WorldWideScience

Sample records for blood vector velocity

  1. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation...... search can also yield the direction, and the full velocity vector is thereby found. An examples from a flow rig is shown....

  2. Examples of in-vivo blood vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Nielsen, Kristian R.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper examples of in-vivo blood vector velocity images of the carotid artery are presented. The transverse oscillation (TO) method for blood vector velocity estimation has been used to estimate the vector velocities and the method is first evaluated in a circulating flowrig where...... person. In case 3) the estimated vector velocities are compared with numerical simulations. Qualitatively the same flow pattern can be seen in both simulations and in the vector velocity images. Furthermore a vortex is identified in the carotid sinus at the deceleration phase after the peak systole...

  3. Recent advances in blood flow vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Udesen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    been acquired using a commercial implementation of the method (BK Medical ProFocus Ultraview scanner). A range of other methods are also presented. This includes synthetic aperture imaging using either spherical or plane waves with velocity estimation performed with directional beamforming or speckle...... Medical 8804 transducer. This resulted in a relative standard deviation of 1.2% for a fully transverse flow. Plane wave imaging was also implemented on the RASMUS scanner and a 100 Hz frame rate was attained. Several vector velocity image sequences of complex flow were acquired, which demonstrates...

  4. Blood vector velocity estimation using an autocorrelation approach: In vivo Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Bachmann, Michael; Rue, Kristina

    2005-01-01

    In conventional techniques for blood velocity estimation, only the axial component of the velocity vector is found. We have previously shown that it is possible to estimate the 2-D blood velocity vector both in simulations and in flow phantom experiments using a fast and inexpensive method (the...... deg phase shift in the lateral direction. The TO method works at angles where conventional methods fails to estimate any blood movement, i.e. when the angle between the ultrasound beam and the velocity vector is approximately 90 deg. In this paper the first in-vivo color flow map (CFM) images......) The common carotid artery, 2) the common carotid artery and the jugular vein, 3) the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. In all three cases the angle between the ultrasound beams and the blood velocity vector is larger than 60 deg. i.e. the conventional Doppler velocity estimator degrades significantly...

  5. In Vivo Validation of a Blood Vector Velocity Estimator with MR Angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Thomsen, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Conventional Doppler methods for blood velocity estimation only estimate the velocity component along the ultrasound beam direction. This implies that a Doppler angle under examination close to 90° results in unreliable information about the true blood direction and blood velocity. The novel method...... transverse oscillation (TO), which combines estimates of the axial and the transverse velocity components in the scan plane, makes it possible to estimate the vector velocity of the blood regardless of the Doppler angle. The present study evaluates the TO method with magnetic resonance phase contrast......° for TO measurements. The correlation between the stroke volume estimated by TO and MRA was 0.91 (p

  6. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging: Simulations and Preliminary In Vivo Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2007-01-01

    for each pulse emission. 2) The transmitted pulse consists of a 13 bit Barker code which is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element. 3) The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is found using 2-D speckle tracking between segments in consecutive speckle images. III Results: The method was tested...

  7. Improved accuracy in the estimation of blood velocity vectors using matched filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gori, P.

    2000-01-01

    The blood velocity can be estimated by finding the shift in position of the blood scatterers between subsequent ultrasonic pulse emissions through cross-correlation of the received RF signals. Usually only the velocity component along the beam direction is found. It was shown in a previous paper...... that the complete velocity vector can be found, if the received signals are focused along lines parallel to the direction of the blood flow. A fairly broad beam is emitted in the approach, and this gives rise to a widening in the profiles of the estimated velocity. To reduce this effect, a focused ultrasound...... emission is used in this study to decrease the size of the beam. The transverse beam lines are then constructed by using filters matched to the response of the individual channels. The filters matched to the points on the focusing lines are obtained by considering the field response of the employed array...

  8. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging using ultrasound: In-vivo examples of complex blood flow in the vascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color flow images of the blood motion are restricted by a relatively low frame rate and angle dependent velocity estimates. The Plane Wave Excitation (PWE) method has been proposed to solve these limitations. The frame rate can be increased, and the 2-D...... vector velocity of the blood motion can be estimated. The transmitted pulse is not focused, and a full speckle image of the blood can be acquired for each emission. A 13 bit Barker code is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element. The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is found using 2-D...... speckle tracking between segments in consecutive speckle images. The flow patterns of six bifurcations and two veins were investigated in-vivo. It was shown: 1) that a stable vortex in the carotid bulb was present opposed to other examined bifurcations, 2) that retrograde flow was present...

  9. 2-D blood vector velocity estimation using a phase shift estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper

    when the angle between the blood and the ultrasound beam is above $50^\\circ$. Furthermore, the TO method is tested in-vivo where the scannings are performed by skilled sonographers. The in-vivo scannings resulted in a sequence of 2-D vector CFM images which showed 2-D flow patterns in the bifurcation......In this PhD thesis a method for 2-D blood velocity estimation called \\textit{the transverse oscillation method} (TO) is investigated. The thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part the basic principles in conventional 1-D flow estimation are described, and the state of the art for 2-D...

  10. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    it virtually impossible to compensate for the factor and obtain correct velocity estimates for either CFM or spectral velocity estimation. This talk will describe methods for finding the correct velocity by estimating both the axial and lateral component of the velocity vector. The transverse oscillation...... method introduces an ultrasound field that oscillation not only along the ultrasound beam both also transverse to it to estimate both the lateral and axial velocity for the full velocity vector. The correct velocity magnitude can be found from this as well as the instantaneous angle. This can be obtained...... over the full region of interest and a real time image at a frame rate of 20 Hz can be displayed. Real time videos have been obtained from both our research systems and from commercial BK Medical scanners. The vector velocity images reveal the full complexity of the human blood flow. It is easy to see...

  11. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  12. Estimation of blood velocity vectors using transverse ultrasound beam focusing and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Lacasa, Isabel Rodriguez

    1999-01-01

    Modern ultrasound scanners estimate the blood velocity by tracking the movement of the blood scatterers along the ultrasound beam. This is done by emitting pulsed ultrasound fields and finding the shift in position from pulse to pulse by correlating the received signals. Only the velocity component...... in a correlation estimator to find the velocity across the beam. This approach is extended in this paper by making beamforming along the direction of the flow. A fairly broad beam is emitted and the received signal is then focused along a selected direction. This direction can be along the ultrasound beam...

  13. Demonstration of a Vector Velocity Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa......With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner...

  14. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  15. Vector velocity estimation of blood flow – A new application in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2017-01-01

    Vector flow techniques in the field of ultrasound encompass different pulse emission and estimation strategies. Numerous techniques have been introduced over the years, and recently commercial implementations usable in the clinic have been made. A number of clinical papers using different vector...

  16. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wave...... been tried including Transverse Oscillation. This method has been tested in computer simulations, on flow phantoms and in-vivo, and subsequently validated against MRI angiography. Transverse Oscillation is now implemented in a commercial ultrasound scanner from BK Medical (UltraView). In this article...... UltraView is demonstrated on the carotid artery, jugular vein and femoral vein that all runs almost parallel to the skin and thus is angled near 90° to the ultrasound waves. Arterial and venous simple and complex flow with formation of vortices is demonstrated by scanning on the longitudinal axis...

  17. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  18. An improved estimation and focusing scheme for vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Munk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The full blood velocity vector must be estimated in medical ultrasound to give a correct depiction of the blood flow. This can be done by introducing a transversely oscillating pulse-echo ultrasound field, which makes the received signal influenced by a transverse motion. Such an approach...... was suggested in [1]. Here the conventional autocorrelation approach was used for estimating the transverse velocity and a compensation for the axial motion was necessary in the estimation procedure. This paper introduces a new estimator for determining the two-dimensional velocity vector and a new dynamic...... beamforming method. A modified autocorrelation approach employing fourth order moments of the input data is used for velocity estimation. The new estimator calculates the axial and lateral velocity component independently of each other. The estimation is optimized for differences in axial and lateral...

  19. Validation of Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Estimation In-Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Thomsen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Conventional Doppler methods for blood velocity estimation only estimate the velocity component along the ultrasound (US) beam direction. This implies that a Doppler angle under examination close to 90deg results in unreliable information about the true blood direction and blood velocity. The novel...... method Transverse Oscillation (TO), which combines estimates of the axial and the transverse velocity components in the scan plane, makes it possible to estimate the vector velocity of the blood regardless of the Doppler angle. The present study evaluates the TO method with magnetic resonance angiography...... +/- 1.7 ml and for MRA: 5.8 ml +/- 2.0 ml with the full range for TO: 3.4 ml - 9.5 ml and for MRA 3.0 ml - 10.8 ml. The correlation between the SV estimated by TO and MRA was 0.91 (p

  20. Performance of a vector velocity estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    tracking can be found in the literature, but no method with a satisfactory performance has been found that can be used in a commercial implementation. A method for estimation of the velocity vector is presented. Here an oscillation transverse to the ultrasound beam is generated, so that a transverse motion...... yields a change in the received signals. The method uses two ultrasound beams for sampling the in-phase and quadrature component of the lateral field, and a set of samples (in-phase and quadrature in both time and space) are taken for each pulse-echo line. These four samples are then used...... in an autocorrelation approach that yields both the axial and the lateral velocity, and thus the velocity vector. The method has the advantage that a standard array transducer and a modified digital beamformer, like those used in modern ultrasound scanners, is sufficient to obtain the information needed. The signal...

  1. Comparison of Vector Velocity Imaging using Directional Beamforming and Transverse Oscillation for a Convex Array Transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    Vector velocity imaging can reveal both the magnitude and direction of the blood velocity. Several techniques have been suggested for estimating the velocity, and this paper compares the performance for directional beamforming and transverse oscillation (TO) vector flow imaging (VFI). Data have b...

  2. Phased-array vector velocity estimation using transverse oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Marcher, Jønne; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    A method for estimating the 2-D vector velocity of blood using a phased-array transducer is presented. The approach is based on the transverse oscillation (TO) method. The purposes of this work are to expand the TO method to a phased-array geometry and to broaden the potential clinical applicabil......A method for estimating the 2-D vector velocity of blood using a phased-array transducer is presented. The approach is based on the transverse oscillation (TO) method. The purposes of this work are to expand the TO method to a phased-array geometry and to broaden the potential clinical...... of the TO method using a phased-array transducer for vector velocity estimation is evaluated through simulation and flow-rig measurements are acquired using an experimental scanner. The vast number of calculations needed to perform flow simulations makes the optimization of the TO fields a cumbersome process......, but with a poorer performance compared with a 128-element transducer. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the TO method is suitable for use in conjunction with a phased-array transducer, and that 2-D vector velocity estimation is possible down to a depth of 15 cm....

  3. Transverse Oscillations for Phased Array Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    of superficial blood vessels. To broaden the usability of the method, it should be expanded to a phased array geometry enabling vector velocity imaging of the heart. Therefore, the scan depth has to be increased to 10-15 cm. This paper presents suitable pulse echo fields (PEF). Two lines are beamformed...... into negative frequencies are used as metrics to assess estimator performance. At 10 cm’s depth for an initial setup, the relative mean bias and standard deviation are 9.1% and 9.5%, respectively. At a depth of 15 cm, the values are 20% and 13%, respectively. The PEF metric ER can be used to assess the bias...... (correlation coefficient, R: -0.76), and therefore predict estimator performance. CV is correlated with the standard deviation (R=0.74). The results demonstrate the potential for using a phased array for vector velocity imaging at larger depths, and potentially for imaging the heart....

  4. In vivo comparison of three ultrasound vector velocity techniques to MR phase contrast angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Oddershede, Niels

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to validate angle independent vector velocity methods for blood velocity estimation. Conventional Doppler ultrasound (US) only estimates the blood velocity along the US beam direction where the estimate is angle corrected assuming laminar flow parallel to vessel...... boundaries. This results in incorrect blood velocity estimates, when angle of insonation approaches 90° or when blood flow is non-laminar. Three angle independent vector velocity methods are evaluated in this paper: directional beamforming (DB), synthetic aperture flow imaging (STA) and transverse....... MRA = 0.24 ml (95% CI: −0.32–0.81) with LoA = −1.41–1.90 ml. According to the results, reliable volume flow estimates can be obtained with all three methods. The three US vector velocity techniques can yield quantitative insight into flow dynamics and visualize complex flow patterns, which potentially...

  5. In-vivo Examples of Flow Patterns With The Fast Vector Velocity Ultrasound Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color flow images of the blood motion are limited by a relatively low frame rate and are restricted to only giving velocity estimates along the ultrasound beam direction. To circumvent these limitations, the Plane Wave Excitation (PWE) method...... has been proposed. Material and Methods: The PWE method can estimate the 2D vector velocity of the blood with a high frame rate. Vector velocity estimates are acquired by using the following approach: The ultrasound is not focused during the ultrasound transmission, and a full speckle image...... of the blood can be acquired for each pulse emission. The pulse is a 13 bit Barker code transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element. The 2D vector velocity of the blood is found using 2D speckle tracking between segments in consecutive speckle images. Implemented on the experimental scanner RASMUS...

  6. A new estimator for vector velocity estimation [medical ultrasonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    A new estimator for determining the two-dimensional velocity vector using a pulsed ultrasound field is derived. The estimator uses a transversely modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation....... The new estimator automatically compensates for the axial velocity when determining the transverse velocity. The estimation is optimized by using a lag different from one in the estimation process, and noise artifacts are reduced by averaging RF samples. Further, compensation for the axial velocity can...... be introduced, and the velocity estimation is done at a fixed depth in tissue to reduce the influence of a spatial velocity spread. Examples for different velocity vectors and field conditions are shown using both simple and more complex field simulations. A relative accuracy of 10.1% is obtained...

  7. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA......) blood flow velocity, photoplethysmographic finger BP, and step frequency were measured continuously during three consecutive 5-min intervals of treadmill running at increasing running intensities. Data were analysed in the time and frequency domains. BP data for seven subjects and MCA velocity data....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  8. Estimating 2-D Vector Velocities Using Multidimensional Spectrum Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels; Løvstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Wilson (1991) presented an ultrasonic wide-band estimator for axial blood flow velocity estimation through the use of the 2-D Fourier transform. It was shown how a single velocity component was concentrated along a line in the 2-D Fourier space, where the slope was given by the axial velocity...

  9. Arterial secondary blood flow patterns visualized with vector flow ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Hansen, Jens Munk

    2011-01-01

    and velocity magnitudes the blood flow patterns were visualised with streamlines in Matlab (Mathworks, Natick, MA, USA). The rotational flow was quantified by the angular frequency for each cardiac cycle, and the mean rotational frequencies and standard deviations were calculated for the abdominal aorta f-1......This study presents the first quantification and visualisation of secondary flow patterns with vector flow ultrasound. The first commercial implementation of the vector flow method Transverse Oscillation was used to obtain in-vivo, 2D vector fields in real-time. The hypothesis of this study...... was that the rotational direction is constant within each artery. Three data sets of 10 seconds were obtained from three main arteries in healthy volunteers. For each data set the rotational flow patterns were identified during the diastole. Each data set contains a 2D vector field over time and with the vector angles...

  10. Real-Time GPU Implementation of Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradway, David; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Krebs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Rapid estimation of blood velocity and visualization of complex flow patterns are important for clinical use of diagnostic ultrasound. This paper presents real-time processing for two-dimensional (2-D) vector flow imaging which utilizes an off-the-shelf graphics processing unit (GPU). In this work...... vector flow acquisition takes 2.3 milliseconds seconds on an Advanced Micro Devices Radeon HD 7850 GPU card. The detected velocities are accurate to within the precision limit of the output format of the display routine. Because this tool was developed as a module external to the scanner’s built...

  11. Ultrasound systems for blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners can be used both for displayinggray-scale images of the anatomy and for visualizing theblood flow dynamically in the body.The systems can interrogate the flow at a single position in the bodyand there find the velocity distribution over time. They can also show adynami....... The calculation of the velocity distribution is then explainedalong with the different physical effects influencing the estimation.The estimation of mean velocities using auto- andcross-correlation for color flow mapping is also described....... color image of velocity at up to 20 to 60 frames a second. Both measurements are performedby repeatedly pulsing in the same direction and then usethe correlation from pulse to pulse to determine the velocity.The paper gives a simple model for the interactionbetween the ultrasound and the moving blood...

  12. A New Method for Estimation of Velocity Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Munk, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a new method for determining the velocity vector of a remotely sensed object using either sound or electromagnetic radiation. The movement of the object is determined from a field with spatial oscillations in both the axial direction of the transducer and in one or two...

  13. Adaptive blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of data-adaptive spectral estimation techniques for blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound. Current commercial systems are based on the averaged periodogram, which requires a large observation window to give sufficient spectral resolution. Herein, we propose...

  14. In-vivo evaluation of three ultrasound vector velocity techniques with MR angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Oddershede, Niels

    2008-01-01

    In conventional Doppler ultrasound (US) the blood velocity is only estimated along the US beam direction. The estimate is angle corrected assuming laminar flow parallel to the vessel boundaries. As the now in the vascular system never is purely laminar, the velocities estimated with conventional...... additionally constructed and mean differences for the three comparisons were: DB/MRA = 0.17 ml; STA/MRA = 0.07 ml; TO/MRA = 0.24 ml. The three US vector velocity techniques yield quantitative insight in to flow dynamics and can potentially give the clinician a powerful tool in cardiovascular disease assessment....

  15. In Vivo 3-D Vector Velocity Estimation with Continuous Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Ewertsen, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a method for estimating 3-D vector velocities at very high frame rate using continuous data acquisition is presented. An emission sequence was designed to acquire real-time continuous data in one plane. The transverse oscillation (TO) method was used to estimate 3-D vector flow...... in a carotid flow phantom and in vivo in the common carotid artery of a healthy 27-year old female. Based on the out-of-plane velocity component during four periodic cycles, estimated flow rates in an experimental setup was 2.96 ml/s ± 0.35 ml/s compared to the expected 3.06 ml/s ± 0.09 ml/s. In the in vivo...... measurements, three heart cycles acquired at 2.1 kHz showed peak out-of-plane velocities of 83 cm/s, 87 cm/s and 90 cm/s in agreement with the 92 cm/s found with spectral Doppler. Mean flow rate was estimated to 257 ml/min. The results demonstrate that accurate real-time 3- D vector velocities can be obtained...

  16. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  17. Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Estimation using a Phased Array Transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcher, Jønne; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Seerup, Gert

    2012-01-01

    greater than 100 mm. Tests at depths of 72 mm and 82 mm with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s, showed a relative mean bias ~Bvx that varied from 0 % and to 21 % and a relative mean standard deviation ~vx that varied from 18 % and to 51 %. The investigation showed an increasing bias with respect to depth, which......The Transverse Oscillation method has shown its commercial feasibility, providing the user with 2D velocity information. Todays implementation on commercial ultrasound platforms only support linear array transducers and are limited in depth. Extending the implementation to a phased array transducer...... leaves room for optimization. Despite the bias, the method has shown to work and produce reliable results, and 2D velocity estimates are provided within the entire color-box down to a depth of more than 100 mm making vector velocity imaging possible in the entire heart....

  18. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0 +/- 1.4, B=13.1 +/- 1.2, K=1.1 +/- 1.8, and C=2.9 +/- 1.4 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at approximately -20 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z greater than 1 kpc

  19. Improved Vector Velocity Estimation using Directional Transverse Oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-01-01

    emissions at a 90 degrees beam-to-flow angle at a vessel depth of 30 mm. The standard deviation (SD) drops from 9.14% for TO to 5.4%, when using DTO. The bias is -5.05% and the angle is found within +/- 3.93 degrees. At 70 mm a relative SD of 7% is obtained, the bias is -1.74%, and the angle is found within......A method for estimating vector velocities using transverse oscillation (TO) combined with directional beamforming is presented. Directional Transverse Oscillation (DTO) is selfcalibrating, which increase the estimation accuracy and finds the lateral oscillation period automatically. A normal......, and a modified TO estimator can be used to find both the lateral and axial velocity. The approach is self-calibrating as the lateral oscillation period directly is estimated from the directional signal through a Fourier transform. The approach was implemented on the SARUS scanner using a BK Medical 8820e...

  20. Group-velocity-locked vector soliton molecules in fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiyang; Cheng, Jianwei; Liu, Bowen; Sun, Qizhen; Li, Lei; Fu, Songnian; Tang, Dingyuan; Zhao, Luming; Liu, Deming

    2017-05-24

    Physics phenomena of multi-soliton complexes have enriched the life of dissipative solitons in fiber lasers. By developing a birefringence-enhanced fiber laser, we report the first experimental observation of group-velocity-locked vector soliton (GVLVS) molecules. The birefringence-enhanced fiber laser facilitates the generation of GVLVSs, where the two orthogonally polarized components are coupled together to form a multi-soliton complex. Moreover, the interaction of repulsive and attractive forces between multiple pulses binds the particle-like GVLVSs together in time domain to further form compound multi-soliton complexes, namely GVLVS molecules. By adopting the polarization-resolved measurement, we show that the two orthogonally polarized components of the GVLVS molecules are both soliton molecules supported by the strongly modulated spectral fringes and the double-humped intensity profiles. Additionally, GVLVS molecules with various soliton separations are also observed by adjusting the pump power and the polarization controller.

  1. Ultrasonic 3-D Vector Flow Method for Quantitative In Vivo Peak Velocity and Flow Rate Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Ewertsen, Caroline; Bouzari, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Current clinical ultrasound (US) systems are limited to show blood flow movement in either 1-D or 2-D. In this paper, a method for estimating 3-D vector velocities in a plane using the transverse oscillation method, a 32×32 element matrix array, and the experimental US scanner SARUS is presented....... The aim of this paper is to estimate precise flow rates and peak velocities derived from 3-D vector flow estimates. The emission sequence provides 3-D vector flow estimates at up to 1.145 frames/s in a plane, and was used to estimate 3-D vector flow in a cross-sectional image plane. The method...... is validated in two phantom studies, where flow rates are measured in a flow-rig, providing a constant parabolic flow, and in a straight-vessel phantom ( ∅=8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating time varying waveforms. Flow rates are estimated to be 82.1 ± 2.8 L/min in the flow-rig compared...

  2. Daily rhythm of cerebral blood flow velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spielman Arthur J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CBFV (cerebral blood flow velocity is lower in the morning than in the afternoon and evening. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the time of day changes in CBFV: 1 CBFV changes are due to sleep-associated processes or 2 time of day changes in CBFV are due to an endogenous circadian rhythm independent of sleep. The aim of this study was to examine CBFV over 30 hours of sustained wakefulness to determine whether CBFV exhibits fluctuations associated with time of day. Methods Eleven subjects underwent a modified constant routine protocol. CBFV from the middle cerebral artery was monitored by chronic recording of Transcranial Doppler (TCD ultrasonography. Other variables included core body temperature (CBT, end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2, blood pressure, and heart rate. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO served as a measure of endogenous circadian phase position. Results A non-linear multiple regression, cosine fit analysis revealed that both the CBT and CBFV rhythm fit a 24 hour rhythm (R2 = 0.62 and R2 = 0.68, respectively. Circadian phase position of CBT occurred at 6:05 am while CBFV occurred at 12:02 pm, revealing a six hour, or 90 degree difference between these two rhythms (t = 4.9, df = 10, p Conclusion In conclusion, time of day variations in CBFV have an approximately 24 hour rhythm under constant conditions, suggesting regulation by a circadian oscillator. The 90 degree-phase angle difference between the CBT and CBFV rhythms may help explain previous findings of lower CBFV values in the morning. The phase difference occurs at a time period during which cognitive performance decrements have been observed and when both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events occur more frequently. The mechanisms underlying this phase angle difference require further exploration.

  3. 3-D Vector Velocity Estimation with Row-Column Addressed Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    2015-01-01

    The concept of 2-D row-column (RC) addressed arrays for 3-D imaging have shown to be an interesting alternative to 2-D matrix array, due to the reduced channel count. However, the properties for RC arrays to estimate blood velocities have never been reported, which is of great importance...... for a clinical implementation of this type of array. The aim of this study is, thus, to develop a technique for estimating 3-D vector flow with a RC array using the transverse oscillation (TO) method. The properties are explored both in a simulation study and with a prototype probe for experimental use. In both...

  4. Adaptive Clutter Filtering for Improved Measurement of Cardiac Blood Velocities

    OpenAIRE

    Vågsholm, Beate Haram

    2017-01-01

    In ultrasound color flow images of the heart, irregular blood flow patterns might be an early indication of heart disease. The blood flow is possible to image using multi-dimensional blood velocity estimation like speckle tracking. In order to image the blood flow, the signal from the surrounding tissue must be attenuated, and this is often termed clutter filtering. Insufficient clutter filtering might cause bias in the velocity estimation. It is difficult to design filters with a fixed cut-o...

  5. Ultrasonic 3-D Vector Flow Method for Quantitative In Vivo Peak Velocity and Flow Rate Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbek, Simon; Ewertsen, Caroline; Bouzari, Hamed; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Thomsen, Carsten; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2017-03-01

    Current clinical ultrasound (US) systems are limited to show blood flow movement in either 1-D or 2-D. In this paper, a method for estimating 3-D vector velocities in a plane using the transverse oscillation method, a 32×32 element matrix array, and the experimental US scanner SARUS is presented. The aim of this paper is to estimate precise flow rates and peak velocities derived from 3-D vector flow estimates. The emission sequence provides 3-D vector flow estimates at up to 1.145 frames/s in a plane, and was used to estimate 3-D vector flow in a cross-sectional image plane. The method is validated in two phantom studies, where flow rates are measured in a flow-rig, providing a constant parabolic flow, and in a straight-vessel phantom ( ∅=8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating time varying waveforms. Flow rates are estimated to be 82.1 ± 2.8 L/min in the flow-rig compared with the expected 79.8 L/min, and to 2.68 ± 0.04 mL/stroke in the pulsating environment compared with the expected 2.57 ± 0.08 mL/stroke. Flow rates estimated in the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer are compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measured flow rates using a 1-D through-plane velocity sequence. Mean flow rates were 333 ± 31 mL/min for the presented method and 346 ± 2 mL/min for the MRI measurements.

  6. Range/velocity limitations for time-domain blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1993-01-01

    The traditional range/velocity limitation for blood velocity estimation systems using ultrasound is elucidated. It is stated that the equation is a property of the estimator used, not the actual physical measurement situation, as higher velocities can be estimated by the time domain cross...

  7. Estimation of blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    imaging, and, finally, some of the more recent experimental techniques. The authors shows that the Doppler shift, usually considered the way velocity is detected, actually, plays a minor role in pulsed systems. Rather, it is the shift of position of signals between pulses that is used in velocity...

  8. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    are parallel to the skin surface. Angling the transducer will often disturb the flow, and new techniques for finding transverse velocities are needed. The various approaches for determining transverse velocities will be explained. This includes techniques using two-dimensional correlation (speckle tracking...

  9. Blood flow velocity in migraine attacks - a transcranial Doppler study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwetsloot, C.P.; Caekebeke, J.F.V.; Jansen, J.C.; Odink, J.; Ferrari, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    A pulsed Doppler device was used to measure blood flow velocities in the common carotid artery, the extracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery in 31 migraneurs without aura (n=27) and with aura (n=4), both during and ouside an attack. The aims were to compare blood flow velocity during and between migraine attacks and to study asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. Compared with blood flow velocity values obtained in the attack-free interval, blood flow velocity was lower during attacks without aura in both common carotid arteries, but not in the other extra- and intracranial vessels which were examined. However, during attacks of migraine with aura, blood flow velocity tended to be lower in all examined vessels. There were no asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. It is suggested that during migraine attacks without aura there is a dissociation in blood flow regulation in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries. 20 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Principle and performance of the transverse oscillation vector velocity technique in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Udesen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    to the axial blood velocity. A major drawback is that only the axial velocity component is found. Often the lateral component is most important as blood vessels run parallel to the skin surface. The talk presents the transverse oscillation approach, which also can find the lateral velocity component by using...

  11. Real-Time Navigation of Nonholonomic Mobile Robots under Velocity Vector Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Hui Zhang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, linear navigation law is studied in depth and we suggest an efficient, practical and simple approach for nonholonomic mobile robot navigation under velocity vector control based on the linear navigation law. First of all, an obstacle is equivalent to a velocity vector when detected by a robot's sensory system according to the relative distant and relative direction between the robot and the obstacle. Then the vector sum of all obstacles' equivalent velocity vectors (OEVVs and the linear navigation velocity vector (LNVV derived from the linear navigation law drives the robot to reach the desired goal position without colliding with any obstacle in the robot's workspace. Furthermore, during the process of driving the mobile robot under the resultant velocity vector, a set of strategies for velocity and acceleration constraints (VAC is devised to make kinematic behaviours of the mobile robot more practical. Finally, to validate the effectiveness and superiority, extensive simulation results with no obstacles, a single obstacle and multiple obstacles are provided.

  12. Vector velocity estimation using directional beam forming and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The two-dimensional velocity vector using a pulsed ultrasound field can be determined with the invention. The method uses a focused ultrasound field along the velocity direction for probing the moving medium under investigation. Several pulses are emitted and the focused received fields along...

  13. Vector Velocity Imaging Using Cross-Correlation and Virtual Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    .7\\%,14.3\\%,13.4\\%\\}$ relative to the peak velocity. The amount of in-tube angle estimates in the range of $\\pm 10^{\\circ}$ from the true angle are $\\{74\\%,77\\%,66\\%\\}$. In-vivo measurements are carried out on a human volunteer. These measurements include the common carotid artery and the femoral bifurcation....

  14. Joint probability discrimination between stationary tissue and blood velocity signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    In CFM-mode the blood velocity estimates are overlaid onto the B-mode image. The velocity estimation gives non-zero velocity estimates in both the surrounding tissue and the vessels. A discrimination algorithm is needed to determine, which estimates represent blood flow and should be displayed....... This study presents a new statistical discriminator. Investigation of the RF-signals reveals that features can be derived that distinguish the segments of the signal, which do an do not carry information on the blood flow. In this study 4 features, have been determined: (a) the energy content in the segments...... before and after echo-canceling, and (b) the amplitude variations between samples in consecutive RF-signals before and after echo-canceling. The statistical discriminator was obtained by computing the probability density functions (PDFs) for each feature through histogram analysis of data...

  15. Tissue motion in blood velocity estimation and its simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1998-01-01

    . The motion due to the heart, when the volunteer was asked to hold his breath, gave a peak velocity of 4.2±1.7 mm/s. The movement of the carotid artery wall due to changing blood pressure had a peak velocity of 8.9±3.7 mm/s over the cardiac cycle. The variations are due to differences in heart rhythm......Determination of blood velocities for color flow mapping systems involves both stationary echo cancelling and velocity estimation. Often the stationary echo cancelling filter is the limiting factor in color flow mapping and the optimization and further development of this filter is crucial...... to the improvement of color flow imaging. Optimization based on in-vivo data is difficult since the blood and tissue signals cannot be accurately distinguished and the correct extend of the vessel under investigation is often unknown. This study introduces a model for the simulation of blood velocity data in which...

  16. Sub- and Superluminal Velocities in Space with Vector Time

    CERN Document Server

    Barashenkov, V S

    2000-01-01

    Within the bounds of the known relativistic theory the hypothesis of superluminal velosities allows one to influence the Past what leads to acausal paradoxes. We should like tostress, however, that this conclusion is based on thecontradictory continuation of the customary Lorentz transformations after the light barrier. Since at present no other prohibitions forfaster-than-light signals carrying the energy and information are unknown, the answer on the question does exist such signals or not cannot be obtained only from an experiment or from amore general theory. As such a generalization of a theory with vector time is considered which allows one some superluminal phenomena compatible with the principles ofrelativity and causality. Spreading ofsignals in themultitime world is characterized by some peculiarities which can be used for an experimental determination of the time dimensionality ofour world.

  17. Reduced retinal blood flow velocity in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgansky-Eliash, Zvia; Nelson, Darin A; Bar-Tal, Orly Pupko; Lowenstein, Anat; Grinvald, Amiram; Barak, Adiel

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the retinal blood flow velocities of patients with diabetes and healthy control subjects. We used a novel device offering a noninvasive diagnostic of retinal function. Flow velocities in retinal arterioles and venules were quantitatively analyzed by retinal function imager scanning in 58 eyes of 42 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and 51 eyes of 32 normal subjects. Group differences were assessed by the mixed-model effect. Average velocity in arterial compartments (in mm/s) was 3.74 +/- 1.09 for the diabetic group and 4.19 +/- 0.99 for the control subjects. The average velocity of all segments, taking associated heart rate and individual segment widths into account, was 17% slower in the diabetic group (P velocity was lower than the arterial velocity (2.61 +/- 0.65 for the diabetic group; 3.03 +/- 0.59 for the control subjects). Individual vein velocities, taking heart rate and segment widths into account, was 17% slower, on average, in the diabetic group (P velocities in the retinal arterioles and venules of patients with diabetes compared with healthy control subjects, supporting the view of abnormal vessel function in eyes with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Data adaptive estimation of transversal blood flow velocities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirnia, E.; Jakobsson, A.; Gudmundson, E.

    2014-01-01

    The examination of blood flow inside the body may yield important information about vascular anomalies, such as possible indications of, for example, stenosis. Current Medical ultrasound systems suffer from only allowing for measuring the blood flow velocity along the direction of irradiation......, posing natural difficulties due to the complex behaviour of blood flow, and due to the natural orientation of most blood vessels. Recently, a transversal modulation scheme was introduced to induce also an oscillation along the transversal direction, thereby allowing for the measurement of also...... the transversal blood flow. In this paper, we propose a novel data-adaptive blood flow estimator exploiting this modulation scheme. Using realistic Field II simulations, the proposed estimator is shown to achieve a notable performance improvement as compared to current state-of-the-art techniques....

  19. Whole blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow velocities in obese hypertensive or obese normotensive adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcaboy, Meltem; Nazliel, Bijen; Goktas, Tayfun; Kula, Serdar; Celik, Bülent; Buyan, Necla

    2018-01-26

    Obesity affects all major organ systems and leads to increased morbidity and mortality. Whole blood viscosity is an important independent regulator of cerebral blood flow. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of whole blood viscosity on cerebral artery blood flow velocities using transcranial Doppler ultrasound in pediatric patients with obesity compared to healthy controls and analyze the effect of whole blood viscosity and blood pressure status to the cerebral artery blood flow velocities. Sixty patients with obesity diagnosed according to their body mass index (BMI) percentiles aged 13-18 years old were prospectively enrolled. They were grouped as hypertensive or normotensive according to their ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Whole blood viscosity and middle cerebral artery velocities by transcranial Doppler ultrasound were studied and compared to 20 healthy same aged controls. Whole blood viscosity values in hypertensive (0.0619±0.0077 poise) and normotensive (0.0607±0.0071 poise) groups were higher than controls (0.0616±0.0064 poise), with no significance. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities were higher in the obese hypertensive (73.9±15.0 cm/s) and obese normotensive groups (75.2±13.5 cm/s) than controls (66.4±11.5 cm/s), but with no statistical significance. Physiological changes in blood viscosity and changes in blood pressure did not seem to have any direct effect on cerebral blood flow velocities, the reason might be that the cerebral circulation is capable of adaptively modulating itself to changes to maintain a uniform cerebral blood flow.

  20. 3D Vector Velocity Estimation using a 2D Phased Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    A method to estimate the three dimensional (3D) velocity vector is presented is this paper. 3D velocity vector techniques are needed to measure the full velocity and characterize the complicated flow patterns in the human body. The Transverse Oscillation (TO) method introduces oscillations...... transverse to the ultrasound beam, which enables the estimation of the transverse velocity. To expand the method from 2D to 3D, it is proposed to decouple the velocity estimation into separate estimates of vx, vy, and vz in combination with a 2D phased matrix array. Through simulations the feasibility...... of using the TO method for estimation 3D velocity vectors, and the proposed decoupling is demonstrated. A 64x64 and a 32x32 elements transducer are emulated using Field II. Plug flow with a speed of 1 m/s in a small region is rotated in the XY -plane. A binary flow example with [vx,vy]=[1,0] and [0,1] m...

