WorldWideScience

Sample records for blood-gas barrier permeability

  1. Effects of ambient air particulate exposure on blood-gas barrier permeability and lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Mortensen, Jann; Møller, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of pulmonary diseases and detrimental outcomes related to the cardiovascular system, including altered vessel functions. This study's objective was too evaluate the effects of ambient particle exposure on the blood-gas permeability, lung.......5-15.8 microg/m(3) PM(10-2.5)) or filtered (91-542 particles/cm(3)) air collected above a busy street. The clearance rate of aerosolized (99m)Tc-labeled diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ((99m)Tc-DTPA) was measured as an index for the alveolar epithelial membrane integrity and permeability of the lung blood......-gas barrier after rush-hour exposure. Lung function was assessed using body plethysmography, flow-volume curves, and measurements of the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. CC16 was measured in plasma and urine as another marker of alveolar integrity. Particulate matter exposure had no significant effect...

  2. Development and remodeling of the vertebrate blood-gas barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanya, Andrew; Anagnostopoulou, Aikaterini; Djonov, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    During vertebrate development, the lung inaugurates as an endodermal bud from the primitive foregut. Dichotomous subdivision of the bud results in arborizing airways that form the prospective gas exchanging chambers, where a thin blood-gas barrier (BGB) is established. In the mammalian lung, this proceeds through conversion of type II cells to type I cells, thinning, and elongation of the cells as well as extrusion of the lamellar bodies. Subsequent diminution of interstitial tissue and apposition of capillaries to the alveolar epithelium establish a thin BGB. In the noncompliant avian lung, attenuation proceeds through cell-cutting processes that result in remarkable thinning of the epithelial layer. A host of morphoregulatory molecules, including transcription factors such as Nkx2.1, GATA, HNF-3, and WNT5a; signaling molecules including FGF, BMP-4, Shh, and TFG- β and extracellular proteins and their receptors have been implicated. During normal physiological function, the BGB may be remodeled in response to alterations in transmural pressures in both blood capillaries and airspaces. Such changes are mitigated through rapid expression of the relevant genes for extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors. While an appreciable amount of information regarding molecular control has been documented in the mammalian lung, very little is available on the avian lung.

  3. Development and Remodeling of the Vertebrate Blood-Gas Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Makanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During vertebrate development, the lung inaugurates as an endodermal bud from the primitive foregut. Dichotomous subdivision of the bud results in arborizing airways that form the prospective gas exchanging chambers, where a thin blood-gas barrier (BGB is established. In the mammalian lung, this proceeds through conversion of type II cells to type I cells, thinning, and elongation of the cells as well as extrusion of the lamellar bodies. Subsequent diminution of interstitial tissue and apposition of capillaries to the alveolar epithelium establish a thin BGB. In the noncompliant avian lung, attenuation proceeds through cell-cutting processes that result in remarkable thinning of the epithelial layer. A host of morphoregulatory molecules, including transcription factors such as Nkx2.1, GATA, HNF-3, and WNT5a; signaling molecules including FGF, BMP-4, Shh, and TFG-β and extracellular proteins and their receptors have been implicated. During normal physiological function, the BGB may be remodeled in response to alterations in transmural pressures in both blood capillaries and airspaces. Such changes are mitigated through rapid expression of the relevant genes for extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors. While an appreciable amount of information regarding molecular control has been documented in the mammalian lung, very little is available on the avian lung.

  4. Membrane mediated development of the vertebrate blood-gas-barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanya, Andrew N

    2016-03-01

    During embryonic lung development, establishment of the gas-exchanging units is guided by epithelial tubes lined by columnar cells. Ultimately, a thin blood-gas barrier (BGB) is established and forms the interface for efficient gas exchange. This thin BGB is achieved through processes, which entail lowering of tight junctions, stretching, and thinning in mammals. In birds the processes are termed peremerecytosis, if they involve cell squeezing and constriction, or secarecytosis, if they entail cutting cells to size. In peremerecytosis, cells constrict at a point below the protruding apical part, resulting in fusion of the opposing membranes and discharge of the aposome, or the cell may be squeezed by the more endowed cognate neighbors. Secarecytosis may entail formation of double membranes below the aposome, subsequent unzipping and discharge of the aposome, or vesicles form below the aposome, fuse in a bilateral manner, and release the aposome. These processes occur within limited developmental windows, and are mediated through cell membranes that appear to be of intracellular in origin. In addition, basement membranes (BM) play pivotal roles in differentiation of the epithelial and endothelial layers of the BGB. Laminins found in the BM are particularly important in the signaling pathways that result in formation of squamous pneumocytes and pulmonary capillaries, the two major components of the BGB. Some information exists on the contribution by BM to BGB formation, but little is known regarding the molecules that drive peremerecytosis, or even the origins and composition of the double and vesicular membranes involved in secarecytosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Developments in permeable and low permeability barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferis, S.A.; Norris, G.H.; Thomas, A.O.

    1997-01-01

    The concept of the reactive treatment zone whereby pollutants are attenuated as they move along a pathway in the ground has enabled a re-thinking of many of the concepts of containment. In particular it offers the potential for the control of the flux from a contaminated area by controlling the contaminant concentration in the pathway(s) as well as or instead of using a low permeability barrier. The paper outlines the basic concepts of the reactive treatment zone and the use of permeable and low permeability reactive systems. The paper then gives a case history of the installation of a permeable barrier using an in-situ reaction chamber

  6. The pulmonary blood-gas barrier in the avian embryo: inauguration, development and refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanya, A N; Hlushchuk, R; Djonov, V

    2011-08-31

    In vertebrates, efficient gas exchange depends primarily on establishment of a thin blood-gas barrier (BGB). The primordial air conduits of the developing avian lung are lined with a cuboidal epithelium that is ultimately converted to a squamous one that participates in the formation of the BGB. In the early stages, cells form intraluminal protrusions (aposomes) then transcellular double membranes separating the aposome from the basal part of the cell establish, unzip and sever the aposome from the cell. Additionally, better endowed cells squeeze out adjacent cells or such cells constrict spontaneously thus extruding the squeezed out aposome. Formation of vesicles or vacuoles below the aposome and fusion of such cavities with their neighboring cognates results in severing of the aposome. Augmentation of cavities and their subsequent fusion with the apical plasma membranes results in formation of numerous microfolds separating concavities on the apical part of the cell. Abscission of such microfolds results in a smooth squamous epithelium just before hatching. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  8. Therapeutic benefits of enhancing permeability barrier for atopic eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Man

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory role of epidermal permeability barrier function in cutaneous inflammation has been well appreciated. While barrier disruption induces cutaneous inflammation, improvement of permeability barrier function alleviates inflammation. Studies have demonstrated that improvement of epidermal permeability barrier function not only prevents the development of atopic eczema, but also delays the relapse of these diseases. Moreover, enhancing the epidermal permeability barrier also alleviates atopic eczema. Furthermore, co-applications of barrier enhancing products with glucocorticoids can increase the therapeutic efficacy and reduce the adverse effects of glucocorticoids in the treatment of atopic eczema. Therefore, utilization of permeability barrier enhancing products alone or in combination with glucocorticoids could be a valuable approach in the treatment of atopic eczema. In this review, we discuss the benefits of improving the epidermal permeability barrier in the management of atopic eczema.

  9. Herbal medicines that benefit epidermal permeability barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal permeability barrier function plays a critical role in regulating cutaneous functions. Hence, researchers have been searching for effective and affordable regimens to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function. In addition to topical stratum corneum lipids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, and liver X receptor ligands, herbal medicines have been proven to benefit epidermal permeability barrier function in both normal and diseased skin, including atopic dermatitis, glucocorticoid-induced skin damage, and UVB-damaged skin. The potential mechanisms by which herbal medicines improve the permeability barrier include stimulation of epidermal differentiation, lipid production, antimicrobial peptide expression, and antioxidation. Therefore, utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative approach to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function in order to prevent and/or treat skin disorders associated with permeability barrier abnormalities.

  10. Altered permeability barrier structure in cholesteatoma matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, Viggo; Halkier-Sørensen, Lars; Rasmussen, Gurli

    2002-01-01

    lipid structures filling the intercellular spaces mainly control the barrier function. The barrier in cholesteatoma epithelium is several times thicker than in unaffected skin but presents distinctive features of a defective barrier as seen in other scaling skin diseases. The intercellular spaces appear...... frequently occur. The corneocytes are shed in clusters, not as single cells. Further, lipid droplets and intracellular membranous material are occasionally seen. In spite of these clear signs of barrier dysfunction, it is unknown whether the thickness of the barrier compensates for the defect in barrier...

  11. Permeable reactive barriers for pollutant removal from groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, F.G.; Meggyes, T.

    2001-01-01

    The removal of pollutants from the groundwater using permeable reactive barriers is a novel in-situ groundwater remediation technology. The most relevant decontamination processes used are chemical reduction, oxidation, precipitation and sorption, for which examples are given. Some common organic pollutants are halogenated hydrocarbons, aromatic and nitroaromatic compounds which can be treated in reactive barriers successfully. Lead, chromium and, in particular, uranium are dealt with in great detail among inorganic pollutants because of their occurrence in many European countries. Construction methods for cut-off walls and reactive barriers exhibit similar features. Apart from conventional methods, drilling, deep soil mixing, jet technology, arrays of wells, injected systems and biobarriers are applied to construct permeable reactive barriers. Permeable reactive barriers bear great potential for the future in remediation engineering. (orig.)

  12. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M. [Ebasco Environmental, Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Phillips, S.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

  13. Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M.; Cantrell, K.J.; Phillips, S.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods

  14. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood-brain barrier model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Di; Sun, Linlin; Mi, Gujie; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J.

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, an in vitro blood-brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood-brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITC-Dextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood-brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood-brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood-brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood-brain barrier (e.g. CPB).

  15. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  16. Immuno-localization of type-IV collagen in the blood-gas barrier and the epithelial-epithelial cell connections of the avian lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimoh, S A; Maina, J N

    2013-02-23

    The terminal respiratory units of the gas exchange tissue of the avian lung, the air capillaries (ACs) and the blood capillaries (BCs), are small and rigid: the basis of this mechanical feature has been highly contentious. Because the strength of the blood-gas barrier (BGB) of the mammalian lung has been attributed to the presence of type-IV collagen (T-IVc), localization of T-IVc in the basement membranes (BM) of the BGB and the epithelial-epithelial cell connections (E-ECCs) of the exchange tissue of the lung of the avian (chicken) lung was performed in order to determine whether it may likewise contribute to the strength of the BGB. T-IVc was localized in both the BM and the E-ECCs. As part of an integrated fibroskeletal scaffold on the lung, T-IVc may directly contribute to the strengths of the ACs and the BCs.

  17. Immuno-localization of type-IV collagen in the blood-gas barrier and the epithelial–epithelial cell connections of the avian lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimoh, S. A.; Maina, J. N.

    2013-01-01

    The terminal respiratory units of the gas exchange tissue of the avian lung, the air capillaries (ACs) and the blood capillaries (BCs), are small and rigid: the basis of this mechanical feature has been highly contentious. Because the strength of the blood-gas barrier (BGB) of the mammalian lung has been attributed to the presence of type-IV collagen (T-IVc), localization of T-IVc in the basement membranes (BM) of the BGB and the epithelial–epithelial cell connections (E-ECCs) of the exchange tissue of the lung of the avian (chicken) lung was performed in order to determine whether it may likewise contribute to the strength of the BGB. T-IVc was localized in both the BM and the E-ECCs. As part of an integrated fibroskeletal scaffold on the lung, T-IVc may directly contribute to the strengths of the ACs and the BCs. PMID:23193049

  18. Endocannabinoids modulate human blood-brain barrier permeability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, William H; Tufarelli, Cristina; Neophytou, Maria; Anderson, Susan I; England, Timothy J; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2015-06-01

    Endocannabinoids alter permeability at various epithelial barriers, and cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid levels are elevated by stroke, with potential neuroprotective effects. We therefore explored the role of endocannabinoids in modulating blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in normal conditions and in an ischaemia/reperfusion model. Human brain microvascular endothelial cell and astrocyte co-cultures modelled the BBB. Ischaemia was modelled by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and permeability was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Endocannabinoids or endocannabinoid-like compounds were assessed for their ability to modulate baseline permeability or OGD-induced hyperpermeability. Target sites of action were investigated using receptor antagonists and subsequently identified with real-time PCR. Anandamide (10 μM) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA, 10 μM) decreased BBB permeability (i.e. increased resistance). This was mediated by cannabinoid CB2 receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels, calcitonin gene-regulated peptide (CGRP) receptor (anandamide only) and PPARα (OEA only). Application of OEA, palmitoylethanolamide (both PPARα mediated) or virodhamine (all 10 μM) decreased the OGD-induced increase in permeability during reperfusion. 2-Arachidonoyl glycerol, noladin ether and oleamide did not affect BBB permeability in normal or OGD conditions. N-arachidonoyl-dopamine increased permeability through a cytotoxic mechanism. PPARα and γ, CB1 receptors, TRPV1 channels and CGRP receptors were expressed in both cell types, but mRNA for CB2 receptors was only present in astrocytes. The endocannabinoids may play an important modulatory role in normal BBB physiology, and also afford protection to the BBB during ischaemic stroke, through a number of target sites. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Pathogenesis of the permeability barrier abnormality in epidermolytic hyperkeratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuth, M; Yosipovitch, G; Williams, M L; Weber, F; Hintner, H; Ortiz-Urda, S; Rappersberger, K; Crumrine, D; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    2001-10-01

    Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a dominantly inherited ichthyosis, frequently associated with mutations in keratin 1 or 10 that result in disruption of the keratin filament cytoskeleton leading to keratinocyte fragility. In addition to blistering and a severe disorder of cornification, patients typically display an abnormality in permeability barrier function. The nature and pathogenesis of the barrier abnormality in epidermolytic hyperkeratosis are unknown, however. We assessed here, first, baseline transepidermal water loss and barrier recovery kinetics in patients with epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Whereas baseline transepidermal water loss rates were elevated by approximately 3-fold, recovery rates were faster in epidermolytic hyperkeratosis than in age-matched controls. Electron microscopy showed no defect in either the cornified envelope or the adjacent cornified-bound lipid envelope, i.e., a corneocyte scaffold abnormality does not explain the barrier abnormality. Using the water-soluble tracer, colloidal lanthanum, there was no evidence of tracer accumulation in corneocytes, despite the fragility of nucleated keratinocytes. Instead, tracer, which was excluded in normal skin, moved through the extracellular stratum corneum domains. Increasing intercellular permeability correlated with decreased quantities and defective organization of extracellular lamellar bilayers. The decreased lamellar material, in turn, could be attributed to incompletely secreted lamellar bodies within granular cells, demonstrable not only by several morphologic findings, but also by decreased delivery of a lamellar body content marker, acid lipase, to the stratum corneum interstices. Yet, after acute barrier disruption a rapid release of preformed lamellar body contents was observed together with increased organelle contents in the extracellular spaces, accounting for the accelerated recovery kinetics in epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. Accelerated recovery, in turn, correlated with a

  20. The blood-retinal barrier permeability in diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsaa, B; Lund-Andersen, H; Mehlsen, J

    1981-01-01

    By the of aid an extended corpus vitreum fluorophotometric technique, the blood-retinal barrier permeability for fluorescein was studied in diabetologically well characterized patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The method, which involves simultaneous determination of the fluorescein...... concentration in corpus vitreum and plasma, is described and discussed. A clear correlation was found between the degree of retinopathy and permeability (P). Patients with normal visus, ophthalmoscophy, fundus photo and fluorescence angiography exhibited P-values of 1.10(-7) cm . sec-1. This was similar to P...

  1. Evaluation of synthetic zeolite as engineering passive permeable reactive barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, O.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of toxic pollutants in groundwater brings about significant changes in the properties of water resources and has to be avoided in order to preserve the environmental quality. Heavy metals are among the most dangerous inorganic water pollutants, that related to many anthropogenic sources and their compounds are extremely toxic. The treatment of contaminated groundwater is among the most difficult and expensive environmental problems. Over the past years, permeable reactive barriers have provided an increasingly important role in the passive insitu treatment of contaminated groundwater. There are a large number of materials that are able to immobilize contaminants by sorption, including granulated active carbon, zeolite, montmorillonite, peat, compost, sawdust, etc. Zeolite X is a synthetic counterpart of the naturally occurring mineral Faujasite. It has one of the largest cavities and cavity entrances of any known zeolites. The main aim of this work is to examine the possibility of using synthetic zeolite X as an engineering permeable reactive barrier to remove heavy metals from a contaminated groundwater. Within this context, the following investigations were carried out: 1. Review on the materials most commonly used as engineered permeable reactive barriers to identify the important features to be considered in the examination of the proposed permeable reactive barrier material (zeolite X). 2. Synthesis of zeolite X and characterization of the synthesized material using different techniques. 3. Batch tests were carried out to characterize the equilibrium and kinetic sorption properties of the synthesized zeolite X towards the concerned heavy metals; zinc and cadmium ions. 4. Column tests were also performed to determine the design factors for permeable reactive barrier against zinc and cadmium ions solutions.Breakthrough curves measured in such experiments used to determine the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients for both metal ions. 5. Analytical

  2. Decontamination of groundwater by permeable reactive barriers; Descontaminacion de aguas subterraneas mediante barreras reactivas permeables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Flores, A.; Chimenos, J. M.

    2002-07-01

    Passive in-situ remediation techniques have seen increased application at contaminated aquifers in recent years as a means of contaminant control and as means of passively treating contaminants in groundwater, because of their low economic cost and minor ground occupation. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are based on the creation of a subsurface barrier, where groundwater contaminants are intercepted in the saturated zone, establishing a passive system of control and contamination treatment, in particular in the heavy metals removal. This paper discusses, related to PRBs experimentation, the results obtained from laboratory experiences by means of Mg oxides and sandy soils as barrier materials, showing a high removal of Cd, Cu, Ni, Fe, Pb and Zn. (Author) 21 refs.

  3. Long-Term Monitoring of Permeable Reactive Barriers - Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, L.

    2001-04-12

    The purpose of this project is to conduct collaborative research to evaluate and maximize the effectiveness of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with a broad-based working group including representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) and its project partner, Battelle, are leading the DoD effort with funding from DoD's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) and Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is coordinating the DOE effort with support from Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA), a research program under DOEs Office of Science and Technology. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is leading EPA's effort. The combined effort of these three agencies allows the evaluation of a large number of sites. Documents generated by this joint project will be reviewed by the participating agencies' principal investigators, the Permeable Barriers Group of the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF), and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC). The technical objectives of this project are to collect and review existing field data at selected PRB sites, identify data gaps, conduct additional measurements, and provide recommendations to DOE users on suitable long-term monitoring strategies. The specific objectives are to (1) evaluate geochemical and hydraulic performance of PRBs, (2) develop guidelines for hydraulic and geochemical characterization/monitoring, and (3) devise and implement long-term monitoring strategies through the use of hydrological and geochemical models. Accomplishing these objectives will provide valuable information regarding the optimum configuration and lifetime of barriers at specific sites. It will

  4. Field Studies of the Electrical Properties of Permeable Reactive Barriers for Monitoring Barrier Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, R.; Labrecque, D. J.; Slater, L.

    2006-12-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are a promising technology for the remediation of groundwater containing a range of organic and inorganic contaminants. Although there are number of different types of reactive barriers, some of the most important are constructed from granular zero valent iron (ZVI). One challenge in the large- scale, long-term implementation of PRBs is to monitor the change in barrier properties over time. For example, mineral precipitates can reduce the effectiveness of the barrier by either insulating the reaction surfaces of the ZVI particles and/or by filling the pore space in the barrier and thus reducing its hydraulic permeability. Previous research has shown that resistivity and induced polarization (IP) measurements are sensitive to corrosion and precipitation due to redox reactions between ions in solution and the ZVI mineral surface. New field studies, supported by additional laboratory studies appear to confirm this work. Resisitivity and IP surveys were conducted at a total of seven barriers at four different sites: the Denver Federal Center; Monticello, Utah; the Kansas City, Missouri Department of Energy site, and the Asarco Smelter Site in East Helena, Montana. These surveys used combinations of surface and borehole surveys to characterized barriers. The surveys are repeated at approximately six-month intervals to provide information on temporal changes. In addition, surveys at the Kansas City barrier followed up on earlier research by providing several years of historical data and a new barrier at East Helena Montana has been instrumented with an autonomous monitoring system allowing continuous monitoring of the barrier electrical properties. Results show an increase in both real and imaginary conductivity as barriers age. For new barriers, the conductivity of ZVI is typically a few tens of mS/m, only modestly higher than that of the background sediments surrounding the barrier. For heavily altered barriers such as the Monticello

  5. Directed site exploration for permeable reactive barrier design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Graettinger, A.J.; Moylan, J.; Reeves, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are being employed for in situ site remediation of groundwater that is typically flowing under natural gradients. Site characterization is of critical importance to the success of a PRB. A design-specific site exploration approach called quantitatively directed exploration (QDE) is presented. The QDE approach employs three spatially related matrices: (1) covariance of input parameters, (2) sensitivity of model outputs, and (3) covariance of model outputs to identify the most important location to explore based on a specific design. Sampling at the location that most reduces overall site uncertainty produces a higher probability of success of a particular design. The QDE approach is demonstrated on the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO, a case study where a PRB was installed and failed. It is shown that additional quantitatively directed site exploration during the design phase could have prevented the remedial failure that was caused by missing a geologic body having high hydraulic conductivity at the south end of the barrier. The most contributing input parameter approach using head uncertainty clearly indicated where the next sampling should be made toward the high hydraulic conductivity zone. This case study demonstrates the need to include the specific design as well as site characterization uncertainty when choosing the sampling locations. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  6. SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, Robert S.; Li, Zhaohui; Roy, Stephen J.; Burt, Todd; Johnson, Timothy L.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector

  7. Permeable reactive barrier - innovative technology for ground-water remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidic, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Significant advances in the application of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for ground-water remediation have been witnessed in the last 5 years. From only a few full-scale systems and pilot-scale demonstrations, there are currently at least 38 full-scale PRBs using zero-valent iron (ZVI) as a reactive material. Of those, 26 are continuous reactive walls, 9 are funnel-and- gate systems and 3 are in situ reactive vessels. Most of the PRB systems have used granular iron media and have been applied to address the control of contamination caused by chlorinated volatile organic compounds or heavy metals. Many regulatory agencies have expressed interest in PRB systems and are becoming more comfortable in issuing permits. The main advantage of PRB systems is that the installation costs are comparable with those of other ground-water remediation technologies, while the O and M costs are significantly lower and are mostly due to monitoring requirements, which are required for all remediation approaches. In addition, the land use can resume after the installation of the PRB systems, since there are few visible signs of the installation above grounds except for the monitoring wells. It is difficult to make any definite conclusions about the long-term performance of PRB systems because there is no more than 5 years of the record of performance that can be used for such analysis. The two main challenges still facing this technology are: (1) evaluating the longevity (geochemistry) of a PRB; and (2) ensuring/verifying hydraulic performance. A number of public/private partnerships have been established in recent years that are working together to resolve some of these problems. This organized approach by combining the efforts of several government agencies and private companies will likely result in better understanding and, hopefully, better acceptance of this technology in the future. (author)

  8. Topical apigenin improves epidermal permeability barrier homoeostasis in normal murine skin by divergent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Maihua; Sun, Richard; Hupe, Melanie; Kim, Peggy L; Park, Kyungho; Crumrine, Debra; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan Luis; Mauro, Theodora M; Elias, Peter M; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2013-03-01

    The beneficial effects of certain herbal medicines on cutaneous function have been appreciated for centuries. Among these agents, chrysanthemum extract, apigenin, has been used for skin care, particularly in China, for millennia. However, the underlying mechanisms by which apigenin benefits the skin are not known. In this study, we first determined whether topical apigenin positively influences permeability barrier homoeostasis, and then the basis thereof. Hairless mice were treated topically with either 0.1% apigenin or vehicle alone twice daily for 9 days. At the end of the treatments, permeability barrier function was assessed with either an electrolytic water analyzer or a Tewameter. Our results show that topical apigenin significantly enhanced permeability barrier homoeostasis after tape stripping, although basal permeability barrier function remained unchanged. Improved barrier function correlated with enhanced filaggrin expression and lamellar body production, which was paralleled by elevated mRNA levels for the epidermal ABCA12. The mRNA levels for key lipid synthetic enzymes also were upregulated by apigenin. Finally, both cathelicidin-related peptide and mouse beta-defensin 3 immunostaining were increased by apigenin. We conclude that topical apigenin improves epidermal permeability barrier function by stimulating epidermal differentiation, lipid synthesis and secretion, as well as cutaneous antimicrobial peptide production. Apigenin could be useful for the prevention and treatment of skin disorders characterized by permeability barrier dysfunction, associated with reduced filaggrin levels and impaired antimicrobial defenses, such as atopic dermatitis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Permeable Barrier Materials for Strontium Immobilization: - UFA Determination of Hydraulic Conductivity. - Column Sorption Experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moody, T

    1996-01-01

    Selected materials were tested to emulate a permeable barrier and to examine the: (1) capture efficiency of these materials relating to the immobilization of strontium-90 and hexavalent chromium in Hanford groundwater...

  10. Clinical implications of the sugar absorption test: intestinal permeability test to assess mucosal barrier function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uil, J. J.; van Elburg, R. M.; van Overbeek, F. M.; Mulder, C. J.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Heymans, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    Functional integrity as an aspect of the mucosal barrier function of the small bowel can be estimated by the intestinal permeability for macromolecules. In the first part of this paper, an overview of intestinal permeability and its measurement is given. In the second part of the paper our own

  11. Permeable barrier materials for strontium immobilization: Unsaturated flow apparatus determination of hydraulic conductivity -- Column sorption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, T.E.; Conca, J.

    1996-09-01

    Selected materials were tested to emulate a permeable barrier and to examine the (1) capture efficiency of these materials relating to the immobilization of strontium-90 and hexavalent chromium (Cr 6+ ) in Hanford Site groundwater; and (2) hydraulic conductivity of the barrier material relative to the surrounding area. The emplacement method investigated was a permeable reactive barrier to treat contaminated groundwater as it passes through the barrier. The hydraulic conductivity function was measured for each material, and retardation column experiments were performed for each material. Measurements determining the hydraulic conductivity at unsaturated through saturated water content were executed using the Unsaturated Flow Apparatus

  12. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avsenik Jernej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Hydraulic performance of permeable barriers for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, D.J.A.; Shikaze, S.G.; Cherry, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The passive interception and in situ treatment of dissolved contaminants in groundwater by permeable reactive barriers has recently gained favor at an increasing number of sites as an alternative to conventional approaches to groundwater remediation such as the pump-and-treat method. Permeable reactive barriers have two essential functions. The first is that the barriers must be installed in a position such that all of the plume passes through the reactive system. The second function is to achieve acceptable treatment of the contamination by physical, chemical or biological means within or downgradient of the barrier. In this paper, issues associated with the hydraulic performance of permeable reaction barriers are evaluated using a three-dimensional groundwater flow model. The efficiency of plume capture by permeable wall and funnel-and-gate systems is examined for some generic and for site-specific hydrogeologic systems. The results have important implications to decisions pertaining to the selection, design and installation of permeable reactive barrier systems

  14. Effect of cryoprotectants for maintaining drug permeability barriers in porcine buccal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marxen, Eva; Axelsen, Mary Carlos; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2016-01-01

    if permeability barriers for small molecules (nicotine and diazepam) were maintained after freezing porcine buccal mucosa with cryoprotectants to -80°C. Combinations of dimethyl sulfoxide, bovine serum albumin, glycerol and sucrose were used as cryoprotectants. The permeability of nicotine and diazepam across...... fresh or frozen/thawed tissue was determined using modified Ussing chambers. Haematoxylin-eosin stained tissue sections for histology were prepared. The permeability of nicotine across tissue frozen without cryoprotectants was significantly higher compared to tissue frozen with cryoprotectants or fresh...... tissue. Freezing with or without cryoprotectants did not significantly affect the flux of diazepam compared to fresh tissue. Only minor histological changes were seen in frozen/thawed porcine buccal mucosa compared to fresh tissue. In conclusion, permeability barriers for nicotine and diazepam were...

  15. Application of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Imaging in Global Cerebral Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanidze, J; Kallas, O N; Gupta, A; Weidman, E; Baradaran, H; Mir, D; Giambrone, A; Segal, A Z; Claassen, J; Sanelli, P C

    2016-09-01

    Blood-brain barrier permeability is not routinely evaluated in the clinical setting. Global cerebral edema occurs after SAH and is associated with BBB disruption. Detection of global cerebral edema using current imaging techniques is challenging. Our purpose was to apply blood-brain barrier permeability imaging in patients with global cerebral edema by using extended CT perfusion. Patients with SAH underwent CTP in the early phase after aneurysmal rupture (days 0-3) and were classified as having global cerebral edema or nonglobal cerebral edema using established noncontrast CT criteria. CTP data were postprocessed into blood-brain barrier permeability quantitative maps of PS (permeability surface-area product), K(trans) (volume transfer constant from blood plasma to extravascular extracellular space), Kep (washout rate constant of the contrast agent from extravascular extracellular space to intravascular space), VE (extravascular extracellular space volume per unit of tissue volume), VP (plasmatic volume per unit of tissue volume), and F (plasma flow) by using Olea Sphere software. Mean values were compared using t tests. Twenty-two patients were included in the analysis. Kep (1.32 versus 1.52, P cerebral edema compared with nonglobal cerebral edema while VE (0.81 versus 0.39, P cerebral edema. Kep is an important indicator of altered blood-brain barrier permeability in patients with decreased blood flow, as Kep is flow-independent. Further study of blood-brain barrier permeability is needed to improve diagnosis and monitoring of global cerebral edema. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. LOCALIZATION OF PERMEABILITY BARRIERS IN THE FROG SKIN EPITHELIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Palomo, A.; Erlij, D.; Bracho, H.

    1971-01-01

    Ruthenium red and colloidal lanthanum were used to determine the site of the structural barriers to diffusion within the intercellular spaces of frog skin epithelium. Electron micrographs show that occluding zonules located at the outer border of the stratum corneum and at the outer layer of the stratum granulosum are true tight junctions since they are impermeable to these tracers. Measurement of 140La uptake by the living skin shows that lanthanum moves across the external surface of the skin readily, into and out of a compartment that has a limited capacity and is bounded on its internal side by a barrier impermeable to lanthanum. Examination of these skins with the electron microscope suggests that the compartment is localized between the external membrane of the cells at the outer layer of the s. granulosum and at the outermost surface of the skin. These observations and other findings described in the literature indicate that the site of the external high resistance barrier of the frog skin is localized at the outer border of the s. granulosum. PMID:4329611

  17. Permeability of EVOH Barrier Material Used in Automotive Applications: Metrology Development for Model Fuel Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available EVOH (Ethylene-Vinyl Alcohol materials are widely used in automotive applications in multi-layer fuel lines and tanks owing to their excellent barrier properties to aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These barrier materials are essential to limit environmental fuel emissions and comply with the challenging requirements of fast changing international regulations. Nevertheless, the measurement of EVOH permeability to model fuel mixtures or to their individual components is particularly difficult due to the complexity of these systems and their very low permeability, which can vary by several orders of magnitude depending on the permeating species and their relative concentrations. This paper describes the development of a new automated permeameter capable of taking up the challenge of measuring minute quantities as low as 1 mg/(m2.day for partial fluxes for model fuel mixtures containing ethanol, i-octane and toluene at 50°C. The permeability results are discussed as a function of the model fuel composition and the importance of EVOH preconditioning is emphasized for accurate permeability measurements. The last part focuses on the influence of EVOH conditioning on its mechanical properties and its microstructure, and further illustrates the specific behavior of EVOH in presence of ethanol oxygenated fuels. The new metrology developed in this work offers a new insight in the permeability properties of a leading barrier material and will help prevent the consequences of (bioethanol addition in fuels on environmental emissions through fuel lines and tanks.

  18. Treatment of fue diesel with a permeable reactive barrier technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANTIAGO ALONSO CARDONA GALLO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available La investigación estudió el tratamiento de diesel combustibles de producción mexicana contenidos en agua con un sistema de barrera reactiva permeables a escala de laboratorio (siete columnas. Se uso un suelo agrícola como medio reactivo. Se aplico peroxido de hidrógeno al 50% industrial como fuente de oxigeno y nitrógeno en urea al 46% como nutriente. Se caracterizo el medio reactivo con los principales parámetros de interés (humedad, materia orgánica, pH, nitrógeno total, fósforo disponible, clasificación del suelo, conductividad eléctrica, sólidos suspendidos volátiles, densidad real y aparente, porosidad, textura, color, salinidad, conductividad hidráulica, capacidad de campo y densidad de bacterias. Se determinaron las cinéticas de degradación y la capacidad de adsorción del diesel en el medio reactivo. Las barreras reactivas permeables se diseñaron con los resultados cinéticos obtenidos en los reactores por lotes. Las columnas tenían dimensiones de 30 cm de longitud y 10 cm de diámetro. Las cinéticas de determinaron durante 18 días y las columnas se corrieron durante 70 días presentando remociones arriba del 80%. Se usaron concentraciones iniciales de diesel de 15,000 mg/L. Para la modelación de la adsorción se aplicaron las ecuaciones de Freundlich y Langmuir, donde esta ultima presentó un mejor ajuste a los datos a los datos experimentales y una mayor capacidad de adsorción. Para el suministro de los nutrientes y oxigeno se aplico el modelo propuesto por McCarty y la ecuación media para diesel propuesta por Jackson. Se determinó una velocidad de degradación de 0.0908 d-1, un coeficiente de distribución del diesel en el medio reactivo de 0.8 ml/g, una capacidad de adsorción de diesel en el medio reactivo de 13.50 mg/L y un factor de retardo de 3.69

  19. A framework for understanding semi-permeable barrier effects on migratory ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Hall; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Middleton, Arthur D.; Morrison, Thomas A.; Nielson, Ryan M.; Wyckoff, Teal B.

    2013-01-01

    1. Impermeable barriers to migration can greatly constrain the set of possible routes and ranges used by migrating animals. For ungulates, however, many forms of development are semi-permeable, and making informed management decisions about their potential impacts to the persistence of migration routes is difficult because our knowledge of how semi-permeable barriers affect migratory behaviour and function is limited. 2. Here, we propose a general framework to advance the understanding of barrier effects on ungulate migration by emphasizing the need to (i) quantify potential barriers in terms that allow behavioural thresholds to be considered, (ii) identify and measure behavioural responses to semi-permeable barriers and (iii) consider the functional attributes of the migratory landscape (e.g. stopovers) and how the benefits of migration might be reduced by behavioural changes. 3. We used global position system (GPS) data collected from two subpopulations of mule deer Odocoileus hemionus to evaluate how different levels of gas development influenced migratory behaviour, including movement rates and stopover use at the individual level, and intensity of use and width of migration route at the population level. We then characterized the functional landscape of migration routes as either stopover habitat or movement corridors and examined how the observed behavioural changes affected the functionality of the migration route in terms of stopover use. 4. We found migratory behaviour to vary with development intensity. Our results suggest that mule deer can migrate through moderate levels of development without any noticeable effects on migratory behaviour. However, in areas with more intensive development, animals often detoured from established routes, increased their rate of movement and reduced stopover use, while the overall use and width of migration routes decreased. 5. Synthesis and applications. In contrast to impermeable barriers that impede animal movement

  20. Oxidation of trichloroethylene, toluene, and ethanol vapors by a partially saturated permeable reactive barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoodlu, M.G.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Hartog, Niels; Raoof, A.

    2014-01-01

    The mitigation of volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors in the unsaturated zone largely relies on the active removal of vapor by ventilation. In this study we considered an alternative method involving the use of solid potassium permanganate to create a horizontal permeable reactive barrier for

  1. The Effect of Ovariectomy and Estrogen on Penetrating Brain Arterioles and Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cipolla, Marilyn J.; Godfrey, Julie A.; Wiegman, Marchien J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effect of estrogen replacement on the structure and function of penetrating brain arterioles (PA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Materials and Methods: Female ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were replaced with estradiol (E-2) and estriol (E-3) (OVX + E;

  2. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability and Monocyte Infiltration in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, S.; Blezer, E. L. A.; Schreibelt, G.; Dopp, E.; van der Pol, S. M. A.; Schadee-Eestermans, I. L.; Nicolay, K.; Dijkstra, C. D.; de Vries, H. E.

    2004-01-01

    Enhanced cerebrovascular permeability and cellular infiltration mark the onset of early multiple sclerosis lesions. So far, the precise sequence of these events and their role in lesion formation and disease progression remain unknown. Here we provide quantitative evidence that blood-brain barrier leakage is an early event and precedes massive…

  3. Neonatal blood gas sampling methods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adequate collateral circulation before radial arterial puncture may not be a reliable predictor of subsequent risk of vascular injury.75. Conclusion and recommendations. Indwelling arterial catheters remain a practical, reliable and accurate method of neonatal blood gas sampling, provided they are inserted and maintained ...

  4. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.; Baghel, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations

  5. Removal of chromate in a permeable reactive barrier using zero-valent iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Locht, T

    2002-01-01

    Chromate is a commonly found groundwater contaminant. Permeable reactive barriers containing zero-valent iron as iron filings are able to remove the chromate by a combined reduction/precipitation reaction. However, due to the passivation of the reduction capability of the iron surfaces by the pre......Chromate is a commonly found groundwater contaminant. Permeable reactive barriers containing zero-valent iron as iron filings are able to remove the chromate by a combined reduction/precipitation reaction. However, due to the passivation of the reduction capability of the iron surfaces...... by the precipitation of chromate and other groundwater constituents, the barrier may have a limited capacity for chromate removal. By performing a column experiment with iron filings it was shown that the capacity was slightly lower at high chromate concentration (500 ppm) in comparison to low concentration (20 ppm...

  6. Blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier permeability in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalbot, Sonia; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Fladby, Tormod; Andreasen, Niels; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2011-01-01

    The role of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCB) dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been addressed but not yet established. We evaluated the BCB integrity in 179 samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) retrospectively collected from AD patients and control cases using both CSF/serum albumin ratio (QAlb) and CSF secretory Ca2+-dependent phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) activity. These analyses were supplemented with the measurement of total tau, amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42), and ubiquitin CSF levels. We found that due to its higher sensitivity, CSF sPLA2 activity could 1) discriminate AD from healthy controls and 2) showed BCB impairment in neurological control cases while QAlb could not. Moreover, the CSF sPLA2 activity measurement showed that around half of the AD patients were characterized by a BCB impairment. The BCB dysfunction observed in AD was independent from Mini-Mental State Examination score as well as CSF levels of total tau, Aβ1-42, and ubiquitin. Finally, the BCB dysfunction was not limited to any of the CSF biomarkers-based previously identified subgroups of AD. These results suggest that the BCB damage occurs independent of and probably precedes both Aβ and tau pathologies in a restricted subgroup of AD patients.

  7. Use of jet grouting to create a low permeability horizontal barrier below an incinerator ash landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, A.J.; Burke, G.K.; Deutsch, W.L. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The City of Philadelphia's Division of Aviation (DOA) has begun construction of a new commuter runway, designated as Runway 8-26, at the Philadelphia International Airport. A portion of this runway will be constructed over a former Superfund site known as the Enterprise Avenue Landfill, which for many years was used to dispose of solid waste incinerator ash and other hazardous materials. The site was clay capped in the 1980's, but in order for the DOA to use the site, additional remediation was needed to meet US EPA final closure requirements. One component of the closure plan included installation of a low permeability horizontal barrier above a very thin (approximately 0.61 to 0.91 meters) natural clay stratum which underlies an approximately 1020 m 2 area of the landfill footprint so as to insure that a minimum 1.52 meter thick low permeability barrier exists beneath the entire 150,000 m 2 landfill. The new barrier was constructed using jet grouting techniques to achieve remote excavation and replacement of the bottom 0.91 meters of the waste mass with a low permeability grout. The grout was formulated to meet the low permeability, low elastic modulus and compressive strength requirements of the project design. This paper will discuss the advantages of using jet grouting for the work and details the development of the grout mixture, modeling of the grout zone under load, field construction techniques, performance monitoring and verification testing

  8. Alcohol-induced premature permeability in mouse placenta-yolk sac barriers in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi Poodeh, S; Salonurmi, T; Nagy, I; Koivunen, P; Vuoristo, J; Räsänen, J; Sormunen, R; Vainio, S; Savolainen, M J

    2012-10-01

    Acute alcohol exposure induces malformation and malfunction of placenta-yolk sac tissues in rodents, reducing the labyrinth zone in the placenta and altering the permeability and fluidity of the cell membrane. During normal mouse placentation the cells line up in an optimal way to form a hemotrichorial placenta where layers II and III are connected through gap junctions. These act as molecular sieves that limit the passage of large molecules. PlGF is a developmentally regulated protein that controls the passage of molecules in the vasculosyncytial membranes and media of large blood vessels in the placental villi. In addition to the chorioallontoic placenta, rodents also have another type of placenta that consists of Reichert's membrane within the trophoblast cell layer on the maternal side and the parietal endodermal cells on the embryonic site. This forms a separate materno-fetal transport system. We study here whether alcohol affects these two placental barriers, leading to placental malfunction that in turn diminishes the nutrient supply to the embryo. CD-1 mice received two intraperitoneal injections of 3 g/kg ethanol at 4 h intervals at 8.75 days post coitum (dpc). The placentas were collected on 9.5, 11.5 and 14.5 dpc and used for histopathological protein studies. Hemotrichorial cell layer structure interactions through connective tissue and gap junction were analyzed by electron microscopy. The permeability of the feto-maternal barrier was visualized with Evans Blue. VEGF, a permeability inducer, was found to be up-regulated in the mouse placenta after acute alcohol exposure, and permeability was also affected by altered structures in the barriers that separate the feto-maternal blood circulation which destroyed the gap junctions in the hemotrichorial cell layer, reduced the thickness of Reichert's membrane and interfered with with Reichert's trophoblast/Reichert's parietal interaction. These defects together could have caused the permeability malfunction

  9. Studies on blood-brain barrier permeability after microwave-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, J.H.; Chamness, A.F.; Allen, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Since the reported alternations of permeability of the blood-brain barrier by microwave radiation have implications for safety considerations in man, studies were conducted to replicate some of the initial investigations. No transfer of parenterally-administered fluorescin across the blood-brain barrier of rats after 30 min 1.2-GHz radiation at power densities from 2-75 mW/cm 2 was noted. Increased fluorescin uptake was seen only when the rats were made hyperthermic in a warm air-environment. Similarly, no increase of brain uptake of 14 C-mannitol using the Oldendorf dual isotope technique was seen as a result of exposure to pulsed 1.3-GHz radiation at peak power densities up to 20 mW/cm 2 , or in the continuous wave mode from 0.1-50 mW/cm 2 . An attempt to alter the permeability of the blood-brain barrier for serotonin with microwave radiation was unsuccessful. From these studies it would appear that the brain must be made hyperthermic for changes in permeability of the barrier induced by microwave radiation to occur. (orig.) [de

  10. Novel RpoS-Dependent Mechanisms Strengthen the Envelope Permeability Barrier during Stationary Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Angela M; Wang, Wei; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2017-01-15

    Gram-negative bacteria have effective methods of excluding toxic compounds, including a largely impermeable outer membrane (OM) and a range of efflux pumps. Furthermore, when cells become nutrient limited, RpoS enacts a global expression change providing cross-protection against many stresses. Here, we utilized sensitivity to an anionic detergent (sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]) to probe changes occurring to the cell's permeability barrier during nutrient limitation. Escherichia coli is resistant to SDS whether cells are actively growing, carbon limited, or nitrogen limited. In actively growing cells, this resistance depends on the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump; however, this pump is not necessary for protection under either carbon-limiting or nitrogen-limiting conditions, suggesting an alternative mechanism(s) of SDS resistance. In carbon-limited cells, RpoS-dependent pathways lessen the permeability of the OM, preventing the necessity for efflux. In nitrogen-limited but not carbon-limited cells, the loss of rpoS can be completely compensated for by the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump. We suggest that this difference simply reflects the fact that nitrogen-limited cells have access to a metabolizable energy (carbon) source that can efficiently power the efflux pump. Using a transposon mutant pool sequencing (Tn-Seq) approach, we identified three genes, sanA, dacA, and yhdP, that are necessary for RpoS-dependent SDS resistance in carbon-limited stationary phase. Using genetic analysis, we determined that these genes are involved in two different envelope-strengthening pathways. These genes have not previously been implicated in stationary-phase stress responses. A third novel RpoS-dependent pathway appears to strengthen the cell's permeability barrier in nitrogen-limited cells. Thus, though cells remain phenotypically SDS resistant, SDS resistance mechanisms differ significantly between growth states. Gram-negative bacteria are intrinsically resistant to detergents and many

  11. Oxidation of trichloroethylene, toluene, and ethanol vapors by a partially saturated permeable reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G.; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid; Hartog, Niels; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    The mitigation of volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors in the unsaturated zone largely relies on the active removal of vapor by ventilation. In this study we considered an alternative method involving the use of solid potassium permanganate to create a horizontal permeable reactive barrier for oxidizing VOC vapors. Column experiments were carried out to investigate the oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene, and ethanol vapors using a partially saturated mixture of potassium permanganate and sand grains. Results showed a significant removal of VOC vapors due to the oxidation. We found that water saturation has a major effect on the removal capacity of the permeable reactive layer. We observed a high removal efficiency and reactivity of potassium permanganate for all target compounds at the highest water saturation (Sw = 0.6). A change in pH within the reactive layer reduced oxidation rate of VOCs. The use of carbonate minerals increased the reactivity of potassium permanganate during the oxidation of TCE vapor by buffering the pH. Reactive transport of VOC vapors diffusing through the permeable reactive layer was modeled, including the pH effect on the oxidation rates. The model accurately described the observed breakthrough curve of TCE and toluene vapors in the headspace of the column. However, miscibility of ethanol in water in combination with produced water during oxidation made the modeling results less accurate for ethanol. A linear relationship was found between total oxidized mass of VOC vapors per unit volume of permeable reactive layer and initial water saturation. This behavior indicates that pH changes control the overall reactivity and longevity of the permeable reactive layer during oxidation of VOCs. The results suggest that field application of a horizontal permeable reactive barrier can be a viable technology against upward migration of VOC vapors through the unsaturated zone.

  12. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig P; Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle Juhl

    2015-01-01

    as part of the diagnostic work-up at time of diagnosis. Eighteen healthy controls were included for comparison. Patients had magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture performed within 4 weeks of onset of optic neuritis. Information on multiple sclerosis conversion was acquired from hospital records 2......Optic neuritis is an acute inflammatory condition that is highly associated with multiple sclerosis. Currently, the best predictor of future development of multiple sclerosis is the number of T2 lesions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Previous research has found abnormalities...... in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood-brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison...

  13. A calcite permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of Fluoride from spent potliner (SPL) contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, B.D.; Binning, Philip John; Sloan, S.W.

    2008-01-01

    The use of calcite (CaCO3) as a substrate for a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for removing fluoride from contaminated groundwater is proposed and is illustrated by application to groundwater contaminated by spent potliner leachate (SPL), a waste derived from the aluminium smelting process....... The paper focuses on two issues in the implementation of calcite permeable reactive barriers for remediating fluoride contaminated water: the impact of the groundwater chemical matrix and CO2 addition on fluoride removal. Column tests comparing pure NaF solutions, synthetic SPL solutions, and actual SPL...... leachate indicate that the complex chemical matrix of the SPL leachate can impact fluoride removal significantly. For SPL contaminant mixtures, fluoride removal is initially less than expected from idealized, pure, solutions. However, with time, the effect of other contaminants on fluoride removal...

  14. Surfactant-modified zeolites as permeable barriers to organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, R.S.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    We have shown in laboratory experiments that natural zeolites treated with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) are effective sorbents for nonpolar organics, inorganic cations, and inorganic anions. Due to their low cost (∼$0.75/kg) and granular nature, HDTMA-zeolites appear ideal candidates for reactive, permeable subsurface barriers. The HDTMA-zeolites are stable over a wide range of pH (3-13), ionic strength (1 M Cs + or Ca 2+ ), and in organic solvents. Surfactant-modified zeolites sorb nonpolar organics (benzene, toluene, xylene, chlorinated aliphatics) via a partitioning mechanism, inorganic cations (Pb 2+ ) via ion exchange and surface complexation, and inorganic anions (CrO 4 2- , SeO 4 2- , SO 4 2- ) via surface precipitation.The goal of this work is to demonstrate the use of surfactant-modified zeolite as a permeable barrier to ground water contaminants

  15. Structural failures of the blood-gas barrier and the epithelial-epithelial cell connections in the different vascular regions of the lung of the domestic fowl, Gallus gallus variant domesticus, at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, John N; Jimoh, Sikiru A

    2013-03-15

    Structural failure of blood-gas barrier (BGB) and epithelial-epithelial cell connections (EECCs) in different vascular regions of the exchange tissue of the lung was studied in rested and exercised chickens. The number of red blood cells (nRBCs) was counted and protein concentration (PC) measured after lavaging the respiratory system, and blood was sampled to determine the blood lactate levels (BLLs). The numbers of complete BGB breaks (nBGBBs) and those of the EECCs (nEECCBs) were counted in the different vascular territories of the lung. The nRBCs and the PCs increased with increasing exercise intensities but the rate of increase decreased at higher workloads. From rest to the fastest experimental treadmill speed of 2.95 m.sec(-1), BLLs increased 4-fold. In all cases, the nEECCBs exceeded those of the BGB, showing that structurally the BGB is relatively weaker than the EECC. The increase in the number of breaks with increasing exercise can be attributed to increase in the pulmonary capillary blood pressure (PCBP) from faster heart rates and higher cardiac outputs, while the leveling out of the measurements made at higher workloads may have arisen from hemodynamic changes that initially ensued from exudation of blood plasma and then flow of blood into the air capillaries on failure of the BGB. The relative differences in the nBGBBs and the nEECCBs in the different vascular regions of the lung were ascribed to diameters of the branches and their points of origin and angles of bifurcation from the pulmonary artery. Presence of RBCs in the air capillaries of the lungs of rested chickens showed that failure of the BGB commonly occurs even in healthy and unstressed birds. Rapid repair and/or defense responses, which were observed, may explain how birds cope with mechanical injuries of the BGB.

  16. Gas permeability of bentonite barriers: development, construction and testing of a measurement system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraldo Nunes Pitanga

    Full Text Available Abstract This article proposes a testing device to quickly and reliably estimate the gas permeability of bentonite-based clay barriers used in landfill cover systems. The testing methodology is based on a transient gas flow regime that passes through the barrier, therefore not requiring the use of sophisticated equipment that aim to maintain constant differential pressure and measure the gas flow, common requirements for testing methods under a permanent flow regime. To confirm the feasibility of the proposed technique, tests were performed on a pure hydrated bentonite layer, which subsequently encompassed samples of geosynthetic clay liner (GCL at different moisture contents. Geosynthetic clay liners are often selected as a part of the barrier layer for cover systems in solid waste landfills to prevent infiltration of rainfall and migration of biogas into the atmosphere. The results confirmed the equipment reliability and differentiate the different responses of the gas flow barriers studied, considering their different compositions and different moistures.

  17. Novel RpoS-Dependent Mechanisms Strengthen the Envelope Permeability Barrier during Stationary Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Angela M.; Wang, Wei; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria have effective methods of excluding toxic compounds, including a largely impermeable outer membrane (OM) and a range of efflux pumps. Furthermore, when cells become nutrient limited, RpoS enacts a global expression change providing cross-protection against many stresses. Here, we utilized sensitivity to an anionic detergent (sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS]) to probe changes occurring to the cell's permeability barrier during nutrient limitation. Escherichia coli is resista...

  18. /GD-Tracker/ A software for blood-brain barrier permeability assessment\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kala, David; Svoboda, Jan; Litvinec, Andrej; Pošusta, Antonín; Lisý, J.; Šulc, V.; Tomek, A.; Marusič, P.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Otáhal, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2017), s. 43-48 ISSN 0301-5491 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-33115A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : blood-brain barrier * MRI * Gd-DTPA * permeability * stroke * epileptogenesis * MATLAB * freeware * Gd-Tracker Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology

  19. Assessment of the Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Potential Neuroprotective Aurones in Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assay and Porcine Brain Endothelial Cell Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Kok-Fui; Hanapi, Nur Aziah; Chan, Kit-Lam; Yusof, Siti R; Lee, Chong-Yew

    2017-02-01

    Previously, several aurone derivatives were identified with promising neuroprotective activities. In developing these compounds to target the central nervous system (CNS), an assessment of their blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability was performed using in vitro BBB models: parallel artificial membrane permeability assay-BBB which measures passive permeability and primary porcine brain endothelial cell model which enables determination of the involvement of active transport mechanism. Parallel artificial membrane permeability assay-BBB identified most compounds with high passive permeability, with 3 aurones having exceptional P e values highlighting the importance of basic amine moieties and optimal lipophilicity for good passive permeability. Bidirectional permeability assays with porcine brain endothelial cell showed a significant net influx permeation of the aurones indicating a facilitated uptake mechanism in contrast to donepezil, a CNS drug included in the evaluation which only displayed passive permeation. From pH-dependent permeability assay coupled with data analysis using pCEL-X software, intrinsic transcellular permeability (P o ) of a representative aurone 4-3 was determined, considering factors such as the aqueous boundary layer that may hinder accurate in vitro to in vivo correlation. The P o  value determined supported the in vivo feasibility of the aurone as a CNS-active compound. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prediction of Placental Barrier Permeability: A Model Based on Partial Least Squares Variable Selection Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hong Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the human placental barrier permeability of drugs is very important to guarantee drug safety during pregnancy. Quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR method was used as an effective assessing tool for the placental transfer study of drugs, while in vitro human placental perfusion is the most widely used method. In this study, the partial least squares (PLS variable selection and modeling procedure was used to pick out optimal descriptors from a pool of 620 descriptors of 65 compounds and to simultaneously develop a QSAR model between the descriptors and the placental barrier permeability expressed by the clearance indices (CI. The model was subjected to internal validation by cross-validation and y-randomization and to external validation by predicting CI values of 19 compounds. It was shown that the model developed is robust and has a good predictive potential (r2 = 0.9064, RMSE = 0.09, q2 = 0.7323, rp2 = 0.7656, RMSP = 0.14. The mechanistic interpretation of the final model was given by the high variable importance in projection values of descriptors. Using PLS procedure, we can rapidly and effectively select optimal descriptors and thus construct a model with good stability and predictability. This analysis can provide an effective tool for the high-throughput screening of the placental barrier permeability of drugs.

  1. Hypomyelination, memory impairment, and blood-brain barrier permeability in a model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lenise Jihe; Martinez, Denis; Fiori, Cintia Zappe; Baronio, Diego; Kretzmann, Nélson Alexandre; Barros, Helena Maria Tannhauser

    2015-02-09

    We investigated the effect of intermittent hypoxia, mimicking sleep apnea, on axonal integrity, blood-brain barrier permeability, and cognitive function of mice. Forty-seven C57BL mice were exposed to intermittent or sham hypoxia, alternating 30s of progressive hypoxia and 30s of reoxigenation, during 8h/day. The axonal integrity in cerebellum was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. Short- and long-term memories were assessed by novel object recognition test. The levels of endothelin-1 were measured by ELISA. Blood-brain barrier permeability was quantified by Evans Blue dye. After 14 days, animals exposed to intermittent hypoxia showed hypomyelination in cerebellum white matter and higher serum levels of endothelin-1. The short and long-term memories in novel object recognition test was impaired in the group exposed to intermittent hypoxia as compared to controls. Blood-brain barrier permeability was similar between the groups. These results indicated that hypomyelination and impairment of short- and long-term working memories occurred in C57BL mice after 14 days of intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Strength and Numerical Analysis in the Design of Permeable Reactive Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluk, Katarzyna; Wrzesiński, Grzegorz; Lendo-Siwicka, Marzena

    2017-10-01

    Permeable reactive barriers are one of the most important in situ technologies in groundwater remediation. Most of the installed PRBs have tended to use singular reactive media, but there is an increasing number of applications using combined or sequenced media to treat mixtures of contaminants within a groundwater plume. The concept of a multi-layered permeable reactive barrier (MPRB) to prevent and protect groundwater along traffic routes, especially in ecologically and naturally valuable areas, was developed following several field and laboratory investigations conducted in the Department of Geotechnical Engineering of the Warsaw University of Life Sciences. In accordance with the guidelines of the Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council for the selection of reactive materials, numerous laboratory and field investigations should be performed to determine the environmental conditions, type and concentrations of the contaminants, and the physical-chemical and permeability properties of the reactive materials. However, the deformation and strength properties of the reactive materials should be also considered in the design and evaluation of the safety conditions. In this paper, strength and deformation properties of silica spongolite, zeolite, and activated carbon were investigated using direct shear and oedometer tests. The laboratory test results were used in numerical calculations with the application of the finite element method. The aim of this study was to define the impact of the installation stages of a multi-layered permeable reactive barrier on the stability of a road embankment. Numerical analysis may prevent, reduce or eliminate the risk in the case of a breakdown during the construction or/and exploitation of a PRB.

  3. Permeable bio-reactive barriers to address petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at subantarctic Macquarie Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidman, Benjamin L; Terry, Deborah; Wilkins, Dan; Spedding, Tim; Gras, Sally L; Snape, Ian; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Mumford, Kathryn A

    2017-05-01

    A reliance on diesel generated power and a history of imperfect fuel management have created a legacy of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination at subantarctic Macquarie Island. Increasing environmental awareness and advances in contaminant characterisation and remediation technology have fostered an impetus to reduce the environmental risk associated with legacy sites. A funnel and gate permeable bio-reactive barrier (PRB) was installed in 2014 to address the migration of Special Antarctic Blend diesel from a spill that occurred in 2002, as well as older spills and residual contaminants in the soil at the Main Power House. The PRB gate comprised of granular activated carbon and natural clinoptilolite zeolite. Petroleum hydrocarbons migrating in the soil water were successfully captured on the reactive materials, with concentrations at the outflow of the barrier recorded as being below reporting limits. The nutrient and iron concentrations delivered to the barrier demonstrated high temporal variability with significant iron precipitation observed across the bed. The surface of the granular activated carbon was largely free from cell attachment while natural zeolite demonstrated patchy biofilm formation after 15 months following PRB installation. This study illustrates the importance of informed material selection at field scale to ensure that adsorption and biodegradation processes are utilised to manage the environmental risk associated with petroleum hydrocarbon spills. This study reports the first installation of a permeable bio-reactive barrier in the subantarctic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interim Report: Field Demonstration Of Permeable Reactive Barriers To Remove Dissolved Uranium From Groundwater, Fry Canyon, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fry Canyon site in southeastern Utah was selected in 1996 as a long-term field demonstration site to assess the performance of selected permeable reactive barriers for the removal of uranium (U) from groundwater.

  5. Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Optimization, Clare Water Supply Superfund Site, Permeable Reactive Barrier and Soil Remedy Areas, Clare, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report contains a review of the long-term groundwater monitoring network for the Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) and Soil Remedy Areas at the Clare Water Supply Superfund Site in Clare, Michigan.

  6. Abnormal blood-brain barrier permeability in normal appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis investigated by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig Præstekær; Simonsen, Helle Juhl; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is disrupted in normal appearing white matter in MS patients, when compared to healthy controls and whether it is correlated with MS clinical characteristics.......To investigate whether blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is disrupted in normal appearing white matter in MS patients, when compared to healthy controls and whether it is correlated with MS clinical characteristics....

  7. Stress induces endotoxemia and low-grade inflammation by increasing barrier permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin ede Punder

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs are the leading causes of work absence, disability and mortality worldwide. Most of these diseases are associated with low-grade inflammation. Here we hypothesize that stresses (defined as homeostatic disturbances can induce low-grade inflammation by increasing the availability of water, sodium and energy-rich substances to meet the increased metabolic demand induced by the stressor. One way of triggering low-grade inflammation is by increasing intestinal barrier permeability through activation of various components of the stress system. Although beneficial to meet the demands necessary during stress, increased intestinal barrier permeability also raises the possibility of the translocation of bacteria and their toxins across the intestinal lumen into the blood circulation. In combination with modern life-style factors, the increase in bacteria/bacterial toxin translocation arising from a more permeable intestinal wall causes a low-grade inflammatory state. We support this hypothesis with numerous studies finding associations with NCDs and markers of endotoxemia, suggesting that this process plays a pivotal and perhaps even a causal role in the development of low-grade inflammation and its related diseases.

  8. The gut-blood barrier permeability - A new marker in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufnal, Marcin; Pham, Kinga

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that blood-borne metabolites of gut microbiota, such as trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) are involved in the aetiology of cardiovascular diseases and may serve as markers of cardiovascular risk. To enter the bloodstream the microbiota-derived molecules need to pass the gut-blood barrier (GBB). The GBB plays an important role in maintaining organism homeostasis. It is a complex multi-layer system which determines the absorption of nutrients, water and many other substances. The integrity and permeability of the GBB may be impaired in numerous diseases including gastrointestinal, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we propose that the evaluation of the GBB permeability may have a significant diagnostic potential in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Second, we suggest that the GBB permeability is a variable that confounds diagnostic value of new gut microbiota-derived biomarkers such as TMAO. Therefore, cardiovascular risk assessment requires the evaluation of both TMAO and the GBB permeability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factors enhance the permeability of the mouse blood-brain barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shize Jiang

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB impedes entry of many drugs into the brain, limiting clinical efficacy. A safe and efficient method for reversibly increasing BBB permeability would greatly facilitate central nervous system (CNS drug delivery and expand the range of possible therapeutics to include water soluble compounds, proteins, nucleotides, and other large molecules. We examined the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on BBB permeability in Kunming (KM mice. Human VEGF165 was administered to treatment groups at two concentrations (1.6 or 3.0 µg/mouse, while controls received equal-volume saline. Changes in BBB permeability were measured by parenchymal accumulation of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA as assessed by 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Mice were then injected with Evans blue, sacrificed 0.5 h later, and perfused transcardially. Brains were removed, fixed, and sectioned for histological study. Both VEGF groups exhibited a significantly greater signal intensity from the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia than controls (P<0.001. Evans blue fluorescence intensity was higher in the parenchyma and lower in the cerebrovasculature of VEGF-treated animals compared to controls. No significant brain edema was observed by diffusion weighted MRI (DWI or histological staining. Exogenous application of VEGF can increase the permeability of the BBB without causing brain edema. Pretreatment with VEGF may be a feasible method to facilitate drug delivery into the CNS.

