athletes was studied. Sweat samples were also collected from different body sites and analyzed for these metals. The metal content of sweat from different body sites varied, as did the sweating rates of different subjects. Pre-exercise plasma iron concentrations in 10 of the 12 subjects were within the normal range, but at least 4 subjects had sub-normal plasma zinc whereas six had plasma copper levels above normal. The effects of exercise on plasma metal concentrations varied from subject to subject; no general conclusions could be drawn about the biological significance of loss of metals in sweat in relation to whole body metal metabolism. It is suggested that a mild acute phase response may account for lowered zinc and raised copper in the plasma of athletes.

  11. Electronics scrap processing at Brixlegg copper works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenboeck, F.J.; Sauer, E.; Woebking, H.; Woerz, H.

    1985-11-01

    The valuable metals - in particular precious metals, copper, zinc, and tin - that are included in electronics scraps are recovered in the secondary copper works of Brixlegg in the form of commercial intermediate products or in the form of pure metals. The refinery line is as follows: shaft furnace, converter, anode furnace, electrolytic copper refinery and slime plants for precious metal recovery from anode slimes. (orig.).

  12. Biodecolorization and biodegradation of Reactive Blue by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspergillus sp. effectively decolorized Reactive Blue and other structurally different synthetic dyes. Agitation was found to be an important parameter, while glucose (99%), sucrose (97%) and mannitol (98%) were the best carbon sources for the decolorization. Decolorization was effective in an acidic environment (pH 3).

  13. Geographical Study of American Blues Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Music is not often utilized in teaching geography, despite the fact that many scholars orient their research around analyzing both the historical and spatial dimensions of musical expression. This article reports on the use of a teaching module that utilizes blues culture as a lens to understand the geographical history of the United States. The…

  14. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-07-08

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  15. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana L Melcón

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood.

  16. Prussian Blue Analogues of Reduced Dimensionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gengler, Regis Y. N.; Toma, Luminita M.; Pardo, Emilio; Lloret, Francesc; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-valence polycyanides (Prussian Blue analogues) possess a rich palette of properties spanning from room-temperature ferromagnetism to zero thermal expansion, which can be tuned by chemical modifications or the application of external stimuli (temperature, pressure, light irradiation). While

  17. African Retentions in Blues and Jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Eddie S.

    1979-01-01

    The perseverance of African musical characteristics among American Blacks is an historic reality. African retentions have been recorded in Black music of the antebellum period. Various African scales and rhythms permeate Black American music today as evidenced in the retentions found in blues and jazz. (RLV)

  18. A Discography of the Real Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Dean

    1972-01-01

    A short account of the rise and decline of the Blues and a discussion of the artists who performed it is followed by an annotated bibliography of periodicals, books, records and tapes related to this form of Black" music. (184 references) (NH)

  19. Blue laser phase change recording system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Holger; Dambach, S.Soeren; Richter, Hartmut

    2002-01-01

    The migration paths from DVD phase change recording with red laser to the next generation optical disk formats with blue laser and high NA optics are discussed with respect to optical aberration margins and disc capacities. A test system for the evaluation of phase change disks with more than 20 GB capacity is presented and first results of the recording performance are shown

  20. The Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy IZw18

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musella, I.; Marconi, M.; Fiorentino, G.; Clementini, G.; Aloisi, A.; Annibali, F.; Contreras, R.; Saha, A.; Tosi, M.; van der Marel, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results obtained for the Blue compact galaxy IZw18 on the basis of ACS HST data obtained from our group. In particular, we discuss the stellar population and the variable stars content of this galaxy to get information about its star formation history and distance.

  1. [The dangers of blue light: True story!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, G; Leid, J

    2016-05-01

    The dangers of the blue light are the object of numerous publications, for both the scientific community and the general public. The new prolific development of light sources emitting potentially toxic blue light (415-455nm) ranges from LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lamps for interior lighting to television screens, computers, digital tablets and smartphones using OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) or AMOLED (Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode) technology. First we will review some technical terms and the main characteristics of light perceived by the human eye. Then we will discuss scientific proof of the toxicity of blue light to the eye, which may cause cataract or macular degeneration. Analysis of the light spectra of several light sources, from natural light to LED lamps, will allow us to specify even better the dangers related to each light source. LED lamps, whether used as components for interior lighting or screens, are of concern if they are used for extended viewing times and at short distance. While we can protect ourselves from natural blue light by wearing colored glasses which filter out, on both front and back surfaces, the toxic wavelengths, it is more difficult to protect oneself from LED lamps in internal lighting, the use of which should be restricted to "white warmth" lamps (2700K). As far as OLED or AMOLED screens are concerned, the only effective protection consists of using them occasionally and only for a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Biodecolorization and biodegradation of Reactive Blue by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... Aspergillus sp. effectively decolorized Reactive Blue and other structurally different synthetic dyes. Agitation was found to be an important ... Few chemically different dyes such as Reactive Black (75%), Reactive Yellow (70%),. Reactive Red (33%) and ..... Degradation of azo dyes by the lignin degrading ...

  3. Pulse electrodeposition of Prussian Blue thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafisayar, P.; Bahrololoom, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pulse electrodeposition parameters like peak current density and frequency on the electrochemical properties of Prussian Blue thin films were investigated. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry and Chronoamperometry tests were carried out on Prussian Blue thin films which were pulse electrodeposited on Indium Tin Oxide coated glass substrates. The results showed that increase in the peak current densities and using higher pulsating frequencies during electrodeposition decreases the charge transfer resistance of the thin films while the diffusion coefficient of electroactive species in the films is increased as a consequence of using the same pulsating parameters. In addition, pulse electrodeposition technique does not alter deposition mechanism and morphology of the Prussian Blue thin films. - Highlights: • Prussian Blue thin films were pulse electrodeposited onto the ITO coated glass. • Pulse current condition affected thin films' electrochemical properties. • High pulsating current and frequency lower thin films' charge transfer resistance. • High pulsating current and frequency increase diffusion coefficient in thin films

  4. Characterization of dough baked via blue laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blutinger, Jonathan David; Meijers, Yorán; Chen, Peter Yichen; Zheng, Changxi; Grinspun, Eitan; Lipson, Hod

    2018-01-01

    Depth of heat penetration and temperature must be precisely controlled to optimize nutritional value, appearance, and taste of food products. These objectives can be achieved with the use of a high-resolution blue diode laser—which operates at 445 nm—by adjusting the water content of the dough and

  5. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  6. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF PRUSSIAN BLUE FORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    This intense blue colored pigment is used in the preparation of paints, printing inks, laundry dye, etc. [1]. The micro-porous character of PB and its analogues find ... industrial applications such as in removal of heavy metal ions in wine production [4], electrochemical application as battery building [5], electronic switching and ...

  7. Statistical thermodynamics of supercapacitors and blue engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roij, R.H.H.G.

    2013-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of electrode-electrolyte systems, for instance supercapacitors filled with an ionic liquid or blue-energy devices filled with river- or sea water. By a suitable mapping of thermodynamic variables, we identify a strong analogy with classical heat engines. We introduce

  8. The Biology of blue-green algae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carr, Nicholas G; Whitton, B. A

    1973-01-01

    .... This book, extensively illustrated and thoroughly referenced, will provide the source material for students, and experienced as well as new research workers should find it of great value. A series of short appendices summarize details of culture collections, media and some specialized aspects of growing blue-green algae.

  9. METHYLENE BLUE ADSORPTION FROM GLYCEROL SOLUTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT. The mechanism of methylene blue adsorption onto the surface of synthetic acicular habit of α- goethite from glycerol solution has been studied through batch experiment at 25, 30 and 35 0C in a glass cell of minimal dead volume. To describe the adsorption results, an attempt was made to fit the data to the ...