  1. New Developments in Vector Velocity Imaging using the Transverse Oscillation Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring

    2013-01-01

    Vector velocity imaging using the Transverse Oscillation (TO) approach has recently been FDA approved for linear array transducers on a commercial platform. It can now be used clinically for studying the complex flow at e.g. bifurcations, valves, and the heart in real time. Several clinical...

  2. Alignment of stress, mean wind, and vertical gradient of the velocity vector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Mann, Jakob; Patton, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    In many applications in the atmospheric surface layer the turbulent-viscosity hypothesis is applied, i.e. the stress vector can be described through the vertical gradient of velocity. In the atmospheric surface layer, where the Coriolis force and baroclinic effects are considered negligible...

  3. In Vivo Three-Dimensional Velocity Vector Imaging and Volumetric Flow Rate Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) Transverse Oscillation (TO) method is used to obtain 3-D velocity vector estimates in two orthogonal planes. The method is suitable for a real-time implementation. Data are acquired using a Vermon 3.0 MHz 32x32 element 2-D phased array and the experimental ultrasound s...

  4. Blood velocity estimation using ultrasound and spectral iterative adaptive approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes two novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation techniques for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The techniques make no assumption on the sampling pattern of the emissions or the depth samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B......-mode images are interleaved with the Doppler emissions. Furthermore, the techniques are shown, using both simplified and more realistic Field II simulations as well as in vivo data, to outperform current state-of-the-art techniques, allowing for accurate estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using only 30......% of the transmissions, thereby allowing for the examination of two separate vessel regions while retaining an adequate updating rate of the B-mode images. In addition, the proposed methods also allow for more flexible transmission patterns, as well as exhibit fewer spectral artifacts as compared to earlier techniques....

  5. An Iterative Adaptive Approach for Blood Velocity Estimation Using Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation technique for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The technique makes no assumption on the sampling pattern of the slow-time or the fast-time samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B......-mode images are interleaved with the Doppler emissions. Furthermore, the technique is shown, using both simplified and more realistic Field II simulations, to outperform current state-of-the-art techniques, allowing for accurate estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using only 30% of the transmissions......, thereby allowing for the examination of two separate vessel regions while retaining an adequate updating rate of the B-mode images. In addition, the proposed method also allows for more flexible transmission patterns, as well as exhibits fewer spectral artifacts as compared to earlier techniques....

  6. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and plasma catecholamines during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pott, F; Jensen, K; Hansen, H

    1996-01-01

    During dynamic exercise, mean blood velocity (Vmean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) demonstrates a graded increase to work rate and reflects regional cerebral blood flow. At a high work rate, however, vasoactive levels of plasma catecholamines could mediate vasoconstriction of the MCA...... and thereby elevate Vmean at a given volume flow. To evaluate transcranial Doppler-determined Vmean at high plasma catecholamine levels, seven elite cyclists performed a maximal performance test on a bicycle ergometer. Results were compared with those elicited during five incremental exercise bouts and during...

  7. Assessment of orbital blood flow velocities in retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Pehmen Yasin; Dogan, Ferit; Sonmez, Kenan; Con, Rahim; Dokumaci, Dilek Sen; Seyhanli, Eyüp Sabri

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the presence of any stage retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) alters central retinal artery (CRA) and ophthalmic artery (OA) blood flow parameters in premature infants. The patients were divided into two groups according to the development of ROP; those who have ROP were defined as group I, those without ROP were defined as group II. Ninety eyes of 45 patients in group I and 40 eyes of 20 patients in group II were investigated. The blood flows in the CRA and OA were measured using ultrasound color doppler imaging (CDI) that allows to evaluate the peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistivity index (RI). The results were compared between two groups of subjects. There were no significant differences in the PSV, EDV, and RI of CRA between two groups (P = 0.09, P = 0.20 and P = 0.63, respectively). The mean PSV value of OA in group I was found to be significantly higher than the one in group II (P  0.05), whereas the difference in the mean PSV values of OA were found to be significant among the eyes with stage 1 ROP, eyes with stage 2 ROP, and eyes without ROP (P = 0.03). This study demonstrated significant alterations in systolic flow velocities in the OA predicted by CDI in infants with ROP.

  8. A Transverse Oscillation Approach for Estimation of Three-Dimensional Velocity Vectors, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2014-01-01

    The 3-D transverse oscillation method is investigated by estimating 3-D velocities in an experimental flowrigsystem. Measurements of the synthesized transverse oscillatingfields are presented as well. The method employs a 2-D transducer; decouples the velocity estimation; and estimates the axial......, transverse, and elevation velocity components simultaneously. Data are acquired using a research ultrasound scanner. The velocity measurements are conducted with steady flow in sixteen different directions. For a specific flow direction with [α,β]= [45,15]°, the mean estimated velocity vector at the center...... of the vessel is (vx,vy,vz) = (33.8,34.5,15.2) ± (4.6,5.0,0.6)cm/s where the expected velocity is (34.2,34.2,13.0)cm/s. The velocity magnitude is 50.6 ± 5.2cm/s with a bias of 0.7cm/s.The flow angles α and β are estimated as 45.6 ± 4.9° and 17.6± 1.0°. Subsequently, the precision and accuracy are calculated...

  9. A transverse oscillation approach for estimation of three-dimensional velocity vectors, part II: experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    The 3-D transverse oscillation method is investigated by estimating 3-D velocities in an experimental flow-rig system. Measurements of the synthesized transverse oscillating fields are presented as well. The method employs a 2-D transducer; decouples the velocity estimation; and estimates the axial, transverse, and elevation velocity components simultaneously. Data are acquired using a research ultrasound scanner. The velocity measurements are conducted with steady flow in sixteen different directions. For a specific flow direction with [α, ß] = [45, 15]°, the mean estimated velocity vector at the center of the vessel is (v(x), v(y), v(z)) = (33.8, 34.5, 15.2) ± (4.6, 5.0, 0.6) cm/s where the expected velocity is (34.2, 34.2, 13.0) cm/s. The velocity magnitude is 50.6 ± 5.2 cm/s with a bias of 0.7 cm/s. The flow angles α and ß are estimated as 45.6 ± 4.9° and 17.6 ± 1.0°. Subsequently, the precision and accuracy are calculated over the entire velocity profiles. On average for all direction, the relative mean bias of the velocity magnitude is -0.08%. For α and ß, the mean bias is -0.2° and -1.5°. The relative standard deviations of the velocity magnitude ranges from 8 to 16%. For the flow angles, the ranges of the mean angular deviations are 5° to 16° and 0.7° and 8°.

  10. Multi-dimensional spectrum analysis for 2-D vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels; Løvstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Wilson (1991) presented a wide-band estimator for axial blood flow velocity estimation through the use of the two-dimensional (2-D) Fourier transform. It was shown how a single velocity component was concentrated along a line in the 2-D Fourier space, where the slope was given by the axial velocity...... Fourier space, which is found through the 3-D Fourier transform of the data matrix, and that the plane is tilted according to the axial and lateral velocity components. Two estimators are derived for finding the plane in the 3-D Fourier space, where the integrated power spectrum is largest. The first uses...... the 3-D Fourier transform to find the power spectrum, while the second uses a minimum variance approach. Based on this plane, the axial and lateral velocity components are estimated. A number of phantom How measurements, for flow-to-beam angles of 60, 75, and 90 degrees, were performed to test...

  11. Angular correlations between recoil velocity and angular momentum vectors in molecular photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G. E.; Sivakumar, N.; Chawla, D.; Houston, P. L.; Burak, I.

    1988-03-01

    A technique has been developed for determining the angular correlation between a photofragment's angular momentum vector J, its recoil velocity vector v, and the transition dipole moment of the parent molecule μp . Doppler profile spectroscopy used in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence probing by polarized light can be used to determine the correlations. The pairwise correlations between these vectors as well as their triple correlation are discussed for limiting cases using a classical approach as well as for the general case using a quantum approach based on density matrices. The current formulations differ in two ways from the recent approach of Dixon, who used a bipolar expansion of the correlated velocity and angular momentum distributions. The physical basis for the influence of the vector correlations on the Doppler profile is somewhat more transparent in the current formulations, and the direct connection between the measured correlations and the t-matrix elements occurring in the theory of Balint-Kurti and Shapiro for the photodissociation of a triatomic molecule is also demonstrated.

  12. Vector Velocity Estimation for Portable Ultrasound using Directional Transverse Oscillation and Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Ianni, Tommaso; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a vector flow imaging method is presented, which combines the directional transverse oscillation approach with synthetic aperture sequential beamforming to achieve an efficient estimation of the velocities. A double oscillating field is synthesized using two sets of focused emissions...... separated by a distance in the lateral direction. A low resolution line (LRL) is created for each emission in the first stage beamformer, and a second beamformer provides the high resolution data used for the velocity estimation. The method makes it possible to have continuously available data in the whole...... image. Therefore, high and low velocities can be estimated with a high frame rate and a low standard deviation. The first stage is a fixed-focus beamformer that can be integrated in the transducer handle, enabling the wireless transmission of the LRLs. The approach does not require any angle...

  13. Angular velocity estimation based on star vector with improved current statistical model Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Niu, Yanxiong; Lu, Jiazhen; Zhang, He

    2016-11-20

    Angular velocity information is a requisite for a spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control system. In this paper, an approach for angular velocity estimation based merely on star vector measurement with an improved current statistical model Kalman filter is proposed. High-precision angular velocity estimation can be achieved under dynamic conditions. The amount of calculation is also reduced compared to a Kalman filter. Different trajectories are simulated to test this approach, and experiments with real starry sky observation are implemented for further confirmation. The estimation accuracy is proved to be better than 10-4  rad/s under various conditions. Both the simulation and the experiment demonstrate that the described approach is effective and shows an excellent performance under both static and dynamic conditions.

  14. Experimental 3-D Vector Velocity Estimation with Row-Column Addressed Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    Experimental 3-D vector flow estimates obtained with a 62+62 2-D row-column (RC) array with integrated apodization are presented. A transverse oscillation (TO) velocity estimator is implemented on a 3.0 MHz RC array, to yield realtime 3-D vector flow in a cross-sectional scan plane at 750 frames...... per second. The method is validated in a straight-vessel phantom (Ø = 8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating timevarying carotid waveforms. The out-of-plane velocity component perpendicular to the cross section of the vessel and the crosssectional area is used to estimate volumetric flow...... rates. The flow rate measured from five cycles is 2.3 mL/stroke ± 0.1 mL/stroke giving a negative 9.7% bias compared to the pump settings. It is concluded that 124 elements are sufficient to estimate 3-D vector flow, if they are positioned in a row-column wise manner....

  15. Prediction of Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome with Velocity Blood Pressure Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Chao Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is an important complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA. An >100% increase in middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAV after CEA is used to predict the cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS development, but the accuracy is limited. The increase in blood pressure (BP after surgery is a risk factor of CHS, but no study uses it to predict CHS. This study was to create a more precise parameter for prediction of CHS by combined the increase of MCAV and BP after CEA. Methods: Systolic MCAV measured by transcranial Doppler and systematic BP were recorded preoperatively; 30 min postoperatively. The new parameter velocity BP index (VBI was calculated from the postoperative increase ratios of MCAV and BP. The prediction powers of VBI and the increase ratio of MCAV (velocity ratio [VR] were compared for predicting CHS occurrence. Results: Totally, 6/185 cases suffered CHS. The best-fit cut-off point of 2.0 for VBI was identified, which had 83.3% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity, 62.5% positive predictive value and 99.4% negative predictive value for CHS development. This result is significantly better than VR (33.3%, 97.2%, 28.6% and 97.8%. The area under the curve (AUC of receiver operating characteristic: AUC VBI = 0.981, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.949-0.995; AUC VR = 0.935, 95% CI 0.890-0.966, P = 0.02. Conclusions: The new parameter VBI can more accurately predict patients at risk of CHS after CEA. This observation needs to be validated by larger studies.

  16. Tangent-impulse transfer from elliptic orbit to an excess velocity vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Gang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The two-body orbital transfer problem from an elliptic parking orbit to an excess velocity vector with the tangent impulse is studied. The direction of the impulse is constrained to be aligned with the velocity vector, then speed changes are enough to nullify the relative velocity. First, if one tangent impulse is used, the transfer orbit is obtained by solving a single-variable function about the true anomaly of the initial orbit. For the initial circular orbit, the closed-form solution is derived. For the initial elliptic orbit, the discontinuous point is solved, then the initial true anomaly is obtained by a numerical iterative approach; moreover, an alternative method is proposed to avoid the singularity. There is only one solution for one-tangent-impulse escape trajectory. Then, based on the one-tangent-impulse solution, the minimum-energy multi-tangent-impulse escape trajectory is obtained by a numerical optimization algorithm, e.g., the genetic method. Finally, several examples are provided to validate the proposed method. The numerical results show that the minimum-energy multi-tangent-impulse escape trajectory is the same as the one-tangent-impulse trajectory.

  17. Euler-Vector Clustering of GPS Velocities Defines Microplate Geometry in Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, J. C.

    2018-02-01

    I have used Euler-vector clustering to assign 469 GEONET stations in southwest Japan to k clusters (k = 2, 3,..., 9) so that, for any k, the velocities of stations within each cluster are most consistent with rigid-block motion on a sphere. That is, I attempt to explain the raw (i.e., uncorrected for strain accumulation), 1996-2006 velocities of those 469 Global Positioning System stations by rigid motion of k clusters on the surface of a spherical Earth. Because block geometry is maintained as strain accumulates, Euler-vector clustering may better approximate the block geometry than the values of the associated Euler vectors. The microplate solution for each k is constructed by merging contiguous clusters that have closely similar Euler vectors. The best solution consists of three microplates arranged along the Nankaido Trough-Ryukyu Trench between the Amurian and Philippine Sea Plates. One of these microplates, the South Kyushu Microplate (an extension of the Ryukyu forearc into the southeast corner of Kyushu), had previously been identified from paleomagnetic rotations. Relative to ITRF2000 the three microplates rotate at different rates about neighboring poles located close to the northwest corner of Shikoku. The microplate model is identical to that proposed in the block model of Wallace et al. (2009, https://doi.org/10.1130/G2522A.1) except in southernmost Kyushu. On Shikoku and Honshu, but not Kyushu, the microplate model is consistent with that proposed in the block models of Nishimura and Hashimoto (2006, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tecto.2006.04.017) and Loveless and Meade (2010, https://doi.org/10.1029/2008JB006248) without the low-slip-rate boundaries proposed in the latter.

  18. Generation of High-order Group-velocity-locked Vector Solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, X. X.; Wu, Z. C.; Zhang, Q.; Li, L.; Tang, D. Y.; Shen, D. Y.; Fu, S. N.; Liu, D. M.; Zhao, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    We report numerical simulations on the high-order group-velocity-locked vector soliton (GVLVS) generation based on the fundamental GVLVS. The high-order GVLVS generated is characterized with a two-humped pulse along one polarization while a single-humped pulse along the orthogonal polarization. The phase difference between the two humps could be 180 degree. It is found that by appropriate setting the time separation between the two components of the fundamental GVLVS, the high-order GVLVS wit...

  19. High Frame Rate Vector Velocity Estimation using Plane Waves and Transverse Oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating 2-D vector velocities using plane waves and transverse oscillation. The approach uses emission of a low number of steered plane waves, which result in a high frame rate and continuous acquisition of data for the whole image. A transverse oscillating field...... in a flow rig phantom is scanned at beam-to-flow angles of 90, 75, and 60◦ . The relative bias is between -1.4 % and -5.8 % and the relative std. between 5 % and 8.2 % for the lateral velocity component at the measured beam-to-flow angles. The estimated flow angle is 73.4◦± 3.6◦ for the measurement at 75...

  20. Force, Velocity, and Work: The Effects of Different Contexts on Students' Understanding of Vector Concepts Using Isomorphic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2014-01-01

    In this article we compare students' understanding of vector concepts in problems with no physical context, and with three mechanics contexts: force, velocity, and work. Based on our "Test of Understanding of Vectors," a multiple-choice test presented elsewhere, we designed two isomorphic shorter versions of 12 items each: a test with no…

  1. In-vivo blood velocity and velocity gradient profiles downstream of stented and stentless aortic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, Jonas A; Frost, Markus W; Ringgaard, Steffen; Klaaborg, Kaj-Erik; Wierup, Per; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Nygaard, Hans; Hasenkam, J Michael

    2010-05-01

    Abnormal flow conditions across aortic bioprosthetic valves may result in degenerative processes. Thus, it is important to implant biological valve prostheses with velocity profiles similar to those of native valves. The study aim was to compare blood velocity and velocity gradient profiles downstream of stented and stentless aortic valves implanted in pigs, and in native porcine valves. Stented valve prostheses (Mitroflow, n = 7) or stentless valve prostheses (Solo, n = 5 or Toronto SPV, n = 7) were implanted into pigs; the native valve was retained in eight animals. After weaning the animals from cardiopulmonary bypass, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed to determine the blood velocities and velocity gradient profiles. The native valves had a significantly lower peak velocity (92 +/- 26 cm/s) than the artificial valves (Solo: 247 +/- 107 cm/s; Toronto: 252 +/- 41 cm/s; Mitroflow: 229 +/- 18 cm/s). The native valves exhibited a flat velocity profile during systole, whereas the Solo valve, and especially the Toronto SPV valve, displayed more parabola-shaped velocity profiles; velocity profiles downstream of the Mitroflow valve exhibited a flat shape. The native valves had a lower mean velocity gradient at peak systole (p valve (0.14 +/- 0.11; p valve had a percentage of 0.57 +/- 0.09, which was lower than the Solo valve (0.69 +/- 0.12; p = 0.074), and significantly lower than the Toronto valve (0.70 +/- 0.08; p = 0.015). All valves displayed high velocity gradients adjacent to the aortic wall; in particular, the Toronto SPV which also had high velocity gradients at the center of the vessel. All of the artificial valves tested had a significantly higher mean velocity gradient and peak velocity than the native valves. However, the Mitroflow had a mean velocity and a velocity gradient percentage lower than the two stentless valves. The Solo and Mitroflow valves displayed velocity profiles most like native valves, while the Toronto valve had a more

  2. Temporal and spatial performance of vector velocity imaging in the human fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H; Germanakis, I; Kulinskaya, E; Gardiner, H M

    2011-02-01

    To assess the spatial and temporal performance of fetal myocardial speckle tracking, using high-frame-rate (HFR) storing and Lagrangian strain analysis. Dummy electrocardiographic signaling permitted DICOM HFR in 124 normal fetuses and paired low-frame-rate (LFR) video storing at 25 Hz in 93 of them. Vector velocity imaging (VVI) tracking co-ordinates were used to compare time and spatial domain measures. We compared tracking success, Lagrangian strain, peak diastolic velocity and positive strain rate values in HFR vs. LFR video storing. Further comparisons within an HFR subset included Lagrangian vs. natural strain, VVI vs. M-mode annular displacement, and VVI vs. pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) peak velocities. HFR (average 79.4 Hz) tracking was more successful than LFR (86 vs. 76%, P = 0.024). Lagrangian and natural HFR strain correlated highly (left ventricle (LV): r = 0.883, P < 0.001; right ventricle (RV): r = 0.792, P < 0.001) but natural strain gave 20% lower values, suggesting reduced reliability of measurement. Lagrangian HFR strain was similar in LV and RV and decreased with gestation (P = 0.015 and P < 0.001, respectively). LV Lagrangian LFR strain was significantly lower than the values for the RV (P < 0.001) and those using paired LV-HFR recordings (P = 0.007). Annular displacement methods correlated highly (LV = 1.046, r = 0.90, P < 0.001; RV = 1.170, r = 0.88, P < 0.001). Early diastolic waves were visible in 95% of TDI, but in only 26% of HFR and 0% of LFR recordings, and HFR-VVI velocities were significantly lower than those for TDI (P < 0.001). Doppler estimation of velocities remains superior to VVI but image gating and use of original co-ordinates should improve offline VVI assessment of fetal myocardial function. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Linear FMCW Laser Radar for Precision Range and Vector Velocity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockhard, George; Rubio, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An all fiber linear frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) coherent laser radar system is under development with a goal to aide NASA s new Space Exploration initiative for manned and robotic missions to the Moon and Mars. By employing a combination of optical heterodyne and linear frequency modulation techniques and utilizing state-of-the-art fiber optic technologies, highly efficient, compact and reliable laser radar suitable for operation in a space environment is being developed. Linear FMCW lidar has the capability of high-resolution range measurements, and when configured into a multi-channel receiver system it has the capability of obtaining high precision horizontal and vertical velocity measurements. Precision range and vector velocity data are beneficial to navigating planetary landing pods to the preselected site and achieving autonomous, safe soft-landing. The all-fiber coherent laser radar has several important advantages over more conventional pulsed laser altimeters or range finders. One of the advantages of the coherent laser radar is its ability to measure directly the platform velocity by extracting the Doppler shift generated from the motion, as opposed to time of flight range finders where terrain features such as hills, cliffs, or slopes add error to the velocity measurement. Doppler measurements are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than the velocity estimates obtained by pulsed laser altimeters. In addition, most of the components of the device are efficient and reliable commercial off-the-shelf fiber optic telecommunication components. This paper discusses the design and performance of a second-generation brassboard system under development at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project.

  4. A new maximum likelihood blood velocity estimator incorporating spatial and temporal correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    The blood flow in the human cardiovascular system obeys the laws of fluid mechanics. Investigation of the flow properties reveals that a correlation exists between the velocity in time and space. The possible changes in velocity are limited, since the blood velocity has a continuous profile in time...... of possible velocities. In the new estimator an additional similarity investigation for each evaluated velocity and the available velocity estimates in a temporal (between frames) and spatial (within frames) neighborhood is performed. An a priori probability density term in the distribution...

  5. Capabilities of optical SIV technique in measurements of flow velocity vector field dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Dushin, N. S.; Saushin, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The main difference between Smoke Image Velocimetry (SIV) technique and the conventional PIV is that higher concentration of tracer particles typical of smoke visualization techniques is used in SIV. Not separate particles but smoke structures with continuous pixel intensity are visible in the recorded images. Owing to better smoke reflectivity, higher spatial and temporal resolution is obtained in the case when relatively simple equipment (camera and laser) is used. It is simple enough to perform SIV measurements of velocity vector field dynamics at the frequency exceeding 15000 Hz, which offers new opportunities in unsteady flow examination. The paper describes fundamentals of SIV technique and gives some new results obtained using this method for the measurements that require high spatial and temporal resolution. The latter include frequency spectra of turbulent velocity fluctuations, turbulence dissipation profiles in the boundary layer and higher-order moments of velocity fluctuations. It has been shown that SIV technique considerably extends the potential of experimental studies of turbulence and flow structure in high-speed processes.

  6. In-vivo studies of new vector velocity and adaptive spectral estimators in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    Wave Excitation. Furthermore two different adaptive spectral estimators have been investigated: Blood spectral Power Capon method (BPC) and Blood Amplitude and Phase Estimation method (BAPES). The novel techniques investigated in this thesis are developed to circumvent some of the main limitations...... estimate blood velocities angle independently with a high frame rate. Complex vessel geometries in the cardiovascular system were explored in-vivo on four volunteers using the technique. Flow patterns previously visualized with magnetic resonance angiography and predicted by models of computational fluid...... dynamics, were shown for the first time with ultrasound. Additionally, new information on complex flow patterns in bifurcations and around venous valves was discovered. BPC and BAPES are adaptive spectral estimators which can produce spectrograms with a high temporal resolution. Spectrograms obtained in...

  7. Maximum Likelihood Blood Velocity Estimator Incorporating Properties of Flow Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    )-data under investigation. The flow physic properties are exploited in the second term, as the range of velocity values investigated in the cross-correlation analysis are compared to the velocity estimates in the temporal and spatial neighborhood of the signal segment under investigation. The new estimator...... has been compared to the cross-correlation (CC) estimator and the previously developed maximum likelihood estimator (MLE). The results show that the CMLE can handle a larger velocity search range and is capable of estimating even low velocity levels from tissue motion. The CC and the MLE produce...... for the CC and the MLE. When the velocity search range is set to twice the limit of the CC and the MLE, the number of incorrect velocity estimates are 0, 19.1, and 7.2% for the CMLE, CC, and MLE, respectively. The ability to handle a larger search range and estimating low velocity levels was confirmed...

  8. Vector velocity volume flow estimation: Sources of error and corrections applied for arteriovenous fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    A method for vector velocity volume flow estimation is presented, along with an investigation of its sources of error and correction of actual volume flow measurements. Volume flow errors are quantified theoretically by numerical modeling, through flow phantom measurements, and studied in vivo....... This paper investigates errors from estimating volumetric flow using a commercial ultrasound scanner and the common assumptions made in the literature. The theoretical model shows, e.g. that volume flow is underestimated by 15%, when the scan plane is off-axis with the vessel center by 28% of the vessel...... to cross-sectional scans of the fistulas, the major axis was on average 10.2 mm, which is 8.6% larger than the minor axis. The ultrasound beam was on average 1.5 mm from the vessel center, corresponding to 28% of the semi-major axis in an average fistula. Estimating volume flow with an elliptical, rather...

  9. Navigation Doppler Lidar Sensor for Precision Altitude and Vector Velocity Measurements Flight Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrottet, Diego F.; Lockhard, George; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce; Hines, Glenn D.

    2011-01-01

    An all fiber Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) system is under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for precision descent and landing applications on planetary bodies. The sensor produces high resolution line of sight range, altitude above ground, ground relative attitude, and high precision velocity vector measurements. Previous helicopter flight test results demonstrated the NDL measurement concepts, including measurement precision, accuracies, and operational range. This paper discusses the results obtained from a recent campaign to test the improved sensor hardware, and various signal processing algorithms applicable to real-time processing. The NDL was mounted in an instrumentation pod aboard an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter and flown over vegetation free terrain. The sensor was one of several sensors tested in this field test by NASA?s Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project.

  10. Non-invasive Estimation of Pressure Changes along a Streamline using Vector Velocity Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Traberg, Marie Sand

    2015-01-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating pressure changes along a streamline using ultrasound is presented. The suggested method estimates pressure gradients from 2-D vector velocity fields. Changes in pressure are derived using a model based on the Navier-Stokes equations. Scans of a carotid...... estimator is evaluated by comparing its results to a 3-D numerical simulation model. The study showed pressure drops across the constricted phantom varying from -5 Pa to 7 Pa with a standard deviation of 4%. The proposed method had a normalised rootmean-square error of 10% in reference to the simulation...... model. Further, an in-vivo scan of the carotid bifurcation is made to show the feasibility of the technique in a less experimental environment...

  11. Optimization of Transverse Oscillating Fields for Vector Velocity Estimation with Convex Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    A method for making Vector Flow Images using the transverse oscillation (TO) approach on a convex array is presented. The paper presents optimization schemes for TO fields for convex probes and evaluates their performance using Field II simulations and measurements using the SARUS experimental...... scanner. A 3 MHz 192 elements convex array probe (pitch 0.33 mm) is used in both simulations and measurements. An F-number of 5 is used in transmit and two 32 element wide peaks are used in receive separated by 96 elements between peaks. Parabolic velocity profiles are simulated at beam-to-flow angles......) at a depth of 40 mm. Measurements have been made using the SARUS experimental ultrasound scanner and a BK Medical 8820e convex array transducer. Sixty-four elements was used in transmit and 2 x 32 elements in receive for creating a color flow map image of a flow rig phantom with a laminar, parabolic flow...

  12. Technique for velocity vector field dynamics measurement on the basis of smoke visualization of flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Dushin, N. S.; Saushin, I. I.

    2017-09-01

    The main difference between Smoke Image Velocimetry (SIV) technique and traditional PIV is that the smoke with continuous intensity in the image is seeded into the flow instead of separate particles. Owing to better smoke reflectivity, relatively primitive equipment is enough to measure the dynamics of velocity vector fields with the frequency of 25 kHz and higher. The image processing algorithm is adapted to high tracer concentration and relatively large displacement of smoke patches between two consecutive frames. The results of SIV testing are presented, including the estimations of the most measurement noise sensitive characteristics of turbulence calculated from spatial derivatives of fluctuations of small-scale turbulence. The measurement results have been shown to agree well with the data obtained by other methods. Application of SIV technique opens new possibilities in the research of flow pattern and turbulence in unsteady and fast processes.

  13. A Transverse Oscillation Approach for Estimation of Three-Dimensional Velocity Vectors, Part I: Concept and Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    A method for 3-D velocity vector estimation us - ing transverse oscillations is presented. The method employs a 2-D transducer and decouples the velocity estimation into three orthogonal components, which are estimated simultane - ously and from the same data. The validity of the method...... also reveals, that the velocity estimation breaks down with an SNR between −6 and −3 dB. In terms of computational load, the estimation of the three velocity components requires 0.75 billion floating point operations per second (0.75 Gflops) for a realistic setup. This is well within the capability...

  14. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity depends on cardiac output during exercise with a large muscle mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ide, K.; Pott, F.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Secher, N. H.

    1998-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological reduction of the increase in cardiac output during dynamic exercise with a large muscle mass would influence the cerebral blood velocity/perfusion. We studied the relationship between changes in cerebral blood velocity (transcranial Doppler), rectus

  15. Changes in left atrial deformation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Evaluation by vector velocity imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Mahfouz Badran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM represents a generalized myopathic process affecting both ventricular and atrial myocardium. We assessed the global and regional left atrial (LA function and its relation to left ventricular (LV mechanics and clinical status in patients with HCM using Vector Velocity Imaging (VVI. Methods: VVI of the LA and LV was acquired from apical four- and two-chamber views of 108 HCM patients (age 40±19years, 56.5% men and 33 healthy subjects, all had normal LV systolic function. The LA subendocardium was traced to obtain atrial volumes, ejection fraction, velocities, and strain (ɛ/strain rate (SR measurements. Results: Left atrial reservoir (ɛsys,SRsys and conduit (early diastolic SRe function were significantly reduced in HCM compared to controls (P-1.8s-1 was 81% sensitive and 30% specific, SRa>-1.5s-1 was 73% sensitive and 40% specific. By multivariate analysis global LVɛsys and LV septal thickness are independent predictors for LAɛsys, while end systolic diameter is the only independent predictor for SRsys, P<.001. Conclusion: Left atrial reservoir and conduit function as measured by VVI were significantly impaired while contractile function was preserved among HCM patients. Left atrial deformation was greatly influenced by LV mechanics and correlated to severity of phenotype.

  16. Blood flow velocity imaging of malignant melanoma by micro multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, H.; Andoh, T.; Akiguchi, S.; Shirakawa, H.; Kobayashi, D.; Kuraishi, Y.; Hachiga, T.

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a laser Doppler velocimeter to measure blood flow, the micromultipoint laser Doppler velocimeter (μ-MLDV). This equipment can measure absolute velocity and, based on this, can display the course of blood vessels. In this study, we attempted to perform blood flow velocity imaging of malignant melanoma transplanted to the mouse ear. We found that blood flow velocity of the formed blood vessels originating in the melanoma was much greater than that of the capillary vessels in normal skin. Furthermore, the form of the tumor was clearly visible from the blood flow velocity image. These experimental results suggest that μ-MLDV has potential as a diagnostic method for distinguishing benign nevi from malignant melanomas.

  17. Coded excitation and sub-band processing for blood velocity estmation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of broadband coded excitation and subband processing for blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound. In conventional blood velocity estimation a long (narrow-band) pulse is emitted and the blood velocity is estimated using an auto-correlation based approach...... rate can be increased. To increase the SNR for the broad-band excitation waveforms, coding is proposed. Three different coding methods are investigated: nonlinear frequency modulation, complementary (Golay) codes, and Barker codes. Code design is described for the three different methods as well...

  18. Effect of electrical stimulation on blood flow velocity and vessel size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee-Kyung

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Interferential current electrical stimulation alters blood flow velocity and vessel size. We aimed to investigate the changes in the autonomic nervous system depending on electrical stimulation parameters.

  19. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, S. V.; Laurent, Stéphane; Olsen, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predict...

  20. Reference values of fetal peak systolic blood flow Velocity in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objectives of this prospective cross sectional study are (i) to establish new reference values of peak systolic blood flow velocity measurement in the fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA-PSV) following validated methodological guidelines (ii) to correlate peak systolic velocity with gestational age and (iii) to ...

  1. Implementation of ultrasound time-domain cross-correlation blood velocity estimators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1993-01-01

    The implementation of real-time blood velocity estimators using time-domain cross-correlation is investigated. The basic algorithm for stationary echo canceling, cross-correlation estimation and subsequent velocity estimation is presented. Sampled data acquired at rates of approximately 20 MHz...

  2. Improved blood velocity measurements with a hybrid image filtering and iterative Radon transform algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatbar, Pratik Y; Kara, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Neural activity leads to hemodynamic changes which can be detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The determination of blood flow changes in individual vessels is an important aspect of understanding these hemodynamic signals. Blood flow can be calculated from the measurements of vessel diameter and blood velocity. When using line-scan imaging, the movement of blood in the vessel leads to streaks in space-time images, where streak angle is a function of the blood velocity. A variety of methods have been proposed to determine blood velocity from such space-time image sequences. Of these, the Radon transform is relatively easy to implement and has fast data processing. However, the precision of the velocity measurements is dependent on the number of Radon transforms performed, which creates a trade-off between the processing speed and measurement precision. In addition, factors like image contrast, imaging depth, image acquisition speed, and movement artifacts especially in large mammals, can potentially lead to data acquisition that results in erroneous velocity measurements. Here we show that pre-processing the data with a Sobel filter and iterative application of Radon transforms address these issues and provide more accurate blood velocity measurements. Improved signal quality of the image as a result of Sobel filtering increases the accuracy and the iterative Radon transform offers both increased precision and an order of magnitude faster implementation of velocity measurements. This algorithm does not use a priori knowledge of angle information and therefore is sensitive to sudden changes in blood flow. It can be applied on any set of space-time images with red blood cell (RBC) streaks, commonly acquired through line-scan imaging or reconstructed from full-frame, time-lapse images of the vasculature.

  3. Dynamical equations for the vector potential and the velocity potential in incompressible irrotational Euler flows: a refined Bernoulli theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkitani, Koji

    2015-09-01

    We consider incompressible Euler flows in terms of the stream function in two dimensions and the vector potential in three dimensions. We pay special attention to the case with singular distributions of the vorticity, e.g., point vortices in two dimensions. An explicit equation governing the velocity potentials is derived in two steps. (i) Starting from the equation for the stream function [Ohkitani, Nonlinearity 21, T255 (2009)NONLE50951-771510.1088/0951-7715/21/12/T02], which is valid for smooth flows as well, we derive an equation for the complex velocity potential. (ii) Taking a real part of this equation, we find a dynamical equation for the velocity potential, which may be regarded as a refinement of Bernoulli theorem. In three-dimensional incompressible flows, we first derive dynamical equations for the vector potentials which are valid for smooth fields and then recast them in hypercomplex form. The equation for the velocity potential is identified as its real part and is valid, for example, flows with vortex layers. As an application, the Kelvin-Helmholtz problem has been worked out on the basis the current formalism. A connection to the Navier-Stokes regularity problem is addressed as a physical application of the equations for the vector potentials for smooth fields.

  4. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging [blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Presented an approach for synthetic aperture blood flow ultrasound imaging. Estimates with a low bias and standard deviation can be obtained with as few as eight emissions. The performance of the new estimator is verified using both simulations and measurements. The results demonstrate that a fully...

  5. Cerebral blood velocity and other cardiovascular responses to 2 days of head-down tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Mary A. B.; Mader, Thomas H.; Bagian, James P.; Charles, John B.; Meehan, Richard T.