  10. Effect of glycated insulin on the blood-brain barrier permeability: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriyary, Leila; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Lornejad, Mohammad Reza; Ghezlou, Mansoureh; Bigdeli, Bahareh; Delavari, Behdad; Mamashli, Fatemeh; Abbasi, Shayan; Davoodi, Jamshid; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2018-02-11

    Alteration in permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB) is of immense importance in the pathogenesis of diabetes-related central nervous system disorders. Considering the presence of glycated insulin in plasma of type 2 diabetic patients, we hypothesized that glycated insulin could induce changes in paracellular permeability in BBB. Therefore, the authors decided to study the effect of glycated insulin on paracellular permeability in a BBB model. Furthermore, the change induced in insulin conformation upon glycation was studied. In this study, the structural modification was detected by fluorescence-based assays, circular dichroism, and dynamic light scattering. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and production of ROS in astrocytes and HUVEC cells were analyzed by MTT, flow cytometric, and spectrofluorometric assays, respectively. The permeability measurement was performed by Lucifer yellow and FITC-Dextran. According to our results, glycated insulin presented altered conformation and more exposed hydrophobic patches than insulin. Besides, formation of oligomeric species and advanced glycated end products (AGEs) were determined. Additionally, lower cell viability, higher apoptosis induction, and more ROS production were detected upon treatment of cells with glycated insulin. Furthermore, glycated insulin leading to increased Lucifer yellow and FITC-dextran transportation across the BBB model which could result from ROS producing and apoptosis-inducing activities of AGE-insulin. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. TIMP-1 attenuates blood–brain barrier permeability in mice with acute liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Radisky, Evette S; Das, Pritam; Batra, Jyotica; Hata, Toshiyuki; Hori, Tomohide; Baine, Ann-Marie T; Gardner, Lindsay; Yue, Mei Y; Bu, Guojun; del Zoppo, Gregory; Patel, Tushar C; Nguyen, Justin H

    2013-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction in acute liver failure (ALF) results in increased BBB permeability that often precludes the patients from obtaining a life-saving liver transplantation. It remains controversial whether matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) from the injured liver contributes to the deregulation of BBB function in ALF. We selectively upregulated a physiologic inhibitor of MMP-9 (TIMP-1) with a single intracerebroventricular injection of TIMP-1 cDNA plasmids at 48 and 72 hours, or with pegylated-TIMP-1 protein. Acute liver failure was induced with tumor necrosis factor-α and 𝒟-(+)-galactosamine in mice. Permeability of BBB was assessed with sodium fluorescein (NaF) extravasation. We found a significant increase in TIMP-1 within the central nervous system (CNS) after the administration of TIMP-1 cDNA plasmids and that increased TIMP-1 within the CNS resulted in an attenuation of BBB permeability, a reduction in activation of epidermal growth factor receptor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signals, and a restoration of the tight junction protein occludin in mice with experimental ALF. Pegylated TIMP-1 provided similar protection against BBB permeability in mice with ALF. Our results provided a proof of principle that MMP-9 contributes to the BBB dysfunction in ALF and suggests a potential therapeutic role of TIMP-1 in ALF. PMID:23532086

  12. Epidermal permeability barrier function and sphingolipid content in the skin of sphingomyelin synthase 2 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Koji; Itaya, Yurina; Watanabe, Ken; Yamashita, Tadashi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Tokudome, Yoshihiro

    2018-01-17

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) is an enzyme that generates sphingomyelin (SM) from ceramide (CER) and phosphatidylcholine. SM in the epidermis is a precursor of CER, an important lipid for epidermal permeability barrier function. However, the physiological role of SMS in skin is unclear. To uncover the function of SMS in skin, we investigated sphingolipid metabolism enzyme activity in skin, SM content in the epidermis, CER content in the stratum corneum (SC) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as an indicator of barrier function in SMS2-knockout (KO) mice. The activities of sphingolipid metabolism enzymes in skin homogenates were measured using a fluorescently labelled substrate. Enzymatic reaction products were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Lipids in the epidermis or SC were extracted and quantified by high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC). TEWL was measured using a Tewameter TM300. In SMS2-KO mice, SMS activity in skin homogenates, epidermal SM content and SC CER content were significantly decreased relative to wild-type (WT) mice. The TEWL of SMS2-KO mice was significantly increased compared to WT mice. Our data indicate that SMS2 generates SM in the epidermis and contributes to epidermal permeability barrier function and will support understanding of SM-related metabolic disorders. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Breaking down the barriers: the gut microbiome, intestinal permeability and stress-related psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John R.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Cryan, John F.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Clarke, Gerard; Hyland, Niall P.

    2015-01-01

    The emerging links between our gut microbiome and the central nervous system (CNS) are regarded as a paradigm shift in neuroscience with possible implications for not only understanding the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders, but also their treatment. Thus the gut microbiome and its influence on host barrier function is positioned to be a critical node within the brain-gut axis. Mounting preclinical evidence broadly suggests that the gut microbiota can modulate brain development, function and behavior by immune, endocrine and neural pathways of the brain-gut-microbiota axis. Detailed mechanistic insights explaining these specific interactions are currently underdeveloped. However, the concept that a “leaky gut” may facilitate communication between the microbiota and these key signaling pathways has gained traction. Deficits in intestinal permeability may underpin the chronic low-grade inflammation observed in disorders such as depression and the gut microbiome plays a critical role in regulating intestinal permeability. In this review we will discuss the possible role played by the gut microbiota in maintaining intestinal barrier function and the CNS consequences when it becomes disrupted. We will draw on both clinical and preclinical evidence to support this concept as well as the key features of the gut microbiota which are necessary for normal intestinal barrier function. PMID:26528128

  14. The food contaminant deoxynivalenol, decreases intestinal barrier permeability and reduces claudin expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinton, Philippe; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Del Rio, Juan-Carlos; Moreno, Carolina; Marin, Daniela E.; Ferrier, Laurent; Bracarense, Ana-Paula; Kolf-Clauw, Martine; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2009-01-01

    'The gastrointestinal tract represents the first barrier against food contaminants as well as the first target for these toxicants. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereals and causes various toxicological effects. Through consumption of contaminated cereals and cereal products, human and pigs are exposed to this mycotoxin. Using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo approaches, we investigated the effects of DON on the intestinal epithelium. We demonstrated that, in intestinal epithelial cell lines from porcine (IPEC-1) or human (Caco-2) origin, DON decreases trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increases in a time and dose-dependent manner the paracellular permeability to 4 kDa dextran and to pathogenic Escherichia coli across intestinal cell monolayers. In pig explants treated with DON, we also observed an increased permeability of intestinal tissue. These alterations of barrier function were associated with a specific reduction in the expression of claudins, which was also seen in vivo in the jejunum of piglets exposed to DON-contaminated feed. In conclusion, DON alters claudin expression and decreases the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium. Considering that high levels of DON may be present in food or feed, consumption of DON-contaminated food/feed may induce intestinal damage and has consequences for human and animal health.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound to increase localized blood-spinal cord barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Allison H; Hawryluk, Gregory W; Anzai, Yoshimi; Odéen, Henrik; Ostlie, Megan A; Reichert, Ethan C; Stump, Amanda J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2017-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects thousands of people every year in the USA, and most patients are left with some permanent paralysis. Therapeutic options are limited and only modestly affect outcome. To address this issue, we used magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) as a non-invasive approach to increase permeability in the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We hypothesize that localized, controlled sonoporation of the BSCB by MRgFUS will aid delivery of therapeutics to the injury. Here, we report our preliminary findings for the ability of MRgFUS to increase BSCB permeability in the thoracic spinal cord of a normal rat model. First, an excised portion of normal rat spinal column was used to characterize the acoustic field and to estimate the insertion losses that could be expected in an MRgFUS blood spinal cord barrier opening. Then, in normal rats, MRgFUS was applied in combination with intravenously administered microbubbles to the spinal cord region. Permeability of the BSCB was indicated as signal enhancement by contrast administered prior to T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and verified by Evans blue dye. Neurological testing using the Basso, Beattie, and Breshnahan scale and the ladder walk was normal in 8 of 10 rats tested. Two rats showed minor impairment indicating need for further refinement of parameters. No gross tissue damage was evident by histology. In this study, we have opened successfully the blood spinal cord barrier in the thoracic region of the normal rat spine using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles.

  16. LONG-TERM GEOCHEMICAL BEHAVIOR OF A ZEROVALENT IRON PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN GROUNDWATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive, in-situ reactive barriers have proven to be viable, cost-effective systems for the remediation of Cr-contaminated groundwater at some sites. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are installed in the flow-path of groundwater, most typically as vertical treatment walls. Re...

  17. The diffusion permeability to water of the rat blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, T G; Lassen, N A

    1975-01-01

    The diffusion permeability to water of the rat blood-brain-barrier (BBB) was studied. Preliminary data obtained with the Oldendorf tissue uptake method (Oldendorf 1970) in seizure experiments suggested that the transfer from blood to brain of labelled water is diffusion-limited. More definite...... evidence of such a limitation was obtained using the single injection technique of Crone (1963). 14-C-labelled sucrose was used as intravascular reference substance and tritium-labelled water as test substance. The non-exchanging (transmitted) fraction, I-E equals T, of labelled water during a single...... passage increased from 0.26 to 0.67 when the arterial carbon dioxide tension was changed from 15 to 85 mm Hg, a change increasing the cerebral blood flow about sixfold. This finding suggests that water does not pass the blood-brain barrier as freely as lipophilic gases....

  18. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer [ 14 C]-α-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels

  19. Effects of insulin combined with idebenone on blood-brain barrier permeability in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Na; Liu, Li-Bo; Xue, Yi-Xue; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of insulin combined with idebenone on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in experimental streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats as well as the underlying mechanisms. With a diabetic rat model, we show that insulin and idebenone normalize body weight and water intake and restore BBB permeability and that their combination displays a synergistic effect. The results from transmission electron microscopy show that the combination of insulin and idebenone significantly closed the tight junction (TJ) in diabetic rats. The results from Western blotting in diabetic rats show that the upregulation of TJ-associated proteins occludin, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 caused by the combination of insulin and idebenone is more remarkable than that with either agent alone. In addition, the activations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the expression levels of receptors for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were significantly decreased after treatment with insulin and idebenone in diabetic rats. These results suggest that the combination of insulin and idebenone could decrease the BBB permeability in diabetic rats by upregulating the expression of occludin, claudin-5, and ZO-1 and that the ROS/AGE/RAGE/NF-κB signal pathway might be involved in the process. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Gliotransmitters and cytokines in the control of blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipova, Elena D; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana V; Morgun, Andrey V; Pisareva, Natalia V; Malinovskaya, Natalia A; Boitsova, Elizaveta B; Pozhilenkova, Elena A; Belova, Olga A; Salmin, Vladimir V; Taranushenko, Tatiana E; Noda, Mami; Salmina, Alla B

    2018-01-08

    The contribution of astrocytes and microglia to the regulation of neuroplasticity or neurovascular unit (NVU) is based on the coordinated secretion of gliotransmitters and cytokines and the release and uptake of metabolites. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and angiogenesis are influenced by perivascular cells contacting with the abluminal side of brain microvessel endothelial cells (pericytes, astrocytes) or by immune cells existing (microglia) or invading the NVU (macrophages) under pathologic conditions. The release of gliotransmitters or cytokines by activated astroglial and microglial cells is provided by distinct mechanisms, affects intercellular communication, and results in the establishment of microenvironment controlling BBB permeability and neuroinflammation. Glial glutamate transporters and connexin and pannexin hemichannels working in the tight functional coupling with the purinergic system serve as promising molecular targets for manipulating the intercellular communications that control BBB permeability in brain pathologies associated with excessive angiogenesis, cerebrovascular remodeling, and BBB-mediated neuroinflammation. Substantial progress in deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying the (patho)physiology of perivascular glia provides promising approaches to novel clinically relevant therapies for brain disorders. The present review summarizes the current understandings on the secretory machinery expressed in glial cells (glutamate transporters, connexin and pannexin hemichannels, exocytosis mechanisms, membrane-derived microvesicles, and inflammasomes) and the role of secreted gliotransmitters and cytokines in the regulation of NVU and BBB permeability in (patho)physiologic conditions.

  1. Brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability following quantitative cerebral microembolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bralet, A.M.; Bdley, A.; Beley, P.; Bralet, J.

    1979-01-01

    Cerebral microemboli were formed in rats by injecting 4000 carbonized microspheres, 50 +- 10 mu in diameter, labelled with 85 Sr, into the internal carotid artery. The use of radioactive microspheres as embolic agents enabled the number of microspheres to be determined in each cerebral hemisphere. The microspheres were mainly distributed in the cerebral hemisphere on the side of the injection. In 61 rats this hemisphere contained 582 +- 20 microspheres against 99 +- 9 in the contralateral hemisphere. Brain edema was assessed by measuring brain content of water, sodium and potassium. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability was determined by brain accumulation of 125 I-albumin. In the ipsilateral hemisphere brain edema and an increase in BBB permeability appeared 6 hours after embolization and progressed up to 48 hours. Twenty-four hours after embolization, significant correlations were observed between the microsphere content of the cerebral hemispheres and (1) increases in water and sodium levels, (2) the decrease in potassium level, (3) the increase in BBB permeability. The study of these correlations should make it possible to ignore the poor reproducibility of embolizations and to analyze with increased accuracy the results of various experiments

  2. Low Dosage of Chitosan Supplementation Improves Intestinal Permeability and Impairs Barrier Function in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiping Guan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between low dose dietary supplementation with chitosan (COS and body weight, feed intake, intestinal barrier function, and permeability in mice. Twenty mice were randomly assigned to receive an unadulterated control diet (control group or a dietary supplementation with 30 mg/kg dose of chitosan (COS group for two weeks. Whilst no significant differences were found between the conditions for body weight or food and water intake, mice in the COS group had an increased serum D-lactate content (P<0.05 and a decreased jejunal diamine oxidase (DAO activity (P<0.05. Furthermore, mice in COS group displayed a reduced expression of occludin and ZO-1 (P<0.05 and a reduced expression of occludin in the ileum (P<0.05. The conclusion drawn from these findings showed that although 30 mg/kg COS-supplemented diet had no effect on body weight or feed intake in mice, this dosage may compromise intestinal barrier function and permeability. This research will contribute to the guidance on COS supplements.

  3. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heye, Anna K; Thrippleton, Michael J; Armitage, Paul A; Valdés Hernández, Maria Del C; Makin, Stephen D; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-01-15

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n=201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a "sham" DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and K(Trans) estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model in low-permeability

  4. Bexarotene reduces blood-brain barrier permeability in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injured rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xu

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 over-expression disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB in the ischemic brain. The retinoid X receptor agonist bexarotene suppresses MMP-9 expression in endothelial cells and displays neuroprotective effects. Therefore, we hypothesized that bexarotene may have a beneficial effect on I/R-induced BBB dysfunction.A total of 180 rats were randomized into three groups (n = 60 each: (i a sham-operation group, (ii a cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R group, and (iii an I/R+bexarotene group. Brain water content was measured by the dry wet weight method. BBB permeability was analyzed by Evans Blue staining and the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent Omniscan. MMP-9 mRNA expression, protein expression, and activity were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and gelatin zymography, respectively. Apolipoprotein E (apoE, claudin-5, and occludin expression were analyzed by Western blotting.After 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h post-I/R, several effects were observed with bexarotene administration: (i brain water content and BBB permeability were significantly reduced; (ii MMP-9 mRNA and protein expression as well as activity were significantly decreased; (iii claudin-5 and occludin expression were significantly increased; and (iv apoE expression was significantly increased.Bexarotene decreases BBB permeability in rats with cerebral I/R injury. This effect may be due in part to bexarotene's upregulation of apoE expression, which has been previously shown to reduce BBB permeability through suppressing MMP-9-mediated degradation of the tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin. This work offers insight to aid future development of therapeutic agents for cerebral I/R injury in human patients.

  5. Effects of radiofrequency radiation exposure on blood-brain barrier permeability in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2011-12-01

    During the last several decades, numerous studies have been performed aiming at the question of whether or not exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) influences the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of RFR on the permeability of BBB in male and female Wistar albino rats. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were analyzed separately in the study. Rats were exposed to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz continuous-wave (CW) RFR for 20 min (at SARs of 4.26 mW/kg and 1.46 mW/kg, respectively) while under anesthesia. Control rats were sham-exposed. Disruption of BBB integrity was detected spectrophotometrically using the Evans-blue dye, which has been used as a BBB tracer and is known to be bound to serum albumin. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were evaluated for BBB permeability. In female rats, no albumin extravasation was found in in the brain after RFR exposure. A significant increase in albumin was found in the brains of the RF-exposed male rats when compared to sham-exposed male brains. These results suggest that exposure to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz CW RFR at levels below the international limits can affect the vascular permeability in the brain of male rats. The possible risk of RFR exposure in humans is a major concern for the society. Thus, this topic should be investigated more thoroughly in the future.

  6. Topical antihistamines display potent anti-inflammatory activity linked in part to enhanced permeability barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Kai; Man, Mao-Qiang; Santiago, Juan-Luis; Park, Kyungho; Roelandt, Truus; Oda, Yuko; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Lee, Hae-Jin; Gschwandtner, Maria; Thyssen, Jacob P; Trullas, Carles; Tschachler, Erwin; Feingold, Kenneth R; Elias, Peter M

    2013-02-01

    Systemic antagonists of the histamine type 1 and 2 receptors (H1/2r) are widely used as anti-pruritics and central sedatives, but demonstrate only modest anti-inflammatory activity. Because many inflammatory dermatoses result from defects in cutaneous barrier function, and because keratinocytes express both Hr1 and Hr2, we hypothesized that H1/2r antagonists might be more effective if they were used topically to treat inflammatory dermatoses. Topical H1/2r antagonists additively enhanced permeability barrier homeostasis in normal mouse skin by the following mechanisms: (i) stimulation of epidermal differentiation, leading to thickened cornified envelopes; and (ii) enhanced epidermal lipid synthesis and secretion. As barrier homeostasis was enhanced to a comparable extent in mast cell-deficient mice, with no further improvement following application of topical H1/2r antagonists, H1/2r antagonists likely oppose mast cell-derived histamines. In four immunologically diverse, murine disease models, characterized by either inflammation alone (acute irritant contact dermatitis, acute allergic contact dermatitis) or by prominent barrier abnormalities (subacute allergic contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis), topical H1/2r agonists aggravated, whereas H1/2r antagonists improved, inflammation and/or barrier function. The apparent ability of topical H1r/2r antagonists to target epidermal H1/2r could translate into increased efficacy in the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses, likely due to decreased inflammation and enhanced barrier function. These results could shift current paradigms of antihistamine utilization from a predominantly systemic to a topical approach.

  7. Optimization Model for the Design of Multi-layered Permeable Reactive Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połoński, Mieczysław; Pawluk, Katarzyna; Rybka, Iwona

    2017-10-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are employed as in situ groundwater remediation technology. The installation of PRBs is usually a major investment, where one of the biggest cost drivers are material costs. PRBs are barriers against contaminants moving under the natural gradient, however not against groundwater contaminants. The most common construction of a PRB is a single barrier, but in the case of contaminant mixtures a multi-layered construction, i.e. a combination of different reactive materials and removal processes, is required. The most important parameters for PRB design are dimensions. The barrier must be long enough to treat the entire width of the plume (dimension perpendicular to groundwater flow) and should extend to and be keyed into an impermeable layer. The problem is to determine the optimal thickness of a PRB, which should provide a residence time appropriate for reducing the concentration of contaminants to the desired effluent concentration. In PRBs, design is accomplished using numerical methods or simulators, which are useful to predict the scenarios and evaluate the resulting groundwater flow systems to specific site conditions. On the other hand, numerical methods are complicated and may have significant errors if the discretization is too coarse or is incorrectly aligned. This paper deals with a simple, conceptual model of a one-approach optimization method for multi-layered PRB design. Based on literature and laboratory test results (residence time, density and hydraulic coefficient), a selection of layers of reactive materials was determined. Considering the lowest cost of the reactive materials, the required thicknesses of activated carbon, zeolite and zero valent iron were calculated using two different algorithms. The simple model may be used for preliminary barrier design and cost calculations. Using the optimization model in a preliminary design stage, it is possible to reject the PRB concept and avoid losing time for the

  8. The effects of fasudil on the permeability of the rat blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier following experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X N; Fu, J; Wang, W Z

    2011-10-28

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is a primary characteristic of multiple sclerosis (MS). We evaluated the protective effects of fasudil, a selective ROCK inhibitor, in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) that was induced by guinea-pig spinal cord. In addition, we studied the effects of fasudil on BBB and BSCB permeability. We found that fasudil partly alleviated EAE-dependent damage by decreasing BBB and BSCB permeability. These results provide rationale for the development of selective inhibitors of Rho kinase as a novel therapy for MS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Study on the application of permeable reactive barriers for remediation of uranium mine pit water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Na'na; Zhu Yucheng

    2012-01-01

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is economical and convenient on in suit remediation of polluted groundwater. In this paper, according to characteristics of uranium mine pit water, laboratory-scale PRB reactors were designed with the mixture of valent iron, active carbon, hydrated lime and quartz sands as reaction media. The feasibility and effectiveness of treating uranium mine pit water by PRB were tested under 3 different proportions of contaminants through dynamic simulation tests, which came out the optimal proportion of contaminants. The result indicated that the remediation effect of reactor B was the best, whose average removal rate to U was up to 99%. The quality of effluent attained the relevant standards, which indicated that the PRB technology is a feasible method for the treatment of uranium mine pit water. (authors)

  10. The effect of ovariectomy and estrogen on penetrating brain arterioles and blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Marilyn J; Godfrey, Julie A; Wiegman, Marchien J

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the effect of estrogen replacement on the structure and function of penetrating brain arterioles (PA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Female ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were replaced with estradiol (E(2)) and estriol (E(3)) (OVX + E; N=13) and compared to ovariectomized animals without replacement (OVX; N=14) and intact controls (CTL, proestrous; N=13). Passive and active diameters, percent tone, and passive distensibility of pressurized PA were compared. In addition, BBB permeability to Lucifer Yellow, a marker of transcellular transport, was compared in cerebral arteries. Ovariectomy increased myogenic tone in PA, compared to CTL, that was not ameliorated by estrogen treatment. Percent tone at 75 mmHg for CTL vs. OVX and OVX + E was 44+/-3% vs. 51+/-1% and 54+/-3% (PLucifer Yellow for CTL, OVX, and OVX + E was (ng/mL): 3.4+/-1.2, 20.2+/-5.3 (P<0.01 vs. CTL), and 6.15+/-1.2 (n.s.). These results suggest that estrogen replacement may not be beneficial for small-vessel disease in the brain, but may limit BBB disruption and edema under conditions that cause it.

  11. Changes in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in acute hyperammonemia. Effect of dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziylan, Y Z; Uzüm, G; Bernard, G; Diler, A S; Bourre, J M

    1993-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the contribution of elevated plasma ammonia levels to blood-brain barrier (BBB) abnormalities in the presence of intact liver. The permeability changes of the BBB were investigated grossly with Evans blue (EB) and quantitatively by measuring the blood-to-brain transfer content for alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) in normal rats and rats subjected to sublethal doses of ammonium acetate (NH4OAc) (750 and 600 mg/kg ip; at 30-min intervals). Some rats were pretreated with dexamethasone (DXN). Injection of NH4OAc increased both plasma and brain ammonia concentrations about 16-and 5-fold, respectively, above the control level. In rats receiving NH4OAc injection, the blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for AIB was increased 3- to 11-fold. The elevated Ki values were limited to certain gray matter areas and less pronounced permeability changes were detected in white matter. Extravasation sites of EB were more restricted and were especially observed in thalamus and cerebellum, whereas cortex and white matter were unaffected. Dexamethasone pretreatment for 3 d reduced both leakage of EB and the Ki for AIB in NH4OAc injected animals, whereas acute treatment appeared ineffective. Dexamethasone did not prevent the development of coma but slightly decreased the ammonia concentration in plasma and brain. The results obtained indicate that hyperammonemia may disrupt BBB integrity not only to AIB and EB but also enhance the transport of other solutes.

  12. Blood-brain barrier permeability of bioactive withanamides present in Withania somnifera fruit extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vareed, Shaiju K; Bauer, Alison K; Nair, Kavitha M; Liu, Yunbao; Jayaprakasam, Bolleddula; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2014-08-01

    The neuroprotective effect of Withania somnifera L. Dunal fruit extract, in rodent models, is known. Withanamides, the primary active constituents in W.somnifera fruit extract exhibited neuroprotective effects against β-amyloid-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cell culture studies. Therefore, we investigated the blood-brain barrier permeability of withanamides in W.somnifera fruit extract in mice using HPLC coupled with high resolution quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer (Q-TOF/MS) detection. Mice were administered with 250 mg/kg of W.somnifera extract by intraperitoneal injection, and the blood and brain samples analyzed by Q-TOF/MS detection. Four major withanamides were detected in brain and blood of mice administered with W.somnifera extract. The results suggested that the withanamides crossed the blood-brain barrier. These results may help to develop W.somnifera fruit extract as a preventive or therapeutic botanical drug for stress-induced neurological disorders. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of blood--brain barrier permeability changes in rhesus monkeys and man using 82Rb and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, C.K.; Budinger, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    Dynamic positron tomography of the brain with 82 Rb, obtained from a portable generator [ 82 Sr (25 days) -- 82 Rb (76 sec)], provides a means of studying blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in physiological and clinical investigations. The BBB in rhesus monkeys was opened unilaterally by intracarotid infusion of 3 M urea. This osmotic barrier opening allowed entry into the brain of intravenously administered rubidium chloride. The BBB opening was demonstrated noninvasively using 82 Rb and positron emission tomography and corroborated by the accumulation of 86 Rb in tissue samples. Positron emission tomography studies can be repeated every 5 min and indicate that dynamic tomography or static imaging can be used to study BBB permeability changes induced by a wide variety of noxious stimuli. Brain tumors in human subjects are readily detected because of the usual BBB permeability disruption in and around the tumors

  14. Calcium carbonate-based permeable reactive barriers for iron and manganese groundwater remediation at landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Pleasant, Saraya; Jain, Pradeep; Powell, Jon; Townsend, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    High concentrations of iron (Fe(II)) and manganese (Mn(II)) reductively dissolved from soil minerals have been detected in groundwater monitoring wells near many municipal solid waste landfills. Two in situ permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), comprised of limestone and crushed concrete, were installed downgradient of a closed, unlined landfill in Florida, USA, to remediate groundwater containing high concentrations of these metals. Influent groundwater to the PRBs contained mean Fe and Mn concentrations of approximately 30mg/L and 1.62mg/L, respectively. PRBs were constructed in the shallow aquifer (maximum depth 4.6m below land surface) and groundwater was sampled from a network of nearby monitoring wells to evaluate barrier performance in removing these metals. PRBs significantly (pconcrete PRBs, respectively, during the first year of the study. The performance of the PRBs declined after 3years of operation, with Fe removal efficiency decreasing to 64% and 61% for limestone and concrete PRBs, respectively. A comparison of water quality in shallow and deep monitoring wells showed a more dramatic performance reduction in the deeper section of the concrete PRB, which was attributed to an influx of sediment into the barrier and settling of particulates from the upper portions of the PRBs. Although removal of Fe and Mn from redox impacts was achieved with the PRBs, the short time frame of effectiveness relative to the duration of a full-scale remediation effort may limit the applicability of these systems at some landfills because of the construction costs required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Remediation of RDX- and HMX-contaminated groundwater using organic mulch permeable reactive barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farrukh; Schnitker, Stephen P; Newell, Charles J

    2007-02-20

    Organic mulch is a complex organic material that is typically populated with its own consortium of microorganisms. The organisms in mulch breakdown complex organics to soluble carbon, which can then be used by these and other microorganisms as an electron donor for treating RDX and HMX via reductive pathways. A bench-scale treatability study with organic mulch was conducted for the treatment of RDX- and HMX-contaminated groundwater obtained from a plume at the Pueblo Chemical Depot (PCD) in Pueblo, Colorado. The site-specific cleanup criteria of 0.55 ppb RDX and 602 ppb HMX were used as the logical goals of the study. Column flow-through tests were run to steady-state at the average site seepage velocity, using a 70%:30% (vol.:vol.) mulch:pea gravel packing to approach the formation's permeability. Significant results included: (1) Complete removal of 90 ppb influent RDX and 8 ppb influent HMX in steady-state mulch column effluent; (2) pseudo-first-order steady-state kinetic rate constant, k, of 0.20 to 0.27 h(-1) based on RDX data, using triplicate parallel column runs; (3) accumulation of reduced RDX intermediates in the steady-state column effluent at less than 2% of the influent RDX mass; (4) no binding of RDX to the column fill material; and (5) no leaching of RDX, HMX or reduction intermediates from the column fill material. The results of the bench-scale study will be used to design and implement a pilot-scale organic mulch/pea gravel permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the site.

  16. Evaluation of a permeable reactive barrier technology for use at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwyer, Brian P.

    2000-01-01

    Three reactive materials were evaluated at laboratory scale to identify the optimum treatment reagent for use in a Permeable Reactive Barrier Treatment System at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). The contaminants of concern (COCS) are uranium, TCE, PCE, carbon tetrachloride, americium, and vinyl chloride. The three reactive media evaluated included high carbon steel iron filings, an iron-silica alloy in the form of a foam aggregate, and a peculiar humic acid based sorbent (Humasorb from Arctech) mixed with sand. Each material was tested in the laboratory at column scale using simulated site water. All three materials showed promise for the 903 Mound Site however, the iron filings were determined to be the least expensive media. In order to validate the laboratory results, the iron filings were further tested at a pilot scale (field columns) using actual site water. Pilot test results were similar to laboratory results; consequently, the iron filings were chosen for the fill-scale demonstration of the reactive barrier technology. Additional design parameters including saturated hydraulic conductivity, treatment residence time, and head loss across the media were also determined and provided to the design team in support of the final design. The final design was completed by the Corps of Engineers in 1997 and the system was constructed in the summer of 1998. The treatment system began fill operation in December, 1998 and despite a few problems has been operational since. Results to date are consistent with the lab and pilot scale findings, i.e., complete removal of the contaminants of concern (COCs) prior to discharge to meet RFETS cleanup requirements. Furthermore, it is fair to say at this point in time that laboratory developed design parameters for the reactive barrier technology are sufficient for fuel scale design; however,the treatment system longevity and the long-term fate of the contaminants are questions that remain unanswered. This

  17. The impact of obesity on skin disease and epidermal permeability barrier status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, B; Nino, M; Perrino, N R; Laccetti, R; Trio, R; Labella, S; Balato, N

    2010-02-01

    Obese subjects frequently show skin diseases. However, less attention has been paid to the impact of obesity on skin disorders until now. The purposes of this study are: to highlight the incidence of some dermatoses in obese subjects and to study the water barrier function of the obese skin using transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Sixty obese subjects and 20 normal weight volunteers were recruited. Obese group was further divided into three body mass index (BMI) classes: class I (BMI 30-34.9 kg/m(2)), class II (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m(2)) and class III (BMI 40 g/m(2)). All subjects attended dermatological examination for skin diseases. To assess barrier function, TEWL measurements were performed on the volar surface of the forearm using a tewameter. The results of this study showed that: (i) obese subjects show a higher incidence of some dermatoses compared with normal-weight controls; in addition the dermatoses are more, frequent as BMI increases; (ii) the rate of TEWL is lower in obese subjects, than in the normal-weight subjects, particularly in patients with intra-abdominal obesity. Specific dermatoses as skin tags, striae distensae and plantar hyperkeratosis, could be considered as a cutaneous stigma of severe obesity. The low permeability of the skin to evaporative water loss is observed in obese subjects compared with normal weight control. Although the physiological mechanisms are still unknown, this finding has not been previously described and we believe that this may constitute a new field in the research on obesity.

  18. A claudin-9-based ion permeability barrier is essential for hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nakano

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hearing loss is one of the most common birth defects, yet the majority of genes required for audition is thought to remain unidentified. Ethylnitrosourea (ENU-mutagenesis has been a valuable approach for generating new animal models of deafness and discovering previously unrecognized gene functions. Here we report on the characterization of a new ENU-induced mouse mutant (nmf329 that exhibits recessively inherited deafness. We found a widespread loss of sensory hair cells in the hearing organs of nmf329 mice after the second week of life. Positional cloning revealed that the nmf329 strain carries a missense mutation in the claudin-9 gene, which encodes a tight junction protein with unknown biological function. In an epithelial cell line, heterologous expression of wild-type claudin-9 reduced the paracellular permeability to Na+ and K+, and the nmf329 mutation eliminated this ion barrier function without affecting the plasma membrane localization of claudin-9. In the nmf329 mouse line, the perilymphatic K+ concentration was found to be elevated, suggesting that the cochlear tight junctions were dysfunctional. Furthermore, the hair-cell loss in the claudin-9-defective cochlea was rescued in vitro when the explanted hearing organs were cultured in a low-K+ milieu and in vivo when the endocochlear K+-driving force was diminished by deletion of the pou3f4 gene. Overall, our data indicate that claudin-9 is required for the preservation of sensory cells in the hearing organ because claudin-9-defective tight junctions fail to shield the basolateral side of hair cells from the K+-rich endolymph. In the tight-junction complexes of hair cells, claudin-9 is localized specifically to a subdomain that is underneath more apical tight-junction strands formed by other claudins. Thus, the analysis of claudin-9 mutant mice suggests that even the deeper (subapical tight-junction strands have biologically important ion barrier function.

  19. Life-cycle case study comparison of permeable reactive barrier versus pump-and-treat remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Monica R; Olson, Terese M

    2009-12-15

    A permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is a passive remediation technology, which over decades of use, may reduce lifetime environmental impacts when compared with a conventional pump-and-treat system (PTS). Greater material production requirements to install PRBs may offset the expected reductions in operational phase impacts and the trade-offs can be investigated in a life-cycle assessment (LCA). The life-cycle environmental impacts of a zerovalent iron (ZVI) containing PRB with a funnel and gate configuration and a PTS were compared in a case study. Potential impacts of the model PRB are driven by the ZVI reactive medium and the energy usage during construction, while for the PTS they are driven by the operational energy demand. Medium longevity governed the magnitude of the potential PRB impacts and the extent to which it was optimal relative to the PTS. Even at conservatively low estimates of longevity, the PRB offers significant environmental advantages in impact categories of human health and ozone depletion. The minimum ZVI longevity for PRB benefit over the PTS system in all impact categories was 10 years. Suggested PRB design innovations to reduce environmental impacts include the development of alternative reactive media and construction methods.

  20. Assessment of a Hydroxyapatite Permeable Reactive Barrier to Remediate Uranium at the Old Rifle Site Colorado.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert C.; Szecsody, James (PNNL); Rigali, Mark J.; Vermuel, Vince (PNNL); Leullen, Jon (AECOM)

    2016-02-01

    We have performed an initial evaluation and testing program to assess the effectiveness of a hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) permeable reactive barrier and source area treatment to decrease uranium mobility at the Department of Energy (DOE) former Old Rifle uranium mill processing site in Rifle, western Colorado. Uranium ore was processed at the site from the 1940s to the 1970s. The mill facilities at the site as well as the uranium mill tailings previously stored there have all been removed. Groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the site still contains elevated concentrations of uranium, and is currently used for field tests to study uranium behavior in groundwater and investigate potential uranium remediation technologies. The technology investigated in this work is based on in situ formation of apatite in sediment to create a subsurface apatite PRB and also for source area treatment. The process is based on injecting a solution containing calcium citrate and sodium into the subsurface for constructing the PRB within the uranium plume. As the indigenous sediment micro-organisms biodegrade the injected citrate, the calcium is released and reacts with the phosphate to form hydroxyapatite (precipitate). This paper reports on proof-of-principle column tests with Old Rifle sediment and synthetic groundwater.

  1. Investigating dominant processes in ZVI permeable reactive barriers using reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Anne; Ruhl, Aki S.; Amos, Richard T.

    2013-08-01

    The reactive and hydraulic efficacy of zero valent iron permeable reactive barriers (ZVI PRBs) is strongly affected by geochemical composition of the groundwater treated. An enhanced version of the geochemical simulation code MIN3P was applied to simulate dominating processes in chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) treating ZVI PRBs including geochemical dependency of ZVI reactivity, gas phase formation and a basic formulation of degassing. Results of target oriented column experiments with distinct chemical conditions (carbonate, calcium, sulfate, CHCs) were simulated to parameterize the model. The simulations demonstrate the initial enhancement of anaerobic iron corrosion due to carbonate and long term inhibition by precipitates (chukanovite, siderite, iron sulfide). Calcium was shown to enhance long term corrosion due to competition for carbonate between siderite, chukanovite, and aragonite, with less inhibition of iron corrosion by the needle like aragonite crystals. Application of the parameterized model to a field site (Bernau, Germany) demonstrated that temporarily enhanced groundwater carbonate concentrations caused an increase in gas phase formation due to the acceleration of anaerobic iron corrosion.

  2. Assessment of a Hydroxyapatite Permeable Reactive Barrier to Remediate Uranium at the Old Rifle Site Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Robert C.; Szecsody, James; Rigali, Mark J.; Vermuel, Vince; Leullen, Jon

    2016-01-01

    We have performed an initial evaluation and testing program to assess the effectiveness of a hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) permeable reactive barrier and source area treatment to decrease uranium mobility at the Department of Energy (DOE) former Old Rifle uranium mill processing site in Rifle, western Colorado. Uranium ore was processed at the site from the 1940s to the 1970s. The mill facilities at the site as well as the uranium mill tailings previously stored there have all been removed. Groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the site still contains elevated concentrations of uranium, and is currently used for field tests to study uranium behavior in groundwater and investigate potential uranium remediation technologies. The technology investigated in this work is based on in situ formation of apatite in sediment to create a subsurface apatite PRB and also for source area treatment. The process is based on injecting a solution containing calcium citrate and sodium into the subsurface for constructing the PRB within the uranium plume. As the indigenous sediment micro-organisms biodegrade the injected citrate, the calcium is released and reacts with the phosphate to form hydroxyapatite (precipitate). This paper reports on proof-of-principle column tests with Old Rifle sediment and synthetic groundwater.

  3. Laboratory study on sequenced permeable reactive barrier remediation for landfill leachate-contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Jun; Zhao Yongsheng; Zhang Weihong; Hong Mei

    2009-01-01

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was a promising technology for groundwater remediation. Landfill leachate-polluted groundwater riches in various hazardous contaminants. Two lab-scale reactors (reactors A and B) were designed for studying the feasibility of PRB to remedy the landfill leachate-polluted groundwater. Zero valent iron (ZVI) and the mixture of ZVI and zeolites constitute the first section of the reactors A and B, respectively; the second section of two reactors consists of oxygen releasing compounds (ORCs). Experimental results indicated that BOD 5 /COD increased from initial 0.32 up to average 0.61 and 0.6 through reactors A and B, respectively. Removal efficiency of mixed media for pollutants was higher than that of single media (ZVI only). Zeolites exhibited selective removal of Zn, Mn, Mg, Cd, Sr, and NH 4 + , and removal efficiency was 97.2%, 99.6%, 95.9%, 90.5% and 97.4%, respectively. The maximum DO concentration of reactors A and B were 7.64 and 6.78 mg/L, respectively, while the water flowed through the ORC. Therefore, sequenced PRB system was effective and was proposed as an alternative method to remedy polluted groundwater by landfill leachate

  4. Evaluation of five strategies to limit the impact of fouling in permeable reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Benson, Craig H.

    2010-01-01

    Ground water flow and geochemical reactive transport models were used to assess the effectiveness of five strategies used to limit fouling and to enhance the long-term hydraulic behavior of continuous-wall permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) employing granular zero valent iron (ZVI). The flow model accounted for geological heterogeneity and the reactive transport model included a geochemical algorithm for simulating iron corrosion and mineral precipitation reactions that have been observed in ZVI PRBs. The five strategies that were evaluated are pea gravel equalization zones, a sacrificial pre-treatment zone, pH adjustment, large ZVI particles, and mechanical treatment. Results of simulations show that installation of pea gravel equalization zones results in flow equalization and a more uniform distribution of residence times within the PRB. Residence times within the PRB are less affected by mineral precipitation when a pre-treatment zone is employed. pH adjustment limits the total amount of hydroxide ions in ground water to reduce porosity reduction and to retain larger residence times. Larger ZVI particles reduce porosity reduction as a result of the smaller iron surface area for iron corrosion, and retain longer residence time. Mechanical treatment redistributes the porosity uniformly throughout the PRB over time, which is effective in maintaining residence time.

  5. [Smartphone application for blood gas interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiols, Julien; Bardo, Pascale; Garnier, Jean-Pierre; Brouard, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Ninety four per cent of health professionals use their smartphone for business purposes and more than 50% has medical applications. The «Blood Gas» application was created to be part of this dynamic and participate to e-health development in France. The «Blood Gas» application facilitates interpretation of the results of blood gas analysis using an algorithm developed with reference to a medical bibliography. It can detect some complex or intricate acid-base disorders in evaluating the effectiveness of the secondary response. The application also studied the respiratory status of the patient by calculating the PaO2/FiO2 ratio and the alveol-arterial gradient. It also indicates the presence of a shunt effect. Finally, a specific module to calculate the SID (strong ion difference) depending on the model of Stewart can detect complex acid-base disorders.

  6. Effects of GSM modulated radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation on permeability of blood-brain barrier in male & female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sırav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    With the increased use of mobile phones, their biological and health effects have become more important. Usage of mobile phones near the head increases the possibility of effects on brain tissue. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of pulse modulated 900MHz and 1800MHz radio-frequency radiation on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of rats. Study was performed with 6 groups of young adult male and female wistar albino rats. The permeability of blood-brain barrier to intravenously injected evans blue dye was quantitatively examined for both control and radio-frequency radiarion exposed groups. For male groups; Evans blue content in the whole brain was found to be 0.08±0.01mg% in the control, 0.13±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.26±0.05mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. In both male radio-frequency radiation exposed groups, the permeability of blood-brain barrier found to be increased with respect to the controls (pmale animals (pfemale groups; dye contents in the whole brains were 0.14±0.01mg% in the control, 0.24±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.14±0.02mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. No statistical variance found between the control and 1800MHz exposed animals (p>0.01). However 900MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency exposure was found effective on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of female animals. Results have shown that 20min pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure of 900MHz and 1800MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of blood-brain barrier of male rats. For females, 900MHz was found effective and it could be concluded that this result may due to the physiological differences between female and male animals. The results of this study suggest that mobile phone radation could lead to increase the permeability of blood-brain barrier under non-thermal exposure levels. More studies are needed to demonstrate the mechanisms of that breakdown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain pericytes from stress-susceptible pigs increase blood-brain barrier permeability in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandenhaute Elodie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The function of pericytes remains questionable but with improved cultured technique and the use of genetically modified animals, it has become increasingly clear that pericytes are an integral part of blood–brain barrier (BBB function, and the involvement of pericyte dysfunction in certain cerebrovascular diseases is now emerging. The porcine stress syndrome (PSS is the only confirmed, homologous model of malignant hyperthermia (MH in veterinary medicine. Affected animals can experience upon slaughter a range of symptoms, including skeletal muscle rigidity, metabolic acidosis, tachycardia and fever, similar to the human syndrome. Symptoms are due to an enhanced calcium release from intracellular stores. These conditions are associated with a point mutation in ryr1/hal gene, encoding the ryanodine receptor, a calcium channel. Important blood vessel wall muscle modifications have been described in PSS, but potential brain vessel changes have never been documented in this syndrome. Methods In the present work, histological and ultrastructural analyses of brain capillaries from wild type and ryr1 mutated pigs were conducted to investigate the potential impairment of pericytes, in this pathology. In addition, brain pericytes were isolated from the three porcine genotypes (wild-type NN pigs; Nn and nn pigs, bearing one or two (n mutant ryr1/hal alleles, respectively, and tested in vitro for their influence on the permeability of BBB endothelial monolayers. Results Enlarged perivascular spaces were observed in ryr1-mutant samples, corresponding to a partial or total detachment of the astrocytic endfeet. These spaces were electron lucent and sometimes filled with lipid deposits and swollen astrocytic feet. At the ultrastructural level, brain pericytes did not seem to be affected because they showed regular morphology and characteristics, so we aimed to check their ability to maintain BBB properties in vitro. Our results indicated

  8. Neuroprotective effect of pretreatment with Lavandula officinalis ethanolic extract on blood-brain barrier permeability in a rat stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiei, Zahra; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of Lavandula officinalis (L. officinalis) extract against blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and its possible mechanisms in an experimental model of stroke. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by the transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 1 h in rats. Lavender extract (100, 200 mg/kg i.p.) was injected for 20 consecutive days. BBB permeability and oxidative stress biomarkers were evaluated using standard methods. The results of this study showed that L. officinalis ethanolic extract significantly reduced the BBB permeability in experimental groups when compared with ischemia group. The lavender extract significantly reduced malondialdehyde levels of plasma and brain tissue in intact group when compared with control group. L. officinalis extract reduced blood brain barrier permeability and alleviated neurological function in rats, and the mechanism may be related to augmentation in endogenous antioxidant defense and inhibition of oxidative stress in the rat brain. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis CNCM-I2494 restores gut barrier permeability in chronically low-grade inflamed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca eMartín

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic DNBS-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis subsp lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4+ lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes (MLN. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4+ Th1 cells by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10. Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis subsp lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability.

  10. The long noncoding RNA TUG1 regulates blood-tumor barrier permeability by targeting miR-144.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Heng; Xue, Yixue; Wang, Ping; Wang, Zhenhua; Li, Zhen; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhiqing; Shang, Xiuli; Liu, Yunhui

    2015-08-14

    Blood-tumor barrier (BTB) limits the delivery of chemotherapeutic agent to brain tumor tissues. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play critical regulatory roles in various biologic processes of tumors. However, the role of lncRNAs in BTB permeability is unclear. LncRNA TUG1 (taurine upregulated gene 1) was highly expressed in glioma vascular endothelial cells from glioma tissues. It also upregulated in glioma co-cultured endothelial cells (GEC) from BTB model in vitro. Knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability, and meanwhile down-regulated the expression of the tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. Both bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that TUG1 influenced BTB permeability via binding to miR-144. Furthermore, Knockdown of TUG1 also down-regulated Heat shock transcription factor 2 (HSF2), a transcription factor of the heat shock transcription factor family, which was defined as a direct and functional downstream target of miR-144. HSF2 up-regulated the promoter activities and interacted with the promoters of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5 in GECs. In conclusion, our results indicate that knockdown of TUG1 increased BTB permeability via binding to miR-144 and then reducing EC tight junction protein expression by targeting HSF2. Thus, TUG1 may represent a useful future therapeutic target for enhancing BTB permeability.

  11. Evaluation of [14C] and [13C]Sucrose as Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Mohammad K; Chowdhury, Ekram A; Bickel, Ulrich; Mehvar, Reza

    2017-06-01

    Nonspecific quantitation of [ 14 C]sucrose in blood and brain has been routinely used as a quantitative measure of the in vivo blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. However, the reported apparent brain uptake clearance (K in ) of the marker varies widely (∼100-fold). We investigated the accuracy of the use of the marker in comparison with a stable isotope of sucrose ([ 13 C]sucrose) measured by a specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Rats received single doses of each marker, and the K in values were determined. Surprisingly, the K in value of [ 13 C]sucrose was 6- to 7-fold lower than that of [ 14 C]sucrose. Chromatographic fractionation after in vivo administration of [ 14 C]sucrose indicated that the majority of the brain content of radioactivity belonged to compounds other than the intact [ 14 C]sucrose. However, mechanistic studies failed to reveal any substantial metabolism of the marker. The octanol:water partition coefficient of [ 14 C]sucrose was >2-fold higher than that of [ 13 C]sucrose, indicating the presence of lipid-soluble impurities in the [ 14 C]sucrose solution. Our data indicate that [ 14 C]sucrose overestimates the true BBB permeability to sucrose. We suggest that specific quantitation of the stable isotope ( 13 C) of sucrose is a more accurate alternative to the current widespread use of the radioactive sucrose as a BBB marker. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of drug permeability of blood-brain barrier after whole brain conventional fractionation irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longzhen; Cao Yuandong; Chen Yong; Yu Changzhou; Zhuang Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of drug permeability in rat blood-brain barrier(BBB) after different doses of whole brain conventional fractionation irradiation in rats and provide the experimental basis for the optimum time of clinical chemotherapy. Methods: According to different irradiation doses, 100 adult Sprague-Dowley rats were divided randomly into 5 groups: the normal control group(0 Gy); 10 Gy; 20 Gy; 30 Gy; and 40 Gy group. All rats were exposed to conventional fractionation(2 Gy/d, 5 d/w) with 60 Co γ-ray. MTX(25 mg/kg) was injected through the tail mainline 16 hours after whole brain irradiation. Cerebrospinal fluid(CSF) and blood were collected 2 hours later. Those samples were used to assay MTX concentration using RP-HPLC. Results: MTX mean concentrations in CSF was 0.07, 0.08, 0.12, 0.24, 0.23 mg/L in the control, 10 Gy, 20 Gy, 30 Gy, 40 Gy groups, respectively. All the data was analyzed with rank test of transform. MTX concentration of CSF was significantly different except the control and 10 Gy, 30 Gy and 40 Gy group. MTX concentration of blood was not significantly different in all groups (P>0.05). Conclusions: Irradiation can directly damage the function of BBB. BBB would be opened gradually following the increase of irradiation dose. It could be considered as the optimum time of chemotherapy when the whole brain irradiation ranges from 20 Gy to 30 Gy. (authors)

  13. Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: A Review of Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, NE

    2001-06-11

    This report briefly reviews issues regarding the implementation of the zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology at sites managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Initially, the PRB technology, using zero-valent iron for the reactive media, was received with great enthusiasm, and DOE invested millions of dollars testing and implementing PRBs. Recently, a negative perception of the technology has been building. This perception is based on the failure of some deployments to satisfy goals for treatment and operating expenses. The purpose of this report, therefore, is to suggest reasons for the problems that have been encountered and to recommend whether DOE should invest in additional research and deployments. The principal conclusion of this review is that the most significant problems have been the result of insufficient characterization, which resulted in poor engineering implementation. Although there are legitimate concerns regarding the longevity of the reactive media, the ability of zero-valent iron to reduce certain chlorinated hydrocarbons and to immobilize certain metals and radionuclides is well documented. The primary problem encountered at some DOE full-scale deployments has been an inadequate assessment of site hydrology, which resulted in misapplication of the technology. The result is PRBs with higher than expected flow velocities and/or incomplete plume capture. A review of the literature reveals that cautions regarding subsurface heterogeneity were published several years prior to the full-scale implementations. Nevertheless, design and construction have typically been undertaken as if the subsurface was homogeneous. More recently published literature has demonstrated that hydraulic heterogeneity can cause so much uncertainty in performance that use of a passive PRB is precluded. Thus, the primary conclusion of this review is that more attention must be given to site-specific issues. Indeed, the use of a passive PRB requires

  14. Cardiotoxic drugs Herceptin and doxorubicin inhibit cardiac microvascular endothelial cell barrier formation resulting in increased drug permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L. Wilkinson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxicity induced by anti-cancer therapeutics is a severe, and potentially fatal, adverse reaction of the heart in response to certain drugs. Current in vitro approaches to assess cardiotoxicity have focused on analysing cardiomyocytes. More recently it has become apparent that non-cardiomyocyte cells of the heart can potentially contribute to cardiotoxicity. Herceptin and doxorubicin are known to induce cardiotoxicity in the clinic. The effect of these drugs on the endothelial tight junction barrier was tested by analysing tight junction formation and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1 levels, revealing that Herceptin and doxorubicin are able to induce barrier perturbment and decrease barrier function in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs leading to increased permeability. Herceptin treatment had no effect on the tight junction barrier function in human dermal and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. HCMECs showed detectable levels of HER2 compared with the other endothelial cells suggesting that Herceptin binding to HER2 in these cells may interfere with tight junction formation. Our data suggests that doxorubicin and Herceptin can affect tight junction formation in the cardiac microvasculature leading to increased drug permeability and adverse effects on the cardiac myocytes.

  15. Two Reactive Zones within Riverbank Aquifers Impact the Accumulation of Arsenic within Permeable Natural Reactive Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappett, P.; Myers, K.; Jewell, K.; Berube, M.; Datta, S.; Hossain, A.; Hosain, A.; Lipsi, M.; Ahmed, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    River stage fluctuations drives river water, rich oxidants, into riverbanks aquifers. When these aquifers are rich in dissolved iron (Fe), iron oxides (FeOOH) precipitate, creating a reactive surface upon which toxic elements such as arsenic (As) may sorb. These Permeable Natural Reactive Barriers (PNRBs) have been studied on the Meghna River. The lack of understanding of what controls their formation and fate could result in dangerous consequences. Pumping of riverbank aquifers for irrigation could re-mobilize toxic concentrations of As into drinking water aquifers. It is important to understand the hydrological, geochemical and biological processes controlling the properties of PNRBs. To this end, monitoring wells and drive-point piezometers were installed orthogonal to the Meghna River in Bangladesh. The dimensions of the shallow aquifer was mapped with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). The monitoring wells and a river gage were instrumented with pressure transducers to record water level fluctuations. Groundwater flows towards the river for most of the year but reverses under the influence of local irrigation pumping in the late dry season and rapidly rising river stage in the early monsoon. Semi-diurnal tides in the dry season have an amplitude of 80 cm. Declining concentrations of conservative dissolved ions towards the river indicated a zone of dilution from river water extending up to 50 m from the river's dry season edge. Dissolved As was produced as groundwater passed through this dilution zone until the final 20 m where As was abruptly removed from solution. This location coincided with a PNRB with enriched solid-phase Fe and Mn within the upper 3 m of sediment. 16S bacterial community DNA was sequenced from the wells and drive-point piezometers to map the distribution of Fe and As reducers and oxidizers. The richest overall biodiversity was found within the PNRB zone. It contained the most oxidizing and reducing species. This evidence suggests

  16. HighStaphylococcus epidermidisColonization and Impaired Permeability Barrier in Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qian; Sun, Meng; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhang, Li; Zhai, Jin-Long; Hong, Yu-Xiao; Song, Bing; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2017-07-20

    acid were significantly associated with decreased SDASI as compared with moisturizer (95% CI: 0.03-0.432, P = 0.025 and 95% CI: 0.033-0.44, P = 0.024, respectively). High colonization with Staphylococcus epidermidis, along with impaired skin permeability barrier function, contributes to the occurrence of SD.

  17. Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

    2003-10-01

    A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron

  18. Prediction of Central Nervous System Side Effects Through Drug Permeability to Blood-Brain Barrier and Recommendation Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Zhenran

    2017-10-23

    Drug side effects are one of the public health concerns. Using powerful machine-learning methods to predict potential side effects before the drugs reach the clinical stages is of great importance to reduce time consumption and protect the security of patients. Recently, researchers have proved that the central nervous system (CNS) side effects of a drug are closely related to its permeability to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Inspired by this, we proposed an extended neighborhood-based recommendation method to predict CNS side effects using drug permeability to the BBB and other known features of drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to predict CNS side effects considering drug permeability to the BBB. Computational experiments demonstrated that drug permeability to the BBB is an important factor in CNS side effects prediction. Moreover, we built an ensemble recommendation model and obtained higher AUC score (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) and AUPR score (area under the precision-recall curve) on the data set of CNS side effects by integrating various features of drug.

  19. Diel coral reef acidification driven by porewater advection in permeable sands, Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Isaac R.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Maher, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about how biogeochemical processes in permeable sediments affect the pH of coastal waters. We demonstrate that seawater recirculation in permeable sands can play a major role in proton (H+) cycling in a coral reef lagoon. The diel pH range (up to 0.75 units) in the Heron Island la...... that the metabolism of advection‐dominated carbonate sands may provide a currently unknown feedback to ocean acidification....

  20. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna C Davidson

    Full Text Available Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND, indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1 positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  1. Developing Enhanced Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability Models: Integrating External Bio-Assay Data in QSAR Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenyi; Kim, Marlene T.; Sedykh, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Experimental Blood–Brain Barrier (BBB) permeability models for drug molecules are expensive and time-consuming. As alternative methods, several traditional Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed previously. In this study, we aimed to improve the predictivity of traditional QSAR BBB permeability models by employing relevant public bio-assay data in the modeling process. Methods We compiled a BBB permeability database consisting of 439 unique compounds from various resources. The database was split into a modeling set of 341 compounds and a validation set of 98 compounds. Consensus QSAR modeling workflow was employed on the modeling set to develop various QSAR models. A five-fold cross-validation approach was used to validate the developed models, and the resulting models were used to predict the external validation set compounds. Furthermore, we used previously published membrane transporter models to generate relevant transporter profiles for target compounds. The transporter profiles were used as additional biological descriptors to develop hybrid QSAR BBB models. Results The consensus QSAR models have R2=0.638 for fivefold cross-validation and R2=0.504 for external validation. The consensus model developed by pooling chemical and transporter descriptors showed better predictivity (R2=0.646 for five-fold cross-validation and R2=0.526 for external validation). Moreover, several external bio-assays that correlate with BBB permeability were identified using our automatic profiling tool. Conclusions The BBB permeability models developed in this study can be useful for early evaluation of new compounds (e.g., new drug candidates). The combination of chemical and biological descriptors shows a promising direction to improve the current traditional QSAR models. PMID:25862462

  2. Current progress in the permeability and its enhancement approches for TCM active ingredients across blood-eye barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Yang Bai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Blood-eye barrier(BEBis one of the most important structures of organism to maintain homeostasis of the eye. However, it is the major constraint for the medication of intraocular diseases. Traditional Chinese medicines have distinctive advantages for the treatment of intraocular diseases, which can be used to regulate the physiological function of human body with low toxicity. In this article, we have briefly summarized the feature of BEB, with the domestic and foreign literatures combined, and mainly reviewed current progress in the field of study on the permeability of traditional Chinese medicines and effective components in BEB and promoting methods.

  3. Integrated evaluation of the performance of a more than seven year old permeable reactive barrier at a site contaminated with chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchitsch, Nanna; Nooten, Thomas Van; Bastiaens, Leen

    2011-01-01

    role in the long-term performance. An integrated study was performed on the Vapokon permeable reactive barrier (PRB) in Denmark by groundwater and iron core sample characterization. The detailed field groundwater sampling carried out from more than 75 well screens up and downstream the barrier showed...

  4. Permeability barrier in the mantle epithelium lining the testis in the apple-snail Pomacea canaliculata (Gastropoda: Ampullariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, E A; Cavicchia, J C

    2001-04-01

    Intercellular junctions are studied in the epithelium lining the testis of the freshwater snail Pomacea canaliculata by conventional staining and lanthanum tracer techniques. The junctional complex consists of belt desmosomes and septate junctions. Septate junctions are of the pleated-sheet type and they are constantly associated with mitochondria. Gap and tight junctions appear to be absent. These septate junctions seem to be the structural correlate of an epithelial permeability barrier that separate the testis from the extrapallial space where the shell elements are deposited. These junctions may contribute to a functional barrier in the male gonad of Pomacea canaliculata. The results indicate that freshwater prosobranchs have junctional structures very close to those found in other molluscs.