  10. The 1993-1994 Blue Ribbon Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Christine M.

    1994-01-01

    This year's 276 Blue Ribbon schools, including 220 public and 56 private schools, are in 45 states and the District of Columbia, with a Department of Defense school in Honshu, Japan. About 70% are headed by women principals. In 89 schools, students from low-income families comprise at least a quarter of the enrollment. Schools are listed by state.…

  11. Microstructure effects in CVD copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, Dirk Karl

    Computer chip manufacturers are beginning to implement copper as interconnect material in high-performance microprocessor metallization architectures. Replacing currently used aluminum metallization with its copper based counterpart will result in performance gain due to the low resistivity of copper (1.67muO·cm) which generates a reduction in (resistance x capacitance) signal delay. Futhermore, enhancements in stress and electromigration resistance by up to three orders of magnitude are expected from replacing aluminum with copper. Copper deposited by chemical vapor deposition has the proven ability to yield complete fill of aggressive via and trench structures at high deposition rates. At the same time, ultrathin Cu seed layers can be controlled grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for use as activation layer in electrolytic plating (EP) applications. Additionally, integration studies using single and two-level damascene interconnect structures CVD Cu showed that excellent yield can be obtained. However, before CVD Cu can be incorporated into manufacturing process flows, several key reliability issues have to be addressed and resolved. At present, electroplating has the advantage of enhanced electromigration performance compared to CVD copper. It is therefore necessary to demonstrate the systematic ability to tailor the microstructure of CVD copper with the goal of enhanced electromigration and stress migration performance through the successful formation of (111) textured Cu with bamboo type microstructure. In the present work, the evolution of as-deposited Cu resistivity, grain size, texture, and surface roughness were systematically analyzed as a function of film thickness for an optimized CVD Cu process. In particular, investigations of the influence of substrate type and surface pretreatment on texture and grain size showed that: (a) Cu grows (111) textured on PVD TiN, if (002) Ti matrix is present, and on inorganic CVD TiN, regardless of the underlying

  12. Copper welding; Les liaisons du cuivre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monneau, Ph. [SDMS, 38 - Saint-Romans (France)

    2000-07-01

    The following categories of manufactured copper: Cu-c ( > 99.95% copper and less than 0.0003% phosphor) and Cu-OF (oxygen free copper) are useful in vacuum or ultra-vacuum techniques. Homogeneous binding (or heterogeneous with other metals) are mainly performed by welding (TIG, MIG, FE) or by brazing at high or low temperatures. In this article these different methods are reviewed with pros and cons, and several applications are presented, particularly the designing of high frequency resonator cavities for GANIL accelerator, these cavities were made out of solid copper. (A.C.)

  13. The copper-transporting ATPase pump and its potential role in copper-tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Ohno; C.A. Clausen; Frederick Green; G. Stanosz

    2016-01-01

    Copper-tolerant brown-rot decay fungi exploit intricate mechanisms to neutralize the efficacy of copper-containing preservative formulations. The production and accumulation oxalate is the most widely recognized theory regarding the mechanism of copper-tolerance in these fungi. The role of oxalate, however, may be only one part of a series of necessary components...

  14. Approaches to blue light emitting polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Blue-light emitting polymers are important for full colour displays. Blue- light emitting polymers, such as poly(fluorene)s have been reported, but tend to be soluble in the conjugated form. The aim of the project was to produce insoluble polymers, prepared via processible soluble precursor polymers, so that multilayer devices could be easily fabricated. Multilayer devices are often required for more efficient light emission. The target materials were derivatives of poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV), a green-yellow emitting polymer. To blue shift the emission of PPV, bulky substituents, namely chloro, phenyl and alkyl, were attached to the vinylic linkage. These bulky substituents were incorporated to introduce steric interactions between the side group and the backbone phenyl protons, to shorten the effective conjugation length and increase the HOMO-LUMO energy gap. Chloro substituents quenched the fluorescence. Phenyl substituents resulted in highly conjugated precursor polymers with low molecular weights, showing blue- green to green emission in the conjugated form. Alkyl substituted PPV derivatives, prepared via chloro or xanthate precursors, were blue-light emitting conjugated polymers, which were electroluminescent in ITO/polymer/AI devices. The PL quantum yields were found to be up to 38%. The incorporation of electron withdrawing groups into the polymers was attempted, to lower the barrier to electron injection. Chloro groups quenched fluorescence and methylsulfone substituents resulted in insoluble polymers, probably due to cross-linking. However a copolymer containing methylsulfone electron withdrawing groups could be prepared. Phenylsulfone substituents were found to give fluorescent polymers which were soluble in the precursor form. (author)

  15. Comparing copper resistance in two bryophytes: Mielichhoferia elongata Hornsch. versus Physcomitrella patens Hedw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassmann, Stefan; Wernitznig, Stefan; Lichtscheidl, Irene K; Lang, Ingeborg

    2010-10-01

    The bryophyte Mielichhoferia elongata is known to occur on copper-rich substrate, but the exact resistance level remained to be determined by in vitro experiments. Here, we tested its copper tolerance in graded copper solutions and compared the results to the moss Physcomitrella patens that is not known to inhabit heavy metal sites. Our results confirm the survival of M. elongata in classical resistance experiments of up to 10 mM Cu-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution. Interestingly, P. patens is equally resistant. Cultured on copper-enriched agar plates for over 5 weeks, P. patens survived even higher copper levels of up to 100 mM Cu-EDTA and an increment of growth was detected on all concentrations tested. Obviously, P. patens is able to withstand harmfully high levels of copper in both solution and substrate. In this short communication, we give a detailed description of the growth rates and discuss the results in comparison to other moss species and heavy metals.

  16. Pianure Blues: From the Dialect of the Plains to the English of the Blues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Nadiani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors describe a joint performance project called Pianure Blues, in which poems in Romagnolo dialect are transposed into English and performed as blues songs, and in which songs from the Anglo-American blues/roots/folk tradition are transposed and performed as poems in Romagnolo dialect – a process they have called ‘trans-staging’. A process in which they are writers and performers and, especially, translators; translators of each other’s voices, stories, landscapes, rhythms and sounds as they look for the bond between places, languages and traditions that seem very distant from each other but which find a common mood and poetic language, a common aesthetic, in their performances. The authors reflect on the creative process involved and on the significance of establishing an intersemiotic dialogue between a ‘minority’ dialect such as Romagnolo and a ‘global’ language such as English, and the blues, have become.

  17. Performance characteristics, plasma lipids and copper residue in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Copper proteinate) and inorganic (Copper sulphate) Cu source on growth performance, plasma lipids and copper residue in organs and tissues of cockerel chickens. 240 day-old commercial Black-Harco cockerel chicks were randomly distributed to ...

  18. Copper Electroforming at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borjabad, S.; Amare, J.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Villar, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    A brief summary of the copper electroforming process is given. The process parameters tuning to attain a copper part with the required characteristics is explained. Several electroformed copper parts with complicated geometry are described. Some radiopurity measurements are provided

  19. Near-infrared fluorescence glucose sensing based on glucose/galactose-binding protein coupled to 651-Blue Oxazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C., E-mail: john.pickup@kcl.ac.uk

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •We showed that the NIR fluorophore, 651-Blue Oxazine, is solvatochromic (polarity sensitive). •Blue Oxazine was covalently attached to mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP). •Fluorescence intensity of GBP-Blue Oxazine increased with addition of glucose. •Fluorescence from bead-immobilised GBP-Blue Oxazine was detectable through skin in vitro. •This shows proof-of-concept for non-invasive glucose sensing using GBP-Blue Oxazine. -- Abstract: Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes that are environmentally sensitive or solvatochromic are useful tools for protein labelling in in vivo biosensor applications such as glucose monitoring in diabetes since their spectral properties are mostly independent of tissue autofluorescence and light scattering, and they offer potential for non-invasive analyte sensing. We showed that the fluorophore 651-Blue Oxazine is polarity-sensitive, with a marked reduction in NIR fluorescence on increasing solvent polarity. Mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) used as the glucose receptor were site-specifically and covalently labelled with Blue Oxazine using click chemistry. Mutants H152C/A213R and H152C/A213R/L238S showed fluorescence increases of 15% and 21% on addition of saturating glucose concentrations and binding constants of 6 and 25 mM respectively. Fluorescence responses to glucose were preserved when GBP-Blue Oxazine was immobilised to agarose beads, and the beads were excited by NIR light through a mouse skin preparation studied in vitro. We conclude GBP-Blue Oxazine shows proof-of-concept as a non-invasive continuous glucose sensing system.

  20. Hubble's View of Little Blue Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    The recent discovery of a new type of tiny, star-forming galaxy is the latest in a zoo of detections shedding light on our early universe. What can we learn from the unique little blue dots found in archival Hubble data?Peas, Berries, and DotsGreen pea galaxies identified by citizen scientists with Galaxy Zoo. [Richard Nowell Carolin Cardamone]As telescope capabilities improve and we develop increasingly deeper large-scale surveys of our universe, we continue to learn more about small, faraway galaxies. In recent years, increasing sensitivity first enabled the detection of green peas luminous, compact, low-mass (10 billion solar masses; compare this to the Milky Ways 1 trillion solar masses!) galaxies with high rates of star formation.Not long thereafter, we discovered galaxies that form stars similarly rapidly, but are even smaller only 330 million solar masses, spanning less than 3,000 light-years in size. These tiny powerhouses were termed blueberries for their distinctive color.Now, scientists Debra and Bruce Elmegreen (of Vassar College and IBM Research Division, respectively) report the discovery of galaxies that have even higher star formation rates and even lower masses: little blue dots.Exploring Tiny Star FactoriesThe Elmegreens discovered these unique galaxies by exploring archival Hubble data. The Hubble Frontier Fields data consist of deep images of six distant galaxy clusters and the parallel fields next to them. It was in the archival data for two Frontier Field Parallels, those for clusters Abell 2744 and MAS J0416.1-2403, that the authors noticed several galaxies that stand out as tiny, bright, blue objects that are nearly point sources.Top: a few examples of the little blue dots recently identified in two Hubble Frontier Field Parallels. Bottom: stacked images for three different groups of little blue dots. [Elmegreen Elmegreen 2017]The authors performed a search through the two Frontier Field Parallels, discovering a total of 55 little blue dots

  1. The effect of driving force on intramolecular electron transfer in proteins. Studies on single-site mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; van de Kamp, M

    1992-01-01

    An intramolecular electron-transfer process has previously been shown to take place between the Cys3--Cys26 radical-ion (RSSR-) produced pulse radiolytically and the Cu(II) ion in the blue single-copper protein, azurin [Farver, O. & Pecht, I. (1989) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 86, 6868-6972]. To fu...