    1993-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a cephalad redistribution of fluid volume and blood flow within the human body, and space motion sickness, which is a problem during the first few days of space flight, could be related to these changes in fluid status and in blood flow of the cerebrum and vestibular system. To evaluate possible changes in cerebral blood flow during simulated weightlessness, we measured blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) along with retinal vascular diameters, intraocular pressure, impedance cardiography, and sphygmomanometry on nine men (26.2 +/- 6.6 yr) morning and evening for 2 days during continuous 10 deg head-down tilt (HDT). When subjects went from seated to head-down bed rest, their heart rate and retinal diameters decreased, and intraocular pressures increased. After 48 h of HDT, blood flow velocity in the MCA was decreased and thoracic impedance was increased, indicating less fluid in the thorax. Percent changes in blood flow velocities in the MCA after 48 h of HDT were inversely correlated with percent changes in retinal vascular diameters. Blood flow velocities in the MCA were inversely correlated (intersubject) with arterial pressures and retinal vascular diameters. Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, systolic arterial pressure, and at times pulse pressure and blood flow velocities in the MCA were greater in the evening. Total peripheral resistance was higher in the morning. Although cerebral blood velocity is reduced after subjects are head down for 2 days, the inverse relationship with retinal vessel diameters, which have control analogous to that of cerebral vessels, indicates cerebral blood flow is not reduced.

  6. Retinal hemodynamic oxygen reactivity assessed by perfusion velocity, blood oximetry and vessel diameter measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klefter, Oliver Niels; Lauritsen, Anne Øberg; Larsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the oxygen reactivity of a fundus photographic method of measuring macular perfusion velocity and to integrate macular perfusion velocities with measurements of retinal vessel diameters and blood oxygen saturation. METHODS: Sixteen eyes in 16 healthy volunteers were studied at two...... (ICC) and limits of agreement. RESULTS: Fifteen minutes of hyperoxia was accompanied by mean reductions in arterial and venous perfusion velocities of 14% and 16%, respectively (p = 0.0080; p = 0.0019), constriction of major arteries and veins by 5.5% and 8.2%, respectively (p ...). For perfusion velocities, short-term ICCs were 0.79-0.82 and long-term ICCs were 0.06-0.11. Intersession increases in blood glucose were associated with reductions in perfusion velocities (arterial p = 0.0067; venous p = 0.018). CONCLUSION: Oxygen reactivity testing supported that motion-contrast velocimetry...

  7. Estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using a recursive lattice filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Buelund, Claus; Jørgensen, Allan

    1996-01-01

    In medical ultrasound the blood velocity distribution in a vessel can be found by emitting a pulsed field into the patient. The field is then scattered by the tissues and the red blood cells, and a single complex sample set is acquired at the depth of interest for each pulse emitted. The signals...... acquired for showing the blood velocity distribution are inherently non-stationary, due to the pulsatility of the flow. All current signal processing schemes assume that the signal is stationary within the window of analysis, although this is an approximation. In this paper a recursive least......-squares lattice filter is used for finding a parametric model for the velocity distribution. A new set of complex coefficients is calculated for each point in time, and it is thus possible to track the non-stationary properties of the stochastic velocity signal. The dynamic characteristics of the non...

  8. Absolute Geostrophic Velocity Inverted from World Ocean Atlas 2013 (WOAV13) with the P-Vector Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    modular ocean model (MOM). Journal of Oceanography, 54, 185-198. Chu PC, Lan J, Fan CW. 2001a. Japan Sea circulation and thermohaline structure...Part 1 Climatology. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 31, 244-271. Chu PC, Lan J, Fan CW. 2001b. Japan Sea circulation and thermohaline structure...geostrophic velocity, representing the large-scale ocean circulation , is calculated from the WOA13 (T, S) data using the P-vector inverse method (Chu

  9. In vivo lateral blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tiantian; Hozan, Mohsen; Bashford, Gregory R

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we proposed blood measurement using speckle size estimation, which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame based on the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if blood flow is in the same direction as the electronically controlled transducer line selection in a 2-D image. In this observational study, the clinical viability of ultrasound blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation was investigated and compared with that of conventional spectral Doppler of carotid artery blood flow data collected from human patients in vivo. Ten patients (six male, four female) were recruited. Right carotid artery blood flow data were collected in an interleaved fashion (alternating Doppler and B-mode A-lines) with an Antares Ultrasound Imaging System and transferred to a PC via the Axius Ultrasound Research Interface. The scanning velocity was 77 cm/s, and a 4-s interval of flow data were collected from each subject to cover three to five complete cardiac cycles. Conventional spectral Doppler data were collected simultaneously to compare with estimates made by speckle size estimation. The results indicate that the peak systolic velocities measured with the two methods are comparable (within ±10%) if the scan velocity is greater than or equal to the flow velocity. When scan velocity is slower than peak systolic velocity, the speckle stretch method asymptotes to the scan velocity. Thus, the speckle stretch method is able to accurately measure pure lateral flow, which conventional Doppler cannot do. In addition, an initial comparison of the speckle size estimation and color Doppler methods with respect to computational complexity and data acquisition time indicated potential time savings in blood flow velocity estimation using speckle size estimation. Further studies are needed for calculation of the speckle stretch method

  10. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity in elite power athletes during maximal weight-lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerman, R D; McConathy, W J; Smith, G H; East, J W; Rudder, L

    2000-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) has been shown to significantly increase during dynamic exercise (running) secondary to increases in cardiac output. Static exercise (weight-lifting) induces supraphysiological arterial pressures up to 450/380 mmHg, and thus may alter CBFV. Catastrophic brain injuries such as stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, retinal hemorrhage and retinal detachment have been associated with weight-lifting. A recent study has shown that intra-ocular pressure (IOP), which is an indirect measure of intracranial pressure, elevates to pathophysiologic levels during weight-lifting. Recent CBFV studies instituting Valsalva have demonstrated decreases in CBFV from 21%-52%. To date, no studies have examined CBFV during maximal weight-lifting to elucidate the cerebrovascular responses to extreme pressure alterations. We recruited nine elite power athletes, including a multi-world record holder in powerlifting, for a transcranial Doppler study of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity at rest and during maximal weight-lifting. All subjects' resting blood flow velocities were within normal ranges (mean 64.4 +/- 9.5 cm sec2). Blood flow velocities were significantly (p < 0.0001) decreased in all subjects during maximal lifting (mean 48.4 +/- 10.1 cm sec2). Linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant inverse linear relationship in the net change of blood velocities from rest to maximal lift for each subject (r = 0.8585, p < 0.001). This study demonstrates that blood flow velocities are significantly decreased during heavy resistance training. The drop in CBFV during weight-lifting was significantly less than previous Valsalva studies, which likely reveals the cardiovascular, baroreflex, and cerebrovascular system adaptations occurring in these elite power athletes.

  11. Pre- and post-processing filters for improvement of blood velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    should be highly correlated, since transitions should occur smoothly. This idea is the basis of the algorithm developed in this study. From Bayesian image processing theory an a posteriori probability distribution for the velocity field is computed based on constraints on smoothness. An estimate......The standard deviation on the blood velocity estimates are influenced by measurement noise, velocity spread, and signal alteration introduced by de-noising and clutter filters. A noisy and non-smooth appearance of the velocity distribution is obtained, which is not consistent with the actual...... velocity in the vessels. Post-processing is beneficial to obtain an image that minimizes the variation, and present the important information to the clinicians. Applying the theory of fluid mechanics introduces restrictions on the variations possible in a flow field. Neighboring estimates in time and space...

  12. Note: Reflection-type micro multipoint laser Doppler velocimeter for measuring velocity distributions in blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, H; Kobayashi, D; Shirakawa, H; Andoh, T; Akiguchi, S; Wakisaka, T; Ishizuka, M; Hachiga, T

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) for measuring velocity distributions in blood vessels. We converted a transmission-based LDV into a reflection-based LDV to make it suitable for clinical applications. The velocity distribution image of a serpentine flow channel obtained could be qualitatively explained by the numerical results. Finally, we evaluated the system by using it to measure injection of blood into a glass tube by a syringe pump. The results obtained demonstrate that erythrocytes can be used as seeding particles for the reflection-type micro multipoint LDV. The results obtained are useful as basic data for clinical applications.

  13. Cerebral blood flow velocities are reduced during attacks of unilateral migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Olesen, J

    1995-01-01

    It has been disputed whether or not large intracranial arteries are dilated during migraine attacks. In order to answer this question the present transcranial Doppler study focused on side-to-side differences of middle cerebral artery blood velocity during unilateral attacks of migraine without...... aura in 25 patients. Blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery was lower on the headache side (59 cm/s) than on the non-headache side (65 cm/s) during the migraine attack. No such difference was found outside of attack (65 cm/s both sides). The difference (headache side minus non-headache side...

  14. Improved Blood Pressure Prediction Using Systolic Flow Correction of Pulse Wave Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Jeffrey S; Liberson, Alexander S; Borkholder, David A

    2016-12-01

    Hypertension is a significant worldwide health issue. Continuous blood pressure monitoring is important for early detection of hypertension, and for improving treatment efficacy and compliance. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) has the potential to allow for a continuous blood pressure monitoring device; however published studies demonstrate significant variability in this correlation. In a recently presented physics-based mathematical model of PWV, flow velocity is additive to the classic pressure wave as estimated by arterial material properties, suggesting flow velocity correction may be important for cuff-less non-invasive blood pressure measures. The present study examined the impact of systolic flow correction of a measured PWV on blood pressure prediction accuracy using data from two published in vivo studies. Both studies examined the relationship between PWV and blood pressure under pharmacological manipulation, one in mongrel dogs and the other in healthy adult males. Systolic flow correction of the measured PWV improves the R 2 correlation to blood pressure from 0.51 to 0.75 for the mongrel dog study, and 0.05 to 0.70 for the human subjects study. The results support the hypothesis that systolic flow correction is an essential element of non-invasive, cuff-less blood pressure estimation based on PWV measures.

  15. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...... on the most salient vectors, and this works well, but many images contain a plethora of vectors, which makes their structure quite different from the linguistic transitivity structures with which Kress and van Leeuwen have compared ‘narrative’ images. It can also be asked whether facial expression vectors...... should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined...

  16. Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging: Part I: Sequential Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Yu, Alfred C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The paper gives a review of the most important methods for blood velocity vector flow imaging (VFI) for conventional, sequential data acquisition. This includes multibeam methods, speckle tracking, transverse oscillation, color flow mapping derived vector flow imaging, directional beamforming...

  17. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo

    2008-01-01

    In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold immer...

  18. Influence of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on headache and cerebral blood flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couturier, EGM; Laman, DM; vanDuijn, MAJ; vanDuijn, H

    Caffeine consumption may cause headache, particularly migraine. Its withdrawal also produces headaches and may be related to weekend migraine attacks. Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) has shown changes in cerebral blood flow velocities (BFV) during and between attacks of migraine. In order to

  19. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires seve...

  20. Intraoperative changes of transcranial Doppler velocity: relation to arterial oxygen content and whole-blood viscosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, P. R.; Albrecht, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    The association of arterial oxygen content (CaO2) and viscosity with transcranial Doppler (TCD) blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery was studied in 20 adults without cerebrovascular disease undergoing abdominal surgery associated with significant fluctuations in hematology. TCD

  1. Vector Flow Imaging Compared with Pulse Wave Doppler for Estimation of Peak Velocity in the Portal Vein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Moshavegh, Ramin; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2018-01-01

    The study described here investigated whether angle-independent vector flow imaging (VFI) technique estimates peak velocities in the portal vein comparably to pulsed wave Doppler (PWD). Furthermore, intra- and inter-observer agreement was assessed in a substudy. VFI and PWD peak velocities were...... estimated with from intercostal and subcostal views for 32 healthy volunteers, and precision analyses were conducted. Blinded to estimates, three physicians rescanned 10 volunteers for intra- and inter-observer agreement analyses. The precision of VFI and PWD was 18% and 28% from an intercostal view and 23......% and 77% from a subcostal view, respectively. Bias between VFI and PWD was 0.57 cm/s (p = 0.38) with an intercostal view and 9.89 cm/s (p ...

  2. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...... should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined...

  3. The effect of lipid emulsion of different concentration on blood flow velocity: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiang; Wang Maoqiang; Duan Liuxin; Song Peng; Ao Guokun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the function mechanism of lipid emulsion (LE), used as a carrier, by observing the effect of intra-arterial infusion of LE in different concentration and dosage on blood flow velocity. Methods: According to the concentration and dosage used in arterial infusion, the experiments were divided into four groups:group A (20% LE, 2 ml), group B (20% LE, 20 ml), group C (30% LE, 2 ml) and group D (30% LE, 20 ml). Two healthy hybrid dogs were used for the study. Under DSA guidance, the 4 F catheter was placed in the splenic artery and in the hepatic artery respectively. DSA frames were counted in order to calculate the time that the contrast took from the catheter tip to the selected tertiary branches of the splenic or hepatic artery. Results LE infusion, regardless of its concentration level or its dosage, could reduce the blood velocity. The lasting time and the maximal peak value of the blood velocity reduction were significantly different among groups (P < 0.05). The lasting time was 5 minutes, 5-10 minutes, 20 minutes and 20-30 minutes among group A, B, C and D, respectively. The peak value of the reduction appeared at the 18th frames (1.44 s), 30th frames (2.4 s), 9th frames (0.9 s) and 14th frames (1.12 s) in group A, B, C and D, respectively. Conclusion Intra-arterial infusion of LE can reduce the blood flow velocity. The lasting time of the reduction in 30% LE groups is longer than that in 20% LE groups, while the blood velocity reduction in 30% LE groups is less than that in 20% LE groups. (authors)

  4. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: regional cerebral blood flow and blood flow velocity in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L.H.; Jacobsen, V.B.; Haderslev, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    g/min) or placebo for 20 min was studied in 12 patients with migraine without aura outside attacks. Xenon-133 inhalation SPECT-determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-determined blood velocity (V-mean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), as well as the heart......Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...... of migraine attacks. It is therefore important to investigate its mechanism of action in patients with migraine. We here investigate the effects of intravenous human alpha-CGRP (h alpha CGRP) on intracranial hemodynamics. In a double-blind, cross-over study, the effect of intravenous infusion of haCGRP (2 mu...

  5. A method for real-time three-dimensional vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents an approach for making real-time three-dimensional vector flow imaging. Synthetic aperture data acquisition is used, and the data is beamformed along the flow direction to yield signals usable for flow estimation. The signals are cross-related to determine the shift in position...... found mainly at the edges of the vessel due to the echo-cancelling, and the probability of false detection was 2.2%....

  6. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T

    1993-01-01

    . To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow velocity...

  7. Exercise Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy and coronary blood flow velocity in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, Hiroki; Umamoto, Ikuo; Harada, Yoshiaki (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)) (and others)

    1992-03-01

    In 22 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy not associated with coronary stenosis, findings of exercise Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy were reviewed in relation to coronary blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity of the left antero-inferior segment was recorded by using a Doppler catheter. From time velocity integration in systolic and diastolic phases, both % systolic fraction (%SF) and %diastolic 1st third fraction (%d1F) were obtained. A decreased perfusion was visually assessed on exercise Tl-201 myocardial images. In addition, transient dilation of the left ventricular cavity was quantitatively assessed by expressing it as a transient dilation index (TDI) for subendocardial ischemia. Coronary blood flow velocity was characterized by a decrease in both %SF and %d1F and negative systolic flow. Both %SF and %d1F were inversely correlated with TDI. Coronary negative systolic flow was frequently associated with a decreased perfusion. These results suggest factors such as left ventricular relaxation impairment, other than coronary small vessel lesions, may also be involved in the occurrence of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (N.K.).

  8. Magnetic particle imaging for in vivo blood flow velocity measurements in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Michael G.; Salamon, Johannes; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald; Adam, Gerhard; Weller, Horst; Jung, Caroline

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging technology. It is a potential candidate to be used for angiographic purposes, to study perfusion and cell migration. The aim of this work was to measure velocities of the flowing blood in the inferior vena cava of mice, using MPI, and to evaluate it in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A phantom mimicking the flow within the inferior vena cava with velocities of up to 21 cm s‑1 was used for the evaluation of the applied analysis techniques. Time–density and distance–density analyses for bolus tracking were performed to calculate flow velocities. These findings were compared with the calibrated velocities set by a flow pump, and it can be concluded that velocities of up to 21 cm s‑1 can be measured by MPI. A time–density analysis using an arrival time estimation algorithm showed the best agreement with the preset velocities. In vivo measurements were performed in healthy FVB mice (n  =  10). MRI experiments were performed using phase contrast (PC) for velocity mapping. For MPI measurements, a standardized injection of a superparamagnetic iron oxide tracer was applied. In vivo MPI data were evaluated by a time–density analysis and compared to PC MRI. A Bland–Altman analysis revealed good agreement between the in vivo velocities acquired by MRI of 4.0  ±  1.5 cm s‑1 and those measured by MPI of 4.8  ±  1.1 cm s‑1. Magnetic particle imaging is a new tool with which to measure and quantify flow velocities. It is fast, radiation-free, and produces 3D images. It therefore offers the potential for vascular imaging.

  9. Chagas disease vector blood meal sources identified by protein mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith I Keller

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a complex vector borne parasitic disease involving blood feeding Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae insects, also known as kissing bugs, and the vertebrates they feed on. This disease has tremendous impacts on millions of people and is a global health problem. The etiological agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastea: Trypanosomatida: Trypanosomatidae, is deposited on the mammalian host in the insect's feces during a blood meal, and enters the host's blood stream through mucous membranes or a break in the skin. Identifying the blood meal sources of triatomine vectors is critical in understanding Chagas disease transmission dynamics, can lead to identification of other vertebrates important in the transmission cycle, and aids management decisions. The latter is particularly important as there is little in the way of effective therapeutics for Chagas disease. Several techniques, mostly DNA-based, are available for blood meal identification. However, further methods are needed, particularly when sample conditions lead to low-quality DNA or to assess the risk of human cross-contamination. We demonstrate a proteomics-based approach, using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS to identify host-specific hemoglobin peptides for blood meal identification in mouse blood control samples and apply LC-MS/MS for the first time to Triatoma dimidiata insect vectors, tracing blood sources to species. In contrast to most proteins, hemoglobin, stabilized by iron, is incredibly stable even being preserved through geologic time. We compared blood stored with and without an anticoagulant and examined field-collected insect specimens stored in suboptimal conditions such as at room temperature for long periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first study using LC-MS/MS on field-collected arthropod disease vectors to identify blood meal composition, and where blood meal identification was confirmed with more

  10. Chagas disease vector blood meal sources identified by protein mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Judith I; Ballif, Bryan A; St Clair, Riley M; Vincent, James J; Monroy, M Carlota; Stevens, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is a complex vector borne parasitic disease involving blood feeding Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) insects, also known as kissing bugs, and the vertebrates they feed on. This disease has tremendous impacts on millions of people and is a global health problem. The etiological agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastea: Trypanosomatida: Trypanosomatidae), is deposited on the mammalian host in the insect's feces during a blood meal, and enters the host's blood stream through mucous membranes or a break in the skin. Identifying the blood meal sources of triatomine vectors is critical in understanding Chagas disease transmission dynamics, can lead to identification of other vertebrates important in the transmission cycle, and aids management decisions. The latter is particularly important as there is little in the way of effective therapeutics for Chagas disease. Several techniques, mostly DNA-based, are available for blood meal identification. However, further methods are needed, particularly when sample conditions lead to low-quality DNA or to assess the risk of human cross-contamination. We demonstrate a proteomics-based approach, using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify host-specific hemoglobin peptides for blood meal identification in mouse blood control samples and apply LC-MS/MS for the first time to Triatoma dimidiata insect vectors, tracing blood sources to species. In contrast to most proteins, hemoglobin, stabilized by iron, is incredibly stable even being preserved through geologic time. We compared blood stored with and without an anticoagulant and examined field-collected insect specimens stored in suboptimal conditions such as at room temperature for long periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first study using LC-MS/MS on field-collected arthropod disease vectors to identify blood meal composition, and where blood meal identification was confirmed with more traditional DNA

  11. Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery during transnasal endoscopic skull base surgery performed in controlled hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieskiewicz, Andrzej; Lyson, Tomasz; Drozdowski, Andrzej; Piszczatowski, Bartosz; Rutkowski, Robert; Turek, Grzegorz; Lewczuk, Anna; Rogowski, Marek; Mariak, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    To assess blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during transnasal endoscopic procedures performed with decreased hemodynamic parameters. In 40 patients who underwent endoscopic skull base surgery in controlled hypotension (studied group) and in 13 patients operated without reduction of hemodynamic parameters (control group), blood flow velocity in MCA was assessed with transcranial color Doppler sonography. Blood flow velocity in MCA remained within the range of age-specific reference values in all patients before operation. It decreased significantly in both groups after induction of anesthesia and then dropped even further in studied group of patients when hemodynamic parameters were reduced; the systolic velocity fell below the normal reference values in 25% of patients, the mean velocity in 50% and the diastolic velocity in 57% of patients. The diastolic velocity was much more heavily influenced by diminished hemodynamic parameters than systolic velocity in the studied group as opposed to the control group where reduction of blood flow velocity pertained equally systolic and diastolic velocity. During transnasal endoscopic procedures performed in moderate hypotension, in addition to significant drop of blood flow velocity to values well below the normal reference range, a divergent reduction of systolic and diastolic velocity was detected. Since divergent systolic and diastolic velocity may indicate an early phase of cerebral autoregulation compromise, and the decrease of mean blood flow velocity in MCA corresponds with a decrease of cerebral blood flow, further investigations in this field seem warranted. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Blood Velocity Estimation Based on an Optimal Observer for Magnetic Nanorobots Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Do Ton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanorobots are recently used in a drug delivery system in order to perform minimally invasive medical procedures. One main difficulty for controlling nanorobots is the complicated behavior of hydrodynamic drag force and uncertain factors in their dynamics. The drag force depends on the blood velocity but unfortunately, it is apparently unknown. In previous feedback control system designs, the blood velocity was assumed to be known or set constant. This assumption did not reflect the reality and reduce the feasibility of the control systems. Considering this fact, this paper suggests an optimal observer for estimating blood velocity. The only information required for the proposed observer and overall control system is the position of nanorobots. The characteristic, stability, as well as gain tuning rules of the proposed optimal observer is discussed in detail. Simulation results are carried out in MATLAB/Simulink to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed optimal observer as well as the overall feedback control systems for nanorobot navigation in blood vessels.

  13. Prediction of delayed neurological deficit after subarachnoid haemorrhage: a CT blood load and Doppler velocity approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosset, D.G.; McDonald, I.; Cockburn, M.; Straiton, J.; Bullock, R.R.

    1994-01-01

    The predictive value of cranial computed tomography (CT) blood load and serial transcranial Doppler sonography for the development of delayed ischaemic neurological deficit was assessed in 121 patients following subarachnoid haemorrhage. Of the 121 patients, 81 (67 %) had thick layers of blood or haematoma, including intraventricular bleeding. The proportion of patients who developed delayed deficit was higher with increasing amounts of subarachnoid blood on the admission CT (51 % of 53 cases in Fisher grade 3; 35 % of 33 cases in grade 2; 28 % of 7 cases in grade 1, P < 0.01). Doppler velocities obtained from readings at least every 2 days following admission were higher in patients with delayed neurological deficit (peak velocity for grade 3 patients 176 ± 6 cm/s (mean ± SE), versus grade 2: 164 ± 7 cm/s; grade 4 149 ± 9, both P = 0.04, Mann-Whitney). Peak velocity and maximal 24-h rise tended to be higher within different CT grades in patients with a deficit than in those without; this difference was significant for grade 3 patients (P < 0.01). We conclude that a combined approach with CT and Doppler sonography provides greater predictive value for the development of delayed ischaemic neurological deficit than either test considered independently. The value of Doppler sonography may be greatest for patients with Fisher grade 3 blood, in whom the risk of delayed ischaemia is greatest. (orig.)

  14. Cerebral blood flow velocity in migraine and chronic tension-type headache patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karacay Ozkalayci S

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available S Karacay Ozkalayci, B Nazliel, HZ Batur Caglayan, C Irkec Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey Introduction: The present study seeks to use transcranial Doppler ultrasound to evaluate cerebral blood flow velocities in anterior and posterior circulation arteries, during an attack-free episode in migraine patients, with and without aura, as well as in chronic tension-type headache patients who were not receiving prophylactic medication. Methods: A total of 50 patients (35 female, 15 male were evaluated during a headache-free episode: 30 migraine patients without aura (mean age: 32±8 years, 10 migraine patients with aura (mean age: 34±4 years, and 10 patients with chronic tension-type headache (mean age: 34±5 years. Results: No significant difference was present between anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral and vertebral arteries’ blood flow velocities between migraine patients, with and without aura, or in patients with a tension-type headache, and normal controls (p>0.05. However, a significant increase in basilar artery cerebral blood flow velocities relative to controls was present in patients with a tension-type headache (p>0.001. Conclusion: It is difficult to predict the main reason for the significant increase in basilar artery blood flow velocities in patients with chronic tension-type headache. It may be due to constriction of conductance or the dilatation of the resistance vessels. Keywords: cerebral blood flow, migraine without aura, migraine with aura, tension-type headache, transcranial Doppler ultrasonography 

  15. Convex Array Vector Velocity Imaging Using Transverse Oscillation and Its Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Bachmann Nielsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    array probe (pitch 0.33 mm) is used in both simulations and measurements. A parabolic velocity profile is simulated at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The optimization routine changes the lateral oscillation period λx as a function of depth to yield the best possible estimates based on the energy ratio...... between positive and negative spatial frequencies in the ultrasound field. The energy ratio is reduced from −17.1 dB to −22.1 dB. Parabolic profiles are estimated on simulated data using 16 emissions. The optimization gives a reduction in standard deviation from 8.81% to 7.4% for 16 emissions......, with a reduction in lateral velocity bias from −15.93% to 0.78% at 90° (transverse flow) at a depth of 40 mm. Measurements have been performed using the experimental ultrasound scanner and a convex array transducer. A bias of −0.93% was obtained at 87° for a parabolic velocity profile along with a standard...

  16. ABO blood groups of residents and the ABO host choice of malaria vectors in southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjomruz, Mehdi; Oshaghi, Mohammad A; Sedaghat, Mohammad M; Pourfatollah, Ali A; Raeisi, Ahmad; Vatandoost, Hassan; Mohtarami, Fatemeh; Yeryan, Mohammad; Bakhshi, Hassan; Nikpoor, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological evidences revealed the higher prevalence of 'O' blood group in the residents of malaria-endemic areas. Also some data indicated preference of mosquitoes to 'O' group. The aim of this study was to determine ABO group ratio in the residents as well as ABO group preference of Anopheles in two malaria endemic areas in south of Iran. Agglutination method was used for ABO typing of residents. Field blood fed Anopheles specimens were tested against vertebrate DNA using mtDNA-cytB PCR-RFLP and then the human fed specimens were tested for ABO groups using multiplex allele-specific PCR. A total of 409 human blood samples were identified, of which 150(36.7%) were 'O' group followed by 113(27.6%), 109(26.7%), and 37(9.0%) of A, B, and AB groups respectively. Analyzing of 95 blood fed mosquitoes revealed that only four Anopheles stephensi had fed human blood with A(1), B(1), and AB(2) groups. Result of this study revealed high prevalence of O group in south of Iran. To our knowledge, it is the first ABO molecular typing of blood meal in mosquitoes; however, due to low number of human blood fed specimens, ABO host choice of the mosquitoes remains unknown. This study revealed that ABO blood preference of malaria vectors and other arthropod vectors deserves future research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood flow velocity in the Popliteal Vein using Transverse Oscillation Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechsgaard, Thor; Lindskov Hansen, Kristoffer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition leading to varicose veins, leg edema, post-thrombotic syndrome and venous ulcerations. Ultrasound (US) is the main modality for examination of venous disease. Color Doppler and occasionally spectral Doppler US (SDUS) are used for evaluation of the venous...... flow. Peak velocities measured by SDUS are rarely used in a clinical setting for evaluating chronic venous disease due to inadequate reproducibility mainly caused by the angle dependency of the estimate. However, estimations of blood velocities are of importance in characterizing venous disease....... Transverse Oscillation US (TOUS), a non-invasive angle independent method, has been implemented on a commercial scanner. TOUS’s advantage compared to SDUS is a more elaborate visualization of complex flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate, whether TOUS perform equal to SDUS for recording velocities...

  18. Particle size, magnetic field, and blood velocity effects on particle retention in magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Erica M; Maxim, Peter G; Eaton, John K

    2010-01-01

    A physics-based model of a general magnetic drug targeting (MDT) system was developed with the goal of realizing the practical limitations of MDT when electromagnets are the source of the magnetic field. The simulation tracks magnetic particles subject to gravity, drag force, magnetic force, and hydrodynamic lift in specified flow fields and external magnetic field distributions. A model problem was analyzed to determine the effect of drug particle size, blood flow velocity, and magnetic field gradient strength on efficiency in holding particles stationary in a laminar Poiseuille flow modeling blood flow in a medium-sized artery. It was found that particle retention rate increased with increasing particle diameter and magnetic field gradient strength and decreased with increasing bulk flow velocity. The results suggest that MDT systems with electromagnets are unsuitable for use in small arteries because it is difficult to control particles smaller than about 20 microm in diameter.

  19. Blood velocity estimation using spatio-temporal encoding based on frequency division approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a feasibility study of using a spatial encoding technique based on frequency division for blood flow estimation is presented. The spatial encoding is carried out by dividing the available bandwidth of the transducer into a number of narrow frequency bands with approximately disjoint...... spectral support. By assigning one band to one virtual source, all virtual sources can be excited simultaneously. The received echoes are beamformed using Synthetic Transmit Aperture beamforming. The velocity of the moving blood is estimated using a cross- correlation estimator. The simulation tool Field...

  20. Performance of velocity vector estimation using an improved dynamic beamforming setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    control of the acoustic field, based on the Pulsed Plane Wave Decomposition (PPWD), is presented. The PPWD gives an unambigious relation between a given acoustic field and the time functions needed on an array transducer for transmission. Applying this method for the receive beamformation results in a set......-up of the beamformer with different filters for each channel for each estimation depth. The method of the PPWD is illustrated by analytical expressions of the decomposed acoustic field and these results are used for simulation. Results of velocity estimates using the new setup are given on the basis of simulated...

  1. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Blood Flow Velocity and Vessel Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee-Kyung; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Cho, Sung-Hyoun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interferential current electrical stimulation alters blood flow velocity and vessel size. We aimed to investigate the changes in the autonomic nervous system depending on electrical stimulation parameters. Forty-five healthy adult male and female subjects were studied. Bipolar adhesive pad electrodes were used to stimulate the autonomic nervous system at the thoracic vertebrae 1-4 levels for 20 min. Using Doppler ultrasonography, blood flow was measured to determine velocity and vessel size before, immediately after, and 30 min after electrical stimulation. Changes in blood flow velocity were significantly different immediately and 30 min after stimulation. The interaction between intervention periods and groups was significantly different between the exercise and pain stimulation groups immediately after stimulation (p<0.05). The vessel size was significantly different before and 30 min after stimulation (p<0.05). Imbalances in the sympathetic nervous system, which regulates balance throughout the body, may present with various symptoms. Therefore, in the clinical practice, the parameters of electrical stimulation should be selectively applied in accordance with various conditions and changes in form. PMID:28401194

  2. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Blood Flow Velocity and Vessel Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee-Kyung; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Cho, Sung-Hyoun

    2017-01-01

    Interferential current electrical stimulation alters blood flow velocity and vessel size. We aimed to investigate the changes in the autonomic nervous system depending on electrical stimulation parameters. Forty-five healthy adult male and female subjects were studied. Bipolar adhesive pad electrodes were used to stimulate the autonomic nervous system at the thoracic vertebrae 1-4 levels for 20 min. Using Doppler ultrasonography, blood flow was measured to determine velocity and vessel size before, immediately after, and 30 min after electrical stimulation. Changes in blood flow velocity were significantly different immediately and 30 min after stimulation. The interaction between intervention periods and groups was significantly different between the exercise and pain stimulation groups immediately after stimulation (p<0.05). The vessel size was significantly different before and 30 min after stimulation (p<0.05). Imbalances in the sympathetic nervous system, which regulates balance throughout the body, may present with various symptoms. Therefore, in the clinical practice, the parameters of electrical stimulation should be selectively applied in accordance with various conditions and changes in form.

  3. Effect of pool length on blood lactate, heart rate, and velocity in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinen, O P; Keskinen, K L; Mero, A A

    2007-05-01

    Exercise testing in water has been used to follow the progression of conditioning during regular training in swimmers. The present study examined the effects of pool length in eleven male swimmers on a set of 5 x 200-m freestyle swims with increasing speed from submaximal to maximal. Mean velocity of swimming, blood lactate and heart rate were examined in both 25-m and 50-m pools. Turning benefit as a marker for turning skill was measured separately by a underwater video system (speed difference between pre- and post-turning) during short all-out swims. Maximum force during swimming was measured in tethered swimming and explosive strength of leg extensor muscles was evaluated by a counter movement jump. The significantly higher (p=0.033 - 0.000) blood lactate values for the 50-m pool as compared to the 25-m pool were found at each point of swimming velocity versus blood lactate curve. The highest post-test lactate level was 7.36 +/- 1.47 mmol x l (-1) in the short course and 8.24 +/- 1.55 mmol x l (-1) (p=0.033) in the long course. The maximum swimming velocity was significantly greater (4.5 %) in the 25-m pool swimming (1.38 +/- 0.11 m x s (-1) vs. 1.32 +/- 0.12 m x s (-1); p=0.000). The heart rate values were significantly (p=0.020 - 0.000) lower in the short course than in the long course at all points of submaximal velocity with a mean difference of 7.3 +/- 0.7 bpm. Heart rate was equal (172 +/- 14 vs. 172 +/- 14 bpm) after the maximum swims in both short and long course. The turning benefit in the short maximum swim was 0.12 +/- 0.05 m x s (-1) (8.1 +/- 3.2 %), correlating positively with the difference in maximal swimming velocity between the short and long-pool swims (r = 0.59; p = 0.029), with the maximum force during tethered swimming (r=0.75; p=0.004) and with the vertical jumping height in the counter movement jump (r=0.55; p=0.039). We conclude that the pool length has a strong effect on blood lactate concentration and heart rate with greater swimming

  4. Quantification of complex blood flow using real-time in vivo vector flow ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    2010-01-01

    A quantitative method for distinguishing complex from non-complex flow patterns in ultrasound is presented. A new commercial BK Medical ultrasound scanner uses the Transverse Oscillation vector flow technique for visualising flow patterns in real-time. In vivo vector flow data of the blood flow...... patterns of the common carotid artery and the carotid bulb were obtained simultaneously as the basis for quantifying complex flow. The carotid bifurcation of two healthy volunteers were scanned. The presence of complex flow patterns from eight cardiac cycles were evaluated by three experts in medical...... for automatic detection of complex flow patterns....

  5. Estimation of velocity vector angles using the directional cross-correlation method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    transducer is used with a normal transmission of a focused ultrasound field. In the simulations the relative standard deviation of the velocity magnitude is between 0.7% and 7.7% for flow angles between 45 deg and 90 deg. The study showed that angle estimation by directional beamforming can be estimated...... with a high precision. The angle estimation performance is highly dependent on the choice of the time ktprf Tprf (correlation-time) between signals to correlate. One performance example is given with a fixed value of ktprf for all flow angles. The angle estimation on measured data for flow at 60 to 90 deg......, yields a probability of valid estimates between 68% and 98%. The optimal value of ktprf for each flow angle is found from a parameter study and with these values the performance on simulated data yields angle estimates with no outlier estimates and with standard deviations below 2 deg....