  5. Diabetic and sympathetic influences on the water permeability barrier function of human skin as measured using transepidermal water loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Hoon; Park, Ji Woong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The presence of long-standing hyperglycemic conditions has been suggested to lead to many skin problems associated with an impaired skin barrier function. However, the relationship between impaired skin barrier status and altered peripheral nervous system function has not yet been determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the water evaporation rate as a measure of the permeability barrier function of diabetic skin and its relationship to diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN) and peripheral autonomic neuropathy (PAN) using well-controlled confounding variables. This case-control study included 42 participants with chronic diabetes and 43 matched healthy controls. The diabetic group underwent a nerve conduction study and sympathetic skin response (SSR) test to confirm the presence of DSPN and PAN, respectively. Different skin regions were analyzed using the noninvasive Tewameter instrument (Courage + Khazaka Electronic GmbH, Cologne, Germany). The impacts of PAN, DSPN, age, and diabetes duration on the values of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were each analyzed and compared between the groups. Regardless of the presence of DSPN or PAN, the TEWL values as measured on the distal extremities were significantly lower in the diabetic group than in the control group. In the diabetic group, participants with abnormal SSR test results showed decreased TEWL values in the finger, sole, and first toe, as compared with participants with normal SSR test results. In the control group, age showed a negative correlation with the TEWL values with respect to some measured regions. However, in the diabetic group, there was no significant correlation between either patient age or diabetes duration and TEWL values. The presence of a long-term hyperglycemic state can reduce the permeability barrier function of the skin, a phenomenon that might be related to the presence of an impaired peripheral sympathetic nervous system, rather than peripheral

  6. Placental ischemia in pregnant rats impairs cerebral blood flow autoregulation and increases blood–brain barrier permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Junie P.; Fan, Fan; Murphy, Sydney R.; Roman, Richard J.; Drummond, Heather A.; Granger, Joey P.; Ryan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cerebrovascular events contribute to ~40% of preeclampsia/eclampsia‐related deaths, and neurological symptoms are common among preeclamptic patients. We previously reported that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero‐placental perfusion pressure, leads to impaired myogenic reactivity and cerebral edema in the pregnant rat. Whether the impaired myogenic reactivity is associated with altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation and the edema is due to altered blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability remains unclear. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia leads to impaired CBF autoregulation and a disruption of the BBB. CBF autoregulation, measured in vivo by laser Doppler flowmetry, was significantly impaired in placental ischemic rats. Brain water content was increased in the anterior cerebrum of placental ischemic rats and BBB permeability, assayed using the Evans blue extravasation method, was increased in the anterior cerebrum. The expression of the tight junction proteins: claudin‐1 was increased in the posterior cerebrum, while zonula occludens‐1, and occludin, were not significantly altered in either the anterior or posterior cerebrum. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that placental ischemia mediates anterior cerebral edema through impaired CBF autoregulation and associated increased transmission of pressure to small vessels that increases BBB permeability leading to cerebral edema. PMID:25168877

  7. An in vitro transport model for rapid screening and predicting the permeability of candidate compounds at blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Xiao; Mei, Chao; Sun, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Qi

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to design and develop a simple in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation model for elementarily and rapidly predicting the permeability of candidate compounds at BBB and further evaluating whether P-glycoprotein (P-gp) affects them across BBB. The model was mainly composed of cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (rBMECs), glass contraption, and micropore membrane. First, we evaluated the model by morphological observation. Second, the restriction effects of paracellular transport were verified by measuring marker probes transport, and monitoring transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and leakage. Finally, protein expression and activity of P-gp were confirmed by carrying out Western blot analysis and polarized transport of rhodamine-123 (Rho123) in rBMECs. The rBMECs retained both endothelial cells and BBB features. The rBMECs model reproducibly attained approximately 130 Ω cm² on the steady-state TEER value, and displayed a barrier function to marker probes transport by decreasing the permeability. Protein band of 170 kDa manifested the existence of P-gp in the rBMECs, and the findings of cyclosporin A-sensitive decrease of Rho123 efflux confirmed the presence of P-gp activity. A simple, rapid, and convenient in vitro BBB permeation model was successfully established and applied to evaluate the BBB transport profiles of three natural flavonoids: quercetin, naringenin, and rutin.

  8. Use of a permeable biological reaction barrier for groundwater remediation at a uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thombre, M.S.; Thomson, B.M.; Barton, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    Previous work at the University of New Mexico and elsewhere has shown that sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of reducing uranium from the soluble +6 oxidation state to the insoluble +4 oxidation state. This chemistry forms the basis of a proposed groundwater remediation strategy in which microbial reduction would be used to immobilize soluble uranium. One such system would consist of a subsurface permeable barrier which would stimulate microbial growth resulting in the reduction of sulfate and nitrate and immobilization of metals while permitting the unhindered flow of ground water through it. This research investigated some of the engineering considerations associated with a microbial reducing barrier such as identifying an appropriate biological substrate, estimating the rate of substrate utilization, and identifying the final fate of the contaminants concentrated in the barrier matrix. The performance of batch reactors and column systems that treated simulated plume water was evaluated using cellulose, wheat straw, alfalfa hay, sawdust, and soluble starch as substrates. The concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and U(VI) were monitored over time. Precipitates from each system were collected and the precipitated U(IV) was determined to be crystalline UO 2 (s) by X-ray Diffraction. The results of this study support the proposed use of cellulosic substrates as candidate barrier materials

  9. Treatment of creosote-contaminated groundwater in a peat/sand permeable barrier--a column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Grete; Fremmersvik, Gro; Olsen, Rolf A

    2002-08-05

    A column study was conducted to determine if a permeable barrier can be used to treat creosote-contaminated groundwater based on sorption and biodegradation, and to determine which processes remove the various creosote compounds. Creosote-contaminated water (sterile and non-sterile) was applied to sterile and non-sterile saturated columns with peat (20 vol.%) and sand (80 vol.%) for 2 months. Temperature was 9 degrees C, inlet oxygen concentration 9-10mg/l and average residence time was two days. The peat/sand barrier material removed 94-100% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 93-98% nitrogen/sulfur/oxygen (NSO)-containing heterocyclic aromatic compounds, and 44-97% total phenols. The peat/sand material efficiently sorbed PAHs (>2 rings) and three-ring NSO-compounds, and also sorbed significant amounts of two-ring NSO-compounds and naphthalene. Naphthalene and NSO-compounds not sorbed were biological degraded. Phenol and cresols were efficiently removed by microbial degradation. The barrier material was somewhat less efficient removing dimethylphenols (DMPs) and trimethylphenols (TMPs), where DMPs were hardly sorbed and TMPs were hardly degraded. The results imply that a peat/sand barrier can treat creosote-contaminated groundwater. Modifications might be needed for enhanced removal of DMPs and TMPs, and oxygen supply might be necessary in aquifers with low oxygen content.

  10. Permeability of PEGylated immunoarsonoliposomes through in vitro blood brain barrier-medulloblastoma co-culture models for brain tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shehri, Abdulghani; Favretto, Marco E; Ioannou, Panayiotis V; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Weksler, Babette Barbash; Parker, Terry L; Kallinteri, Paraskevi

    2015-03-01

    Owing to restricted access of pharmacological agents into the brain due to blood brain barrier (BBB) there is a need: 1. to develop a more representative 3-D-co-culture model of tumor-BBB interaction to investigate drug and nanoparticle transport into the brain for diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation. 2. to address the lack of new alternative methods to animal testing according to replacement-reduction-refinement principles. In this work, in vitro BBB-medulloblastoma 3-D-co-culture models were established using immortalized human primary brain endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). hCMEC/D3 cells were cultured in presence and in absence of two human medulloblastoma cell lines on Transwell membranes. In vitro models were characterized for BBB formation, zonula occludens-1 expression and permeability to dextran. Transferrin receptors (Tfr) expressed on hCMEC/D3 were exploited to facilitate arsonoliposome (ARL) permeability through the BBB to the tumor by covalently attaching an antibody specific to human Tfr. The effect of anticancer ARLs on hCMEC/D3 was assessed. In vitro BBB and BBB-tumor co-culture models were established successfully. BBB permeability was affected by the presence of tumor aggregates as suggested by increased permeability of ARLs. There was a 6-fold and 8-fold increase in anti-Tfr-ARL uptake into VC312R and BBB-DAOY co-culture models, respectively, compared to plain ARLs. The three-dimensional models might be appropriate models to study the transport of various drugs and nanocarriers (liposomes and immunoarsonoliposomes) through the healthy and diseased BBB. The immunoarsonoliposomes can be potentially used as anticancer agents due to good tolerance of the in vitro BBB model to their toxic effect.

  11. The rights and wrongs of blood-brain barrier permeability studies: a walk through 100 years of history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Ruthven Saunders

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Careful examination of relevant literature shows that many of the most cherished concepts of the blood-brain barrier are incorrect. These include an almost mythological belief in its immaturity that is unfortunately often equated with absence or at least leakiness in the embryo and fetus. The original concept of a blood-brain barrier is often attributed to Ehrlich; however, he did not accept that permeability of cerebral vessels was different from other organs. Goldmann is often credited with the first experiments showing dye (trypan blue exclusion from the brain when injected systemically, but not when injected directly into it. Rarely cited are earlier experiments of Bouffard and of Franke who showed methylene blue and trypan red stained all tissues except the brain. The term blood-brain barrier Blut-Hirnschranke is often attributed to Lewandowsky, but it does not appear in his papers. The first person to use this term seems to be Stern in the early 1920s. Studies in embryos by Stern & colleagues, Weed and Wislocki showed results similar to those in adult animals. These were well-conducted experiments made a century ago, thus the persistence of a belief in barrier immaturity is puzzling. As discussed in this review, evidence for this belief, is of poor experimental quality, often misinterpreted and often not properly cited. The functional state of blood-brain barrier mechanisms in the fetus is an important biological phenomenon with implications for normal brain development. It is also important for clinicians to have proper evidence on which to advise pregnant women who may need to take medications for serious medical conditions. Beliefs in immaturity of the blood-brain barrier have held the field back for decades. Their history illustrates the importance of taking account of all the evidence and assessing its quality, rather than selecting papers that supports a preconceived notion or intuitive belief. This review attempts to right the

  12. Tumor necrosis factor alpha increases epithelial barrier permeability by disrupting tight junctions in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, W; Li, L X; Sun, C M; Wen, Y; Zhou, Y; Dong, Y L; Liu, P

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) on intestinal epithelial cell permeability and the expression of tight junction proteins. Caco-2 cells were plated onto Transwell microporous filters and treated with TNF-alpha (10 or 100 ng/mL) for 0, 4, 8, 16, or 24 h. The transepithelial electrical resistance and the mucosal-to-serosal flux rates of the established paracellular marker Lucifer yellow were measured in filter-grown monolayers of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The localization and expression of the tight junction protein occludin were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis, respectively. SYBR-Green-based real-time PCR was used to measure the expression of occludin mRNA. TNF-alpha treatment produced concentration- and time-dependent decreases in Caco-2 transepithelial resistance and increases in transepithelial permeability to the paracellular marker Lucifer yellow. Western blot results indicated that TNF-alpha decreased the expression of phosphorylated occludin in detergent-insoluble fractions but did not affect the expression of non-phosphorylated occludin protein. Real-time RT-PCR data showed that TNF-alpha did not affect the expression of occludin mRNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TNF-alpha increases Caco-2 monolayer permeability, decreases occludin protein expression and disturbs intercellular junctions.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor alpha increases epithelial barrier permeability by disrupting tight junctions in Caco-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Cui

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α on intestinal epithelial cell permeability and the expression of tight junction proteins. Caco-2 cells were plated onto Transwell® microporous filters and treated with TNF-α (10 or 100 ng/mL for 0, 4, 8, 16, or 24 h. The transepithelial electrical resistance and the mucosal-to-serosal flux rates of the established paracellular marker Lucifer yellow were measured in filter-grown monolayers of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The localization and expression of the tight junction protein occludin were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis, respectively. SYBR-Green-based real-time PCR was used to measure the expression of occludin mRNA. TNF-α treatment produced concentration- and time-dependent decreases in Caco-2 transepithelial resistance and increases in transepithelial permeability to the paracellular marker Lucifer yellow. Western blot results indicated that TNF-α decreased the expression of phosphorylated occludin in detergent-insoluble fractions but did not affect the expression of non-phosphorylated occludin protein. Real-time RT-PCR data showed that TNF-α did not affect the expression of occludin mRNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TNF-α increases Caco-2 monolayer permeability, decreases occludin protein expression and disturbs intercellular junctions.

  14. Confirmation tests of construction method and initial performance quality for low permeable engineered barrier in side part of radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Atsuo; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Komine, Hideo; Iizuka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    As for the low permeable layer, important functions are expected as an engineered barrier of radioactive waste disposal for low-level waste with comparatively high radiation levels. On examining the construction methods of this low permeable layer, it is important to confirm the possibility of the construction in the conditions similar to the actual constructed conditions with a true scale size. Therefore, the construction examination for the side part of the low permeable layer by bentonite and the performance check test of the low permeable layer were carried out. The result of the construction examination showed that the possibility of the construction were confirmed, and the result of performance check test showed that it was possible to ensure the required performance of the low permeable layer, such as hydraulic conductivity. (author)

  15. Study of the interactions bacteria - phenanthrene - activated carbon for the preparation of a permeable reactive barrier; Etude des interactions bacteries - phenanthrene - charbon en vue de l'elaboration d'une barriere permeable reactive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leglize, P.

    2004-12-01

    Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) is a new way for the remediation of contaminated groundwater, but up to now Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were rarely considered. We investigated PAH - bacteria - materials interactions in order to validate the feasibility of PRB for PAH contamination. PHE Adsorption/desorption kinetics onto different materials, activated carbons (CA), pozzolana (Pz) and pozzolana coated with heavy fuel (PzF), were investigated. PHE biodegradation were performed on batch using PAH degrading bacteria and the PRB materials. CA was a good media for PRB process: Phenanthrene sorption capacity is 100 to 10000 fold higher than PzF and Pz. Phenanthrene mineralization with CA was higher than without material. Bacterial properties affected PHE biodegradation. Bio-film production improved PHE biodegradation by PAH degrading bacteria. Column studies showed that inoculation of the column improved its efficiency: adsorbed PHE degradation and increased retardation of PHE. (author)

  16. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r 2   =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r 2   =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r 2   =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response

  17. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Normal Appearing White Matter in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Krakauer, Martin; Skimminge, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    and after the intravenous injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent to assess BBB permeability in the normal appearing white matter (NAWM) in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS). Methodology/Principal Findings: Fifty-nine patients (38 females) with RR-MS undergoing immunomodulatory treatment......-MS patients (CV = 0.19860.046) compared to cerebral white matter of healthy controls (CV = 0.16660.018, p = 0.046). Conclusions/Significance: We found no evidence of a global BBB disruption within the NAWM of RR-MS patients undergoing immunomodulatory treatment. However, the increased variation of T1 values...

  18. In vitro blood-brain barrier permeability predictions for GABAA receptor modulating piperine analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigenmann, Daniela Elisabeth; Dürig, Carmen; Jähne, Evelyn Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The alkaloid piperine from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and several synthetic piperine analogs were recently identified as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. In order to reach their target sites of action, these compounds need to enter the brain......-like endothelial cells (BLEC) model, and a primary animal (bovine endothelial/rat astrocytes co-culture) model. For each compound, quantitative UHPLC-MS/MS methods in the range of 5.00-500ng/mL in the corresponding matrix were developed, and permeability coefficients in the three BBB models were determined...

  19. Topical antihistamines display potent anti-inflammatory activity linked in part to enhanced permeability barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Tzu-Kai; Man, Mao-Qiang; Santiago, Juan-Luis

    2013-01-01

    antagonists likely oppose mast cell-derived histamines. In four immunologically diverse, murine disease models, characterized by either inflammation alone (acute irritant contact dermatitis, acute allergic contact dermatitis) or by prominent barrier abnormalities (subacute allergic contact dermatitis, atopic...... of epidermal differentiation, leading to thickened cornified envelopes; and (ii) enhanced epidermal lipid synthesis and secretion. As barrier homeostasis was enhanced to a comparable extent in mast cell-deficient mice, with no further improvement following application of topical H1/2r antagonists, H1/2r...... dermatitis), topical H1/2r agonists aggravated, whereas H1/2r antagonists improved, inflammation and/or barrier function. The apparent ability of topical H1r/2r antagonists to target epidermal H1/2r could translate into increased efficacy in the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses, likely due to decreased...

  20. Acrolein Disrupts Tight Junction Proteins and Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Epithelial Cell Death Leading to Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Yang; Wang, Min; Zhang, Jingwen; Barve, Shirish S; McClain, Craig J; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2017-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that environmental and dietary factors can affect intestinal epithelial integrity leading to gut permeability and bacterial translocation. Intestinal barrier dysfunction is a pathogenic process associated with many chronic disorders. Acrolein is an environmental and dietary pollutant and a lipid-derived endogenous metabolite. The impact of acrolein on the intestine has not been investigated before and is evaluated in this study, both in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrate that oral acrolein exposure in mice caused damage to the intestinal epithelial barrier, resulting in increased permeability and subsequently translocation of bacterial endotoxin-lipopolysaccharide into the blood. Similar results were seen in vitro using established Caco-2 cell monolayers wherein acrolein decreased barrier function and increased permeability. Acrolein also caused the down-regulation and/or redistribution of three representative tight junction proteins (ie, zonula occludens-1, Occludin, Claudin-1) that critically regulate epithelial paracellular permeability. In addition, acrolein induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated death of epithelial cells, which is an important mechanism contributing to intestinal barrier damage/dysfunction, and gut permeability. Overall, we demonstrate that exposure to acrolein affects the intestinal epithelium by decrease/redistribution of tight junction proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated epithelial cell death, thereby resulting in loss of barrier integrity and function. Our findings highlight the adverse consequences of environmental and dietary pollutants on intestinal barrier integrity/function with relevance to gut permeability and the development of disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Free standing PEDOT films prepared by vapour phase polymerisation as electrically tuneable barriers to drug permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Mahima; Sharma, Manisha; Bullen, Chris; Svirskis, Darren

    2018-03-01

    We report the fabrication of PEDOT films using vapour phase polymerisation with Fe(III)tosylate as the oxidant and to provide the doping ion. Multiple polymerisation steps resulted in the formation of free-standing PEDOT films. The PEDOT films were highly conductive, a single layer was 1840±50S/cm with a small decrease in conductivity for the five layered films to 1550±60S/cm. The five-layered films were flexible and freestanding in air with a thickness of 1.66±0.06μm. The ability of the freestanding PEDOT films to act as electrically tuneable rate controlling membranes was determined for nicotine (MW 162.2Da), dexamethasone phosphate (MW 516.4Da) and bovine lactoferrin (MW 80kDa), using a customised Franz cell. The membranes were highly permeable to nicotine and dexamethasone phosphate, however, the large lactoferrin molecules could not diffuse through the PEDOT membranes. The permeability of dexamethasone phosphate could be controlled electrically with an increase in flux observed when the membranes were maintained in the oxidised state compared to the reduce state. This is the first report where free standing PEDOT films were prepared by vapour phase polymerisation; these films were capable of electrically modifiable permeation of small drug molecules. The free standing and highly conductive PEDOT membranes are exciting materials to explore for molecular separation and drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Creation of a subsurface permeable treatment barrier using in situ redox manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruchter, J.S.; Cole, C.R.; Williams, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of in situ redox manipulation is to create a permeable treatment zone in the subsurface for remediating redox-sensitive contaminants in groundwater. The permeable treatment zone is created just downstream of the contaminant plume or contaminant source through the injection of reagents and/or microbial nutrients to alter the redox potential of the aquifer fluids and sediments. Contaminant plumes migrating through this manipulated zone can then be destroyed or immobilized. In a field test at the Hanford Site, ∼77,000 L of buffered sodium dithionite solution were successfully injected into the unconfined aquifer at the 100-H Area in September 1995. The target contaminant was chromate. No significant plugging of the well screen or the formation was detected during any phase of the test. Dithionite was detected in monitoring wells at least 7.5 m from the injection point. Data were obtained from all three phases of the test (i.e., injection, reaction, withdrawal). Preliminary core data show that from 60% to 100% of the available reactive iron in the targeted aquifer sediments was reduced by the injected dithionite. One year after the injection, groundwater in the treatment zone remains anoxic. Total and hexavalent chromium levels in groundwater have been reduced from a preexperiment concentration of ∼60 μg/L to below the detection limit of the analytical methods

  3. Lack of IL-6 increases blood–brain barrier permeability in fungal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Interleukin (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine, and numerous studies have shown that IL‐6 influences the integrity of the blood–brain barrier. In this study we investigated the role of IL-6 in Cryptococcus meningitis. First, wild-type or IL-6−/− mice were injected with Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) and the survival ...

  4. Evaluation of anionic surfactants effects on the skin barrier function based on skin permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasaka, Mana; Kubota, Koji; Yamasaki, Emi; Yang, Jianzhong; Takata, Sadaki

    2018-01-23

    Anionic surfactants are often used for cleaning and pharmaceutical purposes because of their strong surfactancy and foaming property. However, they are rarely ingested orally, the skin is a part of the human body most affected by surfactants. Barrier function of the skin is very strong, but the anionic surfactants can cause serious damages to it. Recently, amino acid-based surfactants have attracted attention as a safer option owing to their biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity examinations revealed that the amino acid-based surfactants are superior to sulfate-based surfactants. However, a systematical and comprehensive study related to the effect of these surfactants on skin barrier function has not yet been reported. In this work, skin permeation test using the skin of hairless mice and HPLC method is carried out. The material transmission speed through skin in a steady state was different between each surfactant treatment. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the effect of surfactants on skin barrier function and defined Transmission Index as an index for the degree of effect of surfactants. Glutamate series amino acid-based surfactant were effective to Transmission Index and we guessed the cause was due to adsorption. Based on the finding this study, we suggest using adsorptive property as a measure to the effect on the skin barrier function.

  5. Designing low permeability, optical-grade silicone systems: guidelines for choosing a silicone based on transmission rates for barrier applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velderrain, Michelle

    2012-03-01

    Unprotected electronic components exposed to moisture from high humidity may fail due to corrosion of metal leads or other unfavorable reactions on chemically sensitive components. This is of high interest for silicones that encapsulate Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) dies. For these applications, moisture and oxygen may react with materials, such as phosphor, used to make white LEDs for back-lighting applications and decrease or change the light output and color over time. Of the polymeric adhesives and sealants commercially available, silicones are used for their thermal stability, clarity, and comparably low modulus that provides stress relief during thermal cycling. In addition, silicones are also known to be very permeable to low molecular weight gases such as water vapor and oxygen. Recently, several types of silicones were tested for the oxygen and water vapor transmission rates, and it was found that they can have drastically different results. Silicone properties strongly affecting permeability are polymer backbone chemistry, crosslink density and fillers. Phenyl (C6H5) and trifluoropropyl (CF3CH2) groups are used to optimize the refractive index of optically clear silicones. The effect of chemical composition on the water vapor transfer rate (WVTR) and the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) at 400 C and 90% Relative Humidity was investigated on several silicones with various refractive indices and compared to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with similar durometers. It was found that polymer backbone chemistry had a significant influence on the permeation rates and will assist in material selection when designing for low-permeable barriers to improve package reliability.

  6. Early alterations in cerebral hemodynamics, brain metabolism, and blood-brain barrier permeability in experimental intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E J; Hung, Y C; Lee, M Y

    1999-12-01

    The authors sought to ascertain the nature of the hemodynamic and metabolic derangement underlying acute pathophysiological events that occur after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), flow velocity (FV) of the middle cerebral artery, and the arteriovenous contents of oxygen and lactate were investigated in 24 dogs subjected to sham operations (Group A, four animals) or intracerebral injections of 3 ml (Group B, 11 animals) or 5 ml (Group C, nine animals) autologous arterial blood. Twelve additional dogs received intravenous injections of 2% Evans blue or trypan blue dye to evaluate blood-brain barrier (BBB) changes. Within 1 hour, animals with ICH exhibited a rise in FV associated with significant reductions (pglycolysis. Furthermore, the data suggest that a selective increase in permeability, rather than anatomical disruption, of the BBB is involved in the acute pathophysiological events that occur after ICH, which may provide a possible gateway for systemic arterial lactate entering the SSS.

  7. Highly organic natural media as permeable reactive barriers: TCE partitioning and anaerobic degradation profile in eucalyptus mulch and compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Zuhal; Tansel, Berrin; Katsenovich, Yelena; Sukop, Michael; Laha, Shonali

    2012-10-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted with eucalyptus mulch and commercial compost to evaluate suitability of highly organic natural media to support anaerobic decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE) in groundwater. Experimental data for TCE and its dechlorination byproducts were analyzed with Hydrus-1D model to estimate the partitioning and kinetic parameters for the sequential dechlorination reactions during TCE decomposition. The highly organic natural media allowed development of a bioactive zone capable of decomposing TCE under anaerobic conditions. The first order TCE biodecomposition reaction rates were 0.23 and 1.2d(-1) in eucalyptus mulch and compost media, respectively. The retardation factors in the eucalyptus mulch and compost columns for TCE were 35 and 301, respectively. The results showed that natural organic soil amendments can effectively support the anaerobic bioactive zone for remediation of TCE contaminated groundwater. The natural organic media are effective environmentally sustainable materials for use in permeable reactive barriers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The rights and wrongs of blood-brain barrier permeability studies: a walk through 100 years of history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dreifuss, Jean-Jacques; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Johansson, Pia A; Habgood, Mark D; Møllgård, Kjeld; Bauer, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    Careful examination of relevant literature shows that many of the most cherished concepts of the blood-brain barrier are incorrect. These include an almost mythological belief in its immaturity that is unfortunately often equated with absence or at least leakiness in the embryo and fetus. The original concept of a blood-brain barrier is often attributed to Ehrlich; however, he did not accept that permeability of cerebral vessels was different from other organs. Goldmann is often credited with the first experiments showing dye (trypan blue) exclusion from the brain when injected systemically, but not when injected directly into it. Rarely cited are earlier experiments of Bouffard and of Franke who showed methylene blue and trypan red stained all tissues except the brain. The term "blood-brain barrier" "Blut-Hirnschranke" is often attributed to Lewandowsky, but it does not appear in his papers. The first person to use this term seems to be Stern in the early 1920s. Studies in embryos by Stern and colleagues, Weed and Wislocki showed results similar to those in adult animals. These were well-conducted experiments made a century ago, thus the persistence of a belief in barrier immaturity is puzzling. As discussed in this review, evidence for this belief, is of poor experimental quality, often misinterpreted and often not properly cited. The functional state of blood-brain barrier mechanisms in the fetus is an important biological phenomenon with implications for normal brain development. It is also important for clinicians to have proper evidence on which to advise pregnant women who may need to take medications for serious medical conditions. Beliefs in immaturity of the blood-brain barrier have held the field back for decades. Their history illustrates the importance of taking account of all the evidence and assessing its quality, rather than selecting papers that supports a preconceived notion or intuitive belief. This review attempts to right the wrongs. Based on

  9. Permeability of endothelial and astrocyte cocultures: in vitro blood-brain barrier models for drug delivery studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanglei; Simon, Melissa J; Cancel, Limary M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Ji, Xinying; Tarbell, John M; Morrison, Barclay; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. To seek for in vitro BBB models that are more accessible than animals for investigating drug transport across the BBB, we compared four in vitro cultured cell models: endothelial monoculture (bEnd3 cell line), coculture of bEnd3 and primary rat astrocytes (coculture), coculture with collagen type I and IV mixture, and coculture with Matrigel. The expression of the BBB tight junction proteins in these in vitro models was assessed using RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. We also quantified the hydraulic conductivity (L (p)), transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) and diffusive solute permeability (P) of these models to three solutes: TAMRA, Dextran 10K and Dextran 70K. Our results show that L (p) and P of the endothelial monoculture and coculture models are not different from each other. Compared with in vivo permeability data from rat pial microvessels, P of the endothelial monoculture and coculture models are not significantly different from in vivo data for Dextran 70K, but they are 2-4 times higher for TAMRA and Dextran 10K. This suggests that the endothelial monoculture and all of the coculture models are fairly good models for studying the transport of relatively large solutes across the BBB.

  10. The role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP-1) as an active efflux transporter on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingineni, Karthik; Belekar, Vilas; Tangadpalliwar, Sujit R; Garg, Prabha

    2017-05-01

    Drugs acting on central nervous system (CNS) may take longer duration to reach the market as these compounds have a higher attrition rate in clinical trials due to the complexity of the brain, side effects, and poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability compared to non-CNS-acting compounds. The roles of active efflux transporters with BBB are still unclear. The aim of the present work was to develop a predictive model for BBB permeability that includes the MRP-1 transporter, which is considered as an active efflux transporter. A support vector machine model was developed for the classification of MRP-1 substrates and non-substrates, which was validated with an external data set and Y-randomization method. An artificial neural network model has been developed to evaluate the role of MRP-1 on BBB permeation. A total of nine descriptors were selected, which included molecular weight, topological polar surface area, ClogP, number of hydrogen bond donors, number of hydrogen bond acceptors, number of rotatable bonds, P-gp, BCRP, and MRP-1 substrate probabilities for model development. We identified 5 molecules that fulfilled all criteria required for passive permeation of BBB, but they all have a low logBB value, which suggested that the molecules were effluxed by the MRP-1 transporter.

  11. Tempol modulates changes in xenobiotic permeability and occludin oligomeric assemblies at the blood-brain barrier during inflammatory pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochhead, Jeffrey J.; McCaffrey, Gwen; Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Finch, Jessica D.; DeMarco, Kristin M.; Quigley, Colleen E.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Our laboratory has shown that λ-carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammatory pain (CIP) can alter tight junction (TJ) protein expression and/or assembly leading to changes in blood-brain barrier xenobiotic permeability. However, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent oxidative stress during CIP is unknown. ROS (i.e., superoxide) are known to cause cellular damage in response to pain/inflammation. Therefore, we examined oxidative stress-associated effects at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in CIP rats. During CIP, increased staining of nitrosylated proteins was detected in hind paw tissue and enhanced presence of protein adducts containing 3-nitrotyrosine occurred at two molecular weights (i.e., 85 and 44 kDa) in brain microvessels. Tempol, a pharmacological ROS scavenger, attenuated formation of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins in both the hind paw and in brain microvessels when administered 10 min before footpad injection of λ-carrageenan. Similarly, CIP increased 4-hydroxynoneal staining in brain microvessels and this effect was reduced by tempol. Brain permeability to [14C]sucrose and [3H]codeine was increased, and oligomeric assemblies of occludin, a critical TJ protein, were altered after 3 h CIP. Tempol attenuated both [14C]sucrose and [3H]codeine brain uptake as well as protected occludin oligomers from disruption in CIP animals, suggesting that ROS production/oxidative stress is involved in modulating BBB functional integrity during pain/inflammation. Interestingly, tempol administration reduced codeine analgesia in CIP animals, indicating that oxidative stress during pain/inflammation may affect opioid delivery to the brain and subsequent efficacy. Taken together, our data show for the first time that ROS pharmacological scavenging is a viable approach for maintaining BBB integrity and controlling central nervous system drug delivery during acute inflammatory pain. PMID:22081706

  12. Transient and local increase in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and the blood-retinal barrier by hyperthermia of magnetic nanoparticles in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei Shafie, Seyed Nasrollah

    After successfully propelling therapeutic agents encapsulated in magnetic micro-carriers to a specific location inside an animal model by the gradient magnetic field of a modified clinical Magnetic Resonance (MR) scanner, we are now aiming to perform local drug delivery in the region of the central nervous system (CNS). To achieve localized drug delivery and increase efficacy, this project advances the theme that the therapeutic agents must be administered by means no more invasive than an intravenous injection followed by remote propulsion, controlled tracking, and on-command actuation in the CNS. The demanding function of the CNS requires an extremely stable environment. In fact, any small change in the composition of the interstitial fluid in the CNS plays a predominant role in regulating its microenvironment and neuronal activity. Therefore, the CNS is conceived to protect itself from frequent fluctuations of extracellular concentration of hormones, amino acids, and ion levels that occur after meals, exercise, or stress - as well as from toxic pathogens that may be circulating in the blood stream. This preventive barrier consists mainly of tightly interconnected endothelial cells that carpet the inner surface of most blood vessels in the CNS. While it provides a stable neuronal environment, more than 98% of all drug molecules are not able to cross this barrier and the extent to which a molecule enters is determined only by the permeability characteristics of the barrier. Therefore, while pharmaceutical research progresses for drug delivery to the CNS, it is limited by its pharmacokinetics through physiological barriers. Successful transient and local opening of the barrier for diffusion of therapeutics could strongly support the feasibility of treating a variety of neurological disorders. A recent effort presented in this dissertation provides evidence for the emergence of a novel approach to overcome this problem. This technique uses magnetic nanoparticles

  13. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gáspár Oláh,1 Judit Herédi,1 Ákos Menyhárt,1 Zsolt Czinege,2 Dávid Nagy,1 János Fuzik,1 Kitti Kocsis,1 Levente Knapp,1 Erika Krucsó,1 Levente Gellért,1 Zsolt Kis,1 Tamás Farkas,1 Ferenc Fülöp,3 Árpád Párdutz,4 János Tajti,4 László Vécsei,4 József Toldi1 1Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Neuroscience, 2Department of Software Engineering, 3Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and MTA-SZTE Research Group for Stereochemistry, 4Department of Neurology and MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Abstract: Cortical spreading depression (CSD involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid. We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease

  14. The rights and wrongs of blood-brain barrier permeability studies: a walk through 100 years of history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Norman R.; Dreifuss, Jean-Jacques; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Johansson, Pia A.; Habgood, Mark D.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Bauer, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    Careful examination of relevant literature shows that many of the most cherished concepts of the blood-brain barrier are incorrect. These include an almost mythological belief in its immaturity that is unfortunately often equated with absence or at least leakiness in the embryo and fetus. The original concept of a blood-brain barrier is often attributed to Ehrlich; however, he did not accept that permeability of cerebral vessels was different from other organs. Goldmann is often credited with the first experiments showing dye (trypan blue) exclusion from the brain when injected systemically, but not when injected directly into it. Rarely cited are earlier experiments of Bouffard and of Franke who showed methylene blue and trypan red stained all tissues except the brain. The term “blood-brain barrier” “Blut-Hirnschranke” is often attributed to Lewandowsky, but it does not appear in his papers. The first person to use this term seems to be Stern in the early 1920s. Studies in embryos by Stern and colleagues, Weed and Wislocki showed results similar to those in adult animals. These were well-conducted experiments made a century ago, thus the persistence of a belief in barrier immaturity is puzzling. As discussed in this review, evidence for this belief, is of poor experimental quality, often misinterpreted and often not properly cited. The functional state of blood-brain barrier mechanisms in the fetus is an important biological phenomenon with implications for normal brain development. It is also important for clinicians to have proper evidence on which to advise pregnant women who may need to take medications for serious medical conditions. Beliefs in immaturity of the blood-brain barrier have held the field back for decades. Their history illustrates the importance of taking account of all the evidence and assessing its quality, rather than selecting papers that supports a preconceived notion or intuitive belief. This review attempts to right the wrongs

  15. Neonatal blood gas sampling methods | Goenka | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood gas sampling is part of everyday practice in the care of babies admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, particularly for those receiving respiratory support. There is little published guidance that systematically evaluates the different methods of neonatal blood gas sampling, where each method has its individual ...

  16. Using Willie's Acid-Base Box for Blood Gas Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, John R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a method developed by Dr. William T. Lipscomb for teaching blood gas analysis of acid-base status and provides three examples using Willie's acid-base box. Willie's acid-base box is constructed using three of the parameters of standard arterial blood gas analysis: (1) pH; (2) bicarbonate; and (3) CO[subscript…

  17. Oxidation of volatile organic compound vapours by potassium permanganate in a horizontal permeable reactive barrier under unsaturated conditions: experiments and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghareh Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    In this research we evaluated the potential of using solid potassium permanganate to create a horizontal permeable reactive barrier (HPRB) for oxidizing VOC vapours in the unsaturated zone. We have performed batch experiments, short column, and long column experiments, and have fully analyzed the

  18. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN THE SINGLE, BINARY, AND TERNARY SYSTEMS OF COTTON BURR COMPOST, ZEROVALENT IRON, AND SEDIMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent research has shown that carbonaceous solid materials and zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as media in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to degrade groundwater nitrate via heterotrophic denitrification in the solid carbon system, and via abiotic reduction and ...

  19. Dissociation of changes in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier from catecholamine-induced changes in blood pressure of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, R.; Domer, F.R.; Taylor, B.

    1982-01-01

    Researchers have studied the effects of the pressor catecholamine, dopamine, and the depressor catecholamine, isoproterenol, on the systemic blood pressure and the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to albumin in normotensive (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. The rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital. The permeability of the BBB to protein was measured by the extravasation of radioiodinated serum albumin (RISA). The permeability was decreased by both catecholamines despite the dose-dependent, yet opposite, changes in blood pressure in the WKY rats. The blood pressure response to both of the catecholamines was enhanced in the SHR rats. Isoproterenol caused a decrease in the permeability of the BBB in the SHR but dopamine did not. Results with both WKY and SHR rats are suggestive of an adrenergically-mediated decrease in movement across the BBB of compounds of large molecular weight, regardless of changes in blood pressure

  20. Confirmation tests of construction method and initial performance quality for low permeable engineered barrier in bottom of radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Atsuo; Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Fujiwara, Tadafumi; Yada, Tsutomu; Komine, Hideo; Iizuka, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    As for the low permeable layer, important functions are expected as an engineered barrier of radioactive waste disposal for low-level waste with comparatively high radiation levels. On examining the construction methods of this low permeable layer, it is important to confirm the possibility of the construction in the conditions similar to the actual constructed conditions with a true scale size. Therefore, the construction examination for the bottom part of the low permeable layer by bentonite and the performance check test of the buffer layer were carried out. The result of the construction examination showed that the possibility of the construction were confirmed, and the result of performance check test showed that it was possible to ensure the required performance of the low permeable layer, such as hydraulic conductivity. (author)

  1. Permeable reactive barriers for the remediation of groundwater in a mining area: results for a pilot-scale project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Lopez, Salvadora; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Gonzalez-Ciudad, Eva; Belen Martinez-Martinez, Lucia; Hernandez, Carmen; Molina-Ruiz, Jose

    2017-04-01

    The Sierra Minera of Cartagena-La Union is located in the Region of Murcia, Southeast of Spain. This zone presents high levels of heavy metals due to natural, geogenic reasons. In addition, the prolonged mining activity, and subsequent abandonment of farms, has had consequences on the environment, including severe affectation of the groundwater in the area. To remediate this situation, the Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) technology was assayed, which required in addition to the hydro-geological study of the zone, a careful optimization study for the design and construction of PRBs. For such a purpose a pilot-scale project was developed, and this communication reports some of the most relevant findings obtained after a four-years monitorization period. The selected reactive material for the PRBs was limestone filler. The filler is a waste material produced in many factories in the zone. These residues have good adsorption properties, high alkalinity, low cost and high availability, which make them suitable for use in remediation. The PRB was constituted by a 50% limestone filler and 50% sand, a proportion optimized by means of independent batch experiments. A layer of gravel was placed at the top, and on it a layer of natural soil. The barrier was designed in the form of a continuous trench, because the level of the contaminated groundwater was not very deep. In this way, the barrier could be prepared with standard excavation equipment. Parallel to the barrier, 6 wells where arranged downstream for sample collection. The pH and conductivity of the samples was measured directly in situ, and the content of Zn, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Pb were analyzed in the laboratory. All the samples collected after the PRB was constructed had basic pH values between 7.5 and 8. The conductivity was between 5 and 11 mS / cm except for the well 4, which had a value of 3.70 mS / cm. The concentration values of trace elements were below the detection limit (atomic absorption measurement) in

  2. Sodium alginate/graphene oxide hydrogel beads as permeable reactive barrier material for the remediation of ciprofloxacin-contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pingping; Yu, Fei; Wang, Ruoyu; Ma, Yao; Wu, Yanqing

    2018-06-01

    The wide occurrence of antibiotics in groundwater has raised serious concerns due to their impacts on humans and the ecosystem. Most of the research in groundwater remediation focuses on the exploitation of nano-materials. However, nano-materials have several disadvantages such as high production cost, rapid reduction in permeability, disposal problems, and high sensitivity to environmental conditions. To solve these issues, novel sodium alginate/graphene oxide hydrogel beads (GSA) were synthesised and their effectiveness as permeable reactive barrier (PRB) backfill material in the remediation of ciprofloxacin (CPX)-contaminated groundwater was tested. The adsorption of CPX onto GSA followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The isotherm data followed the Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity was 100 mg g -1 at pH 7.0. The adsorption process was sensitive to contact time, initial CPX concentration and ionic strength. However, it was not pH sensitive. Hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, ion exchange, H-bonding, and pore filling were proposed to be the main adsorption mechanisms. The effects of flow rate, influent CPX concentration, and ionic strength on the performance of PRB were confirmed through flow-through column experiments and by using a chemical non-equilibrium two-site model. Accordingly, a proper PRB was designed based on hydrogeological conditions. Finally, the lifetime and cost of the PRBs were calculated. The results obtained provided concrete evidence that GSA is a promising adsorbent material for PRBs applications in the remediation of CPX-contaminated groundwater. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Zebrafish as a Screening Model for Testing the Permeability of Blood-Brain Barrier to Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Soon; Im, So Hee; Yang, Jung Yoon; Lee, Yu-Ri; Kim, Geum Ran; Chae, Jin Sil; Shin, Dae-Seop; Song, Jin Sook; Ahn, Sunjoo; Lee, Byung Hoi; Woo, Jae Chun; Ahn, Jin Hee; Yun, Chang Soo; Kim, Phiho; Kim, Hyoung Rae; Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Bae, Myung Ae

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the permeability of small molecules into the brain via the blood-brain barrier in zebrafish and to investigate the possibility of using this animal model as a screening tool during the early stages of drug discovery. Fifteen compounds were used to understand the permeation into the brain in zebrafish and mice. The ratio of brain-to-plasma concentration was compared between the two animal models. The partition coefficient (K p,brain ), estimated using the concentration ratio at designated times (0.167, 0.25, 0.5, or 2 h) after oral administrations (per os, p.o), ranged from 0.099 to 5.68 in zebrafish and from 0.080 to 11.8 in mice. A correlation was observed between the K p,brain values obtained from the zebrafish and mice, suggesting that zebrafish can be used to estimate K p,brain to predict drug penetration in humans. Furthermore, in vivo transport experiments to understand the permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter-mediated behavior of loperamide (LPM) in zebrafish were performed. The zebrafish, K p,brain,30min of LPM was determined to be 0.099 ± 0.069 after dosing with LPM alone, which increased to 0.180 ± 0.115 after dosing with LPM and tariquidar (TRQ, an inhibitor of P-gp). In mouse, the K p,brain,30min of LPM was determined to be 0.080 ± 0.004 after dosing with LPM alone and 0.237 ± 0.013 after dosing with LPM and TRQ. These findings indicate that the zebrafish could be used as an effective screening tool during the discovery stages of new drugs to estimate their distribution in the brain.

  4. Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier Permeability in Alzheimer’s Disease1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalbot, Sonia; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Fladby, Tormod; Andreasen, Niels; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2011-01-01

    The role of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCB) dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been addressed but not yet established. We evaluated the BCB integrity in 179 samples of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) retrospectively collected from AD patients and control cases using both CSF/serum albumin ratio (QAlb) and CSF secretory Ca2+-dependent phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) activity. These analyses were supplemented with the measurement of total tau, amyloid-β1–42 (Aβ1–42), and ubiquitin CSF levels. We found that due to its higher sensitivity, CSF sPLA2 activity could 1) discriminate AD from healthy controls and 2) showed BCB impairment in neurological control cases while QAlb could not. Moreover, the CSF sPLA2 activity measurement showed that around half of the AD patients were characterized by a BCB impairment. The BCB dysfunction observed in AD was independent from Mini-Mental State Examination score as well as CSF levels of total tau, Aβ1–42, and ubiquitin. Finally, the BCB dysfunction was not limited to any of the CSF biomarkers-based previously identified subgroups of AD. These results suggest that the BCB damage occurs independent of and probably precedes both Aβ and tau pathologies in a restricted subgroup of AD patients. PMID:21471645

  5. Psychological stress has the potential to cause a decline in the epidermal permeability barrier function of the horny layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, S; Baba, S; Akasaka, T

    2015-02-01

    Psychological stress is known to have a negative effect on a large number of skin diseases. However, there is little research on the relationship between psychological stress and the epidermal permeability barrier function (EPBF) of healthy individuals. We hypothesize that psychological stress deteriorates EPBF and aimed to investigate this relationship. Psychological stress was assessed using salivary alpha-amylase (sAmy; KIU L(-1) ), and chromogranin A level corrected with total protein (CgAP; pmol mg(-1) protein) as psychological stress biomarkers. Measurements were obtained from 16 healthy female students during two periods of presumed higher stress (final examinations and returning from a long vacation), and a period considered as a control. The EPBF level was evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL; g m(-2)  h(-1) ). The TEWL was measured three times: just before (TEWL [Intact]), immediately after (TEWL [Str]) and 4 h after (TEWL [4 h]) barrier disruption by tape stripping. The rate of barrier disruption was evaluated by comparing the difference between the TEWL [Intact] and the TEWL [Str] (delta-BD: g m(-2)  h(-1) ). The recovery was assessed by comparing the difference between the TEWL [Intact] and TEWL [4 h] (delta-RE: g m(-2)  h(-1) ). The subjects demonstrated a significant increase in the sAmy value after the long vacation compared with the control. There was no change in the CgAP value between the groups. Meanwhile, the EPBF level showed significant deterioration during both higher stress periods. There was a significant increase in delta-BD and delta-RE after the long vacation. The results indicate the possibility that psychological stress causes a decline in EPBF and deterioration in barrier disruption and recovery. Furthermore, it implies a relationship between psychological stress and the exacerbation or protracted healing of skin disease. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  6. Effect of chemical permeation enhancers on stratum corneum barrier lipid organizational structure and interferon alpha permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Shadi H; Saliaj, Evi; Wettig, Shawn D; Dong, Chilbert; Ivanova, Marina V; Huzil, J Torin; Foldvari, Marianna

    2013-06-03

    The outermost layer of the skin, known as the stratum corneum (SC), is composed of dead corneocytes embedded in an intercellular lipid matrix consisting of ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. The high level of organization within this matrix protects the body by limiting the permeation of most compounds through the skin. While essential for its protective functions, the SC poses a significant barrier for the delivery of topically applied pharmaceutical agents. Chemical permeation enhancers (CPEs) can increase delivery of small drug compounds into the skin by interacting with the intercellular lipids through physical processes including extraction, fluidization, increased disorder, and phase separation. However, it is not clear whether these same mechanisms are involved in delivery of biotherapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins. Here we describe the effect of three categories of CPEs {solvents [ethanol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (transcutol), oleic acid], terpenes [menthol, nerol, camphor, methyl salicylate], and surfactants [Tween 80, SDS, benzalkonium chloride, polyoxyl 40 hydrogenated castor oil (Cremophor RH40), didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), didecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)]} on the lipid organizational structure of human SC as determined by X-ray scattering studies. Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering studies were conducted to correlate the degree of structural changes and hydrocarbon chain packing in SC lipids caused by these various classes of CPEs to the extent of permeation of interferon alpha-2b (IFNα), a 19 kDa protein drug, into human skin. With the exception of solvents, propylene glycol and ethanol, all classes of CPEs caused increased disordering of lamellar and lateral packing of lipids. We observed that the highest degree of SC lipid disordering was caused by surfactants (especially SDS, DDAB, and DTAB) followed by terpenes, such as nerol. Interestingly, in vitro skin permeation studies

  7. Cell-based in vitro blood-brain barrier model can rapidly evaluate nanoparticles' brain permeability in association with particle size and surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Sanshiro; Fujioka, Kouki; Inoue, Yuriko; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2014-01-24

    The possibility of nanoparticle (NP) uptake to the human central nervous system is a major concern. Recent reports showed that in animal models, nanoparticles (NPs) passed through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). For the safe use of NPs, it is imperative to evaluate the permeability of NPs through the BBB. Here we used a commercially available in vitro BBB model to evaluate the permeability of NPs for a rapid, easy and reproducible assay. The model is reconstructed by culturing both primary rat brain endothelial cells and pericytes to support the tight junctions of endothelial cells. We used the permeability coefficient (P(app)) to determine the permeability of NPs. The size dependency results, using fluorescent silica NPs (30, 100, and 400 nm), revealed that the Papp for the 30 nm NPs was higher than those of the larger silica. The surface charge dependency results using Qdots® (amino-, carboxyl-, and PEGylated-Qdots), showed that more amino-Qdots passed through the model than the other Qdots. Usage of serum-containing buffer in the model resulted in an overall reduction of permeability. In conclusion, although additional developments are desired to elucidate the NPs transportation, we showed that the BBB model could be useful as a tool to test the permeability of nanoparticles.

  8. Environmental life cycle assessment of permeable reactive barriers: effects of construction methods, reactive materials and groundwater constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Mark S H; Lo, Irene M C

    2011-12-01

    The effects of the construction methods, materials of reactive media and groundwater constituents on the environmental impacts of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) were evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA). The PRB is assumed to be installed at a simulated site contaminated by either Cr(VI) alone or Cr(VI) and As(V). Results show that the trench-based construction method can reduce the environmental impacts of the remediation remarkably compared to the caisson-based method due to less construction material consumption by the funnel. Compared to using the zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) and quartz sand mixture, the use of the Fe(0) and iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) mixture can reduce the environmental impacts. In the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) in groundwater, the environmental impacts generated by the reactive media were significantly increased because of the higher usage of Fe(0). The environmental impacts are lower by using the Fe(0) and IOCS mixture in the groundwater with NOM, compared with using the Fe(0) and quartz sand mixture. Since IOCS can enhance the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) and As(V), the usage of the Fe(0) can be reduced, which in turn reduces the impacts induced by the reactive media.

  9. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money

  10. Comparison of permeable reactive barrier, funnel and gate, nonpumped wells, and low-capacity wells for groundwater remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    This modeling study compared the performance of a no-action and four active groundwater remediation alternatives: a permeable reactive barrier, a funnel and gate, nonpumped wells with filter media, and a low-capacity extraction and injection well. The simulated aquifer had an average seepage velocity of 0.04 m d(-1), and the initial contaminant plume was 58 m long and 13 m wide. For each active alternative, mass transport modeling identified the smallest structure necessary to contain and remove the contaminant plume. Although the no-action alternative did not contain the plume, each active alternative did contain and remove the plume, but with significantly different installation and operation requirements. Low-capacity pumping wells required the least infrastructure, with one extraction well and one injection well each discharging only 1.7 m(3) d(-1). The amount of time necessary to remove the contaminant plume was similar among active alternatives, except for the funnel and gate, which required much more time. Results of this study suggest that, for a modest seepage velocity and relatively narrow contaminant plume, low-capacity wells may be an effective alternative for groundwater remediation.

  11. Transformation of reactive iron minerals in a permeable reactive barrier (biowall) used to treat TCE in groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y Thomas; Wilson, John T; Wilkin, Richard T

    2008-09-01

    Iron and sulfur reducing conditions generally develop in permeable reactive barrier systems (PRB) constructed to treat contaminated groundwater. These conditions allow formation of FeS mineral phases. FeS readily degrades TCE, but a transformation of FeS to FeS2 could dramatically slow the rate of TCE degradation in the PRB. This study uses acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) as probes for FeS and FeS2 to investigate iron sulfide formation and transformation in a column study and PRB field study dealing with TCE degradation. Solid phase iron speciation shows that most of the iron is reduced and sulfur partitioning measurements show that AVS and CRS coexist in all samples, with the conversion of AVS to CRS being most significant in locations with potential oxidants available. In the column study, 54% of FeS was transformed to FeS2 after 2.4 years. In the field scale PRB, 43% was transformed after 5.2 years. Microscopy reveals FeS, Fe3S4 and FeS2 formation in the column system; however, only pyrite formation was confirmed byX-ray diffraction. The polysulfide pathway is most likely the primary mechanism of FeS transformation in the system, with S0 as an intermediate species formed through H2S oxidation.

  12. Microbial and mineral evolution in zero valent iron-based permeable reactive barriers during long-term operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Millot, Romain; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Omoregie, Enoma; Chaurand, Perrine; Borschneck, Daniel; Bastiaens, Leen; Rose, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    Impacts of subsurface biogeochemical processes over time have always been a concern for the long-term performance of zero valent iron (Fe(0))-based permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). To evaluate the biogeochemical impacts, laboratory experiments were performed using flow-through glass columns for 210 days at controlled temperature (20 °C). Two different particle sizes of Fe(0) were used in the columns, and to simulate indigenous microbial activity, extra carbon source was provided in the two columns (biotic columns) and the remaining two columns were kept abiotic using gamma radiations. Heavy metals (Zn, As) were removed efficiently in all the columns, and no exhaustion of treatment capability or clogging was observed during our experimental duration. Newly formed Fe mineral phases and precipitates were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), and micro-XRF techniques in solid phase at the end of the experiment. In addition, 16S rRNA gene extraction was used for microbial community identification in biotic columns. During the incubation, microbial population shifted in favor of Desulfosporosinus species (sulfate-reducing bacteria) from initial dominance of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in sediments. Dominant mineral phases detected in biotic columns were mackinawite (FeS) and sulfate green rust, while in abiotic columns, magnetite/maghemite phases were more prevalent.

  13. Examples of Department of Energy Successes for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater: Permeable Reactive Barrier and Dynamic Underground Stripping ASTD Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purdy, C.; Gerdes, K.; Aljayoushi, J.; Kaback, D.; Ivory, T.

    2002-02-27

    Since 1998, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has funded the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) Program to expedite deployment of alternative technologies that can save time and money for the environmental cleanup at DOE sites across the nation. The ASTD program has accelerated more than one hundred deployments of new technologies under 76 projects that focus on a broad spectrum of EM problems. More than 25 environmental restoration projects have been initiated to solve the following types of problems: characterization of the subsurface using chemical, radiological, geophysical, and statistical methods; treatment of groundwater contaminated with DNAPLs, metals, or radionuclides; and other projects such as landfill covers, purge water management systems, and treatment of explosives-contaminated soils. One of the major goals of the ASTD Program is to deploy a new technology or process at multiple DOE sites. ASTD projects are encouraged to identify subsequent deployments at other sites. Some of the projects that have successfully deployed technologies at multiple sites focusing on cleanup of contaminated groundwater include: Permeable Reactive Barriers (Monticello, Rocky Flats, and Kansas City), treating uranium and organics in groundwater; and Dynamic Underground Stripping (Portsmouth, and Savannah River), thermally treating DNAPL source zones. Each year more and more new technologies and approaches are being used at DOE sites due to the ASTD program. DOE sites are sharing their successes and communicating lessons learned so that the new technologies can replace the baseline or standard approaches at DOE sites, thus expediting cleanup and saving money.

  14. Heavy metal removal from MSWI fly ash by electrokinetic remediation coupled with a permeable activated charcoal reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Li, Dongwei; Kexiang, Liu; Zhang, Yuewei

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the investigations into the feasibility of the application of a remediation system that couples electrokinetic remediation (EKR) with the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concept for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with activated charcoal as the PRB material. The experimental results of this study showed that the proposed combined method can effectively improve the remediation efficiency and that the addition of the oxalic acid to the PRB media before the coupled system can further enhance the remediation process. In the optimization tests, the maximum removals of Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd were achieved under different experimental conditions. The voltage gradient and processing time were shown to have significant effects on the removal of Cu and Cd, whereas the addition of the oxalic acid had a more significant influence on the removal of Pb. Generally, the processing time is the most significant factor in changing the removal rates of HMs in the enhanced coupled system. In terms of the leaching toxicity, the specimen remediated by ENEKR + PRB showed the lowest leaching value for each HM in the S2 and S3 regions.

  15. Retinal pathology is associated with increased blood-retina barrier permeability in a diabetic and hypercholesterolaemic pig model: Beneficial effects of the LpPLA2 inhibitor Darapladib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Nimish K; Qi, Xin; Goldwaser, Eric L; Godsey, George A; Wu, Hao; Kosciuk, Mary C; Freeman, Theresa A; Macphee, Colin H; Wilensky, Robert L; Venkataraman, Venkat; Nagele, Robert G

    2017-05-01

    Using a porcine model of diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolaemia, we previously showed that diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolaemia is associated with a chronic increase in blood-brain barrier permeability in the cerebral cortex, leading to selective binding of immunoglobulin G and deposition of amyloid-beta 1-42 peptide in pyramidal neurons. Treatment with Darapladib (GlaxoSmithKline, SB480848), an inhibitor of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase-A2, alleviated these effects. Here, investigation of the effects of chronic diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolaemia on the pig retina revealed a corresponding increased permeability of the blood-retina barrier coupled with a leak of plasma components into the retina, alterations in retinal architecture, selective IgG binding to neurons in the ganglion cell layer, thinning of retinal layers due to cell loss and increased glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in Müller cells, all of which were curtailed by treatment with Darapladib. These findings suggest that chronic diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolaemia induces increased blood-retina barrier permeability that may be linked to altered expression of blood-retina barrier-associated tight junction proteins, claudin and occludin, leading to structural changes in the retina consistent with diabetic retinopathy. Additionally, results suggest that drugs with vascular anti-inflammatory properties, such as Darapladib, may have beneficial effects on eye diseases strongly linked to vascular abnormalities such as diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration.

  16. Long-term performance of elemental iron and hydroxyapatite for uranium retention in permeable reactive barriers used for groundwater remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, V.

    2007-01-01

    Elemental iron (Fe 0 ) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) were evaluated as reactive mate-rials for use in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove uranium from conta-minated groundwater. Special attention was given to the long-term performance of the materials, which was investigated by means of column tests with a duration of up to 30 months using two different artificial groundwaters (AGW) with varying composition and uranium concentration. The interaction of the materials with AGW was studied in column tests using 237 U as a radiotracer to monitor the movement of the contamination front through the columns. The tested materials were shredded cast iron (granulated grey cast iron, 0.3 - 1.3 mm) supplied by Gotthard Mayer, Rheinfelden, Germany, and food quality grade hydroxyapatite (Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 3 OH, 99 % 0 (AGW with 9.6 mg U/L and low bicarbonate content of 120 mg/L). No breakthrough was observed for the Fe 0 columns with effluent uranium con-centrations being below the detection limit of 10 μg/L after treating more than 2,000 pore volumes (PV) and no uranium could be leached from loaded Fe 0 columns with 200 PV of uranium free AGW. However, columns with high Fe 0 content (≥ 50%) suffered from severe loss of permeability when AGW with ≥ 320 mg/L bicarbonate was used. In the HAP columns a breakthrough occurred with effluent uranium concentrations > 15 μg/l after treating 1,240 PV (10% and 50% breakthrough after 1,460 PV and 2,140 PV respectively). 12.2% of the accu-mulated uranium could be desorbed again with 840 PV of uranium free AGW. Adsorption was found to be the dominant reaction mechanism for uranium and HAP. Image analysis of high uranium content samples showed uranium and phosphate bearing crystals growing from HAP surfaces. The uranium phases chernikovite and meta-ankoleite of the autunite group were identified by x-ray diffraction. The existence of these mineral phases proves that surface precipitation also occurs under favourable conditions. No uranium

  17. Permeable reactive barrier of surface hydrophobic granular activated carbon coupled with elemental iron for the removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ji; Cao Limei; Guo Rui; Jia Jinping

    2010-01-01

    Granular activated carbon was modified with dimethyl dichlorosilane to improve its surface hydrophobicity, and therefore to improve the performance of permeable reactive barrier constructed with the modified granular activated carbon and elemental iron. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the surface silicon concentration of the modified granular activated carbon is higher than that of the original one, leading to the increased surface hydrophobicity. Although the specific surface area decreased from 895 to 835 m 2 g -1 , the modified granular activated carbon could adsorb 20% more 2,4-dichlorophenol than the original one did in water. It is also proven that the permeable reactive barrier with the modified granular activated carbon is more efficient at 2,4-dichlorophenol dechlorination, in which process 2,4-dichlorophenol is transformed to 2-chlorophenol or 4-chlorophenol then to phenol, or to phenol directly.

  18. Permeable reactive barrier of surface hydrophobic granular activated carbon coupled with elemental iron for the removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Ji, E-mail: yangji@ecust.edu.cn [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Cao Limei; Guo Rui; Jia Jinping [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Granular activated carbon was modified with dimethyl dichlorosilane to improve its surface hydrophobicity, and therefore to improve the performance of permeable reactive barrier constructed with the modified granular activated carbon and elemental iron. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the surface silicon concentration of the modified granular activated carbon is higher than that of the original one, leading to the increased surface hydrophobicity. Although the specific surface area decreased from 895 to 835 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, the modified granular activated carbon could adsorb 20% more 2,4-dichlorophenol than the original one did in water. It is also proven that the permeable reactive barrier with the modified granular activated carbon is more efficient at 2,4-dichlorophenol dechlorination, in which process 2,4-dichlorophenol is transformed to 2-chlorophenol or 4-chlorophenol then to phenol, or to phenol directly.

  19. Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 and Al2O3/TiO2 barrier coatings to reduce the water vapour permeability of polyetheretherketone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadzada, Tamkin; McKenzie, David R.; James, Natalie L.; Yin, Yongbai; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate significantly enhanced barrier properties of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) against water vapour penetration by depositing Al 2 O 3 or Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 nanofilms grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation analysis revealed good adhesion strength of a bilayer Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 coating to PEEK, while the single layer Al 2 O 3 coating displayed flaking and delamination. We identified three critical design parameters for achieving the optimum barrier properties of ALD Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 coatings on PEEK. These are a minimum total thickness dependent on the required water vapour transmission rate, the use of an Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 bilayer coating and the application of the coating to both sides of the PEEK film. Using these design parameters, we achieved a reduction in moisture permeability of PEEK of over two orders of magnitude while maintaining good adhesion strength of the polymer–thin film system. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 coatings reduced water vapour permeability. • Bilayer coatings reduced the permeability more than single layer coatings. • Bilayer coatings displayed higher adhesion strength than the single layer coatings. • Double-sided coatings performed better than single-sided coatings. • Correlation was found between total thickness and reduced water vapour permeability.

  20. The Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Six Indole Alkaloids from Uncariae Ramulus Cum Uncis in the MDCK-pHaMDR Cell Monolayer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Nan Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Uncariae Ramulus Cum Uncis (URCU is a widely used traditional Chinese medicine, and is reported to have various central nervous system effects. Alkaloids have been demonstrated to be the predominant pharmacological active components of URCU. In order to evaluate the blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability and transport mechanism of six typical indole alkaloids from URCU, the MDCK-pHaMDR cell monolayer model was used as an in vitro surrogate model for BBB. The samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the apparent permeability coefficients (Papp were calculated. Among the six alkaloids, isorhynchophylline (2, isocorynoxeine (4, hirsutine (5 and hirsuteine (6 showed high permeability, with Papp values at 10−5 cm/s level in bidirectional transport. For rhynchophylline (1 and corynoxeine (3, they showed moderate permeability, with Papp values from the apical (AP side to the basolateral (BL side at 10−6 cm/s level and efflux ratio (Papp BL→AP/Papp AP→BL above 2. The time- and concentration-dependency experiments indicated that the main mechanism for 2, 4, 5 and 6 through BBB was passive diffusion. The efflux mechanism involved in the transports of compounds 1 and 3 could be reduced significantly by verapamil, and molecular docking screening also showed that 1 and 3 had strong bindings to P-glycoprotein. This study provides useful information for predicting the BBB permeability for 1–6, as well as better understanding of their central nervous system pharmacological activities.