  2. The Blue Coma: The Role of Methylene Blue in Unexplained Coma After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Enrico Antonio; Winterton, Dario; Nardelli, Pasquale; Pasin, Laura; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Bove, Tiziana; Fanelli, Giovanna; Zangrillo, Alberto; Landoni, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Methylene blue commonly is used as a dye or an antidote, but also can be used off label as a vasopressor. Serotonin toxicity is a potentially lethal and often misdiagnosed condition that can result from drug interaction. Mild serotonin toxicity previously was reported in settings in which methylene blue was used as a dye. The authors report 3 cases of life-threatening serotonin toxicity in patients undergoing chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy who also underwent cardiac surgery and received methylene blue to treat vasoplegic syndrome. An observational study. A cardiothoracic intensive care unit (ICU) in a teaching hospital. Three patients who received methylene blue after cardiac surgery, later discovered to be undergoing chronic SSRI therapy. None. All 3 patients received high doses of fentanyl during general anesthesia. They all developed vasoplegic syndrome and consequently were given methylene blue in the ICU. All 3 patients developed serotonin toxicity, including coma, after this administration and diagnostic tests were negative for acute intracranial pathology. Coma lasted between 1 and 5 days. Two patients were discharged from the ICU shortly after awakening, whereas the third patient experienced a complicated postoperative course for concomitant refractory low-cardiac-output syndrome. Patients undergoing chronic SSRI therapy should not be administered methylene blue to treat vasoplegic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Unraveling the Mystery of the Blue Fog: Structure, Properties, and Applications of Amorphous Blue Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sahil Sandesh; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2017-12-01

    The amorphous blue phase III of cholesteric liquid crystals, also known as the "blue fog," are among the rising stars in materials science that can potentially be used to develop next-generation displays with the ability to compete toe-to-toe with disruptive technologies like organic light-emitting diodes. The structure and properties of the practically unobservable blue phase III have eluded scientists for more than a century since it was discovered. This progress report reviews the developments in this field from both fundamental and applied research perspectives. The first part of this progress report gives an overview of the 130-years-long scientific tour-de-force that very recently resulted in the revelation of the mysterious structure of blue phase III. The second part reviews progress made in the past decade in developing electrooptical, optical, and photonic devices based on blue phase III. The strong and weak aspects of the development of these devices are underlined and criticized, respectively. The third- and-final part proposes ideas for further improvement in blue phase III technology to make it feasible for commercialization and widespread use. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Movement patterns and population characteristics of the Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Randy L.; Kwilosz, John R.; Grundel, Ralph

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a three-year mark-release-recapture study of the endangered Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis Nabokov) at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore to describe the butterfly's movement patterns and to assess seasonal changes in the Karner blue's population structure. Estimated mean Karner blue adult life span was less than 3.5 days. Populations exhibited protandry and about a 2:1 male:female sex ratio at population peak within a brood. Ranges, or maximum distances moved by individual butterflies, were typically less than 100 m. Maximum ranges were less than 1 km. These distances are similar to those reported for other lycaenid butterflies and from other studies of the Karner blue in the midwestern United States. At two sites, fewer than 2% of adults had ranges greater than 300 m, while at a third site 4.3% of adults had ranges greater than 300 m. Given typical subpopulation sizes these movement percentages suggest that few adults per generation will move between subpopulations separated by more than 300 m. Movement of individuals between subpopulation sites is important for maintaining genetic diversity within a metapopulation and for recolonizing areas following local extinctions. Therefore, prudent conservation planning should aim for a landscape with habitat patches suitable for Karner blue butterfly occupancy separated by less than 300 m.

  5. Switchable self-assembly of Prussian blue analogs nano-tiles triggered by salt stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedovets, D; Bauduin, P; Causse, J; Girard, L; Diat, O

    2016-01-28

    Prussian blue analogs (PBAs) are materials well known for their bulk physical and (electro)-chemical properties, with an outstanding selectivity for caesium in ion exchange processes. Crystalline nano-tiles, made of copper based PBA, are produced and dispersed in water by tuning their electrostatic interactions. The shape and size of the nano-crystals are determined by combining scattering, microscopic and spectral techniques. We show here that Cu-PBA nano-tiles form planar superstructures by an edge to edge self-assembly process controlled by specific cation effect and ionic strength. Sedimentation and (re-)dispersion of the nano-tiles are found to be fully reversible. This switchable anisotropic self-assembly triggered by salt stimulus makes PBA nanocrystals potentially interesting for applications.

  6. Hindered rotation of a copper phthalocyanine molecule on C60 : Experiments and molecular mechanics calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fendrich, M.; Wagner, Th.; Stöhr, M.; Möller, R.

    2006-01-01

    If copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules are deposited on a Au(111) surface covered with a monolayer of C60, the molecules are found to adsorb individually onto the close-packed layer of C60. As the adsorption site of the CuPc is not symmetric with respect to the underlying C60 layer, the CuPc

  7. Copper Affects the Location of Zinc in Bimetallic Ion-Exchanged Mordenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reule, Allen A C; Shen, Jing; Semagina, Natalia

    2018-03-25

    Bimetallic ion exchange on a zeolite often impacts its catalytic properties compared to its monometallic counterparts. Here, we address the synergistic effect of simultaneous copper and zinc ion exchange on mordenite (MOR), as found earlier for dimethyl ether (DME) carbonylation. Samples with various Cu/Zn ratios were characterized by diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) in the 3600 and 720 cm -1 regions, pore distribution analysis through Ar physisorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When ion-exchanged alone, copper preferentially occupies 12-membered rings, whereas zinc occupies 8-membered rings. In bimetallic combinations, the zinc addition was found to prevent the copper from sintering into nanoparticles and to increase its coordination strength to the zeolite. At a Cu/Zn ratio of 0.25 (for MOR with Si/Al=6.5), copper promotes zinc ion exchange into 12-membered rings, more specifically, into T4 sites that are known for the formation of the coke precursor in DME carbonylation on a MOR. The sites became blocked during the bimetallic ion exchange, leading to suppressed catalyst deactivation. The study contributes to the understanding of mutual ion effects in bimetallic exchanged zeolites and highlights the major role of copper as a governing factor in determining the location of co-exchanged zinc on a MOR. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Annual Copper Mountain Conferences on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, Copper Mountain, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Stephen F. [Front Range Scientific, Inc., Lake City, CO (United States)

    2016-03-25

    This project supported the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, held from 2007 to 2015, at Copper Mountain, Colorado. The subject of the Copper Mountain Conference Series alternated between Multigrid Methods in odd-numbered years and Iterative Methods in even-numbered years. Begun in 1983, the Series represents an important forum for the exchange of ideas in these two closely related fields. This report describes the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, 2007-2015. Information on the conference series is available at http://grandmaster.colorado.edu/~copper/.

  9. Annual Copper Mountain Conferences on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, Copper Mountain, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    This project supported the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, held from 2007 to 2015, at Copper Mountain, Colorado. The subject of the Copper Mountain Conference Series alternated between Multigrid Methods in odd-numbered years and Iterative Methods in even-numbered years. Begun in 1983, the Series represents an important forum for the exchange of ideas in these two closely related fields. This report describes the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, 2007-2015. Information on the conference series is available at http://grandmaster.colorado.edu/~copper/

  10. In vitro and in vivo corrosion evaluation of nickel-chromium- and copper-aluminum-based alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, O F; Miranda, W G; Muench, A

    2000-09-01

    The low resistance to corrosion is the major problem related to the use of copper-aluminum alloys. This in vitro and in vivo study evaluated the corrosion of 2 copper-aluminum alloys (Cu-Al and Cu-Al-Zn) compared with a nickel-chromium alloy. For the in vitro test, specimens were immersed in the following 3 corrosion solutions: artificial saliva, 0.9% sodium chloride, and 1.0% sodium sulfide. For the in vivo test, specimens were embedded in complete dentures, so that one surface was left exposed. The 3 testing sites were (1) close to the oral mucosa (partial self-cleaning site), (2) surface exposed to the oral cavity (self-cleaning site), and (3) specimen bottom surface exposed to the saliva by means of a tunnel-shaped perforation (non-self-cleaning site). Almost no corrosion occurred with the nickel-chromium alloy, for either the in vitro or in vivo test. On the other hand, the 2 copper-aluminum-based alloys exhibited high corrosion in the sulfide solution. These same alloys also underwent high corrosion in non-self-cleaning sites for the in vivo test, although minimal attack was observed in self-cleaning sites. The nickel-chromium alloy presented high resistance to corrosion. Both copper-aluminum alloys showed considerable corrosion in the sulfide solution and clinically in the non-self-cleaning site. However, in self-cleaning sites these 2 alloys did not show substantial corrosion.