  6. Bird hosts, blood parasites and their vectors--associations uncovered by molecular analyses of blackfly blood meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, O; Bensch, S; Malmqvist, B

    2008-03-01

    The level of host specificity of blood-sucking invertebrates may have both ecological and evolutionary implications for the parasites they are transmitting. We used blood meals from wild-caught blackflies for molecular identification of parasites and hosts to examine patterns of host specificity and how these may affect the transmission of avian blood parasites of the genus Leucocytozoon. We found that five different species of ornithophilic blackflies preferred different species of birds when taking their blood meals. Of the blackflies that contained avian blood meals, 62% were infected with Leucocytozoon parasites, consisting of 15 different parasite lineages. For the blackfly species, there was a significant association between the host width (measured as the genetic differentiation between the used hosts) and the genetic similarity of the parasites in their blood meals. The absence of similar parasite in blood meals from blackflies with different host preferences is interpreted as a result of the vector-host associations. The observed associations between blackfly species and host species are therefore likely to hinder parasites to be transmitted between different host-groups, resulting in ecologically driven associations between certain parasite lineages and hosts species.

  7. Capillary blood cell velocity in periulcerous regions of the lower leg measured by laser Doppler anemometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stücker, Markus; Huntermann, Christina; Bechara, Falk Georges; Hoffmann, Klaus; Altmeyer, Peter

    2004-08-01

    The capillary blood flow of the nailfold can be measured by means of modern non-invasive techniques like the videocapillary microscope in vivo. To quantify the capillary blood cell velocity, apart from the nailfold capillaries, we used a new technique, the so-called laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). The present study investigated how far laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF), transcutaneous partial pressure of oxygen (tcpO2), and LDA are capable of quantifying differences of cutaneous microcirculation between patients with leg ulcera and a healthy control group. The effects of intravenous prostaglandin E1 and pentoxifylline were also investigated. Ten patients with venous leg ulcers and 10 patients with mixed venous/arterial ulcers were investigated with LDF, tcpO2, and LDA before and after injection of prostaglandin E1 and pentoxifylline. We measured the resting capillary blood cell velocity (rCBV), the maximum hyperemia, and the time to peak capillary blood cell velocity (tpCBV) during hyperemia after 4 min of suprasystolic occlusion and compared them with the results of a contol group of 20 patients. Laser Doppler flow was increased in all patients during resting period, whereas the tcpO2 was significantly decreased. LDF did not show an extension of tpCBV during reactive hyperemia after suprasystolic occlusion compared to the control group (73.6+/-31.1 vs. 164.1+/-52.5 s, P=0.003). TcpO2 revealed significantly decreased tpCBV in patients with venous and mixed venous/arterial ulcers (90.1+/-61.7 vs. 162.7+/-65.5 s, P0.8). After application of prostaglandin E1, LDA revealed a significant increase of erythrocyte velocity (0.5+/-0.18 to 0.74+/-0.28 mm/s [P=0,01]), whereas pentoxifylline had no significant effect. Capillary density increased significantly after application of prostaglandin E1 (5,1+/-2.7/mm2 to 8.9+/-3/mm2 [P=0.001]) and pentoxifylline (5.3+/- 1.8/mm2 to 8+/-2.1/mm2 [P=0.006]). The LDA is an important additional investigation tool for cutaneous microcirculation.

  8. The effects of squat exercises in postures for toilet use on blood flow velocity of the leg vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jun Ho; Chung, Sin Ho; Shim, Jae Hun

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of squat exercises performed in toilet-using postures on the blood flow velocity of the lower extremities for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis. [Subjects] The subjects were 28 students who were attending B University in Cheonan. They were divided into a group of 14 subjects of sitting toilet users and a group of 14 subjects of squat toilet users. [Methods] The subjects performed squat exercises in different toilet-using postures and we investigated the changes in blood flow velocity. [Results] The variations in blood flow velocities before and after the exercises showed significant differences in both groups but the differences between the two groups were not significant. [Conclusion] Based on the results of this study, we consider squat exercises are effective at improving the variation in lower-extremity blood flow velocity when using a toilet.

  9. 3D vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... conventional methods can estimate only the axial component. Several approaches for 3D vector velocity estimation have been suggested, but none of these methods have so far produced convincing in vivo results nor have they been adopted by commercial manufacturers. The basis for this project is the Transverse...... on the TO fields are suggested. They can be used to optimize the TO method. In the third part, a TO method for 3D vector velocity estimation is proposed. It employs a 2D phased array transducer and decouples the velocity estimation into three velocity components, which are estimated simultaneously based on 5...

  10. Non-invasive Estimation of Pressure Changes using 2-D Vector Velocity Ultrasound: An Experimental Study with In-Vivo Examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Møller, Niclas Dechau

    2018-01-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating intravascular pressure changes using 2-D vector velocity is presented. The method was first validated on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data, and with catheter measurements on phantoms. Hereafter, the method was tested in-vivo at the carotid bifurcation...

  11. Synchrotron X-ray PIV Technique for Measurement of Blood Flow Velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Guk Bae; Lee, Sang Joon; Je, Jung Ho

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray micro-imaging method has been used to observe internal structures of various organisms, industrial devices, and so on. However, it is not suitable to see internal flows inside a structure because tracers typically employed in conventional optical flow visualization methods cannot be detectable with the X-ray micro-imaging method. On the other hand, a PIV (particle image velocimetry) method which has recently been accepted as a reliable quantitative flow visualization technique can extract lots of flow information by applying digital image processing techniques However, it is not applicable to opaque fluids such as blood. In this study, we combined the PIV method and the synchrotron X-ray micro-imaging technique to compose a new X-ray PIV technique. Using the X-ray PIV technique, we investigated the optical characteristics of blood for a coherent synchrotron X-ray beam and quantitatively visualized real blood flows inside an opaque tube without any contrast media. The velocity field information acquired would be helpful for investigating hemorheologic characteristics of the blood flow

  12. Effect of head rotation on cerebral blood velocity in the prone position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Jakob; Sandmand, Marie; Sonne, Morten

    2012-01-01

    for cerebral blood flow. We tested in healthy subjects the hypothesis that rotating the head in the prone position reduces cerebral blood flow. Methods. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), stroke volume (SV), and CO were determined, together with the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V......(mean)) and jugular vein diameters bilaterally in 22 healthy subjects in the prone position with the head centered, respectively, rotated sideways, with and without positive pressure breathing (10 cmH(2)O). Results. The prone position reduced SV (by 5.4 ± 1.5%; P ... MAP (from 78 ± 3 to 80 ± 2 mmHg) as well as bilateral jugular vein diameters, leaving MCA V(mean) unchanged. Positive pressure breathing in the prone position increased MAP (by 3.6 ± 0.8 mmHg) but further reduced SV and CO (by 9.3 ± 1.3 % and 7.2 ± 2.4 % below baseline) while MCA V...

  13. Decomposition of group-velocity-locked-vector-dissipative solitons and formation of the high-order soliton structure by the product of their recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Li, Lei; Geng, Ying; Wang, Hanxiao; Su, Lei; Zhao, Luming

    2018-02-01

    By using a polarization manipulation and projection system, we numerically decomposed the group-velocity-locked-vector-dissipative solitons (GVLVDSs) from a normal dispersion fiber laser and studied the combination of the projections of the phase-modulated components of the GVLVDS through a polarization beam splitter. Pulses with a structure similar to a high-order vector soliton could be obtained, which could be considered as a pseudo-high-order GVLVDS. It is found that, although GVLVDSs are intrinsically different from group-velocity-locked-vector solitons generated in fiber lasers operated in the anomalous dispersion regime, similar characteristics for the generation of pseudo-high-order GVLVDS are obtained. However, pulse chirp plays a significant role on the generation of pseudo-high-order GVLVDS.

  14. Development of dual micro-PIV system for simultaneous velocity measurements: optical arrangement techniques and application to blood flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvon, Alexandr; Lee, Yeon Ho; Cheema, Taqi Ahmad; Park, Cheol Woo

    2014-01-01

    Blood rheological characteristics can significantly vary with the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) in plasma. Moreover, RBCs show a complicated behavior in micro vessels. Thus, the determination of either plasma or blood cell velocity distribution has been the primary objective in blood flow analysis. However, the conditions during blood flow analyses are different from the actual physiological conditions, wherein the motion of the two distinct blood phases simultaneously occurs. In this study, we used an in vitro micro-particle image velocimetry, which is a reliable velocity field measurement technique, to evaluate the velocity distribution of plasma and blood cells simultaneously. Blood flow through a rectangular microchannel was determined using special optical filter arrangements and by assuming two different hematocrit values. Using the proposed technique, the averaged parabolic velocity profiles for the RBCs and plasma were successfully obtained and compared. The developed simultaneous measurement technique can be used to predict blood cell and plasma behaviors simultaneously with high accuracy under given clinical conditions. (paper)

  15. Laboratory and Genetic Biomarkers Associated with Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Hemoglobin SC Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayra Pereira Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reference values for cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV in hemoglobin SC disease (HbSC have not been established. We aimed to investigate associations between laboratory and genetic biomarkers associated with CBFV in HbSC children. Sixty-eight HbSC children were included; CBFV was analyzed by transcranial Doppler, and the time-averaged maximum mean velocity (TAMMV was estimated. Hematological, biochemical, immunological, and genetic analyses were performed. TAMMV was negatively correlated with red blood cell count (RBC count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and direct bilirubin (DB, yet positively correlated with monocytes and ferritin. We found that children with TAMMV ≥ 128 cm/s had decreased red blood cell distribution width (RDW and nitric oxide metabolite (NOx concentration. Children with TAMMV ≥ 143.50 cm/s had decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit, as well as increased ferritin levels. Decreased hemoglobin, hematocrit, RDW, and NOx and increased ferritin were detected in children with TAMMV ≥ 125.75 cm/s. The CAR haplotype was associated with higher TAMMV. In association analyses, RBC, hemoglobin, hematocrit, RDW, monocyte, DB, NOx, and ferritin, as well as the CAR haplotype, were found to be associated with higher TAMMV in HbSC children. Multivariate analysis suggested that high TAMMV was independently associated with hematocrit, RDW, and NOx. Additional studies are warranted to validate the establishment of a cutoff value of 125.75 cm/s associated with elevated TAMMV in HbSC children.

  16. The postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is not explained by PaCO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Secher, N H; Roos, C M

    2006-01-01

    In the normocapnic range, middle cerebral artery mean velocity (MCA Vmean) changes approximately 3.5% per mmHg carbon-dioxide tension in arterial blood (PaCO2) and a decrease in PaCO2 will reduce the cerebral blood flow by vasoconstriction (the CO2 reactivity of the brain). When standing up MCA...

  17. Influence of hemodialysis on the mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, I; Bach, R; Mertens, P R; Liakopoulos, V; Liapi, G; Mann, H; Heintz, B

    2005-08-01

    Several effects of hemodialysis, including hemoconcentration, alterations of hemostasis or hemorheology and endothelial activation, could potentially interfere with cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation. These treatment-specific changes may also be crucial for the enhanced incidence of stroke in uremic patients. Nevertheless, the influence of hemodialysis on CBF has not been yet adequately studied. We registered mean blood flow velocity (MFV) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during hemodialysis treatment in order to evaluate its contribution on CBF changes. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD) of the MCA was performed continuously during hemodialysis treatment in 18 stable patients (10 males and 8 females, mean age 62 +/- 11 years) with end-stage renal disease of various origin. Blood pressure (mmHg), heart rate (/min), ultrafiltration volume (ml), BV changes (deltaBV by hemoglobinometry, %), arterial blood gases (pO2, blood oxygen content, pCO2), hemostasis activation (thrombin-antithrombin III complex, ELISA) and fibrinogen (Clauss) were measured simultaneously at the beginning of treatment and every hour thereafter. Before the hemodialysis session the MFV in the MCA was within normal range (57.5 +/- 13.0 cm/s, ref. 60 +/- 12) and was mainly dependent on the patients' age (r = -0.697, p delta%MFV) were interrelated to the ultrafiltration volume (r = -0.486, p delta%acO2, r = -0.420, p delta%fibrinogen, r = 0.244, p < 0.05). A significant continuous decrease of the MFV in the MCA was observed during hemodialysis treatment, which inversely correlated both with ultrafiltration volume, BV changes and changes of plasma fibrinogen. The ultrafiltration-induced hemoconcentration with concomitant rise of hematocrit and oxygen transport capacity, may partly explain the alterations in the cerebral MFV observed during hemodialysis.

  18. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... breath hold increased Pa(CO(2)) from 5.9 to 8.2 kPa (P ... 180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P breath hold diverts blood toward the brain with a >100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...

  19. A velocity tracking approach for the data assimilation problem in blood flow simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, J; Guerra, T; Sequeira, A

    2017-10-01

    Several advances have been made in data assimilation techniques applied to blood flow modeling. Typically, idealized boundary conditions, only verified in straight parts of the vessel, are assumed. We present a general approach, on the basis of a Dirichlet boundary control problem, that may potentially be used in different parts of the arterial system. The relevance of this method appears when computational reconstructions of the 3D domains, prone to be considered sufficiently extended, are either not possible, or desirable, because of computational costs. On the basis of taking a fully unknown velocity profile as the control, the approach uses a discretize then optimize methodology to solve the control problem numerically. The methodology is applied to a realistic 3D geometry representing a brain aneurysm. The results show that this data assimilation approach may be preferable to a pressure control strategy and that it can significantly improve the accuracy associated to typical solutions obtained using idealized velocity profiles. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Gold-195m: a steady-state imaging agent for venography that gives blood velocity measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowsett, D.J.; Ennis, J.T.; Collum, C.T.; De Jong, R.B.J.

    1985-08-01

    Gold-195m has found applications in first-pass studies for investigating both right and left ventricular activity as well as lung transit. Owing to its reasonably short half-life of 30 sec the authors have found it particularly useful for imaging leg veins up to and including the inferior vena cava. Its short half-life prevents recirculation activity from appearing, so continuous perfusion into a superficial foot vein and application of ankle tourniquets yield a steady-state image of the deep veins, with particularly good resolution. Its decay pattern along a vessel is very sensitive to blood velocity, so measurement of activity at various points on a vein in a computer static image can give velocity values that reveal abnormalities due to partial or complete thrombosis. The radiation dosimetry of /sup 195m/Au used in this way is lower than contrast and technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin ((/sub 99m/Tc) MAA) venography, making it particularly useful for investigating deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in pregnancy.

  1. Gold-195m: a steady-state imaging agent for venography that gives blood velocity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowsett, D.J.; Ennis, J.T.; Collum, C.T.; De Jong, R.B.J.

    1985-01-01

    Gold-195m has found applications in first-pass studies for investigating both right and left ventricular activity as well as lung transit. Owing to its reasonably short half-life of 30 sec the authors have found it particularly useful for imaging leg veins up to and including the inferior vena cava. Its short half-life prevents recirculation activity from appearing, so continuous perfusion into a superficial foot vein and application of ankle tourniquets yield a steady-state image of the deep veins, with particularly good resolution. Its decay pattern along a vessel is very sensitive to blood velocity, so measurement of activity at various points on a vein in a computer static image can give velocity values that reveal abnormalities due to partial or complete thrombosis. The radiation dosimetry of /sup 195m/Au used in this way is lower than contrast and technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin ([/sub 99m/Tc] MAA) venography, making it particularly useful for investigating deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in pregnancy

  2. Wavelet entropy of Doppler ultrasound blood velocity flow waveforms distinguishes nitric oxide-modulated states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Christina E; Hamilton, Paul K; McCann, Aaron J; McGivern, R Canice; McVeigh, Gary E

    2015-05-01

    Wavelet entropy assesses the degree of order or disorder in signals and presents this complex information in a simple metric. Relative wavelet entropy assesses the similarity between the spectral distributions of two signals, again in a simple metric. Wavelet entropy is therefore potentially a very attractive tool for waveform analysis. The ability of this method to track the effects of pharmacologic modulation of vascular function on Doppler blood velocity waveforms was assessed. Waveforms were captured from ophthalmic arteries of 10 healthy subjects at baseline, after the administration of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and after two doses of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME) to produce vasodilation and vasoconstriction, respectively. Wavelet entropy had a tendency to decrease from baseline in response to GTN, but significantly increased after the administration of L-NAME (mean: 1.60 ± 0.07 after 0.25 mg/kg and 1.72 ± 0.13 after 0.5 mg/kg vs. 1.50 ± 0.10 at baseline, p wavelet entropy had a spectral distribution from increasing doses of L-NAME comparable to baseline, 0.07 ± 0.04 and 0.08 ± 0.03, respectively, whereas GTN had the most dissimilar spectral distribution compared with baseline (0.17 ± 0.08, p = 0.002). Wavelet entropy can detect subtle changes in Doppler blood velocity waveform structure in response to nitric-oxide-mediated changes in arteriolar smooth muscle tone. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Differentiation of light-chain cardiac amyloidosis from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using myocardial mechanical parameters by velocity vector imaging echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, Jing; Mu, Yang; Liu, Bohan; Lv, Wenqing; Wang, Ye; Liu, Hongwei; Liu, Hongbin; Zhi, Guang

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of layered velocity vector imaging (VVI)-derived left ventricular (LV) mechanical parameters in the differential diagnosis of primary light-chain cardiac amyloidosis (AL-CA) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We recruited 35 subjects with histologically-diagnosed AL-CA, 35 subjects with HCM, and 30 age-matched healthy controls. We used conventional echocardiography and electrocardiogram to evaluate general heart function and electrophysiology properties. Furthermore, we applied two-dimensional VVI echocardiography to assess the layered mechanical parameters during systole, including endocardial and epicardial longitudinal strain (ENDO and EPI LSsys), circumferential strain (CSsys), radial strain (RSsys), rotation (ROT) and twist (TWI), in different LV walls and levels. Two groups of patients had similarly elevated LV wall thickness and mild diastolic dysfunction, but normal ejection fraction. ENDO LSsys of three circular LV levels and six LV walls was markedly decreased in AL-CA patients, with the most prominent reduction in the basal level. The reduction of ENDO and EPI LSsys in HCM subjects was less profound, and was restricted to certain LV wall and levels. AL-CA patients had significantly reduced RSsys in the LV basal level compared with control or HCM patients. Two groups of patients exhibited similar reduction in layered regional CSsys, ROT and TWI. ROC analysis revealed that the sensitivity and specificity of basal ENDO LSsys for predicting AL-CA was 86 and 89%. Assessment of layered LSsys of LV walls and levels by VVI appeared to provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic index for the differential diagnosis of AL-CA from HCM than conventional echocardiography. Future studies are warranted to evaluate its diagnostic efficacy for AL-CA diagnosis in the large population.

  4. Combining Bootstrap Aggregation with Support Vector Regression for Small Blood Pressure Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soojeong; Ahmad, Awais; Jeon, Gwanggil

    2018-02-28

    Blood pressure measurement based on oscillometry is one of the most popular techniques to check a health condition of individual subjects. This paper proposes a support vector using fusion estimator with a bootstrap technique for oscillometric blood pressure (BP) estimation. However, some inherent problems exist with this approach. First, it is not simple to identify the best support vector regression (SVR) estimator, and worthy information might be omitted when selecting one SVR estimator and discarding others. Additionally, our input feature data, acquired from only five BP measurements per subject, represent a very small sample size. This constitutes a critical limitation when utilizing the SVR technique and can cause overfitting or underfitting, depending on the structure of the algorithm. To overcome these challenges, a fusion with an asymptotic approach (based on combining the bootstrap with the SVR technique) is utilized to generate the pseudo features needed to predict the BP values. This ensemble estimator using the SVR technique can learn to effectively mimic the non-linear relations between the input data acquired from the oscillometry and the nurse's BPs.

  5. The main sceneries of Chagas disease transmission. The vectors, blood and oral transmissions - A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rodrigues Coura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi by the most important domestic vectors, blood transfusion and oral intake. Among the vectors, Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma brasiliensis, Triatoma pseudomaculata, Triatoma sordida, Triatoma maculata, Panstrongylus geniculatus, Rhodnius ecuadoriensis and Rhodnius pallescens can be highlighted. Transmission of Chagas infection, which has been brought under control in some countries in South and Central America, remains a great challenge, particularly considering that many endemic countries do not have control over blood donors. Even more concerning is the case of non-endemic countries that receive thousands of migrants from endemic areas that carry Chagas disease, such as the United States of America, in North America, Spain, in Europe, Japan, in Asia, and Australia, in Oceania. In the Brazilian Amazon Region, since Shaw et al. (1969 described the first acute cases of the disease caused by oral transmission, hundreds of acute cases of the disease due to oral transmission have been described in that region, which is today considered to be endemic for oral transmission. Several other outbreaks of acute Chagas disease by oral transmission have been described in different states of Brazil and in other South American countries.

  6. The main sceneries of Chagas disease transmission. The vectors, blood and oral transmissions - A comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    This review deals with transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi by the most important domestic vectors, blood transfusion and oral intake. Among the vectors, Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma brasiliensis, Triatoma pseudomaculata, Triatoma sordida, Triatoma maculata, Panstrongylus geniculatus, Rhodnius ecuadoriensis and Rhodnius pallescens can be highlighted. Transmission of Chagas infection, which has been brought under control in some countries in South and Central America, remains a great challenge, particularly considering that many endemic countries do not have control over blood donors. Even more concerning is the case of non-endemic countries that receive thousands of migrants from endemic areas that carry Chagas disease, such as the United States of America, in North America, Spain, in Europe, Japan, in Asia, and Australia, in Oceania. In the Brazilian Amazon Region, since Shaw et al. (1969) described the first acute cases of the disease caused by oral transmission, hundreds of acute cases of the disease due to oral transmission have been described in that region, which is today considered to be endemic for oral transmission. Several other outbreaks of acute Chagas disease by oral transmission have been described in different states of Brazil and in other South American countries. PMID:25466622

  7. Transgenic quail production by microinjection of lentiviral vector into the early embryo blood vessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zifu Zhang

    Full Text Available Several strategies have been used to generate transgenic birds. The most successful method so far has been the injection of lentiviral vectors into the subgerminal cavity of a newly laid egg. We report here a new, easy and effective way to produce transgenic quails through direct injection of a lentiviral vector, containing an enhanced-green fluorescent protein (eGFP transgene, into the blood vessels of quail embryos at Hamburger-Hamilton stage 13-15 (HH13-15. A total of 80 embryos were injected and 48 G0 chimeras (60% were hatched. Most injected embryo organs and tissues of hatched quails were positive for eGFP. In five out of 21 mature G0 male quails, the semen was eGFP-positive, as detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, indicating transgenic germ line chimeras. Testcross and genetic analyses revealed that the G0 quail produced transgenic G1 offspring; of 46 G1 hatchlings, 6 were transgenic (6/46, 13.0%. We also compared this new method with the conventional transgenesis using stage X subgerminal cavity injection. Total 240 quail embryos were injected by subgerminal cavity injection, of which 34 (14.1% were hatched, significantly lower than the new method. From these hatched quails semen samples were collected from 19 sexually matured males and tested for the transgene by PCR. The transgene was present in three G0 male quails and only 4/236 G1 offspring (1.7% were transgenic. In conclusion, we developed a novel bird transgenic method by injection of lentiviral vector into embryonic blood vessel at HH 13-15 stage, which result in significant higher transgenic efficiency than the conventional subgerminal cavity injection.

  8. PREDICTION OF BLOOD FLOW VELOCITY AND LEAFLET DEFORMATION VIA 2D MITRAL VALVE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.H. Mohd Adib

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the mitral valve, regional variations in structure and material properties combine to affect the biomechanics of the entire valve. From previous studies, we know that the mitral valve leaflet tissue is highly extensible. A two-dimensional model of the mitral valve was generated using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE mesh. A simple approximation of the heart geometry was used and the valve dimensions were based on actual measurements made. Valve opening and closure was simulated using contact equations. The objective of this study was to investigate and predict flow and leaflet phenomena via a simple 2D mitral valve model based on the critical parameter of blood. Two stages of mitral valves analysis were investigated: the systolic and diastolic stages. The results show a linear correlation between the mitral valve leaflet rigidity and the volume of backflow. Additionally, the simulation predicted mitral valve leaflet displacement during closure, which agreed with the results of our previous data analysis and the results for blood flow velocity during systole condition through the mitral valve outlet, as reported in the medical literature. In conclusion, these computational techniques are very useful in the study of both degenerative valve disease and failure of prostheses and will be further developed to investigate heart valve failure and subsequent surgical repair.

  9. Study of Estimation Method for Unsteady Inflow Velocity in Two-Dimensional Ultrasonic-Measurement-Integrated Blood Flow Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Hiroko; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Funamoto, Kenichi; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Information on hemodynamics is essential for elucidation of mechanisms and development of novel diagnostic methods for circulatory diseases. Two-dimensional ultrasonic-measurement-integrated (2D-UMI) simulation can correctly reproduce an intravascular blood flow field and hemodynamics by feeding back an ultrasonic measurement to the numerical blood flow simulation. In this method, it is critically important to give the correct cross-sectional average inflow velocity (inflow velocity) as the boundary condition. However, systematic study has not been done on the relative validity and effectiveness of existing inflow velocity estimation methods for various target flow fields. The aim of this study was to examine the existing methods systematically and to establish a method to accurately estimate inflow velocities for various vessel geometries and flow conditions in 2D-UMI simulations. A numerical experiment was performed for 2D-UMI simulation of blood flow models in a straight vessel with inflow velocity profiles symmetric and asymmetric to the vessel axis using existing evaluation functions based on Doppler velocity error for the inflow velocity estimation. As a result, it was clarified that a significantly large estimation error occurs in the asymmetric flow due to a nonfeedback domain near the downstream end of the calculation domain. Hence, a new inflow velocity estimation method of 2D-UMI simulation is proposed in which the feedback and evaluation domains are extended to the downstream end. Further numerical experiments of 2D-UMI simulation for two realistic vessel geometries of a healthy blood vessel and a stenosed one confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Vector velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a compact, reliable and low-cost vector velocimeter for example for determining velocities of particles suspended in a gas or fluid flow, or for determining velocity, displacement, rotation, or vibration of a solid surface, the vector velocimeter comprising a laser...

  11. RNA-seq analyses of blood-induced changes in gene expression in the mosquito vector species, Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematophagy is a common trait of insect vectors of disease. Extensive genome-wide transcriptional changes occur in mosquitoes after blood meals, and these are related to digestive and reproductive processes, among others. Studies of these changes are expected to reveal molecular targets for novel vector control and pathogen transmission-blocking strategies. The mosquito Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae, a vector of Dengue viruses, Yellow Fever Virus (YFV and Chikungunya virus (CV, is the subject of this study to look at genome-wide changes in gene expression following a blood meal. Results Transcriptional changes that follow a blood meal in Ae. aegypti females were explored using RNA-seq technology. Over 30% of more than 18,000 investigated transcripts accumulate differentially in mosquitoes at five hours after a blood meal when compared to those fed only on sugar. Forty transcripts accumulate only in blood-fed mosquitoes. The list of regulated transcripts correlates with an enhancement of digestive activity and a suppression of environmental stimuli perception and innate immunity. The alignment of more than 65 million high-quality short reads to the Ae. aegypti reference genome permitted the refinement of the current annotation of transcript boundaries, as well as the discovery of novel transcripts, exons and splicing variants. Cis-regulatory elements (CRE and cis-regulatory modules (CRM enriched significantly at the 5'end flanking sequences of blood meal-regulated genes were identified. Conclusions This study provides the first global view of the changes in transcript accumulation elicited by a blood meal in Ae. aegypti females. This information permitted the identification of classes of potentially co-regulated genes and a description of biochemical and physiological events that occur immediately after blood feeding. The data presented here serve as a basis for novel vector control and pathogen transmission

  12. A Hybrid Windkessel Model of Blood Flow in Arterial Tree Using Velocity Profile Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Virag, Zdravko

    2016-11-01

    For the study of pulsatile blood flow in the arterial system, we derived a coupled Windkessel-Womersley mathematical model. Initially, a 6-elements Windkessel model is proposed to describe the hemodynamics transport in terms of constant resistance, inductance and capacitance. This model can be seen as a two compartment model, in which the compartments are connected by a rigid pipe, modeled by one inductor and resistor. The first viscoelastic compartment models proximal part of the aorta, the second elastic compartment represents the rest of the arterial tree and aorta can be seen as the connection pipe. Although the proposed 6-elements lumped model was able to accurately reconstruct the aortic pressure, it can't be used to predict the axial velocity distribution in the aorta and the wall shear stress and consequently, proper time varying pressure drop. We then modified this lumped model by replacing the connection pipe circuit elements with a vessel having a radius R and a length L. The pulsatile flow motions in the vessel are resolved instantaneously along with the Windkessel like model enable not only accurate prediction of the aortic pressure but also wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. The proposed hybrid model has been validated using several in-vivo aortic pressure and flow rate data acquired from different species such as, humans, dogs and pigs. The method accurately predicts the time variation of wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. Institute for Computational Medicine, Dept. Biomedical Engineering.

  13. Mean blood velocities and flow impedance in the fetal descending thoracic aortic and common carotid artery in normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardo, C M; Campbell, S; Nicolaides, K H

    1988-12-01

    A linear array pulsed Doppler duplex scanner was used to establish reference ranges for mean blood velocities and flow impedance (Pulsatility Index = PI) in the descending thoracic aorta and in the common carotid artery from 70 fetuses in normal pregnancies at 17-42 weeks' gestation. The aortic velocity increased with gestation up to 32 weeks, then remained constant until term, when it decreased. In contrast, the velocity in the common carotid artery increased throughout pregnancy. The PI in the aorta remained constant throughout pregnancy, while in the common carotid artery it fell steeply after 32 weeks. These results suggest that with advancing gestation there is a redistribution of the fetal circulation with decreased impedance to flow to the fetal brain, presumably to compensate for the progressive decrease in fetal blood PO2.

  14. Differential increases in blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery after tourniquet deflation during sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Y; Kawauchi, C H; Ide, M; Saito, S; Mizutani, A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the comparative effects of sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol on cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation during orthopaedic surgery. Thirty patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery were randomly divided into sevoflurane, isoflurane and propofol groups. Anaesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol infusion in 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide, in whatever concentrations were necessary to keep bispectral index values between 45 and 50. Ventilatory rate or tidal volume was adjusted to target PaCO2 of 35 mmHg. A 2.0 MHz transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the temporal window and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery was continuously measured. The extremity was exsanguinated with an Esmarch bandage and the pneumatic tourniquet was inflated to a pressure of 450 mmHg. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, velocity in the middle cerebral artery and arterial blood gas analysis were measured every minute for 10 minutes after release of the tourniquet in all three groups. Velocity in the middle cerebral artery in the three groups increased for five minutes after tourniquet deflation. Because of the different cerebrovascular effects of the three agents, the degree of increase in flow velocity in the isoflurane group was greater than in the other two groups, the change in flow velocity in the propofol group being the lowest (at three minutes after deflation 40 +/- 7%, 32 +/- 6% and 28 +/- 10% in the isoflurane, sevoflurane and propofol groups respectively, P < 0.05).

  15. The phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil has no effect on cerebral blood flow or blood velocity, but nevertheless induces headache in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Jacobsen, Torsten Bjørn

    2002-01-01

    and headache induction. Ten healthy subjects were included in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study where placebo or sildenafil 100 mg (highest therapeutic dose) were administered on two separate days. Blood velocity in the middle cerebral artery (Vmca) was recorded by transcranial Doppler......, and regional cerebral blood flow in the perfusion area of the middle cerebral artery (rCBFmca) was measured using single photon emission computed tomography and xenon inhalation. Radial and temporal artery diameters were studied using high-frequency ultrasound. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded...

  16. World Ocean Geostrophic Velocity Inverted from World Ocean Atlas 2013 with the P-Vector Method (NODC Accession 0121576)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset comprises 3D gridded climatological fields of geostrophic velocity inverted from World Ocean Atlas-2013 (WOA2013) temperature and salinity fields using...

  17. Influence of the velocity vector base relocation to the center of mass of the interrogation area on PIV accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouba Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modification of calculation algorithm used in data processing from PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry method. The modification of standard Multi-step correlation algorithm is based on imaging the centre of mass of the interrogation area to define the initial point of the respective vector, instead of the geometrical centre. This paper describes the principle of initial point-vector assignment, the corresponding data processing methodology including the test track analysis. Both approaches are compared within the framework of accuracy in the conclusion. The accuracy test is performed using synthetic and real data.

  18. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography in children with sickle cell anemia: Clinical and laboratory correlates for elevated blood flow velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagunju, IkeOluwa; Sodeinde, Olugbemiro; Brown, Biobele; Akinbami, Felix; Adedokun, Babatunde

    2014-02-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography of major cerebral arteries is now recommended for routine screening for stroke risk in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). We performed TCD studies on children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) seen at the pediatric hematology clinic over a period of 2 years. TCD scans were repeated yearly in children with normal flow velocities and every 3 months in children with elevated velocities. Findings were correlated with clinical variables, hematologic indices, and arterial oxygen saturation. Predictors of elevated velocities were identified by multiple linear regressions. We enrolled 237 children and performed a total of 526 TCD examinations. Highest time-averaged maximum flow velocities were ≥170 cm/s in 72 (30.3%) cases and ≥200 cm/s in 20 (8.4%). Young age, low hematocrit, low hemoglobin, and arterial oxygen desaturation <95% showed significant correlations with presence of increased cerebral flow velocities. Low hematocrit, low hemoglobin concentration, young age, and low arterial oxygen desaturation predicted elevated cerebral blood flow velocities and, invariably, increased stroke risk, in children with SCA. Children who exhibit these features should be given high priority for TCD examination in the setting of limited resources. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Blood Meal Source Characterization Using Illumina Sequencing in the Chagas Disease Vector Rhodnius pallescens (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in Panamá.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieran, Troy J; Gottdenker, Nicole L; Varian, Christina P; Saldaña, Azael; Means, Nicolas; Owens, Darlisha; Calzada, Jose E; Glenn, Travis C

    2017-11-07

    Accurate blood meal identification is critical to understand hematophagous vector-host relationships. This study describes a customizable Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) approach to identify blood meals from Rhodnius pallescens (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) triatomines using multiple barcoded primers and existing software to pick operational taxonomic units and match sequences for blood meal identification. We precisely identified all positive control samples using this method and further examined 74 wild-caught R. pallescens samples. With this novel blood meal identification method, we detected 13 vertebrate species in the blood meals, as well as single and multiple blood meals in individual bugs. Our results demonstrate the reliability and descriptive uses of our method. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. High-resolution measurement of the unsteady velocity field to evaluate blood damage induced by a mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellofiore, Alessandro; Quinlan, Nathan J

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the potential of prosthetic heart valves to generate abnormal flow and stress patterns, which can contribute to platelet activation and lysis according to blood damage accumulation mechanisms. High-resolution velocity measurements of the unsteady flow field, obtained with a standard particle image velocimetry system and a scaled-up model valve, are used to estimate the shear stresses arising downstream of the valve, accounting for flow features at scales less than one order of magnitude larger than blood cells. Velocity data at effective spatial and temporal resolution of 60 μm and 1.75 kHz, respectively, enabled accurate extraction of Lagrangian trajectories and loading histories experienced by blood cells. Non-physiological stresses up to 10 Pa were detected, while the development of vortex flow in the wake of the valve was observed to significantly increase the exposure time, favouring platelet activation. The loading histories, combined with empirical models for blood damage, reveal that platelet activation and lysis are promoted at different stages of the heart cycle. Shear stress and blood damage estimates are shown to be sensitive to measurement resolution.