  1. Feasibility Of Coupling Permeable Bio-Barriers And Electrokinetics For The Treatment Of Diesel Hydrocarbons Polluted Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramírez, Esperanza Mena; Jiménez, Cristina Sáez; Camacho, José Villaseñor; Rodrigo, Manuel A.Rodrigo; Cañizares, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrokinetics and a biobarrier were combined to remediate of a diesel polluted soil. • pH gradients did not affect the biobarrier activity located in soil central position. • Microorganisms were partially detached from the biobarrier and moved across the soil. • An anionic surfactant helped the contact between pollutant and microorganisms. • A 39% of the diesel biodegradable fraction was homogeneously removed across the soil. - Abstract: In this study, the remediation of a diesel hydrocarbon-polluted clay soil using an electrochemical-biological combined technology is assessed. The polluted soil was subjected to an electrokinetic (EK) treatment with a biological permeable reactive barrier. A lab-scale electrochemical cell for soil treatment was used. The biological barrier placed in the soil was a biofilm reactor previously adapted for diesel degradation. A batch experiment of 336 h was conducted in a synthetic clay soil spiked with 10 g·kg −1 of diesel and a constant voltage gradient of 1.0 V cm −1 . Sodium dodecyl sulphate was used as an anionic surfactant in the cathodic well to allow for hydrocarbon emulsification during the treatment. At the end of the experiment, extreme pH values were observed near the electrodes. However, the pH remained constant at approximately 7.7 in the central biobarrier zone, which allowed for biological processes. Biological growth was observed in the biobarrier, and a part of the biofilm was detached and transported through the soil in both directions. Furthermore, the surfactant was transported across the soil due to electromigration and electroosmosis, which resulted in diesel emulsification. The combination of biological and EK phenomena finally resulted in a homogenous hydrocarbon removal of approximately 27% in the polluted soil, which indicated a 39% removal of the diesel biodegradable fraction. Due to the electroosmotic flow and the biological degradation, some of the water, surfactant and

  2. Risk mitigation by waste-based permeable reactive barriers for groundwater pollution control at e-waste recycling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiyuan, Jingzi; Tsang, Daniel C W; Yip, Alex C K; Zhang, Weihua; Ok, Yong Sik; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-02-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) have proved to be a promising passive treatment to control groundwater contamination and associated human health risks. This study explored the potential use of low-cost adsorbents as PRBs media and assessed their longevity and risk mitigation against leaching of acidic rainfall through an e-waste recycling site, of which Cu, Zn, and Pb were the major contaminants. Batch adsorption experiments suggested a higher adsorption capacity of inorganic industrial by-products [acid mine drainage sludge (AMDS) and coal fly ash (CFA)] and carbonaceous recycled products [food waste compost (FWC) and wood-derived biochar] compared to natural inorganic minerals (limestone and apatite). Continuous leaching tests of sand columns with 10 wt% low-cost adsorbents were then conducted to mimic the field situation of acidic rainfall infiltration through e-waste-contaminated soils (collected from Qingyuan, China) by using synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) solution. In general, Zn leached out first, followed by Cu, and finally delayed breakthrough of Pb. In the worst-case scenario (e.g., at initial concentrations equal to 50-fold of average SPLP result), the columns with limestone, apatite, AMDS, or biochar were effective for a relatively short period of about 20-40 pore volumes of leaching, after which Cu breakthrough caused non-cancer risk concern and later-stage Pb leaching considerably increased both non-cancer and lifetime cancer risk associated with portable use of contaminated water. In contrast, the columns with CFA or FWC successfully mitigated overall risks to an acceptable level for a prolonged period of 100-200 pore volumes. Therefore, with proper selection of low-cost adsorbents (or their mixture), waste-based PRBs is a technically feasible and economically viable solution to mitigate human health risk due to contaminated groundwater at e-waste recycling sites.

  3. FeS-coated sand for removal of arsenic(III) under anaerobic conditions in permeable reactive barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y.-S.; Gallegos, T.J.; Demond, A.H.; Hayes, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron sulfide (as mackinawite, FeS) has shown considerable promise as a material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions. However, as a nanoparticulate material, synthetic FeS is not suitable for use in conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). This study developed a methodology for coating a natural silica sand to produce a material of an appropriate diameter for a PRB. Aging time, pH, rinse time, and volume ratios were varied, with a maximum coating of 4.0 mg FeS/g sand achieved using a pH 5.5 solution at a 1:4 volume ratio (sand: 2 g/L FeS suspension), three days of aging and no rinsing. Comparing the mass deposited on the sand, which had a natural iron-oxide coating, with and without chemical washing showed that the iron-oxide coating was essential to the formation of a stable FeS coating. Scanning electron microscopy images of the FeS-coated sand showed a patchwise FeS surface coating. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a partial oxidation of the Fe(II) to Fe(III) during the coating process, and some oxidation of S to polysulfides. Removal of As(III) by FeS-coated sand was 30% of that by nanoparticulate FeS at pH 5 and 7. At pH 9, the relative removal was 400%, perhaps due to the natural oxide coating of the sand or a secondary mineral phase from mackinawite oxidation. Although many studies have investigated the coating of sands with iron oxides, little prior work reports coating with iron sulfides. The results suggest that a suitable PRB material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions can be produced through the deposition of a coating of FeS onto natural silica sand with an iron-oxide coating. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Linking field and laboratory studies to investigate nitrate removal using permeable reactive barrier technology during managed recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, G.; Beganskas, S.; Weir, W. B.; Redford, K.; Saltikov, C.; Fisher, A. T.

    2017-12-01

    We present data from a series of field and laboratory studies investigating mechanisms for the enhanced removal of nitrate during infiltration as a part of managed recharge. These studies combine physical, geochemical, and microbiological data collected during controlled infiltration experiments at both a plot and a laboratory scale using permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology. The presence of a PRB, made of wood chips or biochar, enhances nitrate removal by stimulating the growth and productivity of native soil microbes to process nitrate via denitrification. Earlier work has shown that unamended soil can remove up to 50% of nitrate during infiltration at rates population changes below the PRB where most of the cycling occurs. Coupled with isotopic analyses, these results suggest that a PRB expands the range of infiltration rates at which significant nitrate can be removed by microbial activity. Further, nitrate removal occurs at different depths below the biochar and redwood chips, suggesting different mechanisms of nitrate removal in the presence of different PRB materials. In laboratory studies we flowed artificial groundwater through intact sediment cores collected at the same field site where we also ran infiltration tests. These experiments show that the fluid flow rate and the presence of a PRB exhibit primary control on nitrate removal during infiltration, and that the relationship between flow rate and nitrate removal is fundamentally different in the presence of a PRB. These data from multiple scales and flow regimes are combined to offer a deeper understanding how the use of PRB technology during infiltration can help address a significant non-point source issue at the surface-subsurface interface.

  5. Uptake Mechanisms of Eu(III) on Hydroxyapatite: A Potential Permeable Reactive Barrier Backfill Material for Trapping Trivalent Minor Actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Zheng, Tao; Yang, Shitong; Zhang, Linjuan; Wang, Jianqiang; Liu, Wei; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2016-04-05

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technique has attracted an increasing level of attention for the in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. In this study, the macroscopic uptake behaviors and microscopic speciation of Eu(III) on hydroxyapatite (HAP) were investigated by a combination of theoretical modeling, batch experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) fitting, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The underlying removal mechanisms were identified to further assess the application potential of HAP as an effective PRB backfill material. The macroscopic analysis revealed that nearly all dissolved Eu(III) in solution was removed at pH 6.5 within an extremely short reaction time of 5 min. In addition, the thermodynamic calculations, desorption experiments, and PXRD and XAS analyses definitely confirmed the formation of the EuPO4·H2O(s) phase during the process of uptake of dissolved Eu(III) by HAP via the dissolution-precipitation mechanism. A detailed comparison of the present experimental findings and related HAP-metal systems suggests that the relative contribution of precipitation to the total Eu(III) removal increases as the P:Eu ratio decreases. The dosage of HAP-based PRB for the remediation of groundwater polluted by Eu(III) and analogous trivalent actinides [e.g., Am(III) and Cm(III)] should be strictly controlled depending on the dissolved Eu(III) concentration to obtain an optimal P:M (M represents Eu, Am, or Cm) ratio and treatment efficiency.

  6. Blood-Labyrinth Barrier Permeability in Menière Disease and Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Findings on Delayed Postcontrast 3D-FLAIR MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdaman, M N; Ishiyama, G; Ishiyama, A; Peng, K A; Kim, H J; Pope, W B; Sepahdari, A R

    2016-06-02

    Menière disease and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss can have overlapping clinical presentation and may have similar pathophysiology. Prior studies using postcontrast 3D-FLAIR MR imaging suggest abnormal blood-labyrinth barrier permeability in both conditions, but the 2 diseases have not been directly compared by using the same imaging techniques. We hypothesized that delayed postcontrast 3D-FLAIR MR imaging would show differences in blood-labyrinth barrier permeability between Menière disease and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Patients with unilateral Menière disease (n = 32) and unilateral idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (n = 11) imaged with delayed postcontrast 3D-FLAIR MR imaging were retrospectively studied. Signal intensities of the medulla and perilymph of the cochlear basal turns of both ears in each patient were measured in a blinded fashion. Cochlea/medulla ratios were calculated for each ear as a surrogate for blood-labyrinth barrier permeability. The ears were segregated by clinical diagnosis. Cochlea/medulla ratio was higher in symptomatic ears of patients with Menière disease (12.6 ± 7.4) than in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (5.7 ± 2.0) and asymptomatic ears of patients with Menière disease (8.0 ± 3.1), indicating increased blood-labyrinth barrier permeability in Menière disease ears. The differences in cochlea/medulla ratio between symptomatic and asymptomatic ears were significantly higher in Menière disease than in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Asymptomatic ears in patients with Menière disease showed higher cochlea/medulla ratio than symptomatic and asymptomatic ears in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Increased cochlea/medulla ratio indicates increased blood-labyrinth barrier permeability in Menière disease compared with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Increased cochlea/medulla ratio in asymptomatic ears of

  7. The Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Lignans and Malabaricones from the Seeds of Myristica fragrans in the MDCK-pHaMDR Cell Monolayer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability of twelve lignans and three phenolic malabaricones from the seeds of Myristica fragrans (nutmeg were studied with the MDCK-pHaMDR cell monolayer model. The samples were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and the apparent permeability coefficients (Papp were calculated. Among the fifteen test compounds, benzonfuran-type, dibenzylbutane-type and arylnaphthalene-type lignans showed poor to moderate permeabilities with Papp values at 10−8–10−6 cm/s; those of 8-O-4′-neolignan and tetrahydrofuran-lignan were at 10−6–10−5 cm/s, meaning that their permeabilities are moderate to high; the permeabilities of malabaricones were poor as their Papp values were at 10−8–10−7 cm/s. To 5-methoxy-dehydrodiisoeugenol (2, erythro-2-(4-allyl-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-propan-1-ol acetate (6, verrucosin (8, and nectandrin B (9, an efflux way was involved and the main transporter for 6, 8 and 9 was demonstrated to be P-glycoprotein. The time and concentration dependency experiments indicated the main transport mechanism for neolignans dehydrodiisoeugenol (1, myrislignan (7 and 8 was passive diffusion. This study summarized the relationship between the BBB permeability and structure parameters of the test compounds, which could be used to preliminarily predict the transport of a compound through BBB. The results provide a significant molecular basis for better understanding the potential central nervous system effects of nutmeg.

  8. Effect of Exercise Intensity on Neurotrophic Factors and Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Induced by Oxidative-Nitrosative Stress in Male College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hee-Tae; Cho, Su-Youn; Yoon, Hyung-Gi; So, Wi-Young

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the effects of aerobic exercise intensity on oxidative-nitrosative stress, neurotrophic factor expression, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Fifteen healthy men performed treadmill running under low-intensity (LI), moderate-intensity (MI), and high-intensity (HI) conditions. Blood samples were collected immediately before exercise (IBE), immediately after exercise (IAE), and 60 min after exercise (60MAE) to examine oxidative-nitrosative stress (reactive oxygen species [ROS]; nitric oxide [NO]), neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF]; nerve growth factor [NGF]), and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability (S-100β; neuron-specific enolase). ROS concentration significantly increased IAE and following HI (4.9 ± 1.7 mM) compared with that after LI (2.8 ± 1.4 mM) exercise (p exercise (p exercise (p exercise (p exercise (p .05). Moderate- and/or high-intensity exercise may induce higher oxidative-nitrosative stress than may low-intensity exercise, which can increase peripheral neurotrophic factor levels by increasing BBB permeability.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of blood-brain barrier permeability in ischemic stroke using diffusion-weighted arterial spin labeling in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Yash V; Lu, Jianfei; Shen, Qiang; Cerqueira, Bianca; Duong, Timothy Q

    2017-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging has recently been proposed to quantify the rate of water exchange (K w ) across the blood-brain barrier in humans. This study aimed to evaluate the blood-brain barrier disruption in transient (60 min) ischemic stroke using K w magnetic resonance imaging with cross-validation by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue histology in the same rats. The major findings were: (i) at 90 min after stroke (30 min after reperfusion), group K w magnetic resonance imaging data showed no significant blood-brain barrier permeability changes, although a few animals showed slightly abnormal K w . Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging confirmed this finding in the same animals. (ii) At two days after stroke, K w magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant blood-brain barrier disruption. Regions with abnormal K w showed substantial overlap with regions of hyperintense T 2 (vasogenic edema) and hyperperfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue histology confirmed these findings in the same animals. The K w values in the normal contralesional hemisphere and the ipsilesional ischemic core two days after stroke were: 363 ± 17 and 261 ± 18 min -1 , respectively (P < 0.05, n = 9). K w magnetic resonance imaging is sensitive to blood-brain barrier permeability changes in stroke, consistent with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue extravasation. K w magnetic resonance imaging offers advantages over existing techniques because contrast agent is not needed and repeated measurements can be made for longitudinal monitoring or averaging.

  10. Effects of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury on the blood-brain barrier permeability to [14C] and [13C]sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Mohammad K; Bickel, Ulrich; Mehvar, Reza

    2017-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy that is associated with severe liver failure may compromise the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. However, the effects of less severe liver diseases, in the absence of overt encephalopathy, on the BBB are not well understood. The goal of the current study was to investigate the effects of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury on the BBB tight junction permeability to small, hydrophilic molecules using the widely used [ 14 C]sucrose and recently-proposed alternative [ 13 C]sucrose as markers. Rats were subjected to 20 min of hepatic ischemia or sham surgery, followed by 8 h of reperfusion before administration of a single bolus dose of [ 14 C] or [ 13 C]sucrose and collection of serial (0-30 min) blood and plasma and terminal brain samples. The concentrations of [ 14 C] and [ 13 C]sucrose in the samples were determined by measurement of total radioactivity (nonspecific) and LC-MS/MS (specific), respectively. IR injury significantly increased the blood, plasma, and brain concentrations of both [ 14 C] and [ 13 C]sucrose. However, when the brain concentrations were corrected for their respective area under the blood concentration-time curve, only [ 14 C]sucrose showed significantly higher (30%) BBB permeability values in the IR animals. Because [ 13 C]sucrose is a more specific BBB permeability marker, these data indicate that our animal model of hepatic IR injury does not affect the BBB tight junction permeability to small, hydrophilic molecules. Methodological differences among studies of the effects of liver diseases on the BBB permeability may confound the conclusions of such studies.

  11. Influence of different storage times and temperatures on blood gas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of storage temperature and time on blood gas and acid-base balance of ovine venous blood. Ten clinically healthy sheep were used in this study. A total number of 30 blood samples, were divided into three different groups, and were stored in a refrigerator adjusted ...

  12. Contamination movement around a permeable reactive barrier at Solid Waste Management Unit 12, Naval Weapons Station Charleston, North Charleston, South Carolina, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Petkewich, Matthew D.; Conlon, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast investigated natural and engineered remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compound groundwater contamination at Solid Waste Management Unit 12 at the Naval Weapons Station Charleston, North Charleston, South Carolina, beginning in 2000. In early 2004, groundwater contaminants began moving around the southern end of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) installed by a consultant in December 2002. The PRB is a 130-foot-long and 3-foot-wide barrier consisting of varying amounts of zero-valent iron with or without sand mixture. Contamination moving around the PRB probably has been transported at least 75 feet downgradient from the PRB at a rate of about 15 to 29 feet per year.

  13. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL TRENDS IN GROUNDWATER CHEMISTRY AND PRECIPITATE FORMATION AT THE ELIZABETH CITY PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accumulation of mineral precipitates and microbial biomass are key factors that impact the long-term performance of PRBs. Both processes can impact remedial performance by affecting zero-valent iron reactivity and permeability. Results will be presented from solid-phase and gro...

  14. Diabetic and sympathetic influences on the water permeability barrier function of human skin as measured using transepidermal water loss: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Hoon; Park, Ji Woong

    2017-11-01

    The presence of long-standing hyperglycemic conditions has been suggested to lead to many skin problems associated with an impaired skin barrier function. However, the relationship between impaired skin barrier status and altered peripheral nervous system function has not yet been determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the water evaporation rate as a measure of the permeability barrier function of diabetic skin and its relationship to diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN) and peripheral autonomic neuropathy (PAN) using well-controlled confounding variables.This case-control study included 42 participants with chronic diabetes and 43 matched healthy controls. The diabetic group underwent a nerve conduction study and sympathetic skin response (SSR) test to confirm the presence of DSPN and PAN, respectively. Different skin regions were analyzed using the noninvasive Tewameter instrument (Courage + Khazaka Electronic GmbH, Cologne, Germany). The impacts of PAN, DSPN, age, and diabetes duration on the values of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were each analyzed and compared between the groups.Regardless of the presence of DSPN or PAN, the TEWL values as measured on the distal extremities were significantly lower in the diabetic group than in the control group. In the diabetic group, participants with abnormal SSR test results showed decreased TEWL values in the finger, sole, and first toe, as compared with participants with normal SSR test results. In the control group, age showed a negative correlation with the TEWL values with respect to some measured regions. However, in the diabetic group, there was no significant correlation between either patient age or diabetes duration and TEWL values.The presence of a long-term hyperglycemic state can reduce the permeability barrier function of the skin, a phenomenon that might be related to the presence of an impaired peripheral sympathetic nervous system, rather than peripheral sensorimotor

  15. High glucose increases glomerular filtration barrier permeability by activating protein kinase G type Iα subunits in a Nox4-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Audzeyenka, Irena; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a primary factor that disturbs podocyte function in the glomerular filtration process; this disturbance leads to the development of diabetic nephropathy, and ultimately, renal failure. Podocyte function may also be altered by biological agents that modify protein kinase activity, including the cGMP-activated protein kinase type Iα (PKGIα). We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-induced podocyte protein hyperpermeability was dependent on PKGIα activation, and that PKGIα was activated via dimerization induced by reactive oxygen species. This hypothesis was investigated in rat podocytes cultured in high glucose (HG, 30 mM). Protein expression was measured with Western blot and immunofluorescence. Podocyte permeability was measured with a transmembrane albumin flux assay. We found that HG increased podocyte permeability in long-term incubations (1, 3, and 5 days); permeability was increased by 66% on day 5. This effect was abolished with apocynin, a NAD(P)H inhibitor, and Rp-8-Br-cGMPS, a PKG inhibitor. It was also abolished by introducing small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against Nox4 and PKGIα into cultured podocytes. Furthermore, HG increased PKGIα dimerization by 138% (0.23 ± 0.04 vs. 0.54 ± 0.09; Pfiltration barrier via Nox4-dependent PKGIα dimerization. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Blood-brain barrier specific permeability assay reveals N-methylated tyramine derivatives in standardised leaf extracts and herbal products of Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könczöl, Árpád; Rendes, Kata; Dékány, Miklós; Müller, Judit; Riethmüller, Eszter; Balogh, György Tibor

    2016-11-30

    The linkage between the central nervous system availability and neuropharmacological activity of the constituents of Ginkgo biloba L. extracts (GBE) is still incomplete. In this study, the in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability profile of the standardised GBE was investigated by the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA). Biomarkers, such as terpene trilactones, flavonoid aglycones and ginkgotoxin exerted moderate or good BBB-permeability potential (BBB+), while glycosides and biflavones were predicted as unable to pass the BBB. N-methyltyramine (NMT) and N,N-dimethyltyramine or hordenine (Hor) were identified among BBB+ compounds, while subsequent direct HRMS analysis revealed tyramine (Tyr) and N,N,N-trimethyltyramine or candicine (Can) in GBE as trace constituents. Distribution of Tyr, NMT, Hor and Can was determined by a validated ion-exchange mechanism-based liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) method in G. biloba samples, such as herbal drugs and dietary supplements. The total content of the four tyramine derivatives in various GBEs ranged from 7.3 up to 6357μg/g dry extract with NMT and Hor as most abundant ones. Considering the pharmacological activities and the revealed fluctuation in the concentration of the analysed adrenergic protoalkaloids, the presented rapid LC-ESI-MS method is proposed for monitoring of the levels of Tyr, NMT, Hor and Can in G. biloba products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement of brain perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability, using dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted MRI at 3 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Courivaud, Frédéric; Rostrup, Egill; Hansen, Adam E

    2009-11-01

    Assessment of vascular properties is essential to diagnosis and follow-up and basic understanding of pathogenesis in brain tumors. In this study, a procedure is presented that allows concurrent estimation of cerebral perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain permeability from dynamic T(1)-weighted imaging of a bolus of a paramagnetic contrast agent passing through the brain. The methods are applied in patients with brain tumors and in healthy subjects. Perfusion was estimated by model-free deconvolution using Tikhonov's method (gray matter/white matter/tumor: 72 +/- 16/30 +/- 8/56 +/- 45 mL/100 g/min); blood volume (6 +/- 2/4 +/- 1/7 +/- 6 mL/100 g) and permeability (0.9 +/- 0.4/0.8 +/- 0.3/3 +/- 5 mL/100 g/min) were estimated by using Patlak's method and a two-compartment model. A corroboration of these results was achieved by using model simulation. In addition, it was possible to generate maps on a pixel-by-pixel basis of cerebral perfusion, cerebral blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Transferrin Functionalized Liposomes Loading Dopamine HCl: Development and Permeability Studies across an In Vitro Model of Human Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopalco, Antonio; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Denora, Nunzio; Lopedota, Angela; Franco, Massimo; Laquintana, Valentino

    2018-03-20

    The transport of dopamine across the blood brain barrier represents a challenge for the management of Parkinson's disease. The employment of central nervous system targeted ligands functionalized nanocarriers could be a valid tactic to overcome this obstacle and avoid undesirable side effects. In this work, transferrin functionalized dopamine-loaded liposomes were made by a modified dehydration-rehydration technique from hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcoline, cholesterol and 1,2-stearoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N -[carboxy(poly(ethylene glycol)-2000)]. The physical features of the prepared liposomes were established with successive determination of their endothelial permeability across an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, constituted by human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). Functionalized dopamine-loaded liposomes with encapsulation efficiency more than 35% were made with sizes in a range around 180 nm, polydispersity indices of 0.2, and positive zeta potential values (+7.5 mV). Their stability and drug release kinetics were also evaluated. The apparent permeability (P e ) values of encapsulated dopamine in functionalized and unfunctionalized liposomes showed that transferrin functionalized nanocarriers could represent appealing non-toxic candidates for brain delivery, thus improving benefits and decreasing complications to patients subjected to L-dopa chronical treatment.

  19. Using dissolved gas analysis to investigate the performance of an organic carbon permeable reactive barrier for the treatment of mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.L.; Mayer, K.U.; Amos, R.T.; Blowes, D.W.; Ptacek, C.J.; Bain, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    The strongly reducing nature of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) treatment materials can lead to gas production, potentially resulting in the formation of gas bubbles and ebullition. Degassing in organic C based PRB systems due to the production of gases (primarily CO2 and CH4) is investigated using the depletion of naturally occurring non-reactive gases Ar and N2, to identify, confirm, and quantify chemical and physical processes. Sampling and analysis of dissolved gases were performed at the Nickel Rim Mine Organic Carbon PRB, which was designed for the treatment of groundwater contaminated by low quality mine drainage characterized by slightly acidic pH, and elevated Fe(II) and SO4 concentrations. A simple 4-gas degassing model was used to analyze the dissolved gas data, and the results indicate that SO4 reduction is by far the dominant process of organic C consumption within the barrier. The data provided additional information to delineate rates of microbially mediated SO4 reduction and confirm the presence of slow and fast flow zones within the barrier. Degassing was incorporated into multicomponent reactive transport simulations for the barrier and the simulations were successful in reproducing observed dissolved gas trends.

  20. FIELD TEST INSTRUCTION 100-NR-2 OPERABLE UNIT DESIGN OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR SEQUESTRATION OF SR-90 SATURATED ZONE APATITE PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER EXTENSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOWLES NA

    2010-10-06

    The objective of this field test instruction is to provide technical guidance for aqueous injection emplacement of an extension apatite permeable reactive barrier (PRE) for the sequestration of strontium-90 (Sr-90) using a high concentration amendment formulation. These field activities will be conducted according to the guidelines established in DOE/RL-2010-29, 100-NR-2 Design Optimization Study, hereafter referred to as the DOS. The DOS supports the Federal Facility Agreement Consent Order (EPA et al., 1989), Milestone M-16-06-01, and 'Complete Construction of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at 100-N.' Injections of apatite precursor chemicals will occur at an equal distance intervals on each end of the existing PRE to extend the PRB from the existing 91 m (300 ft) to at least 274 m (900 ft). Field testing at the 100-N Area Apatite Treatability Test Site, as depicted on Figure 1, shows that the barrier is categorized by two general hydrologic conceptual models based on overall well capacity and contrast between the Hanford and Ringold hydraulic conductivities. The upstream portion of the original barrier, shown on Figure 1, is characterized by relatively low overall well specific capacity. This is estimated from well development data and a lower contrast in hydraulic conductivity between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formations. Comparison of test results from these two locations indicate that permeability contrast between the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation is significantly less over the upstream one-third of the barrier. The estimated hydraulic conductivity for the Hanford formation and Ringold Formation over the upstream portion of the barrier based on observations during emplacement of the existing 91 m (300 ft) PRB is approximately 12 and 10 m/day (39 and 32 ft/day), respectively (PNNL-17429). However, these estimates should be used as a rough guideline only, as significant variability in hydraulic conductivity is likely to be observed in

  1. Oxidative Stress Increases the Blood Brain Barrier Permeability Resulting in Increased Incidence of Brain Metastasis in BRCA Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Increased Incidence of Brain Metastasis in BRCA Mutation Carriers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hava Avraham, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Beth Israel...Permeability Resulting in Increased Incidence of Brain Metastasis in BRCA Mutation Carriers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0172 5c...significantly up-regulated with a decrease in cellular sensitivity to paclitaxel. Cells that harbor endogenous mutant or defective BRCA l (such as MDA-MB-436

  2. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class II...

  3. Minoxidil sulfate induced the increase in blood-brain tumor barrier permeability through ROS/RhoA/PI3K/PKB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan-ting; Xue, Yi-xue; Wang, Yan-feng; Wang, Jin-hui; Chen, Xia; ShangGuan, Qian-ru; Lian, Yan; Zhong, Lei; Meng, Ying-nan

    2013-12-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) activator, minoxidil sulfate (MS), can selectively increase the permeability of the blood-tumor barrier (BTB); however, the mechanism by which this occurs is still under investigation. Using a rat brain glioma (C6) model, we first examined the expression levels of occludin and claudin-5 at different time points after intracarotid infusion of MS (30 μg/kg/min) by western blotting. Compared to MS treatment for 0 min group, the protein expression levels of occludin and claudin-5 in brain tumor tissue of rats showed no changes within 1 h and began to decrease significantly after 2 h of MS infusion. Based on these findings, we then used an in vitro BTB model and selective inhibitors of diverse signaling pathways to investigate whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)/RhoA/PI3K/PKB pathway play a key role in the process of the increase of BTB permeability induced by MS. The inhibitor of ROS or RhoA or PI3K or PKB significantly attenuated the expression of tight junction (TJ) protein and the increase of the BTB permeability after 2 h of MS treatment. In addition, the significant increases in RhoA activity and PKB phosphorylation after MS administration were observed, which were partly inhibited by N-2-mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG) or C3 exoenzyme or LY294002 pretreatment. The present study indicates that the activation of signaling cascades involving ROS/RhoA/PI3K/PKB in BTB was required for the increase of BTB permeability induced by MS. Taken together, all of these results suggested that MS might increase BTB permeability in a time-dependent manner by down-regulating TJ protein expression and this effect could be related to ROS/RhoA/PI3K/PKB signal pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dietary Virgin Olive Oil Reduces Blood Brain Barrier Permeability, Brain Edema, and Brain Injury in Rats Subjected to Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mohagheghi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that dietary virgin olive oil (VOO reduces hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in rat brain slices. We sought to extend these observations in an in vivo study of rat cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Four groups, each consisting of 18 Wistar rats, were studied. One group (control received saline, while three treatment groups received oral VOO (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mL/kg/day, respectively. After 30 days, blood lipid profiles were determined, before a 60-min period of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. After 24-h reperfusion, neurological deficit scores, infarct volume, brain edema, and blood brain barrier permeability were each assessed in subgroups of six animals drawn from each main group. VOO reduced the LDL/HDL ratio in doses of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mL/kg/day in comparison to the control group (p < 0.05, and offered cerebroprotection from ischemia-reperfusion. For controls vs. doses of 0.25 vs. 0.5 vs. 0.75 mL/kg/day, attenuated corrected infarct volumes were 207.82 ± 34.29 vs. 206.41 ± 26.23 vs. 124.21 ± 14.73 vs. 108.46 ± 31.63 mm3; brain water content of the infarcted hemisphere was 82 ±± 0.25 vs. 81.5 ± 0.56 vs. 80.5 ± 0.22 vs. 80.5 ± 0.34%; and blood brain barrier permeability of the infarcted hemisphere was 11.31 ± 2.67 vs. 9.21 ± 2.28 vs. 5.83 ± 1.6 vs. 4.43 ± 0.93 µg/g tissue (p < 0.05 for measures in doses 0.5 and 0.75 mL/kg/day vs. controls. Oral administration of VOO reduces infarct volume, brain edema, blood brain barrier permeability, and improves neurologic deficit scores after transient MCAO in rats.

  5. Charge modification of the endothelial surface layer modulates the permeability barrier of isolated rat mesenteric small arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaren, Paul M. A.; VanBavel, Ed; Vink, Hans; Spaan, Jos A. E.

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that modulation of the effective charge density of the endothelial surface layer ( ESL) results in altered arterial barrier properties to transport of anionic solutes. Rat mesenteric small arteries ( diameter similar to 190 mu m) were isolated, cannulated, perfused, and superfused

  6. Combining Bone Marrow Stromal Cells with Green Tea Polyphenols Attenuates the Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Permeability in Rats with Compression Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, De-shui; Liu, Li-bo; Cao, Yang; Wang, Yan-song; Bi, Yun-long; Wei, Zi-Jian; Tong, Song-ming; Lv, Gang; Mei, Xi-fan

    2015-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) combined with green tea polyphenols (GTPs) on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) permeability after spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat model. In the model of SCI rats, we found that the water content and the BSCB permeability were decreased by BMSCs and GTPs treatment, and their combination had a synergistic effect. Further, the motor function of rats was also greatly improved by BMSCs and GTPs administration. After treated by the combination of BMSCs and GTPs, SCI rats showed the up-regulated expression of tight junction (TJ) associated proteins claudin-5, occludin and ZO-1 by Western blot, which was more remarkable than that in the single treatment. The increased expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 were the most obvious in the spinal cord microvessels using immunohistochemistry assay. This led to the conclusion that the combination of BMSCs and GTPs could decrease the BSCB permeability by up-regulating protein expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1. In addition, after BMSCs and GTPs administration, the results of Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed a significant decrease in protein expression level and the activation of nuclear factor-кB (NF-кB) p65. Our results indicated that combination of BMSCs and GTPs could improve motor function after SCI, which might be correlated with improvements in BSCB integrity, and that NF-кB might be involved in the modulating process.

  7. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier predicts no evidence of disease activity at two years after natalizumab or fingolimod treatment in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Stig P; Simonsen, Helle J; Varatharaj, Aravinthan; Galea, Ian; Frederiksen, Jette L; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2018-03-31

    To investigate if blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, as measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), can provide early detection of sub-optimal treatment response in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). 35 RRMS patients starting on fingolimod or natalizumab, drugs with a common effect of decreasing lymphocyte influx into the CNS, were scanned with DCE-MRI at 3T prior to treatment and at three and six-months post-treatment. We calculated the influx constant K i , a measure of BBB permeability, using the Patlak model. Sub-optimal treatment response was defined as loss of no evidence of disease activity (NEDA-3) status after two years of treatment. Subjects with loss of NEDA status at 2 years had a 51% higher mean K i in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) measured after six months of treatment, compared to subjects with maintained NEDA status (mean difference 0.06 (CI 0.02-0.09) ml/100g/min; p=0.002). K i in NAWM at 6 months was a good predictor of loss of NEDA status at two years (AUC 0.84, CI 0.70-0.99; p=0.003) and a value above 0.136 ml/100/g/min yielded an odds ratio of 12.4 for sub-optimal treatment response at 2 years, with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 82%. Our results suggest that BBB permeability as measured by DCE-MRI reliably predicts sub-optimal treatment response and is a surrogate marker of the state of health of the BBB. We find a predictive threshold for disease activity, which is remarkably identical in clinically isolated syndrome as previously reported and established RRMS as investigated here. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 American Neurological Association.

  8. Examination of blood-brain barrier permeability in dementia of the Alzheimer type with [68Ga]EDTA and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlageter, N.L.; Carson, R.E.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1987-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with [ 68 Ga]ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ([ 68 Ga]EDTA) was used to examine the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in five patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and in five healthy age-matched controls. Within a scanning time of 90 min, there was no evidence that measurable intravascular tracer entered the brain in either the dementia or the control group. An upper limit for the cerebrovascular permeability-surface area product of [68Ga]EDTA was estimated as 2 X 10(-6) s-1 in both groups. The results provide no evidence for breakdown of the BBB in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type

  9. Examination of blood-brain barrier permeability in dementia of the Alzheimer type with [68Ga]EDTA and positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, N L; Carson, R E; Rapoport, S I

    1987-02-01

    Positron emission tomography with [68Ga]ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ([68Ga]EDTA) was used to examine the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in five patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and in five healthy age-matched controls. Within a scanning time of 90 min, there was no evidence that measurable intravascular tracer entered the brain in either the dementia or the control group. An upper limit for the cerebrovascular permeability-surface area product of [68Ga]EDTA was estimated as 2 X 10(-6) s-1 in both groups. The results provide no evidence for breakdown of the BBB in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type.

  10. Examination of blood-brain barrier permeability in dementia of the Alzheimer type with (68Ga)EDTA and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlageter, N.L.; Carson, R.E.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1987-02-01

    Positron emission tomography with (/sup 68/Ga)ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ((/sup 68/Ga)EDTA) was used to examine the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in five patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and in five healthy age-matched controls. Within a scanning time of 90 min, there was no evidence that measurable intravascular tracer entered the brain in either the dementia or the control group. An upper limit for the cerebrovascular permeability-surface area product of (68Ga)EDTA was estimated as 2 X 10(-6) s-1 in both groups. The results provide no evidence for breakdown of the BBB in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type.

  11. Blood-retinal barrier glycerol permeability in diabetic macular edema and healthy eyes: estimations from macular volume changes after peroral glycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thornit, Dorte Nellemann; Vinten, Carl Martin; Sander, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the changes in macular volume (MV) between healthy subjects and patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) after an osmotic load and to determine the glycerol permeability (P(gly)) of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). METHODS: In this unmasked study, 13 patients with DME and 5...... model of glycerol and osmotic water movements across the BRB was constructed to estimate P(gly). RESULTS: Median MV decreased from 7.30 mm(3) (range, 6.68-7.35) to the maximum median DeltaMV of -0.30 mm(3) (25%-75% quartile: -0.34 to -0.25) in the healthy volunteers and from 7.97 mm(3) (range, 6...

  12. Utilization of coal/biomass fly ash and bentonite as a low permeability barrier for the containment of acid-generating mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penney, K.; Mohamedelhassan, E.; Catalan, L.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    The control and treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) in decommissioned mine sites is a major environmental challenge. In general, AMD has a low pH, high acidity, and elevated concentrations of heavy metals. This study investigated the use of coal/biomass fly ash (CBFA) and CBFA/bentonite mixtures as a low permeability seal to contain acid generating mine tailings and treat AMD. Although pure CBFA is effective as a reactive barrier to treat most toxic metals in AMD, its initial hydraulic conductivity exceeds the maximum regulatory requirement of 1 x 10 -7 cm/s. Therefore, 3 cases were investigated, notably CBFA only; CBFA amended with low percentages of bentonite; and layering of CBFA and CBFA amended with bentonite. Practical geoenvironmental applications for low permeability CBFA or bentonite/CBFA mixtures include a cap overlying reactive mine tailings, a containment pond liner, and a core in containment dams and dykes. Mixing 10 per cent by mass bentonite with CBFA decreased the hydraulic conductivity to 1 x 10 -7 cm/s or less throughout the entire permeation by water and AMD. The installation of a layer of pure CBFA upstream of the bentonite/CBFA mixture resulted in a further decrease in hydraulic conductivity over time by preventing the collapse of the bentonite double layer and promoting precipitation of gypsum and ettringite in the CBFA layer. The effluent from all tested bentonite/CBFA barriers met the regulatory requirements for chemical parameters, except for aluminum which was leached from the CBFA. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs.

  13. Aspiration of activated charcoal elicits an increase in lung microvascular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, T C; Willis, B H; Xiao, F; Conrad, S A; Carden, D L

    1999-01-01

    Gastric decontamination with orally administered activated charcoal is the recommended treatment for many poisonings. However, ingestion of central nervous system depressants resulting in loss of protective airway reflexes may result in pulmonary aspiration of activated charcoal. Although activated charcoal has been reported to be an inert substance, evidence suggests that pulmonary aspiration of charcoal is associated with lung edema formation and pulmonary compromise. This study tested the hypothesis that intratracheal instillation of activated charcoal disrupts the integrity of the lung microvascular barrier. The capillary filtration coefficient (Kf,c), a sensitive measure of lung microvascular permeability, was determined isogravimetrically prior to and after intratracheal instillation of activated charcoal 0.04 g/kg (12% weight/vol solution, pH 7.4) or an equal volume of sterile water in isolated, perfused rat lungs. Arterial blood gas analysis was determined prior to and after tracheal instillation of activated charcoal or sterile water in a separate group of animals. Intratracheal instillation of activated charcoal resulted in a significant increase in pulmonary microvascular permeability compared to lungs treated with sterile water or control lungs (delta Kf,c = +0.21 +/- 0.076; -0.014 +/- 0.04; and -0.041 +/- 0.02 mL/min/cm H2O/100 g lung tissue, respectively, p animals administered activated charcoal compared to time-matched controls and animals administered sterile water. Intratracheal instillation of activated charcoal is associated with a significant increase in lung microvascular permeability and arterial blood gas derangements. The effects of activated charcoal on pulmonary microvascular barrier integrity may contribute to the lung edema formation and pulmonary compromise observed following clinical aspiration of activated charcoal.

  14. Influence of Bevacizumab on Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability and O-(2-18F-Fluoroethyl)-l-Tyrosine Uptake in Rat Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmayr, Carina; Oliveira, Dennis; Niemietz, Nicole; Willuweit, Antje; Lohmann, Philipp; Galldiks, Norbert; Shah, N Jon; Ermert, Johannes; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2017-05-01

    Restoration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after antiangiogenic therapy of gliomas with bevacizumab may result in a decrease in contrast enhancement on MRI despite tumor progression. This so-called pseudoresponse is difficult to differentiate from a true tumor response with conventional MRI. Initial patient studies have indicated that PET using O -(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) may be helpful for solving this diagnostic problem. This study was performed to investigate the effects of bevacizumab on BBB permeability and 18 F-FET uptake in a human xenograft model. Methods: Human U87 glioblastoma cells were implanted into the striatum of immunodeficient RNU rats. 18 F-FET PET scans and ex vivo autoradiography were performed in animals receiving a single high dose of bevacizumab (45 mg/kg 2 d before PET; n = 9) or in animals receiving 2 lower doses (10 mg/kg 9 and 2 d before PET; n = 10) to evaluate short-term and long-term effects on the BBB, respectively, and in control animals without bevacizumab treatment ( n = 8). Time-activity curves, slope, and tumor-to-brain ratios of 18 F-FET uptake (18-61 min after injection) were evaluated using a volume-of-interest analysis. After PET scanning, Evans blue dye (EBD) was injected into animals, and cryosections of the brains were evaluated by autoradiography, by histology, and for EBD fluorescence to assess BBB permeability. Results: Compared with the control, short-term bevacizumab therapy resulted in a trend toward BBB restoration ( P = 0.055) and long-term therapy resulted in a significant decrease ( P = 0.004) in BBB permeability, as assessed by EBD fluorescence. In contrast, no significant differences in tumor-to-brain ratios or slope of 18 F-FET uptake were observed in PET and autoradiography ( P > 0.05). Conclusion: 8 F-FET uptake in glioblastomas seems to be largely independent of BBB permeability and reflects the viability of tumor tissue during antiangiogenic therapy more reliably than contrast

  15. Po2 temperature blood factor for blood gas apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teisseire, B P; Hérigault, R A; Teisseire, L J; Laurent, D N

    1984-01-01

    PO2 temperature formulae supplied by manufacturers on automatic blood gas apparatus, PO2 corr. = PO2 37 degrees C X 10F X delta T were studied and compared to the experimental determination of the delta log PO2/delta T ratio (Hérigault et al. [10]). Acid-base status at 37 degrees C appeared to have a measurable influence on the PO2 temperature factor; alkalosis increased the delta log PO2/delta T ratio, and the contrary was found for acidosis in comparison with normal acid-base status at 37 degrees C. For the same PO2, measured at 37 degrees C, all the proposed formulae of commercial blood gas automatic apparatus did not give the same temperature corrected PO2. The observed difference between the corrected PO2 may be important and greater than the precision of the initial measurement. To correct the measured PO2 for temperature, a relationship between delta log PO2/delta T and PO2 is proposed, between PO2 zero and PO2 180 mmHg, which takes into account measured pH and PO2 values at 37 degrees C:delta log PO2/delta T = [(-0.35 pH + 0.658) X 10(-4) X PO2] + 0.035.

  16. Blood gas analysis in Mangalarga Marchador horses with colic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiane F. Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aims to distinguish blood gas changes in horses with colic syndrome in which small or large intestine is affected. Materials and methods. Thirty Mangalarga Marchador horses were assessed, divided into groups according to the affected intestinal segment in episodes of colic syndrome (ECS: a group (N=10 of horses suffering from ECS with lesions only in the small intestine, a group (N=10 of horses suffering from ECS with lesions only in the large intestine and a group (N=10 of healthy horses (control. All the animals with ECS were submitted to exploratory laparotomy in order to establish the intestinal segment affected. Blood samples were collected by venipuncture, before surgical procedure to determine sodium, potassium, chloride, urea, glucose, hematocrit, hemoglobin, pH, carbon dioxide partial pressure, total carbon dioxide concentration, bicarbonate, base excess and anion gap. Results. No significant changes were found in plasma levels of Na+, K+, Cl-, pCO2 and anion gap in any type of ECS. Horses with small intestine injuries presented higher levels of tCO2, urea and bicarbonate compared to those with large intestine injuries and to the control group, as well as higher levels of glucose and base excess than the control group. Conclusions. Horses with colic syndrome bearing small intestine injuries show wider variations in the blood gas parameters than horses with large bowel lesions.

  17. A Novel Algorithm for the Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Suggests That Brain Topical Application of Endothelin-1 Does Not Cause Early Opening of the Barrier in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jorks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of different experimental methods for ex vivo assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB opening based on Evans blue dye extravasation. However, these methods require many different steps to prepare the brain and need special equipment for quantification. We here report a novel, simple, and fast semiquantitative algorithm to assess BBB integrity ex vivo. The method is particularly suitable for cranial window experiments, since it keeps the spatial information about where the BBB opened. We validated the algorithm using sham controls and the established model of brain topical application of the bile salt dehydrocholate for early BBB disruption. We then studied spreading depolarizations in the presence and the absence of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 and found no evidence of early BBB opening (three-hour time window. The algorithm can be used, for example, to assess BBB permeability ex vivo in combination with dynamic in vivo studies of BBB opening.

  18. The blood-retinal barrier permeability to fluorescein in normal subjects and in juvenile diabetics without retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsaa, B; Lund-Andersen, H; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    .1 +/- 0.4) X 10(-7) cm/sec (mean +/- 2 X SD) and in juvenile diabetics (1.1 +/- 0.7) X 10(-7) cm/sec (mean +/- 2 X SD). Thus a break-down of the blood-retinal barrier cannot be demonstrated as a very early and general phenomenon in the early course of the diabetic disease. The fluorescein diffusion...... coefficient in the vitreous body was determined and juvenile diabetics without apparent retinopathy showed a diffusion coefficient of (0.80 +/- 0.25) X 10(-5) cm2/sec (mean +/- 2 X SD), which was the same as in normals where the diffusion coefficient was (0.69 +/- 0.46) X 10(-5) cm2/sec (mean +/- 2 X SD)....

  19. Effects of Pringle maneuver and partial hepatectomy on the pharmacokinetics and blood-brain barrier permeability of sodium fluorescein in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Mohammad K; Shaik, Imam H; Bickel, Ulrich; Mehvar, Reza

    2015-08-27

    Liver diseases are known to affect the function of remote organs. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Pringle maneuver, which results in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, and partial hepatectomy (Hx) on the pharmacokinetics and brain distribution of sodium fluorescein (FL), which is a widely used marker of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Rats were subjected to Pringle maneuver (total hepatic ischemia) for 20 min with (HxIR) or without (IR) 70% hepatectomy. Sham-operated animals underwent laparotomy only. After 15 min or 8h of reperfusion, a single 25-mg/kg dose of FL was injected intravenously and serial (0-30 min) blood and bile and terminal brain samples were collected. Total and free (ultrafiltration) plasma, total brain homogenate, and bile concentrations of FL and/or its glucuronidated metabolite (FL-Glu) were determined by HPLC. Both IR and HxIR caused significant reductions in the biliary excretions of FL and FL-Glu, resulting in significant increases in the plasma AUC of the marker. Additionally, the free fraction of FL in plasma was significantly increased by HxIR. Although the brain concentrations of FL were increased by almost twofold in both IR and HxIR animals, the brain concentrations corrected by the free FL AUC (and not the total AUC) were similar in both groups at either time points. It is concluded that Pringle maneuver and/or partial hepatectomy substantially alters the hepatobiliary disposition, plasma AUC, plasma free fraction, and brain accumulation of FL without altering the BBB permeability to the marker. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo EPR pharmacokinetic evaluation of the redox status and the blood brain barrier permeability in the SOD1G93A ALS rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenković, Stefan; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Mojović, Miloš; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Selaković, Vesna; Andjus, Pavle; Bačić, Goran

    2017-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the motor pathways of the central nervous system. Although a number of pathophysiological mechanisms have been described in the disease, post mortem and animal model studies indicate blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and elevated production of reactive oxygen species as major contributors to disease pathology. In this study, the BBB permeability and the brain tissue redox status of the SOD1 G93A ALS rat model in the presymptomatic (preALS) and symptomatic (ALS) stages of the disease were investigated by in vivo EPR spectroscopy using three aminoxyl radicals with different cell membrane and BBB permeabilities, Tempol, 3-carbamoyl proxyl (3CP), and 3-carboxy proxyl (3CxP). Additionally, the redox status of the two brain regions previously implicated in disease pathology, brainstem and hippocampus, was investigated by spectrophotometric biochemical assays. The EPR results indicated that among the three spin probes, 3CP is the most suitable for reporting the intracellular redox status changes, as Tempol was reduced in vivo within minutes (t 1/2 =2.0±0.5min), thus preventing reliable kinetic modeling, whereas 3CxP reduction kinetics gave divergent conclusions, most probably due to its membrane impermeability. It was observed that the reduction kinetics of 3CP in vivo, in the head of preALS and ALS SOD1 G93A rats was altered compared to the controls. Pharmacokinetic modeling of 3CP reduction in vivo, revealed elevated tissue distribution and tissue reduction rate constants indicating an altered brain tissue redox status, and possibly BBB disruption in these animals. The preALS and ALS brain tissue homogenates also showed increased nitrilation, superoxide production, lipid peroxidation and manganese superoxide dismutase activity, and a decreased copper-zinc superoxide dismutase activity. The present study highlights in vivo EPR spectroscopy as a reliable tool for the investigation of

  1. Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Model after Localized Brain Cooling in Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Soo [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Koo [Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Mi Jung [Department of Pathology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Phil Hye [Department of Neurology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Young-Su [Department of Industrial Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dae Young [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 05355 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jeong [Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 07441 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwan Seop [Department of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang 14068 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20℃) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min{sup -1} vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min{sup -1}, p = 0.661 for K{sup trans}; 0.30 ± 0.05 min{sup -1} vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min{sup -1}, p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Localized brain cooling (20℃) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group.

  2. Assessment of blood-brain barrier permeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model after localized brain cooling in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Kwan Seop; Kwon, Mi Jung; Ju, Young Su [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Koo; Lee, Phil Hye [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dae Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20 .deg. ) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37 .deg. ) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min{sup -1} vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min{sup -1},p = 0.661 for K{sup trans}; 0.30 ± 0.05 min{sup -1} vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min{sup -1},p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Localized brain cooling (20 .deg. ) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37 .deg. ) infusion group.

  3. Influence of blood-brain barrier permeability on O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine uptake in rat gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegmayr, Carina; Bandelow, Ulrike; Oliveira, Dennis; Lohmann, Philipp; Willuweit, Antje; Galldiks, Norbert; Luebke, Joachim H.R. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Filss, Christian; Ermert, Johannes; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); RWTH/University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); RWTH/University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) is an established tracer for the diagnosis of brain tumors with PET. This study investigates the influence of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability on {sup 18}F-FET uptake in two rat glioma models and one human xenograft model. F98 glioma, 9L gliosarcoma or human U87 glioblastoma cells were implanted into the striatum of 56 Fischer or RNU rats. Thereafter, animals were divided into a control group and a group receiving injections of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex). After 12-13 days of tumor growth animals received injection of Evans blue dye (EBD) to visualize BBB disturbance and underwent {sup 18}F-FET PET followed by autoradiography. Time activity curves, standardized uptake values (SUV) and Tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake [18-61 min post injection (p.i.)] were evaluated using a volume-of-Interest (VOI) analysis. BBB disturbance was quantitatively evaluated by EBD fluorescence. The membrane gaps of blood vessel endothelial tight junctions were measured using electron microscopy to visualize ultrastructural BBB alterations in one untreated and one Dex treated F98 glioma. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVAs. In Dex treated animals EBD extravasation was significantly reduced in 9L (P < 0.001) and U87 (P = 0.008) models and showed a trend in F98 models (P = 0.053). In contrast, no significant differences of {sup 18}F-FET uptake were observed between Dex treated animals and control group except a decrease of the TBR in the 9L tumor model in PET (P < 0.01). Ultrastructural evaluation of tumor blood vessel endothelia revealed significant reduction of the cleft diameter between endothelial cells after Dex treatment in F98 model (P = 0.010). Despite a considerable reduction of BBB permeability in rat gliomas after Dex treatment, no relevant changes of {sup 18}F-FET uptake were noted in this experimental study. Thus, {sup 18}F-FET uptake in gliomas appears to be widely independent of the

  4. Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Transient Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Model after Localized Brain Cooling in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kwon, Mi Jung; Lee, Phil Hye; Ju, Young-Su; Yoon, Dae Young; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kwan Seop

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of localized brain cooling on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in rats, by using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Thirty rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each: control group, localized cold-saline (20℃) infusion group, and localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded for 1 hour in anesthetized rats, followed by 3 hours of reperfusion. In the localized saline infusion group, 6 mL of cold or warm saline was infused through the hollow filament for 10 minutes after MCA occlusion. DCE-MRI investigations were performed after 3 hours and 24 hours of reperfusion. Pharmacokinetic parameters of the extended Tofts-Kety model were calculated for each DCE-MRI. In addition, rotarod testing was performed before tMCAO, and on days 1-9 after tMCAO. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohisto-chemistry was performed to identify infiltrating neutrophils associated with the inflammatory response in the rat brain. Permeability parameters showed no statistical significance between cold and warm saline infusion groups after 3-hour reperfusion 0.09 ± 0.01 min -1 vs. 0.07 ± 0.02 min -1 , p = 0.661 for K trans ; 0.30 ± 0.05 min -1 vs. 0.37 ± 0.11 min -1 , p = 0.394 for kep, respectively. Behavioral testing revealed no significant difference among the three groups. However, the percentage of MPO-positive cells in the cold-saline group was significantly lower than those in the control and warm-saline groups (p < 0.05). Localized brain cooling (20℃) does not confer a benefit to inhibit the increase in BBB permeability that follows transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in an animal model, as compared with localized warm-saline (37℃) infusion group

  5. Differential blood-brain barrier permeabilities to [14C]sucrose and [3H]inulin after osmotic opening in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziylan, Y.Z.; Robinson, P.J.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (B-BB) in 3-month-old rats was opened unilaterally by infusing 1.8 m L(+)arabinose in water into the internal carotid artery through a catheter in the external carotid. Two poorly penetrating uncharged test radiotracers of differing molecular weight and size, [ 14 C]sucrose (340 daltons, radius 5 A) and [ 3 H]inulin (5500 daltons, radius 15 A), were simultaneously injected i.v. in untreated rats, or rats at 1, 30, or 50 min after infusion of hypertonic arabinose solution. Evans-blue solution was injected 5 min prior to osmotic treatment as a visual indicator of barrier integrity. In regions of uninfused control brains, the [ 14 C]sucrose permeability-surface area (PA) product approximated 10(-5) s-1, whereas PA was not measurable for [ 3 H]inulin. In arabinose-infused animals, PA products on the ipsilateral hemisphere for both [ 14 C]sucrose and [ 3 H]inulin were markedly elevated 6 min after infusion, but decreased by 35 and 55 min. In nearly all regions, statistically significant differences were not found between 6-min [ 14 C]sucrose- and [ 3 H]inulin-PA values (P greater than 0.05). However, at 35 and 55 min in most regions, the PA for [ 3 H]inulin was significantly lower (P less than 0.05) than PA for [ 14 C]sucrose. The results indicated that the B-BB closed more rapidly to larger than to smaller molecules after osmotic treatment and were consistent with a pore model for osmotic B-BB opening

  6. Remediation of nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater using a pilot-scale two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification permeable reactive barrier with spongy iron/pine bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoxin; Huang, Yuanying; Hu, Hongyan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Renwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was proposed for remediating nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater in an oxygen rich environment, which has a packing structure of an upstream pine bark layer and a downstream spongy iron and river sand mixture layer. The HAD PRB involves biological deoxygenation, heterotrophic denitrification, hydrogenotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic Fe corrosion. Column and batch experiments were performed to: (1) investigate the NO3(-)-N removal and inorganic geochemistry; (2) explore the nitrogen transformation and removal mechanisms; (3) identify the hydrogenotrophic denitrification capacity; and (4) evaluate the HAD performance by comparison with other approaches. The results showed that the HAD PRB could maintain constant high NO3(-)-N removal efficiency (>91%) before 38 pore volumes (PVs) of operation (corresponding to 504d), form little or even negative NO2(-)-N during the 45 PVs, and produce low NH4(+)-N after 10 PVs. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria played a dominant role in oxygen depletion via aerobic respiration, providing more CO2 for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The HAD PRB significantly relied on heterotrophic denitrification. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification removed 10-20% of the initial NO3(-)-N. Effluent total organic carbon decreased from 403.44mgL(-1) at PV 1 to 9.34mgL(-1) at PV 45. Packing structure had a noticeable effect on its denitrification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Interrelations between blood-brain barrier permeability and matrix metalloproteinases are differently affected by tissue plasminogen activator and hyperoxia in a rat model of embolic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski Dominik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In ischemic stroke, blood-brain barrier (BBB regulations, typically involving matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and inhibitors (TIMPs as mediators, became interesting since tissue plasminogen activator (tPA-related BBB breakdown with risk of secondary hemorrhage was considered to involve these mediators too. Despite high clinical relevance, detailed interactions are purely understood. After a pilot study addressing hyperoxia as potential neuroprotective co-treatment to tPA, we analyzed interrelations between BBB permeability (BBB-P, MMPs and TIMPs. Findings Rats underwent embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion (eMCAO and treatment with normobaric (NBO or hyperbaric oxygen (HBO, tPA, tPA+HBO, or no treatment. BBB-P was assessed by intravenously applied FITC-albumin at 4 or 24 hours. MMP-2/-9 and TIMP-1/-2 serum levels were determined at 5 or 25 hours. Time point-corrected partial correlations were used to explore interrelations of BBB-P in ischemic regions (extra-/intravasal FITC-albumin ratio and related serum markers. BBB-P correlated positively with MMP-2 and MMP-9 in controls, whereas hyperoxia led to an inverse association, most pronounced for HBO/MMP-9 (r = -0.606; P Conclusions HBO was found to reverse the positively directed interrelation of BBB-P and MMPs after eMCAO, but this effect failed to sustain in the expected amount when HBO and tPA were given simultaneously.

  8. Effects of propranolol and clonidine on brain edema, blood-brain barrier permeability, and endothelial glycocalyx disruption after fluid percussion brain injury in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Bentzer, Peter; Hansen, Morten Bagge

    2018-01-01

    ), vehicle (n = 16), or sham (n = 5) for 24 hours. Primary outcome was brain water content at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were blood-brain barrier permeability and plasma levels of syndecan-1 (glycocalyx disruption), cell damage (histone-complexed DNA fragments), epinephrine, norepinephrine, and animal...... motor function. RESULTS: We found no difference in brain water content (mean ± SD) between propranolol (80.8 ± 0.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 80.7-81.0) and vehicle (81.1 ± 0.6%; 95% CI, 80.8-81.4) (p = 0.668) or between propranolol/clonidine (80.8 ± 0.3%; 95% CI, 80.7-81.0) and vehicle (p = 0...... beta-blockade with propranolol or the combination of propranolol and the alfa2-agonist clonidine on brain water content. The novel finding of an increase in plasma concentrations of epinephrine and syndecan-1 after propranolol treatment in traumatic brain injury is of unclear significance and should...

  9. Remediation of the Highland Drive South Ravine, Port Hope, Ontario: Contaminated Groundwater Discharge Management Using Permeable Reactive Barriers and Contaminated Sediment Removal - 13447

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, David; Roos, Gillian; Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Case, Glenn; Yule, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The Highland Drive South Ravine (HDSR) is the discharge area for groundwater originating from the Highland Drive Landfill, the Pine Street North Extension (PSNE) roadbed parts of the Highland Drive roadbed and the PSNE Consolidation Site that contain historical low-level radioactive waste (LLRW). The contaminant plume from these LLRW sites contains elevated concentrations of uranium and arsenic and discharges with groundwater to shallow soils in a wet discharge area within the ravine, and directly to Hunt's Pond and Highland Drive South Creek, which are immediately to the south of the wet discharge area. Remediation and environmental management plans for HDSR have been developed within the framework of the Port Hope Project and the Port Hope Area Initiative. The LLRW sites will be fully remediated by excavation and relocation to a new Long-Term Waste Management Facility (LTWMF) as part of the Port Hope Project. It is projected, however, that the groundwater contaminant plume between the remediated LLRW sites and HDSR will persist for several hundreds of years. At the HDSR, sediment remediation within Hunt's Ponds and Highland Drive South Creek, excavation of the existing and placement of clean fill will be undertaken to remove current accumulations of solid-phase uranium and arsenic associated with the upper 0.75 m of soil in the wet discharge area, and permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) will be used for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater to prevent the ongoing discharge of uranium and arsenic to the area in HDSR where shallow soil excavation and replacement has been undertaken. Bench-scale testing using groundwater from HDSR has confirmed excellent treatment characteristics for both uranium and arsenic using permeable reactive mixtures containing granular zero-valent iron (ZVI). A sequence of three PRBs containing ZVI and sand in backfilled trenches has been designed to intercept the groundwater flow system prior to its discharge to the ground surface

  10. Regional quality control survey of blood-gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minty, B D; Nunn, J F

    1977-09-01

    We undertook an external quality control survey of blood-gas analysis in 16 laboratories at 13 hospitals. All samples were prepared in the laboratories under investigation by equilibration of blood or serum with gas mixtures of known composition. pH of serum was measured with no significant bias but with an SD of random error 0.026 pH units, which was almost twice the SD of the reference range (0.015). An acceptable random error (half SD of reference range) was not obtained in a longitudinal internal quality control suvey although there were acceptable results for buffer pH in both field and internal surveys. Blood PO2 was measured with no significant bias but with SD of random error 1.38 kPa which reduced to 0.72 kPa by excluding one egregious result. The latter value was just over half of the SD of the reference range (1.2 kPa). PCO2 of blood was also measured without significant bias but with a much smaller SD of random error of 0.28 kPa (by excluding one egregious result), which was again just over half the SD of the reference range (0.51 kPa). Measurements of blood PO2 and PCO2 seem generally acceptable in relation to their respective reference ranges but measurements of pH were unsatisfactory in both internal and external trials.