  11. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  12. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ...

  13. Aspen biology, community classification, and management in the Blue Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    David K. Swanson; Craig L. Schmitt; Diane M. Shirley; Vicky Erickson; Kenneth J. Schuetz; Michael L. Tatum; David C. Powell

    2010-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is a valuable species that is declining in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon. This publication is a compilation of over 20 years of aspen management experience by USDA Forest Service workers in the Blue Mountains. It includes a summary of aspen biology and occurrence in the Blue Mountains, and a...

  14. Alcian blue-stained particles in a eutrophic lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, J.; Søndergaard, Morten

    1998-01-01

    We used a neutral solution of Alcian Blue to stain transparent particles in eutrophic Lake Frederiksborg Slotss0, Denmark. Alcian Blue-stained particles (ABSP) appeared to be similar to the so-called transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) identified with an acidic solution of Alcian Blue. Our...

  15. 49 CFR 173.216 - Asbestos, blue, brown or white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Asbestos, blue, brown or white. 173.216 Section... Class 7 § 173.216 Asbestos, blue, brown or white. (a) Asbestos, blue, brown or white, includes each of the following hydrated mineral silicates: chrysolite, crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite asbestos...

  16. Poporodní blues – česká adaptace dotazníku „Maternity blues questionnaire“

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Takács, L.; Smolík, Filip; Mlíková Seidlerová, J.; Čepický, P.; Hoskovcová, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 5 (2016), s. 355-368 ISSN 1210-7832 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : EPDS postpartum mood * Maternity Blues Questionnaire * postnatal depression * postpartum blues * postpartum depression Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  17. Luminescence and physical properties of copper doped CdO derived nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhaliliba, M., E-mail: bmost_31@yahoo.fr [Physics Department, Sciences Faculty, Oran University of Sciences and Technology USTOMB, BP1505 Oran (Algeria); Benouis, C.E. [Physics Department, Sciences Faculty, Oran University of Sciences and Technology USTOMB, BP1505 Oran (Algeria); Tiburcio-Silver, A. [ITT-DIEE, Apdo, Postal 20, Metepec 3, 52176, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Yakuphanoglu, F. [Firat University, Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, 23119, Elazig (Turkey); Avila-Garcia, A.; Tavira, A. [Cinvestav-IPN, Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica-SEES, Apdo. postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Trujillo, R.R. [Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores-BUAP 14 Sur y Av. San Claudio, C.U. Puebla, Pue. Mexico (Mexico); Mouffak, Z. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering California State University, Fresno, CA (United States)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper, we studied the photoluminescence (PL), the morphological, electrical and optical properties of pure and copper-doped cadmium oxide. CdO films were grown by a facile sol-gel spin coating process at 1200 rpm, and doped with copper at 2 and 3%. A (1 1 1)-oriented cubic structure with a lattice parameter of a=4.69 A was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Copper was shown to improve the optical transmittance in the short wavelength range of the visible spectrum. The optical band gap of CdO ranged between 2.49 and 2.62 eV as a result of Cu content. At room temperature, resistance fell drastically with Cu doping levels. AFM analysis of samples exhibited nano-mounts and nanowires. Finally, PL results showed a strong blue-violet emission peak at 2.80 eV. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pure and copper doped CdO have been synthesized by a facile sol-gel route at fixed speed 1200 rpm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural properties of pure and doped CdO were studied in details. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transmittance in UV-vis and IR spectra were investigated. Optical band gaps were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic force microscope surface morphology has been analyzed and grain sizes and height were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Room temperature resistance was measured. Pure and copper doped CdO photoluminescence has been achieved at ambient. Electrical measurement was complemented by Hall effect measurement in the aim to re-evaluate the resistivity and the carrier mobility.

  18. Transcriptional response of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lam. following exposure to heat stress and copper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Negri

    Full Text Available Global warming is a major factor that may affect biological organization, especially in marine ecosystems and in coastal areas that are particularly subject to anthropogenic pollution. We evaluated the effects of simultaneous changes in temperature and copper concentrations on lysosomal membrane stability (N-acetyl-hexosaminidase activity and malondialdehyde accumulation (MDA in the gill of the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lam.. Temperature and copper exerted additive effects on lysosomal membrane stability, exacerbating the toxic effects of metal cations present in non-physiological concentrations. Mussel lysosomal membrane stability is known to be positively related to scope for growth, indicating possible effects of increasing temperature on mussel populations in metal-polluted areas. To clarify the molecular response to environmental stressors, we used a cDNA microarray with 1,673 sequences to measure the relative transcript abundances in the gills of mussels exposed to copper (40 µg/L and a temperature gradient (16°C, 20°C, and 24°C. In animals exposed only to heat stress, hierarchical clustering of the microarray data revealed three main clusters, which were largely dominated by down-regulation of translation-related differentially expressed genes, drastic up-regulation of protein folding related genes, and genes involved in chitin metabolism. The response of mussels exposed to copper at 24°C was characterized by an opposite pattern of the genes involved in translation, most of which were up-regulated, as well as the down-regulation of genes encoding heat shock proteins and "microtubule-based movement" proteins. Our data provide novel information on the transcriptomic modulations in mussels facing temperature increases and high copper concentrations; these data highlight the risk of marine life exposed to toxic chemicals in the presence of temperature increases due to climate change.

  19. Superhydrophobic Copper Surfaces by Shot Peening and Chemical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forooshani, H. Mojiri; Aliofkhazraei, M.; Rouhaghdam, A. Sabour

    In this paper, superhydrophobic surfaces are developed on polycrystalline copper using a combination of mechanical and chemical treatments by shot peening, dislocation etching and stearic acid treatment. The key point in this combined approach is the fabrication of a dislocation forest by shot peening. These sites were dissolved by etching, and hierarchical structures were fabricated. When these etched surfaces are treated by stearic acid, which has low surface energy, they become superhydrophobic with contact angle more than 150∘. Because of the superior properties and low costs involved with this method, it is expected to be widely used in the industry to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces.

  20. Copper-complexing ligands produced by an intact estuarine microbial community in response to copper stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, J.; Dryden, C.; Gordon, A.

    2002-12-01

    Copper is both an important nutrient and a pollutant in the marine environment. By studying the interactions between microorganisms and copper in the Elizabeth River (VA), home to a major Naval Base, we field tested the hypothesis that picoplankton and/or bacterioplankton produce strong, copper-complexing ligands in response to elevated copper concentrations. A simple light/ dark test was used to distinguish between heterotrophic and phototrophic ligand production. Samples were bottled and moored, submerged one meter, for a week. Direct counts using DAPI stain and epiflourescence were conducted to find concentrations of picoplankton and bacterioplankton. Using cathodic stripping voltammetry, we found the total copper concentrations, and then from a titration of the ligands by copper, the ligand concentrations and conditional stability constants were obtained. The Elizabeth River naturally had between 10-20 nM total dissolved copper concentrations. However when copper complexation was considered we found that the levels of bio-available Cu(II) ions were much lower. In fact in the natural samples the levels were not high enough to affect the relative reproductive rates of several microorganisms. Naturally there was a 50 nM "buffer zone" of ligand to total dissolved copper concentration. Furthermore, when stressed with excess copper, healthy picoplankton produced enough ligand to alleviate toxicity, and rebuild the buffer zone. However bacterioplankton only produced enough ligand so that they were no longer affected. Therefore, intact estuarine communities regulate copper bioavailability and toxicity with ligand production.

  1. COPPER AND COPPER-CONTAINING PESTICIDES: METABOLISM, TOXICITY AND OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Husak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief review of the current knowledge regarding metabolism and toxicity of copper and copper-based pesticides in living organisms. Copper is an essential trace element in all living organisms (bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, because it participates in different metabolic processes and maintain functions of organisms. The transport and metabolism of copper in living organisms is currently the subject of many studies. Copper is absorbed, transported, distributed, stored, and excreted in the body via the complex of homeostatic processes, which provide organisms with a needed constant level of this micronutrient and avoid excessive amounts. Many aspects of copper homeostasis were studied at the molecular level. Copper based-pesticides, in particularly fungicides, bacteriocides and herbicides, are widely used in agricultural practice throughout the world. Copper is an integral part of antioxidant enzymes, particularly copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD, and plays prominent roles in iron homeostasis. On the other hand, excess of copper in organism has deleterious effect, because it stimulates free radical production in the cell, induces lipid peroxidation, and disturbs the total antioxidant capacity of the body. The mechanisms of copper toxicity are discussed in this review also.