  1. Effects of Blood Coagulate Removal Method on Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) Life Table Characteristics and Vector Competence for Dengue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dodewaard, Caitlin A M; Richards, Stephanie L; Harris, Jonathan W

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available blood can be used as an alternative to live animals to maintain mosquito colonies and deliver infectious bloodmeals during research studies. We analyzed the extent to which two methods for blood coagulate removal (defibrination or addition of sodium citrate) affected life table characteristics (i.e., fecundity, fertility, hatch rate, and adult survival) and vector competence (infection, dissemination, and transmission) of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) for dengue virus (DENV). Two types of bovine blood were tested at two extrinsic incubation temperatures (27 or 30°C) for DENV-infected and uninfected mosquitoes. Fully engorged mosquitoes were transferred to individual cages containing an oviposition cup and a substrate. Eggs (fecundity) and hatched larvae (fertility) were counted. At 14 and 21 d post feeding on a DENV-infected bloodmeal, 15 mosquitoes were sampled from each group, and vector competence was analyzed (bodies [infection], legs [dissemination], and saliva [transmission]). Differences in life table characteristics and vector competence were analyzed for mosquitoes fed blood processed using different methods for removal of coagulates. The method for removal of coagulates significantly impacted fecundity, fertility, and hatch time in the uninfected group, but not DENV-infected group. Infected mosquitoes showed significantly higher fecundity and faster hatch time than uninfected mosquitoes. We show no significant differences in infection or dissemination rates between groups; however, horizontal transmission rate was significantly higher in mosquitoes fed DENV-infected citrated compared with defibrinated blood. We expect the findings of this study to inform research using artificial blood delivery methods to assess vector competence. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. A method to preserve low parasitaemia Plasmodium-infected avian blood for host and vector infectivity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jenny S; Giannitti, Federico; Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Tell, Lisa A; Snipes, Joy; Wright, Stan; Cornel, Anthony J

    2016-03-11

    Avian malaria vector competence studies are needed to understand more succinctly complex avian parasite-vector-relations. The lack of vector competence trials may be attributed to the difficulty of obtaining gametocytes for the majority of Plasmodium species and lineages. To conduct avian malaria infectivity assays for those Plasmodium spp. and lineages that are refractory to in vitro cultivation, it is necessary to obtain and preserve for short periods sufficient viable merozoites to infect naïve donor birds to be used as gametocyte donors to infect mosquitoes. Currently, there is only one described method for long-term storage of Plasmodium spp.-infected wild avian blood and it is reliable at a parasitaemia of at least 1%. However, most naturally infected wild-caught birds have a parasitaemia of much less that 1%. To address this problem, a method for short-term storage of infected wild avian blood with low parasitaemia (even ≤ 0.0005%) has been explored and validated. To obtain viable infective merozoites, blood was collected from wild birds using a syringe containing the anticoagulant and the red blood cell preservative citrate phosphate dextrose adenine solution (CPDA). Each blood sample was stored at 4 °C for up to 48 h providing sufficient time to determine the species and parasitaemia of Plasmodium spp. in the blood by morphological examination before injecting into donor canaries. Plasmodium spp.--infected blood was inoculated intravenously into canaries and once infection was established, Culex stigmatosoma, Cx. pipiens and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were then allowed to feed on the infected canaries to validate the efficacy of this method for mosquito vector competence assays. Storage of Plasmodium spp.--infected donor blood at 4 °C yielded viable parasites for 48 h. All five experimentally-infected canaries developed clinical signs and were infectious. Pathologic examination of three canaries that later died revealed splenic lesions typical of

  3. Identification of blood meal sources in the main African malaria mosquito vector by MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niare, Sirama; Berenger, Jean-Michel; Dieme, Constentin; Doumbo, Ogobara; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe; Almeras, Lionel

    2016-02-13

    The identification of blood meal sources in malaria vectors is critical to better understanding host/vector interactions and malaria epidemiology and control. Currently, the identification of mosquito blood meal origins is based on time-consuming and costly techniques such as precipitin tests, ELISA and molecular tools. Although these tools have been validated to identify the blood meal and trophic preferences of female Anopheles mosquitoes, they present several limitations. Recently, matrix-assisted, laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was successfully used as a quick and accurate tool for arthropod identification, including mosquitoes. The aim of the present work was to test whether MALDI-TOF MS could also be applied to identification of blood meal sources from engorged mosquitoes. Abdomen proteins extracted from Anopheles gambiae (stricto sensu, S molecular form) that were either unengorged or artificially engorged on seven distinct types of vertebrate blood (human, horse, sheep, rabbit, mouse, rat, dog) were submitted for MALDI-TOF MS. The comparison of mass spectrometry (MS) spectra from mosquito abdomens collected 1 h post-feeding, were able to discriminate blood meal origins. Moreover, using Aedes albopictus specimens, abdominal protein MS spectra from engorged mosquitoes were found specific to host blood source and independent of the mosquito species. A sequential analysis revealed stability of mosquito abdominal protein spectra up to 24 h post-feeding. These results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS could determine feeding patterns of freshly engorged mosquitoes up to 24 h post-blood meal. The MALDI-TOF MS technique appears to be an efficient tool for large epidemiological surveillance of vector-borne diseases and outbreak source identification.

  4. [Effects on blood flow velocity, wound healing and pain in hand microsurgery patients following heating on non-affected side].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsuk; So, Heeyoung

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of heating on the non-affected hand on blood flow velocity, wound healing, and pain for hand microsurgery patients. This study was designed using the nonequivalent control group pretest-posttest design. Thirty-nine patients were assigned either to the experimental group (20 patients) or control group (19 patients). Data were analyzed with χ²-test, Fisher's exact test, t-test, and repeated measure ANOVA using SPSS/WIN 17.0 program. After treatment in this program, blood flow velocity (F=5.13, p=.008) and wound healing (F=4.11, p=.020) improved significantly in the experimental group compared to the control group. But there was no significant improvement in pain in the experimental group compared to the control group (F=2.40, p=.097). Based upon these results, the non-affected side hand heating was recommended as an independent nursing intervention for the patients who need improvement in blood flow velocity and wound healing such as patients who have microsurgery. As the heating was effective even when applied on the non-affected side, it is the applicable to patients who cannot tolerate any therapy on affected side.

  5. 3D position and velocity vector computations of objects jettisoned from the international space station using close-range photogrammetry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanyan, Valeri; Oshel, Edward; Adamo, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Measurement of the jettisoned object departure trajectory and velocity vector in the International Space Station (ISS) reference frame is vitally important for prompt evaluation of the object's imminent orbit. We report on the first successful application of photogrammetric analysis of the ISS imagery for the prompt computation of the jettisoned object's position and velocity vectors. As post-EVA analyses examples, we present the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) and the Russian "Orlan" Space Suit jettisons, as well as the near-real-time (provided in several hours after the separation) computations of the Video Stanchion Support Assembly Flight Support Assembly (VSSA-FSA) and Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) jettisons during the US astronauts space-walk. Standard close-range photogrammetry analysis was used during this EVA to analyze two on-board camera image sequences down-linked from the ISS. In this approach the ISS camera orientations were computed from known coordinates of several reference points on the ISS hardware. Then the position of the jettisoned object for each time-frame was computed from its image in each frame of the video-clips. In another, "quick-look" approach used in near-real time, orientation of the cameras was computed from their position (from the ISS CAD model) and operational data (pan and tilt) then location of the jettisoned object was calculated only for several frames of the two synchronized movies.

  6. In-Vivo High Dynamic Range Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2015-01-01

    Current vector flow systems are limited in their detectable range of blood flow velocities. Previous work on phantoms has shown that the velocity range can be extended using synthetic aperture directional beamforming combined with an adaptive multi-lag approach. This paper presents a first invivo...... example with a high dynamic velocity range. Velocities with an order of magnitude apart are detected on the femoral artery of a 41 years old healthy individual. Three distinct heart cycles are captured during a 3 secs acquisition. The estimated vector velocities are compared against each other within...

  7. The relative influence of hematocrit and red blood cell velocity on oxygen transport from capillaries to tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücker, Adrien; Secomb, Timothy W; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen transport to parenchymal cells occurs mainly at the microvascular level and depends on convective RBC flux, which is proportional in an individual capillary to the product of capillary hematocrit and RBC velocity. This study investigates the relative influence of these two factors on tissue PO 2 . A simple analytical model is used to quantify the respective influences of hematocrit, RBC velocity, and RBC flow on tissue oxygenation around capillaries. Predicted tissue PO 2 levels are compared with a detailed computational model. Hematocrit is shown to have a larger influence on tissue PO 2 than RBC velocity. The effect of RBC velocity increases with distance from the arterioles. Good agreement between analytical and numerical results is obtained, and the discrepancies are explained. Significant dependence of MTCs on RBC velocity at low hematocrit is demonstrated. For a given RBC flux in a capillary, the PO 2 in the surrounding tissue increases with increasing hematocrit, as a consequence of decreasing IVR to diffusive oxygen transport from RBCs to tissue. These results contribute to understanding the effects of blood flow changes on oxygen transport, such as those that occur in functional hyperemia in the brain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Reduced red blood cell velocity in nail-fold capillaries as a sensitive and specific indicator of microcirculation injury in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Tanaka, Chihiro; Kaji, Kenzo; Komura, Kazuhiro; Ueda-Hayakawa, Ikuko; Horie, Sho; Ikuta, Munehiro; Tachino, Katsuhiko; Ogawa, Fumihide; Sato, Shinichi; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2009-06-01

    To assess red blood cell velocity in finger nail-fold capillaries using video capillaroscopy in patients with SSc and other collagen diseases. This study included 127 patients with SSc as well as patients with SLE (n = 33), DM/PM (n = 21), RA (n = 13) and APS (n = 12), and 20 healthy subjects. Red blood cell velocity was evaluated using frame-to-frame determination of the position of capillary plasma gaps. The mean red blood cell velocity was significantly decreased in patients with SSc compared to healthy controls (63.0% reduction) and patients with other conditions. Mean blood velocity was similar between patients with dcSSc and lcSSc. Importantly, even SSc patients with normal or non-specific nail-fold video capillaroscopic (NVC) patterns or a scleroderma early NVC pattern exhibited a significantly lower red blood cell velocity compared to healthy controls (51.7 and 61.4% reduction, respectively) or patients with other conditions, despite normal or mild capillary changes. Patients with the scleroderma active and late NVC pattern showed a more decreased blood velocity (65.5 and 66.2% reduction, respectively). This reduced blood velocity was significantly associated with NVC findings, including capillary ramification and capillary loss. Although remarkably reduced velocity was observed in SSc patients with intractable digital ulcers (72.1% reduction), it was significantly improved by lipo-prostaglandin E(1) (lipo-PGE(1)) infusion. Our results suggest that reduced blood velocity is a hallmark of SSc. Furthermore, measurement of red blood cell velocity may be useful in evaluating therapeutic effects on microcirculation.

  9. Post-exercise diastolic stunning detected by velocity vector imaging is a useful marker for induced ischemia in ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Koji; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Aikawa, Masaru; Mihara, Hirotsugu; Iguchi, Nobuo; Asano, Ryuta; Umemura, Jun; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya

    2013-06-01

    Recently, post-exercise diastolic stunning (PES) has been reported as a new clinical marker of induced ischemia. Velocity vector imaging (VVI) has been developed to visualize regional wall motion abnormalities based on vectors detected by the tissue tracking technique, which has the potential to visualize PES. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of PES detection by VVI as an objective marker of ischemia compared to stress thallium-201 (Tl-201) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We studied consecutive patients who were scheduled to undergo exercise stress Tl-201 SPECT for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. Transthoracic echocardiography was recorded digitally before and 20 min after exercise for Tl-201 SPECT, and the data were used subsequently for VVI analysis. We defined PES regions as those with new abnormal vectors observed during isovolumic relaxation. After excluding 14 patients with old myocardial infarction and/or atrial fibrillation, echocardiograms suitable for VVI analysis were obtained from 62 of 65 patients (feasibility, 95 %; 44 men; mean age, 64 ± 11 years). SPECT revealed induced ischemia in 20 patients, whereas VVI identified PES in 18 patients. VVI detected inducible ischemia with 85 % sensitivity and 98 % specificity compared to SPECT. VVI detection of PES is a new clinical tool for induced ischemia. Regional diastolic wall motion abnormalities following induced ischemia can be noninvasively detected by VVI.

  10. 3-D MDT with spherical targets by bilinear interpolation for determining blood velocity profiles including the vessel wall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choomphon-anomakhun, Natthaphon; Natenapit, Mayuree

    2018-02-01

    A numerical simulation of three-dimensional (3-D) implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) using ferromagnetic spherical targets, including the effect from the vessel wall on the blood flow, is presented. The targets were implanted within arterioles and subjected to an externally uniform applied magnetic field in order to increase the effectiveness of targeting magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs). The capture area (As) of the MDCPs was determined by inspection of the particle trajectories simulated from the particle equations of motion. The blood flow velocities at any particle position around the target were obtained by applying bilinear interpolation to the numerical blood velocity data. The effects on As of the type of ferromagnetic materials in the targets and MDCPs, average blood flow rates, mass fraction of the ferromagnetic material in the MDCPs, average radii of MDCPs (Rp) and the externally applied magnetic field strength (μ0H0) were evaluated. Furthermore, the appropriate μ0H0 and Rp for the IA-MDT design is suggested. In the case of the SS409 target and magnetite MDCPs, dimensionless capture areas ranging from 4.1- to 12.4 and corresponding to particle capture efficiencies of 31-94% were obtained with Rp ranging from 100- to 500 nm, weight fraction of 80%, μ0H0 of 0.6 T and an average blood flow rate of 0.01 ms-1. In addition, the more general 3-D modelling of IA-MDT in this work is applicable to IA-MDT using spherical targets implanted within blood vessels for both laminar and potential blood flows including the wall effect.

  11. Intraoperative Vector Flow Imaging of the Heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Pedersen, Mads Møller

    2013-01-01

    The cardiac flow is complex and multidirectional, and difficult to measure with conventional Doppler ultrasound (US) methods due to the one-dimensional and angle-dependent velocity estimation. The vector velocity method Transverse Oscillation (TO) has been proposed as a solution to this. TO is im......The cardiac flow is complex and multidirectional, and difficult to measure with conventional Doppler ultrasound (US) methods due to the one-dimensional and angle-dependent velocity estimation. The vector velocity method Transverse Oscillation (TO) has been proposed as a solution to this....... TO is implemented on a conventional US scanner (Pro Focus 2202 UltraView, BK Medical) using a linear transducer (8670, BK Medical) and can provide real-time, angle-independent vector velocity estimates of the cardiac blood flow. During cardiac surgery, epicardiac US examinations using TO were performed on three...

  12. MR velocity mapping measurement of renal artery blood flow in patients with impaired kidney function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, M; Petersen, L.J.; Stahlberg, F

    1996-01-01

    . MR velocity mapping was performed in both renal arteries using an ECG-triggered gradient echo pulse sequence previously validated in normal volunteers. Effective renal plasma flow was calculated from the clearance rate of PAH during constant infusion and the split of renal function was evaluated...... by 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy. A reduction of RBF was found, and there was a significant correlation between PAH clearance multiplied by 1/(1-hematocrit) and RBF determined by MR velocity mapping. Furthermore, a significant correlation between the distribution of renal function and the percent distribution...

  13. Comparison of blood flow velocity through the internal carotid artery based on Doppler ultrasound and numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassani-Ardekani, Hajar; Ghalichi, Farzan; Niroomand-Oscuii, Hanieh; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Tarzmani, Mohammad K.

    2012-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound is a usual non-invasive method to estimate the stenosis percentage in large arteries such as carotid by measuring maximum velocity of blood flow. Based on clinical investigations, because of vessel wall motions, Doppler positioning and angle correction, some errors can arise in Doppler results which lead to incorrect diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the results of Doppler test and the numerical simulation of blood flow in the same case. For this evaluation, two patients including an 87-year-old man and a 72-year-old woman suffering from stenosis in the internal carotid artery were selected. First, clinical information of each patient such as CT-Angio scan images and Doppler ultrasound results on different locations of the stenosed artery were obtained. Then, the geometries were reconstructed and numerical simulations were carried out using ANSYS software. Results showed that the velocity profile of Doppler test and numerical simulation were in good agreement at the regions of pre-and post-stenosis. However, the value of maximum velocity at the stenotic region had significant differences.

  14. Biostable insect kinin analogs reduce blood meal and disrupt ecdysis in the blood-gorging Chagas’ disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodnius prolixus is a blood-gorging hemipteran that takes blood meals that are approximately 10 times its body weight. This blood meal is crucial for growth and development and is needed to ensure a successful molt into the next instar. Kinins are a multifunctional family of neuropeptides which hav...

  15. Towards 3C-3D digital holographic fluid velocity vector field measurement—tomographic digital holographic PIV (Tomo-HPIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, J; Atkinson, C

    2008-01-01

    Most unsteady and/or turbulent flows of geophysical and engineering interest have a highly three-dimensional (3D) complex topology and their experimental investigation is in pressing need of quantitative velocity measurement methods that are robust and can provide instantaneous 3C-3D velocity field data over a significant volumetric domain of the flow. This paper introduces and demonstrates a new method that uses multiple digital CCD array cameras to record in-line digital holograms of the same volume of seed particles from multiple orientations. This technique uses the same basic equipment as Tomo-PIV minus the camera lenses, it overcomes the depth-of-field problem of digital in-line holography and does not require the complex optical calibration of Tomo-PIV. The digital sensors can be oriented in an optimal manner to overcome the depth-of-field limitation of in-line holograms recorded using digital CCD or CMOS array cameras, resulting in a 3D reconstruction of the seed particles within the volume of interest, which can subsequently be analysed using 3D cross-correlation PIV analysis to yield a 3C-3D velocity field. A demonstration experiment of Tomo-HPIV using uniform translation with nominally 11 µm diameter seed particles shows that the 3D displacement derived from 3D cross-correlation Tomo-HPIV analysis can be measured within 5% of the imposed uniform translation, where the imposed uniform translation has an estimated standard uncertainty of 4.3%. So this paper proposes a multi-camera digital holographic imaging 3C-3D PIV method, which is identified as tomographic digital holographic PIV or Tomo-HPIV

  16. Assessment of altered three-dimensional blood characteristics in aortic disease by velocity distribution analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, Julio; Barker, Alex J.; van Ooij, Pim; Schnell, Susanne; Puthumana, Jyothy; Bonow, Robert O.; Collins, Jeremy D.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo test the feasibility of velocity distribution analysis for identifying altered three-dimensional (3D) flow characteristics in patients with aortic disease based on 4D flow MRI volumetric analysis. MethodsForty patients with aortic (Ao) dilation (mid ascending aortic diameter MAA=407 mm,

  17. New type of Sendai virus vector provides transgene-free iPS cells derived from chimpanzee blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumitsu Fujie

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are potentially valuable cell sources for disease models and future therapeutic applications; however, inefficient generation and the presence of integrated transgenes remain as problems limiting their current use. Here, we developed a new Sendai virus vector, TS12KOS, which has improved efficiency, does not integrate into the cellular DNA, and can be easily eliminated. TS12KOS carries KLF4, OCT3/4, and SOX2 in a single vector and can easily generate iPSCs from human blood cells. Using TS12KOS, we established iPSC lines from chimpanzee blood, and used DNA array analysis to show that the global gene-expression pattern of chimpanzee iPSCs is similar to those of human embryonic stem cell and iPSC lines. These results demonstrated that our new vector is useful for generating iPSCs from the blood cells of both human and chimpanzee. In addition, the chimpanzee iPSCs are expected to facilitate unique studies into human physiology and disease.

  18. Increased cerebral blood flow velocity in children with mild sleep-disordered breathing: a possible association with abnormal neuropsychological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Catherine M; Hogan, Alexandra M; Onugha, Nwanneka; Harrison, Dawn; Cooper, Sara; McGrigor, Victoria J; Datta, Avijit; Kirkham, Fenella J

    2006-10-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing describes a spectrum of upper airway obstruction in sleep from simple primary snoring, estimated to affect 10% of preschool children, to the syndrome of obstructive sleep apnea. Emerging evidence has challenged previous assumptions that primary snoring is benign. A recent report identified reduced attention and higher levels of social problems and anxiety/depressive symptoms in snoring children compared with controls. Uncertainty persists regarding clinical thresholds for medical or surgical intervention in sleep-disordered breathing, underlining the need to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition. Adults with sleep-disordered breathing have an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease independent of atherosclerotic risk factors. There has been little focus on cerebrovascular function in children with sleep-disordered breathing, although this would seem an important line of investigation, because studies have identified abnormalities of the systemic vasculature. Raised cerebral blood flow velocities on transcranial Doppler, compatible with raised blood flow and/or vascular narrowing, are associated with neuropsychological deficits in children with sickle cell disease, a condition in which sleep-disordered breathing is common. We hypothesized that there would be cerebral blood flow velocity differences in sleep-disordered breathing children without sickle cell disease that might contribute to the association with neuropsychological deficits. Thirty-one snoring children aged 3 to 7 years were recruited from adenotonsillectomy waiting lists, and 17 control children were identified through a local Sunday school or as siblings of cases. Children with craniofacial abnormalities, neuromuscular disorders, moderate or severe learning disabilities, chronic respiratory/cardiac conditions, or allergic rhinitis were excluded. Severity of sleep-disordered breathing in snoring children was categorized by attended polysomnography. Weight

  19. Differential effects of hyperventilation on cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation during sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinohara, Hiroshi; Kadoi, Yuji; Ide, Masanobu; Kuroda, Masataka; Saito, Shigeru; Mizutani, Akio

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the degree of increase in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation when modulating hyperventilation during orthopedic surgery under sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol anesthesia. Twenty-four patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery were randomly divided into sevoflurane, isoflurane, and propofol groups. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, isoflurane, or propofol administration with 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide at anesthetic drug concentrations adequate to maintain bispectral values between 45 and 50. A 2.0-MHz transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the temporal window, and mean blood flow velocity in the MCA (V (mca)) was continuously measured. The extremity was exsanguinated with an Esmarch bandage, and the pneumatic tourniquet was inflated to a pressure of 450 mmHg. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, V (mca) and arterial blood gases were measured every minute for 10 min after release of the tourniquet in all three groups. Immediately after tourniquet release, the patients' respiratory rates were increased to tightly maintain end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO(2)) at 35 mmHg. No change in partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO(2)) was observed pre- and posttourniquet deflation in any of the three groups. Increase in V (mca) in the isoflurane group was greater than that in the other two groups after tourniquet deflation. In addition, during the study period, no difference in V (mca) after tourniquet deflation was observed between the propofol and sevoflurane groups. Hyperventilation could prevent an increase in V (mca) in the propofol and sevoflurane groups after tourniquet deflation. However, hyperventilation could not prevent an increase in V (mca) in the isoflurane group.

  20. The influence of transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) on human cerebral blood flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Elting, Jan-Willem J.; Fidler, Vaclav; Staal, Michiel J.

    It has been shown that transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) reduces sympathetic tone. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has proven qualities to improve coronary, peripheral, and cerebral blood circulation. Therefore, we postulate that TENS and SCS affect the autonomic nervous system in

  1. The hot-film anemometer--a method for blood velocity determination. II. In vivo comparison with the electromagnetic blood flowmeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, P K

    1980-01-01

    Using a constant temperature hot-film anemometer and an electromagnetic blood flowmeter, volumetric flows and velocity profiles were registered in the pulmonary artery, ascending aorta, abdominal aorta and superior vena cava of mongrel dogs. The anemometer registered in 3 out of 4 dogs in the ascending aorta and in 4 out of 5 dogs in the pulmonary artery. The flow profile in these two vessels was flat with a slight deviation with the highest velocity nearer to the posterior wall. In the abdominal aorta the flow profile was sinusoid and in the superior vena cava irregular. In 22 simultaneous measurements anemometer mean results were 97 +/- 23% (+/- SD) of flowmeter results and peak results correspondingly 113 +/- 23%. None of these differences were significant. It is stressed that both qualitatively and quantitatively hot-film anemometer results are comparable to electromagnetic flowmeter results. However, certain differences have been demonstrated.

  2. Correlation of pulse wave velocity with left ventricular mass in patients with hypertension once blood pressure has been normalized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu H. Chan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vascular stiffness has been proposed as a simple method to assess arterial loading conditions of the heart which induce left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH. There is some controversy as to whether the relationship of vascular stiffness to LVH is independent of blood pressure, and which measurement of arterial stiffness, augmentation index (AI or pulse wave velocity (PWV is best. Carotid pulse wave contor and pulse wave velocity of patients (n=20 with hypertension whose blood pressure (BP was under control (<140/90 mmHg with antihypertensive drug treatment medications, and without valvular heart disease, were measured. Left ventricular mass, calculated from 2D echocardiogram, was adjusted for body size using two different methods: body surface area and height. There was a significant (P<0.05 linear correlation between LV mass index and pulse wave velocity. This was not explained by BP level or lower LV mass in women, as there was no significant difference in PWV according to gender (1140.1+67.8 vs 1110.6+57.7 cm/s. In contrast to PWV, there was no significant correlation between LV mass and AI. In summary, these data suggest that aortic vascular stiffness is an indicator of LV mass even when blood pressure is controlled to less than 140/90 mmHg in hypertensive patients. The data further suggest that PWV is a better proxy or surrogate marker for LV mass than AI and the measurement of PWV may be useful as a rapid and less expensive assessment of the presence of LVH in this patient population.

  3. Deterministic nonlinear characteristics of in vivo blood flow velocity and arteriolar diameter fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthimos, D; Osterloh, K; Pries, A R; Griffith, T M

    2004-01-01

    We have performed a nonlinear analysis of fluctuations in red cell velocity and arteriolar calibre in the mesenteric bed of the anaesthetized rat. Measurements were obtained under control conditions and during local superfusion with N G -nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, 30 μM) and tetrabutylammonium (TBA, 0.1 mM), which suppress NO synthesis and block Ca 2+ activated K + channels (K Ca ), respectively. Time series were analysed by calculating correlation dimensions and largest Lyapunov exponents. Both statistics were higher for red cell velocity than diameter fluctuations, thereby potentially differentiating between global and local mechanisms that regulate microvascular flow. Evidence for underlying nonlinear structure was provided by analysis of surrogate time series generated from the experimental data following randomization of Fourier phase. Complexity indices characterizing time series under control conditions were in general higher than those derived from data obtained during superfusion with L-NNA and TBA

  4. Biostable insect kinin analogs reduce blood meal and disrupt ecdysis in the blood-gorging Chagas' disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Angela B; Nachman, Ronald J; Kaczmarek, Krzysztof; Zabrocki, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    Rhodnius prolixus is a blood-gorging hemipteran that takes blood meals that are approximately 10 times its body weight. This blood meal is crucial for growth and development and is needed to ensure a successful molt into the next instar. Kinins are a multifunctional family of neuropeptides which have been shown to play a role in the control of feeding in a variety of insects. In this study, two biostable Aib-containing kinin analogs were tested to see if they interfere with blood-feeding and subsequent development into the next instar. One of the analogs, 1729 (Ac-R[Aib]FF[Aib]WGa), had no effect on the size of the blood meal or on the subsequent molting of the insect into the next instar. This analog also did not interfere with either short-term or long-term diuresis. The second analog, 1728 ([Aib]FF[Aib]WGa), appeared to be an antifeedant. Insects feeding on blood containing this analog (15μM) only consumed 60% of the blood meal taken by insects fed on blood without analog. Insects feeding on blood containing 1728 had a slower rate of rapid diuresis (diuresis in the first 3-5h after feeding) leading to less urine being excreted by 5days post feeding. The consequence of these effects was that insects fed on 1728 did not molt. This data indicates that the biostable Aib-containing analog 1728 disrupts normal growth and development in the blood-feeding insect, R. prolixus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Seasonal prevalence and blood meal analysis of filarial vector Culex quinquefasciatus in coastal areas of Digha, West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Syed Afrin; Das, Surajit; Chatterjee, Soumendranath

    2015-09-01

    Filariasis is one of the major vector-borne diseases causing serious health problem in the tropics and subtropics. The coastal areas of Digha are known to be a filariasis prone region of West Bengal, India. The filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti is transmitted by Culex quinquefasciatus, the established filarial vector in West Bengal, India. The present work was aimed to determine the abundance of different mosquito species; and the frequency, distribution and blood meal analysis of Cx. quinquefasciatus in coastal areas of Digha. During the present study, a total of 11,537 mosquitoes [Cx. quinquefasciatus, Armigeres subalbatus, Anopheles barbirostris, An. annularis, An. subpictus, An. sundaicus, Aedes albopictus, and Cx. vishnui (group)] were collected by hand collection method from human habitations and cattlesheds of 10 villages of Digha, West Bengal, India. The seasonal prevalence of Cx. quinquefasciatus was studied. In each season, blood meals of 300 Cx. quinquefasciatus collected from human habitations were analysed during the study period. Cx. quinquefasciatus was found to be the dominant species (88.44% of the total collection) in the study area. It was most frequently found in and around human habitations than cattlesheds. Total man hour density calculation revealed that this species was most prevalent during the rainy season. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the abundance of Cx. quinquefasciatus varied with different seasons. Blood meal analysis showed that the filarial vector preferred human blood than that of other animals. This study suggested Cx. quinquefasciatus as the dominant mosquito species in the study area; and the anthropophilic nature of Cx. quinquefasciatus might be the reason of increase in the intensity of filarial transmission in coastal areas of Digha.

  6. Reciprocal Influence of Slow Waves Extracted in Intracranial Pressure, Arterial Pressure and Cerebral Blood Velocity Signals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cervenansky, F

    2001-01-01

    ...), and arterial blood pressure (ABP). To clarify the links, we compared two frequency methods based on coherence function to estimate the influence of ICP, ABP, and CBV on couples, respectively CBV-ABP, ICP-CBV and ICP-ABP, of slow waves...

  7. Intraoperative vascular anatomy, arterial blood flow velocity, and microcirculation in unilateral and bilateral cleft lip repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, A.A.; Schumann, D.; Reddy, R.R.; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K.; Mueller-Gerbl, M.; Zeilhofer, H.F.; Sailer, H.F.; Reddy, S.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cleft lip repair aims to normalize the disturbed anatomy and function. The authors determined whether normalization of blood circulation is achieved. METHODS: The authors measured the microcirculatory flow, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin level in the lip and nose of controls (n = 22)

  8. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during intense static exercise is dominated by a Valsalva maneuver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Frank; van Lieshout, Johannes J.; Ide, Kojiro; Madsen, Per; Secher, Niels H.

    2003-01-01

    Lifting of a heavy weight may lead to "blackout" and occasionally also to cerebral hemorrhage, indicating pronounced consequences for the blood flow through the brain. We hypothesized that especially strenuous respiratory straining (a Valsalva-like maneuver) associated with intense static exercise

  9. A computational model for nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate biotransport in the microcirculation: effect of reduced nitric oxide consumption by red blood cells and blood velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonikar, Prabhakar; Kavdia, Mahendra

    2010-12-01

    Bioavailability of vasoactive endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) in vasculature is a critical factor in regulation of many physiological processes. Consumption of NO by RBC plays a crucial role in maintaining NO bioavailability. Recently, Deonikar and Kavdia (2009b) reported an effective NO-RBC reaction rate constant of 0.2×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) that is ~7 times lower than the commonly used NO-RBC reaction rate constant of 1.4×10(5)M(-1)s(-1). To study the effect of lower NO-RBC reaction rate constant and nitrite and nitrate formation (products of NO metabolism in blood), we developed a 2D mathematical model of NO biotransport in 50 and 200μm ID arterioles to calculate NO concentration in radial and axial directions in the vascular lumen and vascular wall of the arterioles. We also simulated the effect of blood velocity on NO distribution in the arterioles to determine whether NO can be transported to downstream locations in the arteriolar lumen. The results indicate that lowering the NO-RBC reaction rate constant increased the NO concentration in the vascular lumen as well as the vascular wall. Increasing the velocity also led to increase in NO concentration. We predict increased NO concentration gradient along the axial direction with an increase in the velocity. The predicted NO concentration was 281-1163nM in the smooth muscle cell layer for 50μm arteriole over the blood velocity range of 0.5-4cms(-1) for k(NO-RBC) of 0.2×10(5)M(-1)s(-1), which is much higher than the reported values from earlier mathematical modeling studies. The NO concentrations are similar to the experimentally measured vascular wall NO concentration range of 300-1000nM in several different vascular beds. The results are significant from the perspective that the downstream transport of NO is possible under the right circumstances. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kennard-Stone combined with least square support vector machine method for noncontact discriminating human blood species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linna; Li, Gang; Sun, Meixiu; Li, Hongxiao; Wang, Zhennan; Li, Yingxin; Lin, Ling

    2017-11-01

    Identifying whole bloods to be either human or nonhuman is an important responsibility for import-export ports and inspection and quarantine departments. Analytical methods and DNA testing methods are usually destructive. Previous studies demonstrated that visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy method can realize noncontact human and nonhuman blood discrimination. An appropriate method for calibration set selection was very important for a robust quantitative model. In this paper, Random Selection (RS) method and Kennard-Stone (KS) method was applied in selecting samples for calibration set. Moreover, proper stoichiometry method can be greatly beneficial for improving the performance of classification model or quantification model. Partial Least Square Discrimination Analysis (PLSDA) method was commonly used in identification of blood species with spectroscopy methods. Least Square Support Vector Machine (LSSVM) was proved to be perfect for discrimination analysis. In this research, PLSDA method and LSSVM method was used for human blood discrimination. Compared with the results of PLSDA method, this method could enhance the performance of identified models. The overall results convinced that LSSVM method was more feasible for identifying human and animal blood species, and sufficiently demonstrated LSSVM method was a reliable and robust method for human blood identification, and can be more effective and accurate.

  11. Measurement of cardiac valve and aortic blood flow velocities in stroke patients: a comparison of 4D flow MRI and echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrum, Thomas; Guenther, Felix; Fuchs, Alexander; Schuchardt, Florian; Hennemuth, Anja; Harloff, Andreas

    2018-01-11

    4D flow MRI is an emerging technique that allows quantification of 3D blood flow in vivo. However, comparisons with methods of blood velocity quantification used in clinical routine are sparse. Therefore, we compared velocity quantification using 4D flow MRI with transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography at the mitral and aortic valves and the aorta. Forty-eight stroke patients (age 67.3 ± 15.0 years) were examined by 4D flow MRI. Blood flow velocities were assessed using standardized 2D analysis planes positioned in the mitral valve (MV), aortic valve (AV), ascending aorta (AAo), and descending aorta (DAo) and were compared with echocardiography. MRI showed moderate-high correlations of systolic velocity values for the MV (r = 0.67, p flow velocities compared with echocardiography by 8.6% for the MV (p = 0.07), 3.1% for the AV (p = 0.48), 10.7% for the AAo (p = 0.09), and 15.0% for the DAo (p = 0.01). Blood flow velocities obtained using 4D flow MRI and echocardiography at the MV, AV, and the ascending and DAo showed moderate to high correlations. Underestimation of absolute velocity values by MRI was low. Thus, 4D flow MRI seems ideally suited to comprehensively assess cardiac and aortic pathologies and related hemodynamic changes in future studies.

  12. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity and blood flow during exercise and muscle ischemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Perko, M; Hanel, B

    1992-01-01

    Changes in middle cerebral artery flow velocity (Vmean), measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound, were used to determine whether increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) or brain activation enhance cerebral perfusion during exercise. We also evaluated the role of "central command......, they support the hypothesis that cerebral perfusion during exercise reflects an increase in brain activation that is independent of MAP, central command, and muscle metaboreceptors but is likely to depend on influence of mechanoreceptors.......," mechanoreceptors, and/or muscle "metaboreceptors" on cerebral perfusion. Ten healthy subjects performed two levels of dynamic exercise corresponding to a heart rate of 110 (range 89-134) and 148 (129-170) beats/min, respectively, and exhaustive one-legged static knee extension. Measurements were continued during 2...