  11. Blood-brain barrier permeability and neuroprotective effects of three main alkaloids from the fruits of Euodia rutaecarpa with MDCK-pHaMDR cell monolayer and PC12 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Nan; Yang, Yan-Fang; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2018-02-01

    The fruits of Euodia rutaecarpa (Euodiae Fructus, EF), the widely used traditional Chinese medicine, have various central nervous system effects. Alkaloids following as evodiamine (EDM), rutaecarpine (RCP) and dehydroevodiamine (DEDM) are the major substances in EF. The MDCK-pHaMDR cell monolayer model was utilized as a blood-brain barrier (BBB) surrogate model to study their BBB permeability. The transport samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and the apparent permeability coefficients (P app ) were calculated. EDM and RCP showed high permeability through BBB by passive diffusion, while DEDM showed moderate permeability with efflux mechanism related to P-glycoprotein (P-gp). EDM and RCP could also reduce the efflux of DEDM probably by inhibiting P-gp. The neuroprotective effects of the three alkaloids were then studied on the PC12 cell line injured by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP + ) or hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). EDM could significantly reduce MPP + or H 2 O 2 -induced cell injury dose-dependently. RCP could increase the cell viability in MPP + treated group while DEDM showed a protective effect against H 2 O 2 injury. This study predicted the permeability of EDM, RCP and DEDM through BBB and discovered the neuroprotective substance basis of EF as a potential encephalopathy drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Dissolved Organic Matter and Geochemical Controls on Arsenic Cycling from Sediments to Groundwater along the Meghna River, Bangladesh: Tracking possible links to permeable natural reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S.; Berube, M.; Knappett, P.; Kulkarni, H. V.; Vega, M.; Jewell, K.; Myers, K.

    2017-12-01

    extent of As accumulation in the sediments and groundwater along a 1 km stretch of the Meghna. These findings contribute to the overall understanding of geochemical processes involved in As release into groundwaters from sediments within a fluvial deltaic environment and close proximity to a possible permeable natural reactive barrier.

  13. CLDN5 affects lncRNAs acting as ceRNA dynamics contributing to regulating blood‑brain barrier permeability in tumor brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shun-Chang; Li, Qi; Peng, Jia-Yi; Zhouwen, Jian-Long; Zhang, Dai-Nan; Zhang, Chuan-Bao; Jiang, Wen-Guo; Jia, Wang

    2018-03-01

    The blood‑brain barrier (BBB) constitutes an efficient organization of tight junctions that limits the delivery of tumor to the brain. The principal tight junction protein in BBB is claudin‑5 (CLDN5), but its mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Long non‑coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are aberrantly expressed in many cancers, some lncRNAs play key roles in regulating BBB permeability and are involved in tumor brain metastasis. In particular, lncRNAs can function as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs). Herein, we investigated whether ceRNA dysregulation is associated with alterations of the level of CLDN5 in human brain vascular endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells. The Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 and Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA 4.0 Array were used to detect the expression levels of 2,578 miRNAs, 22,829 lncRNAs, and 44,699 mRNAs in pLL3.7‑CLDN5‑transfected and pLL3.7 control hCMEC/D3 cells. The distinctly expressed miRNAs, lncRNAs, and mRNAs were subjected to construction of miRNA‑lncRNA‑mRNA interaction network. A total of 41 miRNAs, 954 lncRNAs, and 222 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between the CLDN5‑overexpressing and control group. 148 lncRNA acting as ceRNAs were identified based on the miRNA‑lncRNA‑mRNA interaction network. The function of differential mRNA in the network was determined by GO and pathway analysis. The potential roles of the 27 ceRNAs were revealed, the possible biology functions of these regulatory ceRNAs mainly included tight junction, focal adhesion, cell‑cell adhesion, cell growth and apoptosis. The identified sets of miRNAs, lncRNAs and mRNAs specific to CLDN5‑overexpressing hCMEC/D3 cells were verified by quantitative real‑time RT‑PCR experiment. Our study predicts the biological functions of a multitude of ceRNAs associated with the alteration of CLDN5 in brain vascular endothelial cells. Our data suggest that these dysregulated ceRNAs, in conjunction with the high CLDN5 levels, could serve

  14. microRNA-4516 Contributes to Different Functions of Epithelial Permeability Barrier by Targeting Poliovirus Receptor Related Protein 1 in Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Hu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71 and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16 remain the predominant etiological agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. The clinical manifestations caused by the two viruses are obviously different. CV-A16 usually triggers a repeated infection, and airway epithelial integrity is often the potential causative factor of respiratory repeated infections. Our previous studies have demonstrated that there were some differentially expressed miRNAs involved in the regulation of adhesion function of epithelial barrier in EV-A71 and CV-A16 infections. In this study, we compared the differences between EV-A71 and CV-A16 infections on the airway epithelial barrier function in human bronchial epithelial (16HBE cells and further screened the key miRNA which leaded to the formation of these differences. Our results showed that more rapid proliferation, more serious destruction of 16HBE cells permeability, more apoptosis and disruption of intercellular adhesion-associated molecules were found in CV-A16 infection as compared to EV-A71 infection. Furthermore, we also identified that microRNA-4516 (miR-4516, which presented down-regulation in EV-A71 infection and up-regulation in CV-A16 infection was an important regulator of intercellular junctions by targeting Poliovirus receptor related protein 1(PVRL1. The expressions of PVRL1, claudin4, ZO-1 and E-cadherin in CV-A16-infected cells were significantly less than those in EV-A71-infected cells, while the expressions of these proteins were subverted when pre-treated with miR-4516-overexpression plasmid in EV-A71 infected and miR-4516-knockdown plasmid in CV-A16 infected 16HBE cells. Thus, these data suggested that the opposite expression of miR-4516 in EV-A71 and CV-A16 infections might be the initial steps leading to different epithelial impairments of 16HBE cells by destroying intercellular adhesion, which finally resulted in different outcomes of EV-A71 and CV-A16 infections.

  15. Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, Lee D.; Korte, N.; Baker, J.

    2005-12-14

    The objective of this work was to conduct laboratory and field experiments to determine the sensitivity of low frequency electrical measurements (resistivity and induced polarization) to the processes of corrosion and precipitation that are believed to limit permeable reactive barrier (PRB) performance. The research was divided into four sets of experiments that were each written up and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal: [1] A laboratory experiment to define the controls of aqueous chemistry (electrolyte activity; pH; valence) and total zero valent iron (Fe0) available surface area on the electrical properties of Fe0 columns. [2] A laboratory experiment to determine the impact of corrosion and precipitation on the electrical response of synthetic Fe0 columns as a result of geochemical reactions with NaSO4 and NaCO3 electrolytes. [3] Laboratory experiments on a sequence of cores retrieved from the Kansas City PRB to determine the magnitude of electrical and geochemical changes within a field active PRB after eight years of operation [4] Field-scale cross borehole resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of the Kansas City PRB to evaluate the potential of electrical imaging as a technology for non-invasive, long-term monitoring of indicators of reduced PRB performance This report first summarizes the findings of the four major experiments conducted under this research. The reader is referred to the four papers in Appendices 1-4 for a full description of each experiment, including motivation and significance, technical details, findings and implications. The deliverables of the project, including the publications, conference papers and new collaborative arrangements that have resulted are then described. Appendices 5-6 contain two technical reports written by co-PI Korte describing (1) supporting geochemical measurements, and (2) the coring procedure, conducted at the Kansas City PRB as part of this project.

  16. Remediation of persistent organic pollutant-contaminated soil using biosurfactant-enhanced electrokinetics coupled with a zero-valent iron/activated carbon permeable reactive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuchao; Gao, Ke; Zhang, Yun; Zou, Hua

    2017-12-01

    Zero-valent iron/activated carbon (Fe/C) particles can degrade persistent organic pollutants via micro-electrolysis and therefore, they may be used to develop materials for permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). In this study, surfactant-enhanced electrokinetics (EK) was coupled with a Fe/C-PRB to treat phenanthrene (PHE) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) co-contaminated clay soil. An environment-friendly biosurfactant, rhamnolipid, was selected as the solubility-enhancing agent. Five bench-scale tests were conducted to investigate the performance of EK-PRB on PHE and TCP removal from soil as well as the impact of pH and rhamnolipid concentration. The results show that both PHE and TCP, driven by electro-osmotic flow (EOF), moved toward the cathode and reacted with the Fe/C-PRB. Catholyte acidification and rhamnolipid concentration increase improved the removal efficiencies of PHE and TCP. The highest removal efficiency of PHE in soil column was five times the efficiency of the control group on which only EK was applied (49.89 versus 9.40%). The highest removal efficiency of TCP in soil column was 4.5 times the efficiency of the control group (64.60 versus 14.30%). Desorption and mobility of PHE and TCP improved with the increase of rhamnolipid concentration when this exceeded the critical micelle concentration. This study indicates that the combination of EK and a Fe/C-PRB is efficient and promising for removing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from contaminated soil with the enhancement of rhamnolipid.

  17. The proton permeability of self-assembled polymersomes and their neuroprotection by enhancing a neuroprotective peptide across the blood-brain barrier after modification with lactoferrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Jiang, Xinguo; Gong, Shuyu; Feng, Liang; Zhong, Yanqiang; Pang, Zhiqing

    2014-02-01

    Biotherapeutics such as peptides possess strong potential for the treatment of intractable neurological disorders. However, because of their low stability and the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), biotherapeutics are difficult to transport into brain parenchyma via intravenous injection. Herein, we present a novel poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymersome-based nanomedicine with self-assembled bilayers, which was functionalized with lactoferrin (Lf-POS) to facilitate the transport of a neuroprotective peptide into the brain. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D*) of H+ through the polymersome membrane was 5.659 × 10-26 cm2 s-1, while that of liposomes was 1.017 × 10-24 cm2 s-1. The stability of the polymersome membrane was much higher than that of liposomes. The uptake of polymersomes by mouse brain capillary endothelial cells proved that the optimal density of lactoferrin was 101 molecules per polymersome. Fluorescence imaging indicated that Lf101-POS was effectively transferred into the brain. In pharmacokinetics, compared with transferrin-modified polymersomes and cationic bovine serum albumin-modified polymersomes, Lf-POS obtained the greatest BBB permeability surface area and percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID per g). Furthermore, Lf-POS holding S14G-humanin protected against learning and memory impairment induced by amyloid-β25-35 in rats. Western blotting revealed that the nanomedicine provided neuroprotection against over-expression of apoptotic proteins exhibiting neurofibrillary tangle pathology in neurons. The results indicated that polymersomes can be exploited as a promising non-invasive nanomedicine capable of mediating peptide therapeutic delivery and controlling the release of drugs to the central nervous system.

  18. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Environmental Science and Engineering Div.; Lowe, K.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Murdoch, L.D. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Slack, W.W. [FRx, Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Houk, T.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Piketon, OH (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies.

  19. Recovery of Cr as Cr(III) from Cr(VI)-contaminated kaolinite clay by electrokinetics coupled with a permeable reactive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tasuma; Kawai, Katsunori; Moribe, Mai; Niinae, Masakazu

    2014-08-15

    Zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) and magnetite (Fe3O4) were investigated as potential reductants in an electrokinetic/permeable reactive barrier hybrid system (EK/PRB) for the recovery of Cr as Cr(III) from Cr(VI)-contaminated kaolinite. For the EK/Fe(0) PRB, regardless of the pH in the anode well, the system facilitated the reduction of Cr(VI) into Cr(III), but the recovery of the Cr(III) in the PRB was low. Conversely, the reduction of Cr(VI) occurred only in the PRB for the EK/Fe3O4 PRB. However, when the anode pH was not controlled and the soil pH values correspondingly decreased gradually from the anode side, a greater fraction of Cr(VI) sorbed onto the kaolinite; as a result, a lower amount of Cr(VI) migrated to the Fe3O4 PRB. In addition, it was found that the majority of Cr(VI) migrating to the Fe3O4 PRB retained its oxidation state without being converted into Cr(III). These two adverse effects were mitigated by maintaining the soil pH values at 6.8, but at the same time, 18% of Cr(VI) penetrated through the Fe3O4 PRB. The penetration of Cr(VI) through the Fe3O4 PRB was successfully prevented by increasing the reaction time through the introduction of a cation exchange membrane between the Fe3O4 PRB and the anode well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential artifacts in interpretation of differential breakthrough of colloids and dissolved tracers in the context of transport in a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Johnson, W.P.; Piana, M.J.; Fuller, C.C.; Naftz, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Many published studies have used visual comparison of the timing of peak breakthrough of colloids versus conservative dissolved tracers (hereafter referred to as dissolved tracers or tracers) in subsurface media to determine whether they are advected differently, and to elucidate the mechanisms of differential advection. This purely visual approach of determining differential advection may have artifacts, however, due to the attachment of colloids to subsurface media. The attachment of colloids to subsurface media may shift the colloidal peak breakthrough to earlier times, causing an apparent "faster" peak breakthrough of colloids relative to dissolve tracers even though the transport velocities for the colloids and the dissolved tracers may actually be equivalent. In this paper, a peak shift analysis was presented to illustrate the artifacts associated with the purely visual approach in determining differential advection, and to quantify the peak shift due to colloid attachment. This peak shift analysis was described within the context of microsphere and bromide transport within a zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) located in Fry Canyon, Utah. Application of the peak shift analysis to the field microsphere and bromide breakthrough data indicated that differential advection of the microspheres relative to the bromide occurred in the monitoring wells closest to the injection well in the PRB. It was hypothesized that the physical heterogeneity at the grain scale, presumably arising from differences in inter- versus intra-particle porosity, contributed to the differential advection of the microspheres versus the bromide in the PRB. The relative breakthrough (RB) of microspheres at different wells was inversely related to the ionic strength of ground water at these wells, in agreement with numerous studies showing that colloid attachment is directly related to solution ionic strength.

  1. Permeable Reactive Barrier: Technology Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    munitions compounds, zeolites for treating radionuclides and heavy metals, and “transformed redmud” (a waste material formed from bauxite ore during...acid mine drainage). The materials included straw, newspaper, raw cotton, alfalfa, wheat straw, jute pellets, vegetable oil, compost, leaf mulch, wood...and Ptacek (1997) and Benner et al. (1999, 2002) installed an organic-carbon PRB in an aquifer affected by acid- mine drainage derived from a sulfidic

  2. Crustal permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Tom; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth’s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures.  The practical importance of permeability – and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability – is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production (“fracking”), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration.  Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment.  This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. 

  3. Radial artery pseudoaneurysm: A rare complication after a single arterial puncture for blood-gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kajal Nitin; Gandhi, Shruti P; Sutariya, Harsh C

    2016-10-01

    With a reported incidence of 0.048%, radial artery pseudoaneurysm (PA) is a rare but serious complication of arterial cannulation. We report a case of PA developing after a single puncture of the right radial artery for arterial blood-gas analysis diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound in young male patient. The development of PA after puncture of radial artery for continuous blood pressure monitoring and serial blood-gas analysis has been reported in the past; however, to the best of our knowledge, there is only one case report of development of PA after a single arterial puncture for blood-gas analysis is reported in the past.

  4. Installation of a permeable reactive barrier at the mining complex facility in Los Gigantes - Cordoba : Monitoring plan of surface and underground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande Cobian, Juan D.; Sanchez Proano, Paula; Cicerone, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    The Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission declares under its Environmental policy the commitment to restore those sites where activities concerning Uranium mining were developed. It makes it beyond the scope of the Project of Environmental Restitution of the Uranium Mining (PRAMU from its Spanish abbreviation). The Chemistry of Water and Soil Division at the Environmental Chemistry and Energy Generation Department belonging to the Chemistry Management Office assist the PRAMU on the installation of an hydroxyapatite permeable reactive barrier (PRB) inside the Mining Complex facility placed at Los Gigantes in the Argentine province of Cordoba (in advance named the site). Among the preliminary assessment activities that are being carried out before the installation of the PRB, it has been prepared a monitoring program of surface water and groundwater useful to develop an environmental baseline suitable for the efficiency assessment of the corrective action to be applied. An exploratory campaign was conducted in the site with the aim of establishing a monitoring net of meteorological and hydrological, as well as physical, chemical and biological parameters in matrixes of sediments, water and suspended particulate matter collected on a regular time basis from its surface water and groundwater bodies. The processed results turn into useful environmental information to: a) determine the status of the environmental baseline of the site, b) establish a water quality index (WQI) to manage the natural resource quality according to a rational basis, c) plan experiments related to the design process of a biogenic hydroxyapatite PRB and d) apply chemometric and mechanistic models to forecast the contaminants mobilization through different scenarios and improve the engineering design of the PRB. Once achieved the hydrogeological characterisation of the site and taking into account the originality of the system the following results have been reached: 1) The boundaries of

  5. Notional Permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.; Van den Bos, J.P.; Maertens, J.; Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Meer, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Different layer design of a rock slope and under layers has a large effect on the strengths on the rock slope itself. In the stability formula developed of VAN DER MEER [1988] this effect is represented by the term Notional Permeability with symbol P. A more open, or permeable, structure underneath

  6. Atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} barrier coatings to reduce the water vapour permeability of polyetheretherketone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzada, Tamkin, E-mail: tahm4852@uni.sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McKenzie, David R.; James, Natalie L.; Yin, Yongbai [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Li, Qing [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-09-30

    We demonstrate significantly enhanced barrier properties of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) against water vapour penetration by depositing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} nanofilms grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation analysis revealed good adhesion strength of a bilayer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} coating to PEEK, while the single layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating displayed flaking and delamination. We identified three critical design parameters for achieving the optimum barrier properties of ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} coatings on PEEK. These are a minimum total thickness dependent on the required water vapour transmission rate, the use of an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} bilayer coating and the application of the coating to both sides of the PEEK film. Using these design parameters, we achieved a reduction in moisture permeability of PEEK of over two orders of magnitude while maintaining good adhesion strength of the polymer–thin film system. - Highlights: • Atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} coatings reduced water vapour permeability. • Bilayer coatings reduced the permeability more than single layer coatings. • Bilayer coatings displayed higher adhesion strength than the single layer coatings. • Double-sided coatings performed better than single-sided coatings. • Correlation was found between total thickness and reduced water vapour permeability.

  7. PIWIL1/piRNA-DQ593109 Regulates the Permeability of the Blood-Tumor Barrier via the MEG3/miR-330-5p/RUNX3 Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyuan Shen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The blood-tumor barrier (BTB restricts the efficient delivery of anti-glioma drugs to cranial glioma tissues. Increased BTB permeability may allow greater delivery of the therapeutic agents. Increasing evidence has revealed that PIWI proteins and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs play an important role in tumor progression. However, whether PIWI proteins and piRNAs regulate BTB permeability remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that the PIWIL1/piRNA-DQ593109 (piR-DQ593109 complex was the predominant regulator of BTB permeability. Briefly, PIWIL1 was upregulated in glioma endothelial cells (GECs. Furthermore, piR-DQ593109 was also overexpressed in GECs, as revealed via a piRNA microarray. Downregulation of PIWIL1 or piR-DQ593109 increased the permeability of the BTB. Moreover, PIWIL1 and piR-DQ593109, which formed a piRNA-induced silencing complex, degraded the long non-coding RNA maternally expressed 3 (MEG3 in a sequenced-dependent manner. Furthermore, restoring MEG3 released post-transcriptional inhibition of Runt related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 by sponging miR-330-5p. In addition, RUNX3 bounded to the promoter regions and reduced the promoter activities of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5, which significantly impaired the expression levels of ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. In conclusion, downregulating PIWIL1 and piR-DQ593109 increased BTB permeability through the MEG3/miR-330-5p/RUNX3 axis. These data may provide insight into glioma treatment.

  8. Alteration behavior of bentonite barrier of radioactive waste disposal by alkaline solutions. Part 1. Permeability change of compacted bentonite immersed in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Kunihiko

    2010-01-01

    Permeability tests using the compacted bentonites and alkaline solutions were carried out to estimate of alteration behavior and the change of permeability during the alteration reaction. The permeability tests of the compacted bentonites were carried out at 23degC for one week after they were immersed in alkaline solution at 60degC for four weeks (immersing test). After permeability tests, the compacted bentonites were repeatedly tested as the same procedure (i.e. repetition of permeability test and immersing test) at 11 cycles. The compacted bentonites with initial dry density of 1.6 Mg/m 3 were reacted with the different type of the alkaline solutions (deionized water, NaOH (pH=12 and 14), KOH (pH=12 and 14) and Ca(OH) 2 (pH=12)) in each experiments. In the case of deionized water and alkaline solutions of pH12, the mineral compositions of altered bentonite were similar to original bentonite while the exchangeable cations of altered bentonites were changed. No changes of the mineralogical features of montmorillonite in altered bentonites (i.e. illitization, baideritization and increasing of layer charge) were observed in the case of deionized water, pH12-NaOH and pH12-Ca(OH) 2 . The montmorillonite was changed to the illite/smectite interstratified mineral containing about 40% illite like component during the reaction with pH12-KOH. In the case of alkaline solutions with pH14, the component minerals of bentonite (e.g. montmorillonite, quartz and clinoptilolite) were dissolved, consequently secondly minerals (e.g. analcime and phillipsite) were crystallized during experiments. Furthermore, the mineralogical features of montmorillonite were changed as illitization (pH14-KOH), beidellitization (pH14-NaOH and pH14-KOH) and increasing of layer charge (pH14-NaOH and pH14-KOH). No increasing of permeability were observed during the experiment using pH12-NaOH and pH12-Ca(OH) 2 as well as the case of deionized water. In the case of pH12-KOH, the permeability continually

  9. Relocation of blood gas laboratory to the emergency department helps decrease lactic acid values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazg, Jared; Huang, Phyllis; Weiner, Corey; Singh, Guneet; Likourezos, Antonios; Salem, Linda; Dickman, Eitan; Marshall, John

    2018-03-20

    Emergency physicians often rely on Lactic Acid (LA) values to make important clinical decisions. Accuracy of LA values improve when blood gas analysis is performed in the emergency department (ED) as opposed to a satellite laboratory (SL). To investigate an association between blood gas laboratory location and accuracy of ED lactic acid samples. The study team evaluated lactic acid values from venous and arterial blood gas samples drawn between June 1, 2015 and September 30, 2016. The study was exempt from institutional review board approval. Samples were separated into two groups: those which were drawn prior to and after relocation of the blood gas laboratory to the ED. The data, including patient demographic characteristics, acute illness severity indices, and blood gas results were compared within and between each group using t-test for continuous variables and chi-square test for categorical variables. The primary outcome was the mean lactate value measured in the SL group in 2015 compared to the ED group in 2016. Potassium and creatinine values were measured between the two groups as secondary outcomes. Of the 21,595 consecutive samples drawn, 10,363 samples were from the SL group and 11,232 from the ED group. The SL group included 5458 (52.7%) women; mean (SD) age was 61.8 (21.0). The ED group contained 5860 (52.2%) women; mean (SD) age was 61.7 (20.5). Mean Emergency Severity Index (ESI) were the same in each group at 2.31 and rates of Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) were also equivalent in each group at 22.2%. Significant differences were found between LA values in the SL group (mean 2.21mmol/L) and in the ED group (mean 1.99mmol/L) with a p value of gas laboratory and may provide more accurate LA results than blood gas samples analyzed at an SL blood gas laboratory within the same institution. Hospitals may consider moving blood gas laboratories to the ED to improve accuracy of one of the most important early blood markers used in the

  10. Portable blood gas and electrolyte analyzer evaluated in a multiinstitutional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Lindemans (Jan); P. Hoefkens (Peter); A.L. van Kessel; M. Bonnay; W.R. Kulpmann; J.D.E. van Suijlen

    1999-01-01

    textabstractA recently introduced blood gas/electrolyte analyzer (SenDx 100((R)), renamed ABL70) intended for point-of-care, near-patient, or stat laboratory use was evaluated simultaneously in four different institutions and compared with three different laboratory

  11. VARIABILITY OF CONTINUOUSLY MEASURED ARTERIAL PH AND BLOOD-GAS VALUES IN THE NEAR-TERM FETAL LAMB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOUDSTRA, BR; DEWOLF, BTHM; SMITS, TM; NATHANIELSZ, PW; ZIJLSTRA, WG; AARNOUDSE, JG

    1995-01-01

    In fetal sheep, arterial blood gas values show considerable spontaneous fluctuations. The aim of the present study was to obtain quantitative data on fetal blood gas variability. Accurate assessment of the intraindividual variations can hardly be obtained from intermittent blood samples, but

  12. The Role of miR-330-3p/PKC-α Signaling Pathway in Low-Dose Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide-II Increasing the Permeability of Blood-Tumor Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahui Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to determine whether EMAP II increases the permeability of the blood-tumor barrier (BTB by affecting the expression of miR-330-3p as well as its possible mechanisms. We determined the over-expression of miR-330-3p in glioma microvascular endothelial cells (GECs by Real-time PCR. Endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II significantly decreased the expression of miR-330-3p in GECs. Pre-miR-330-3p markedly decreased the permeability of BTB and increased the expression of tight junction (TJ related proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-5, however, anti-miR-330-3p had the opposite effects. Anti-miR-330-3p could enhance the effect of EMAP-II on increasing the permeability of BTB, however, pre-miR-330-3p partly reversed the effect of EMAP-II on that. Similarly, anti-miR-330-3p improved the effects of EMAP-II on increasing the expression levels of PKC-α and p-PKC-α in GECs and pre-miR-330-3p partly reversed the effects. MiR-330-3p could target bind to the 3′UTR of PKC-α. The results of in vivo experiments were similar to those of in vitro experiments. These suggested that EMAP-II could increase the permeability of BTB through inhibiting miR-330-3p which target negative regulation of PKC-α. Pre-miR-330-3p and PKC-α inhibitor decreased the BTB permeability and up-regulated the expression levels of ZO-1, occludin and claudin-5 while anti-miR-330-3p and PKC-α activator brought the reverse effects. Compared with EMAP-II, anti-miR-330-3p and PKC-α activator alone, the combination of the three combinations significantly increased the BTB permeability. EMAP-II combined with anti-miR-330-3p and PKCα activator could enhance the DOX’s effects on inhibiting the cell viabilities and increasing the apoptosis of U87 glioma cells. Our studies suggest that low-dose EMAP-II up-regulates the expression of PKC-α and increases the activity of PKC-α by inhibiting the expression of miR-330-3p, reduces the expression of ZO-1

  13. Measurement of brain perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability, using dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted MRI at 3 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Courivaud, Frédéric; Rostrup, Egill

    2009-01-01

    /min); blood volume (6 +/- 2/4 +/- 1/7 +/- 6 mL/100 g) and permeability (0.9 +/- 0.4/0.8 +/- 0.3/3 +/- 5 mL/100 g/min) were estimated by using Patlak's method and a two-compartment model. A corroboration of these results was achieved by using model simulation. In addition, it was possible to generate maps...... imaging of a bolus of a paramagnetic contrast agent passing through the brain. The methods are applied in patients with brain tumors and in healthy subjects. Perfusion was estimated by model-free deconvolution using Tikhonov's method (gray matter/white matter/tumor: 72 +/- 16/30 +/- 8/56 +/- 45 mL/100 g...

  14. Permeability of public and private spaces in reproductive healthcare seeking: barriers to uptake of services among low income African American women in a smaller urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Annis G

    2014-05-01

    This study was undertaken in partnership with a publicly funded reproductive healthcare organization to better understand barriers to utilization of its services as perceived by low income African American women in its community and how those barriers might be managed. The study uses a place-based, ecological perspective to theorize privacy challenges across different levels of the communication ecology. Analysis of participant observation, interviews, and focus group data identified three key public-private problematics in African American women's experience of reproductive healthcare seeking in a smaller urban setting: a public-private problematic of organizational identity, of organizational regions, and of organizational members. Potential strategies are identified for managing these problematics by the organization and community members. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. CARDIOPULMONARY AND BLOOD GAS PARAMETERS IN SHEEP UNDER INHALATIONAL ANESTHESIA DURING DECUBITUS ALTERNATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Liana Villela Gouvea; João Gabriel César Palermo; José Renato Junqueira Borges; Ricardo Miyasaka Almeida; Fábio Henrique Bezerra Ximenes; Roberta Ferro de Godoy

    2016-01-01

    Sheep herds, especially Santa Ines breed, have grown in the Brazilian Midwest in recent years. Therefore, clinical cases have also grown, and along came the need of conducting major surgeries without pain associated with the use of inhalational anesthesia. This study evaluated the cardiopulmonary and blood gas parameters in sheep under inhalational anesthesia with controlled ventilation, and assessed the effect of decubitus alternations on the parameters. The animals were anesthetized with ac...

  16. The role of pre-hospital blood gas analysis in trauma resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katila Ari

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess, whether arterial blood gas measurements during trauma patient's pre-hospital shock resuscitation yield useful information on haemodynamic response to fluid resuscitation by comparing haemodynamic and blood gas variables in patients undergoing two different fluid resuscitation regimens. Methods In a prospective randomised study of 37 trauma patients at risk for severe hypovolaemia, arterial blood gas values were analyzed at the accident site and on admission to hospital. Patients were randomised to receive either conventional fluid therapy or 300 ml of hypertonic saline. The groups were compared for demographic, injury severity, physiological and outcome variables. Results 37 patients were included. Mean (SD Revised Trauma Score (RTS was 7.3427 (0.98 and Injury Severity Score (ISS 15.1 (11.7. Seventeen (46% patients received hypertonic fluid resuscitation and 20 (54% received conventional fluid therapy, with no significant differences between the groups concerning demographic data or outcome. Base excess (BE values decreased significantly more within the hypertonic saline (HS group compared to the conventional fluid therapy group (mean BE difference -2.1 mmol/l vs. -0.5 mmol/l, p = 0.003. The pH values on admission were significantly lower within the HS group (mean 7.31 vs. 7.40, p = 0.000. Haemoglobin levels were in both groups lower on admission compared with accident site. Lactate levels on admission did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusion Pre-hospital use of small-volume resuscitation led to significantly greater decrease of BE and pH values. A portable blood gas analyzer was found to be a useful tool in pre-hospital monitoring for trauma resuscitation.

  17. Establishing blood gas ranges in healthy bovine neonates differentiated by age, sex, and breed type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillane, Patrick; Krump, Lea; Kennedy, Aideen; Sayers, Ríona G; Sayers, Gearóid P

    2018-04-01

    Calf mortality and morbidity commonly occurs within the first month of life postpartum. Standard health ranges are invaluable aids in diagnostic veterinary medicine to confirm normal or the degree and nature of abnormal parameters in (sub)clinically ill animals. Extensive research has indicated significant differences between the physiologies of neonate and adult cattle, particularly for blood parameters such as pH, base excess, anion gap, and bicarbonate (HCO 3 - ). The objective of this research was to determine the influence of age, sex, and breed type, in addition to environmental factors, on the normal blood gas profiles of neonatal calves, and thus develop a scientifically validated reference range accounting for any significant factors. The study was conducted on healthy neonatal calves (n = 288), and completed over a 2-yr period. Individual calf blood gas analysis was conducted for parameters of pH, base excess, Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Cl - , glucose, total hemoglobin, HCO 3 - , pCO 2 , anion gap, strong ion difference, and hematocrit levels. Regression procedures examined the combined effect of year, farm, age, breed type, sex, and hours postfeeding on each variable. Significant effects were observed for age, sex, and breed type on several of the blood gas variables. Furthermore, year, farm, and hours postfeeding appeared to have less of an influence on neonatal bovine blood gas profiles. Consequently, specific ranges based on the neonate's age, sex, and breed type will allow for more detailed and accurate diagnosis of health and ill health in neonatal calves. The Authors. Published by FASS Inc. and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  18. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS DURING PARTURITION AND BLOOD GAS TENSIONS IMMEDIATELY AFTER BIRTH IN THOROUGHBRED FOALS

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMOTO, Keiji; YASUDA, Jun; TOO, Kimehiko

    1991-01-01

    In 101 newborn Thoroughbred foals and foaling mares, 45 fetal (FECGs) and 101 neonatal electrocardiograms (NECGs) were obtained to investigate neonatal arrhythmias and other parameters including changes in fetal (FHR) and neonatal heart rate (NHR). Moreover, umbilical arterial, venous and jugular venous blood gas tensions and pH immediately after birth were analyzed to compare with the type and the degree of neonatal arrhythmias. Before delivery, in 37 fetuses FHR gradually decreased while in...

  19. Variations of the blood gas levels and thermodilutional parameters during ICP monitoring after severe head trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrano, Riccardo; Elli, Marco; Stoppa, Francesca; Di Traglia, Mario; Di Nardo, Matteo; Perrotta, Daniela; David, Piero; Paoli, Sara; Cecchetti, Corrado

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to define, in children following head trauma and GSC ≤ 8, at which level of intracranial pressure (ICP), the thermodilutional, and gas analytic parameters implicated in secondary cerebral insults shows initial changes. We enrolled in the study 56 patients: 30 males and 26 females, mean age 71 ± 52 months. In all children, volumetric hemodynamic and blood gas parameters were monitored following initial resuscitation and every 4 h thereafter or whenever a hemodynamic deterioration was suspected. During the cumulative hospital stay, a total of 1050 sets of measurements were done. All parameters were stratified in seven groups according to ICP (group A1 = 0-5 mmHg, group A2 = 6-10 mmHg, group A3 = 11-15 mmHg, group A4 16-20 mmHg, group A5 21-25 mmHg, group A6 26-30 mmHg, group A7 >31 mmHg). Mean values of jugular oxygen saturation (SJO2), jugular oxygen partial pressure (PJO2), extravascular lung water (EVLWi), pulmonary vascular permeability (PVPi), fluid overload (FO), and cerebral extraction of oxygen (CEO2) vary significantly from A3 (11-15 mmHg) to A4 (16-20 mmHg). They relate to ICP in a four-parameter sigmoidal function (4PS function with: r(2) = 0.90), inflection point of 15 mmHg of ICP, and a maximum curvature point on the left horizontal asymptote at 13 mmHg of ICP. Mean values of SJO2, PJO2, EVLWi, PVPi, FO, and CEO2 become pathologic at 15 mmHg of ICP; however, the curve turns steeper at 13 mmHg, possibly a warning level in children for the development of post head trauma secondary insult.

  20. Comparison of Linear and Cyclic His-Ala-Val Peptides in Modulating the Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability: Impact on Delivery of Molecules to the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaofi, Ahmed; On, Ngoc; Kiptoo, Paul; Williams, Todd D; Miller, Donald W; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of peptide cyclization on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) modulatory activity and plasma stability of His-Ala-Val peptides, which are derived from the extracellular 1 domain of human E-cadherin. The activities to modulate the intercellular junctions by linear HAV4 (Ac-SHAVAS-NH2), cyclic cHAVc1 (Cyclo(1,8)Ac-CSHAVASC-NH2), and cyclic cHAVc3 (Cyclo(1,6)Ac-CSHAVC-NH2) were compared in in vitro and in vivo BBB models. Linear HAV4 and cyclic cHAVc1 have the same junction modulatory activities as assessed by in vitro MDCK monolayer model and in situ rat brain perfusion model. In contrast, cyclic cHAVc3 was more effective than linear HAV4 in modulating MDCK cell monolayers and in improving in vivo brain delivery of Gd-DTPA on i.v. administration in Balb/c mice. Cyclic cHAVc3 (t1/2 = 12.95 h) has better plasma stability compared with linear HAV4 (t1/2 = 2.4 h). The duration of the BBB modulation was longer using cHAVc3 (2-4 h) compared with HAV4 (brain delivery of IRdye800cw-PEG (25 kDa) as detected by near IR imaging. The result showed that cyclic cHAVc3 peptide had better activity and plasma stability than linear HAV4 peptide. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Blood gas testing and related measurements: National recommendations on behalf of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Lora; Kopčinović, Lara Milevoj; Dorotić, Adrijana; Baršić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Blood gas analysis (BGA) is exposed to risks of errors caused by improper sampling, transport and storage conditions. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) generated documents with recommendations for avoidance of potential errors caused by sample mishandling. Two main documents related to BGA issued by the CLSI are GP43-A4 (former H11-A4) Procedures for the collection of arterial blood specimens; approved standard – fourth edition, and C46-A2 Blood gas and pH analysis and related measurements; approved guideline – second edition. Practices related to processing of blood gas samples are not standardized in the Republic of Croatia. Each institution has its own protocol for ordering, collection and analysis of blood gases. Although many laboratories use state of the art analyzers, still many preanalytical procedures remain unchanged. The objective of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CSMBLM) is to standardize the procedures for BGA based on CLSI recommendations. The Working Group for Blood Gas Testing as part of the Committee for the Scientific Professional Development of the CSMBLM prepared a set of recommended protocols for sampling, transport, storage and processing of blood gas samples based on relevant CLSI documents, relevant literature search and on the results of Croatian survey study on practices and policies in acid-base testing. Recommendations are intended for laboratory professionals and all healthcare workers involved in blood gas processing. PMID:27812301

  2. Abrupt changes in mixed venous blood gas composition after the onset of exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaburi, R; Daly, J; Hansen, J E; Effros, R M

    1989-09-01

    It has been assumed that increases in both O2 uptake and ventilation occurring within the first few seconds after the onset of exercise cannot be the result of changes in blood gas composition reaching the central circulation because of the circulatory delay from the exercising limbs (A. Krogh and J. Lindhard, J. Physiol. Lond. 42: 112-136, 1913). We sought to validate this assumption by measuring the time course of pulmonary arterial blood gases during the transition from rest to exercise. Six healthy men underwent pulmonary arterial catheterization and then performed transitions from rest to moderate cycle ergometer exercise. An anaerobic sampling manifold withdrew 19 samples of blood during the rest-to-exercise transition; sampling interval was usually 4 s. Blood gas analysis showed that, on average, from rest-to-steady-state exercise, O2 saturation (Svo2) fell from 71 to 41% and mixed venous PCO2 (PvCO2) rose from 42 to 59 Torr. Contrary to our expectations, Svo2 decreased and PvCO2 increased with no discernible latency after exercise onset (by 10% and 2 Torr, respectively, within 6 s). The half time for the Svo2 decrease was 32 s, whereas for the PvCO2 increase it was 80 s. The time course of superior vena cava blood gas composition was determined in several experiments; no rapid changes after exercise onset were found. We conclude that at exercise onset there is a rapid fall in Svo2 and rise in PvCO2 well in advance of arrival of blood produced by exercising legs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. [Investigation of reference intervals of blood gas and acid-base analysis assays in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate and analyze the upper and lower limits and their sources of reference intervals in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays. The data of reference intervals were collected, which come from the first run of 2014 External Quality Assessment (EQA) program in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays performed by National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL). All the abnormal values and errors were eliminated. Data statistics was performed by SPSS 13.0 and Excel 2007 referring to upper and lower limits of reference intervals and sources of 7 blood gas and acid-base analysis assays, i.e. pH value, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-. Values were further grouped based on instrument system and the difference between each group were analyzed. There were 225 laboratories submitting the information on the reference intervals they had been using. The three main sources of reference intervals were National Guide to Clinical Laboratory Procedures [37.07% (400/1 079)], instructions of instrument manufactures [31.23% (337/1 079)] and instructions of reagent manufactures [23.26% (251/1 079)]. Approximately 35.1% (79/225) of the laboratories had validated the reference intervals they used. The difference of upper and lower limits in most assays among 7 laboratories was moderate, both minimum and maximum (i.e. the upper limits of pH value was 7.00-7.45, the lower limits of Na+ was 130.00-156.00 mmol/L), and mean and median (i.e. the upper limits of K+ was 5.04 mmol/L and 5.10 mmol/L, the upper limits of PCO2 was 45.65 mmHg and 45.00 mmHg, 1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), as well as the difference in P2.5 and P97.5 between each instrument system group. It was shown by Kruskal-Wallis method that the P values of upper and lower limits of all the parameters were lower than 0.001, expecting the lower limits of Na+ with P value 0.029. It was shown by Mann-Whitney that the statistic differences were found among instrument

  4. [Prehospital arterial blood gas analysis after collapse connected to triathlon participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettrup-Christensen, Asbjørn; Amstrup-Hansen, Louise; Zwisler, Stine T

    2017-05-01

    Long-distance athletes are at risk of serious fluid and electrolyte disturbances, such as hypernatraemia (dehydration). Recently, cases of serious morbidity have been reported, due to acute exercise-associated hyponatraemia, which can advance to encephalopathy. An arterial blood gas analysis (ABG) was drawn from collapsed athletes at the championship of full-distance triathlon 2015, and different electrolyte imbalances were found. Our findings show that prehospital ABG can assist in differentiating the cause of collapse, and presumably, targeted treatment can be initiated already on scene.

  5. Changes in electrolytes and blood gas after transfusion of irradiated MAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyao, Hideki; Katayama, Akinori; Okamoto, Yumi; Koyama, Kaoru; Kawasaki, Jun; Kawazoe, Taro

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the changes in recipient serum electrolytes and arterial blood gas after irradiated blood transfusion. We measured electrolytes and arterial blood gas before and after the transfusion during elective surgery in 55 patients. The mean blood loss was 1,477 g and the mean transfused blood unit of irradiated Mannitol-Adenine-Phosphate (MAP) was 5.9 units. Potassium concentration increased from 3.8 to 4.2 mEq·l -1 . A total of 187 units, which had been stored for 12.3±3.5 days after donation and for 5.1±3.8 days after irradiation, was used. There was a significant correlation between the storage period from the day of irradiation and the potassium concentration of the supernatant (r=0.56, p<0.0001). This study recommends that a safe transfusion rate of irradiated blood should be determined because the high potassium concentration of irradiated blood may lead to lethal complications in case of rapid transfusion. (author)

  6. An evaluation of the AVL 937C blood-gas and pH microanalyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutter, W P; Aitchison, T C; Thorburn, J; Sharp, F

    1976-12-01

    The AVL 937C blood-gas and pH microanalyser was evaluated with particular reference to its use in obsterics and in neonatal paediatrics in which its ability to analyse blood smaples as small as 40 micronlitre would be of particular value. Analysing samples of cord blood, maternal venous blood and foetal scalp blood, the reproducibility over the range of values measured was excellent with samples of 40-100 micronlitre. SD of the variation in values measured on samples collected in syringes were po2 0.11 kPa; Pco2 0.21 kPa; PH 0.005 unit. The same values for specimens collected in capillary tubes were: Po2 0.19 kPa;Pco 0.43 kPa; pH 0.013 unit. Analysis of tonometered blood samples showed a similar high standard of accuracy. The 91-98% confidence limits for the measurement of blood-gas values in samples collected in syringes were: Po2-0.22 to +0.49kPa; Pco2-0.53 to +0.42 kPa. The same values for samples collected in capillary tubes were: Po2 -0.38 to +0.70 kPa; Pco2 -0.97 to +0.86 kPa.

  7. Impaired fetal blood gas status in polyhydramnios and its relation to raised amniotic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, N M; Vaughan, J; Talbert, D

    1994-01-01

    A substantial proportion of perinatal losses in polyhydramnios occur as unexplained normally formed stillbirths. In order to investigate the relationship between fetal condition and raised amniotic pressure (AP), fetal blood gas and acid-base status were determined together with AP in 22 pregnancies with polyhydramnios. At fetal blood sampling, 8 (36%) had a venous pH value and 16 (73%) a pO2 value below the reference range. Both fetal pH and pO2 were significantly negatively correlated with the degree of elevation in AP (y = 7.43 - 0.036x, r = 0.56, p = 0.006, where y = pH and x = AP z score, and y = -1.6 - 0.48x, r = 0.54, p = 0.01, where y = pO2 z score, respectively). Although some of these fetuses were hydropic, had congenital anomalies, or were from multiple pregnancies, univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that the above associations could not be accounted for by these potentially confounding variables. This work suggests that abnormal fetal blood gas status in human pregnancies with poly-hydramnios is associated with elevated AP.

  8. Blood gas analyzer utility in evaluating oxygen kinetics of the aqueous humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ersan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To measure the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 and carbon dioxide (PCO2 and the pH of aqueous humor (AH and arterial blood samples from rabbits using a blood gas analyzer. Methods: Twenty New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized intramuscularly with ketamine and xylazine and were then allowed to breathe room air. Using a gas blood analyzer, arterial blood and AH samples were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH. Results: The mean arterial blood pressure was 87.14 ± 15.0 mmHg. The mean blood and AH PO2 were 95.18 ± 11.76 mmHg and 88.83 ± 9.92 mmHg, the mean blood and AH PCO2 were 25.86 ± 5.46 mmHg and 29.50 ± 5.36 mmHg, and the mean blood and AH pH were 7.38 ± 0.06 and 7.33 ± 0.09, respectively. Conclusion: Conclusions: The blood gas analyzer was easily employed to evaluate the aqueous humor in rabbits. When comparing the results of studies evaluating aqueous PO2, care should be taken to determine the methods used in these studies.

  9. Correlation of central venous pressure with venous blood gas analysis parameters; a diagnostic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Rahim-Taleghani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to assess the correlation between central venous pressure (CVP and venous blood gas (VBG analysis parameters, to facilitate management of severe sepsis and septic shock in emergency department. Material and methods: This diagnostic study was conducted from January 2014 until June 2015 in three major educational medical centers, Tehran, Iran. For patients selected with diagnosis of septic shock, peripheral blood sample was taken for testing the VBG parameters and the anion gap (AG was calculated. All the mentioned parameters were measured again after infusion of 500 cc of normal saline 0.9% in about 1 h. Results: Totally, 93 patients with septic shock were enrolled, 63 male and 30 female. The mean age was 72.53 ± 13.03 and the mean Shock Index (SI before fluid therapy was 0.79 ± 0.30. AG and pH showed significant negative correlations with CVP, While HCO3 showed a significant positive correlation with CVP. These relations can be affected by the treatment modalities used in shock management such as fluid therapy, mechanical ventilation and vasopressor treatment. Conclusion: It is likely that there is a significant statistical correlation between VBG parameters and AG with CVP, but further research is needed before implementation of the results of this study. Keywords: Shock, Septic, Central venous pressure, Blood gas analysis, Emergency department, Emergency medicine

  10. Development and validation of a sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method for the quantitation of [(13)C]sucrose in rat plasma, blood, and brain: Its application to the measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Mohammad K; Bickel, Ulrich; Mehvar, Reza

    2016-03-15

    Accurate and reproducible measurement of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity is critical in the assessment of the pathophysiology of the central nervous system disorders and in monitoring therapeutic effects. The widely-used low molecular weight marker [(14)C]sucrose is non-specific in the absence of chromatographic separation. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a sensitive and reproducible LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of stable isotope-modified [(13)C12]sucrose in brain, plasma, and blood to determine BBB permeability to sucrose. After addition of internal standard (IS, [(13)C6]sucrose), the marker and IS were recovered from diluted rat blood, plasma, and brain homogenate by protein precipitation using acetonitrile. The recovery of the marker and IS was almost quantitative (90-106%) for all three matrices. The recovered samples were directly injected into an isocratic UPLC system with a run time of 6 min. Mass spectrometry was conducted using multiple reaction monitoring in negative mode. The method was linear (r(2)≥0.99) in the concentration ranges tested for the diluted blood and plasma (10-1000 ng/mL) and brain homogenate (1-200 ng/mL). The lower limit of quantitation of the assay was 0.5 pg injected on column. The assay was validated (n=5) based on acceptable intra- and inter-run accuracy and precision values. The method was successfully used for the measurement of serial blood and plasma and terminal brain concentrations of [(13)C12]sucrose after a single intravenous dose (10 mg/kg) of the marker to rats. As expected, the apparent brain uptake clearance values of [(13)C12]sucrose were low in healthy rats. The method may be useful for determination of the BBB integrity in animal models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Roe

    Full Text Available Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE. Infection with WNV (NY99 strain significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1 did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101 strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  12. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Kelsey; Orillo, Beverly; Verma, Saguna

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV) causes blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE). Infection with WNV (NY99 strain) significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1) did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101) strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  13. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Weijiang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); South China Institute of Environmental Science, MEP, Guangzhou 510655 (China); Fu, Fenglian, E-mail: fufenglian2006@163.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • Acid-washed zero-valent iron and zero-valent aluminum were used in PRBs. • The time that removal efficiencies of heavy metal were above 99.5% can keep 300 h. • Removal mechanism of Cr(VI), Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} was discussed. • Heavy metal ions were removed by reduction, adsorption, and co-precipitation. - Abstract: The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0 mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} were all above 99.5% can keep about 300 h using 80 g/40 g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+}) concentration of 20.0 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed.

  14. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Weijiang; Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Acid-washed zero-valent iron and zero-valent aluminum were used in PRBs. • The time that removal efficiencies of heavy metal were above 99.5% can keep 300 h. • Removal mechanism of Cr(VI), Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ was discussed. • Heavy metal ions were removed by reduction, adsorption, and co-precipitation. - Abstract: The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0 mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ were all above 99.5% can keep about 300 h using 80 g/40 g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ ) concentration of 20.0 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed.

  15. Comparison of pneumatic tube system with manual transport for routine chemistry, hematology, coagulation and blood gas tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupek, Alex; Matthewson, Beverly; Whitman, Erin; Fullarton, Rachel; Chen, Yu

    2017-08-28

    The pneumatic tube system (PTS) is commonly used in modern clinical laboratories to provide quick specimen delivery. However, its impact on sample integrity and laboratory testing results are still debatable. In addition, each PTS installation and configuration is unique to its institution. We sought to validate our Swisslog PTS by comparing routine chemistry, hematology, coagulation and blood gas test results and sample integrity indices between duplicate samples transported either manually or by PTS. Duplicate samples were delivered to the core laboratory manually by human courier or via the Swisslog PTS. Head-to-head comparisons of 48 routine chemistry, hematology, coagulation and blood gas laboratory tests, and three sample integrity indices were conducted on 41 healthy volunteers and 61 adult patients. The PTS showed no impact on sample hemolysis, lipemia, or icterus indices (all pcoagulation and blood gas (in syringe and capillary tube) laboratory tests.

  16. Diabetic ketoacidosis: difference between potassium determined by blood gas analysis versus plasma measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Fernando César; Laguna Neto, Daniel; Dias, Fábio Guirado; Spressão, Márcia; Matos, Priscila Nascimbeni; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Pires, Antônio Carlos

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of potassium concentrations measured by blood gas analysis (PBG) compared with laboratory serum potassium (LSP), in the initial care of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Fifty three patients with diabetes mellitus were evaluated in a retrospective analysis. PBG was carried out using the Radiometer ABL 700 (Radiometer Copenhagen(®)), and results were compared with LSP ADVIA 1650 Chemistry system (Siemens(®)), the gold standard method. Both methods are based on potentiometry. Mean PBG was 3.66 mmol/L and mean LSP was 4.79 mmol/L. Mean difference between PBG and LSP was -1.13 mmol/L (p PBG measurement is faster and easier, it should not be used as a surrogate for LSP in the clinical treatment of DKA.

  17. A case of cyanide poisoning and the use of arterial blood gas analysis to direct therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstege, Christopher P; Forrester, Joseph D; Borek, Heather A; Lawrence, David T

    2010-11-01

    Cyanide poisoning is a difficult diagnosis for health care professionals. Existing reports clearly demonstrate that the initial diagnosis is often missed in surreptitious cases. The signs and symptoms can mimic numerous other disease processes. We report a case in which a suicidal patient ingested cyanide and was found unresponsive by 2 laboratory coworkers. The coworkers employed cardiopulmonary resuscitation with mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. The suicidal patient died shortly after arrival to the hospital, while the 2 coworkers who performed mouth-to-mouth resuscitation presented with signs and symptoms that mimicked early cyanide toxicity but were instead due to acute stress response. An arterial blood gas analysis may help aid in the diagnosis of cyanide toxicity. Electrocardiographic findings in a patient with cyanide poisoning range significantly, depending on the stage of the poisoning.

  18. Long-term performance of elemental iron and hydroxyapatite for uranium retention in permeable reactive barriers used for groundwater remediation; Langzeitverhalten von elementarem Eisen und Hydroxylapatit zur Uranrueckhaltung in permeablen reaktiven Waenden bei der Grundwassersanierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermann, V.

    2007-11-21

    Elemental iron (Fe{sup 0}) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) were evaluated as reactive mate-rials for use in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove uranium from conta-minated groundwater. Special attention was given to the long-term performance of the materials, which was investigated by means of column tests with a duration of up to 30 months using two different artificial groundwaters (AGW) with varying composition and uranium concentration. The interaction of the materials with AGW was studied in column tests using {sup 237}U as a radiotracer to monitor the movement of the contamination front through the columns. The tested materials were shredded cast iron (granulated grey cast iron, 0.3 - 1.3 mm) supplied by Gotthard Mayer, Rheinfelden, Germany, and food quality grade hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}OH, 99 % < 0.42 mm) supplied by Che-mische Fabrik Budenheim CFB, Germany. Both materials exhibited uranium retention of more than 99.9% and sorption capacities of up to 28.3 mg U/g HAP and more than 38.4 mg U/g Fe{sup 0} (AGW with 9.6 mg U/L and low bicarbonate content of 120 mg/L). No breakthrough was observed for the Fe{sup 0} columns with effluent uranium con-centrations being below the detection limit of 10 {mu}g/L after treating more than 2,000 pore volumes (PV) and no uranium could be leached from loaded Fe{sup 0} columns with 200 PV of uranium free AGW. However, columns with high Fe{sup 0} content ({>=} 50%) suffered from severe loss of permeability when AGW with {>=} 320 mg/L bicarbonate was used. In the HAP columns a breakthrough occurred with effluent uranium concentrations > 15 {mu}g/l after treating 1,240 PV (10% and 50% breakthrough after 1,460 PV and 2,140 PV respectively). 12.2% of the accu-mulated uranium could be desorbed again with 840 PV of uranium free AGW. Adsorption was found to be the dominant reaction mechanism for uranium and HAP. Image analysis of high uranium content samples showed uranium and phosphate bearing crystals growing

  19. Film Permeability Determination Using Static Permeability Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    The permeability of tarps to soil fumigant pesticides varies depending on the active ingredient chemical: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methyl bromide, chloropicrin, or other. The diffusion rate can be represented by the mass transfer coefficient (MTC).

  20. Estimation of soil permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr F. Elhakim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soils are permeable materials because of the existence of interconnected voids that allow the flow of fluids when a difference in energy head exists. A good knowledge of soil permeability is needed for estimating the quantity of seepage under dams and dewatering to facilitate underground construction. Soil permeability, also termed hydraulic conductivity, is measured using several methods that include constant and falling head laboratory tests on intact or reconstituted specimens. Alternatively, permeability may be measured in the field using insitu borehole permeability testing (e.g. [2], and field pumping tests. A less attractive method is to empirically deduce the coefficient of permeability from the results of simple laboratory tests such as the grain size distribution. Otherwise, soil permeability has been assessed from the cone/piezocone penetration tests (e.g. [13,14]. In this paper, the coefficient of permeability was measured using field falling head at different depths. Furthermore, the field coefficient of permeability was measured using pumping tests at the same site. The measured permeability values are compared to the values empirically deduced from the cone penetration test for the same location. Likewise, the coefficients of permeability are empirically obtained using correlations based on the index soil properties of the tested sand for comparison with the measured values.

  1. Blood gas sample spiking with total parenteral nutrition, lipid emulsion, and concentrated dextrose solutions as a model for predicting sample contamination based on glucose result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Aguirre, Jose C; Smeets, Steven W; Wockenfus, Amy M; Karon, Brad S

    2018-03-16

    Evaluate the effects of blood gas sample contamination with total parenteral nutrition (TPN)/lipid emulsion and dextrose 50% (D50) solutions on blood gas and electrolyte measurement; and determine whether glucose concentration can predict blood gas sample contamination with TPN/lipid emulsion or D50. Residual lithium heparin arterial blood gas samples were spiked with TPN/lipid emulsion (0 to 15%) and D50 solutions (0 to 2.5%). Blood gas (pH, pCO2, pO2), electrolytes (Na+, K+ ionized calcium) and hemoglobin were measured with a Radiometer ABL90. Glucose concentration was measured in separated plasma by Roche Cobas c501. Chart review of neonatal blood gas results with glucose >300 mg/dL (>16.65 mmol/L) over a seven month period was performed to determine whether repeat (within 4 h) blood gas results suggested pre-analytical errors in blood gas results. Results were used to determine whether a glucose threshold could predict contamination resulting in blood gas and electrolyte results with greater than laboratory-defined allowable error. Samples spiked with 5% or more TPN/lipid emulsion solution or 1% D50 showed glucose concentration >500 mg/dL (>27.75 mmol/L) and produced blood gas (pH, pO 2 , pCO 2 ) results with greater than laboratory-defined allowable error. TPN/lipid emulsion, but not D50, produced greater than allowable error in electrolyte (Na + ,K + ,Ca ++ ,Hb) results at these concentrations. Based on chart review of 144 neonatal blood gas results with glucose >250 mg/dL received over seven months, four of ten neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients with glucose results >500 mg/dL and repeat blood gas results within 4 h had results highly suggestive of pre-analytical error. Only 3 of 36 NICU patients with glucose results 300-500 mg/dL and repeat blood gas results within 4 h had clear pre-analytical errors in blood gas results. Glucose concentration can be used as an indicator of significant blood sample contamination with either TPN

  2. Reliability of point-of-care hematocrit, blood gas, electrolyte, lactate and glucose measurement during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinfelder-Visscher, J.; Weerwind, P.W.; Teerenstra, S.; Brouwer, René

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, the GEM Premier blood gas analyser was upgraded to the GEM Premier 3000. In addition to pH, pCO2, pO2, Na+, K+, Ca2+, and hematocrit measurement, glucose and lactate can be measured on the GEM Premier 3000. In this prospective clinical study, the analytical performance of the

  3. [Multicenter clinical study on umbilical cord arterial blood gas parameters for diagnosis of neonatal asphyxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    To obtain the normal range of statistics of umbilical artery blood gas parameters of the newborns for diagnosis of neonatal asphyxia. From March 2008 through September 2009, 17 978 singleton term appropriate for gestational age (AGA) or larger than gestational age (LGA) newborns in six hospitals of five provinces/autonomous regions were consecutively enrolled in this prospective study. The normal ranges of umbilical artery blood gas parameters were obtained from 17 645 newborns with 1 min Apgar score ≥ 8. The correlations between umbilical artery blood pH, BE and prenatal high-risk factors, Apgar scores, and organ damage were analyzed. The diagnostic criteria for asphyxia included the following: (1) Having high-risk factors that might cause asphyxia; (2) 1 min Apgar score ≤ 7 (the respiratory depression must be present); (3) At least one organ showed evidence of hypoxic damage; (4) Other causes of low Apgar score were excluded. The study focused on the distributive characteristics of umbilical artery blood pH (clinically corrected by Eisenberg formula) and BE values of the asphyxiated and non-asphyxiated cases in low Apgar score group, as well as the sensitivity and specificity of different selected pH and BE threshold spots within their distributing ranges. Among the 17 978 singleton term AGA or LGA newborns, the statistically normal range of umbilical artery blood pH, BE for the 17 645 cases with 1 min Apgar scores ≥ 8 were 7.20 ± 0.20 (x(-) ± 1.96 s) and -7.64 ± 10.02 (x(-) ± 1.96 s), respectively. The pH well correlated positively with BE (r = 0.734, P blood pH and BE values correlated positively with the Apgar scores. The umbilical artery blood pH and BE values correlated negatively with organ damage (r = 1, the P values = 0.000 for both). Among the 333 low Apgar score cases, the umbilical artery blood pH corrected values and BE values of the asphyxiated group (163 cases) were 7.011 ± 0.09 (x(-) ± s) and -14.98 ± 2.99 (x(-) ± s), being lower than

  4. Development in NMR spiral imaging and application to the assessment of the permeability of the blood-brain barrier on 2 models of brain tumors; Developpements en imagerie RMN spirale et application a la caracterisation de la permeabilite de la barriere hemato-encephalique sur deux modeles de tumeurs intracerebrales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaumont, M

    2007-12-15

    The results presented in this work were obtained as part of methodological developments in magnetic resonance imaging. First of all, the setting of the rapid imaging technique using a k-space sampling scheme along a variable density spiral is described. Numerical simulations were used to optimize the acquisitions parameters and to compare different reconstruction techniques. An original approach to calibrate the k-space trajectory was proposed. Then, spiral imaging was used to implement a method to measure the blood brain barrier permeability to Gd-DOTA. This protocol was combined to blood volume and vessel size index measurements using Sinerem. The results obtained highlighted differences between the microvascular parameters measured on C6 and RG2 tumor models. The presence of Sinerem induces a mean decrease of the transfer constant across the vascular wall (Ktrans), in the tumor, of 24 per cent. This study also showed extravasation of the Sinerem, during the first two hours after the product injection, only in the RG2 tumors. (author)

  5. Impact of Endogenous and Exogenous Interferences on Clinical Chemistry Parameters Measured on Blood Gas Analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieme, Caleb V; Voss, Dena R; Davis, Scott R; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of hemolysis, icterus, and lipemia (HIL) was determined for residual whole blood specimens analyzed for clinical chemistry parameters on blood gas analyzers. The frequency and potential impact of exogenous interference from iodide, salicylate, and thiocyanate (metabolite of sodium nitroprusside) on analysis of whole blood chloride was also assessed. Over an approximately two month period at an academic medical center, indices for HIL were determined on Roche cobas c502 analyzers for 1,986 residual whole blood specimens that had been previously analyzed for clinical chemistry parameters on Radiometer ABL90 FLEX blood gas analyzers. To examine exogenous interferences, retrospective analysis was performed over multiple years to ascertain whether patient samples analyzed for whole blood chloride were potentially affected by interference from iodide, salicylate, or thiocyanate. Some degree of hemolysis (defined as hemolysis index of greater than 60) was present in 9.7% of the whole blood specimens. Increasing rates of hemolysis were associated with higher whole blood potassium concentrations. Nearly 60% of specimens with potassium concentrations between 6.0 and 6.9 mEq/L had hemolysis indices of 100 or greater, and 75% of specimens with a potassium concentration of 7.0 mEq/L or greater were severely hemolyzed (hemolysis index of 300 or greater). In contrast to the hemolysis results, icterus and lipemia were determined to have minimal impact on patient results. For the exogenous interferences, we did not identify any patient samples where elevated salicylate levels or pharmaceutical iodide administration overlapped with whole blood chloride analysis (out of 75,887 and 169,229 total chloride measurements, respectively). We did, however, find that for patients receiving nitroprusside therapy in the inpatient setting, whole blood chloride concentrations were significantly higher during nitroprusside therapy [106.7 +/- 6.2 mEq/L (mean, SD)] compared to before

  6. Relationships among ventilation-perfusion distribution, multiple inert gas methodology and metabolic blood-gas tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A S; Patterson, R W; Kaufman, R D

    1987-12-01

    The retention equations upon which the Multiple Inert Gas Method is based are derived from basic principles using elementary algebra. It is shown that widely disparate distributions produce indistinguishable sets of retentions. The limits of resolution of perfused compartments in the VA/Q distribution obtainable by the use of the multiple inert gas method are explored mathematically, and determined to be at most shunt and two alveolar compartments ("tripartite" distribution). Every continuous distribution studied produced retentions indistinguishable from those of its unique "matching" tripartite distribution. When a distribution is minimally specified, it is unique. Any additional specification (increased resolution--more compartments) of the distribution results in the existence of an infinitude of possible distributions characterized by indistinguishable sets of retention values. No further increase in resolution results from the use of more tracers. When sets of retention values were extracted from published multiple inert gas method continuous distributions, and compared with the published "measured" retention sets, substantial differences were found. This illustrates the potential errors incurred in the practical, in vivo application of the multiple inert gas method. In preliminary studies, the tripartite distribution could be determined with at least comparable accuracy by blood-gas (oxygen, carbon dioxide) measurements.