  2. Comment on "Active sites for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol on Cu/ZnO catalysts"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakamura, Junji; Fujitani, Tadahiro; Kuld, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Kattel et al (Reports, 24 March 2017, p. 1296) report that a zinc on copper (Zn/Cu) surface undergoes oxidation to zinc oxide/copper (ZnO/Cu) during carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrogenation to methanol and conclude that the Cu-ZnO interface is the active site for methanol synthesis. Similar experiments...

  3. Roadside soils show low plant available zinc and copper concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, Natalie; Walter, M. Todd; Osmond, Deanna; Hunt, William

    2016-01-01

    Vehicle combustion and component wear are a major source of metal contamination in the environment, which could be especially concerning where road ditches are actively farmed. The objective of this study was to assess how site variables, namely age, traffic (vehicles day −1 ), and percent carbon (%C) affect metal accumulation in roadside soils. A soil chronosequence was established with sites ranging from 3 to 37 years old and bioavailable, or mobile, concentrations of Zinc (Zn) and Copper (Cu) were measured along major highways in North Carolina using a Mehlich III extraction. Mobile Zn and Cu concentrations were low overall, and when results were scaled via literature values to “total metal”, the results were still generally lower than previous roadside studies. This could indicate farming on lands near roads would pose a low plant toxicity risk. Zinc and Cu were not correlated with annual average traffic count, but were positively correlated with lifetime traffic load (the product of site age and traffic count). This study shows an often overlooked variable, site age, should be included when considering roadside pollution accumulation. Zinc and Cu were more strongly associated with %C, than traffic load. Because vehicle combustion is also a carbon source, it is not obvious whether the metals and carbon are simply co-accumulating or whether the soil carbon in roadside soils may facilitate previously overlooked roles in sequestering metals on-site. - Highlights: • Low plant available zinc and copper concentrations in roadside soils of the southeast U.S. • Metals from vehicular traffic may not be adversely affecting plants in roadside environment. • Traffic volume and site age better predictor of metal pollution than traffic volume alone. - Mobile concentrations of Zn and Cu in roadside soils were below toxic levels. Zn and Cu concentrations were better correlated with lifetime vehicle load, as opposed to traffic volume.

  4. Copper-based opaque red glasses - Understanding the colouring mechanism of copper nanoparticles in archaeological glass samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drünert, F.; Blanz, M.; Pollok, K.; Pan, Z.; Wondraczek, L.; Möncke, D.

    2018-02-01

    Red opaque glasses of two different sites in central Germany, a medieval glassworks in Glashütten, Taunus Mountains, and an early modern glassworks in Wieda, Harz Mountains, were analysed with regard to their optical appearance. By scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, metallic copper nanoparticles were identified as a conspicuous constituent in these glasses. In addition, similar opaque red glasses were reproduced in the laboratory in order to better understand the manufacturing process. Detailed analysis of the optical scattering was conducted in order to evaluate the role of Cu0 nanoparticles in the colouring mechanism relative to other possible reasons of colouration. We find clear differences between the possible contributions of Cu2O (cuprite) particles and metallic copper (Cu0) nanoparticles. Through simulated backscattering spectra we were able to calculate an average copper particle radius in the archaeological glass samples resulting in a value of up to 95 nm, which matches well the results of SEM investigation (minimum 65 nm). Using the methods we applied in this study, it becomes possible to reconstruct various processing conditions as they were applied in medieval manufacture of these particular materials.

  5. Plasma Copper Status in Hypercholesterolemic Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Femi Olaleye

    ... Rosenstein, F., and Lei, K.Y.. (1994): Pool size and concentration of plasma cholesterol are increased and tissue copper levels are reduced during early stages of copper deficiency in rats. J. Nutr. 124, 628-635. Anon (2000): Cardiovascular disease ranks as the first cause of death in Spain. Rev Esp Salud Publica 74 (3),.

  6. Extra-Hepatic Storage of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Damsgaard, Else; Horn, N.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution of copper among the organs of an aborted, male foetus, expected to develop Menkes' syndrome, was entirely different from the distribution in 4 normal foetuses. Copper concentrations determined by neutron activation analysis showed a considerably reduced content in the liver, but ...

  7. Material characterization of ancient Indian copper

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Ancient Indian copper; material characterization; electrochemical behaviour; rust analysis; corrosion rate. Abstract. A chalcolithic (2350–1800 BC) copper chisel from Balathal has been characterized by X-ray diffraction, microstructural and electrochemical methods. The surface patina was composed of sulfates ...

  8. Pharmacological Properties of Nanometals (Silver, Copper, Iron)

    OpenAIRE

    Chekman, I.S.

    2015-01-01

    The article summarizes the results of studies on the pharmacological, toxicological and specific properties of nanometals (silver, iron, copper). It is established that nanoparticles of silver, copper, iron exhibit antimicrobial action. Acute toxicity of nanometals depends on their nature, administration route and animal sex. Effects on heart activity and hemodynamic status as well as erythrocyte osmotic fragility have dose-dependent nature.

  9. Chemistry of the copper silicon interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.J.; Sashin, V.A.; Nixon, K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Copper and silicon readily interdiffuse, even at room temperature, to form an interface which can be several nanometers thick. Over the years considerable effort has gone into investigating the diffusion process and chemical nature of the interface formed. Photoemission measurements give evidence for the formation of a stable suicide with a definite stoichiometry, Cu 3 Si. This is evidenced by splitting of the Si LVV Auger line and slight shifts and change in shape of the copper valence band density of states as measured by ultra-violet photoemission. In this paper we present calculations of the electronic structure of copper suicide, bulk copper and silicon, and preliminary measurements of the interface by electron momentum spectroscopy. Densities of states for copper and copper suicide are dominated by the copper 3d bands, and difference between the two compounds are relatively small. By contrast, the full band structures are quite distinct. Hence, experimental measurements of the full band structure of the copper on silicon interface, for example by EMS, have the potential to reveal the chemistry of the interface in a detailed way

  10. Copper laser diagnostics and kinetics support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    In the effort MSNW participated with the LINL copper-Vapor Laser Program by providing a useful plasma diagnostic for interpretation of Copper-vapor laser kinetics. MSNW developed and delivered a pulsed interferometric diagnostic package to LLNL. Moreover MSNW provided personal services at the request and direction of LLL in the implementation of the diagnostic and interpretation of the data

  11. Differential bacteriophage mortality on exposure to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyu; Dennehy, John J

    2011-10-01

    Many studies report that copper can be used to control microbial growth, including that of viruses. We determined the rates of copper-mediated inactivation for a wide range of bacteriophages. We used two methods to test the effect of copper on bacteriophage survival. One method involved placing small volumes of bacteriophage lysate on copper and stainless steel coupons. Following exposure, metal coupons were rinsed with lysogeny broth, and the resulting fluid was serially diluted and plated on agar with the corresponding bacterial host. The second method involved adding copper sulfate (CuSO(4)) to bacteriophage lysates to a final concentration of 5 mM. Aliquots were removed from the mixture, serially diluted, and plated with the appropriate bacterial host. Significant mortality was observed among the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) bacteriophages Φ6 and Φ8, the single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) bacteriophage PP7, the ssDNA bacteriophage ΦX174, and the dsDNA bacteriophage PM2. However, the dsDNA bacteriophages PRD1, T4, and λ were relatively unaffected by copper. Interestingly, lipid-containing bacteriophages were most susceptible to copper toxicity. In addition, in the first experimental method, the pattern of bacteriophage Φ6 survival over time showed a plateau in mortality after lysates dried out. This finding suggests that copper's effect on bacteriophage is mediated by the presence of water.

  12. Mixed-ligand binuclear copper(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new mixed-ligand binuclear copper(II) complex [Cu(MS)(bpy)]2.(ClO4)2, built of 5-methylsalicylaldehyde and 2,2'-bipyridyl has been synthesized and characterized by using elemental analysis, IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Crystal structure of the complex shows that copper(II) ion lies in a square pyramidal coordination ...

  13. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-02

    Aug 2, 2016 ... This micronutrient is necessary for the proper growth, development and maintenance of connective tissue, bone, brain and heart. Copper is found to ... Wilson's disease. (WD) is a monogenic, autosomal, recessive inherited disor- der where the copper ATPase, ATP7B, is a major causative gene (Tanzi et al.