  13. Facial immersion in cold water enhances cerebral blood velocity during breath-hold exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Pott, Frank C; Secher, Niels H

    2009-01-01

    180-W exercise (from 47 to 53 cm/s), and this increment became larger with facial immersion (76 cm/s, approximately 62%; P brain with a >100% increase in MCA V(mean), largely...... perfusion evaluated as the middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA V(mean)) during exercise in nine male subjects. At rest, a breath hold of maximum duration increased the arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa(CO(2))) from 4.2 to 6.7 kPa and MCA V(mean) from 37 to 103 cm/s (mean; approximately 178%; P...... exercise, a breath hold increased Pa(CO(2)) from 5.9 to 8.2 kPa (P

  14. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Henrik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow, but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP. In this study our aim was to correlate average peak coronary flow velocity (APV to CPP during mechanical CCs. Methods In a closed chest porcine model, cardiac arrest was established through electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in eleven pigs. After one minute, mechanical chest compressions were initiated and then maintained for 10 minutes upon which the pigs were defibrillated. Measurements of coronary blood flow in the left anterior descending artery were made at baseline and during VF with a catheter based Doppler flow fire measuring APV. Furthermore measurements of central (thoracic venous and arterial pressures were also made in order to calculate the theoretical CPP. Results Average peak coronary flow velocity was significantly higher compared to baseline during mechanical chests compressions and this was observed during the entire period of mechanical chest compressions (12 - 39% above baseline. The APV slowly declined during the 10 min period of mechanical chest compressions, but was still higher than baseline at the end of mechanical chest compressions. CPP was simultaneously maintained at > 20 mmHg during the 10 minute episode of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Our study showed good correlation between CPP and APV which was highly significant, during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs in a closed chest porcine model. In addition APV was even higher during mechanical CCs compared to baseline. Mechanical

  15. The product of resting heart rate times blood pressure is associated with high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anxin Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential associations between resting heart rate, blood pressure and the product of both, and the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV as a maker of arterial stiffness. METHODS: The community-based "Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities in Community (APAC Study" examined asymptomatic polyvascular abnormalities in a general Chinese population and included participants with an age of 40+ years without history of stroke and coronary heart disease. Arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV≥1400 cm/s. We measured and calculated the product of resting heart rate and systolic blood pressure (RHR-SBP and the product of resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure (RHR-MAP. RESULTS: The study included 5153 participants with a mean age of 55.1 ± 11.8 years. Mean baPWV was 1586 ± 400 cm/s. Significant (P<0.0001 linear relationships were found between higher baPWV and higher resting heart rate or higher arterial blood pressure, with the highest baPWV observed in individuals from the highest quartiles of resting heart rate and blood pressure. After adjusting for confounding parameters such as age, sex, educational level, body mass index, fasting blood concentrations of glucose, blood lipids and high-sensitive C-reactive protein, smoking status and alcohol consumption, prevalence of arterial stiffness increased significantly (P<0.0001 with increasing RHR-SBP quartile (Odds Ratio (OR: 2.72;95%Confidence interval (CI:1.46,5.08 and increasing RHR-MAP (OR:2.10;95%CI:1.18,3.72. Similar results were obtained in multivariate linear regression analyses with baPWV as continuous variable. CONCLUSIONS: Higher baPWV as a marker of arterial stiffness was associated with a higher product of RHR-SBP and RHR-MAP in multivariate analysis. In addition to other vascular risk factors, higher resting heart rate in combination with higher blood pressure are risk factors for arterial stiffness.

  16. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification of rodent blood meals confirms host sharing by flea vectors of plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Heather A; Stapp, Paul; Cohen, Amybeth

    2010-12-01

    Elucidating feeding relationships between hosts and parasites remains a significant challenge in studies of the ecology of infectious diseases, especially those involving small or cryptic vectors. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are a species of conservation importance in the North American Great Plains whose populations are extirpated by plague, a flea-vectored, bacterial disease. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, we determined that fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta) associated with prairie dogs feed upon northern grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster), a rodent that has been implicated in the transmission and maintenance of plague in prairie-dog colonies. Our results definitively show that grasshopper mice not only share fleas with prairie dogs during plague epizootics, but also provide them with blood meals, offering a mechanism by which the pathogen, Yersinia pestis, may be transmitted between host species and maintained between epizootics. The lack of identifiable host DNA in a significant fraction of engorged Oropsylla hirsuta collected from animals (47%) and prairie-dog burrows (100%) suggests a rapid rate of digestion and feeding that may facilitate disease transmission during epizootics but also complicate efforts to detect feeding on alternative hosts. Combined with other analytical approaches, e.g., stable isotope analysis, molecular genetic techniques can provide novel insights into host-parasite feeding relationships and improve our understanding of the role of alternative hosts in the transmission and maintenance of disease. © 2010 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  17. Identification of salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding in the malaria vector Anopheles campestris-like mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriwatapron Sor-suwan

    Full Text Available Malaria sporozoites must invade the salivary glands of mosquitoes for maturation before transmission to vertebrate hosts. The duration of the sporogonic cycle within the mosquitoes ranges from 10 to 21 days depending on the parasite species and temperature. During blood feeding salivary gland proteins are injected into the vertebrate host, along with malaria sporozoites in the case of an infected mosquito. To identify salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding of female Anopheles campestris-like, a potential malaria vector of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques were used. Results showed that 19 major proteins were significantly depleted in three to four day-old mosquitoes fed on a first blood meal. For the mosquitoes fed the second blood meal on day 14 after the first blood meal, 14 major proteins were significantly decreased in amount. The significantly depleted proteins in both groups included apyrase, 5'-nucleotidase/apyrase, D7, D7-related 1, short form D7r1, gSG6, anti-platelet protein, serine/threonine-protein kinase rio3, putative sil1, cyclophilin A, hypothetical protein Phum_PHUM512530, AGAP007618-PA, and two non-significant hit proteins. To our knowledge, this study presents for the first time the salivary gland proteins that are involved in the second blood feeding on the day corresponding to the transmission period of the sporozoites to new mammalian hosts. This information serves as a basis for future work concerning the possible role of these proteins in the parasite transmission and the physiological processes that occur during the blood feeding.

  18. Identification of salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding in the malaria vector Anopheles campestris-like mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sor-suwan, Sriwatapron; Jariyapan, Narissara; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Paemanee, Atchara; Phumee, Atchara; Phattanawiboon, Benjarat; Intakhan, Nuchpicha; Chanmol, Wetpisit; Bates, Paul A; Saeung, Atiporn; Choochote, Wej

    2014-01-01

    Malaria sporozoites must invade the salivary glands of mosquitoes for maturation before transmission to vertebrate hosts. The duration of the sporogonic cycle within the mosquitoes ranges from 10 to 21 days depending on the parasite species and temperature. During blood feeding salivary gland proteins are injected into the vertebrate host, along with malaria sporozoites in the case of an infected mosquito. To identify salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding of female Anopheles campestris-like, a potential malaria vector of Plasmodium vivax in Thailand, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques were used. Results showed that 19 major proteins were significantly depleted in three to four day-old mosquitoes fed on a first blood meal. For the mosquitoes fed the second blood meal on day 14 after the first blood meal, 14 major proteins were significantly decreased in amount. The significantly depleted proteins in both groups included apyrase, 5'-nucleotidase/apyrase, D7, D7-related 1, short form D7r1, gSG6, anti-platelet protein, serine/threonine-protein kinase rio3, putative sil1, cyclophilin A, hypothetical protein Phum_PHUM512530, AGAP007618-PA, and two non-significant hit proteins. To our knowledge, this study presents for the first time the salivary gland proteins that are involved in the second blood feeding on the day corresponding to the transmission period of the sporozoites to new mammalian hosts. This information serves as a basis for future work concerning the possible role of these proteins in the parasite transmission and the physiological processes that occur during the blood feeding.

  19. Combination probe for optically assisted ultrasonic velocity-change imaging aimed at detecting unstable blood vessel plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Shohei; Mano, Kazune; Wada, Kenji; Matsunaka, Toshiyuki; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2016-04-01

    Blood vessel plaque with a large lipid core is at risk of becoming thrombus and is likely to induce acute heart disease. To prevent this, it is necessary to determine not only the plaque's size but also its chemical composition. We, therefore, made the prototype of a combination probe to diagnose carotid artery plaque. It is used to differentiate propagation characteristics between light spectra and ultrasonic images. By propagating light and ultrasound along a common direction, it is possible to effectively warm the diagnosis domain. Moreover, the probe is thought to be compact and be easy to use for diagnosing human carotid artery plaque. We applied the combination probe to a carotid artery phantom with a lipid area and obtained an image of the ultrasonic velocity change in the fatty area.

  20. Accelerated time-resolved three-dimensional MR velocity mapping of blood flow patterns in the aorta using SENSE and k-t BLAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Riet, Wilma van der; Crelier, Gerard; Salomonowitz, Erich

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and potential limitations of the acceleration techniques SENSE and k-t BLAST for time-resolved three-dimensional (3D) velocity mapping of aortic blood flow. Furthermore, to quantify differences in peak velocity versus heart phase curves. Materials and methods: Time-resolved 3D blood flow patterns were investigated in eleven volunteers and two patients suffering from aortic diseases with accelerated PC-MR sequences either in combination with SENSE (R = 2) or k-t BLAST (6-fold). Both sequences showed similar data acquisition times and hence acceleration efficiency. Flow-field streamlines were calculated and visualized using the GTFlow software tool in order to reconstruct 3D aortic blood flow patterns. Differences between the peak velocities from single-slice PC-MRI experiments using SENSE 2 and k-t BLAST 6 were calculated for the whole cardiac cycle and averaged for all volunteers. Results: Reconstruction of 3D flow patterns in volunteers revealed attenuations in blood flow dynamics for k-t BLAST 6 compared to SENSE 2 in terms of 3D streamlines showing fewer and less distinct vortices and reduction in peak velocity, which is caused by temporal blurring. Solely by time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping in combination with SENSE detected pathologic blood flow patterns in patients with aortic diseases. For volunteers, we found a broadening and flattering of the peak velocity versus heart phase diagram between the two acceleration techniques, which is an evidence for the temporal blurring of the k-t BLAST approach. Conclusion: We demonstrated the feasibility of SENSE and detected potential limitations of k-t BLAST when used for time-resolved 3D velocity mapping. The effects of higher k-t BLAST acceleration factors have to be considered for application in 3D velocity mapping.

  1. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    The main objective of this project was to continue the development of a synthetic aperture vector flow estimator. This type of estimator is capable of overcoming two of the major limitations in conventional ultrasound systems: 1) the inability to scan large region of interest with high temporal......, this thesis showed that novel information can be obtained with vector velocity methods providing quantitative estimates of blood flow and insight into the complexity of the hemodynamics dynamics. This could give the clinician a new tool in assessment and treatment of a broad range of diseases....

  2. Retinal blood vessel segmentation using line operators and support vector classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Elisa; Perfetti, Renzo

    2007-10-01

    In the framework of computer-aided diagnosis of eye diseases, retinal vessel segmentation based on line operators is proposed. A line detector, previously used in mammography, is applied to the green channel of the retinal image. It is based on the evaluation of the average grey level along lines of fixed length passing through the target pixel at different orientations. Two segmentation methods are considered. The first uses the basic line detector whose response is thresholded to obtain unsupervised pixel classification. As a further development, we employ two orthogonal line detectors along with the grey level of the target pixel to construct a feature vector for supervised classification using a support vector machine. The effectiveness of both methods is demonstrated through receiver operating characteristic analysis on two publicly available databases of color fundus images.

  3. Quantification of resting myocardial blood flow velocity in normal humans using real-time contrast echocardiography. A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Siri; Frigstad, Sigmund; Helland, Frode; Oye, Kjetil; Slordahl, Stig; Skjarpe, Terje

    2005-01-01

    Background Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) is a novel method for assessing myocardial perfusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a very low-power real-time MCE for quantification of regional resting myocardial blood flow (MBF) velocity in normal human myocardium. Methods Twenty study subjects with normal left ventricular (LV) wall motion and normal coronary arteries, underwent low-power real-time MCE based on color-coded pulse inversion Doppler. Standard apical LV views were acquired during constant IV. infusion of SonoVue®. Following transient microbubble destruction, the contrast replenishment rate (β), reflecting MBF velocity, was derived by plotting signal intensity vs. time and fitting data to the exponential function; y (t) =A (1-e-β(t-t0)) + C. Results Quantification was feasible in 82%, 49% and 63% of four-chamber, two-chamber and apical long-axis view segments, respectively. The LAD (left anterior descending artery) and RCA (right coronary artery) territories could potentially be evaluated in most, but contrast detection in the LCx (left circumflex artery) bed was poor. Depending on localisation and which frames to be analysed, mean values of were 0.21–0.69 s-1, with higher values in medial than lateral, and in basal compared to apical regions of scan plane (p = 0.03 and p < 0.01). Higher β-values were obtained from end-diastole than end-systole (p < 0.001), values from all-frames analysis lying between. Conclusion Low-power real-time MCE did have the potential to give contrast enhancement for quantification of resting regional MBF velocity. However, the technique is difficult and subjected to several limitations. Significant variability in β suggests that this parameter is best suited for with-in patient changes, comparing values of stress studies to baseline. PMID:15958173

  4. Quantification of resting myocardial blood flow velocity in normal humans using real-time contrast echocardiography. A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slordahl Stig

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE is a novel method for assessing myocardial perfusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a very low-power real-time MCE for quantification of regional resting myocardial blood flow (MBF velocity in normal human myocardium. Methods Twenty study subjects with normal left ventricular (LV wall motion and normal coronary arteries, underwent low-power real-time MCE based on color-coded pulse inversion Doppler. Standard apical LV views were acquired during constant IV. infusion of SonoVue®. Following transient microbubble destruction, the contrast replenishment rate (β, reflecting MBF velocity, was derived by plotting signal intensity vs. time and fitting data to the exponential function; y (t =A (1-e-β(t-t0 + C. Results Quantification was feasible in 82%, 49% and 63% of four-chamber, two-chamber and apical long-axis view segments, respectively. The LAD (left anterior descending artery and RCA (right coronary artery territories could potentially be evaluated in most, but contrast detection in the LCx (left circumflex artery bed was poor. Depending on localisation and which frames to be analysed, mean values of were 0.21–0.69 s-1, with higher values in medial than lateral, and in basal compared to apical regions of scan plane (p = 0.03 and p Conclusion Low-power real-time MCE did have the potential to give contrast enhancement for quantification of resting regional MBF velocity. However, the technique is difficult and subjected to several limitations. Significant variability in β suggests that this parameter is best suited for with-in patient changes, comparing values of stress studies to baseline.

  5. Hunting, swimming, and worshiping: human cultural practices illuminate the blood meal sources of cave dwelling Chagas vectors (Triatoma dimidiata in Guatemala and Belize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Stevens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma dimidiata, currently the major Central American vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease, inhabits caves throughout the region. This research investigates the possibility that cave dwelling T. dimidiata might transmit the parasite to humans and links the blood meal sources of cave vectors to cultural practices that differ among locations.We determined the blood meal sources of twenty-four T. dimidiata collected from two locations in Guatemala and one in Belize where human interactions with the caves differ. Blood meal sources were determined by cloning and sequencing PCR products amplified from DNA extracted from the vector abdomen using primers specific for the vertebrate 12S mitochondrial gene. The blood meal sources were inferred by ≥ 99% identity with published sequences. We found 70% of cave-collected T. dimidiata positive for human DNA. The vectors had fed on 10 additional vertebrates with a variety of relationships to humans, including companion animal (dog, food animals (pig, sheep/goat, wild animals (duck, two bat, two opossum species and commensal animals (mouse, rat. Vectors from all locations fed on humans and commensal animals. The blood meal sources differ among locations, as well as the likelihood of feeding on dog and food animals. Vectors from one location were tested for T. cruzi infection, and 30% (3/10 tested positive, including two positive for human blood meals.Cave dwelling Chagas disease vectors feed on humans and commensal animals as well as dog, food animals and wild animals. Blood meal sources were related to human uses of the caves. We caution that just as T. dimidiata in caves may pose an epidemiological risk, there may be other situations where risk is thought to be minimal, but is not.

  6. The Polar Fluid Model for Blood Flow through a Tapered Artery with Overlapping Stenosis: Effects of Catheter and Velocity Slip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. V. Ramana Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood flow through an overlapping clogged tapered artery in the presence of catheter is discussed. Since cholesterol deposition is resulting in the stenosis formation, velocity slip at the arterial wall is considered. The equations governing the fluid flow have been solved analytically under the assumption of the mild stenosis. The analysis with respect to various parameters arising out of fluid and geometry considered, on physiological parameters such as impedance and wall shear stress at the maximum height of the stenosis as well as across the entire length of the stenosis has been reported. A table summarizing the locations of extreme heights and the corresponding annular radii is provided. It is observed that the wall shear stress is the same at both the locations corresponding to the maximum height of the stenosis in case of nontapered artery while it varies in case of tapered artery. It is also observed that slip velocity and diverging tapered artery facilitate the fluid flow. Shear stress at the wall is increasing as micropolar parameter is decreasing and the trend is reversed in case of coupling number. The results obtained are validated by comparing them with the experimental and theoretical results.

  7. The main sceneries of Chagas disease transmission. The vectors, blood and oral transmissions--a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2015-05-01

    This review deals with transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi by the most important domestic vectors, blood transfusion and oral intake. Among the vectors, Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma brasiliensis, Triatoma pseudomaculata, Triatoma sordida, Triatoma maculata, Panstrongylus geniculatus, Rhodnius ecuadoriensis and Rhodnius pallescens can be highlighted. Transmission of Chagas infection, which has been brought under control in some countries in South and Central America, remains a great challenge, particularly considering that many endemic countries do not have control over blood donors. Even more concerning is the case of non-endemic countries that receive thousands of migrants from endemic areas that carry Chagas disease, such as the United States of America, in North America, Spain, in Europe, Japan, in Asia, and Australia, in Oceania. In the Brazilian Amazon Region, since Shaw et al. (1969) described the first acute cases of the disease caused by oral transmission, hundreds of acute cases of the disease due to oral transmission have been described in that region, which is today considered to be endemic for oral transmission. Several other outbreaks of acute Chagas disease by oral transmission have been described in different states of Brazil and in other South American countries.

  8. Instantaneous center of motion and velocity vector in stifle of dogs undergoing intercondylar notchplasty and articular repair following transection of the cranial cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selmi, A.L.; Padilha Filho, J.G.; Lins, B.T.; Mendes, G.M.; Eimantas, G.C.

    2007-01-01

    The instantaneous center of motion (ICM) and velocity vector (Vv), after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) followed by a fascial strip reconstruction in association with intercondylar notchplasty (IN), were studied in nine adult dogs. The right stifle was submitted to IN followed by fascial strip reconstruction of the CCL (GI) while in the left stifle IN was not performed (GC). Dogs were evaluated the day prior to surgery, immediately after surgery and at 30, 90 and 180 days postoperatively (po), time at which a subgroup of three dogs were euthanatized. The ICM and resulting Vv were determined by radiographic examination of the stifle. All the stifles presented normally positioned ICM and Vv before surgery. No changes were observed in ICM or Vv in all stifles following intra-articular repair, in association or not with IN, throughout the evaluation period, despite the fact that three dogs in GC and two in GI presented a positive cranial drawer sign immediately following surgery, two dogs in GC and GI at 30 days po, and one single dog in each group thereafter until 180 days po. It is concluded that articular repair, in association with IN or not, did not alter stifle biomechanics, in respect to ICM and Vv [pt

  9. Cerebral hemispheric blood flow velocity differences in left- and right- handers: functional trans-cranial Doppler ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikaroodi H

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: It is a well known fact that language functions are primarily related to the left hemisphere in right handed individuals, there is still no agreement about hemispheric language dominance in left handers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the possibility of using functional Transcranial Doppler ultra sonography (TCD, as a non-invasive method for investigation of hemispheric language dominance and also to explore possible gender influence on hemispheric language representation."n"nMethods: We performed functional TCD during a word generation task, in 62 healthy volunteers (30 right handers and 32 left handers, 50% male and 50% female. All subjects were medical students in the age range of 22-29 years. Right or left handedness was determined using Edinburgh questionnaire. Two subjects were excluded from the study because of poor temporal windows. Mean blood flow velocity was measured in both right and left middle cerebral arteries (MCA at rest and during a word generation task, and changes in flow velocities were compared."n"nResults: Increase of MCA blood flow velocity was observed in 55% (33 subjects of the students in the left side, and in 45% (27 subjects of them in the right side. Right hemispheric

  10. Uterine artery dysfunction in pregnant ACE2 knockout mice is associated with placental hypoxia and reduced umbilical blood flow velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaleyeva, Liliya M; Pulgar, Victor M; Lindsey, Sarah H; Yamane, Larissa; Varagic, Jasmina; McGee, Carolynne; daSilva, Mauro; Lopes Bonfa, Paula; Gurley, Susan B; Brosnihan, K Bridget

    2015-07-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) knockout is associated with reduced fetal weight at late gestation; however, whether uteroplacental vascular and/or hemodynamic disturbances underlie this growth-restricted phenotype is unknown. Uterine artery reactivity and flow velocities, umbilical flow velocities, trophoblast invasion, and placental hypoxia were determined in ACE2 knockout (KO) and C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) mice at day 14 of gestation. Although systolic blood pressure was higher in pregnant ACE2 KO vs. WT mice (102.3 ± 5.1 vs. 85.1 ± 1.9 mmHg, n = 5-6), the magnitude of difference was similar to that observed in nonpregnant ACE2 KO vs. WT mice. Maternal urinary protein excretion, serum creatinine, and kidney or heart weights were not different in ACE2 KO vs. WT. Fetal weight and pup-to-placental weight ratio were lower in ACE2 KO vs. WT mice. A higher sensitivity to Ang II [pD2 8.64 ± 0.04 vs. 8.5 ± 0.03 (-log EC50)] and greater maximal contraction to phenylephrine (169.0 ± 9.0 vs. 139.0 ± 7.0% KMAX), were associated with lower immunostaining for Ang II receptor 2 and fibrinoid content of the uterine artery in ACE2 KO mice. Uterine artery flow velocities and trophoblast invasion were similar between study groups. In contrast, umbilical artery peak systolic velocities (60.2 ± 4.5 vs. 75.1 ± 4.5 mm/s) and the resistance index measured using VEVO 2100 ultrasound were lower in the ACE2 KO vs. WT mice. Immunostaining for pimonidazole, a marker of hypoxia, and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α were higher in the trophospongium and placental labyrinth of the ACE2 KO vs. WT. In summary, placental hypoxia and uterine artery dysfunction develop before major growth of the fetus occurs and may explain the fetal growth restricted phenotype. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Reduced arteriovenous shunting capacity after local heating and redistribution of baseline skin blood flow in type 2 diabetes assessed with velocity-resolved quantitative laser Doppler flowmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus; Nyström, Fredrik H; Länne, Toste; Ostgren, Carl J; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-07-01

    To compare the microcirculatory velocity distribution in type 2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects at baseline and after local heating. The skin blood flow response to local heating (44 degrees C for 20 min) was assessed in 28 diabetic patients and 29 control subjects using a new velocity-resolved quantitative laser Doppler flowmetry technique (qLDF). The qLDF estimates erythrocyte (RBC) perfusion (velocity x concentration), in a physiologically relevant unit (grams RBC per 100 g tissue x millimeters per second) in a fixed output volume, separated into three velocity regions: v 10 mm/s. The increased blood flow occurs in vessels with a velocity >1 mm/s. A significantly lower response in qLDF total perfusion was found in diabetic patients than in control subjects after heat provocation because of less high-velocity blood flow (v >10 mm/s). The RBC concentration in diabetic patients increased sevenfold for v between 1 and 10 mm/s, and 15-fold for v >10 mm/s, whereas no significant increase was found for v velocity increased from 0.94 to 7.3 mm/s in diabetic patients and from 0.83 to 9.7 mm/s in control subjects. The perfusion increase occurs in larger shunting vessels and not as an increase in capillary flow. Baseline diabetic patient data indicated a redistribution of flow to higher velocity regions, associated with longer duration of diabetes. A lower perfusion was associated with a higher BMI and a lower toe-to-brachial systolic blood pressure ratio.

  12. Intra-Arterial Delivery of AAV Vectors to the Mouse Brain After Mannitol Mediated Blood Brain Barrier Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, Alejandro; Sondhi, Dolan; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Crystal, Ronald G.; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Ballon, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutics to neural tissue is greatly hindered by the blood brain barrier (BBB). Direct local delivery via diffusive release from degradable implants or direct intra-cerebral injection can bypass the BBB and obtain high concentrations of the therapeutic in the targeted tissue, however the total volume of tissue that can be treated using these techniques is limited. One treatment modality that can potentially access large volumes of neural tissue in a single treatment is intra-arterial (IA) injection after osmotic blood brain barrier disruption. In this technique, the therapeutic of interest is injected directly into the arteries that feed the target tissue after the blood brain barrier has been disrupted by exposure to a hyperosmolar mannitol solution, permitting the transluminal transport of the therapy. In this work we used contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of IA injections in mice to establish parameters that allow for extensive and reproducible BBB disruption. We found that the volume but not the flow rate of the mannitol injection has a significant effect on the degree of disruption. To determine whether the degree of disruption we observed with this method was sufficient for delivery of nanoscale therapeutics, we performed IA injections of an adeno-associated viral vector containing the CLN2 gene (AAVrh.10CLN2), which is mutated in the lysosomal storage disorder Late Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (LINCL). We demonstrated that IA injection of AAVrh.10CLN2 after BBB disruption can achieve widespread transgene production in the mouse brain after a single administration. Further, we showed that there exists a minimum threshold of BBB disruption necessary to permit the AAV.rh10 vector to pass into the brain parenchyma from the vascular system. These results suggest that IA administration may be used to obtain widespread delivery of nanoscale therapeutics throughout the murine brain after a single

  13. In vitro confocal micro-PIV measurements of blood flow in a square microchannel: the effect of the haematocrit on instantaneous velocity profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rui; Wada, Shigeo; Takeda, Motohiro; Tsubota, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2007-01-01

    A confocal microparticle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) system was used to obtain detailed information on the velocity profiles for the flow of pure water (PW) and in vitro blood (haematocrit up to 17%) in a 100-microm-square microchannel. All the measurements were made in the middle plane of the microchannel at a constant flow rate and low Reynolds number (Re=0.025). The averaged ensemble velocity profiles were found to be markedly parabolic for all the working fluids studied. When comparing the instantaneous velocity profiles of the three fluids, our results indicated that the profile shape depended on the haematocrit. Our confocal micro-PIV measurements demonstrate that the root mean square (RMS) values increase with the haematocrit implying that it is important to consider the information provided by the instantaneous velocity fields, even at low Re. The present study also examines the potential effect of the RBCs on the accuracy of the instantaneous velocity measurements.

  14. The Effects of Taekwondo Training on Peripheral Neuroplasticity-Related Growth Factors, Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity, and Cognitive Functions in Healthy Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Youn Cho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although regular Taekwondo (TKD training has been reported to be effective for improving cognitive function in children, the mechanism underlying this improvement remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to observe changes in neuroplasticity-related growth factors in the blood, assess cerebral blood flow velocity, and verify the resulting changes in children’s cognitive function after TKD training. Thirty healthy elementary school students were randomly assigned to control (n = 15 and TKD (n = 15 groups. The TKD training was conducted for 60 min at a rating of perceived exertion (RPE of 11–15, 5 times per week, for 16 weeks. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 levels were measured by blood sampling before and after the training, and the cerebral blood flow velocities (peak systolic [MCAs], end diastolic [MCAd], mean cerebral blood flow velocities [MCAm], and pulsatility index [PI] of the middle cerebral artery (MCA were measured using Doppler ultrasonography. For cognitive function assessment, Stroop Color and Word Tests (Word, Color, and Color-Word were administered along with other measurements. The serum BDNF, VEGF, and IGF-1 levels and the Color-Word test scores among the sub-factors of the Stroop Color and Word Test scores were significantly higher in the TKD group after the intervention (p < 0.05. On the other hand, no statistically significant differences were found in any factors related to cerebral blood flow velocities, or in the Word test and Color test scores (p > 0.05. Thus, 16-week TKD training did not significantly affect cerebral blood flow velocities, but the training may have been effective in increasing children’s cognitive function by inducing an increase in the levels of neuroplasticity-related growth factors.

  15. The impact of low erythrocyte density in human blood on the fitness and energetic reserves of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emami S Noushin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaemia is a common health problem in the developing world. This condition is characterized by a reduction in erythrocyte density, primarily from malnutrition and/or infectious diseases such as malaria. As red blood cells are the primary source of protein for haematophagous mosquitoes, any reduction could impede the ability of mosquito vectors to transmit malaria by influencing their fitness or that of the parasites they transmit. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of differences in the density of red blood cells in human blood on malaria vector (Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto fitness. The hypotheses tested are that mosquito vector energetic reserves and fitness are negatively influenced by reductions in the red cell density of host human blood meals commensurate with those expected from severe anaemia. Methods Mosquitoes (An. gambiae s.s. were offered blood meals of different packed cell volume (PCV of human blood consistent with those arising from severe anaemia (15% and normal PCV (50%. Associations between mosquito energetic reserves (lipid, glucose and glycogen and fitness measures (reproduction and survival and blood meal PCV were investigated. Results The amount of protein that malaria vectors acquired from blood feeding (indexed by haematin excretion was significantly reduced at low blood PCV. However, mosquitoes feeding on blood of low PCV had the same oviposition rates as those feeding on blood of normal PCV, and showed an increase in egg production of around 15%. The long-term survival of An. gambiae s.s was reduced after feeding on low PCV blood, but PCV had no significant impact on the proportion of mosquitoes surviving through the minimal period required to develop and transmit malaria parasites (estimated as 14 days post-blood feeding. The impact of blood PCV on the energetic reserves of mosquitoes was relatively minor. Conclusions These results suggest that feeding on human hosts whose PCV has

  16. Generation of Patient-Specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Sendai Reprogramming Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology has changed preclinical research since their generation was described by Shinya Yamanaka in 2006. iPSCs are derived from somatic cells after being reprogrammed back to an embryonic state by specific combination of reprogramming factors. These reprogrammed cells resemble all the characteristic of embryonic stem cells (ESC). The reprogramming technology is even more valuable to research diseases biology and treatment by opening gene and cell therapies in own patient's iPSC. Patient-specific iPSC can be generated from a large variety of patient cells by any of the myriad of reprogramming platforms described. Here, we describe the generation of patient-specific iPSC from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells by Sendai Reprogramming vectors.

  17. Measurement of the blood flow rate and velocity in coronary artery stenosis using intracoronary frequency domain optical coherence tomography: Validation against fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Haroon; Sharif, Faisal; Leahy, Martin J

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the blood flow rate and velocity in coronary artery stenosis using intracoronary frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). A correlation between fractional flow reserve (FFR) and FD-OCT derived blood flow velocity is also included in this study. A total of 20 coronary stenoses in 15 patients were assessed consecutively by quantitative coronary angiography (QCA), FFR and FD-OCT. A percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) optimization system was used in this study which combines wireless FFR measurement and FD-OCT imaging in one platform. Stenoses were labelled severe if FFR ≤ 0.8. Blood flow rate and velocity in each stenosis segment were derived from the volumetric analysis of the FD-OCT pull back images. The FFR value was ≤ 0.80 in 5 stenoses (25%). The mean blood flow rate in severe coronary stenosis ( n  = 5) was 2.54 ± 0.55 ml/s as compared to 4.81 ± 1.95 ml/s in stenosis with FFR > 0.8 ( n  = 15). A good and significant correlation between FFR and FD-OCT blood flow velocity in coronary artery stenosis ( r  = 0.74, p  < 0.001) was found. The assessment of stenosis severity using FD-OCT derived blood flow rate and velocity has the ability to overcome many limitations of QCA and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS).

  18. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2-M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists.

  19. A method for the identification of guinea pig blood meal in the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Lucero, David; Stevens, Lori

    2007-01-01

    Background In a SINE-based PCR assay, a primer set specific for guinea pig genome short interspersed elements DNA was used to test the utility of genomic markers for identifying the source of vertebrate blood meals of Triatoma infestans. Methods The investigation consisted of two assays. In Assay 1, thirty-six insects, collected from the Province of Zudáñez in Chuquisaca, Bolivia were frozen 1–40 hours after feeding, under controlled conditions, on guinea pigs. The species of the vertebrate host was confirmed from dissection of the posterior part of the abdomen of each insect followed by DNA extraction and PCR amplification. Assay 2 investigated whether the technique worked under field conditions. We analyzed the bloodmeal of 34 insects collected from households and peri-domestic structures from communities where wild and captive guinea pigs occur. After collection, the insects were maintained at room temperature for 2 months without feeding and then analyzed. Results In Assay 1, each of the 36 insects allowed to feed on guinea pig blood tested positive for guinea pig DNA. The guinea pig DNA was reliably identified in as little as 1 hour and up to 40 hours after feeding. For Assay 2, 8 out of the 34 samples (23%) showed positive results with guinea pig specific primers. Conclusion The results in assay 1 demonstrated that DNA from the vertebrate host can be amplified 1–40 hours post feeding from the abdomen of the blood-feeding Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans. The results in assay 2 confirmed that the procedure works on insects collected from households and peri-domestic structures and that the source of a blood meal can be determined at least 2 months post feeding. PMID:17222347

  20. Doppler study of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity and cerebral autoregulation during a simulated ascent of Mount Everest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Minassian, A; Beydon, L; Ursino, M; Gardette, B; Gortan, C; Richalet, J P

    2001-01-01

    To explore cerebral hemodynamics in 8 healthy volunteers in a hypobaric chamber up to the altitude of Mount Everest after a progressive stepwise decompression to 8,848 m. Physiological, clinical, and transcranial Doppler data were collected after at least 3 days at 5,000, 6,000, and 7,000 m and within 4 hours of reaching 8,000 m and returning to sea level. Three subjects were excluded at 8,000 and 8,848 m because of acute neurological deficits. Heart rate increased; mean arterial pressure remained stable; PaO2 and PaCO2 decreased with altitude; hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Ht) increased; arterial O2 content decreased over 6,000 m; middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv) increased only during acute exposure to 8,000 m; and the corresponding pulsatility (PI) and resistivity indices (RI) decreased over 5,000 m. PI and RI correlated with heart rate. The transient hyperemic response (THR) of MCAv to common carotid compression was depressed at 8,000 m. At 8,000 m, the increase in MCAv seemed to reflect the normal hemodynamic response to acute hypoxia. The decrease of THR at this altitude could be an indication of impaired cerebral autoregulation. The role of impaired cerebral autoregulation in the genesis of acute neurologic deficits, observed at 8,000 m and above in 3 subjects, remains speculative.

  1. A Highly Similar Mathematical Model for Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Qi; Wang, Jisheng; Xiang, Hu; Ge, Hong; Wang, Hui; Xie, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity(CBFV) is an important parameter for study of cerebral hemodynamics. However, a simple and highly similar mathematical model has not yet been established for analyzing CBFV. To alleviate this issue, through TCD examination in 100 geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease (46 males and 54 females), we established a representative eighth-order Fourier function Vx(t) that simulates the CBFV. The measured TCD waveforms were compared to those derived from Vx(t), an illustrative Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was employed to determine the validity. The results showed that the TCD waves could been reconstructed for patients with different CBFVs by implementing their variable heart rates and the formulated maximum/minimum of Vx(t). Comparisons between derived and measured TCD waveforms suggest that the two waveforms are very similar. The results confirm that CBFV can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function. This function Vx(t) can be used extensively for a prospective study of cerebral hemodynamics in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease.