  7. EVALUATION OF CARDIORESPIRATORY, BLOOD GAS, AND LACTATE VALUES DURING EXTENDED IMMOBILIZATION OF WHITE RHINOCEROS (CERATOTHERIUM SIMUM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Peter; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Meyer, Leith; Hofmeyr, Jennifer; Mathebula, Nomkhosi; Kruger, Marius; Brüns, Angela; Martin, Laura; Miller, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Ten white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) were immobilized for a total of 13 procedures in holding facilities in Kruger National Park using etorphine, azaperone, and hyaluronidase to assess the effect of extended immobilization on serial cardiorespiratory, blood gas, and lactate values. Butorphanol was administered intravenously following initial blood collection and physiologic assessment (t=0). Respiratory and cardiovascular parameters, body temperature, and arterial blood gases were monitored at 10-min intervals for a total of 100 min. Initial parameters at the time of recumbency revealed severe hypoxemia, hypercapnia, tachycardia, an increased alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient, and mildly elevated lactate levels. At 10 min and 20 min, there were significant (Prhinoceros remained severely hypoxemic for the remainder of the procedure (median PaO2=50.5 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval, 43.8-58.1). Median values for respiratory rate (5 breaths/min) and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2; 68.5 mm Hg) did not change significantly for the remaining 80 min. Median lactate, base excess, bicarbonate, and pH values improved between 20 and 100 min despite the persistent hypercapnia, indicating that the animals adequately compensated for respiratory and lactic acidosis. White rhinoceros were immobilized for 100 min with no negative effects, a desirable outcome if procedures require extended chemical immobilization without oxygen supplementation.

  8. An intelligent prognostic system for analyzing patients with paraquat poisoning using arterial blood gas indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lufeng; Lin, Feiyan; Li, Huaizhong; Tong, Changfei; Pan, Zhifang; Li, Jun; Chen, Huiling

    The arterial blood gas (ABG) test is used to assess gas exchange in the lung, and the acid-base level in the blood. However, it is still unclear whether or not ABG test indexes correlate with paraquat (PQ) poisoning. This study investigates the predictive value of ABG tests in prognosing patients with PQ poisoning; it also identifies the most significant indexes of the ABG test. An intelligent machine learning-based system was established to effectively give prognostic analysis of patients with PQ poisoning based on ABG indexes. In the proposed system, an enhanced support vector machine combined with a feature selection strategy was developed to predict the risk status from a pool of 103 patients (56 males and 47 females); of these, 52 subjects were deceased and 51 patients were alive. The proposed method was rigorously evaluated against the real-life dataset in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. Additionally, the feature selection was investigated to identify correlating factors for the risk status. The results demonstrated that there were significant differences in ABG indexes between deceased and alive subjects (p-value <0.01). According to the feature selection, we found that the most important correlated indexes were associated with partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO 2 ). This study discovered the relationship between ABG test and poisoning degree to provide a new avenue for prognosing PQ poisoning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Permeability and relative permeability in rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, S.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1990-10-01

    Important features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical correlation functions using modern image processing techniques. These correlation functions contain information about porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity, formation factor, and elastic constants, as well as the fluid permeability and relative permeability. The physical basis of this approach is discussed and examples of the results for various sandstones are presented. The analysis shows that Kozeny-Carman relations and Archie's empirical laws must be modified to account for finite percolation thresholds in order to avoid unphysical behavior in the calculated relative permeabilities. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Sympathoadrenal, cardiovascular and blood gas responses to highly selective mu and delta opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiritsy-Roy, J A; Marson, L; Van Loon, G R

    1989-12-01

    The relative importance of mu and delta opioid receptors in brain regulation of sympathoadrenal, cardiovascular and respiratory function was investigated using highly selective mu and delta opioid peptide analogs. Groups of conscious rats received i.c.v. injections of either the mu-selective agonist, [D-Ala2, MePhe4, Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO) or the delta-selective agonist, [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE). Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded continuously via a chronic catheter in the carotid artery, and arterial blood samples were taken at intervals through the same catheter for determination of blood pH, pCO2, pO2 and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Both DAMGO and DPDPE increased plasma catecholamine levels and blood pressure in a dose-related manner. The slopes of the dose-response lines were parallel, but the delta compound was about 250 times less potent than DAMGO. Only the highest dose of 5 nmol of DAMGO caused a significant bradycardia, mediated by parasympathetic (vagal) activation. DAMGO and DPDPE also induced dose-dependent acidosis, with DAMGO again being much more potent than DPDPE. The effects of both DAMGO and DPDPE on plasma catecholamines, blood pressure and blood gases were antagonized by a mu-selective dose of naloxone (0.4 mg/kg i.a.). Intracerebroventricular administration of the delta-selective antagonist, ICI 174,864, only partially attenuated sympathoadrenal and blood gas responses to DAMGO or DPDPE. The pressor responses to DAMGO or DPDPE were resistant to antagonism by ICI 174,864. These results indicate that brain opioid receptors regulating autonomic outflow, cardiovascular and respiratory function are mainly of the mu type, although a delta opioid system may contribute to sympathoadrenal and respiratory effects of opioids.

  11. Permeable Pavements at Purdue

    OpenAIRE

    Knapp, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Two case studies will be presented describing sustainable drainage alternatives. The processes used for the 2nd Street project in Seymour will provide a comparison of the design processes for conventional and green infrastructure solutions. Purdue University will discuss a number of permeable pavement installations on campus and provide a map for viewing. Asphalt, concrete, and permeable paver options will be discussed.

  12. Evaluation of a new handheld point-of-care blood gas analyser using 100 equine blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardell, David; West, Eleanor; Mark Senior, J

    2017-02-22

    To determine whether the Enterprise point-of-care blood analysis system (EPOC) produces results in agreement with two other blood gas analysers in regular clinical use (i-STAT and Radiometer ABL77) and to investigate the precision of the new machine when used with equine whole blood. Prospective, randomized, non-blinded, comparative laboratory analyser study. Horses admitted to a university teaching hospital requiring arterial or venous blood gas analysis as part of their routine clinical management. One hundred equine blood samples were run immediately, consecutively and in randomized order on three blood gas analysers. Results of variables common to all three analysers were tested for agreement and compared with guidelines used in human medicine. These require 80% of results from the test analyser to fall within a defined range or percentage of results from the comparator devices to achieve acceptability. Additionally, 21 samples were run twice in quick succession on the EPOC analyser to investigate precision. Agreement targets were not met for haematocrit, haemoglobin and base excess for either i-STAT or ABL77 analysers. EPOC precision targets were not met for partial pressure of carbon dioxide, ionized calcium, haematocrit and haemoglobin. Overall comparative performance of the EPOC was good to excellent for pH, oxygen tension, potassium, bicarbonate and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin, but marginal to poor for other parameters. The EPOC may be useful in performing analysis of equine whole blood, but trend analysis of carbon dioxide tension, ionized calcium, haematocrit and haemoglobin should be interpreted with caution. The EPOC should not be used interchangeably with other blood gas analysers. Copyright © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Permeability prediction in chalks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Prasad, Manika

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of elastic waves is the primary datum available for acquiring information about subsurface characteristics such as lithology and porosity. Cheap and quick (spatial coverage, ease of measurement) information of permeability can be achieved, if sonic velocity is used for permeability...... prediction, so we have investigated the use of velocity data to predict permeability. The compressional velocity fromwireline logs and core plugs of the chalk reservoir in the South Arne field, North Sea, has been used for this study. We compared various methods of permeability prediction from velocities....... The relationships between permeability and porosity from core data were first examined using Kozeny’s equation. The data were analyzed for any correlations to the specific surface of the grain, Sg, and to the hydraulic property defined as the flow zone indicator (FZI). These two methods use two different approaches...

  14. Maternal and fetal arterial blood gas data in normotensive, singleton, isoflurane anesthetized sheep at 124-126 days of gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, Claire M; Kemp, Matthew W; Musk, Gabrielle C

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this case series was to describe the differences between maternal and fetal blood-gas results during anesthesia. Sixteen singleton adult merino ewes weighing 60.1 ± 5.1 kg at 125.7 d (124 to 126 d) gestation were anesthetized. Maternal (radial) and fetal (umbilical) arterial blood gas samples were collected 79 ± 6 min after the start of anesthesia if maternal mean arterial pressure (MAP) was stable and > 65 mmHg. Fetal pH, partial arterial pressure of oxygen ( P aO 2 ), glucose, arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ), sodium, and chloride were significantly lower and fetal partial arterial pressure of carbon dioxide ( P aCO 2 ), lactate, hematocrit, total hemoglobin, potassium, and calcium were significantly higher than maternal blood-gas values. Fetal pH, P aO 2 , and BE were lower and fetal lactate was higher than fetal umbilical arterial samples previously reported, which may indicate a non-reassuring fetal status. Further refinement of the ovine experimental model is warranted with fetal monitoring during maternal anesthesia.

  15. A policy of routine umbilical cord blood gas analysis decreased missing samples from high-risk births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlberg, M; Elvander, C; Johansson, S; Cnattingius, S; Stephansson, O

    2017-01-01

    This study compared obstetric units practicing routine or selective umbilical cord blood gas analysis, with respect to the risk of missing samples in high-risk deliveries and in infants with birth asphyxia. This was a Swedish population-based cohort study that used register data for 155 235 deliveries of live singleton infants between 2008 and 2014. Risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to estimate the association between routine and selective umbilical cord blood gas sampling strategies and the risk of missing samples. Selective sampling increased the risk ratios when routine sampling was used as the reference, with a value of 1.0, and these were significant in high-risk deliveries and birth asphyxia. The risk ratios for selective sampling were large-for-gestational age (9.07), preterm delivery at up to 36 weeks of gestation (8.24), small-for-gestational age (7.94), two or more foetal scalp blood samples (5.96), an Apgar score of less than seven at one minute (2.36), emergency Caesarean section (1.67) and instrumental vaginal delivery (1.24). Compared with routine sampling, selective umbilical cord blood gas sampling significantly increased the risks of missing samples in high-risk deliveries and in infants with birth asphyxia. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. One-week exposure to a free-choice high-fat high-sugar diet does not disrupt blood-brain barrier permeability in fed or overnight fasted rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnsburger, M.; Unmehopa, U A; Eggels, L.; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, S E

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The hypothalamus lies adjacent to the third ventricle and is in close proximity with the median eminence (ME), a circumventricular organ with an incomplete blood-brain barrier (BBB) which controls direct entry of nutrients into the brain. The blood-CSF barrier of the hypothalamus shows

  17. One-week exposure to a free-choice high-fat high-sugar diet does not disrupt blood-brain barrier permeability in fed or overnight fasted rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnsburger, M.; Unmehopa, U. A.; Eggels, L.; Serlie, M. J.; La Fleur, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamus lies adjacent to the third ventricle and is in close proximity with the median eminence (ME), a circumventricular organ with an incomplete blood-brain barrier (BBB) which controls direct entry of nutrients into the brain. The blood-CSF barrier of the hypothalamus shows dynamic

  18. Permeability of porour rhyolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K.; Rust, A.; Wright, H.; Roberge, J.

    2003-04-01

    The development of permeability in bubble-bearing magmas determines the efficiency of volatile escape during their ascent through volcanic conduits, which, in turn, controls their explosive potential. As permeability requires bubble connectivity, relationships between permeability and porosity in silicic magmas must be controlled by the formation, growth, deformation and coalescence of their constituent bubbles. Although permeability data on porous volcanic pyroclasts are limited, the database can be greatly extended by including data for ceramic and metallic foams1. Several studies indicate that a single number does not adequately describe the permeability of a foam because inertial effects, which predominate at high flow rates, cause deviations from Darcy's law. These studies suggest that permeability is best modeled using the Forschheimer equation to determine both the Darcy permeability (k1) and the non-Darcian (k2) permeability. Importantly, at the high porosities of ceramic foams (75-95%), both k1 and k2 are strongly dependent on pore size and geometry, suggesting that measurement of these parameters provides important information on foam structure. We determined both the connected porosity (by He-pycnometry) and the permeability (k1 and k2) of rhyolitic samples having a wide range in porosity (22-85%) and vesicle textures. In general, these data support previous observations of a power law relationship between connected porosity and Darcy permeability2. In detail, variations in k1 increase at higher porosities. Similarly, k2 generally increases in both mean and standard deviation with increasing porosity. Measurements made on three mutually perpendicular cores from individual pumice clasts suggest that some of the variability can be explained by anisotropy in the vesicle structure. By comparison with ceramic foams, we suggest that the remaining variability results from differences either in average vesicle size or, more likely, in the size of apertures

  19. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types...

  20. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The value of arterial blood gas parameters for prediction of mortality in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Isabel von Auenmueller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sudden cardiac death is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and early prognostication remains challenging. There is a lack of valid parameters for the prediction of survival after cardiac arrest. Aims: This study aims to investigate if arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to our hospital after resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were included in this retrospective study. The patient's survival 5 days after resuscitation defined the study end-point. For the statistical analysis, the mean, standard deviation, Student's t-test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were used (level of significance P< 0.05. Results: Arterial blood gas samples were taken from 170 patients. In particular, pH < 7.0 (odds ratio [OR]: 7.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.11–16.69; P< 0.001 and lactate ≥ 5.0 mmol/L (OR: 6.79; 95% CI: 2.77–16.66; P< 0.001 showed strong and independent correlations with mortality within the first 5 days after hospital admission. Conclusion: Our study results indicate that several arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital resuscitation. The most relevant parameters are pH and lactate because they are strongly and independently associated with mortality within the first 5 days after resuscitation. Despite this correlation, none of these parameters by oneself is strong enough to allow an early prognostication. Still, these parameters can contribute as part of a multimodal approach to assessing the patients' prognosis.

  2. Evaluation of hematologic, blood gas, and select biochemical variables in ovine whole blood stored in CPDA-1 bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rejane S; Barrêto, Raimundo A; Sousa, Isadora K F; Chaves, Dowglish F; Soares, Herbert S; Barros, Isabella O; Minervino, Antonio H H; Ortolani, Enrico L

    2013-03-01

    The economic consequences from mortality of sheep after blood loss can be considerable. To date there are no reports addressing hematologic, blood gas, and biochemical changes in ovine blood stored in CPDA-1 bags. The aim of this study was to investigate hematologic, blood gas, and biochemical alterations resulting from storage of ovine blood in CPDA-1 bags to establish transfusion protocols in sheep. From each of 7 healthy 8-month-old sheep 450 mL of blood were collected into CPDA-1 bags and stored for 35 days in at 3-6°C. Samples were taken from the bags at days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 35. Whole blood was used to assess PCV, MCV, RBC count, pH, pO2 , pCO2 , and concentrations of bicarbonate, sodium, and lactate. Plasma was used to measure potassium, hemoglobin, and glucose concentrations. The PCV remained stable throughout the storage period, while plasma hemoglobin and MCV began to increase on days 7 and 21, respectively. The RBC count began to decrease on day 21. Blood pH decreased and pCO2 increased steadily throughout the storage period. Potassium concentration increased from 3.8 to 18.3 mmol/L on day 7 and remained high thereafter. In contrast, sodium concentration began to decrease on day 7. The results show that ovine blood undergoes hematologic, blood gas, and biochemical changes during storage. Further studies are required to establish RBC viability in CPDA-1 bags after a storage period of 35 days. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  3. The effects of a history of seizures during pregnancy on umbilical arterial blood gas values in pregnant women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ozhan; Sarı, Mustafa Erkan; Ertuğrul, Funda Arpacı; Kurt, Aslıhan; Selimova, Vefa; Atalay, Cemal Reşat

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate if the number of seizures that occur during pregnancy has any effect on umbilical arterial blood gas values at delivery. In total, 55 women who were 37 to 41 weeks pregnant and diagnosed with generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy and 50 pregnant women with similar characteristics but not diagnosed as epileptic were included in this study. The patients diagnosed with epilepsy were divided into two groups: 27 patients with a history of at least 5 epileptic seizures during pregnancy and 28 who had no seizures during pregnancy. All patients diagnosed with epilepsy had a history of caesarean delivery or a caesarean section under general anesthesia on the advice of neurology. Pregnant women in the control group were also chosen from among patients who had a caesarean on account of a previous caesarean delivery. In the cases included in the study, umbilical arterial blood gas sampling was performed immediately after delivery. When the control group without epilepsy was compared with pregnant women who had no history of epileptic seizures during pregnancy, no difference was found in umbilical arterial blood gas values (p>0.05). When patients with a history of 5 or more epileptic seizures during pregnancy were compared with the control group without epilepsy and the patients with epilepsy who had no history of seizures during pregnancy, there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05), although their umbilical arterial blood pH values were found to be lower, while partial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2), values were higher and partial oxygen pressure (pO2) values were lower. Taking potential fetal risks into consideration, maternal generalized tonic-clonic epileptic seizures might be worrying. Tonic-clonic seizures that occur during pregnancy appear to be associated with temporary hypoxia. Therefore, monotherapy for seizures and treatment at the lowest effective dose should be administered to women with epilepsy in the

  4. The effect of fluid therapy on hemodynamic and venous blood gas parameters in patients with septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Mirbaha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemodynamics and venous blood gas (VBG may be used to guide fluid therapy in septic shock patients. However, the influence of fluid therapy on hemodynamic and blood gas parameters is not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of fluid therapy on hemodynamic and VBG parameters. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from January to April 2016. All patients with diagnosis of severe sepsis were enrolled in the study. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean arterial pressure (MAP, central venous pressure (CVP shock index, VBG parameters, serum sodium (Na and chloride (Cl levels, anion gap, and oxygen saturation (O2sat were assessed before fluid resuscitation, after resuscitation, and after fluid challenge test. Results: A total of 100 patients were included (mean age were 72.54 ± 12.77 years, 66% male. Fluid therapy significantly increased DBP (df: 2; F= 4.17; p = 0.017, MAP (df: 2; F= 6.06; p= 0.003, and CVP (df: 2; F= 27.54; p < 0.001, while the shock index was significantly reduced After fluid challenge test (df: 2; F= 7.6; p= 0.001. In addition, fluid therapy had no effect on pH (p= 0.90, HCO3 (p= 0.23, base excess (p= 0.13, SCVO2 (p= 0.73, O2sat (p= 0.73, anion gap (p= 0.96, serum Na level (p= 0.71, and serum Cl level (p= 0.64. Conclusion: Administration of fluid therapy in septic shock patients had no significant effect on SBP, heart rate, or blood gas parameters. Future studies on a larger sample of patients should confirm these findings and correlate them to clinical outcomes.

  5. Haemodynamics, blood gas and metabolic changes after anaesthesia with chloral hydrate and magnesium sulphate in camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S K; Singh, J; Singh, A P; Peshin, P K

    1984-01-01

    The effects of chloral hydrate and magnesium sulphate (1:1, 10 per cent solution) were evaluated in six healthy adult camels. A dose of 1 ml kg-1 was used. These agents produced satisfactory anaesthesia with good muscle relaxation. The changes in the electroencephalogram showed that the anaesthetic effect lasted for 45 to 60 minutes. Tachycardia and hypotension were moderate and within safe limits. Electrocardiogram studies showed ST segment elevation and primary T wave changes. The acid-base status, blood gas tensions, haemoglobin concentration, blood glucose level and the plasma concentration of total protein, sodium, potassium and chloride were not altered.

  6. Dietary sodium bicarbonate, cool temperatures, and feed withdrawal: impact on arterial and venous blood-gas values in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, R F; Hooge, D M; Cummings, K R

    2003-04-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) has been used successfully in mammals and birds to alleviate pulmonary hypertension. Experiment 1 was designed to provide measurements of arterial and venous blood-gas values from unanesthetized male broilers subjected to a cool temperature (16 degrees C) challenge and fed either a control diet or the same diet alkalinized by dilution with 1% NaHCO3. The incidences of pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites) for broilers fed the control or bicarbonate diets were 15.5 and 10.5%, respectively (P = 0.36, NS). Non-ascitic broilers fed the control diet were heavier than those fed the bicarbonate diet on d 49 (2,671 vs. 2,484 g, respectively); however, other comparisons failed to reveal diet-related differences in heart weight, pulse oximetry values, electrocardiogram amplitudes, or blood-gas values (P > 0.05). When the data were resorted into categories based on right:total ventricular weight ratios (RV:TV) indicative of normal (RV:TV or = 0.28) pulmonary arterial pressures, broilers with elevated RV:TV ratios had poorly oxygenated arterial blood that was more acidic, had high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2), and had higher HCO3 concentrations when compared with broilers with normal RV:TV ratios. Experiment 2 was conducted to determine if metabolic variations associated with differences in feed intake or environmental temperature potentially could mask an impact of diet composition on blood-gas values. Male broilers maintained at thermoneutral temperature (24 degrees C) either received feed ad libitum or had the feed withdrawn > or = 12 h prior to blood sampling. Broilers fed ad libitum had lower venous saturation of hemoglobin with O2, higher venous PCO2, and higher arterial HCO3 concentrations than broilers subjected to feed withdrawal. Broilers in experiment 2 fed ad libitum and exposed to cool temperatures (16 degrees C) had lower arterial partial pressure of O2 and higher venous PCO2 than broilers fed ad libitum and maintained at 24

  7. Permeable pavement study (Edison)

    Science.gov (United States)

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, New Jersey, that incorporated permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). Each permeable pavement type has four, 54.9-m2, lined sections that direct all infiltrate into 5.7-m3 tanks enabling complete volume collection and sampling. This paper highlights the results from a 12-month period when samples were collected from 13 rainfall/runoff events and analyzed for nitrogen species, orthophosphate, and organic carbon. Differences in infiltrate concentrations among the three permeable pavement types were assessed and compared with concentrations in rainwater samples and impervious asphalt runoff samples, which were collected as controls. Contrary to expectations based on the literature, the PA infiltrate had significantly larger total nitrogen (TN) concentrations than runoff and infiltrate from the other two permeable pavement types, indicating that nitrogen leached from materials in the PA strata. There was no significant difference in TN concentration between runoff and infiltrate from either PICP or PC, but TN in runoff was significantly larger than in the rainwater, suggesting meaningful inter-event dry de

  8. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to flaxseed oil and vitamin E and maintenance of the skin permeability barrier function pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Nutrilinks Sarl, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Belgium, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim....... The applicant identified two published human intervention studies as being pertinent to the health claim. Owing to the very limited information provided regarding key methodological aspects, and to the important limitations of the statistical analysis performed, the Panel considers that no conclusions can...... be drawn from these studies for the scientific substantiation of the claim. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of a combination of flaxseed oil and vitamin E and maintenance of the skin permeability barrier function...

  9. Influence of different storage times and temperatures on blood gas and acid-base balance in ovine venous blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, H A; Aamer, A A

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of storage temperature and time on blood gas and acid-base balance of ovine venous blood. Ten clinically healthy sheep were used in this study. A total number of 30 blood samples, were divided into three different groups, and were stored in a refrigerator adjusted to +4 ºC (Group I, n = 10), at RT of about 22-25 ºC (Group II, n = 10) and in an incubator adjusted to 37 ºC (Group III, n = 10) for up to 48 h. Blood samples were analysed for blood gas and acid-base indices at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of storage. In comparison to the baseline value (0), there were significant decreases of blood pH of samples stored at RT and in the incubator after 1 h (ppO2 values were significantly higher for Group I after 2 h and for Groups II and III after 1 h (preference range and it may be of clinical diagnostic use for up to 6 h.

  10. Biostable glucose permeable polymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A new biostable glucose permeable polymer has been developed which is useful, for example, in implantable glucose sensors. This biostable glucose permeable polymer has a number of advantageous characteristics and, for example, does not undergo hydrolytic cleavage and degradation, thereby providing...... a composition that facilitates long term sensor stability in vivo. The versatile characteristics of this polymer allow it to be used in a variety of contexts, for example to form the body of an implantable glucose sensor. The invention includes the polymer composition, sensor systems formed from this polymer...

  11. Regulation of intestinal permeability: The role of proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Ceuleers, Hannah; Witters, Leonie; Patteet, Eveline; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid; De Man, Joris G; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2017-03-28

    The gastrointestinal barrier is - with approximately 400 m 2 - the human body's largest surface separating the external environment from the internal milieu. This barrier serves a dual function: permitting the absorption of nutrients, water and electrolytes on the one hand, while limiting host contact with noxious luminal antigens on the other hand. To maintain this selective barrier, junction protein complexes seal the intercellular space between adjacent epithelial cells and regulate the paracellular transport. Increased intestinal permeability is associated with and suggested as a player in the pathophysiology of various gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gastrointestinal tract is exposed to high levels of endogenous and exogenous proteases, both in the lumen and in the mucosa. There is increasing evidence to suggest that a dysregulation of the protease/antiprotease balance in the gut contributes to epithelial damage and increased permeability. Excessive proteolysis leads to direct cleavage of intercellular junction proteins, or to opening of the junction proteins via activation of protease activated receptors. In addition, proteases regulate the activity and availability of cytokines and growth factors, which are also known modulators of intestinal permeability. This review aims at outlining the mechanisms by which proteases alter the intestinal permeability. More knowledge on the role of proteases in mucosal homeostasis and gastrointestinal barrier function will definitely contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets for permeability-related diseases.

  12. Pathophysiological consequences of VEGF-induced vascular permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Sara M.; Cheresh, David A.

    2005-09-01

    Although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces angiogenesis, it also disrupts vascular barrier function in diseased tissues. Accordingly, VEGF expression in cancer and ischaemic disease has unexpected pathophysiological consequences. By uncoupling endothelial cell-cell junctions VEGF causes vascular permeability and oedema, resulting in extensive injury to ischaemic tissues after stroke or myocardial infarction. In cancer, VEGF-mediated disruption of the vascular barrier may potentiate tumour cell extravasation, leading to widespread metastatic disease. Therefore, by blocking the vascular permeability promoting effects of VEGF it may be feasible to reduce tissue injury after ischaemic disease and minimize the invasive properties of circulating tumour cells.

  13. Can transcutaneous carbon dioxide pressure be a surrogate of blood gas samples for spontaneously breathing emergency patients? The ERNESTO experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschanski, Nicolas; Garcia, Léa; Delasalle, Emilie; Mzabi, Lynda; Rouff, Edwin; Dautheville, Sandrine; Renai, Fayrouz; Kieffer, Yann; Lefevre, Guillaume; Freund, Yonathan; Ray, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    It is known that the arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2) is useful for emergency physicians to assess the severity of dyspnoeic spontaneously breathing patients. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide pressure (PtcCO2) measurements could be a non-invasive alternative to PaCO2 measurements obtained by blood gas samples, as suggested in previous studies. This study evaluates the reliability of a new device in the emergency department (ED). We prospectively included patients presenting to the ED with respiratory distress who were breathing spontaneously or under non-invasive ventilation. We simultaneously performed arterial blood gas measurements and measurement of PtcCO2 using a sensor placed either on the forearm or the side of the chest and connected to the TCM4 CombiM device. The agreement between PaCO2 and PtcCO2 was assessed using the Bland-Altman method. Sixty-seven spontaneously breathing patients were prospectively included (mean age 70 years, 52% men) and 64 first measurements of PtcCO2 (out of 67) were analysed out of the 97 performed. Nineteen patients (28%) had pneumonia, 19 (28%) had acute heart failure and 19 (28%) had an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Mean PaCO2 was 49 mm Hg (range 22-103). The mean difference between PaCO2 and PtcCO2 was 9 mm Hg (range -47 to +54) with 95% limits of agreement of -21.8 mm Hg and 39.7 mm Hg. Only 36.3% of the measurement differences were within 5 mm Hg. Our results show that PtcCO2 measured by the TCM4 device could not replace PaCO2 obtained by arterial blood gas analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. The effects of hypotension on differences between the results of simultaneous venous and arterial blood gas analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Shirani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Analysis of venous blood gas (VBG can represent arterial blood gas (ABG analysis in patients with various diseases. The effects of hypotension on differences between the results of simultaneous venous and arterial blood gas analyses were reviewed. Methods: This observational, cross-sectional study was conducted from March to October 2010 in emergency depart-ments of two university hospitals in Tehran (Iran on consecutive adult patients for whom ABG had been indicated for diagnosis/treatment. Arterial and peripheral venous bloods were simultaneously sampled with blood pressure measure-ment. The VBG-ABG amount of difference regarding pH, HCO 3 , PCO 2 , PO 2 , SO 2 , and Base Excess (BE was com-pared between those with and without hypotension. Results: During the study, 192 patients (51.6 ± 23.6 years, 67.7% males were entered into the hypotension (n = 78 and normotensive groups (n = 114. The average VBG-ABG amount of difference (95% limits of agreement in the hypotension versus normotensive group were -0.030 (-0.09 to 0.03 vs. -0.016 (-0.1 to 0.068 for pH (p = 0.01, 1.79 (-1.91 to 5.49 vs. 1.32 (-1.94 to 4.58 mEq/L for HCO 3 (p = 0.032, 2.69 (-20.43 to 25.81 vs. 2.03 (-7.75 to 11.81 mmHg for PCO 2 (p = 0.295, -35.97 (-130.17 to 58.23 vs. -32.65 (-104.79 to 39.49 mmHg for PO 2 (p = 0.293, -18.58 (-14.66 to 51.82 vs. -9.06 (-31.28 to 13.16 percent (p < 0.001 for SO 2 , and 0.25 (-3.73 to 4.23 vs. 0.79 (-2.51 to 4.09 for BE (p = 0.036. Conclusions: Hypotensive status is associated with an increase in the amount of difference between VBG and ABG analysis regarding pH, HCO 3 , and BE, though the amount of increase does not seem to be clinically important. Studying the precise effects of replacing ABG with VBG on the clinical decision-making and the following outcomes is worth-while.

  15. Blood gas and electrolyte values of (Capra hircus Canindé breed goats raised in the northeastern semiarid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talyta Lins Nunes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Nunes T.L., Oliveira M.G.C., Paiva A.L.C., Bezerra T.C.G., Barrêto Júnior R.A. & Paula V.V. [Blood gas and electrolyte values of (Capra hircus Canindé breed goats raised in the northeastern semiarid.] Valores hemogasométricos de caprinos (Capra hircus da raça Canindé criados no semiárido nordestino. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 36(3:255-260, 2014. Departamento de Ciências Animais, Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Árido, BR 110, Km 47, Bairro Presidente Costa e Silva, Mossoró, RN 59625-900, Brasil. E-mail: talyta_lins@hotmail.com Canindé goat breed is native of northeastern Brazil and is in danger of extinction. The objective of this research was to determine blood gas and electrolytes values in Canindé goat breed reared in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, establishing baseline data for the breed in the semi-arid conditions. Blood samples from 83 clinically healthy animals were collected and distributed in four groups: Group I comprised of 32 pregnant females, Group II, 29 non-pregnant, Group III, 10 males, and group IV consisted of 12 pups. The blood sample was submitted for blood gas analysis, determining the concentration of sodium, potassium, chloride, total carbon dioxide, pH, carbon dioxide partial pressure, sodium bicarbonate, excess base, and anion gap. Data with normal distribution were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test; those which did not have a normal distribution were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Spearman. The results were expressed as mean and standard deviation. The values obtained were similar to those found in other studies with different goat and sheep breeds, and thus may serve as reference for the Canindé breed. The data suggest an influence of age, sex and reproductive status in the variables analyzed.

  16. Renal Fractional Excretion of Sodium in Relation to Arterial Blood Gas and Spirometric Parameters in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arterial gas derangement could change urinary sodium excretion in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD patients.There are very few and conflicting data in regards to the measurement of fractional excretion of sodium in COPD patients. The main aim of this study was to assess the relationship between renal fractional excretion of sodium(FeNa with arterial blood gas and spirometric parameters in COPD. Materials and Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study performed on 40 consecutive stable COPD outpatients in 2 main general hospitals (Emam Reza, Ghaem in Mashhad/Iran between 2011 and 2012. We investigated the relationship of renal FeNa with arterial blood gas parameters including HCO3, PH, PaCO2 and PaO2, and spirometric parameters. Analysis was done by SPSS v16 with a statistically meaningful p value of less than 0.05. Results: Mean age was 65.97±10.77 SD years and female to male ratio was 0.26. A renal FeNa of less than 1% was presented in 27% patients. There was a significant, positive relationship between renal FeNa and PaO2 (P=0.005, r=0.456. The correlations between PaCO2, HCO3, PH and spirometric parameters were not seen (P>0.05, but there was a significant relationship between Urine Na and PaO2. Outstanding, it seems likely that kidneys of COPD patients are responsible for sodium retaining state particularly in the presence of hypoxemia. Conclusion: This study indicates that in COPD patients, PaO2 but not PaCO2 is related to renal FeNa which shows the probable role of hypoxemia on sodium output in COPD patients. However, some caution is needed for interpretation of the probable role of hypercapnia on sodium retention in COPD.

  17. Influence of different storage times and temperatures on blood gas and acid-base balance in ovine venous blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the effects of storage temperature and time on blood gas and acid-base balance of ovine venous blood. Ten clinically healthy sheep were used in this study. A total number of 30 blood samples, were divided into three different groups, and were stored in a refrigerator adjusted to +4 ºC (Group I, n = 10, at RT of about 22-25 ºC (Group II, n = 10 and in an incubator adjusted to 37 ºC (Group III, n = 10 for up to 48 h. Blood samples were analysed for blood gas and acid-base indices at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of storage. In comparison to the baseline value (0, there were significant decreases of blood pH of samples stored at RT and in the incubator after 1 h (p<0.05, the pH value of refrigerated blood samples exhibited insignificant changes during the study (p<0.05. Mean values of pCO2 showed a significant increase in Group I and Group III after 1 h then a progressive decrease after 12 h in all Groups. Mean pO2 values were significantly higher for Group I after 2 h and for Groups II and III after 1 h (p<0.05. In general, base excess decreased significantly for all the groups during the study especially in Groups II and III. In comparison with baseline values, in all groups, bicarbonate (HCO3 increased between 1 h and 6 h (p<0.05, and later decreased at the end of the study (p<0.05. In conclusion, status of acid-base indices of the samples stored at refrigerator and RT were found within normal reference range and it may be of clinical diagnostic use for up to 6 h.

  18. Reliability of point-of-care hematocrit, blood gas, electrolyte, lactate and glucose measurement during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfelder-Visscher, J; Weerwind, P W; Teerenstra, S; Brouwer, M H J

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the GEM Premier blood gas analyser was upgraded to the GEM Premier 3000. In addition to pH, pCO2, pO2, Na+, K+, Ca2+, and hematocrit measurement, glucose and lactate can be measured on the GEM Premier 3000. In this prospective clinical study, the analytical performance of the GEM Premier 3000 was compared with the Ciba Corning 865 analyser for blood gas/electrolytes/metabolites, and for hematocrit with the Sysmex XE 2100 instrument. During a 6-month period, 127 blood samples were analysed on both the GEM Premier 3000 analyser and our laboratory analysers (Ciba Corning 865/Sysmex 2100 instrument), and compared using the agreement analysis for quantitative data. With the exception of K+, the other parameters (pCO2, pO2, Na+, Ca2+, hematocrit, glucose, and lactate) can be described in terms of the mean and standard deviation of the differences. For K+ measurement, a clear linear trend (r=0.79, preference range, the GEM Premier 3000 measured systematically too low or too high, respectively. Furthermore, in comparison with the other parameters, a therapeutically unacceptable systematic difference (mean of difference: -2.2%, p=0.05) in hematocrit measurement on the GEM Premier 3000 was observed for hematocrit values below 30%. The variance of the readings for the GEM Premier 3000 measurements was at clinically acceptable levels. The GEM Premier 3000 analyser seems to be suitable for point-of-care testing of electrolytes, metabolites, and blood gases during cardiopulmonary bypass. However, its downward bias in hematocrit values below 30% suggests that using the GEM Premier 3000 as a transfusion trigger leads to overtreatment with packed red cells.

  19. Correlation between arterial and venous blood gas analysis parameters in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novović Miloš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Arterial blood gas (ABG analyses have an important role in the assessment and monitoring of the metabolic and oxygen status of patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Arterial puncture could have a lot of adverse effects, while sampling of venous blood is simpler and is not so invasive. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether venous blood gas (VBG values of pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2, partial oxygen pressure (PO2, bicarbonate (HCO3, and venous and arterial blood oxygen saturation (SO2 can reliably predict ABG levels in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD. Methods. Forty-seven patients with a prior diagnosis of COPD were included in this prospective study. The patients with acute exacerbation of this disease were examined at the General Hospital EMS Department in Prijepolje. ABG samples were taken immediately after venous sampling, and both were analyzed. Results. The Pearson correlation coefficients between arterial and venous parameters were 0.828, 0.877, 0.599, 0.896 and 0.312 for pH, PCO2, PO2, HCO3 and SO2, respectively. The statistically significant correlation between arterial and venous pH, PCO2 and HCO3, values was found in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD (p<0.001. Conclusion. When we cannot provide arterial blood for analysis, venous values of the pH, Pv,CO2 and HCO3 parameters can be an alternative to their arterial equivalents in the interpretation of the metabolic status in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD, while the values of venous Pv,O2 and Sv,O2 cannot be used as predictors in the assessment of oxygen status of such patients.

  20. Intestinal permeability - a new target for disease prevention and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, S.C.; Barbara, G.; Buurman, W.; Ockhuizen, T.; Schulzke, J.D.; Serino, M.; Tilg, H.; Watson, A.; Wells, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Data are accumulating that emphasize the important role of the intestinal barrier and intestinal permeability for health and disease. However, these terms are poorly defined, their assessment is a matter of debate, and their clinical significance is not clearly established. In the present review,

  1. Intestinal permeability and carrier-mediated monosaccharide absorption in preterm neonates during the early postnatal period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwet, Ellen V.; Heineman, Erik; Buurman, Wim A.; ter Riet, Gerben; Ramsay, Graham; Blanco, Carlos E.

    2002-01-01

    Immaturity of intestinal epithelial barrier function and absorptive capacity may play a role in the pathophysiology of intestinal complications in preterm neonates during the early postnatal period. We determined the intestinal permeability and carrier-mediated absorption of monosaccharides in

  2. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier

  3. Permeability measuremens of brazilian Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Rogério da Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The permeability of Brazilian Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora wood was measured in a custom build gas analysis chamber in order to determine which species could be successfully treated with preservatives. Liquid permeability was tested using an emulsion of Neen oil and a control of distillated water. Air was used to test the gas phase permeability. For both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora, the longitudinal permeability of gas was shown to be about twice as great as the liquid phase permeability. No radial permeability was observed for either wood. The permeability of air and water through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was greater than that through the sapwood of Eucalyptus citriodora. The permeability of neen oil preservative through the sapwood of Eucalyptus grandis was also greater than through the sapwood of E. Citradora, but the difference was not statistically significant. Scanning Electron Microscopy images showed that the distribution and obstruction in the vessels could be correlated with observed permeability properties. Irrespective of the causes of differences in permeability between the species, the fluid phase flux through the sapwood of both species was significant, indicating that both Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus citriodora could be successfully treated with wood preservative.

  4. THE DIFFERENCE IN RESPIRATORY AND BLOOD GAS VALUES DURING RECOVERY AFTER EXERCISE WITH SPONTANEOUS VERSUS REDUCED BREATHING FREQUENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Kapus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Extrapolation from post-exercise measurements has been used to estimate respiratory and blood gas parameters during exercise. This may not be accurate in exercise with reduced breathing frequency (RBF, since spontaneous breathing usually follows exercise. This study was performed to ascertain whether measurement of oxygen saturation and blood gases immediately after exercise accurately reflected their values during exercise with RBF. Eight healthy male subjects performed an incremental cycling test with RBF at 10 breaths per minute. A constant load test with RBF (B10 was then performed to exhaustion at the peak power output obtained during the incremental test. Finally, the subjects repeated the constant load test with spontaneous breathing (SB using the same protocol as B10. Pulmonary ventilation (VE, end-tidal oxygen (PETO2, and carbon dioxide pressures (PETCO2 and oxygen saturation (SaO2 were measured during both constant load tests. The partial pressures of oxygen (PO2 and carbon dioxide (PCO2 in capillary blood were measured during the last minute of exercise, immediately following exercise and during the third minute of recovery. At the end of exercise RBF resulted in lower PETO2, SaO2 and PO2, and higher PETCO2 and PCO2 when compared to spontaneous breathing during exercise. Lower SaO2 and PETO2 were detected only for the first 16s and 20s of recovery after B10 compared to the corresponding period in SB. There were no significant differences in PO2 between SB and B10 measured immediately after the exercise. During recovery from exercise, PETCO2 remained elevated for the first 120s in the B10 trial. There were also significant differences between SB and B10 in PCO2 immediately after exercise. We conclude that RBF during high intensity exercise results in hypoxia; however, due to post-exercise hyperpnoea, measurements of blood gas parameters taken 15s after cessation of exercise did not reflect the changes in PO2 and SaO2 seen during

  5. Permeability of dura mater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer Carsten

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of cortical spreading depression (CSD) it has been suggested that noxious substances diffuse through the dura with resulting firing of epidural nerves. In my view this is unlikely because there are good reasons to suggest that there must be a dura-brain barrier. Alternatively collateral...

  6. Low Permeability Polyimide Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resodyn Technologies proposes a new technology that enables the application of polyimide based cryogenic insulation with low hydrogen permeability. This effort...

  7. Effect of timolol on the permeability of corneal endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, R F; Coakes, R L; Bourne, W M

    1979-01-01

    The effect of short-term administration of timolol on the permeability of the corneal endothelium to fluorescein was measured in normal subjects (single drop) and in a small group of glaucoma patients (one week's treatment). No effect on the endothelium was found in the normal eyes. In the glaucomatous eyes, endothelial permeability was higher than normal when measured after one week without topical medications and normal when measured after one week on timolol treatment. No evidence was found that short-term administration of this drug disturbs the barrier function of the endothelium.

  8. Transverse permeability of woven fabrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Akkerman, Remko; Loendersloot, Richard; van den Berg, S.

    2008-01-01

    The transverse permeability is an essential input in describing the consolidation process of CETEX® laminates. A two-dimensional, finite difference based, Stokes flow solver has been developed to determine the mesoscopic permeability of arbitrary fabric structures. The use of a multigrid solver

  9. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery

  10. The permeability enhancing mechanism of DMSO in ceramide bilayers simulated by molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notman, Rebecca; den Otter, Wouter K.; Noro, Massimo G.; Briels, Willem J.; Anwar, Jamshed

    2007-01-01

    The lipids of the topmost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, represent the primary barrier to molecules penetrating the skin. One approach to overcoming this barrier for the purpose of delivery of active molecules into or via the skin is to employ chemical permeability enhancers, such as

  11. Comparison of arterial blood gas with continuous intra-arterial and transcutaneous PO2 sensors in adult critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G E; Hassell, K T; Mahutte, C K

    1987-05-01

    We compared the partial pressure of oxygen directly via a continuous intra-arterial probe (PiaO2) and indirectly using a transcutaneous device (PtcO2) with simultaneously obtained arterial blood PaO2. The PiaO2 values were measured using a bipolar oxygen sensor placed through an 18-ga arterial catheter. The PtcO2 values were measured using a transcutaneous O2-CO2 sensor placed on the abdomen. Seven critically ill, hemodynamically stable, ventilator-dependent adult patients were studied. Measurements were obtained at varying concentrations (0.25 to 1.0) of inspired oxygen after a 10-min stabilization. A total of 78 simultaneous values were obtained; by linear regression: PiaO2 = 0.91 PaO2 + 1.39 (r = .98, standard errors of the estimate [SEE] = 18.6); PtcO2 = 0.39 PaO2 + 36.2 (r = .89, SEE = 14.1). To assess these instruments as trend monitors, we compared the changes in simultaneous PaO2, PiaO2, and PtcO2 values; by linear regression: delta PiaO2 = 0.90 delta PaO2 + 3.88 (r = .96, SEE = 27.7); delta PtcO2 = 0.43 delta PaO2 + 5.6 (r = .94, SEE = 15.2). We conclude that, although these instruments correlate highly with the PaO2, the SEE was substantial and therefore may limit their clinical reliability in adults. Any acute or clinically significant change in PiaO2 or PtcO2 should be confirmed with a blood gas PaO2.

  12. Different fasting periods in tiletamine-zolezepam-anethetized cats: Glycemia, recovery, blood-gas and cardiorrespiratory parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Gering

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different fasting periods on glycemia levels and on cardiorrespiratory parameters in tiletamine-zolazepam-anesthetized cats were evaluated. Twenty one animals were randomly assigned to three groups: 8 hours (G8, 12 hours (G12 or 18 hours (G18 of the preoperative fasting. The tiletamine-zolazepam (2 mg/kg was administered intravenously. The heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (fR, rectal temperature (T R, glycemia (G, laboratorial glycemia (Glab, venous oxygen partial pressure (PvO2, venous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PvCO2, venous hemoglobin saturation (SvO2, pH, base deficit (BD, bicarbonate concentration (HCO3- and haematocrit were evaluated at 90 minutes after the last meal (T0, immediately before anesthesia (T1 and at ten (T2 and thirty (T3 minutes after tiletamine-zolezepam administration. The time between the administration of anesthetic and the cat's trial to elevate head (Th and the interval between drug administration and aniamal's quadrupedal position (Tqp were recorded. No differences among groups were recorded for glycemia, HR, PvO2, SvO2, pH, BD, HCO3-, Ht and Tqp. In G12 from T2, glycemia increased and from T1 PvCO2 decreased. At T1, PvO2 increased in all groups. In G8 and G12, from T1, DB and HCO3- decreased. In G12 and G18, from T2, Ht decreased. In G12, the Th mean was higher than G8. In conclusion, in tiletamine-zolazepam-anesthetized cats, the different preoperative fasting did not influence glycemia, blood-gas and cardiorrespiratory parameters. Additionally, there was no relationship between glycemia and anesthesia recovery.

  13. Usefulness of Clinical Prediction Rules, D-dimer, and Arterial Blood Gas Analysis to Predict Pulmonary Embolism in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Awan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Pulmonary embolism (PE is seven times more common in cancer patients than non-cancer patients. Since the existing clinical prediction rules (CPRs were validated predominantly in a non-cancer population, we decided to look at the utility of arterial blood gas (ABG analysis and D-dimer in predicting PE in cancer patients. Methods: Electronic medical records were reviewed between December 2005 and November 2010. A total of 177 computed tomography pulmonary angiograms (CTPAs were performed. We selected 104 individuals based on completeness of laboratory and clinical data. Patients were divided into two groups, CTPA positive (patients with PE and CTPA negative (PE excluded. Wells score, Geneva score, and modified Geneva score were calculated for each patient. Primary outcomes of interest were the sensitivities, specificities, positive, and negative predictive values for all three CPRs. Results: Of the total of 104 individuals who had CTPAs, 33 (31.7% were positive for PE and 71 (68.3% were negative. There was no difference in basic demographics between the two groups. Laboratory parameters were compared and partial pressure of oxygen was significantly lower in patients with PE (68.1 mmHg vs. 71 mmHg, p = 0.030. Clinical prediction rules showed good sensitivities (88−100% and negative predictive values (93−100%. An alveolar-arterial (A-a gradient > 20 had 100% sensitivity and negative predictive values. Conclusions: CPRs and a low A-a gradient were useful in excluding PE in cancer patients. There is a need for prospective trials to validate these results.

  14. Evaluation of a hand-held blood gas analyzer for rapid determination of blood gases, electrolytes and metabolites in intensive care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, Antti A M; Lehto, Tiina M; Hedberg, Pirjo S M; Vaskivuo, Tommy E

    2016-04-01

    Intensive care units, operating rooms, emergency departments, and neonatology units need rapid measurements of blood gases, electrolytes, and metabolites. These analyses can be performed in a central laboratory or at the clinic with traditional or compact cassette-type blood gas analyzers such as the epoc blood gas testing system for analyzing whole blood samples at the bedside. In this study, the performance and interchangeability of a hand-held epoc blood gas analyzer was evaluated. The analytical performance of the epoc analyzer was evaluated by determining within-and between-run precisions. The accuracy of the epoc analyzer was assessed by comparing patient results from the device with those obtained with the Siemens Rapidlab 1265 and Rapidpoint RP500 and Siemens Dimension Vista and Sysmex XE-2100 analyzers. The following parameters were measured: pH, pCO2, pO2, Hb (calc), Na+, K+, iCa2+, glucose, and lactate. The CV% of the epoc's between-day imprecision for the various parameters varied from 0.4 to 8.6. The within-run imprecision CV% varied from 0.6 to 5.2. The squared regression coefficient (R2) between the epoc and RL1265 varied from 0.94 to 0.99, with the exception of Na+ and Ca2+ (R2≥0.82). The correlation (R2) of Na+ and K+ between epoc and Dimension Vista was 0.73 and 0.89, respectively. The correlation (R2) of Hb between the epoc and the XE-2100 analyzer was 0.94. With most of the measured blood gas parameters, the epoc analyzer correlated well with reference techniques. The epoc analyzer is suitable for rapid measurement of the blood gases, the electrolytes, and the metabolites in the ICU.

  15. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B [NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at University Tuebingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, D-72770 Reutlingen (Germany); Ahlers, M [GELITA AG, Gammelsbacher Str. 2, D-69412 Eberbach (Germany)], E-mail: schlosshauer@nmi.de

    2008-09-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation.

  16. Permeability testing of biomaterial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesmann, L; Hajosch, R; Nuernberger, J Vaz; Schlosshauer, B; Ahlers, M

    2008-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of biomaterials are critical parameters for a variety of implants. To analyse the permeability of membranes made from crosslinked ultrathin gelatin membranes and the transmigration of cells across the membranes, we combined three technical approaches: (1) a two-chamber-based permeability assay, (2) cell culturing with cytochemical analysis and (3) biochemical enzyme electrophoresis (zymography). Based on the diffusion of a coloured marker molecule in conjunction with photometric quantification, permeability data for a gelatin membrane were determined in the presence or absence of gelatin degrading fibroblasts. Cytochemical evaluation after cryosectioning of the membranes was used to ascertain whether fibroblasts had infiltrated the membrane inside. Zymography was used to investigate the potential release of proteases from fibroblasts, which are known to degrade collagen derivatives such as gelatin. Our data show that the diffusion equilibrium of a low molecular weight dye across the selected gelatin membrane is approached after about 6-8 h. Fibroblasts increase the permeability due to cavity formation in the membrane inside without penetrating the membrane for an extended time period (>21 days in vitro). Zymography indicates that cavity formation is most likely due to the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases. In summary, the combination of the depicted methods promises to facilitate a more rational development of biomaterials, because it provides a rapid means of determining permeability characteristics and bridges the gap between descriptive methodology and the mechanistic understanding of permeability alterations due to biological degradation

  17. Epidermal Permeability Barrier in the Treatment of Keratosis Pilaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanawatt Kootiratrakarn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate and compare the efficacy, safety, hydrating properties, and tolerability of 10% lactic acid (LA and 5% salicylic acid (SA in the therapy of keratosis pilaris (KP. Material and Method. Patients with KP were randomized for treatment with either 10% LA or 5% SA creams being applied twice daily for 3 months. The patients were clinically assessed at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment and 4 weeks after treatment. The functional properties of the stratum corneum (SC were determined before treatment, 12 weeks, and follow-up phase by high-frequency conductance and transepidermal water loss (TEWL. Results. At the end of the trial, the mean reduction of the lesions from baseline was statistically significant for 10% LA (66% and 5% SA (52%. During the treatment, higher conductance values were found on both group and this improvement was maintained until the follow up period. No significant differences in transepidermal water loss were observed after treatment. The adverse effects were limited to mild irritation localized on the skin without systemic side effect. Conclusion. The study demonstrated that 10% LA and 5% SA are beneficial to treat KP with the significantly clearance and marked improvement as by instrumental evaluation.

  18. Permeability barriers to embryo cryopreservation of Pectinophora gossypiella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to cryopreserve the embryos of the pink bollworm moth, Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders). Previously developed dipteran cryopreservation protocols were not directly adaptable to use with the embryos of this lepidopteran species. Physiochemical and ele...

  19. Development of Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRB) Using Edible Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    been used to stimulate anaerobic bioremediation. In practice, the added organic substrates are first fermented to hydrogen (H2) and low-molecular...up, all of the columns were switched over to an influent solution containing 1 g/L yeast extract and 2 g/L lactate for 18 days to establish anaerobic ...filter-sterilized anaerobic digester sludge supernatant and yeast extract stimulated VC and ethene production by Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain

  20. Treatment for cracked and permeable Houston clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Leung, M.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, the treatability of a field clay (obtained from Houston, Texas) and a clay-sand mixture to reduce their hydraulic conductivity was evaluated. Remolded field clay and clay-sand mixture with and without methanol contamination were treated to reduce their hydraulic conductivity by permeating very dilute grout solutions. The concentration of sodium silicate in the grout solution was 8%, while the solid content in the cement grout was 0.3%. The hydraulic conductivity of permeable Houston clay (hydraulic conductivity >10 -5 cm/sec) could be reduced to less than 10 -7 cm/sec (U.S. EPA limit for soil barriers) by permeating with a selected combination of grout solutions

  1. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  2. VEGF-Induced Vascular Permeability Is Mediated by FAK

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiao Lei; Nam, Ju-Ock; Jean, Christine; Lawson, Christine; Walsh, Colin T.; Goka, Erik; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Tomar, Alok; Tancioni, Isabelle; Uryu, Sean; Guan, Jun-Lin; Acevedo, Lisette M.; Weis, Sara M.; Cheresh, David A.; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) form cell-cell adhesive junctional structures maintaining vascular integrity. This barrier is dynamically regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor signaling. We created an inducible knockin mouse model to study the contribution of the integrin-associated focal adhesion tyrosine kinase (FAK) signaling on vascular function. Here we show that genetic or pharmacological FAK inhibition in ECs prevents VEGF-stimulated permeability downstream of VEGF re...

  3. Practical Perspectives On The In-Vitro And In-Vivo Evaluation Of A Fiber Optic Blood Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansmann, Douglas R.; Gehrich, John L.

    1988-06-01

    in-vitro blood gas analyzer.

  4. Transparent anodes for polymer photovoltaics: Oxygen permeability of PEDOT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.; Carlé, Jon Eggert; Cruys-Bagger, N.

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen permeability of the transparent organic anode poly(3,4,-ethylene dioxythiophene) with paratoluenesulphonate as the anion (PEDOT:pTS) was determined to be 2.5 +/- 0.7 x 10(-15) cm(3) (STP) CM cm(-2) S-1 Pa-1, and is thus comparable in magnitude to the oxygen permeability of polyethylene......The oxygen permeability of the transparent organic anode poly(3,4,-ethylene dioxythiophene) with paratoluenesulphonate as the anion (PEDOT:pTS) was determined to be 2.5 +/- 0.7 x 10(-15) cm(3) (STP) CM cm(-2) S-1 Pa-1, and is thus comparable in magnitude to the oxygen permeability...... of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET). The oxygen diffusion through bilayers of polyethylene (PE) and PEDOT:pTS and bilayers of PET and PEDOT:pTS was established. The bilayer structures were applied as the carrier substrate and the transparent anode in polymer-based photovoltaic devices employing a mixture of poly(1-methoxy-4...... of the devices with PET as the carrier substrate degraded more slowly due to the lower oxygen and water permeability, whereas devices using PE as the carrier substrate gave devices with a very short lifetime. It was found that PEDOT:pTS on its own is a not a significant barrier for oxygen in the context...

  5. Endothelial Regulator of Calcineurin 1 Promotes Barrier Integrity and Modulates Histamine-Induced Barrier Dysfunction in Anaphylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballesteros-Martinez, Constanza; Mendez-Barbero, Nerea; Montalvo-Yuste, Alma

    2017-01-01

    anaphylaxis. Functionalin vitroassays showed that overexpression of Rcan1 promotes barrier integrity, suggesting a role played by this molecule in vascular permeability. Consistent with these findings,in vivomodels of subcutaneous and intravenous histamine-mediated fluid extravasation showed increased...

  6. Building barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turksen, Kursad

    2017-10-02

    Formation of tissue barriers starts in early development where it is critical for normal cell fate selection, differentiation and organogenesis. Barrier maintenance is critical to the ongoing function of organs during adulthood and aging. Dysfunctional tissue barrier formation and function at any stage of the organismal life cycle underlies many disease states.

  7. Effect of heparin in combined with magnesium sulfate on the blood gas and blood viscosity in patients with pulmonary heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Deng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of heparin in combined with magnesium sulfate on the blood gas indicators and blood viscosity in patients with pulmonary heart disease merged with respiratory failure. Methods: A total of 80 patients with pulmonary heart disease merged with respiratory failure who were admitted in our hospital were included in the study and randomized into the observation group (n=40 and the control group (n=40. The patients in the control group were given routine symptomatic treatments of pulmonary heart disease. On the above basis, the patients in the observation group were given intravenous drip of heparin and magnesium sulfate. The patients in the two groups were treated for 2 weeks. The blood gas indicators, blood viscosity indicators, PAPs, SBP, and DBP in the two groups were compared. The clinical efficacy in the two groups was evaluated. Results: After 2-week treatment, PaO2 and PaCO2 in the two groups were improved, pH value was not significantly changed, PaO2 in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group, while PaCO2 was significantly lower than that in the control group. The hemorheology indicators after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment, among which the comparison of WBV, PV, Hct, and EAI between the two groups was statistically significant, and PAPs after treatment in the observation group was significantly reduced when compared with the control group. SBP and DBP after treatment in the two groups were not significantly changed. Conclusions: Heparin in combined with magnesium sulfate in the treatment of pulmonary heart disease merged with respiratory failure can improve the blood gas indicators and blood viscosity indicators, and reduce SBP of pulmonary artery, with a higher efficacy; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  8. Assessment of blood gas parameters and the degree of inflammation in noninvasive positive pressure ventilation combined with aminophylline treatment of COPD complicated with type II respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ru Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation combined with aminophylline therapy on blood gas parameters and the degree of inflammation in patients with COPD and type II respiratory failure. Methods: A total of 80 patients with COPD and type Ⅱ respiratory failure were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=40, control group received symptomatic treatment + aminophylline treatment, observation group received symptomatic treatment + aminophylline + noninvasive positive pressure ventilation treatment, and then differences in blood gas parameters, pulmonary function parameters, hemorheology parameters and inflammatory factor levels were compared between two groups of patients after treatment. Results: Radial artery pH and PO2 values of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group while PCO2, Cl- and CO2CP values were lower than those of control group; pulmonary function parameters FVC, FEV1, FEF25-75, MMF, PEF and FRC values of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group; whole blood viscosity (150 s- and 10 s-, plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, erythrocyte aggregation index and erythrocyte rigidity index values in peripheral venous blood of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group; serum IL-17, IL-33, TREM-1, sICAM-1 and PGE2 levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation combined with aminophylline can optimize the respiratory function of patients with COPD and type II respiratory failure and improve blood gas parameters and the degree of inflammation.