  14. Copper Regulates Cyclic AMP-Dependent Lipolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi; Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Chan, Jefferson; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Muchenditsi, Abigael; Pendyala, Venkata S.; Jia, Shang; Aron, Allegra T.; Ackerman, Cheri M.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Guan, Timothy; Smaga, Lukas P.; Farhi, Samouil L.; New, Elizabeth J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Chang, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling relies extensively on dynamic pools of redox-inactive metal ions such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc, but their redox-active transition metal counterparts such as copper and iron have been studied primarily as static enzyme cofactors. Here we report that copper is an endogenous regulator of lipolysis, the breakdown of fat, which is an essential process in maintaining the body's weight and energy stores. Utilizing a murine model of genetic copper misregulation, in combination with pharmacological alterations in copper status and imaging studies in a 3T3-L1 white adipocyte model, we demonstrate that copper regulates lipolysis at the level of the second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP), by altering the activity of the cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase PDE3B. Biochemical studies of the copper-PDE3B interaction establish copper-dependent inhibition of enzyme activity and identify a key conserved cysteine residue within a PDE3-specific loop that is essential for the observed copper-dependent lipolytic phenotype. PMID:27272565

  15. High Copper Amalgam Alloys in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam Restoration is an example of the material giving its name to the process. Amalgam fillings are made up of mercury, powdered silver and tin. They are mixed and packed into cavities in teeth where it hardens slowly and replaces the missing tooth substance. The high copper have become material of choice as compared to low copper alloys nowadays because of their improved mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, better marginal integrity and improved performance in clinical trial. The high copper amalgam was used as a restorative material. The application of high copper amalgam was found to be much more useful than low copper amalgam. High copper had much more strength, corrosion resistance, durability and resistance to tarnish as compared to low copper amalgams. No marked expansion or condensation was noted in the amalgam restoration after its setting after 24 hrs. By using the high copper alloy, the chances of creep were also minimized in the restored tooth. No discomfort or any kind of odd sensation in the tooth was noted after few days of amalgam restoration in the tooth.

  16. Lead and Copper Control 101-slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation is an overview of the most important water treatment strategies for the control of lead and copper release from drinking water corrosion. In addition to the sections specifically on lead and copper treatment, sections are included that cover sampling to find le...

  17. Synthesis and optical characterization of copper nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hence, copper (Cu) colloidal NPs were prepared using laser ablation (Nd:YAG, ... Copper nanoparticles; optical property; LSPR, laser ablation. 1. Introduction. Among all nanomaterials, nanoparticles (NPs) are of great interest because of their optical, structural, ... useful for applications in a wide range of fields like can-.

  18. Copper removal from contaminated soils by soil washing process using camellian-derived saponin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Arturo; Fernanda Campos, Maria; Videla, Álvaro; Letelier, María Victoria; Fuentes, Bárbara

    2015-04-01

    Antofagasta Region in North of Chile has been the main copper producer district in the world. As a consequence of a lack of mining closure regulation, a large number of abandon small-to-medium size metal-contaminated sites have been identified in the last survey performed by the Chilean Government. Therefore, more research development on sustainable reclamation technologies must be made in this extreme arid-dry zone. The objective of this study is to test the effectiveness of soil remediation by washing contaminated soil using camellian-derived saponin for the mobilization of copper. Soil samples were taken from an abandoned copper mine site located at 30 km North Antofagasta city. They were dried and sieved at 75 µm for physico-chemical characterization. A commercial saponin extracted from camellias seed was used as biosurfactant. The soil used contains 67.4 % sand, 26.3 % silt and 6.3 % clay. The soil is highly saline (electric conductivity, 61 mScm-1), with low organic matter content (0.41%), with pH 7.30, and a high copper concentration (2200 mg Kg-1 soil). According to the sequential extraction procedure of the whole soil, copper species are mainly as exchangeable fraction (608.2 mg Kg-1 soil) and reducible fraction (787.3 mg Kg-1 soil), whereas the oxidizable and residual fractions are around 205.7 and 598.8 mg Kg-1 soil, respectively. Soil particles under 75 µm contain higher copper concentrations (1242 mg Kg-1 soil) than the particle fraction over 75 µm (912 mg Kg-1 soil). All washing assays were conducted in triplicate using a standard batch technique with and without pH adjustment. The testing protocols includes evaluation of four solid to liquid ratio (0.5:50; 1.0:50; 2.0:50, and 5.0:50) and three saponin concentrations (0, 1, and 4 mg L-1). After shaking (24 h, 20±1 °C) and subsequently filtration (0.45 µm), the supernatants were analyzed for copper and pH. The removal efficiencies of copper by saponin solutions were calculated in according to the

  19. Sustainable Life on the Blue Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvarg, D.

    2002-05-01

    Environmental trends such as declining sources of potable fresh-water and the recognized need to restore and give full economic value to natural water recharging services derived from watersheds, forests, wetlands, etc. pose global security issues. Fifty years ago top White House Science and technology advisors saw the solution to future water shortages, not in water conservation but rather in building a series of nuclear powered desalination plants along America's shorelines. This reflected the popular belief that we could compensate for any land-based resource shortfalls in protein, energy and fresh water by turning to the seas, while also using these same waters as dumping sites for our wastes and toxins. The world's largest habitat, the deep seas, are threatened by commercial trawling and deep-drilling for oil and gas, as well as revived interest in deep ocean mineral mining. The collapse of global fisheries suggests a need for restoration of marine wildlife and limited sustainable wild harvests (from a vastly decapitalized fishing fleet) combined with sustainable forms of aquaculture. Ocean mineral mining has proven environmental risks, and we have now begun the shift to mineral substitution using various composites and petrochemical derivatives. My old metal bathtub for example, rather than being replaced, was recently covered with a plastic liner, extending its life for years to come. This would suggest that petroleum is far too valuable a substance needed for the manufacture of things like sailcloth and hot-tubs, to be frittered away as a (climate altering) fuel. Deep ocean drilling technology in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere is extending projected oil resources even as it creates new and unmanageable risks both to climate and to the marine environment (as does oil industry interest in mining methane hydrates from the abyssal depths). The role of whale oil in the US economy of the 1850s (as the lubricant of the machine age) and "rock oil" (petroleum) in

  20. Rapid fluorescence assay for Sudan dyes using polyethyleneimine-coated copper nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Yu; Li, Jia Xing; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun; Qu, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We report that the intensity of the blue fluorescence of copper nanoclusters coated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) is strongly reduced in the presence of the food dyestuffs Sudan I-IV. This finding was exploited in a label-free fluorescence assay for these Sudan dyes both in ethanol and aqueous solutions. The PEI-capped nanoclusters have an average diameter of 1.8 nm and are displaying, under 355 nm excitation, a blue emission at 480 nm that matches the absorption bands of the Sudan dyes. The clusters are stable in solution for at least 1 month. Under optimum conditions, this assay can be applied to the quantification of the dyes Sudan I, II, III, and IV, respectively, in the 0.1−30, 0.1–30, 0.1–25, and 0.1–25 μM concentration ranges, and the detection limits (3σ/slope) are 65, 70, 45, and 50 nM, respectively. The capability of reducing the fluorescence of the PEI-capped copper nanoclusters is directly related to the number of the functional groups in that Sudan III and IV give lower detection limits. This analytical scheme exhibits a remarkably high selectivity for the Sudan dyes over potentially interfering substances. The method was successfully applied to determine Sudan I, II, III, and IV in hot chilli powder. (author)

  1. Three-dimensional organization of three-domain copper oxidases: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Zhukova, Yu. N.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Zaitsev, V. N.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    'Blue' copper-containing proteins are multidomain proteins that utilize a unique redox property of copper ions. Among other blue multicopper oxidases, three-domain oxidases belong to the group of proteins that exhibit a wide variety of compositions in amino acid sequences, functions, and occurrences in organisms. This paper presents a review of the data obtained from X-ray diffraction investigations of the three-dimensional structures of three-domain multicopper oxidases, such as the ascorbate oxidase catalyzing oxidation of ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and its three derivatives; the multicopper oxidase CueO (the laccase homologue); the laccases isolated from the basidiomycetes Coprinus cinereus, Trametes versicolor, Coriolus zonatus, Cerrena maxima, and Rigidoporus lignosus and the ascomycete Melanocarpus albomyces; and the bacterial laccases CotA from the endospore coats of Bacillus subtilis. A comparison of the molecular structures of the laccases of different origins demonstrates that, structurally, these objects are highly conservative. This obviously indicates that the catalytic activity of the enzymes under consideration is characterized by similar mechanisms

  2. Blue-Detuned Magneto-Optical Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, K. N.; Devlin, J. A.; Wall, T. E.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2018-02-01

    We present the properties and advantages of a new magneto-optical trap (MOT) where blue-detuned light drives "type-II" transitions that have dark ground states. Using 87Rb, we reach a radiation-pressure-limited density exceeding 1 011 cm-3 and a temperature below 30 μ K . The phase-space density is higher than in normal atomic MOTs and a million times higher than comparable red-detuned type-II MOTs, making the blue-detuned MOT particularly attractive for molecular MOTs, which rely on type-II transitions. The loss of atoms from the trap is dominated by ultracold collisions between Rb atoms. For typical trapping conditions, we measure a loss rate of 1.8 (4 )×10-10 cm3 s-1 .