  2. The association of 25(OH)D with blood pressure, pulse pressure and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in African women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, I.M.; Kruger, M.C.; Doak, C.M.; Schutte, A.E.; Huisman, H.W.; van Rooyen, J.M.; Schutte, R.; Malan, L.; Malan, N.T.; Fourie, C.M.; Kruger, A.

    2013-01-01

    High susceptibility of the African population to develop cardiovascular disease obliges us to investigate possible contributing risk factors. Our aim was to determine whether low 25(OH)D status is associated with increased blood pressure and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in black South African

  3. Oral Levosimendan Increases Cerebral Blood Flow Velocities in Patients with a History of Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: A Pilot Safety Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Kivikko, MD, PhD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Oral levosimendan increases cerebral blood flow velocities and diminishes NT-pro-BNP levels in patients with earlier ischemic cerebrovascular event. Daily doses up to 1.0 mg were well tolerated, whereas the 2.0 mg dose level induced an increase in ventricular extrasystoles. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00698763.

  4. Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography for imaging blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, YH; Chen, ZP; Saxer, CE; Xiang, SH; de Boer, JF; Nelson, JS

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a novel phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that uses phase information derived from a Hilbert transformation to image blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity. Using the phase change

  5. Blood flow velocity is reduced in a tumor micro-dissemination in the visceral pleura in anesthetized open-chest rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Iguchi, Kesato; Ito, Hiromichi; Ookawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Nakamura, Ryota; Goto, Yukinobu; Sakai, Mitsuaki; Ishikawa, Shigemi; Onizuka, Masataka

    2009-01-01

    Recently we developed a method to observe pulmonary micrometastasis by labeling cancer cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP). We applied the method for observation of micro-dissemination on the visceral pleura. RCN9 rat colon cancer cells labeled with GFP were injected into the pleural cavity of Fischer F344 rats. Six weeks after injection, the chest wall was resected under general anesthesia and the lung surface was observed by real-time confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Blood flow was visualized by intravenous injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled red blood cells, by which blood flow velocity was measured. Dissemination was created in 4 out of 5 rats. Fifteen sites of micro-dissemination were observed (mean diameter, 35.8+/-13.3 microm). Blood flow velocity was 114.1+/-26.1 microm/s in the tumor tissue and 183.4+/-35.0 microm/s out of the tumor tissue. We were able to observe pleural micro-dissemination. Blood flow velocity was significantly lower in the tumor tissue.

  6. Determination of the foraging behaviour and blood meal source of malaria vector mosquitoes in Trincomalee District of Sri Lanka using a multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunathilaka, Nayana; Denipitiya, Thanuja; Hapugoda, Menaka; Abeyewickreme, Wimaladharma; Wickremasinghe, Rajitha

    2016-04-26

    Studies of host preference patterns in blood-feeding anopheline mosquitoes are crucial to incriminating malaria vectors. However, little information is available on host preferences of Anopheles mosquitoes in Sri Lanka. Adult Anopheles mosquitoes were collected from five selected sentinel sites in Trincomalee District during June-September 2011. Each blood-fed mosquito was processed on filter papers. DNA was extracted using the dried blood meal protocol of the QIAmp DNA mini kit. A multiplexed, real-time PCR assay targeting eight animals was developed for two panels to identify the host meal of Anopheles. Human blood index (HBI), forage ratio (FR) and host feeding index (HFI) were calculated. A total of 280 field-caught, freshly engorged female mosquitoes belonging to 12 anopheline species were analysed. The overall HBI and HFI in the present study were low indicating that humans were not the preferred host for the tested anopheline species. Nevertheless, a small proportion engorged Anopheles aconitus, Anopheles culicifacies, Anopheles barbirostris, Anopheles annularis, Anopheles subpictus, Anopheles peditaeniatus, Anopheles pseudojamesi, and Anopheles barbumbrosus contained human blood. The presence of human blood in mosquito species indicates the possibility of them transmitting malaria. Further studies on vector competence are needed to determine the role of each of the above anopheline species as efficient vectors of malaria.

  7. Relationship of CHA2DS2-VASc and CHADS2 score to left atrial remodeling detected by velocity vector imaging in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihui Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The CHADS2/CHA2DS2-VASc scores are used to predict thrombo-embolic/stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF. Nevertheless, limited data are available regarding the association between these risk stratification for stroke and left atrial (LA remodeling status of AF patients. The purpose of this study was to explore the association between these scores and LA remodeling status assessed quantificationally by echocardiography in AF patients. METHODS: One hundred AF patients were divided into 3 groups based on the CHA2DS2-VASc/CHADS2 score: the score of 0 (low stroke risk, the score of 1 (moderate stroke risk and the score of ≥2 (high stroke risk. All patients were performed through conventional and velocity vector imaging echocardiography. Echocardiographic parameters: maximum LA volume index (LAVImax, LA total emptying fraction (LAEFt and LA mean strain were obtained to assess quantificationally LA remodeling status. RESULTS: On categorizing with CHA2DS2-VASc, the score of 1 group showed augment in LAVImax and attenuation in LA mean strain derived from VVI, compared with the score of 0 group (LAVImax: 40.27±21.91 vs. 26.79±7.87, p=0.002; LA mean strain: 15.18±6.36 vs. 22±8.54, p=0.001. On categorizing with the CHADS2 score, similar trends were seen between the score of ≥2 and 1 groups (LAVImax: 43.72±13.77 vs. 31.41±9.50, p<0.001; LA mean strain: 11.01±5.31 vs. 18.63±7.00, p<0.001. With multivariate logistic regression, LAVImax (odds ratio: 0.92 , 95% C=I: 0.85 to 0.98, p= 0.01 and LA mean strain reflecting LA remodeling (odds ratio: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.19, p=0.01 were strongly predictive of the CHA2DS2-VASc score of 0. CONCLUSIONS: The superiority of the CHADS2 score may lay in identifying LA remodeling of AF patients with high stroke risk. Whereas, the CHA2DS2-VASc score was better than the CHADS2 score at identifying LA remodeling of AF patients presenting low stroke risk.

  8. The Effects of Taekwondo Training on Peripheral Neuroplasticity-Related Growth Factors, Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity, and Cognitive Functions in Healthy Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Su-Youn; So, Wi-Young; Roh, Hee-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Although regular Taekwondo (TKD) training has been reported to be effective for improving cognitive function in children, the mechanism underlying this improvement remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to observe changes in neuroplasticity-related growth factors in the blood, assess cerebral blood flow velocity, and verify the resulting changes in children’s cognitive function after TKD training. Thirty healthy elementary school students were randomly assigned to control (n = 15) and TKD (n = 15) groups. The TKD training was conducted for 60 min at a rating of perceived exertion (RPE) of 11–15, 5 times per week, for 16 weeks. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels were measured by blood sampling before and after the training, and the cerebral blood flow velocities (peak systolic [MCAs], end diastolic [MCAd], mean cerebral blood flow velocities [MCAm], and pulsatility index [PI]) of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were measured using Doppler ultrasonography. For cognitive function assessment, Stroop Color and Word Tests (Word, Color, and Color-Word) were administered along with other measurements. The serum BDNF, VEGF, and IGF-1 levels and the Color-Word test scores among the sub-factors of the Stroop Color and Word Test scores were significantly higher in the TKD group after the intervention (p 0.05). Thus, 16-week TKD training did not significantly affect cerebral blood flow velocities, but the training may have been effective in increasing children’s cognitive function by inducing an increase in the levels of neuroplasticity-related growth factors. PMID:28441325

  9. Malaria vectors and their blood-meal sources in an area of high bed net ownership in the western Kenya highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndenga, Bryson A; Mulaya, Nicholas L; Musaki, Sandra K; Shiroko, Joan N; Dongus, Stefan; Fillinger, Ulrike

    2016-02-09

    Blood-meal sources of malaria vectors affect their capacity to transmit the disease. Most efficient malaria vectors prefer human hosts. However, with increasing personal protection measures it becomes more difficult for them to find human hosts. Here recent malaria vector blood-meal sources in western Kenya highlands were investigated. Adult mosquitoes resting indoors, outdoors and exiting through windows were collected in three study areas within the western Kenya highlands from June 2011 to June 2013. A census of people, livestock and of insecticide-treated nets was done per house. Mosquito blood-meal sources were determined as human, goat, bovine or chicken using enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays. Most (86.3 %) households possessed at least one bed net, 57.2 % had domesticated animals and 83.6 % had people sharing houses with livestock at night. Most (94.9 %) unfed malaria vectors were caught exiting through windows. Overall, 53.1 % of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto obtained blood-meals from humans, 26.5 % from goats and 18.4 % from bovines. Single blood-meal sources by An. gambiae s.s. from humans were 26.5 %, 8.2 % from bovines and 2.0 % from goats. Mixed blood-meal sources by An. gambiae s.s. identified included: 24.5 % human/goat, 10.2 % human/bovine, 8.2 % human/bovine/goat and also 8.2 % bovine/goat. One An. arabiensis mosquito obtained blood-meal only from humans. An unusually high frequency of animal and mixed human-animal blood meals in the major malaria vector An. gambiae s.s. was revealed in the western Kenya highlands where bed net coverage is above the WHO target. The shift in blood-meal sources from humans to livestock is most likely the vectors' response to increased bed net coverage and the close location of livestock frequently in the same house as people at night. Livestock-targeted interventions should be considered under these circumstances to address residual malaria transmission.

  10. The effect of adding CO2 to hypoxic inspired gas on cerebral blood flow velocity and breathing during incremental exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Lin Fan

    Full Text Available Hypoxia increases the ventilatory response to exercise, which leads to hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia and subsequent reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF. We studied the effects of adding CO2 to a hypoxic inspired gas on CBF during heavy exercise in an altitude naïve population. We hypothesized that augmented inspired CO2 and hypoxia would exert synergistic effects on increasing CBF during exercise, which would improve exercise capacity compared to hypocapnic hypoxia. We also examined the responsiveness of CO2 and O2 chemoreception on the regulation ventilation ([Formula: see text]E during incremental exercise. We measured middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv; index of CBF, [Formula: see text]E, end-tidal PCO2, respiratory compensation threshold (RC and ventilatory response to exercise ([Formula: see text]E slope in ten healthy men during incremental cycling to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.10 with and without augmenting the fraction of inspired CO2 (FICO2. During exercise in normoxia, augmenting FICO2 elevated MCAv throughout exercise and lowered both RC onset and[Formula: see text]E slope below RC (P0.05. The [Formula: see text]E slope above RC was unchanged with either hypoxia or augmented FICO2 (P>0.05. We found augmenting FICO2 increased CBF during sub-maximal exercise in normoxia, but not in hypoxia, indicating that the 'normal' cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia is blunted during exercise in hypoxia, possibly due to an exhaustion of cerebral vasodilatory reserve. This finding may explain the lack of improvement of exercise capacity in hypoxia with augmented CO2. Our data further indicate that, during exercise below RC, chemoreception is responsive, while above RC the ventilatory response to CO2 is blunted.

  11. A New Method for Forensic DNA Analysis of the Blood Meal in Chagas Disease Vectors Demonstrated Using Triatoma infestans from Chuquisaca, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Background Feeding patterns of the vector are important in the epidemiology of Chagas disease, the leading cause of heart disease in Latin America. Chagas disease is caused by the parasite, Trypanasoma cruzi, which is transmitted by blood feeding insects. Historically, feeding behaviours of haematophagous insects have been investigated using serological reactions, which have detection limits in terms of both taxonomic resolution, and quantity and quality of the blood meal. They are labor intensive, require technical expertise, need fresh or frozen samples and antibodies often are either not available commercially or the resources for synthesis and purification are not available. We describe an assay to identify vertebrate blood meal sources, and the parasite T. cruzi using species-specific PCR assays from insect vectors and use the method to provide information regarding three questions: (1) Do domestic and peri-domestic (chicken coop and animal corral) habitats vary in the blood meals detected in the vectors? (2) What is the pattern of multiple blood meals? (3) Does the rate of T. cruzi infection vary among habitats and is it associated with specific blood meal types? Methodology/Principal Findings Assays based on the polymerase chain reaction were evaluated for identification of the blood meal source in the heamatophagous Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans. We evaluate a technique to identify 11 potential vertebrate food sources from the complex mixture extracted from the vector's abdomen. We tested the assay on 81 T. infestans specimens collected from the Andean highlands in the department of Chuquisaca, located in central Bolivia, one of the regions in South America where sylvatic T. infestans have been reported. This area is suggested to be the geographic origin of T. infestans and has very high human infection rates that may be related to sylvatic vector populations. Conclusion/Significance The results of the assays revealed that a high percentage of

  12. A new method for forensic DNA analysis of the blood meal in chagas disease vectors demonstrated using Triatoma infestans from Chuquisaca, Bolivia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Pizarro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Feeding patterns of the vector are important in the epidemiology of Chagas disease, the leading cause of heart disease in Latin America. Chagas disease is caused by the parasite, Trypanasoma cruzi, which is transmitted by blood feeding insects. Historically, feeding behaviours of haematophagous insects have been investigated using serological reactions, which have detection limits in terms of both taxonomic resolution, and quantity and quality of the blood meal. They are labor intensive, require technical expertise, need fresh or frozen samples and antibodies often are either not available commercially or the resources for synthesis and purification are not available. We describe an assay to identify vertebrate blood meal sources, and the parasite T. cruzi using species-specific PCR assays from insect vectors and use the method to provide information regarding three questions: (1 Do domestic and peri-domestic (chicken coop and animal corral habitats vary in the blood meals detected in the vectors? (2 What is the pattern of multiple blood meals? (3 Does the rate of T. cruzi infection vary among habitats and is it associated with specific blood meal types? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Assays based on the polymerase chain reaction were evaluated for identification of the blood meal source in the heamatophagous Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans. We evaluate a technique to identify 11 potential vertebrate food sources from the complex mixture extracted from the vector's abdomen. We tested the assay on 81 T. infestans specimens collected from the Andean highlands in the department of Chuquisaca, located in central Bolivia, one of the regions in South America where sylvatic T. infestans have been reported. This area is suggested to be the geographic origin of T. infestans and has very high human infection rates that may be related to sylvatic vector populations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the assays revealed that a

  13. The United States Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Study: evidence for vector-borne transmission of the parasite that causes Chagas disease among United States blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Paul T; Stramer, Susan L; Townsend, Rebecca L; Kamel, Hany; Ofafa, Karen; Todd, Charles W; Currier, Mary; Hand, Sheryl; Varnado, Wendy; Dotson, Ellen; Hall, Chris; Jett, Pamela L; Montgomery, Susan P

    2012-09-01

    Screening US blood donors for Trypanosoma cruzi infection is identifying autochthonous, chronic infections. Two donors in Mississippi were identified through screening and investigated as probable domestically acquired vector-borne infections, and the US T. cruzi Infection Study was conducted to evaluate the burden of and describe putative risk factors for vector-borne infection in the United States. Blood donors who tested enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay repeat reactive and positive by radioimmunoprecipitation assay, and whose mode of infection could not be identified, were evaluated with a questionnaire to identify possible sources of infection and by additional serologic and hemoculture testing for T. cruzi infection. Of 54 eligible donors, 37 (69%) enrolled in the study. Fifteen (41%) enrollees had four or more positive serologic tests and were considered positive for T. cruzi infection; one was hemoculture positive. Of the 15, three (20%) donors had visited a rural area of an endemic country, although none had stayed for 2 or more weeks. All had lived in a state with documented T. cruzi vector(s) or infected mammalian reservoir(s), 13 (87%) reported outdoor leisure or work activities, and 11 (73%) reported seeing wild reservoir animals on their property. This report adds 16 cases, including one from the Mississippi investigation, of chronic T. cruzi infection presumably acquired via vector-borne transmission in the United States to the previously reported seven cases. The estimated prevalence of autochthonous infections based on this study is 1 in 354,000 donors. Determining US foci of vector-borne transmission is needed to better assess risk for infection. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  14. "Cognitive activity" monitored by non-invasive measurement of cerebral blood flow velocity and its application to the investigation of cerebral dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, H S; Boland, M

    1992-12-01

    We have developed a method of non-invasively detecting language lateralisation by measuring the increase in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity occurring during a word association task, using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. All exclusively right handed subjects (N = 12) showed a relative increase in left sided flow velocity during the task; mean rise was 4.04% on the left, and -0.03% on the right (p 5%) in left, compared with right, hemisphere flow velocity, and three showing only small differences between left and right sides, possibly reflecting bilateral language representation. This technique offers potential not only in studying patterns of cerebral dominance, but also in studying cognitive responses to other stimuli.

  15. The effect of adding CO2 to hypoxic inspired gas on cerebral blood flow velocity and breathing during incremental exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jui-Lin; Kayser, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the ventilatory response to exercise, which leads to hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia and subsequent reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF). We studied the effects of adding CO2 to a hypoxic inspired gas on CBF during heavy exercise in an altitude naïve population. We hypothesized that augmented inspired CO2 and hypoxia would exert synergistic effects on increasing CBF during exercise, which would improve exercise capacity compared to hypocapnic hypoxia. We also examined the responsiveness of CO2 and O2 chemoreception on the regulation ventilation ([Formula: see text]E) during incremental exercise. We measured middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv; index of CBF), [Formula: see text]E, end-tidal PCO2, respiratory compensation threshold (RC) and ventilatory response to exercise ([Formula: see text]E slope) in ten healthy men during incremental cycling to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FIO2 = 0.10) with and without augmenting the fraction of inspired CO2 (FICO2). During exercise in normoxia, augmenting FICO2 elevated MCAv throughout exercise and lowered both RC onset and[Formula: see text]E slope below RC (Phypoxia, MCAv and [Formula: see text]E slope below RC during exercise were elevated, while the onset of RC occurred at lower exercise intensity (Phypoxia increased [Formula: see text]E at RC (PE slope below RC (P>0.05). The [Formula: see text]E slope above RC was unchanged with either hypoxia or augmented FICO2 (P>0.05). We found augmenting FICO2 increased CBF during sub-maximal exercise in normoxia, but not in hypoxia, indicating that the 'normal' cerebrovascular response to hypercapnia is blunted during exercise in hypoxia, possibly due to an exhaustion of cerebral vasodilatory reserve. This finding may explain the lack of improvement of exercise capacity in hypoxia with augmented CO2. Our data further indicate that, during exercise below RC, chemoreception is responsive, while above RC the ventilatory response to CO2 is blunted.

  16. Molecular detection of vector-borne pathogens in blood and splenic samples from dogs with splenic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movilla, Rebeca; Altet, Laura; Serrano, Lorena; Tabar, María-Dolores; Roura, Xavier

    2017-03-13

    The spleen is a highly perfused organ involved in the immunological control and elimination of vector-borne pathogens (VBP), which could have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of splenic disease. This study aimed to evaluate certain VBP in samples from dogs with splenic lesions. Seventy-seven EDTA-blood and 64 splenic tissue samples were collected from 78 dogs with splenic disease in a Mediterranean area. Babesia spp., Bartonella spp., Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp., Hepatozoon canis, Leishmania infantum, hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. and Rickettsia spp. were targeted using PCR assays. Sixty EDTA-blood samples from dogs without evidence of splenic lesions were included as a control group. More than half (51.56%) of the biopsies (33/64) were consistent with benign lesions and 48.43% (31/64) with malignancy, mostly hemangiosarcoma (25/31). PCR yielded positive results in 13 dogs with spleen alterations (16.67%), for Babesia canis (n = 3), Babesia gibsoni (n = 2), hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. (n = 2), Rickettsia massiliae (n = 1) and "Babesia vulpes" (n = 1), in blood; and for B. canis, B. gibsoni, Ehrlichia canis and L. infantum (n = 1 each), in spleen. Two control dogs (3.3%) were positive for B. gibsoni and H. canis (n = 1 each). Benign lesions were detected in the 61.54% of infected dogs (8/13); the remaining 38.46% were diagnosed with malignancies (5/13). Infection was significantly associated to the presence of splenic disease (P = 0.013). There was no difference in the prevalence of infection between dogs with benign and malignant splenic lesions (P = 0.69); however B. canis was more prevalent in dogs with hemangiosarcoma (P = 0.006). VBP infection could be involved in the pathogenesis of splenic disease. The immunological role of the spleen could predispose to alterations of this organ in infected dogs. Interestingly, all dogs with B. canis infection were diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma in the present survey. As previously

  17. The effect of a single blood meal on the phenotypic expression of insecticide resistance in the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coetzee Maureen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles funestus is a major malaria vector in southern Africa. Vector control relies on the use of insecticide chemicals to significantly reduce the number of malaria vectors by targeting that portion of the female population that takes blood meals and subsequently rests indoors. It has been suggested that the intake of a blood meal may assist female mosquitoes to tolerate higher doses of insecticide through vigour tolerance. It is hypothesized that during the process of blood digestion, detoxification mechanisms required for the neutralizing of harmful components in the blood meal may also confer an increased ability to tolerate insecticide intoxication through increased enzyme regulation. Methods Bottle bioassays using a range of concentrations of the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin were performed on pyrethroid susceptible and resistant laboratory strains of An. funestus in order to detect differences in insecticide susceptibility following a single blood meal. Based on these results, a discriminating dosage was identified (double the lowest dosage that resulted in 100% mortality of the susceptible strain. Blood-fed and unfed females drawn from the resistant strain of An. funestus were then assayed against this discriminating dose, and the percentage mortality for each sample was scored and compared. Results In the insecticide dose response assays neither the fully susceptible nor the resistant strain of An. funestus showed any significant difference in insecticide susceptibility following a blood meal, regardless of the stage of blood meal digestion. A significant increase in the level of resistance was however detected in the resistant An. funestus strain following a single blood meal, based on exposure to a discriminating dose of permethrin. Conclusion The fully susceptible An. funestus strain did not show any significant alteration in susceptibility to insecticide following a blood meal suggesting that vigour

  18. The effect of a single blood meal on the phenotypic expression of insecticide resistance in the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillings, Belinda L; Coetzee, Maureen; Koekemoer, Lizette L; Brooke, Basil D

    2008-01-01

    Background Anopheles funestus is a major malaria vector in southern Africa. Vector control relies on the use of insecticide chemicals to significantly reduce the number of malaria vectors by targeting that portion of the female population that takes blood meals and subsequently rests indoors. It has been suggested that the intake of a blood meal may assist female mosquitoes to tolerate higher doses of insecticide through vigour tolerance. It is hypothesized that during the process of blood digestion, detoxification mechanisms required for the neutralizing of harmful components in the blood meal may also confer an increased ability to tolerate insecticide intoxication through increased enzyme regulation. Methods Bottle bioassays using a range of concentrations of the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin were performed on pyrethroid susceptible and resistant laboratory strains of An. funestus in order to detect differences in insecticide susceptibility following a single blood meal. Based on these results, a discriminating dosage was identified (double the lowest dosage that resulted in 100% mortality of the susceptible strain). Blood-fed and unfed females drawn from the resistant strain of An. funestus were then assayed against this discriminating dose, and the percentage mortality for each sample was scored and compared. Results In the insecticide dose response assays neither the fully susceptible nor the resistant strain of An. funestus showed any significant difference in insecticide susceptibility following a blood meal, regardless of the stage of blood meal digestion. A significant increase in the level of resistance was however detected in the resistant An. funestus strain following a single blood meal, based on exposure to a discriminating dose of permethrin. Conclusion The fully susceptible An. funestus strain did not show any significant alteration in susceptibility to insecticide following a blood meal suggesting that vigour tolerance through increased body

  19. Response to Blood Meal in the Fat Body of Anopheles stephensi Using Quantitative Proteomics: Toward New Vector Control Strategies Against Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Mohanty, Ajeet Kumar; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi K; Dey, Gourav; Advani, Jayshree; Pinto, Sneha M; Kumar, Ashwani; Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya Keshava

    2017-09-01

    Malaria remains a grand challenge for disruptive innovation in global health therapeutics and diagnostics. Anopheles stephensi is one of the major vectors of malaria in Asia. Vector and transmission control are key focus areas in the fight against malaria, a field of postgenomics research where proteomics can play a substantive role. Moreover, to identify novel strategies to control the vector population, it is necessary to understand the vector life processes at a global and molecular scale. In this context, fat body is a vital organ required for vitellogenesis, vector immunity, vector physiology, and vector-parasite interaction. Given its central role in energy metabolism, vitellogenesis, and immune function, the proteome profile of the fat body and the impact of blood meal (BM) ingestion on the protein abundances of this vital organ have not been investigated so far. Therefore, using a proteomics approach, we identified the proteins expressed in the fat body of An. stephensi and their differential expression in response to BM ingestion. In all, we identified 3,218 proteins in the fat body using high-resolution mass spectrometry, of which 483 were found to be differentially expressed in response to the BM ingestion. Bioinformatics analysis of these proteins underscored their role in amino acid metabolism, vitellogenesis, lipid transport, signal peptide processing, mosquito immunity, and oxidation-reduction processes. Interestingly, we identified five novel genes, which were found to be differentially expressed upon BM ingestion. Proteins that exhibited altered expression in the present study are potential targets for vector control strategies and development of transmission blocking vaccines in the fight against malaria.

  20. Synoptic Monthly Gridded WOD Absolute Geostrophic Velocity (SMG-WOD-V) (January 1945 - December 2014) with the P-Vector Method (NCEI Accession 0146195)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SMG-WOD-V dataset comprises synoptic monthly global gridded fields of absolute geostrophic velocity inverted from the synoptic monthly gridded WOD temperature...

  1. Absolute Geostrophic Velocity Inverted from the Polar Science Center Hydrographic Climatology (PHC3.0) of the Arctic Ocean with the P-Vector Method (NCEI Accession 0156425)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset (called PHC-V) comprises 3D gridded climatological fields of absolute geostrophic velocity of the Arctic Ocean inverted from the Polar science center...

  2. Preliminary evidence for reduced preoperative cerebral blood flow velocity as a risk factor for cognitive decline three months after cardiac surgery: an extension study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerotti Benvenuti, S; Zanatta, P; Valfrè, C; Polesel, E; Palomba, D

    2012-11-01

    This extension study investigated the association between preoperative cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity and postoperative cognitive decline (POCD) at a three-month follow-up in patients who underwent cardiac surgery. Continuous transcranial Doppler ultrasound on both middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) was used preoperatively in 31 right-handed cardiac surgery patients at rest. Each patient performed a neuropsychological evaluation to assess cognitive performance before surgery, at discharge and at three-month follow-up. Patients with POCD at the three-month follow-up had a marginally significantly lower preoperative CBF velocity in the left MCA than patients without POCD. Moreover, the group with POCD had a significantly lower CBF velocity in the left than in the right MCA, whereas no difference between the left and right CBF velocity was found in the group without POCD. These preliminary findings suggest that reduced preoperative CBF velocity in the left MCA may represent an independent risk factor for cognitive decline in patients three months after surgery.

  3. Microwave Ablation Using Four-Tine Antenna: Effects of Blood Flow Velocity, Vessel Location, and Total Displacement on Porous Hepatic Cancer Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montree Chaichanyut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is concerned with microwave ablation analyses using a 2.45 GHz four-tine (4T antenna for hepatic cancer tissue. In the study, three-dimensional finite-element models were utilized to examine the tissue temperature distributions during and after MW ablation. A preliminary study was first carried out with regard to the specific absorption rates along the 4T antenna insertion depths and the temperature distributions inside the solid and porous liver models with either 3 cm-in-diameter tumor or 5 cm-in-diameter tumor. Based on the preliminary results, the porous models were further examined for the effect of varying blood flow velocities (0–200 cm/s with a 1 cm-in-diameter blood vessel next to the antenna and also for the effect of vessel-antenna locations (0, 0.8, and 1.3 cm with a constant blood flow velocity of 16.7 cm/s. All scenarios were simulated under temperature-controlled mode (90°C. The findings revealed that the blood flow velocity and vessel location influence the ablation effectiveness and that increased blood flow inhibits heat transfer to the vessel wall. At the nearest and farthest vessel-antenna locations (0 and 1.3 cm, approximately 90.3% and 99.55% of the cancer cells were eradicated except for the areas adjacent to the vessel. In addition, total tissue thermal displacement is 5.9 mm which is 6.59% of the total length of the overall model.

  4. Rotations with Rodrigues' vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, E

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears to be a fundamental matrix that is used to express the components of the angular velocity, the rotation matrix and the angular momentum vector. The Hamiltonian formalism of rotational dynamics in terms of this vector uses the same matrix. The quantization of the rotational dynamics is performed with simple rules if one uses Rodrigues' vector and similar formal expressions for the quantum operators that mimic the Hamiltonian classical dynamics.

  5. Abdominal aorta: characterisation of blood flow and measurement of its regional distribution by cine magnetic resonance phase-shift velocity mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amanuma, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Saitama Medical School (Japan); Mohiaddin, R.H. [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hasegawa, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Saitama Medical School (Japan); Heshiki, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Saitama Medical School (Japan); Longmore, D.B. [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1992-12-01

    Magnetic resonance phase-shift-induced velocity mapping is a powerful technique for measuring in vivo blood velocity and flow non-invasively. Using this method we examined dimensions, distensibility, blood flow and its regional distribution in the abdominal aorta in 10 normal volunteers. Data were acquired at three levels of the descending aorta. Thirty percent reduction in diastolic cross sectional area was observed in the caudal direction between these levels. Total blood flow (ml/min) in the abdominal aorta at the three sites was 4094{+-}1600, 2339{+-}910 and 1602{+-}549 respectively. Flows in the coeliac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and renal arteries were also calculated. The net flow in the abdominal aorta above the coeliac trunk was persistently forward, while there was considerable backflow (13% of total instantaneous flow) below the renal arteries during early diastole. Magnetic resonance imaging is a non-invasive technique for quantitative assessment of blood flow in the abdominal aorta and its main branches. (orig.)

  6. Open loop control of an induction motor's velocity using PWM with space vectors; Control en lazo abierto de la velocidad de un motor de induccion utilizando PWM con vectores espaciales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Lopez, Manuel

    2001-10-15

    This work describes the design and implementation of an open loop speed controller for an induction motor. This controller is based on a DSP TMS320F240 chip from Texas Instruments. Speed control is achieved by maintaining the magnetic flux constant through the regularization of stator voltage/frequency relationship. Voltage and frequency variation are achieved using the strategy of pulse width modulation with space vectors. Hardware design is presented (current source and the printed circuit for the intelligent power module) and the software (control algorithms and the modulation strategy using space vectors). The algorithms given were implement using the TMS320F240 language. [Spanish] Este trabajo describe el diseno y la implementacion de un control de la velocidad en lazo abierto de un motor de induccion, basado en el DSP TMS320F240 de Texas Instruments. El control de la velocidad se logra manteniendo el flujo en el entre hierro constante, lo cual es realizado al regular el valor de la relacion voltaje/frecuencia en el estator. La variacion del voltaje y la frecuencia se realiza utilizando la estrategia de modulacion del ancho de los pulsos con vectores espaciales. Se presenta el diseno de los circuitos (fuente de corriente continua y circuito impreso para el modulo inteligente de potencia) y de los programas (algoritmos de control y de la estrategia de modulacion con vectores espaciales) necesarios que se utilizaron durante la implementacion del accionamiento del motor. Los algoritmos dados fueron implementados en el lenguaje ensamblador del TMS320F240.

  7. Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae as a potential West Nile virus vector in Tucson, Arizona: Blood meal analysis indicates feeding on both humans and birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Zinser

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Most reports from the United States suggest Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes feed minimally on humans. Given the abundance of C. quinquefasciatus in residential Tucson and parts of metropolitan Phoenix, and the arrival of West Nile virus to this area, discovering the blood meal hosts of the local population is important. Using a sandwich ELISA technique, the local C. quinquefasciatus were found to feed on both humans and birds. This suggests they should be considered potential West Nile virus vectors.

  8. Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) as a potential West Nile virus vector in Tucson, Arizona: Blood meal analysis indicates feeding on both humans and birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Margaret; Ramberg, Frank; Willott, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Most reports from the United States suggest Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes feed minimally on humans. Given the abundance of C. quinquefasciatus in residential Tucson and parts of metropolitan Phoenix, and the arrival of West Nile virus to this area, discovering the blood meal hosts of the local population is important. Using a sandwich ELISA technique, the local C. quinquefasciatus were found to feed on both humans and birds. This suggests they should be considered potential West Nile virus vectors. PMID:15861236

  9. The midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus (Larroussius) perniciosus, a vector of Leishmania infantum: comparison of sugar fed and blood fed sand flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostálová, Anna; Votýpka, Jan; Favreau, Amanda J; Barbian, Kent D; Volf, Petr; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Jochim, Ryan C

    2011-05-10

    Parasite-vector interactions are fundamental in the transmission of vector-borne diseases such as leishmaniasis. Leishmania development in the vector sand fly is confined to the digestive tract, where sand fly midgut molecules interact with the parasites. In this work we sequenced and analyzed two midgut-specific cDNA libraries from sugar fed and blood fed female Phlebotomus perniciosus and compared the transcript expression profiles. A total of 4111 high quality sequences were obtained from the two libraries and assembled into 370 contigs and 1085 singletons. Molecules with putative roles in blood meal digestion, peritrophic matrix formation, immunity and response to oxidative stress were identified, including proteins that were not previously reported in sand flies. These molecules were evaluated relative to other published sand fly transcripts. Comparative analysis of the two libraries revealed transcripts differentially expressed in response to blood feeding. Molecules up regulated by blood feeding include a putative peritrophin (PperPer1), two chymotrypsin-like proteins (PperChym1 and PperChym2), a putative trypsin (PperTryp3) and four putative microvillar proteins (PperMVP1, 2, 4 and 5). Additionally, several transcripts were more abundant in the sugar fed midgut, such as two putative trypsins (PperTryp1 and PperTryp2), a chymotrypsin (PperChym3) and a microvillar protein (PperMVP3). We performed a detailed temporal expression profile analysis of the putative trypsin transcripts using qPCR and confirmed the expression of blood-induced and blood-repressed trypsins. Trypsin expression was measured in Leishmania infantum-infected and uninfected sand flies, which identified the L. infantum-induced down regulation of PperTryp3 at 24 hours post-blood meal. This midgut tissue-specific transcriptome provides insight into the molecules expressed in the midgut of P. perniciosus, an important vector of visceral leishmaniasis in the Old World. Through the comparative

  10. A segmented K-space velocity mapping protocol for quantification of renal artery blood flow during breath-holding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Cortsen, M; Söndergaard, L

    1995-01-01

    Two important prerequisites for MR velocity mapping of pulsatile motion are synchronization of the sequence execution to the time course of the flow pattern and robustness toward loss of signal in complex flow fields. Synchronization is normally accomplished by using either prospective ECG...... the segmented k-space technique, in which the entire data acquisition can be made within a breath-hold by the sampling of several phase-encoding lines within a small time window during each heart cycle. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of a segmented k-space velocity mapping protocol...

  11. Intracranial Blood-Flow Velocity and Pressure Measurements Using an Intra-Arterial Dual-Sensor Guidewire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferns, S. P.; Schneiders, J. J.; Siebes, M.; van den Berg, R.; van Bavel, E. T.; Majoie, C. B.