  9. Evaluation of venous blood gas levels, blood chemistry and haemocytometric parameters in milk fed veal calves at different periods of livestock cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambelluca, S; Fiore, E; Sadocco, A; Gianesella, M; Vazzana, I; Orefice, T; Morgante, M

    2016-12-01

    An evaluation of blood chemistry profile in relation to specific stages of livestock cycle can help better understand variations in physiological conditions in order to adjust management systems to animal needs. In addition to basal hematological investigation, the acid-base balance and blood gases are essential tools in evaluating metabolism in calves. The relationship between blood gas parameters, diet and growth should be further investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in acid-base status, blood gases, serum chemistry and hematological parameters in veal calves at different periods of livestock cycle. One hundred twenty-eight healthy cross breeding calves were enrolled in a farm in North-East Italy. Blood samplings were carried out from the jugular vein on day 1 (t1), 60 (t2) and 150 (t3) after arrival. Blood gas analysis was performed and hematological parameters were evaluated. One-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post-hoc test were performed to assess differences between blood parameter values at the different periods. The main differences in blood gas parameter levels during the livestock cycle concerned pH, Base Excess and HCO3 with higher values recorded in t3. Urea, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and bilirubin mean values were significantly higher in t1 than in t2 and t3. Aspartate aminotransferase increased from t1 to t2 and t3. Alkaline Phosphatase was higher in t2. Fe levels severely dropped in t2 and in t3, and the decrease led to a restrained but significant reduction in haemoglobin values. A correspondent decrease in the other haemocytometric parameters was found.

  10. Effect of adjuvant noninvasive positive pressure ventilation on blood gas parameters, cardiac function and inflammatory state in patients with COPD and type II respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Ming Zhu1

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: T o analyze the effect of adjuvant noninvasive positive pressure ventilation on blood gas parameters, cardiac function and inflammatory state in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and type II respiratory failure. Methods: 90 patients with COPD and type II respiratory failure were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=45. Control group received conventional therapy, observation group received conventional therapy + adjuvant noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and differences in blood gas parameters, cardiac function, inflammatory state, etc., were compared between two groups of patients 2 weeks after treatment. Results: Arterial blood gas parameters pH and alveolar-arterial partial pressure of oxygen [P(A-aO2] levels of observation group were higher than those of control group while, potassium ion (K+, chloride ion (Cl﹣ and carbon dioxide combining power (CO2CP levels were lower than those of control group 2 weeks after treatment; echocardiography parameters Doppler-derived tricuspid lateral annular systolic velocity (DTIS and pulmonary arterial velocity (PAV levels were lower than those of control group (P<0.05 while pulmonary artery accelerating time (PAACT, left ventricular enddiastolic dimension (LVDd and right atrioventricular tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE levels were higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum cardiac function indexes adiponectin (APN, Copeptin, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, cystatin C (CysC, growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15 and heart type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP content were lower than those of control group (P<0.05; serum inflammatory factors hypersensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 content were lower than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Adjuvant

  11. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, T P; Arango, J; Wolc, A; Brady, J V; Fulton, J E; Rubinoff, I; Ehr, I J; Persia, M E; O'Sullivan, N P

    2016-02-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT®1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iCa mmol/L), glucose (Glu mg/dl), hematocrit (Hct% Packed Cell Volume [PCV]), pH, partial pressure carbon dioxide (PCO2 mm Hg), partial pressure oxygen (PO2 mm Hg), total concentration carbon dioxide (TCO2 mmol/L), bicarbonate (HCO3 mmol/L), base excess (BE mmol/L), oxygen saturation (sO2%), and hemoglobin (Hb g/dl). Data were analyzed using ANOVA to investigate the effect of production status as categorized by bird age. Trait relationships were evaluated by linear correlation and their spectral decomposition. All traits differed significantly among pullets and mature laying hens in both first and second lay cycles. Levels for K, iCa, Hct, pH, TCO2, HCO3, BE, sO2, and Hb differed significantly between first cycle and second cycle laying hens. Many venous blood gas and chemistry parameters were significantly correlated. The first 3 eigenvalues explained ∼2/3 of total variation. The first 2 principal components (PC) explained 51% of the total variation and indicated acid-balance and relationship between blood O2 and CO2. The third PC explained 16% of variation and seems to be related to blood iCa. Establishing reference ranges for pullet and laying hen blood gas and chemistry with the i-STAT®1 handheld unit provides a mechanism to further investigate pullet and layer physiology, evaluate metabolic disturbances, and may potentially serve as a means to select breeder candidates with optimal blood gas or chemistry levels on-farm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  12. Commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullet and laying hen venous blood gas and chemistry profiles utilizing the portable i-STAT?1 analyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Schaal, T. P.; Arango, J.; Wolc, A.; Brady, J. V.; Fulton, J. E.; Rubinoff, I.; Ehr, I. J.; Persia, M. E.; O'Sullivan, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    Venous blood gas and chemistry reference ranges were determined for commercial Hy-Line W-36 pullets and laying hens utilizing the portable i-STAT?1 analyzer and CG8+ cartridges. A total of 632 samples were analyzed from birds between 4 and 110 wk of age. Reference ranges were established for pullets (4 to 15 wk), first cycle laying hens (20 to 68 wk), and second cycle (post molt) laying hens (70 to 110 wk) for the following traits: sodium (Na mmol/L), potassium (K mmol/L), ionized calcium (iC...

  13. Scintigraphic assessment of vascularity and blood-tissue barrier of human brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Front, D.

    1978-01-01

    Assessment of vascularity and blood-tissue barrier was performed by sequential scintigraphy in 43 patients with brain tumours. The blood-tumour barrier was evaluated by use of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, and vascularity using sup(99m)Tc-labelled red blood cells. Three groups of tumours were found: tumours with low vascularity and permeable barrier, tumours with high vascularity and permeable barrier, and tumours with low vascularity and relatively impermeable barrier. The first group indicates that when vessels are permeable, there may be a rapid penetration of large amounts of pertechnetate into the tumour even when vascularity is not increased. In the other two groups penetration of pertechnetate into the tumour is affected by vascularity, as it determines the total area where passage of the radiopharmaceutical takes place. It is suggested that the permeability of the blood-tumour barrier and the amount of vascularity may have an effect on the success of chemotherapy in brain tumours. (author)

  14. Evaluation of a portable clinical analyzer for the determination of blood gas partial pressures, electrolyte concentrations, and hematocrit in venous blood samples collected from cattle, horses, and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiró, Juliana R; Borges, Alexandre S; Gonçalves, Roberto C; Mendes, Luiz Claudio N

    2010-05-01

    To compare results reported for blood gas partial pressures, electrolyte concentrations, and Hct in venous blood samples collected from cattle, horses, and sheep and analyzed by use of a portable clinical analyzer (PCA) and reference analyzer (RA). Clinically normal animals (24 cattle, 22 horses, and 22 sheep). pH; Pco(2); Po(2); total carbon dioxide concentration; oxygen saturation; base excess; concentrations of HCO(3)(-), Na(+), K(+), and ionized calcium; Hct; and hemoglobin concentration were determined with a PCA. Results were compared with those obtained for the same blood sample with an RA. Bias (mean difference) and variability (95% confidence interval) were determined for all data reported. Data were also subjected to analyses by Deming regression and Pearson correlation. Analysis of Bland-Altman plots revealed good agreement between results obtained with the PCA and those obtained with the RA for pH and total carbon dioxide concentration in cattle, K(+) concentration in horses and sheep, and base excess in horses. Except for Na(+) concentration and Hct in horses and sheep, correlation was good or excellent for most variables reported. Data from blood gas and electrolyte analyses obtained by use of the PCA can be used to evaluate the health status of cattle, horses, and sheep. Furthermore, the handheld PCA device may have a great advantage over the RA device as a result of the ability to analyze blood samples on farms that may be located far from urban centers.

  15. Effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jin Shi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of insulin pump and continuous intravenous insulin on ketone body metabolism, blood gas indexes and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Methods: Patients with diabetic ketoacidosis who were treated in Meizhou Maternal and Child Heath Hospital between May 2014 and March 2017 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into the group A who received subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump and the group B who received intravenous small-dose insulin injection by micropump. The indexes of ketone body, blood gas and stress were measured before and after treatment. Results: 12 h and 24 h after treatment, serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of both groups of patients were significantly lower than those before treatment while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those before treatment, and serum β-hydroxybutyrate, MDA, NE, ACTH and Cor contents of group A were significantly lower than those of group B while pH, HCO3 - and base excess levels as well as serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT and TAC contents were significantly higher than those of group B. Conclusion: Subcutaneous insulin infusion by insulin pump can improve ketone body metabolism, acidosis status and stress state in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

  16. Determination of reference intervals and comparison of venous blood gas parameters using a standard and nonstandard collection method in 51 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, K; Kutter, A; Jud Schefer, R S; Sigrist, N

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine reference intervals (RI) for venous blood parameters determined with the RAPIDPoint 500 (RP500) blood gas analyzer using blood gas syringes (BGS) and to determine whether immediate analysis of venous blood collected into lithium heparin (LH) tubes can replace anaerobic blood sampling into BGS. The null hypothesis was that canine venous blood samples collected in BGS and in LH tubes are comparable. Jugular blood was collected from 51 healthy dogs into a BGS and a LH tube. The BGS was immediately analyzed followed by the LH tube. The RI were calculated from BGS results. The BGS and LH tubes results were compared using paired t-test or Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test and Bland-Altman analysis. To assess clinical relevance, the bias between BGS and LH tubes was compared with the allowable total error (TEa). Values derived from LH tubes showed no significant difference for standard bicarbonate (HCO3std), whole blood base excess (BE B), Na, K, Cl, glucose and hemoglobin (tHb). The pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen, actual bicarbonate, extracellular base excess, ionized Ca, anion gap and lactate were significantly (p.

  17. Assessment of blood gas analysis results and degree of infection in children with severe pneumonia and respiratory failure after NCPAP therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the blood gas analysis results and degree of infection in children with severe pneumonia and respiratory failure after NCPAP therapy. Methods: A total of 60 cases of children with severe pneumonia and respiratory failure who were treated in our hospital from August 2013 to August 2015 were included in the study and randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=30. Control group received routine anti-infection and oxygen inhalation by nasal tube, observation group received additional NCPAP therapy, and then differences in values of blood gas and oxygen metabolism indexes, resting pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics indexes and serum infection-related parameters were compared between two groups. Results: After observation group received NCPAP therapy, PaO2, PH, CaO2, DO2 and SaO2 values were higher than those of control group while PaCO2 and VO2 values were lower than those of control group; VC%, FVC%, FEV1%, PEF%, MMEF% and MVV% values were higher than those of control group; respiratory mechanics parameters PIP, PP, Pm, VE and R values were lower than those of control group; serum CHE and PA values were higher than those of control group while sTREM-1 and HMGB-1 values were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: NCPAP therapy can significantly optimize the respiratory function and promote the recovery from infection in children with severe pneumonia and respiratory failure, and it has positive clinical significance.

  18. Gap junction protein connexin43 exacerbates lung vascular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J O'Donnell

    Full Text Available Increased vascular permeability causes pulmonary edema that impairs arterial oxygenation and thus contributes to morbidity and mortality associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and sepsis. Although components of intercellular adhesive and tight junctions are critical for maintaining the endothelial barrier, there has been limited study of the roles of gap junctions and their component proteins (connexins. Since connexins can modulate inflammatory signaling in other systems, we hypothesized that connexins may also regulate pulmonary endothelial permeability. The relationships between connexins and the permeability response to inflammatory stimuli were studied in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. Prolonged treatment with thrombin, lipopolysaccharide, or pathological cyclic stretch increased levels of mRNA and protein for the major connexin, connexin43 (Cx43. Thrombin and lipopolysaccharide both increased intercellular communication assayed by transfer of microinjected Lucifer yellow. Although thrombin decreased transendothelial resistance in these cells, the response was attenuated by pretreatment with the connexin inhibitor carbenoxolone. Additionally, the decreases of transendothelial resistance produced by either thrombin or lipopolysaccharide were attenuated by reducing Cx43 expression by siRNA knockdown. Both carbenoxolone and Cx43 knockdown also abrogated thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Taken together, these data suggest that increased lung vascular permeability induced by inflammatory conditions may be amplified via increased expression of Cx43 and intercellular communication among pulmonary endothelial cells.

  19. Mechanical control of the endothelial barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburg, Joppe; de Rooij, Johan

    The integrity of the endothelial barrier is controlled by the combined action of chemical and mechanical signaling systems. Permeability-regulating factors signal through small GTPases to regulate the architecture of the cytoskeleton and this has a strong impact on the morphology and stability of

  20. Corneal and conjunctival drug permeability: Systematic comparison and pharmacokinetic impact in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Eva; Del Amo, Eva M; Toropainen, Elisa; Tengvall-Unadike, Unni; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Urtti, Arto; Ruponen, Marika

    2018-04-03

    On the surface of the eye, both the cornea and conjunctiva are restricting ocular absorption of topically applied drugs, but barrier contributions of these two membranes have not been systemically compared. Herein, we studied permeability of 32 small molecular drug compounds across an isolated porcine cornea and built a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model for the permeability. Corneal drug permeability (data obtained for 25 drug molecules) showed a 52-fold range in permeability (0.09-4.70 × 10 -6  cm/s) and the most important molecular descriptors in predicting the permeability were hydrogen bond donor, polar surface area and halogen ratio. Corneal permeability values were compared to their conjunctival drug permeability values. Ocular drug bioavailability and systemic absorption via conjunctiva were predicted for this drug set with pharmacokinetic calculations. Drug bioavailability in the aqueous humour was simulated to be drug across the conjunctiva to the blood circulation restricts significantly ocular drug bioavailability and, therefore, ocular absorption does not increase proportionally with the increasing corneal drug permeability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dopamine enhances duodenal epithelial permeability via the dopamine D5receptor in rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X-Y; Zhang, D-N; Wang, Y-A; Fan, R-F; Hong, F; Zhang, Y; Li, Y; Zhu, J-X

    2017-05-01

    The intestinal barrier is made up of epithelial cells and intercellular junctional complexes to regulate epithelial ion transport and permeability. Dopamine (DA) is able to promote duodenal epithelial ion transport through D1-like receptors, which includes subtypes of D 1 (D 1 R) and D 5 (D 5 R), but whether D1-like receptors influence the duodenal permeability is unclear. FITC-dextran permeability, short-circuit current (I SC ), Western blot, immunohistochemistry and ELISA were used in human D 5 R transgenic mice and hyperendogenous enteric DA (HEnD) rats in this study. Dopamine induced a downward deflection in I SC and an increase in FITC-dextran permeability of control rat duodenum, which were inhibited by the D1-like receptor antagonist, SCH-23390. However, DA decreased duodenal transepithelial resistance (TER), an effect also reversed by SCH-23390. A strong immunofluorescence signal for D 5 R, but not D 1 R, was observed in the duodenum of control rat. In human D 5 R knock-in transgenic mice, duodenal mucosa displayed an increased basal I SC with high FITC-dextran permeability and decreased TER with a lowered expression of tight junction proteins, suggesting attenuated duodenal barrier function in these transgenic mice. D 5 R knock-down transgenic mice manifested a decreased basal I SC with lowered FITC-dextran permeability. Moreover, an increased FITC-dextran permeability combined with decreased TER and tight junction protein expression in duodenal mucosa were also observed in HEnD rats. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that DA enhances duodenal permeability of control rat via D 5 R, which provides new experimental and theoretical evidence for the influence of DA on duodenal epithelial barrier function. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; DEMONCHY, JGR; HEYMANS, HSA

    1992-01-01

    The role of the physiologic barrier function of the small bowel and its possible role in health and disease has attracted much attention over the past decade. The intestinal mucosal barrier for luminal macromolecules and microorganism is the result of non-immunologic and immunologic defense

  3. Enhancement and inhibition effects on the corneal permeability of timolol maleate: Polymers, cyclodextrins and chelating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Isabel; Vázquez, José Antonio; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V

    2017-08-30

    This study investigates how both bioadhesive polymers (chitosan, hyaluronic acid and alginate) and permeability enhancers (ethylene glycol- bis(2-aminoethylether)- N, N, N', N'- tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin) influence the permeability of the anti-glaucoma drug timolol maleate through ex vivo bovine corneas. Our results showed that only the permeability enhancers alone were able to increase drug permeability, whereas the polymers significantly reduced drug permeation, and however, they increased the pre-corneal residence of timolol. Ternary systems (polymer-enhancer-drug) showed a reduced drug permeability compared to the polymers alone. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of the epithelium surface confirmed there was no evidence of epithelial disruption caused by these formulations, suggesting that polymer-enhancer interactions reduce drug solubilization and counteract the disruptive effect of the permeability enhancers on the surface of the cornea. Further mucoadhesive tests, revealed a stable interaction of chitosan and hyaluronic acid with the epithelium, while alginate showed poor mucoadhesive properties. The differences in mucoadhesion correlated with the permeability of timolol maleate observed, i.e. formulations containing mucoadhesive polymers showed lower drug permeabilities. The results of the present study indicate polymers acting as an additional barrier towards drug permeability which is even more evident in the presence of permeability enhancers like EGTA and hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin. Then, this study highlights the need to adequately select additives intended for ocular applications since interactions between them can have opposite results to what expected in terms of drug permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ciliary muscle capillaries have blood-tissue barrier characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Hofman, P.; Klooster, J.; Blaauwgeers, H. G.; van der Gaag, R.; Vrensen, G. F.

    1998-01-01

    It was determined whether the capillaries in the ciliary muscle are of the blood-tissue barrier or of the permeable non-barrier type. Ciliary body and iris of normal human and animal eyes were examined by electron microscopy and by immunohistochemical staining with a panel of antibodies recognizing

  5. Practical Application of Sheet Lead for Sound Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead Industries Association, New York, NY.

    Techniques for improving sound barriers through the use of lead sheeting are described. To achieve an ideal sound barrier a material should consist of the following properties--(1) high density, (2) freedom from stiffness, (3) good damping capacity, and (4) integrity as a non-permeable membrane. Lead combines these desired properties to a greater…

  6. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  7. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  8. Clogging in permeable concrete: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Kia, A; Wong, HS; Cheeseman, CR

    2017-01-01

    Permeable concrete (or ??? pervious concrete ??? in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urba n drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing part...

  9. Review of Hydrogen Isotope Permeability Through Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, S. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1983-08-15

    This report is the first part of a comprehensive summary of the literature on hydrogen isotope permeability through materials that do not readily form hydrides. While we mainly focus on pure metals with low permeabilities because of their importance to tritium containment, we also give data on higher-permeability materials such as iron, nickel, steels, and glasses.

  10. Variability of permeability with diameter of conduit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using some theoretical assumptions, it is demonstrated that permeability varies from zero at wall-fluid boundary to maximum at mid-stream, creating a permeability profile similar to the velocity profile. An equation was obtained to establish this. We also found that peak values of permeability increase with increasing porosity, ...

  11. Permeability of Non-Crimp Fabric Preforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loendersloot, Richard; Lomov, Stepan V.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental permeability data of non-crimp fabrics (NCFs) is discussed in this chapter. The chapter starts with a general introduction on permeability, followed by a discussion on experimental permeability data. The infl uence of geometrical features of the textile architecture, in particular the

  12. Analysis of bias in measurements of potassium, sodium and hemoglobin by an emergency department-based blood gas analyzer relative to hospital laboratory autoanalyzer results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Bo Zhang

    Full Text Available The emergency departments (EDs of Chinese hospitals are gradually being equipped with blood gas machines. These machines, along with the measurement of biochemical markers by the hospital laboratory, facilitate the care of patients with severe conditions who present to the ED. However, discrepancies have been noted between the Arterial Blood Gas (ABG analyzers in the ED and the hospital laboratory autoanalyzer in relation to electrolyte and hemoglobin measurements. The present study was performed to determine whether the ABG and laboratory measurements of potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels are equivalent, and whether ABG analyzer results can be used to guide clinical care before the laboratory results become available.Study power analyses revealed that 200 consecutive patients who presented to our ED would allow this prospective single-center cohort study to detect significant differences between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels. Paired arterial and venous blood samples were collected within 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were measured in the ED by an ABL 90 FLEX blood gas analyzer. The biochemistry and blood cell counts of the venous samples were measured in the hospital laboratory. The potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin concentrations obtained by both methods were compared by using paired Student's t-test, Spearman's correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and Deming regression.The mean ABG and laboratory potassium values were 3.77±0.44 and 4.2±0.55, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory sodium values were 137.89±5.44 and 140.93±5.50, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory Hemoglobin values were 12.28±2.62 and 12.35±2.60, respectively (P = 0.24.Although there are the statistical difference and acceptable biases between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium and sodium, the biases do not exceed USCLIA-determined limits. In parallel, there are no statistical differences and

  13. Experimental Volcanology: Fragmentation and Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieler, O.

    2005-12-01

    An increasing number of scientists design new experiments to analyse processes that control the dynamics of explosive eruptions. There research is mostly coupled to numerical models and aims toward its controlling parameters. The fragmentation process, its threshold and the speed of the fragmentation wave as well as the energy consumed by the fragmentation are some hot spots of the experimental volcanology. Analysing the fragmentation behaviour of volcaniclastics as close to the natural system as possible, we found a number of physical constrains. Identifying the porosity as determining factor of the threshold, we realised that neither threshold nor the speed of the fragmentation process are solely controlled by the rock density. The later results of the shock tube type apparatus lead to the analysis of the specific surface area and permeability as direct links to textural features. Permeability analysis performed in a modified shock tube type apparatus, show two clear, distinct trends for dome rock and pyroclastic samples. The specific surface determined by Argon sorbtion (BET) as well as textural features of pumices from Campi Flegrei, Montserrat and Krakatoa (1883) give in contrary evidence of a more complex story. Large spherical, or ellipsoidal bubbles around fractured crystals prove that the high permeability of the pumice has partially developed after the fixing of the bubble size distribution. This puts up the question, if permeability measurements on pyroclastic samples reveal relevant numbers! The surface tension controlled 'self sealing' behaviour of surfaces from foaming obsidian hinders in situ measurements. Close textural investigations will have to clarify how the 'post process' samples deviate from the syneruptive conduit filling.

  14. Economic alternatives for containment barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.J.; Jasperse, B.H.; Fisher, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Fixation, barriers, and containment of existing landfills and other disposal areas are often performed by insitu auger type soil mixing and jet grouting. Cement or other chemical reagents are mixed with soil to form both vertical and horizontal barriers. Immobilization of contaminants can be economically achieved by mixing soil and the contaminants with reagents that solidify or stabilize the contaminated area. Developed in Japan, and relatively new to the United States, the first large scale application was for a vertical barrier at the Jackson Lake Dam project in 1986. This technology has grown in both the civil and environmental field since. The paper describes current United States practice for Deep Soil Mixing (over 12 meters in depth), and Shallow Soil Mixing for vertical barriers and stabilization/solidification, and Jet Grouting for horizontal and vertical barriers. Creating very low permeability barriers at depth with minimal surface return often makes these techniques economical when compared to slurry trenches. The paper will discuss equipment, materials, soil and strength parameters, and quality control

  15. Pathophysiology of increased intestinal permeability in obstructive jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimakopoulos, Stelios F; Scopa, Chrisoula D; Vagianos, Constantine E

    2007-01-01

    Despite advances in preoperative evaluation and postoperative care, intervention, especially surgery, for relief of obstructive jaundice still carries high morbidity and mortality rates, mainly due to sepsis and renal dysfunction. The key event in the pathophysiology of obstructive jaundice-associated complications is endotoxemia of gut origin because of intestinal barrier failure. This breakage of the gut barrier in obstructive jaundice is multi-factorial, involving disruption of the immunologic, biological and mechanical barrier. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that obstructive jaundice results in increased intestinal permeability. The mechanisms implicated in this phenomenon remain unresolved, but growing research interest during the last decade has shed light in our knowledge in the field. This review summarizes the current concepts in the pathophysiology of obstructive jaundice-induced gut barrier dysfunction, analyzing pivotal factors, such as altered intestinal tight junctions expression, oxidative stress and imbalance of enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis. Clinicians handling patients with obstructive jaundice should not neglect protecting the intestinal barrier function before, during and after intervention for the relief of this condition, which may improve their patients’ outcome. PMID:18161914

  16. Determination of reference intervals and comparison of venous blood gas parameters using standard and non-standard collection methods in 24 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Karin; Kutter, Annette Pn; Schefer, Rahel Jud; Marly-Voquer, Charlotte; Sigrist, Nadja

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine in-house reference intervals (RIs) for venous blood analysis with the RAPIDPoint 500 blood gas analyser using blood gas syringes (BGSs) and to determine whether immediate analysis of venous blood collected into lithium heparin (LH) tubes can replace anaerobic blood sampling into BGSs. Methods Venous blood was collected from 24 healthy cats and directly transferred into a BGS and an LH tube. The BGS was immediately analysed on the RAPIDPoint 500 followed by the LH tube. The BGSs and LH tubes were compared using paired t-test or Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test, Bland-Altman and Passing-Bablok analysis. To assess clinical relevance, bias or percentage bias between BGSs and LH tubes was compared with the allowable total error (TEa) recommended for the respective parameter. Results Based on the values obtained from the BGSs, RIs were calculated for the evaluated parameters, including blood gases, electrolytes, glucose and lactate. Values derived from LH tubes showed no significant difference for standard bicarbonate, whole blood base excess, haematocrit, total haemoglobin, sodium, potassium, chloride, glucose and lactate, while pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen, actual bicarbonate, extracellular base excess, ionised calcium and anion gap were significantly different to the samples collected in BGSs ( P glucose and lactate can be made based on blood collected in LH tubes and analysed within 5 mins. For pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide and oxygen, extracellular base excess, anion gap and ionised calcium the clinically relevant alterations have to be considered if analysed in LH tubes.

  17. Effect of aggregate grain size distribution on properties of permeable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) ratio on the mechanical properties of permeable concrete is investigated. The aim of this study is to prepare permeable concrete mixture with optimum properties in terms of strength and permeability. For this purpose, five different permeable ...

  18. cGMP and nitric oxide modulate thrombin-induced endothelial permeability : Regulation via different pathways in human aortic and umbilical vein endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draijer, R.; Atsma, D.E.; Laarse, A. van der; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that cGMP and cAMP reduce the endothelial permeability for fluids and macromolecules when the endothelial permeability is increased by thrombin. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism by which cGMP improves the endothelial barrier function and examined

  19. Evaluation of performance of barrier materials in geological disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasakura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2004-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the hydraulic and mechanical performance of barrier materials for geological disposal of radioactive waste. Many experiments on the hydraulic and mechanical performance of barrier materials have been implemented. However, both the ordinary water head-controlled permeability test for evaluating hydraulic performance and the oedometer test for obtaining the mechanical properties are usually needed. In this study, the flow pump permeability test was applied to various barrier materials with the purpose of quickly evaluating their hydraulic performance. The flow pump permeability test was shown to be applicable to every barrier material employed in this study, of which the coefficient of permeability ranged from 10-7 to 10-14 m/sec. The time needed to obtain the coefficient of permeability was about 1/8 that of ordinary head-controlled permeability tests. The resulting coefficient of permeability was more accurate than that from the standard water head-controlled permeability test. Moreover, the bentonite-engineered barrier materials were subjected to a constant strain rate consolidation test, which is a method to quickly evaluate the mechanical performance. The results of the consolidation tests were consistent with the results of the oedometer tests and the necessary time for the test was reduced to only four days even in case of Na-ben-tonite, for which a couple of months was necessary with the standard oedometer test. (author)

  20. Outer Membrane Permeability of Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Studies of Passive Diffusion of Small Organic Nutrients Reveal the Absence of Classical Porins and Intrinsically Low Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowata, Hikaru; Tochigi, Saeko; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The outer membrane of heterotrophic Gram-negative bacteria plays the role of a selective permeability barrier that prevents the influx of toxic compounds while allowing the nonspecific passage of small hydrophilic nutrients through porin channels. Compared with heterotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, the outer membrane properties of cyanobacteria, which are Gram-negative photoautotrophs, are not clearly understood. In this study, using small carbohydrates, amino acids, and inorganic ions as permeation probes, we determined the outer membrane permeability of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in intact cells and in proteoliposomes reconstituted with outer membrane proteins. The permeability of this cyanobacterium was >20-fold lower than that of Escherichia coli. The predominant outer membrane proteins Slr1841, Slr1908, and Slr0042 were not permeable to organic nutrients and allowed only the passage of inorganic ions. Only the less abundant outer membrane protein Slr1270, a homolog of the E. coli export channel TolC, was permeable to organic solutes. The activity of Slr1270 as a channel was verified in a recombinant Slr1270-producing E. coli outer membrane. The lack of putative porins and the low outer membrane permeability appear to suit the cyanobacterial autotrophic lifestyle; the highly impermeable outer membrane would be advantageous to cellular survival by protecting the cell from toxic compounds, especially when the cellular physiology is not dependent on the uptake of organic nutrients. IMPORTANCE Because the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria affects the flux rates for various substances into and out of the cell, its permeability is closely associated with cellular physiology. The outer membrane properties of cyanobacteria, which are photoautotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, are not clearly understood. Here, we examined the outer membrane of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. We revealed that it is relatively permeable to inorganic ions but is

  1. Effect of acute, slightly increased intra-abdominal pressure on intestinal permeability and oxidative stress in a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Leng

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH is known as a common, serious complication in critically ill patients. Bacterial translocation and permeability changes are considered the pathophysiological bases for IAH-induced enterogenic endotoxemia and subsequent multiorgan failure. Nevertheless, the effects of slightly elevated intra-abdominal pressures (IAPs on the intestinal mucosa and the associated mechanisms remain unclear. METHODS: To investigate the acute effects of different nitrogen pneumoperitoneum grades on colonic mucosa, male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to six groups with different IAPs (0 [control], 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 mmHg, n = 6/group. During 90 min of exposure, we dynamically monitored the heart rate and noninvasive hemodynamic parameters. After gradual decompression, arterial blood gas analyses were conducted. Thereafter, structural injuries to the colonic mucosa were identified using light microscopy. Colon permeability was determined using the expression of tight junction proteins, combined with fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FD-4 absorption. The pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance was determined based on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and antioxidant enzymes. RESULTS: IAH significantly affected the histological scores of the colonic mucosa, tight junction protein expression, mucosal permeability, and pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance. Interestingly, elevations of IAP that were lower than the threshold for IAH also showed a similar, undesirable effect. In the 8 mmHg group, mild hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypoxemia occurred, accompanied by reduced blood and abdominal perfusion pressures. Mild microscopic inflammatory infiltration and increased MDA levels were also detected. Moreover, an 8-mm Hg IAP markedly inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins, although no significant differences in FD-4 permeability were observed between the 0- and 8-mmHg groups. CONCLUSIONS: Acute exposure to slightly

  2. Permeability of highly compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1980-12-01

    The object of the study was the water flow through the bentonite which is caused by hydraulic gradients. The study comprised laboratory tests and theoretical considerations. It was found that high bulk densities reduced the permeability to very low values. It was concluded that practically impervious conditions prevail when the gradients are low. Thus with a regional gradient of 10 -2 and a premeability of 10 -13 m/s the flow rate will not be higher than approximately 1 mm in 30 000 years. (G.B.)

  3. Ischemia-reperfusion impairs blood-brain barrier function and alters tight junction protein expression in the ovine fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Threlkeld, S W; Cummings, E E; Juan, I; Makeyev, O; Besio, W G; Gaitanis, J; Banks, W A; Sadowska, G B; Stonestreet, B S

    2012-12-13

    The blood-brain barrier is a restrictive interface between the brain parenchyma and the intravascular compartment. Tight junctions contribute to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Hypoxic-ischemic damage to the blood-brain barrier could be an important component of fetal brain injury. We hypothesized that increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia depend upon the duration of reperfusion and that decreases in tight junction proteins are associated with the ischemia-related impairment in blood-brain barrier function in the fetus. Blood-brain barrier function was quantified with the blood-to-brain transfer constant (K(i)) and tight junction proteins by Western immunoblot in fetal sheep at 127 days of gestation without ischemia, and 4, 24, or 48 h after ischemia. The largest increase in K(i) (Pbrain barrier function after ischemia. We conclude that impaired blood-brain barrier function is an important component of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the fetus, and that increases in quantitatively measured barrier permeability (K(i)) change as a function of the duration of reperfusion after ischemia. The largest increase in permeability occurs 4 h after ischemia and blood-brain barrier function improves early after injury because the blood-brain barrier is less permeable 24 and 48 than 4 h after ischemia. Changes in the tight junction molecular composition are associated with increases in blood-brain barrier permeability after ischemia. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Steam-water relative permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  5. The Generation of Barriers to Melt Ascent in the Martian Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools, Joe W.; Montési, Laurent G. J.

    2018-01-01

    Planetary mantles can be regarded as an aggregate of two phases: a solid, porous matrix and a liquid melt. Melt travels rapidly upward through the matrix due to its buoyancy. When this melt enters the colder lithosphere, it begins to crystallize. If crystallization happens at a high rate, the newly formed crystals can clog the pore space, reducing its permeability to essentially zero. This zone of zero permeability is the permeability barrier. We use the MELTS family of thermodynamic calculators to determine melt compositions and the crystallization sequence of ascending melt throughout Martian history and simulate the formation of permeability barriers. At lower strain rates (10-17-10-15 s-1) permeability barriers form deep in the lithosphere, possibly contributing to the formation of localized volcanic edifices on the Martian surface once fracturing or thermal erosion enables melt to traverse the lithosphere. Higher strain rates (10-13 s-1) yield shallower permeability barriers, perhaps producing extensive lava flows. Permeability barrier formation is investigated using an anhydrous mantle source or mantle sources that include up to 1,000 ppm H2O. Introducing even small amounts of water (25 ppm H2O) reduces mantle viscosity in a manner similar to increasing the strain rate and results in a shallower barrier than in the anhydrous case. Large amounts of water (1,000 ppm H2O) yield very shallow weak barriers or no barriers at all. The depth of the permeability barrier has evolved through time, likely resulting in a progression in the style of surface volcanism from widespread flows to massive, singular volcanoes.

  6. Barriers and post-closure monitoring (AL121125)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, K.V.; Janecky, D.

    1995-01-01

    This project focuses on the rapid implementation of near-surface barriers, biotreatment, and post-closure monitoring technology. It uses water-permeable and biologic barriers that chemically capture and/or degrade contaminants without significantly altering the natural water flow regime. Barrier approaches are being tested for two different applications. The first is the use of barriers for confinement of chemical contaminants for in-trench treatments with leach systems or an in-place bioreactor. The second is an enhancement of the current practice of emplacing grout or clay slurry walls into direct horizontal surface and subsurface water flows around a contaminated area by integrating permeable reactive barriers and petroleum reservoir gel/foam/polymer technology

  7. Severe Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption in Cardioembolic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Liu; Feina Shi; Zhicai Chen; Shenqiang Yan; Xinfa Ding; Min Lou

    2018-01-01

    BackgroundPrevious studies demonstrated that cardioembolism (CE) was prone to develop hemorrhagic transformation (HT), whereas hyper-permeability of blood–brain barrier (BBB) might be one reason for the development of HT. We, thus, aimed to investigate whether the BBB permeability (BBBP) was higher in CE stroke than other stroke subtypes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients.MethodsThis study was a retrospective review of prospectively collected clinical and imaging database of AIS patients...

  8. Experimental Study on Permeability of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Honglu; Liu, Rentai; Zheng, Zhuo; Liu, Haojie; Gao, Yan; Liu, Yankai

    2018-01-01

    To study the influencing factors on permeability of pervious concrete, by adding inorganic organic composite materials obtained experimental results show that different aggregate size, aggregate cement ratio of different, different water cement ratio on the permeability performance. The permeability of the concrete was tested by using the self - made permeable device. The experimental results showed that the permeation coefficient of the experiment was obtained and the factors influencing the permeability of the concrete were compared and analyzed. At the same time, the porosity of pervious concrete was measured, the influence of various variables on porosity was studied, and the influence of various factors on the permeability of voids was found. Finally, through comprehensive analysis of a variety of factors, the optimal water cement ratio is 0.28. At this time, the pervious performance of concrete is optimal.

  9. Air permeability of polyester nonwoven fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guocheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Air permeability is one of the most important properties of non-woven fabrics in many applications. This paper aims to investigate the effects of thickness, porosity and density on the air permeability of needle-punched non-woven fabrics and compare the experimental values with two models which are based on hydraulic radius theory and drag theory, respectively. The air permeability of the samples was measured by an air permeability tester FX3300. The results showed that the air permeability of non-woven fabrics decreased with the increase in thickness and density of samples, increased with the increase of porosity, and the air permeability was not directly proportional to the pressure gradient. Meanwhile, the prediction model based on hydraulic radius theory had a better agreement with experimental values than the model based on drag theory, but the values were much higher than the experimental results, especially for higher porosity and higher pressure gradient.

  10. Clogging in permeable concrete: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2017-05-15

    Permeable concrete (or "pervious concrete" in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urban drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing particulates influence clogging, which occurs when particles build-up and block connected porosity. Permeable concrete requires regular maintenance by vacuum sweeping and pressure washing, but the effectiveness and viability of these methods is questionable. The potential for clogging is related to the tortuosity of the connected porosity, with greater tortuosity resulting in increased potential for clogging. Research is required to develop permeable concrete that can be poured on-site, which produces a pore structure with significantly reduced tortuosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 96 perfusable blood vessels to study vascular permeability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duinen, V; van den Heuvel, A; Trietsch, S J; Lanz, H L; van Gils, J M; van Zonneveld, A J; Vulto, P; Hankemeier, T

    2017-12-22

    Current in vitro models to test the barrier function of vasculature are based on flat, two-dimensional monolayers. These monolayers do not have the tubular morphology of vasculature found in vivo and lack important environmental cues from the cellular microenvironment, such as interaction with an extracellular matrix (ECM) and exposure to flow. To increase the physiological relevance of in vitro models of the vasculature, it is crucial to implement these cues and better mimic the native three-dimensional vascular architecture. We established a robust, high-throughput method to culture endothelial cells as 96 three-dimensional and perfusable microvessels and developed a quantitative, real-time permeability assay to assess their barrier function. Culture conditions were optimized for microvessel formation in 7 days and were viable for over 60 days. The microvessels exhibited a permeability to 20 kDa dextran but not to 150 kDa dextran, which mimics the functionality of vasculature in vivo. Also, a dose-dependent effect of VEGF, TNFα and several cytokines confirmed a physiologically relevant response. The throughput and robustness of this method and assay will allow end-users in vascular biology to make the transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional culture methods to study vasculature.

  12. Barrier Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heteren, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Barrier-system dynamics are a function of antecedent topography and substrate lithology, Relative sea-level (RSL) changes, sediment availability and type, climate, vegetation type and cover, and various aero- and hydrodynamic processes during fair-weather conditions and extreme events. Global change

  13. The Permeability of Boolean Sets of Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willot F.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerical and analytical results on the permeability of Boolean models of randomly-oriented cylinders with circular cross-section are reported. The present work investigates cylinders of prolate (highly-elongated and oblate (nearly flat types. The fluid flows either inside or outside of the cylinders. The Stokes flow is solved using full-fields Fourier-based computations on 3D binarized microstructures. The permeability is given for varying volume fractions of pores. A new upper-bound is derived for the permeability of the Boolean model of oblate cylinders. The behavior of the permeability in the dilute limit is discussed.

  14. Low Permeability Polyimide Insulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resodyn Technologies proposes a new technology that enables the application of polyimide based cryogenic insulation with low hydrogen permeability. This effort...

  15. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: An update on Barrier Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2011-05-01

    This report updates a previous report covering the performance of a permeable reactive barrier installed at 100N. In this report we re-evaluate the results after having an additional year of performance monitoring data to incorporate.

  16. Effect of Ginkgo biloba extract in combined with prednisone on the arterial blood gas and pulmonary function in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Chun Shi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb in combined with prednisone on the arterial blood gas and pulmonary function in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. Methods: A total of 76 patients with IPF who were admitted in our hospital from March, 2015 to March, 2016 were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group. The patients in the two groups were given oxygen inhalation, bronchodilator agents, phlegm dissipating and asthma relieving, anti-infection, and other supporting treatments. The patients in the control group were orally given prednisone (0.5 mg/ kg.d, continuously for 4 weeks, then in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg.d, continuously for 8 weeks, and finally the dosage was reduced to 0.125 mg/kg.d. On this basis, the patients in the observation group were given additional EGb, i.e. Ginkgo leaf capsule, 1 g/time, 3 times/d, continuously for 12 weeks. The efficacy was evaluated after 12-week treatment. PaO2, PaCO2, P(A-aO2, and SaO2 before and after treatment were detected. FVC, FEV1/FVC, MVV, TLC, and DLCO before and after treatment were determined. Results: PaO2, PaCO2, and SaO2 after treatment were significantly elevated, while P(A-aO2 was significantly reduced when compared with before treatment. The comparison of PaO2 and P(A-aO2 between the two groups was statistically significant, while the comparison of PaCO2 and SaO2 between the two groups was not statistically significant. After treatment, FVC, FEV1/FVC, MVV, TLC, and DLCO in the two groups were significantly elevated when compared with before treatment, and those in the observation group were significantly superior to those in the control group. Conclusions: EGb in combined with prednisone in the treatment of IPF can effectively improve the arterial blood gas indicators and pulmonary function, and enhance the patients’ living qualities; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended.

  17. Effect of pectin, lecithin, and antacid feed supplements (Egusin®) on gastric ulcer scores, gastric fluid pH and blood gas values in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of two commercial feed supplements, Egusin 250® [E-250] and Egusin SLH® [E-SLH], on gastric ulcer scores, gastric fluid pH, and blood gas values in stall-confined horses undergoing feed-deprivation. Methods Nine Thoroughbred horses were used in a three-period crossover study. For the three treatment groups, sweet feed was mixed with E-250, E-SLH, or nothing (control group) and fed twice daily. Horses were treated for 21 days, then an additional 7 days while on an alternating feed-deprivation model to induce or worsen ulcers (period one). In periods two and three, horses (n=6) were treated for an additional 7 days after feed-deprivation. Gastroscopies were performed on day -1 (n=9), day 21 (n=9), day 28 (n=9) and day 35 (n=6). Gastric juice pH was measured and gastric ulcer scores were assigned. Venous blood gas values were also measured. Results Gastric ulcers in control horses significantly decreased after 21 days, but there was no difference in ulcer scores when compared to the Egusin® treated horses. NG gastric ulcer scores significantly increased in E-250 and control horses on day 28 compared to day 21 as a result of intermittent feed-deprivation, but no treatment effect was observed. NG ulcer scores remained high in the control group but significantly decreased in the E-SLH- and E-250-treated horses by day 35. Gastric juice pH values were low and variable and no treatment effect was observed. Mean blood pCO2 values were significantly increased two hours after feeding in treated horses compared to controls, whereas mean blood TCO2 values increased in the 24 hour sample, but did not exceed 38 mmol/l. Conclusions The feed-deprivation model increased NG gastric ulcer severity in the horses. However, by day 35, Egusin® treated horses had less severe NG gastric ulcers compared to untreated control horses. After 35 days, Egusin® products tested here ameliorate the severity of gastric ulcers in

  18. Artificial neural network models for prediction of intestinal permeability of oligopeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Min-Kook

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral delivery is a highly desirable property for candidate drugs under development. Computational modeling could provide a quick and inexpensive way to assess the intestinal permeability of a molecule. Although there have been several studies aimed at predicting the intestinal absorption of chemical compounds, there have been no attempts to predict intestinal permeability on the basis of peptide sequence information. To develop models for predicting the intestinal permeability of peptides, we adopted an artificial neural network as a machine-learning algorithm. The positive control data consisted of intestinal barrier-permeable peptides obtained by the peroral phage display technique, and the negative control data were prepared from random sequences. Results The capacity of our models to make appropriate predictions was validated by statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, enrichment curve, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (the ROC score. The training and test set statistics indicated that our models were of strikingly good quality and could discriminate between permeable and random sequences with a high level of confidence. Conclusion We developed artificial neural network models to predict the intestinal permeabilities of oligopeptides on the basis of peptide sequence information. Both binary and VHSE (principal components score Vectors of Hydrophobic, Steric and Electronic properties descriptors produced statistically significant training models; the models with simple neural network architectures showed slightly greater predictive power than those with complex ones. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the selection of intestinal barrier-permeable peptides for generating peptide drugs or peptidomimetics.

  19. The measurement of water vapor permeability of glove materials using dilute tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doughty, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    As fusion technology progresses, there will be an increasing need to handle tritium and tritiated compounds. Protective clothing, especially drybox gloves, must be an effective barrier to minimize worker exposure. The water vapor permeability of glove materials and finished glove constructions is a crucial property of drybox gloves and is not sufficiently well characterized. We have built an apparatus that measures water vapor permeability of elastomers using dilute tritiated water. The technique is more sensitive than other methods currently available and allows us to make measurements on materials and under conditions previously inaccessible. In particular, we present results on laminated drybox gloves for which data is not currently available. (orig.)

  20. The Effect of Moisture Content On Gas Permeability of Unsaturated Sandstones: Implications For Vapour Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, K. J.; Bloomfield, J. P.; Williams, P. J.; Gooddy, D. C.

    Work has been undertaken to assess the impact of moisture content on the gas perme- ability of sandstones and the implications this may have for transport of Volatile Or- ganic Carbon compounds (VOCs) within the unsaturated zone. Different lithologies from the Permo-Triassic Sandstones of the UK were selected and laboratory stud- ies conducted to evaluate their permeability and capillary pressure-saturation (PcSw) behaviour. Measured gas permeabilities have been compared with modelled relative permeabilities which have been derived by applying the van Genuchten function to the PcSw curves. For some of the lithologies gas permeability was found to increase by several orders of magnitude as moisture content was reduced to conditions equating to field capacity. Some of the finer-grained lithologies show very little increase in perme- ability even at field capacity. For these lithologies moisture contents within the unsat- urated zone may therefore have considerable implications for the transport of VOCs. Seasonal variations in moisture content may significantly reduce gas permeability in parts of the unsaturated zone at certain times of the year. By identifying which litholo- gies are most sensitive to moisture content related changes in permeability, a coherent model of the pathways and barriers to vapour transport can be developed.

  1. Caractérisation de la perméabilité des couches constituant la barrière passive des installations de stockage de déchets non dangereux Permeability characterization of the geological barrier of non dangerous landfill sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouthier B.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Pour obtenir son autorisation d’exploiter, une Installation de Stockage de Déchets Non Dangereux (ISDND doit justifier réglementairement sa favorabilité géologique. Le « Guide de bonnes pratiques pour les reconnaissances géologiques » de l’AFNOR fournit les critères d’aptitude du site à recevoir une ISDND et les moyens à mettre en œuvre, dont ceux qui concernent la perméabilité des couches géologiques qui protègent le milieu naturel. La mesure de la perméabilité in situ, en forage, des matériaux peu à très peu perméables des deux couches de la barrière de sécurité passive, est une opération délicate qui nécessite une mise en œuvre soignée respectant les normes appropriées, choisies en fonction des gammes de perméabilité attendues. Plusieurs types d’essai en forage sont présentés. In order to get administrative authorization, a non dangerous waste landfill site (ISDND, must justify a favourable geological context, which follows the AFNOR “Guide de bonnes pratiques pour les reconnaissances géologiques ». Criteria and technical means are described among which the in situ and lab permeability determination processes. The low and very low permeability coefficient to be measured within the deep argillaceous formations of a landfill site, is a delicate operation which must be representative and accurate. Depending the permeability range, several norms are proposed.

  2. Neutrophils Compromise Retinal Pigment Epithelial Barrier Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehao Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that neutrophils and their secreted factors mediate breakdown of the integrity of the outer blood-retina-barrier by degrading the apical tight junctions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. The effect of activated neutrophils or neutrophil cell lysate on apparent permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants was evaluated by measuring [H] mannitol flux in a modified Ussing chamber. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 in murine peritoneal neutrophils, and the effects of neutrophils on RPE tight-junction protein expression were assessed by confocal microscopy and western blot. Our results revealed that basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophils decreased occludin and ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours and increased the permeability of bovine RPE-Choroid explants by >3-fold (P<.05. Similarly, basolateral incubation of explants with neutrophil lysate decreased ZO-1 expression at 1 and 3 hours (P<.05 and increased permeability of explants by 75%. Further, we found that neutrophils prominently express MMP-9 and that incubation of explants with neutrophils in the presence of anti-MMP-9 antibody inhibited the increase in permeability. These data suggest that neutrophil-derived MMP-9 may play an important role in disrupting the integrity of the outer blood-retina barrier.

  3. Role of central and peripheral opiate receptors in the effects of fentanyl on analgesia, ventilation and arterial blood-gas chemistry in conscious rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Fraser; May, Walter J.; Gruber, Ryan B.; Discala, Joseph F.; Puscovic, Veljko; Young, Alex P.; Baby, Santhosh M.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the effects of the peripherally restricted µ-opiate receptor (µ-OR) antagonist, naloxone methiodide (NLXmi) on fentanyl (25 µg/kg, i.v.)-induced changes in (1) analgesia, (2) arterial blood gas chemistry (ABG) and alveolar-arterial gradient (A-a gradient), and (3) ventilatory parameters, in conscious rats. The fentanyl-induced increase in analgesia was minimally affected by a 1.5 mg/kg of NLXmi but was attenuated by a 5.0 mg/kg dose. Fentanyl decreased arterial blood pH, pO2 and sO2 and increased pCO2 and A-a gradient. These responses were markedly diminished in NLXmi (1.5 mg/kg)-pretreated rats. Fentanyl caused ventilatory depression (e.g., decreases in tidal volume and peak inspiratory flow). Pretreatment with NLXmi (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) antagonized the fentanyl decrease in tidal volume but minimally affected the other responses. These findings suggest that (1) the analgesia and ventilatory depression caused by fentanyl involve peripheral µ-ORs and (2) NLXmi prevents the fentanyl effects on ABG by blocking the negative actions of the opioid on tidal volume and A-a gradient. PMID:24284037

  4. EVALUATION OF BLOOD GAS VALUES IN ANESTHETIZED SOUTHERN WHITE RHINOCEROS ( CERATOTHERIUM SIMUM) VENTILATED WITH A NOVEL DEMAND VENTILATOR IN A ZOOLOGICAL PARK SETTING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mark; Mama, Khursheed R; Zuba, Jeffrey R; Lamberski, Nadine; Oosterhuis, James E; Clancy, Meredith M; Delk, Katie W; Kinney, Matthew E; Morris, Patrick J; Olea-Popelka, Francisco

    2017-12-01

    Rhinoceros conservation efforts are essential to the survival of the species. One such effort is focused on using advanced reproductive technologies to produce viable northern white rhinoceros ( Ceratotherium simum cottoni) embryos for implantation into southern white rhinoceros ( Ceratotherium simum simum) surrogates. Anesthesia may be required to facilitate necessary procedures in these surrogate rhinoceros, but commonly reported side effects including hypercapnia and hypoxemia limit anesthetic recumbency time due to animal safety concerns. Although many interventions have been attempted, success in improving these physiologic parameters to date is mixed. The objective of this report is to describe arterial pH (pHa), blood gas (PaO 2 and PaCO 2 ), bicarbonate, base excess, lactate, and cardiovascular (heart rate, direct arterial blood pressure) values recorded in seven intubated and ventilated female southern white rhinoceros anesthetized for reproductive examinations in a zoological park setting. Anesthetic induction was accomplished using etorphine, medetomidine, butorphanol, and midazolam. The primary hypotheses were that PaO 2 and PaCO 2 would improve after intubation and mechanical ventilation. Induction and recovery observations were also summarized. Physiologic and laboratory data were analyzed using a mixed linear regression model using ranks. Statistical significance was set at P white rhinoceros.

  5. Method validation of a set of 12 GEM® Premier™ 4000 blood gas analyzers for point-of-care testing in a university teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oris, Charlotte; Clavel, Yoan; Jabaudon, Matthieu; Pialat, Annick; Mohamed, Hadj Abdelkader; Lioret, Frédérique; Sapin, Vincent; Bouvier, Damien

    2018-03-01

    Blood gas analyzers are o0.ften integrated into point-of-care testing provisions. International standards (ISO 22870 and 15189) as adapted to French COFRAC regulations make accreditation of point-ofta-care testintag obligatory. We installed and assessed 12 GEM PREMIER 4000 analyzers for pH, p CO 2 , p O 2 , Na + , K + , Cl - , Ca 2+ , lactate, hemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin (O 2 Hb) at Clermont-Ferrand Hospital. These instruments were distributed across 11 care sites in the hospital. Precision was studied at two control levels for each parameter. Comparisons between GEM analyzers were performed (on 30 samples) for pH, p CO 2 , p O 2 , Na + , K + , Cl - , Ca 2+ , lactate, hemoglobin and O 2 Hb; and between GEM analyzers and the central laboratory for Na + , K + , Cl - , Ca 2+ and hemoglobin (on 30-50 samples). Uncertainty in measurement (UM) was evaluated with an approach using reproducibility and accuracy data. The coefficients of variation (CVs) were in line with recommendations, except for the repeatability CV for p O 2 . All CVs were below 4%. All comparisons complied with recommendations. Uncertainties of measurement were also validated. Our results met standard requirements and the 12 analyzers were assessed as suitable for point-of-care testing in services of academic medical centers, as exemplified at Clermont-Ferrand hospital.

  6. Blood gas analysis, anion gap, and strong ion difference in horses treated with polyethylene glycol balanced solution (PEG 3350 or enteral and parenteral electrolyte solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Luís Nina Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Large volumes of different electrolytes solutions are commonly used for ingesta hydration in horses with large colon impaction, but little is known about their consequences to blood acid-base balance. To evaluate the effects of PEG 3350 or enteral and parenteral electrolyte solutions on the blood gas analysis, anion gap and strong ion difference, five adult female horses were used in a 5x5 latin square design. The animals were divided in five groups and distributed to each of the following treatments: NaCl (0.9% sodium chloride solution; EES (enteral electrolyte solution, EES+LR (EES plus lactated Ringer's solution; PEG (balanced solution with PEG 3350 and PEG+LR (PEG plus lactated Ringer's solution. Treatments PEG or PEG + LR did not change or promoted minimal changes, while the EES caused a slight decrease in pH, but its association with lactated Ringer's solution induced increase in AG and SID values, as well as caused hypernatremia. In turn, the treatment NaCl generated metabolic acidosis. PEG 3350 did not alter the acid-base balance. Despite it's slight acidifying effect, the enteral electrolyte solution (EES did not cause clinically relevant changes.

  7. Crustal permeability: Introduction to the special issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Gleeson, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The topic of crustal permeability is of broad interest in light of the controlling effect of permeability on diverse geologic processes and also timely in light of the practical challenges associated with emerging technologies such as hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production (‘fracking’), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration. This special issue of Geofluids is also motivated by the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic concept of permeability as a static material property that exerts control on fluid flow and the perspective of economic geologists, geophysicists, and crustal petrologists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. Issues associated with fracking, enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration have already begun to promote a constructive dialog between the static and dynamic views of permeability, and here we have made a conscious effort to include both viewpoints. This special issue also focuses on the quantification of permeability, encompassing both direct measurement of permeability in the uppermost crust and inferential permeability estimates, mainly for the deeper crust.

  8. A Negative Permeability Material at Red Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hsiao-Kuan; Chettiar, Uday K.; Cai, Wenshan

    2007-01-01

    A negative permeability in a periodic array of pairs of thin silver strips is demonstrated experimentally for two distinct samples. The effect of the strip surface roughness on negative permeability is evaluated. The first sample, Sample A, is fabricated of thinner strips with a root mean square ...

  9. Intercomparison on measurement of water vapour permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    Three different materials are tested - hard woodfibre board - damp proof course - underlay for roofing The water vapour permeability has been measured according to EN ISO 12572 (2001).......Three different materials are tested - hard woodfibre board - damp proof course - underlay for roofing The water vapour permeability has been measured according to EN ISO 12572 (2001)....

  10. Microorganism Removal in Permeable Pavement Parking Lots ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three types of permeable pavements (pervious concrete, permeable interlocking concrete pavers, and porous asphalt) were monitored at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, New Jersey for indicator organisms such as fecal coliform, enterococci, and E. coli. Results showed that porous asphalt had much lower concentration in monitored infiltrate compared to pervious concrete and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Concentrations of monitored organisms in infiltrate from porous asphalt were consistently below the bathing water quality standard. Fecal coliform and enterococci exceeded bathing water quality standards more than 72% and 34% of the time for permeable interlocking concrete pavers and pervious concrete, respectively. Purpose is to evaluate the performance of permeable pavement in removing indicator organisms from infiltrating stormwater runoff.

  11. Different Methods of Predicting Permeability in Shale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Krogsbøll, Anette

    Permeability is often very difficult to measure or predict in shale lithology. In this work we are determining shale permeability from consolidation tests data using Wissa et al., (1971) approach and comparing the results with predicted permeability from Kozeny’s model. Core and cuttings materials...... were obtained from Fjerritslev shale Formation in Juassic interval of Stenlille and Vedsted on-shore wells of Danish basin. The calculated permeability from specific surface and porosity vary from 0.09 to 48.53 μD while that calculated from consolidation tests data vary from 1000 μD at a low vertical...... effective stress to 9 μD at high vertical effective stress of 100 MPa. The indirect permeability calculated from consolidation tests falls in the same magnitude at higher vertical effective stress, above 40 MPa, as that of the Kozeny model for shale samples with high non-clay content ≥ 70% but are higher...

  12. Twist1 controls lung vascular permeability and endotoxin-induced pulmonary edema by altering Tie2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Jiang, Elisabeth; Jiang, Amanda; Lu, Yongbo; Juan, Aimee M; Chen, Jing; Mammoto, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    Tight regulation of vascular permeability is necessary for normal development and deregulated vascular barrier function contributes to the pathogenesis of various diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, cancer and inflammation. The angiopoietin (Ang)-Tie2 pathway is known to control vascular permeability. However, the mechanism by which the expression of Tie2 is regulated to control vascular permeability has not been fully elucidated. Here we show that transcription factor Twist1 modulates pulmonary vascular leakage by altering the expression of Tie2 in a context-dependent way. Twist1 knockdown in cultured human lung microvascular endothelial cells decreases Tie2 expression and phosphorylation and increases RhoA activity, which disrupts cell-cell junctional integrity and increases vascular permeability in vitro. In physiological conditions, where Ang1 is dominant, pulmonary vascular permeability is elevated in the Tie2-specific Twist1 knockout mice. However, depletion of Twist1 and resultant suppression of Tie2 expression prevent increase in vascular permeability in an endotoxin-induced lung injury model, where the balance of Angs shifts toward Ang2. These results suggest that Twist1-Tie2-Angs signaling is important for controlling vascular permeability and modulation of this mechanism may lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches for pulmonary edema and other diseases caused by abnormal vascular permeability.

  13. Gas and Water Permeability of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Martin, P. L.; Romero, F. J.; Gutierrez-Rodirgo, V.; Barcala, J. M.

    2012-11-01

    The gas pressure of concrete samples was measured in an unsteady-state equipment working under low injection pressures and in a newly fine tuned steady-state setup working under different pressures. These measurements allowed the estimation of the intrinsic and relative gas permeability of the concrete and of the effect of boundary conditions on them. Permeability decreased with water content, but it was also greatly affected by the hydraulic history of concrete, i.e. if it had been previously dried or wetted. In particular, and for a given degree of saturation, the gas permeability of concrete previously saturated was lower than if the concrete had been just air dried or saturated after air drying. In any case, the gas permeability was about two orders of magnitude higher than the liquid water permeability (10-16 vs. 10-18 m2), probably due to the chemical reactions taking place during saturation (carbonation). The relative gas permeability of concrete increased sharply for water degrees of saturation smaller than 50%. The boundary conditions also affected the gas permeability, which seemed to be mostly conditioned by the back pressure and the confining pressure, increasing as the former increased and decreasing as the latter increased, i.e. decreasing as the effective pressure increased. Overall the increase of pressure head or injection pressure implied a decrease in gas permeability. External,microcracking during air-drying could not be ruled out as responsible for the decrease of permeability with confining pressure. The apparent permeability obtained applying the Klinkenberg method for a given effective pressure was only slightly smaller than the average of all the values measured for the same confining pressure range. For this reason it is considered that the Klinkenberg effect was not relevant in the range of pressures applied. (Author) 37 refs.

  14. Barrier abnormalities and keratinocyte-derived cytokine cascade after cessation of long-term topical glucocorticosteroid on hairless mouse skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Kai Lin

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: An epidermis-derived cytokine cascade was observed following TCS-induced barrier disruption, which is similar to that from permeability barrier insults by acetone or tape stripping. The study suggests that concurrent application of skin care products during TCS treatment improves barrier homeostasis, and should become a standard practice to alleviate TCS-induced WD.

  15. The structure of a fluid confined by permeable walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritis, Nikolaos; Rickayzen, Gerald

    Osmosis has been studied using the methods of molecular dynamics and for several different models of a semi-permeable barrier. One of these models has also been used in theoretical and Monte Carlo investigations of the effect of such a barrier on the structure of a hard sphere fluid (Marsh, P., Rickayzen, G., and Calleja, M., 1995, Molec. Phys., 84, 799 ; Kim, S.-C., Calleja, M., and Rickayzen, G., 1995, J. Phys.: condens. Matter, 7, 8053). Results presented in these papers showed that this problem also provides a sensitive test for the validity of various density functional theories. In order to bring the theory to bear on the problem of osmosis, this earlier study is extended to the hard core Lennard-Jones fluid. At the same time a new sum rule for the density of a fluid in a periodic potential, which provides a useful check on the computations, is derived. It is again found that the agreement between the computed and the simulated density profiles is good except at the centre of the barrier and when the bulk density and pressure are close to the critical.

  16. Using magnetic permeability bits to store information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerwilke, John; Petrie, J. R.; Wieland, K. A.; Mencia, Raymond; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Cress, C. D.; Newburgh, G. A.; Edelstein, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    Steps are described in the development of a new magnetic memory technology, based on states with different magnetic permeability, with the capability to reliably store large amounts of information in a high-density form for decades. The advantages of using the permeability to store information include an insensitivity to accidental exposure to magnetic fields or temperature changes, both of which are known to corrupt memory approaches that rely on remanent magnetization. The high permeability media investigated consists of either films of Metglas 2826 MB (Fe40Ni38Mo4B18) or bilayers of permalloy (Ni78Fe22)/Cu. Regions of films of the high permeability media were converted thermally to low permeability regions by laser or ohmic heating. The permeability of the bits was read by detecting changes of an external 32 Oe probe field using a magnetic tunnel junction 10 μm away from the media. Metglas bits were written with 100 μs laser pulses and arrays of 300 nm diameter bits were read. The high and low permeability bits written using bilayers of permalloy/Cu are not affected by 10 Mrad(Si) of gamma radiation from a 60Co source. An economical route for writing and reading bits as small at 20 nm using a variation of heat assisted magnetic recording is discussed.