  3. Blue green component and integrated urban design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Srđan M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to demonstrate the hidden potential of blue green components, in a synergetic network, not as separate systems, like used in past. The innovative methodology of the project Blue Green Dream is presented through examples of good practice. A new approach in the project initiate thoughtful planning and remodeling of the settlement for the modern man. Professional and scientific public is looking for way to create more healthy and stimulating place for living. However, offered integrative solutions still remain out of urban and architectural practice. Tested technologies in current projects confirmed measurability of innovative approaches and lessons learned. Scientific and professional contributions are summarized in master's and doctoral theses that have been completed or are in process of writing.

  4. Measuring Blue Space Visibility and ‘Blue Recreation’ in the Everyday Lives of Children in a Capital City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Amber L.; Bottomley, Ross; Chambers, Tim; Thornton, Lukar; Stanley, James; Smith, Moira; Barr, Michelle; Signal, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Blue spaces (water bodies) may promote positive mental and physical health through opportunities for relaxation, recreation, and social connections. However, we know little about the nature and extent of everyday exposure to blue spaces, particularly in settings outside the home or among children, nor whether exposure varies by individual or household characteristics. Wearable cameras offer a novel, reliable method for blue space exposure measurement. In this study, we used images from cameras worn over two days by 166 children in Wellington, New Zealand, and conducted content and blue space quantification analysis on each image (n = 749,389). Blue space was identified in 24,721 images (3.6%), with a total of 23 blue recreation events. Visual exposure and participation in blue recreation did not differ by ethnicity, weight status, household deprivation, or residential proximity to the coastline. Significant differences in both visual exposure to blue space and participation in blue recreation were observed, whereby children from the most deprived schools had significantly higher rates of blue space exposure than children from low deprivation schools. Schools may be important settings to promote equitable blue space exposures. Childhood exposures to blue space may not follow the expected income inequality trends observed among adults. PMID:28587134

  5. Measuring Blue Space Visibility and 'Blue Recreation' in the Everyday Lives of Children in a Capital City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Amber L; Bottomley, Ross; Chambers, Tim; Thornton, Lukar; Stanley, James; Smith, Moira; Barr, Michelle; Signal, Louise

    2017-05-26

    Blue spaces (water bodies) may promote positive mental and physical health through opportunities for relaxation, recreation, and social connections. However, we know little about the nature and extent of everyday exposure to blue spaces, particularly in settings outside the home or among children, nor whether exposure varies by individual or household characteristics. Wearable cameras offer a novel, reliable method for blue space exposure measurement. In this study, we used images from cameras worn over two days by 166 children in Wellington, New Zealand, and conducted content and blue space quantification analysis on each image ( n = 749,389). Blue space was identified in 24,721 images (3.6%), with a total of 23 blue recreation events. Visual exposure and participation in blue recreation did not differ by ethnicity, weight status, household deprivation, or residential proximity to the coastline. Significant differences in both visual exposure to blue space and participation in blue recreation were observed, whereby children from the most deprived schools had significantly higher rates of blue space exposure than children from low deprivation schools. Schools may be important settings to promote equitable blue space exposures. Childhood exposures to blue space may not follow the expected income inequality trends observed among adults.

  6. Modification of polycrystalline copper by proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia S, F.; Cabral P, A.; Saniger B, J.M.; Banuelos, J.G.; Barragan V, A.

    1997-01-01

    Polished copper samples were irradiated with proton beams of 300 and 700 keV at room temperature and at -150 Centigrade. In this work the obtained results are reported when such copper irradiated samples are analysed with Sem, Tem, AFM. The Sem micrographs showed evident changes in surface of these copper samples, therefore an EDAX microanalysis was done for its characterization. additionally, the Tem micrographs showed heaps formation until 200 nm. Its electron diffraction spectra indicated that these heaps consist of a copper compound. Finally with AFM were observed changes in coloration of the irradiated sample surface, as well as changes in texture and rugosity of them. These results show in general that irradiation process with protons which is known as an innocuo process produces changes in the copper properties. (Author)

  7. Refining processes in the copper casting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rzadkosz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of technology of copper and alloyed copper destined for power engineering casts. The casts quality was assessed based on microstructure, chemical content analysis and strength properties tests. Characteristic deoxidising (Logas, Cup and modifying (ODM2, Kupmod2 formulas were used for the copper where high electrical conductivity was required. Chosen examples of alloyed copper with varied Cr and Zr content were studied, and the optimal heat treatment parameters were tested for a chosen chromium copper content, based on the criterion of hardness and electrical conductivity tests. Searching for materials with high wear resistance, the influence of variable silicone content on the properties of CuNiSi alloy was researched.

  8. Activation of ADAM 12 protease by copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency: elimina......Conversion of latent proteases to the active form occurs by various mechanisms characteristic for different protease families. Here we report that the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM 12-S is activated by Cu(II). Copper activation is distinct from the cysteine switch component of latency......: elimination of the ADAM 12 cysteine switch by a point mutation in the propeptide had no effect on copper activation, whereas mutation of an unpaired cysteine residue in the catalytic domain resulted in a mutant form of ADAM 12-S that was insensitive to copper. This suggests a multi-step activation mechanism...... for ADAM 12 involving both furin cleavage and copper binding....

  9. Copper nitrate: a privileged reagent for organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingchun; Ye, Rongxuan; Shen, Weijia; Xu, Bin

    2018-04-18

    Copper has been explored as an ideal candidate for replacing noble metals in organic synthesis, especially for practical large scale preparation. Recent decades have witnessed the renaissance and improvement of copper-catalyzed and copper-mediated organic reactions. Copper nitrate is a common inorganic copper salt which has been proved to be a ubiquitous reactant in organic synthesis due to its commercial availability, stability, inexpensiveness and environmentally benign nature. Copper nitrate could be used as a nitration reagent, oxidant, catalyst or promoter, and Lewis acid as well. Remarkably, great attention has been devoted to the efficient transformation of copper nitrate into functionalized or complicated compounds through various reaction types including cyclization, C-H activation, difunctionalization, nitration, rearrangement and asymmetric synthesis with chiral ligands. Further modification of copper nitrate, such as solid-supported copper nitrate or copper nitrate complexes, extends its applications in organic synthesis. The present review highlights recent advances of copper nitrate in organic synthesis, along with the mechanisms.

  10. Nature's palette: the search for natural blue colorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Andrew G; Culver, Catherine A; van Breemen, Richard B

    2014-07-16

    The food and beverage industry is seeking to broaden the palette of naturally derived colorants. Although considerable effort has been devoted to the search for new blue colorants in fruits and vegetables, less attention has been directed toward blue compounds from other sources such as bacteria and fungi. The current work reviews known organic blue compounds from natural plant, animal, fungal, and microbial sources. The scarcity of blue-colored metabolites in the natural world relative to metabolites of other colors is discussed, and structural trends common among natural blue compounds are identified. These compounds are grouped into seven structural classes and evaluated for their potential as new color additives.

  11. Blue light does not inhibit nodulation in Sesbania rostrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimomura, Aya; Arima, Susumu; Hayashi, Makoto; Maymon, Maskit; Hirsch, Ann M; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2017-01-02

    Earlier, we reported that root nodulation was inhibited by blue light irradiation of Lotus japonicus. Because some legumes do not establish nodules exclusively on underground roots, we investigated whether nodule formation in Sesbania rostrata, which forms both root and "stem" nodules following inoculation with Azorhizobium caulinodans, is inhibited by blue light as are L. japonicus nodules. We found that neither S. rostrata nodulation nor nitrogen fixation was inhibited by blue light exposure. Moreover, although A. caulinodans proliferation was not affected by blue light irradiation, bacterial survival was decreased. Therefore, blue light appears to impose different responses depending on the legume-rhizobial symbiosis.

  12. FROM CIRCULAR ECONOMY TO BLUE ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iustin-Emanuel, ALEXANDRU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Addressing the subject of this essay is based on the background ideas generated by a new branch of science - Biomimicry. According to European Commissioner for the Environment, "Nature is the perfect model of circular economy". Therefore, by imitating nature, we are witnessing a process of cycle redesign: production-consumption-recycling. The authors present some reflections on the European Commission's decision to adopt after July 1, 2014 new measures concerning the development of more circular economies. Starting from the principles of Ecolonomy, which is based on the whole living paradigm, this paper argues for the development within each economy of entrepreneurial policies related to the Blue economy. In its turn, Blue economy is based on scientific analyses that identify the best solutions in a business. Thus, formation of social capital will lead to healthier and cheaper products, which will stimulate entrepreneurship. Blue economy is another way of thinking economic practice and is a new model of business design. It is a healthy, sustainable business, designed for people. In fact, it is the core of the whole living paradigm through which, towards 2020, circular economy will grow more and more.

  13. 'Blue Whale Challenge': A Game or Crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhra, Richa; Baryah, Neha; Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj

    2017-11-11

    A bewildering range of games are emerging every other day with newer elements of fun and entertainment to woo youngsters. Games are meant to reduce stress and enhance the cognitive development of children as well as adults. Teenagers are always curious to indulge in newer games; and e-gaming is one such platform providing an easy access and quicker means of entertainment. The particular game challenge which has taken the world by storm is the dangerous "Blue Whale Challenge" often involving vulnerable teenagers. The Blue Whale Challenge is neither an application nor internet based game but the users get a link through social media chat groups to enter this "deadly" challenge game. This probably is the only game where the participant has to end his/her life to complete the game. The innocent teenagers are being targeted based on their depressed psychology and are coercively isolated from their social milieux on the pretext of keeping the challenges confidential. To add to the woes, no option is offered to quit the challenge even if the contender is unable to complete the challenge. Blue Whale Challenge in its sheer form could be seen as an illegal, unethical and inhumane endeavor in our present society. The present communication discusses the severe effects of the game on teenagers, the ethical concerns involved and the preventive measures necessary to curb it.

  14. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez del Rio, M.; Gutierrez-Leon, A.; Castro, G.R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solis, C.; Sanchez-Hernandez, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytan, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as anil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue. (orig.)

  15. Blue Light Protects Against Temporal Frequency Sensitive Refractive Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Frances; Britton, Stephanie; Spatcher, Molly; Hanowsky, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    Time spent outdoors is protective against myopia. The outdoors allows exposure to short-wavelength (blue light) rich sunlight, while indoor illuminants can be deficient at short-wavelengths. In the current experiment, we investigate the role of blue light, and temporal sensitivity, in the emmetropization response. Five-day-old chicks were exposed to sinusoidal luminance modulation of white light (with blue; N = 82) or yellow light (without blue; N = 83) at 80% contrast, at one of six temporal frequencies: 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz daily for 3 days. Mean illumination was 680 lux. Changes in ocular components and corneal curvature were measured. Refraction, eye length, and choroidal changes were dependent on the presence of blue light (P blue light, refraction did not change across frequencies (mean change -0.24 [diopters] D), while in the absence of blue light, we observed a hyperopic shift (>1 D) at high frequencies, and a myopic shift (>-0.6 D) at low frequencies. With blue light there was little difference in eye growth across frequencies (77 μm), while in the absence of blue light, eyes grew more at low temporal frequencies and less at high temporal frequencies (10 vs. 0.2 Hz: 145 μm; P blue light. Illuminants rich in blue light can protect against myopic eye growth when the eye is exposed to slow changes in luminance contrast as might occur with near work.

  16. Blue Light Protects Against Temporal Frequency Sensitive Refractive Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Frances; Britton, Stephanie; Spatcher, Molly; Hanowsky, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Time spent outdoors is protective against myopia. The outdoors allows exposure to short-wavelength (blue light) rich sunlight, while indoor illuminants can be deficient at short-wavelengths. In the current experiment, we investigate the role of blue light, and temporal sensitivity, in the emmetropization response. Methods Five-day-old chicks were exposed to sinusoidal luminance modulation of white light (with blue; N = 82) or yellow light (without blue; N = 83) at 80% contrast, at one of six temporal frequencies: 0, 0.2, 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz daily for 3 days. Mean illumination was 680 lux. Changes in ocular components and corneal curvature were measured. Results Refraction, eye length, and choroidal changes were dependent on the presence of blue light (P blue light, refraction did not change across frequencies (mean change −0.24 [diopters] D), while in the absence of blue light, we observed a hyperopic shift (>1 D) at high frequencies, and a myopic shift (>−0.6 D) at low frequencies. With blue light there was little difference in eye growth across frequencies (77 μm), while in the absence of blue light, eyes grew more at low temporal frequencies and less at high temporal frequencies (10 vs. 0.2 Hz: 145 μm; P blue light. Conclusions Illuminants rich in blue light can protect against myopic eye growth when the eye is exposed to slow changes in luminance contrast as might occur with near work. PMID:26393671

  17. Fast, Cell-compatible Click Chemistry with Copper-chelating Azides for Biomolecular Labeling**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttamapinant, Chayasith; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Grecian, Scott; Clarke, Scott; Singh, Upinder; Slade, Peter; Gee, Kyle R.; Ting, Alice. Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report that azides capable of copper-chelation undergo much faster “Click chemistry” (copper-accelerated azide-alkyne cycloaddition, or CuAAC) than nonchelating azides under a variety of biocompatible conditions. This kinetic enhancement allowed us to perform site-specific protein labeling on the surface of living cells with only 10–40 µM CuI/II and much higher signal than could be obtained using the best previously-reported live-cell compatible CuAAC labeling conditions. Detection sensitivity was also increased for CuAAC detection of alkyne-modified proteins and RNA labeled by metabolic feeding. PMID:22555882

  18. A study on eggshell pigmentation: biliverdin in blue-shelled chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R; Xu, G Y; Liu, Z Z; Li, J Y; Yang, N

    2006-03-01

    Biliverdin is an important pigment in the eggshell of chickens and other avian species. Determination of the biosynthesis site for biliverdin is essential for understanding the biochemical process and genetic basis of eggshell pigmentation. Either blood or the shell gland could be the biosynthesis site of eggshell biliverdin. A segregation population with full-sib sisters genotyped Oo and oo, which laid blue-shelled eggs and light brown eggs, respectively, was constructed in a native Chinese chicken breed. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry and HPLC were used to determine the biliverdin concentration in eggshells, blood, bile, excreta, and shell gland of both groups of chickens. Biliverdin content was significantly different between egg shells of blue-shelled and brown-shelled chickens (P < 0.01). Blood and bile were tested 3 to 4 h before oviposition, and excreta was tested randomly. Results showed no significant difference in biliverdin concentration in blood, bile, and excreta between the 2 groups. In the shell gland, the biliverdin contents for the blue-shelled and brown-shelled chickens were 8.25 +/- 2.55 and 1.29 +/- 0.12 nmol/g, respectively, which showed a significant difference (P < 0.01). Our results demonstrated that blood is not the biosynthesis site of the shell biliverdin. Biliverdin is most likely synthesized in the shell gland and then deposited onto the eggshell of chickens.

  19. EU Climate-KIC Innovation Blue Green Dream Project: Creation of Educational Experience, Communication and Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Gires, Auguste; Vicari, Rosa; Schertzer, Daniel; Maksimovic, Cedo

    2013-04-01

    The combined effects of climate change and increasing urbanization call for a change of paradigm for planning, maintenance and management of new urban developments and retrofitting of existing ones to maximize ecosystem services and increase resilience to the adverse climate change effects. This presentation will discuss synergies of the EU Climate-KIC Innovation Blue Green Dream (BGD) Project in promoting the BGD demonstration and training sites established in participating European countries. The BGD demonstration and training sites show clear benefits when blue and green infrastructures are considered together. These sites present a unique opportunity for community learning and dissemination. Their development and running acts as a hub for engineers, architects, planners and modellers to come together in their design and implementation stage. This process, being captured in a variety of media, creates a corpus of knowledge, anchored in specific examples of different scales, types and dimensions. During the EU Climate-KIC Innovation Blue Green Dream Project, this corpus of knowledge will be used to develop dissemination and training materials whose content will be customised to fit urgent societal needs.

  20. Surface films and corrosion of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, J.; Laitinen, T.; Maekelae, K.; Saario, T.; Bojinov, M.

    1999-03-01

    In Sweden and Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be encapsulated in cast iron canisters that have an outer shield made of copper. The copper shield is responsible for the corrosion protection of the canister construction. General corrosion of the copper is not expected to be the limiting factor in the waste repository environment when estimating the life-time of the canister construction. However, different forms of localised corrosion, i.e. pitting, stress corrosion cracking, or environmentally assisted creep fracture may cause premature failure of the copper shield. Of the probable constituents in the groundwater, nitrites, chlorides, sulphides and carbonates have been suggested to promote localised corrosion of copper. The main assumption made in planning this research program is that the surface films forming on copper in the repository environment largely determine the susceptibility of copper to the different forms of localised corrosion. The availability of reactants, which also may become corrosion rate limiting, is investigated in several other research programs. This research program consists of a set of successive projects targeted at characterising the properties of surface films on copper in repository environment containing different detrimental anions. A further aim was to assess the significance of the anion-induced changes in the stability of the oxide films with regard to localised corrosion of copper. This report summarises the results from a series of investigations on properties of surface films forming on copper in water of pH = 8.9 at temperature of 80 deg C and pressure of 2 MPa. The main results gained so far in this research program are as follows: The surface films forming on copper in the thermodynamic stability region of monovalent copper at 80 deg C consist of a bulk part (about 1 mm thick) which is a good ionic and electronic conductor, and an outer, interfacial layer (0.001 - 0.005 mm thick) which shows p-type semiconductor