  17. Anisotropy of permeability in faulted porous sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, N. J. C.; Healy, D.; Taylor, C. W.

    2014-06-01

    Studies of fault rock permeabilities advance the understanding of fluid migration patterns around faults and contribute to predictions of fault stability. In this study a new model is proposed combining brittle deformation structures formed during faulting, with fluid flow through pores. It assesses the impact of faulting on the permeability anisotropy of porous sandstone, hypothesising that the formation of fault related micro-scale deformation structures will alter the host rock porosity organisation and create new permeability pathways. Core plugs and thin sections were sampled around a normal fault and oriented with respect to the fault plane. Anisotropy of permeability was determined in three orientations to the fault plane at ambient and confining pressures. Results show that permeabilities measured parallel to fault dip were up to 10 times higher than along fault strike permeability. Analysis of corresponding thin sections shows elongate pores oriented at a low angle to the maximum principal palaeo-stress (σ1) and parallel to fault dip, indicating that permeability anisotropy is produced by grain scale deformation mechanisms associated with faulting. Using a soil mechanics 'void cell model' this study shows how elongate pores could be produced in faulted porous sandstone by compaction and reorganisation of grains through shearing and cataclasis.

  18. Gas and water permeability of concrete for reactor buildings--prototype scale specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, R.H.

    1987-02-01

    The permeability testing was performed on four concrete cylinders, 0.25 m in diameter and 2 m long, modelling the wall-thickness of reactor containment structures on the prototype scale. Tests were performed on the cylinders before and after artificial induction of longitudinal cracks, intented to model defects developing after some period of adverse service conditions. Permeability increased greatly with the introduction of longitudinal cracks in the concrete, and was also affected by moisture content and casting direction. The influence of reinforcing steel could not be resolved within the bounds of experimental variability. Ultrasound measurements were taken on each cylinder before and after cracking, and a correlation between increased permeability and lowered Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity was observed. Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity measurements thus show promise as a means of continuous monitoring of the integrity of the concrete barrier in service

  19. The effect of hyperosmosis on paracellular permeability in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Hitoshi; Takei, Takuto; Aikawa, Katsuyoshi; Shimizu, Makoto

    2009-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a significant barrier to oral absorption of hydrophilic compounds, and their passage through the intercellular space is restricted by the tight junctions. In this study we found that hyperosmosis is a significant factor altering paracellular transport in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Osmotic regulators, such as sodium chloride, mannitol, and raffinose, decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced lucifer yellow permeability. The effect of these osmotic regulators on Caco-2 cell monolayers was not likely to be caused by gross cytotoxicity. Although certain amino acids and oligosaccharides have been reported to have specific tight junction-modulating activity, we found that the increased paracellular permeability of Caco-2 monolayers induced by these compounds was at least partly due to the increased osmotic pressure of the test solutions. These findings provide a new potential precaution in the evaluation of paracellular permeability-modulating substances using the Caco-2 cell monolayer system.

  20. Transport phenomena in sharply contrasting media with a diffusion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvoretskaya, O A; Kondratenko, P S

    2011-01-01

    Using the advection–diffusion equation, we analytically study contaminant transport in a sharply contrasting medium with a diffusion barrier due to localization of a contaminant source in a low-permeability medium. Anomalous diffusion behavior and a crossover between different transport regimes are observed. The diffusion barrier results in exponential attenuation of the source power, retardation of the contaminant plume growth and modification of the concentration distribution at large distances. (paper)

  1. Permeability Tests on Silkeborg Sand No. 0000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Willy; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Silkeborg Sand No. 0000. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. The apparatus, test procedures and the analysis method are described......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...

  2. Permeability Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. Finally the test results are briefly summarised and a relationship between......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...

  3. Quantifying porosity, compressibility and permeability in Shale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Frykman, Peter

    (XRD) of shale samples show about 50% silt and high content of kaolinite in the clay fraction when compared with offshore samples from the Central Graben. Porosity measurements from helium porosimetry-mercury immersion (HPMI), mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) and nuclear magnetic resonance...... strain data. We found that Kozeny's modelled permeability fall in the same order of magnitude with measured permeability for shale rich in kaolinite but overestimates permeability by two to three orders of magnitudes for shale with high content of smectite. The empirical Yang and Aplin model gives good...

  4. Effect of temperature on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus

    of the salinity of the pore fluid can increase the electrical double layer repulsion between quartz grains and kaolinite particles in Berea sandstone, which could lead to kaolinite mobilisation and permeability reduction. Heating increases the magnitude of the mineral surface charge, whereas salinity reduction...... permeability to brine than to gas is often observed, which might be due to interaction between the mineral surface and the pore fluid. By modelling a layer of immobile fluid on the fluid-mineral interface permeability to brine was estimated, based on both the pore size distribution from NMR combined...

  5. CAN BLOOD GAS AND ACID-BASE PARAMETERS AT MAXIMAL 200 METERS FRONT CRAWL SWIMMING BE DIFFERENT BETWEEN FORMER COMPETITIVE AND RECREATIONAL SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Kapus

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether maximal 200 m front crawl swimming strategies and breathing patterns influenced blood gas and acid-base parameters in a manner which gives advantage to former competitive swimmers in comparison with their recreational colleagues. Twelve former competitive male swimmers (the CS group and nine recreational male swimmers (the RS group performed a maximal 200 m front crawl swimming with self- selected breathing pattern. Stroke rate (SR and breathing frequency (BF were measured during the swimming test. Measures also included blood lactate concentration ([LA] and parameters of blood acid-base status before and during the first minute after the swimming test. The CS group swam faster then the RS group. Both groups have similar and steady SR throughout the swimming test. This was not matched by similar BF in the CS group but matched it very well in the RS group (r = 0.89. At the beginning of swimming test the CS group had low BF, but they increased it throughout the swimming test. The BF at the RS group remained constant with only mirror variations throughout the swimming test. Such difference in velocity and breathing resulted in maintaining of blood Po2 from hypoxia and Pco2 from hypercapnia. This was similar in both groups. [LA] increased faster in the CS group than in the RS group. On the contrary, the rate of pH decrease remained similar in both groups. The former competitive swimmers showed three possible advantages in comparison to recreational swimmers during maximal 200 m front crawl swimming: a more dynamic and precise regulation of breathing, more powerful bicarbonate buffering system and better synchronization between breathing needs and breathing response during swimming

  6. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Used to Manufacture Gas Storage Tanks With Reduced Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sandi G.; Johnston, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been considerable research in the area of polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. This research has shown that the dispersion of small amounts of an organically modified layered silicate improves the polymer strength, modulus, thermal stability, and barrier properties. There have been several reports on the dispersion of layered silicates in an epoxy matrix. Potential enhancements to the barrier properties of epoxy/silicate nanocomposites make this material attractive for low permeability tankage. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) have several advantages for cryogenic storage tanks. They are lightweight, strong, and stiff; therefore, a smaller fraction of a vehicle's potential payload capacity is used for propellant storage. Unfortunately, the resins typically used to make PMC tanks have higher gas permeability than metals. This can lead to hydrogen loss through the body of the tank instead of just at welds and fittings. One approach to eliminate this problem is to build composite tanks with thin metal liners. However, although these tanks provide good permeability performance, they suffer from a substantial mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion, which can lead to failure of the bond between the liner and the body of the tank. Both problems could be addressed with polymersilicate nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced hydrogen permeability, making them potential candidates for linerless PMC tanks. Through collaboration with Northrop Grumman and Michigan State University, nanocomposite test tanks were manufactured for the NASA Glenn Research Center, and the helium permeability was measured. An organically modified silicate was prepared at Michigan State University and dispersed in an epoxy matrix (EPON 826/JeffamineD230). The epoxy/silicate nanocomposites contained either 0 or 5 wt% of the organically modified silicate. The tanks were made by filament winding carbon fibers with the nanocomposite resin. Helium permeability

  7. Barrier Functionality of Porcine and Bovine Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailar Nakhlband

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, isolated cell based blood-brain barrier (BBB models have been widely used for brain drug delivery and targeting, due to their relatively proper bioelectrical and permeability properties. However, primary cultures of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs isolated from different species vary in terms of bioelectrical and permeability properties. Methods: To pursue this, in the current investigation, primary porcine and bovine BCECs (PBCECs and BBCECs, respectively were isolated and used as an in vitro BBB model. The bioelectrical and permeability properties were assessed in BCECs co-cultured with C6 cells with/without hydrocortisone (550 nM. The bioelectrical properties were further validated by means of the permeability coefficients of transcellular and paracellular markers. Results: The primary PBCECs displayed significantly higher trans-endothelial electrical resistance (~900 W.cm2 than BBCECs (~700 W.cm2 - both co-cultured with C6 cells in presence of hydrocortisone. Permeability coefficients of propranolol/diazepam and mannitol/sucrose in PBCECs were ~21 and ~2 (×10-6 cm.sec-1, where these values for BBCECs were ~25 and ~5 (×10-6 cm.sec-1. Conclusion: Upon our bioelectrical and permeability findings, both models display discriminative barrier functionality but porcine BCECs seem to provide a better platform than bovine BCECs for drug screening and brain targeting.

  8. Characterization of Polymer Layered Silicate Nanocomposites by Rheology and Permeability Methods: Impact of the Interface Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waché Rémi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymer clay nanocomposites are mostly described as materials with improved properties. However, many studies are not concluding about the possible benefits. This work reports permeability measurements on different polyolefins nanocomposites. Clay exfoliation has been proved by various techniques. Unfortunately, the nanocomposite does not exhibit good barrier properties. Hence, permeability coefficients were found to increase. A poor quality of the interface between filler and medium is likely to be responsible for this degradation. Insufficient interactions between silicate layers and the surrounding polymer lead to preferential pathways for diffusion. Organoclay exfoliation does not necessarily lead to better barrier properties. A good quality of the interface between polymer and filler is required to reach a high performance level. The standard techniques used to characterize exfoliation degree do not permit to highlight this kind of phenomena.

  9. Permeability of gypsum samples dehydrated in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike; Blöcher, Guido

    2011-09-01

    We report on changes in rock permeability induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air (dry) for up to 800 h at ambient pressure and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Subsequently, the reaction kinetics, so induced changes in porosity, and the concurrent evolution of sample permeability were constrained. Weighing the heated samples in predefined time intervals yielded the reaction progress where the stoichiometric mass balance indicated an ultimate and complete dehydration to anhydrite regardless of temperature. Porosity showed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% to 30%, whilst the initial bulk volume remained unchanged. Within these limits permeability significantly increased with porosity by almost three orders of magnitude from approximately 7 × 10-19 m2 to 3 × 10-16 m2. We show that - when mechanical and hydraulic feedbacks can be excluded - permeability, reaction progress, and porosity are related unequivocally.

  10. Surface sedimentation at permeable pavement systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støvring, Jan; Dam, Torben; Jensen, Marina Bergen

    2018-01-01

    of restorative cleaning (RC), nine recently built PP systems were tested for their infiltration capacity with and without restorative cleaning (RC) over an interval of 12–14.5 months. The results were related to each site’s unique history of sedimentation. RC significantly improved permeability, but when...... revisited after approximately one year, the permeability of cleaned surfaces was not significantly better for the RC spots than from their uncleaned neighbouring areas. Relating permeability to the contextual issues revealed that PP perimeter, adjacent bare soil and mismanagement strongly affected...... the sedimentation process. At two of the sites, sedimentation processes were so advanced that surface permeability was below the level of service (five-year design storm)....

  11. Permeability of uncharged organic molecules in reverse osmosis desalination membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dražević, Emil; Košutić, Krešimir; Svalina, Marin; Catalano, Jacopo

    2017-06-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes are primarily designed for removal of salts i.e. for desalination of brackish and seawater, but they have also found applications in removal of organic molecules. While it is clear that steric exclusion is the dominant removal mechanism, the fundamental explanation for how and why the separation occurs remains elusive. Until recently there was no strong microscopic evidences elucidating the structure of the active polyamide layers of RO membranes, and thus they have been conceived as "black boxes"; or as an array of straight capillaries with a distribution of radii; or as polymers with a small amount of polymer free domains. The knowledge of diffusion and sorption coefficients is a prerequisite for understanding the intrinsic permeability of any organic solute in any polymer. At the same time, it is technically challenging to accurately measure these two fundamental parameters in very thin (20-300 nm) water-swollen active layers. In this work we have measured partition and diffusion coefficients and RO permeabilities of ten organic solutes in water-swollen active layers of two types of RO membranes, low (SWC4+) and high flux (XLE). We deduced from our results and recent microscopic studies that the solute flux of organic molecules in polyamide layer of RO membranes occurs in two domains, dense polymer (the key barrier layer) and the water filled domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasticiser Effect on Water Vapour Permeability Properties of Locust bean gum--Based Edible Films

    OpenAIRE

    BOZDEMİR, Özgür Altan; TUTAŞ, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The barrier properties of edible films prepared from polysaccharide polymer (locust bean gum) and various plasticisers (glycerol, propylene glycol, sorbitol, and polyethylene glycol 200) together with hydrophobic modifiers (stearopten and beeswax) were examined. It was determined that the films containing polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG 200) and sorbitol have the lowest water vapour permeability values and the films containing glycerol have the highest WVP values. It was found that the ...

  13. Effects of endotoxaemia on markers of permeability, metabolism and inflammation in the large bowel of healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, V L; Ibsen, M; Andresen, L

    2007-01-01

    Increased permeability and increased luminal concentrations of L-lactate have previously been shown in the large bowel in septic patients. To advance these observations, a human model of colorectal barrier failure in sepsis is desirable. Therefore, we assessed the effects of endotoxaemia on markers...

  14. Negative permeability from random particle composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Shahid, E-mail: shussain2@qinetiq.com

    2017-04-15

    Artificial media, such as those composed of periodically-spaced wires for negative permittivity and split ring resonators for negative permeability have been extensively investigated for negative refractive index (NRI) applications (Smith et al., 2004; Pendry et al., 1999) [1,2]. This paper presents an alternative method for producing negative permeability: granular (or particulate) composites incorporating magnetic fillers. Artificial media, such as split-ring resonators, are designed to produce a magnetic resonance feature, which results in negative permeability over a narrow frequency range about the resonance frequency. The position of the feature is dependent upon the size of the inclusion. The material in this case is anisotropic, such that the feature is only observable when the materials are orientated in a specific direction relative to the applied field. A similar resonance can be generated in magnetic granular (particulate) materials: ferromagnetic resonance from the natural spin resonance of particles. Although the theoretical resonance profiles in granular composites shows the permeability dipping to negative values, this is rarely observed experimentally due to resonance damping effects. Results are presented for iron in spherical form and in flake form, dispersed in insulating host matrices. The two particle shapes show different permeability performance, with the magnetic flakes producing a negative contribution. This is attributed to the stronger coupling with the magnetic field resulting from the high aspect ratio of the flakes. The accompanying ferromagnetic resonance is strong enough to overcome the effects of damping and produce negative permeability. The size of random particle composites is not dictated by the wavelength of the applied field, so the materials are potentially much thinner than other, more traditional artificial composites at microwave frequencies. - Highlights: • Negative permeability from random particle composites is

  15. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on the Blood Brain Barrier

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Persson, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    ...) in the 91 5-2450 MHz range on the permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB) in rats. Male and female Fischer rats were exposed to continuous wave or pulse-modulated EMF, with different pulse powers and times up to 960 minutes...

  16. Charge Inversion in semi-permeable membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siddhartha; Sinha, Shayandev; Jing, Haoyuan

    Role of semi-permeable membranes like lipid bilayer is ubiquitous in a myriad of physiological and pathological phenomena. Typically, lipid membranes are impermeable to ions and solutes; however, protein channels embedded in the membrane allow the passage of selective, small ions across the membrane enabling the membrane to adopt a semi-permeable nature. This semi-permeability, in turn, leads to electrostatic potential jump across the membrane, leading to effects such as regulation of intracellular calcium, extracellular-vesicle-membrane interactions, etc. In this study, we theoretically demonstrate that this semi-permeable nature may trigger the most remarkable charge inversion (CI) phenomenon in the cytosol-side of the negatively-charged lipid bilayer membrane that are selectively permeable to only positive ions of a given salt. This CI is manifested as the changing of the sign of the electrostatic potential from negative to positive from the membrane-cytosol interface to deep within the cytosol. We study the impact of the parameters such as the concentration of this salt with selectively permeable ions as well as the concentration of an external salt in the development of this CI phenomenon. We anticipate such CI will profoundly influence the interaction of membrane and intra-cellular moieties (e.g., exosome or multi-cellular vesicles) having implications for a host of biophysical processes.

  17. Transformable ferroelectric control of dynamic magnetic permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Changjun; Jia, Chenglong; Wang, Fenglong; Zhou, Cai; Xue, Desheng

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic permeability, which measures the response of a material to an applied magnetic field, is crucial to the performance of magnetic devices and related technologies. Its dynamic value is usually a complex number with real and imaginary parts that describe, respectively, how much magnetic power can be stored and lost in the material. Control of permeability is therefore closely related to energy redistribution within a magnetic system or energy exchange between magnetic and other degrees of freedom via certain spin-dependent interactions. To avoid a high power consumption, direct manipulation of the permeability with an electric field through magnetoelectric coupling leads to high efficiency and simple operation, but remains a big challenge in both the fundamental physics and material science. Here we report unambiguous evidence of ferroelectric control of dynamic magnetic permeability in a Co /Pb (Mg1/3Nb2/3) 0.7Ti0.3O3 (Co/PMN-PT) heterostructure, in which the ferroelectric PMN-PT acts as an energy source for the ferromagnetic Co film via an interfacial linear magnetoelectric interaction. The electric field tuning of the magnitude and line shape of the permeability offers a highly localized means of controlling magnetization with ultralow power consumption. Additionally, the emergence of negative permeability promises a new way of realizing functional nanoscale metamaterials with adjustable refraction index.

  18. Rebamipide suppresses diclofenac-induced intestinal permeability via mitochondrial protection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Lei; Mei, Qiao; Xu, Jian-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Chang; Hu, Jing; Jin, Juan; Yao, Qiang; Chen, Mo-Li

    2012-03-14

    To investigate the protective effect and mechanism of rebamipide on small intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac in mice. Diclofenac (2.5 mg/kg) was administered once daily for 3 d orally. A control group received the vehicle by gavage. Rebamipide (100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically once a day for 3 d 4 h after diclofenac administration. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by Evans blue and the FITC-dextran method. The ultrastructure of the mucosal barrier was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mitochondrial function including mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-reduced (NADH) levels, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATPase activities were measured. Small intestinal mucosa was collected for assessment of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Compared with the control group, intestinal permeability was significantly increased in the diclofenac group, which was accompanied by broken tight junctions, and significant increases in MDA content and MPO activity. Rebamipide significantly reduced intestinal permeability, improved inter-cellular tight junctions, and was associated with decreases in intestinal MDA content and MPO activity. At the mitochondrial level, rebamipide increased SDH and ATPase activities, NADH level and decreased mitochondrial swelling. Increased intestinal permeability induced by diclofenac can be attenuated by rebamipide, which partially contributed to the protection of mitochondrial function.

  19. Lateral Facies and Permeability Changes in Upper Shoreface Sandstones, Berakas Syncline, Brunei Darussalam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovinda Ovinda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.1.11-20Several outcrops were studied to identify sedimentary facies and to analyze permeability distribution, through which an outcrop analogue for upper shoreface reservoirs can be established. Four facies were identified: upper shoreface, lower shoreface, offshore transition, and tidal ones. Stratigraphic correlation of eleven outcrops indicates that the upper shoreface sandstone is generally clean, well sorted, parallel, and planar cross laminated. The sand becomes thinner and pinches out to the northwest where the mud proportion increases within the sand. Muddier sand was deposited in a relatively low energy upper shoreface setting. The thickness of the upper shoreface reservoir sand generally is 5 m. It decreases to zero over approximately 1.3 km as the sand pinches out to the northwest. To the northeast, the thickness also decreases to 4 m over approximately 4 km. Permeability values are more variable laterally than vertically. The permeability distribution has an obvious relationship to the sedimentary facies and is mainly controlled by the proportion of mud and bioturbation. As the sand pinches out in the northwest, permeability decreases from 590 md to 97 md over 1 km. To the northeast, permeability also decreases to 152 md over approximately 4 km where the sand becomes highly bioturbated. These values indicate that the sands are of good to very good reservoir quality. It appears that there are no major barriers to the lateral flow of fluid within the upper shoreface sandstone.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide metabolism regulates endothelial solute barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is an important gaseous signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. In addition to free H2S, H2S can be oxidized to polysulfide which can be biologically active. Since the impact of H2S on endothelial solute barrier function is not known, we sought to determine whether H2S and its various metabolites affect endothelial permeability. In vitro permeability was evaluated using albumin flux and transendothelial electrical resistance. Different H2S donors were used to examine the effects of exogenous H2S. To evaluate the role of endogenous H2S, mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs were isolated from wild type mice and mice lacking cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, a predominant source of H2S in endothelial cells. In vivo permeability was evaluated using the Miles assay. We observed that polysulfide donors induced rapid albumin flux across endothelium. Comparatively, free sulfide donors increased permeability only with higher concentrations and at later time points. Increased solute permeability was associated with disruption of endothelial junction proteins claudin 5 and VE-cadherin, along with enhanced actin stress fiber formation. Importantly, sulfide donors that increase permeability elicited a preferential increase in polysulfide levels within endothelium. Similarly, CSE deficient MAECs showed enhanced solute barrier function along with reduced endogenous bound sulfane sulfur. CSE siRNA knockdown also enhanced endothelial junction structures with increased claudin 5 protein expression. In vivo, CSE genetic deficiency significantly blunted VEGF induced hyperpermeability revealing an important role of the enzyme for barrier function. In summary, endothelial solute permeability is critically regulated via exogenous and endogenous sulfide bioavailability with a prominent role of polysulfides.

  1. Usefulness of Permeability Map by Perfusion MRI of Brain Tumor the Grade Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sung Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Dongsan Hospital, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joo Young [GE Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyuk Won [Dept. of Radiology, Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    This study was conducted to assess how effective the permeability ratio and relative cerebral blood volume ratio are to tumor through perfusion MRI by measuring and reflecting the grade assessment and differential diagnosis and the permeability and relative cerebral blood volume of contrast media plunged from blood vessel into organ due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier in cerebral. Subject and Method : Subject of study was 29 patients whose diagnosis were confirmed by biopsy after surgery and 550 (11 slice x 50 image) perfusion MRI were used to make image of relative cerebral blood volume with the program furnished on instrument. The other method was to transmit to private computer and the image analysis was made additionally by making image of relative cerebral blood volume-reformulated singular value decomposition, rCBV-rSVD and permeability using IDL.6.2. In addition, Kruskal-wallis test tonggyein non numerical average by a comparative analysis of brain tumors Results : The rCBV ratio (Functool PF; GE Medical Systems and IDL 6.2 program by analysis) and permeability ratio of tumors were as follows; high grade glioma(n=4), (14.75, 19.25) 13.13. low grade astrocytoma(n=5) (14.80, 15.90) 11.60, glioblastoma(n=5) (10.90, 18.60), 22.00, metastasis(n=6) (11.00, 15.08). 22.33. meningioma(n=6) (18.58, 7.67), 5.58. oliogodendroglioma(n=3) (23.33, 16.33, 15.67. Conclusion : It was not easy to classify the grade with the relative cerebral blood volume ratio measured by using the relative cerebral blood image by type of tumors, however, permeability ratio measured by permeability image revealed that the higher the grade of tumor, the higher the measured permeability ratio, showing the assessment of tumor grade is more effective to differential diagnosis.

  2. Incorporation of lipolysis in monolayer permeability studies of lipid-based oral drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Layek, Buddhadev; Prabha, Swayam

    2018-04-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems, a well-tolerated class of formulations, have been evaluated extensively to enhance the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. However, it has been difficult to predict the in vivo performance of lipid dosage forms based on conventional in vitro techniques such as cell monolayer permeability studies because of the complexity of the gastrointestinal processing of lipid formulations. In the current study, we explored the feasibility of coupling Caco-2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney monolayer permeability studies with lipolysis, a promising in vitro technique to evaluate lipid systems. A self-emulsifying lipid delivery system was formulated using a blend of oil (castor oil), surfactant (Labrasol® or PL497), and co-surfactant (lecithin). Formulations demonstrating high drug solubility and rapid self-emulsification were selected to study the effect of lipolysis on in vitro cell permeability. Lipolysis of the formulations was carried out using pancreatin as the digestive enzyme. All the digested formulations compromised monolayer integrity as indicated by lowered trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and enhanced Lucifer yellow (LY) permeability. Further, the changes in TEER value and LY permeability were attributable to the digestion products of the formulation rather than the individual lipid excipients, drug, digestion enzyme, or the digestion buffer. The digested formulations were fractionated into pellet, oily phase, and aqueous phase, and the effect of each of these on cell viability was examined. Interestingly, the aqueous phase, which is considered important for in vivo drug absorption, was responsible for cytotoxicity. Because lipid digestion products lead to disruption of cell monolayer, it may not be appropriate to combine lipolysis with cell monolayer permeability studies. Additional in vivo studies are needed to determine any potential side effects of the lipolysis products on the intestinal permeability barrier

  3. Ascorbic acid attenuates endothelial permeability triggered by cell-free hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, Jamie L; Bastarache, Julie A; Shaver, Ciara M; Fessel, Joshua P; Dikalov, Sergey I; May, James M; Ware, Lorraine B

    2018-01-01

    Increased endothelial permeability is central to shock and organ dysfunction in sepsis but therapeutics targeted to known mediators of increased endothelial permeability have been unsuccessful in patient studies. We previously reported that cell-free hemoglobin (CFH) is elevated in the majority of patients with sepsis and is associated with organ dysfunction, poor clinical outcomes and elevated markers of oxidant injury. Others have shown that Vitamin C (ascorbate) may have endothelial protective effects in sepsis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that high levels of CFH, as seen in the circulation of patients with sepsis, disrupt endothelial barrier integrity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were grown to confluence and treated with CFH with or without ascorbate. Monolayer permeability was measured by Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) or transfer of 14 C-inulin. Viability was measured by trypan blue exclusion. Intracellular ascorbate was measured by HPLC. CFH increased permeability in a dose- and time-dependent manner with 1 mg/ml of CFH increasing inulin transfer by 50% without affecting cell viability. CFH (1 mg/ml) also caused a dramatic reduction in intracellular ascorbate in the same time frame (1.4 mM without CFH, 0.23 mM 18 h after 1 mg/ml CFH, p < 0.05). Pre-treatment of HUVECs with ascorbate attenuated CFH induced permeability. CFH increases endothelial permeability in part through depletion of intracellular ascorbate. Supplementation of ascorbate can attenuate increases in permeability mediated by CFH suggesting a possible therapeutic approach in sepsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Frictional stability-permeability relationships for fractures in shales: Friction-Permeability Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Elsworth, Derek [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Department of Geosciences, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Wang, Chaoyi [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Ishibashi, Takuya [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, EMS Energy Institute, and G3 Center, Pennsylvania State University, University Park Pennsylvania USA; Fukushima Renewable Energy Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Koriyama Japan; Fitts, Jeffrey P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey USA

    2017-01-01

    There is wide concern that fluid injection in the subsurface, such as for the stimulation of shale reservoirs or for geological CO2 sequestration (GCS), has the potential to induce seismicity that may change reservoir permeability due to fault slip. However, the impact of induced seismicity on fracture permeability evolution remains unclear due to the spectrum of modes of fault reactivation (e.g., stable versus unstable). As seismicity is controlled by the frictional response of fractures, we explore friction-stability-permeability relationships through the concurrent measurement of frictional and hydraulic properties of artificial fractures in Green River shale (GRS) and Opalinus shale (OPS). We observe that carbonate-rich GRS shows higher frictional strength but weak neutral frictional stability. The GRS fracture permeability declines during shearing while an increased sliding velocity reduces the rate of permeability decline. By comparison, the phyllosilicate-rich OPS has lower friction and strong stability while the fracture permeability is reduced due to the swelling behavior that dominates over the shearing induced permeability reduction. Hence, we conclude that the friction-stability-permeability relationship of a fracture is largely controlled by mineral composition and that shale mineral compositions with strong frictional stability may be particularly subject to permanent permeability reduction during fluid infiltration.

  6. Modulating the skin barrier function by DMSO: molecular dynamics simulations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic transmembrane pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Otter, Wouter K.; Notman, R.; Anwar, J.; Noro, M.G.; Briels, Willem J.

    2008-01-01

    The dense lipid bilayers at the outer surface of the skin represent the primary barrier to molecules penetrating the human skin. One approach to overcome this barrier, with promising applications in administering medicinal drugs to the body, is to employ chemical permeability enhancers. How these

  7. A meta-analysis on the utility of peripheral venous blood gas analyses in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Beng Leong; Kelly, Anne-Maree

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this case-based review is to identify and summarize the relevant evidence for the clinical utility of peripheral venous blood gas (pVBG) analyses in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treated in the emergency department. Relevant studies were identified using the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, and CINAHL databases and by hand searching of references of published articles. Included studies were prospective trials comparing arterial and pVBG results in patients with COPD or respiratory distress that reported at least average differences and/or limits of agreement between the two results in English. Outcomes of interest were agreement between arterial and pVBG values for pH, pCO2, pO2, and HCO3. Eighty-nine studies were identified of which six were relevant. The weighted average difference for pCO2 was 5.92 mmHg, whereas those for pH, pO2, and HCO3 were 0.028, 18.65 mmHg, and 1.34 mEq/l, respectively. Using Bland-Altman analysis, the 95% limits of agreement were in the range of -0.10 to 0.08, -17 to 26 mmHg and, -3.5 to 3.5 mEq/l for pH, pCO2, and HCO3, respectively. Reported cutoff pVBG pCO2 values for screening of arterial hypercarbia ranged from 30 to 46 mmHg. No studies investigated the role of pVBG analysis in treatment alteration or clinical outcomes. Available evidence suggests that there is good agreement for pH and HCO3 values between arterial and pVBG results in patients with COPD, but not for pO2 or pCO2. Widespread clinical use is limited because of the lack of validation studies on clinical outcomes.

  8. Permeability Change of Crystalline Silicate Mineral-Packed Bed Column by Highly Alkaline Plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hideo Usui; Yuichi Niibori; Hitoshi Mimura; Osamu Tochiyama

    2007-01-01

    For the construction of the geological disposal system, the use of the cementitious material may change the permeability of the natural barrier around the repository. Cementitious materials may alter the pH of ground water to highly alkaline. Also, the potential permeability change of the natural barrier is one of the notable factors for performance assessments of geological disposal systems. In the high pH region, the solubility of silica is very high compared to that in the natural pH (around 8). Therefore, highly alkaline groundwater would dissolve and alter a part of rock surface. Usui et al. (2005) reported that the change of mineral pore structure due to chemical reaction is the key factor to consider the change of the permeability [5-6]. Moreover, such a change of the pore structure was considered to be the result of the spatial heterogeneity of chemical composition. Since such spatial heterogeneity exists also in the sedimentary rocks consisting of crystalline minerals such as quartz and feldspar, we need to examine natural rock, in order to obtain more reliable understanding about the change of permeability induced by highly alkaline groundwater (plume). In this study, silica sand as crystalline mineral was packed in the column, and the effect of dissolution induced by the highly alkaline plume on the permeability-change was examined. The silica sand particles mainly consist of SiO 2 and include Al 2 O 3 , FeO, and K 2 O. The volumetric flow rate and the pressure difference between the inlet and outlet of the column were measured, and the permeability was calculated. At the same time, the concentrations of elements in the fluid were measured by ICP-AES. The experimental result showed that permeability decreased gradually, although the silica sand was continuously dissolved in the column. The behavior of the permeability is considered to be the result from the rearrangement of the particles, or precipitation of secondary mineral. In the column test using

  9. Biointrusion test plan for the Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, S.O.; Cadwell, L.L.; Brandt, C.A.; Downs, J.L.; Rossi, R.E.; Gee, G.W.

    1994-04-01

    This document provides a testing and monitoring plan for the biological component of the prototype barrier slated for construction at the Hanford Site. The prototype barrier is an aboveground structure engineered to demonstrate the basic features of an earthen cover system. It is designed to permanently isolate waste from the biosphere. The features of the barrier include multiple layers of soil and rock materials and a low-permeability asphalt sublayer. The surface of the barrier consists of silt loam soil, covered with plants. The barrier sides are reinforced with rock or coarse earthen-fill to protect against wind and water erosion. The sublayers inhibit plant and animal intrusion and percolation of water. A series of tests will be conducted on the prototype barrier over the next several years to evaluate barrier performance under extreme climatic conditions. Plants and animals will play a significant role in the hydrologic and water and wind erosion characteristics of the prototype barrier. Studies on the biological component of the prototype barrier will include work on the initial revegetation of the surface, continued monitoring of the developing plant community, rooting depth and dispersion in the context of biointrusion potential, the role of plants in the hydrology of the surface and toe regions of the barrier, the role of plants in stabilizing the surface against water and wind erosion, and the role of burrowing animals in the hydrology and water and wind erosion of the barrier

  10. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types in the parking lanes – permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). An impermeable liner installed 0.4 m below the driving surface in four 11.6-m by 4.74-m sections per each pavement type captures all infiltrating water and routes it to collection tanks that can contain events up to 38 mm. Each section has a design impervious area to permeable pavement area ratio of 0.66:1. Pressure transducers installed in the underdrain collection tanks measured water level for 24 months. Level was converted to volume using depth-to-volume ratios for individual collection tanks. Using a water balance approach, the measured infiltrate volume was compared to rainfall volume on an event-basis to determine the rainfall retained in the pavement strata and underlying aggregate. Evaporation since the previous event created additional storage in the pavement and aggregate layers. Events were divided into three groups based on antecedent dry period (ADP) and three, four-month categories of potential e

  11. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to examine the in vivo buccal pH-dependent permeability of nicotine in humans and furthermore compare the in vivo permeability of nicotine to previous in vitro permeability data. The buccal permeability of nicotine was examined in a three-way cross-over study in eight healthy non......-smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine....... The disappearance rate of nicotine increased significantly as the pH increased, which resulted in P(app) values of 0.57+/-0.55 x 10(-4), 2.10+/-0.23 x 10(-4), and 3.96+/-0.54 x 10(-4)cms(-1) (mean+/-S.D.) at pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1, respectively. A linear relationship (R(2)=0.993) was obtained between the P...

  12. Vascular permeability alterations induced by arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Wang, Hsiu-Jen; Yu, Hsin-Su; Chang, Louis W

    2004-01-01

    The impact of arsenic on the integrity of blood vessels in vivo via in situ exposure (local injection) of arsenic was investigated. Vascular permeability changes were evaluated by means of the Evans blue assay and the India ink tracer techniques. Rats were intravenously injected with Evans blue followed by intradermal injections of various doses of sodium arsenite on the back skins of the animals. Evans blue at different time points was extracted and assayed as indices of vascular leakage. Skin at various time point injection sites was sampled for arsenic measurement via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. Our time course study with Evans blue technique demonstrated a biphasic pattern of vascular permeability change: an early phase of permeability reduction and a later phase of permeability promotion at all dose levels tested. The India ink tracer technique also demonstrated a time-correlated increase in vascular labelling in the tissues examined, signifying an increase in vascular leakage with time. Moreover, we found that despite an early increase in tissue arsenic content at time of injection, tissue arsenic declined rapidly and returned to near control levels after 30-60 min. Thus, an inverse correlation between tissue arsenic content and the extent of vascular permeability was apparent. This study provides the first demonstration that in situ exposure to arsenic will produce vascular dysfunction (vascular leakage) in vivo.

  13. New chemical approach to permeability reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presley, C.T.; Argabright, P.A.; Smith, R.E.; Phillips B.L.

    1974-01-01

    A new class of polyelectrolytes, polyisocyanurate salts, has been discovered at this laboratory. The most versatile member of this class, T/sub M/PI, possesses a number of unique properties, not the least of which is its hydrolysis in basic solution. The hydrolysis product is in the form of a colloidal suspension resulting from the opening of some hydrophilic isocyanurate salt rings to the more hydrophobic biuret moiety. The influence of base and T/sub M/PI concentrations on the rate of hydrolysis and, more importantly, the time to onset of particle formation, were investigated. The reaction of T/sub M/PI with base was shown to be an efficient method for generating particles, irreversibly, in porous media for the purpose of reducing permeability. The T/sub M/PI-based partial plugging process has a number of important advantages, namely: (1) the plugging agent is injected as a single solution; (2) the time available after mixing for placement of the solution in the reservoir (i.e., handling time) can be varied over rather wide limits; (3) the process can be designed so that the final permeability is essentially any desired fraction of the initial permeability; (4) the fractional permeability reduction appears to be independent of the initial permeability; and (5) the particles are not removed by subsequent water injection. (16 refs.)

  14. Flood Mitigation by Permeable Pavements in Chinese Sponge City Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Maochuan Hu; Xingqi Zhang; Yim Ling Siu; Yu Li; Kenji Tanaka; Hong Yang; Youpeng Xu

    2018-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the effectiveness of permeable pavements on flood mitigation at different spatial scales for their effective application, for example, sponge city construction in China. This study evaluated the effectiveness of three types of permeable pavements (i.e., permeable asphalts (PA), permeable concretes (PC), and permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP)) on flood mitigation at a community scale in China using a hydrological model. In addition, the effects of cloggin...

  15. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    and 9 are found together with Rh proteins in cells exposed to portal blood coming from the intestine. In the kidney, AQP3 might participate in the excretion of NH(4) (+) in the collecting duct. The interplay between the ammonia-permeable aquaporins and the other types of ammonia- and urea......The human aquaporins,AQP3,AQP7, AQP8,AQP9, and possibly AQP10, are permeable to ammonia, and AQP7, AQP9, and possibly AQP3, are permeable to urea. In humans, these aquaporins supplement the ammonia transport of the Rhesus (Rh) proteins and the urea transporters (UTs). The mechanism by which...... ammonium is transported by aquaporins is not fully resolved. A comparison of transport equations, models, and experimental data shows that ammonia is transported in its neutral form, NH(3). In the presence of NH(3), the aquaporin stimulates H(+) transport. Consequently, this transport of H(+) is only...

  16. Altered erythrocyte cation permeability in familial pseudohyperkalaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, G; Vantyghem, M C; Doise, B; Lallau, G; Racadot, A; Lefebvre, J

    1989-08-01

    1. Erythrocyte cation transport pathways have been investigated in a family with pseudohyperkalaemia. 2. Ouabain- and bumetanide-resistant Na+ and K+ effluxes in three pseudohyperkalaemic patients were not different from those of control subjects when assessed at 37 degrees C. 3. When the temperature was decreased to 20 degrees C and 9 degrees C, K+ passive permeability markedly increased and Na+ permeability remained unchanged in these patients. In contrast, in control subjects a reduction in temperature caused a marked reduction in Na+ and K+ passive permeability. 4. These findings could account for the marked increase in plasma K+ concentration observed at subphysiological temperatures. 5. The Na+-K+ co-transport pathway was reduced in all members of the family, but the Na+-K+ pump was reduced in only two of them. These alterations were independent from the pseudohyperkalaemic state.

  17. Mathematical models of skin permeability: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitragotri, Samir; Anissimov, Yuri G; Bunge, Annette L; Frasch, H Frederick; Guy, Richard H; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Kasting, Gerald B; Lane, Majella E; Roberts, Michael S

    2011-10-10

    Mathematical models of skin permeability play an important role in various fields including prediction of transdermal drug delivery and assessment of dermal exposure to industrial chemicals. Extensive research has been performed over the last several decades to yield predictions of skin permeability to various molecules. These efforts include the development of empirical approaches such as quantitative structure-permeability relationships and porous pathway theories as well as the establishment of rigorous structure-based models. In addition to establishing the necessary mathematical framework to describe these models, efforts have also been dedicated to determining the key parameters that are required to use these models. This article provides an overview of various modeling approaches with respect to their advantages, limitations and future prospects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mathematical Modeling and Experimental Validation of Nanoemulsion-Based Drug Transport across Cellular Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakia, Ekta; Shah, Lipa; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2017-07-01

    Nanoemulsions have shown potential in delivering drug across epithelial and endothelial cell barriers, which express efflux transporters. However, their transport mechanisms are not entirely understood. Our goal was to investigate the cellular permeability of nanoemulsion-encapsulated drugs and apply mathematical modeling to elucidate transport mechanisms and sensitive nanoemulsion attributes. Transport studies were performed in Caco-2 cells, using fish oil nanoemulsions and a model substrate, rhodamine-123. Permeability data was modeled using a semi-mechanistic approach, capturing the following cellular processes: endocytotic uptake of the nanoemulsion, release of rhodamine-123 from the nanoemulsion, efflux and passive permeability of rhodamine-123 in aqueous solution. Nanoemulsions not only improved the permeability of rhodamine-123, but were also less sensitive to efflux transporters. The model captured bidirectional permeability results and identified sensitive processes, such as the release of the nanoemulsion-encapsulated drug and cellular uptake of the nanoemulsion. Mathematical description of cellular processes, improved our understanding of transport mechanisms, such as nanoemulsions don't inhibit efflux to improve drug permeability. Instead, their endocytotic uptake, results in higher intracellular drug concentrations, thereby increasing the concentration gradient and transcellular permeability across biological barriers. Modeling results indicated optimizing nanoemulsion attributes like the droplet size and intracellular drug release rate, may further improve drug permeability.

  19. Negative permeability from random particle composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shahid

    2017-04-01

    Artificial media, such as those composed of periodically-spaced wires for negative permittivity and split ring resonators for negative permeability have been extensively investigated for negative refractive index (NRI) applications (Smith et al., 2004; Pendry et al., 1999) [1,2]. This paper presents an alternative method for producing negative permeability: granular (or particulate) composites incorporating magnetic fillers. Artificial media, such as split-ring resonators, are designed to produce a magnetic resonance feature, which results in negative permeability over a narrow frequency range about the resonance frequency. The position of the feature is dependent upon the size of the inclusion. The material in this case is anisotropic, such that the feature is only observable when the materials are orientated in a specific direction relative to the applied field. A similar resonance can be generated in magnetic granular (particulate) materials: ferromagnetic resonance from the natural spin resonance of particles. Although the theoretical resonance profiles in granular composites shows the permeability dipping to negative values, this is rarely observed experimentally due to resonance damping effects. Results are presented for iron in spherical form and in flake form, dispersed in insulating host matrices. The two particle shapes show different permeability performance, with the magnetic flakes producing a negative contribution. This is attributed to the stronger coupling with the magnetic field resulting from the high aspect ratio of the flakes. The accompanying ferromagnetic resonance is strong enough to overcome the effects of damping and produce negative permeability. The size of random particle composites is not dictated by the wavelength of the applied field, so the materials are potentially much thinner than other, more traditional artificial composites at microwave frequencies.

  20. In situ permeability testing of rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Broce, R.D.; Lie, K.

    1981-04-01

    Storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in bedded salt formations requires a knowledge of the in situ permeability of SENM rock salt. Since assumptions for safety assessments have been made in which these wastes could generate gas pressures on the order of the lithostatic pressure over geologic time scales, the permeability of the surrounding formation becomes an important parameter for determining the manner in which the gases will be contained or dispersed. This report describes the series of tests conducted in the AEC-7 borehole, located near the WIPP site, to determine the in situ gas flow characteristics of the bedded salt. In these tests, compressed air was injected into the borehole and flow into the surrounding formation measured. These measured flow rates were interpreted in terms of formation permeabilities and porosities which were, in turn, used as modeling parameters for the repository response analysis. Two series of field tests were performed. The first series consisted of a number of whole-hole flow tests conducted to provide preliminary design information required for future operation of a guarded straddle packer system capable of measuring permeabilities > or = 0.1 μdarcy. The second series of tests were conducted using the Systems, Science and Software (S-Cubed) designed guarded straddle packer system. In these interval permeability tests, 100-foot lengths of borehole were isolated and the flow characteristics of the surrounding formation examined. In this report, a complete description of the test procedures, instrumentation, and measurement techniques is first given. The analytical/numerical methods used for data interpretation are then presented, followed by results of the interval and permeability tests. (The whole-hole tests are summarized in Appendix A.) Conclusions are presented in the final section

  1. Abnormal intestinal permeability in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Jordan J; Meddings, Jonathan; Heathcote, E Jenny

    2006-09-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMAs) found in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) cross-react with bacterial proteins and hence molecular mimicry has been proposed as a mechanism for AMA development. Alterations in gastrointestinal permeability would provide a potential route for increased exposure of gut flora to the immune system. In this study we aimed to compare the measured gastrointestinal permeability in patients with PBC to that in patients with liver disease (hepatitis C) and healthy control populations. Subjects drank a mixture of sucrose, lactulose, and mannitol dissolved in water. Eight-hour urinary excretion of the sugars was measured to assess intestinal permeability. Antiendomysial antibody testing was performed to exclude subclinical celiac disease. Eighty-six patients with PBC were evaluated and compared to 69 hepatitis C patients and 155 healthy controls. The mean urinary excretion of sucrose in the PBC patients (133.89 +/- 72.56 mg) was significantly higher than that in hepatitis C patients (101.07+/-63.35) or healthy controls (89.46+/-41.76) (P=0.0001), suggesting abnormal gastric or proximal small intestinal permeability. Sucrose excretion was not increased among patients with hepatitis C compared to healthy controls. The ratio of lactulose:mannitol excretion, reflecting small bowel permeability, was also elevated in the PBC group (0.017+/-0.012) compared to healthy controls (0.012+/-0.007) (P=0.0001) but was equal to that found among patients with hepatitis C (0.016+/-0.011) (P=NS). We conclude that the permeability of both the stomach and the small bowel is increased in patients with PBC, however, it is unclear if it is a cause, consequence, or manifestation of the disease.

  2. Control the Epithelial Barrier: A Pivotal First Line of Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M McKay

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumen-derived material gains access to the mucosa by permeating between adjacent epithelial cells (ie, paracellular pathway, by transcytosis across the apical and basolateral cell membranes (ie, transcellular pathway or by exploiting breaks or erosions in the epithelium that may, for example, result from inflammation. Increased epithelial permeability (or decreased barrier function has repeatedly been demonstrated in a variety of gut disturbances; notably, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. There has been an exponential increase in our knowledge of the structural elements that comprise the epithelial barrier, and of the intrinsic factors (eg, cytokines and external stimuli (eg, bacterial toxins that can either perturb or enhance epithelial permeability. Canadian researchers have been very active in the study of epithelial permeability and have been responsible for major advances in the field, documenting increased permeability in patients with ulcer disease and IBD and some of their first degree relatives (as well as before onset of overt inflammation, and elucidating mechanisms of stress-induced and cytokine-induced increases in permeability (1-8. A recent study from Scott et al (9 continues this impressive tradition.

  3. Reducing small intestinal permeability attenuates colitis in the IL10 gene-deficient mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, M C; Madsen, K; Doyle, J; Meddings, J

    2008-01-01

    Background: Defects in the small intestinal epithelial barrier have been associated with inflammatory bowel disease but their role in the causation of disease is still a matter of debate. In some models of disease increased permeability appears to be a very early event. The interleukin 10 (IL10) gene-deficient mouse spontaneously develops colitis after 12 weeks of age. These mice have been shown to have increased small intestinal permeability that appears early in life. Furthermore, the development of colitis is dependent upon luminal agents, as animals do not develop disease if raised under germ-free conditions. Aims: To determine if the elevated small bowel permeability can be prevented, and if by doing so colonic disease is prevented or attenuated. Methods: IL10 gene-deficient (IL10−/−) mice) were treated with AT-1001 (a zonulin peptide inhibitor), a small peptide previously demonstrated to reduce small intestinal permeability. Small intestinal permeability was measured, in vivo, weekly from 4 to 17 weeks of age. Colonic disease was assessed at 8 weeks in Ussing chambers, and at 17 weeks of age inflammatory cytokines and myeloperoxidase were measured in the colon. Colonic permeability and histology were also endpoints. Results: Treated animals showed a marked reduction in small intestinal permeability. Average area under the lactulose/mannitol time curve: 5.36 (SE 0.08) in controls vs 3.97 (SE 0.07) in the high-dose AT-1001 group, p<0.05. At 8 weeks of age there was a significant reduction of colonic mucosal permeability and increased electrical resistance. By 17 weeks of age, secretion of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) from a colonic explant was significantly lower in the treated group (25.33 (SE 4.30) pg/mg vs 106.93 (SE 17.51) pg/ml in controls, p<0.01). All other markers also demonstrated a clear reduction of colitis in the treated animals. Additional experiments were performed which demonstrated that AT-1001 was functionally active only in the small

  4. Development of an Improved Permeability Modification Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, H.W.; Elphnick, J.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the development of an improved permeability modification simulator performed jointly by BDM Petroleum Technologies and Schlumberger Dowell under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the US Department of Energy. The improved simulator was developed by modifying NIPER's PC-GEL permeability modification simulator to include a radial model, a thermal energy equation, a wellbore simulator, and a fully implicit time-stepping option. The temperature-dependent gelation kinetics of a delayed gel system (DGS) is also included in the simulator.

  5. The Permeability of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, A.F.; Burcharth, H. F.; Adel, H. den

    1992-01-01

    The results of an extensive series of permeability experiments originally analysed by Shih (1990) are reinterpreted in the light of new experiments. It is proposed that the Forchheimer equation might not fully describe flow at the high Reynolds numbers found in the interior of rubble material....... A new series of tests designed to test for deviations from the Forchheimer equation and investigate the effects of material shape are described. While no evidence can be found to indicate a deviation from the Forchheimer equation a dependency of permeability and the surface roughness the material...

  6. Protection of the blood-brain barrier by hypercapnia during acute hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbach, G.L.; Mayhan, W.G.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of hypercapnia on susceptibility of the blood-brain barrier to disruption during acute hypertension. Two methods were used to test the hypothesis that cerebral vasodilation during hypercapnia increases disruption of the blood-brain barrier. First, permeability of the blood-brain barrier was measured in anesthetized cats with 125 I-labeled serum albumin. Severe hypertension markedly increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier during normocapnia, but not during hypercapnia. The protective effect of hypercapnia was not dependent on sympathetic nerves. Second, in anesthetized rats, permeability of the barrier was quantitated by clearance of fluorescent dextran. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier during hypertension was decreased by hypercapnia. Because disruption of the blood-brain barrier occurred primarily in pial venules, the authors also measured pial venular diameter and pressure. Acute hypertension increased pial venular pressure and diameter in normocapnic rats. Hypercapnia alone increased pial venular pressure and pial venular diameter, and acute hypertension during hypercapnia further increased venular pressure. The magnitude of increase in pial venular pressure during acute hypertension was significantly less in hypercapnic than in normocapnic rats. They conclude that hypercapnia protects the blood-brain barrier. Possible mechanisms of this effect include attenuation of the incremental increase in pial venular pressure by hypercapnia or a direct effect on the blood-brain barrier not related to venous pressure

  7. Characterization of facies and permeability patterns in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerans, C.; Lucia, F.J.; Senger, R.K.; Fogg, G.E.; Nance, H.S.; Hovorka, S.D.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of this research is to develop methods for better describing the three-dimensional geometry of carbonate reservoir flow units as related to conventional or enhanced recovery of oil. San Andres and Grayburg reservoirs were selected for study because of the 13 Bbbl of remaining mobile oil and 17 Bbbl of residual oil in these reservoirs. The key data base is provided by detailed characterization of geologic facies and rock permeability in reservior-scale outcrops of the Permian San Andres Formation in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Emphasis is placed on developing an outcrop analog for San Andres strata that can be used as (1) a guide to interpreting the regional and local geologic framework of the subsurface reservoirs (2) a data source illustrating the scales and patterns of variability of rock-fabric facies and petrophysical properties, particularly in lateral dimension, and on scales that cannot be studied during subsurface reservoir characterization. The research approach taken to achieve these objectives utilizes the integration of geologic description, geostatistical techniques, and reservoir flow simulation experiments. Results from this research show that the spatial distribution of facies relative to the waterflood direction can significantly affect how the reservoir produces. Bypassing of unswept oil occurs due to cross flow of injected water from high permeability zones into lower permeability zones were high permeability zones terminate. An area of unswept oil develops because of the slower advance of the water-injection front in the lower permeability zones. When the injection pattern is reversed, the cross-flow effect changes due to the different arrangements of rock-fabric flow units relative to the flow of injected water, and the sweep efficiency is significantly different. Flow across low-permeability mudstones occurs showing that these layers do not necessarily represent flow barriers.

  8. High-permeability criterion for BCS classification: segmental/pH dependent permeability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Miller, Jonathan M; Hilfinger, John M; Yamashita, Shinji; Yu, Lawrence X; Lennernäs, Hans; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-10-04

    The FDA classifies a drug substance as high-permeability when the fraction of dose absorbed (F(abs)) in humans is 90% or higher. This direct correlation between human permeability and F(abs) has been recently controversial, since the β-blocker sotalol showed high F(abs) (90%) and low Caco-2 permeability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the scientific basis for this disparity between permeability and F(abs). The effective permeabilities (P(eff)) of sotalol and metoprolol, a FDA standard for the low/high P(eff) class boundary, were investigated in the rat perfusion model, in three different intestinal segments with pHs corresponding to the physiological pH in each region: (1) proximal jejunum, pH 6.5; (2) mid small intestine, pH 7.0; and (3) distal ileum, pH 7.5. Both metoprolol and sotalol showed pH-dependent permeability, with higher P(eff) at higher pH. At any given pH, sotalol showed lower permeability than metoprolol; however, the permeability of sotalol determined at pH 7.5 exceeded/matched metoprolol's at pH 6.5 and 7.0, respectively. Physicochemical analysis based on ionization, pK(a) and partitioning of these drugs predicted the same trend and clarified the mechanism behind these observed results. Experimental octanol-buffer partitioning experiments confirmed the theoretical curves. An oral dose of metoprolol has been reported to be completely absorbed in the upper small intestine; it follows, hence, that metoprolol's P(eff) value at pH 7.5 is not likely physiologically relevant for an immediate release dosage form, and the permeability at pH 6.5 represents the actual relevant value for the low/high permeability class boundary. Although sotalol's permeability is low at pH 6.5 and 7.0, at pH 7.5 it exceeds/matches the threshold of metoprolol at pH 6.5 and 7.0, most likely responsible for its high F(abs). In conclusion, we have shown that, in fact, there is no discrepancy between P(eff) and F(abs) in sotalol's absorption; the data emphasize that

  9. Permeable pavement research – Edison, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    These are the slides for the New York City Concrete Promotional Council Pervious Concrete Seminar presentation. The basis for the project, the monitoring design and some preliminary monitoring data from the permeable pavement parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center are pre...

  10. Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary microvascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, A.B.J. [Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-04-01

    The literature has been reviewed to evaluate the technique and clinical value of radionuclide measurements of microvascular permeability and oedema formation in the lungs. Methodology, modelling and interpretation vary widely among studies. Nevertheless, most studies agree on the fact that the measurement of permeability via pulmonary radioactivity measurements of intravenously injected radiolabelled proteins versus that in the blood pool, the so-called pulmonary protein transport rate (PTR), can assist the clinician in discriminating between permeability oedema of the lungs associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and oedema caused by an increased filtration pressure, for instance in the course of cardiac disease, i.e. pressure-induced pulmonary oedema. Some of the techniques used to measure PTR are also able to detect subclinical forms of lung microvascular injury not yet complicated by permeability oedema. This may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass and major vascular surgery, for instance. By paralleling the clinical severity and course of the ARDS, the PTR method may also serve as a tool to evaluate new therapies for the syndrome. Taken together, the currently available radionuclide methods, which are applicable at the bedside in the intensive care unit, may provide a gold standard for detecting minor and major forms of acute microvascular lung injury, and for evaluating the severity, course and response to treatment. (orig.). With 2 tabs.

  11. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observ...

  12. Water permeability of pigmented waterborne coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkers, P.A.J.; Huinink, H.P.; Erich, S.J.F.; Reuvers, N.J.W.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Coatings are used in a variety of applications. Last decades more and more coating systems are transforming from solvent to waterborne coating systems. In this study the influence of pigments on the water permeability of a waterborne coating system is studied, with special interest in the possible

  13. Foam film permeability: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, R; Krastev, R; Zitha, Pacelli L J

    2008-02-28

    The mass transfer of gas through foam films is a prototype of various industrial and biological processes. The aim of this paper is to give a perspective and critical overview of studies carried out to date on the mass transfer of gas through foam films. Contemporary experimental data are summarized, and a comprehensive overview of the theoretical models used to explain the observed effects is given. A detailed description of the processes that occur when a gas molecule passes through each layer that forms a foam film is shown. The permeability of the film-building surfactant monolayers plays an important role for the whole permeability process. It can be successfully described by the models used to explain the permeability of surfactant monolayers on aqueous sub-phase. For this reason, the present paper briefly discusses the surfactant-induced resistance to mass transfer of gases through gas-liquid interface. One part of the paper discusses the experimental and theoretical aspects of the foam film permeability in a train of foam films in a matrix or a cylinder. This special case is important to explain the gas transfer in porous media or in foams. Finally, this paper will highlight the gaps and challenges and sketch possible directions for future research.

  14. Cadmium substituted high permeability lithium ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    3, 0⋅4, 0⋅5 and 0⋅6 were pre- pared by a double sintering ... Lithium ferrites; initial permeability; grain size; microstructure; magnetic properties. 1. Introduction ... The single-phase spinel nature of the samples was con- firmed from X-ray ...

  15. Variability of permeability with diameter of conduit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    section. If a porous system is conceived to be a bundle of capillary tubes of equal radii and length [4], the permeability k is expected to increase from zero from the wall–fluid boundary towards the centre of the flow. 2. Theoretical background. Limiting Navier–Stokes equations to incompressible fluids, we get. −. 1 ρ. ∂. ∂x.

  16. Programs for the calculi of blocks permeabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Hernandez, J.J.; Sovero Sovero, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    This report studies the stochastic analysis of radionuclide transport. The permeability values of blocks are necessary to do a numeric model for the flux and transport problems in ground soils. The determination of block value by function on grill value is the objective of this program

  17. Modelling of water permeability in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guang, Ye; Lura, Pietro; van Breugel, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a network model to predict the permeability of cement paste from a numerical simulation of its microstructure. Based on a linked list pore network structure, the effective hydraulic conductivity is estimated and the fluid flow is calculated according to the Hagen-Poiseuille la...

  18. Multi-Center Prediction of Hemorrhagic Transformation in Acute Ischemic Stroke using Permeability Imaging Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, Fabien; Alger, Jeffry R.; Hu, Xiao; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Dani, Krishna A.; Muir, Keith W.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Coutts, Shelagh B.; Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven; Liebeskind, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Permeability images derived from magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion images are sensitive to blood-brain barrier derangement of the brain tissue and have been shown to correlate with subsequent development of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in acute ischemic stroke. This paper presents a multi-center retrospective study that evaluates the predictive power in terms of HT of six permeability MRI measures including contrast slope (CS), final contrast (FC), maximum peak bolus concentration (MPB), peak bolus area (PB), relative recirculation (rR), and percentage recovery (%R). Dynamic T2*-weighted perfusion MR images were collected from 263 acute ischemic stroke patients from four medical centers. An essential aspect of this study is to exploit a classifier-based framework to automatically identify predictive patterns in the overall intensity distribution of the permeability maps. The model is based on normalized intensity histograms that are used as input features to the predictive model. Linear and nonlinear predictive models are evaluated using a crossvalidation to measure generalization power on new patients and a comparative analysis is provided for the different types of parameters. Results demonstrate that perfusion imaging in acute ischemic stroke can predict HT with an average accuracy of more than 85% using a predictive model based on a nonlinear regression model. Results also indicate that the permeability feature based on the percentage of recovery performs significantly better than the other features. This novel model may be used to refine treatment decisions in acute stroke. PMID:23587928

  19. Sub-core permeability and relative permeability characterization with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahasky, C.; Benson, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    This study utilizes preclinical micro-Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to image and quantify the transport behavior of pulses of a conservative aqueous radiotracer injected during single and multiphase flow experiments in a Berea sandstone core with axial parallel bedding heterogeneity. The core is discretized into streamtubes, and using the micro-PET data, expressions are derived from spatial moment analysis for calculating sub-core scale tracer flux and pore water velocity. Using the flux and velocity data, it is then possible to calculate porosity and saturation from volumetric flux balance, and calculate permeability and water relative permeability from Darcy's law. Full 3D simulations are then constructed based on this core characterization. Simulation results are compared with experimental results in order to test the assumptions of the simple streamtube model. Errors and limitations of this analysis will be discussed. These new methods of imaging and sub-core permeability and relative permeability measurements enable experimental quantification of transport behavior across scales.

  20. Preliminary study of soil permeability properties using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianti, M.; Sudriani, Y.; Rustini, H. A.

    2018-02-01

    Soil permeability measurement is undoubtedly important in carrying out soil-water research such as rainfall-runoff modelling, irrigation water distribution systems, etc. It is also known that acquiring reliable soil permeability data is rather laborious, time-consuming, and costly. Therefore, it is desirable to develop the prediction model. Several studies of empirical equations for predicting permeability have been undertaken by many researchers. These studies derived the models from areas which soi