    2010-01-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a role in the growth and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. In 4 patients, we obtained local pressure and BFV by using a dual-sensor pressure and Doppler velocity wire within and in vessels surrounding unruptured aneurysms. Local BFVs can serve as boundary conditions

  12. Changes in inferior vena cava blood flow velocity and diameter during breathing movements in the human fetus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Huisman (T.); S. van den Eijnde (Stefan); P.A. Stewart (Patricia); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractBreathing movements in the human fetus cause distinct changes in Doppler flow velocity measurements at arterial, venous and cardiac levels. In adults, breathing movements result in a momentary inspiratory collapse of the inferior vena cava vessel wall. The study objective was to quantify

  13. Parasite load in the blood and skin of dogs naturally infected by Leishmania infantum is correlated with their capacity to infect sand fly vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Lairton Souza; Sousa, Orlando Marcos Farias de; Solcà, Manuela da Silva; Bastos, Leila Andrade; Bordoni, Marcelo; Magalhães, Jairo Torres; Larangeira, Daniela Farias; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Fraga, Deborah Bittencourt Mothé; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2016-10-15

    The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is primarily responsible for the transmission of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the New World, and dogs are considered to be the main urban reservoir of this disease. In order to improve the efficacy of control measures, it is essential to assess the transmission capacity of Leishmania infantum to the sand fly vector by naturally infected dogs. The present study investigated the existence of correlations between canine clinical presentation and the intensity of parasite load in the blood, skin and spleen of naturally infected dogs. In addition, we also attempted to establish correlations between the intensity of parasite load in canine tissue and the parasite load detected in sandflies five days after feeding on naturally infected dogs. A total of 23 dogs were examined and classified according to clinical manifestation of canine VL. Blood samples, splenic aspirate and skin biopsies were collected and parasite DNA was quantified by qPCR. Canine capacity to infect Lu. longipalpis with parasites was evaluated by xenodiagnosis and parasite loads were measured five days after feeding. No significant differences were observed with respect to canine clinical manifestation and the parasite loads detected in the blood, skin and spleen samples obtained from naturally infected dogs. Regardless of clinical canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) presentation and the degree of parasite burden, almost half of the dogs successfully infected sandflies with parasites, albeit to a low number of sandflies with correspondingly low parasite loads. Parasite loads in both canine blood and skin were shown to be positively correlated with the canine infectiousness to the sand fly vector, and positive correlations were also observed with respect to these tissues and the sand fly infection rate, as well as the parasite load detected in sandflies following xenodiagnosis. In conclusion, this indicates that parasite loads in both blood and skin can function as

  14. The effect of multiple blood-feeding on the longevity and insecticide resistant phenotype in the major malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Shüné V; Brooke, Basil D

    2014-08-23

    Anopheles arabiensis is a major malaria vector in Africa. Adult females are likely to imbibe multiple blood meals during their lifetime. This results in regular exposure to potential toxins and blood-meal induced oxidative stress. Defence responses to these stressors may affect other factors of epidemiological significance, such as insecticide resistance and longevity. The aims of this study were to examine the effect of multiple blood-feeding on insecticide tolerance/resistance with increasing age, to assess the underlying biochemical mechanisms for the responses recorded, and to assess the effect of multiple blood-feeding on the life histories of adult females drawn from insecticide resistant and susceptible laboratory reared An. arabiensis. Laboratory reared An. arabiensis females from an insecticide resistant and an insecticide susceptible colony were offered either a single blood meal or multiple blood meals at 3-day intervals. Their tolerance or resistance to insecticide was then monitored by WHO bioassay four hours post blood-feeding. The biochemical basis of the phenotypic response was assessed by examining the effect of blood on detoxification enzyme activity and the effect of blood-meals on detoxification enzyme activity in ageing mosquitoes. Control cohorts that were not offered any blood meals showed steadily decreasing levels of insecticide tolerance/resistance with age, whereas a single blood meal significantly increased tolerance/resistance primarily at the age of three days. The expression of resistance/tolerance in those cohorts fed multiple blood meals generally showed the least variation with age. These results were consistent following exposure to DDT and pyrethroids but not to malathion. Multiple blood-meals also maintained the DDT and permethrin resistant phenotype, even after treatment females had stopped taking blood-meals. Biochemical analysis suggests that this phenotypic effect in resistant females may be mediated by the maintenance of

  15. [Efficacy of Modified Acupuncture Method at Renying (ST 9) for Patients with Cervical Spondylosis of Vertebral Artery Type and Its Impact on Velocity of Cervical Blood Flow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xing-Hua; Ma, Chao-Yang; Tang, Lei; Wan, Wen-Jun; Wang, Yan-Fu; Xu, Fen; Zhao, Shun-Yu

    2017-04-25

    To observe the clinical efficacy of modified acupuncture at Renying point (ST 9) for patients with cervical spondylosis of vertebral artery type and its influence on velocity of cervical blood flow. Fifty-nine cases of vertebral artery type cervical spondylosis were randomly divided into control group ( n =30) and treatment group ( n =29). Both groups were acupunctured at ST 9, with routine acupuncture technique used in the control group and modified technique in the treatment group, respectively. All cases received two courses of treatment, each course covered consecutive 6 once-per-day treatments. Before and after treatment, transcranial Doppler (TCD) was used to measure the systolic peak blood flow velocity (Vs) of left vertebral artery (LVA), right vertebral artery (RVA) and basilar artery (BA), and the scores of "cervical vertigo symptoms and functional assessment scale" (CVSFAS) were also assessed, separately. CVSFAS scoring, Vs of LVA, RVA and BA after treatment showed significant improvement compared with those before treatment ( P spondylosis of vertebral artery type via increasing the Vs of vertebral-basilar artery, improving the local blood circulation and relieving pain.

  16. Synchronized Measurements of Maximum Blood Flow Velocities in Carotid, Brachial and Femoral Arteries, and ECG in Human Posture Changes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirao, Y

    2001-01-01

    ...., sitting to standing and standing to sitting) using an ultrasonic Doppler technique. The ultrasonic Doppler technique can measure the dynamics of blood flow in arteries that exist deep within the human body...

  17. 3-D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon

    ultrasonic vector flow estimation and bring it a step closer to a clinical application. A method for high frame rate 3-D vector flow estimation in a plane using the transverse oscillation method combined with a 1024 channel 2-D matrix array is presented. The proposed method is validated both through phantom...... studies and in vivo. Phantom measurements are compared with their corresponding reference value, whereas the in vivo measurement is validated against the current golden standard for non-invasive blood velocity estimates, based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The study concludes, that a high precision...... are introduced with the array. The major disadvantage with an RC transducer, is the limited field-of-view, which is restricted to the forward looking array. It is discussed, that this drawback may be solved with a diverging lens, providing a larger field-of-view, due the the dispersion of the energy. Based...

  18. Blood-feeding patterns of native mosquitoes and insights into their potential role as pathogen vectors in the Thames estuary region of the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugman, V A; Hernández-Triana, L M; England, M E; Medlock, J M; Mertens, P P C; Logan, J G; Wilson, A J; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N; Carpenter, S

    2017-03-27

    The range of vertebrate hosts on which species of mosquito blood-feed is an important parameter for identifying potential vectors and in assessing the risk of incursion and establishment of vector-borne pathogens. In the United Kingdom, studies of mosquito host range have collected relatively few specimens and used techniques that could only broadly identify host species. This study conducted intensive collection and analysis of mosquitoes from a grazing marsh environment in southeast England. This site provides extensive wetland habitat for resident and migratory birds and has abundant human nuisance biting mosquitoes. The aim was to identify the blood-feeding patterns of mosquito species present at the site which could contribute to the transmission of pathogens. Twice-weekly collections of mosquitoes were made from Elmley Nature Reserve, Kent, between June and October 2014. Mosquitoes were collected using resting boxes, by aspiration from man-made structures and using a Mosquito Magnet Pro baited with 1-octen-3-ol. Blood-fed specimens were classified according to the degree of blood meal digestion using the Sella scale and vertebrate origin determined using sequencing of a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I gene. Mosquitoes that were morphologically cryptic were identified to species level using multiplex PCR and sequencing methods. A total of 20,666 mosquitoes of 11 species were collected, and 2,159 (10.4%) were blood-fed (Sella scale II-VI); of these 1,341 blood-fed specimens were selected for blood meal analysis. Vertebrate origin was successfully identified in 964 specimens (72%). Collections of blood-fed individuals were dominated by Anopheles maculipennis complex (73.5%), Culiseta annulata (21.2%) and Culex pipiens form pipiens (10.4%). Nineteen vertebrate hosts comprising five mammals and 14 birds were identified as hosts for mosquitoes, including two migratory bird species. Feeding on birds by Culex modestus and Anopheles

  19. Dogs with hearth diseases causing turbulent high-velocity blood flow have changes in patelet function and von Willebrand factor multimer distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier

    2005-01-01

    and echocardiography were performed in all dogs. PFA100 closure times (the ability of platelets to occlude a hole in a membrane at high shear rates), platelet activation markers (plasma thromboxane B2 concentration, platelet surface P-selectin expression), platelet aggregation (in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma......The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate platelet function using in vitro tests based on both high and low shear rates and von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimeric composition in dogs with cardiac disease and turbulent high-velocity blood flow. Client-owned asymptomatic, untreated...... with MVP (regardless of MR status) compared with control dogs. No significant difference in platelet activation markers was found among groups. The data suggest that a form of platelet dysfunction detected at high shear rates was present in dogs with MR and SAS, possibly associated with a qualitative v...

  20. Dogs with hearth diseases causing turbulent high-velocity blood flow have changes in patelet function and von Willebrand factor multimer distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate platelet function using in vitro tests based on both high and low shear rates and von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimeric composition in dogs with cardiac disease and turbulent high-velocity blood flow. Client-owned asymptomatic, untreated...... dogs were divided into 4 groups: 14 Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (Cavaliers) with mitral valve prolapse (MVP) and no or minimal mitral regurgitation (MR), 17 Cavaliers with MVP and moderate to severe MR, 14 control dogs, and 10 dogs with subaortic stenosis (SAS). Clinical examinations...... and echocardiography were performed in all dogs. PFA100 closure times (the ability of platelets to occlude a hole in a membrane at high shear rates), platelet activation markers (plasma thromboxane B2 concentration, platelet surface P-selectin expression), platelet aggregation (in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma...

  1. Vector Flow Imaging Compared with Conventional Doppler Ultrasound and Thermodilution for Estimation of Blood Flow in the Ascending Aorta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    (constant and pulsatile) estimation. The correlation coefficients for all flowrig evaluations were 0.99 indicating systematic bias. After bias correction, the percentage error was reduced to 11.5%, 12.6% and 15.9% for velocity and flow rate (constant and pulsatile) estimation. In the in vivo setup, TO, TEE......, after correction for the systematic bias found in the flowrig. TO is a reliable and precise method for velocity and flow rate estimation on a flowrig. However, TO with the present setup, is not interchangeable with PACTD for cardiac volume flow estimation, but is a reliable and precise angle......-independent ultrasound alternative for velocity estimation of cardiac flow....

  2. HOBOE (Head-of-Bed Optimization of Elevation) Study: association of higher angle with reduced cerebral blood flow velocity in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Abigail Jade; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Quain, Debbie; Parsons, Mark W; Levi, Christopher R

    2011-10-01

    Cerebral autoregulation can be impaired after ischemic stroke, with potential adverse effects on cerebral blood flow during early rehabilitation. The objective of this study was to assess changes in cerebral blood flow velocity with orthostatic variation at 24 hours after stroke. This investigation was an observational study comparing mean flow velocities (MFVs) at 30, 15, and 0 degrees of elevation of the head of the bed (HOB). Eight participants underwent bilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) transcranial Doppler monitoring during orthostatic variation at 24 hours after ischemic stroke. Computed tomography angiography separated participants into recanalized (artery completely reopened) and incompletely recanalized groups. Friedman tests were used to determine MFVs at the various HOB angles. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the change in MFV (from 30° to 0°) between groups and between hemispheres within groups. For stroke-affected MCAs in the incompletely recanalized group, MFVs differed at the various HOB angles (30°: median MFV=51.5 cm/s, interquartile range [IQR]=33.0 to 103.8; 15°: median MFV=55.5 cm/s, IQR=34.0 to 117.5; 0°: median MFV=85.0 cm/s, IQR=58.8 to 127.0); there were no significant differences for other MCAs. For stroke-affected MCAs in the incompletely recanalized group, MFVs increased with a change in the HOB angle from 30 degrees to 0 degrees by a median of 26.0 cm/s (IQR=21.3 to 35.3); there were no significant changes in the recanalized group (-3.5 cm/s, IQR=-12.3 to 0.8). The changes in MFV with a change in the HOB angle from 30 degrees to 0 degrees differed between hemispheres in the incompletely recanalized group but not in the recanalized group. Generalizability was limited by sample size. The incompletely recanalized group showed changes in MFVs at various HOB angles, suggesting that cerebral blood flow in this group may be sensitive to orthostatic variation, whereas the recanalized group maintained stable blood flow

  3. Reference values of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity according to age and blood pressure in a central Asia population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiming, Gulinuer; Zhou, Xianhui; Lv, Wenkui; Peng, Yi; Zhang, Wenhui; Cheng, Xinchun; Li, Yaodong; Xing, Qiang; Zhang, Jianghua; Zhou, Qina; Zhang, Ling; Lu, Yanmei; Wang, Hongli; Tang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a direct measure of aortic stiffness, has increasingly become an important assessment for cardiovascular risk. The present study established the reference and normal values of baPWV in a Central Asia population in Xinjiang, China. We recruited participants from a central Asia population in Xinjiang, China. We performed multiple regression analysis to investigate the determinants of baPWV. The median and 10th-90th percentiles were calculated to establish the reference and normal values based on these categories. In total, 5,757 Han participants aged 15-88 years were included in the present study. Spearman correlation analysis showed that age (r = 0.587, p Central Asia population.

  4. High-resolution melting (HRM of the cytochrome B gene: a powerful approach to identify blood-meal sources in Chagas disease Vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H Peña

    Full Text Available Methods to determine blood-meal sources of hematophagous Triatominae bugs (Chagas disease vectors are serological or based on PCR employing species-specific primers or heteroduplex analysis, but these are expensive, inaccurate, or problematic when the insect has fed on more than one species. To solve those problems, we developed a technique based on HRM analysis of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome B (Cyt b. This technique recognized 14 species involved in several ecoepidemiological cycles of the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi and it was suitable with DNA extracted from intestinal content and feces 30 days after feeding, revealing a resolution power that can display mixed feedings. Field samples were analyzed showing blood meal sources corresponding to domestic, peridomiciliary and sylvatic cycles. The technique only requires a single pair of primers that amplify the Cyt b gene in vertebrates and no other standardization, making it quick, easy, relatively inexpensive, and highly accurate.

  5. High-Resolution Melting (HRM) of the Cytochrome B Gene: A Powerful Approach to Identify Blood-Meal Sources in Chagas Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Victor H.; Fernández, Geysson J.; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés M.; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M.; Cantillo, Omar; Triana-Chávez, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Methods to determine blood-meal sources of hematophagous Triatominae bugs (Chagas disease vectors) are serological or based on PCR employing species-specific primers or heteroduplex analysis, but these are expensive, inaccurate, or problematic when the insect has fed on more than one species. To solve those problems, we developed a technique based on HRM analysis of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome B (Cyt b). This technique recognized 14 species involved in several ecoepidemiological cycles of the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi and it was suitable with DNA extracted from intestinal content and feces 30 days after feeding, revealing a resolution power that can display mixed feedings. Field samples were analyzed showing blood meal sources corresponding to domestic, peridomiciliary and sylvatic cycles. The technique only requires a single pair of primers that amplify the Cyt b gene in vertebrates and no other standardization, making it quick, easy, relatively inexpensive, and highly accurate. PMID:22389739

  6. Pulse Wave Velocity as Marker of Preclinical Arterial Disease: Reference Levels in a Uruguayan Population Considering Wave Detection Algorithms, Path Lengths, Aging, and Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Farro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV has emerged as the gold standard for non-invasive evaluation of aortic stiffness; absence of standardized methodologies of study and lack of normal and reference values have limited a wider clinical implementation. This work was carried out in a Uruguayan (South American population in order to characterize normal, reference, and threshold levels of PWV considering normal age-related changes in PWV and the prevailing blood pressure level during the study. A conservative approach was used, and we excluded symptomatic subjects; subjects with history of cardiovascular (CV disease, diabetes mellitus or renal failure; subjects with traditional CV risk factors (other than age and gender; asymptomatic subjects with atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries; patients taking anti-hypertensives or lipid-lowering medications. The included subjects (n=429 were categorized according to the age decade and the blood pressure levels (at study time. All subjects represented the “reference population”; the group of subjects with optimal/normal blood pressures levels at study time represented the “normal population.” Results. Normal and reference PWV levels were obtained. Differences in PWV levels and aging-associated changes were obtained. The obtained data could be used to define vascular aging and abnormal or disease-related arterial changes.

  7. Time course of changes in cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation in patients with diabetes mellitus or previous stroke under sevoflurane anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinohara, Hiroshi; Kadoi, Yuji; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kawauchi, Chikara; Mizutani, Akio

    2011-06-01

    We observed an increase in mean middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (V(mca)) after tourniquet deflation during orthopedic surgery under sevoflurane anesthesia in patients with diabetes mellitus or previous stroke. Eight controls, seven insulin-treated diabetic patients, and eight previous stroke patients were studied. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, V(mca), arterial blood gases, and plasma lactate levels were measured every minute for 10 min after tourniquet release in all patients. V(mca) was measured using a transcranial Doppler probe. V(mca) in all three groups increased after tourniquet deflation, the increase lasting for 4 or 5 min. However, the degree of increase in V(mca) in the diabetic patients was smaller than that in the other two groups after tourniquet deflation (at 2 min after tourniquet deflation: control 58.5 ± 3.3, previous stroke 58.4 ± 4.6, diabetes 51.7 ± 2.3; P < 0.05 compared with the other two groups). In conclusion, the degree of increase in V (mca) in diabetic patients is smaller than that in controls and patients with previous stroke.

  8. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Pflugradt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG. Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations’ vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway.

  9. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geissdoerfer, Kai; Goernig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations’ vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway. PMID:28098831

  10. Influence of upper body position on middle cerebral artery blood velocity during continuous positive airway pressure breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund Rasmussen, J; Mantoni, T; Belhage, B

    2007-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a treatment modality for pulmonary oxygenation difficulties. CPAP impairs venous return to the heart and, in turn, affects cerebral blood flow (CBF) and augments cerebral blood volume (CBV). We considered that during CPAP, elevation of the upper body...... in 11 healthy subjects during CPAP at different body positions (15 degrees head-down tilt, supine, 15 degrees, 30 degrees and 45 degrees upper body elevation). In the supine position, 10 cmH(2)O of CPAP reduced MCA V(mean) by 9 +/- 3% and increased cHbT by 4 +/- 2 micromol/L (mean +/- SEM); (P ....05). In the head-down position, CPAP increased cHbT to 13 +/- 2 micromol/L but left MCA V(mean) unchanged. Upper body elevation by 15 degrees attenuated the CPAP associated reduction in MCA V(mean) (-7 +/- 2%), while cHbT returned to baseline (1 +/- 2 micromol/L). With larger elevation of the upper body MCA V...

  11. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W.; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity

  12. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Mans, Ben J. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort 0110 (South Africa); Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F., E-mail: jandersen@niaid.nih.gov [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  13. Glytube: a conical tube and parafilm M-based method as a simplified device to artificially blood-feed the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Costa-da-Silva

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue virus, requires a blood meal to produce eggs. Although live animals are still the main blood source for laboratory colonies, many artificial feeders are available. These feeders are also the best method for experimental oral infection of Ae. aegypti with Dengue viruses. However, most of them are expensive or laborious to construct. Based on principle of Rutledge-type feeder, a conventional conical tube, glycerol and Parafilm-M were used to develop a simple in-house feeder device. The blood feeding efficiency of this apparatus was compared to a live blood source, mice, and no significant differences (p = 0.1189 were observed between artificial-fed (51.3% of engorgement and mice-fed groups (40.6%. Thus, an easy to assemble and cost-effective artificial feeder, designated "Glytube" was developed in this report. This simple and efficient feeding device can be built with common laboratory materials for research on Ae. aegypti.

  14. Identification of Salivary Gland Proteins Depleted after Blood Feeding in the Malaria Vector Anopheles campestris-like Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Sor-suwan, Sriwatapron; Jariyapan, Narissara; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Paemanee, Atchara; Phumee, Atchara; Phattanawiboon, Benjarat; Intakhan, Nuchpicha; Chanmol, Wetpisit; Bates, Paul A.; Saeung, Atiporn; Choochote, Wej

    2014-01-01

    Malaria sporozoites must invade the salivary glands of mosquitoes for maturation before transmission to vertebrate hosts. The duration of the sporogonic cycle within the mosquitoes ranges from 10 to 21 days depending on the parasite species and temperature. During blood feeding salivary gland proteins are injected into the vertebrate host, along with malaria sporozoites in the case of an infected mosquito. To identify salivary gland proteins depleted after blood feeding of female Anopheles ca...

  15. Blood flow velocity prediction in aorto-iliac stent grafts using computational fluid dynamics and Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Albert Y; Doyle, Barry J; Jansen, Shirley; Ponosh, Stefan; Cisonni, Julien; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-05-01

    Covered Endovascular Reconstruction of Aortic Bifurcation (CERAB) is a new technique to treat extensive aortoiliac occlusive disease with covered expandable stent grafts to rebuild the aortoiliac bifurcation. Post stenting Doppler ultrasound (DUS) measurement of maximum peak systolic velocity (PSV max ) in the stented segment is widely used to determine patency and for follow up surveillance due to the portability, affordability and ease of use. Anecdotally, changes in hemodynamics created by CERAB can lead to falsely high PSV max requiring CT angiography (CTA) for further assessment. Therefore, the importance of DUS would be enhanced with a proposed PSV max prediction tool to ascertain whether PSV max falls within the acceptable range of prediction. We have developed a prediction tool based on idealized models of aortoiliac bifurcations with various infra-renal PSV (PSV in ), iliac to aortic area ratios (R) and aortoiliac bifurcation angles (α). Taguchi method with orthogonal arrays (OA) was utilized to minimize the number of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations performed under physiologically realistic conditions. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) analyses were performed to assess Goodness of fit and to predict PSV max. PSV in and R were found to contribute 94.06% and 3.36% respectively to PSV max . The Goodness of fit based on adjusted R 2 improved from 99.1% to 99.9% based on linear and exponential functions. The PSV max predictor based on the exponential model was evaluated with sixteen patient specific cases with a mean prediction error of 9.9% and standard deviation of 6.4%. Eleven out of sixteen cases (69%) in our current retrospective studies would have avoided CTA if the proposed predictor was used to screen out DUS measured PSV max with prediction error greater than 15%. The predictor therefore has the potential to be used as a clinical tool to detect PSV max more accurately post aortoiliac stenting and might

  16. Ecografia transfontanelar com fluxo a cores em recém-nascidos prematuros Intracranial blood flow velocities evaluated by color doppler (duplex in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cardoso de Assis

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinarmos, evolutivamente, a medida da velocidade do fluxo sangüíneo nas artérias intracranianas, em recém-nascidos prematuros (RNP normais e com hemorragia intracerebral, avaliamos - no período de junho de 1994 a março de 1999 - 73 recém-nascidos prematuros. A idade gestacional variou de 28 a 36 semanas e o peso ao nascimento variou de 720g a 2530g. O diagnóstico da hemorragia intracerebral foi realizado utilizando-se a ecografia transfontanelar (EGT. Para avaliação seqüencial da medida da velocidade do fluxo sangüíneo nas artérias intracranianas os 73 foram submetidos a EGT, com Doppler pulsátil, no 3º, 7º, 30º e 90º dias de vida. Após obtermos os valores numéricos destas velocidades determinamos o indice de resistência (IR. Ao analisarmos os valores do IR, comparando-se os 2 grupos de RNP, concluimos que os valores do IR são sempre mais elevados nos RNP normais (RNP-N que nos RNP com hemorragia intracerebral (RNP-HIC; que tanto no grupo de RNP normais quanto no grupo de RNP com hemorragia intracerebral os valores do IR decrescem significativamente com o acréscimo da idade dos neonatos. Analisando-se ainda, comparativamente, os valores do IR nos RNP com hemorragia intracerebral, em seus diversos graus, observamos não haver, evolutivamente, diferença estatisticamente significante. Analisando-se também , comparativamente, os valores do IR nos RNP com hemorragia intracerebral localizada no hemisfério cerebral direito ou esquerdo concluimos não haver diferença estatisticamente significante entre os valores do IR obtidos das artérias localizadas no hemisfério cerebral acometido comparados aos valores do IR obtidos do hemisfério cerebral não afetado.In order to ascertain the blood flow velocities in the intracranial arteries we evaluated 73 preterm neonates during a period ranging from June 1994 to March 1999. These preterm infants were divided in two separate groups, 18 healthy and 55 with

  17. Bacterial and protozoal agents of canine vector-borne diseases in the blood of domestic and stray dogs from southern Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Carla; Almeida, Bruno; Coimbra, Mónica; Fernandes, Maria Catarina; Cristóvão, José Manuel; Ramos, Cláudia; Martins, Ângela; Martinho, Filipe; Silva, Pedro; Neves, Nuno; Nunes, Mónica; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Cardoso, Luís; Campino, Lenea

    2015-03-23

    The so-called canine vector-borne diseases (CVBD) are caused by a wide range of pathogens transmitted by arthropods. In addition to their veterinary importance, many of these canine vector-borne pathogens can also affect the human population due to their zoonotic potential, a situation that requires a One Health approach. As the prevalence of vector-borne pathogens in cats from southern Portugal has been recently evaluated, the aim of the present study was to assess if the same agents were present in dogs living in the same area, and to assess positivity-associated risk factors. One thousand and ten dogs (521 domestic and 489 stray) from veterinary medical centres and animal shelters in southern Portugal were enrolled. Anaplasma spp./Ehrlichia spp., Bartonella spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Babesia spp., Hepatozoon spp. and Leishmania infantum infections were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays in blood samples. Sixty-eight (6.7%) dogs were PCR-positive to at least one of the tested CVBD agent species, genera or complex, including one dog found positive to two different genera. Nineteen (1.9%) dogs were positive to Anaplasma spp./Ehrlichia spp., eight (0.8%) to B. burgdorferi s.l., 31 (3.1%) to Hepatozoon spp. and 11 (1.1%) to L. infantum. Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis, B. burgdorferis.l. and Hepatozoon canis were identified by DNA sequencing, including one animal confirmed with both A. platys and H. canis. Furthermore, Wolbachia spp. was amplified in blood from four dogs. None of the tested dogs was positive by PCR for Bartonella spp. or Babesia spp. The molecular identification of CVBD agents in southern Portugal, some of them with zoonotic concern, reinforces the importance to alert the veterinary community, owners and public health authorities to prevent the risk of transmission of vector-borne pathogens among dogs and to other vertebrate hosts including humans. The prevalence of the selected pathogens was lower than that previously

  18. Optimization of mosquito egg production under mass rearing setting: effects of cage volume, blood meal source and adult population density for the malaria vector, Anopheles arabiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamai, Wadaka; Bimbile-Somda, Nanwintoum S; Maiga, Hamidou; Juarez, José Guillermo; Muosa, Zaynab A I; Ali, Adel Barakat; Lees, Rosemary Susan; Gilles, Jeremie R L

    2017-01-24

    Anopheles arabiensis is one of the major malaria vectors that put millions of people in endemic countries at risk. Mass-rearing of this mosquito is crucial for strategies that use sterile insect technique to suppress vector populations. The sterile insect technique (SIT) package for this mosquito species is being developed by the Insect Pest Control Subprogramme of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. To improve mass-rearing outcomes for An. arabiensis, the question of whether the egg production by females would be affected by the size of the adult holding cages, the source of the blood meal and the total number of pupae that could be loaded into the cages was addressed and finally the impact of adding additional pupae to the cage daily to maintain adult numbers on egg productivity assessed. Mass production cages of two different volumes, two different sources of blood meal (bovine and porcine) and two different population densities (cages originally loaded with either 15,000 or 20,000 pupae) were tested and evaluated on the basis of eggs produced/cage or per female. Males and females pupae with a ratio of 1:1 were added to the cages at day 1 and 2 of pupation. The emerging adults had constant access to 5% sugar solution and blood fed via the Hemotek membrane feeding system. Eggs were collected either twice a week or daily. A generalized linear model was used to identify factors which gave significantly higher egg production. Neither cage volume nor blood meal source affected egg production per cage or per female. However, increasing population density to 20,000 pupae had a negative effect on eggs produced per cage and per female. Although high density negatively impacted egg production, adding 1000 daily additional pupae compensating for daily mortality resulted in a substantial increase in egg production. Moreover, in all tests the first and the third egg batches collected were significantly higher than others eggs batches

  19. Label-free blood serum detection by using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and support vector machine for the preoperative diagnosis of parotid gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing; Li, Bo; Wen, Zhining; Luo, Xianyang; Xue, Lili; Li, Longjiang

    2015-10-05

    It is difficult for the parotid gland neoplasms to make an accurate preoperative diagnosis due to the restriction of biopsy in the parotid gland neoplasms. The aim of this study is to apply the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) method for the blood serum biochemical detection and use the support vector machine for the analysis in order to develop a simple but accurate blood serum detection for preoperative diagnosis of the parotid gland neoplasms. The blood serums were collected from four groups: the patients with pleomorphic adenoma, the patients with Warthin's tumor, the patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma and the volunteers without parotid gland neoplasms. Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) were mixed with the blood serum as the SERS active nanosensor to enhance the Raman scattering signals produced by the various biochemical materials and high quality SERS spectrum were obtained by using the Raman microscope system. Then the support vector machine was utilized to analyze the differences of the SERS spectrum from the blood serum of different groups and established a diagnostic model to discriminate the different groups. It was demonstrated that there were different intensities of SERS peaks assigned to various biochemical changes in the blood serum between the parotid gland tumor groups and normal control group. Compared with the SERS spectra of the normal serums, the intensities of peaks assigned to nucleic acids and proteins increased in the SERS spectra of the parotid gland tumor serums, which manifested the differences of the biochemical metabolites in the serum from the patients with parotid gland tumors. When the leave-one-sample-out method was used, support vector machine (SVM) played an outstanding performance in the classification of the SERS spectra with the high accuracy (84.1 % ~ 88.3 %), sensitivity (82.2 % ~ 97.4 %) and specificity (73.7 % ~ 86.7 %). Though the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity decreased in the leave

  20. Cloning and characterization of a V-ATPase subunit C from the American visceral leishmaniasis vector Lutzomyia longipalpis modulated during development and blood ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Ramalho-Ortigão

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a serious tropical disease that affects approximately 500 thousand people worldwide every year. In the Americas, VL is caused by the parasite Leishmania (Leishmania infantum chagasi mainly transmitted by the bite of the sand fly vector Lutzomyia longipalpis. Despite recent advances in the study of interaction between Leishmania and sand flies, very little is known about sand fly protein expression profiles. Understanding how the expression of proteins may be affected by blood feeding and/or presence of parasite in the vector's midgut might allow us to devise new strategies for controlling the spread of leishmaniasis. In this work, we report the characterization of a vacuolar ATPase subunit C from L. longipalpis by screening of a midgut cDNA library with a 220 bp fragment identified by means of differential display reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The expression of the gene varies along insect development and is upregulated in males and bloodfed L. longipalpis, compared to unfed flies.

  1. Characterization of a blood activated chitinolytic system in the midgut of the sand fly vectors Lutzomyia longipalpis and Phlebotomus papatasi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho-Ortigão, J M; Kamhawi, S; Joshi, M B; Reynoso, D; Lawyer, P G; Dwyer, D M; Sacks, D L; Valenzuela, J G

    2005-12-01

    We characterized a cDNA from Phlebotomus papatasi, PpChit1, which encodes a midgut specific chitinase and show the presence of a functional, blood-induced chitinolytic system in sand flies. PpChit1 is detected only in the midgut and is regulated by blood feeding. A recombinant protein (rPpChit1) produced in HEK 293-F cells exhibited a similar activity profile to that found in the native protein against several specific substrates, including an oligomeric glycol chitin and synthetic 4-methyl-umbelliferone labelled substrates. Western blotting showed that the native protein is recognized by mouse polyclonal antibodies against rPpChit1. Additionally, the rPpChit1 and the native chitinase displayed similar retention times in a HPLC size fractionation column. When added to rPpChit1 or to midgut lysates, PpChit1 sera reduced chitinolytic activity by 65-70%.

  2. Analysis of Systolic Backflow and Secondary Helical Blood Flow in the Ascending Aorta Using Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    echocardiography and pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution, and associated with gender, age, aortic diameter, atherosclerotic plaques, left ventricular ejection fraction and previous myocardial infarctions. Secondary flow was present for all patients. The duration and rotational frequency (p ... that backflow is injurious and that secondary flow is a normal flow phenomenon. The study also shows that transverse oscillation can provide new information on blood flow in the ascending aorta....

  3. A Plasmodium vivax Plasmid DNA- and Adenovirus-Vectored Malaria Vaccine Encoding Blood-Stage Antigens AMA1 and MSP142in a Prime/Boost Heterologous Immunization Regimen Partially Protects Aotus Monkeys against Blood-Stage Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-04-01

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium , which are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum , it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against P. vivax malaria. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the 42-kDa C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 42 ) in a plasmid recombinant DNA prime/adenoviral (Ad) vector boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with plasmid DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens with each antigen, prime/boost regimens with both antigens, and empty vector controls and then subjected to blood-stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, on the basis of their ability to induce the longest prepatent period and the longest time to the peak level of parasitemia, the lowest peak and mean levels of parasitemia, the smallest area under the parasitemia curve, and the highest self-cure rate. Overall, prechallenge MSP1 42 antibody titers strongly correlated with a decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, the P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad serotype 5 vaccine encoding blood-stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP1 42 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and this regimen for further development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Association of long-term blood pressure variability and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity: a retrospective study from the APAC cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Yuling; Wang, Anxin; An, Shasha; Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xuemei; Ruan, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Xiuhua; Zhao, Xingquan; Wu, Shouling

    2016-02-19

    We investigated associations between long-term blood pressure variability (BPV) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Within the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study, we retrospectively collected long-term BPV and baPWV measures. Long-term BPV was calculated using the mean and standard deviation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) across 4 years based on annual values of SBP. In total, 3,994 subjects (2,284 men) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We stratified the study population into four SBP quartiles. Left and right baPWV was higher in participants with long-term SBPV in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile (left: 1,725 ± 488 vs. 1,461 ± 340 [p < 0.001]; right: 1,722 ± 471 vs. 1,455 ± 341 [p < 0.001], respectively). We obtained the same result for total baPWV (fourth vs. first quartile: 1,772 ± 429 vs. 1,492 ± 350 [p < 0.001]). Furthermore, there was a trend for gradually increased baPWV (≥1,400 cm/s) with increased SBPV (p < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment, baPWV was positively correlated with long-term BPV (p < 0.001). In conclusion, long-term BPV is significantly associated with arterial stiffness as assessed by baPWV.

  5. A novel method to estimate blood flow velocity in the left atrial appendage using enhanced computed tomography: role of Hounsfield unit density ratio at two distinct points within the left atrial appendage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, Ryobun; Kurita, Takashi; Kotake, Yasuhito; Akaiwa, Yuzuru; Hashiguchi, Naotaka; Motoki, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Hirano, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2017-07-01

    Low blood flow velocity in the left atrial appendage (LAA) indicates a high risk of thromboembolism. Although transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been the standard method with which to evaluate the LAA blood flow velocity, a clinically noninvasive method is desired. We hypothesized that the ratio of the Hounsfield unit (HU) density at two distinct points within the LAA represents the blood flow velocity in the LAA. We retrospectively investigated 60 consecutive patients with atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal type, n = 29) who underwent enhanced computed tomography (CT) and TEE. The peak emptying flow velocity in the LAA (LAAPV) was evaluated using TEE. HU density was measured at proximal and distal sites of the LAA (LAAp and LAAd) on CT images. The LAAd/LAAp ratio was correlated with the LAAPV (P velocity of the LAA can be estimated by the HU density ratio at distal and proximal sites within the LAA. Our method might be a feasible substitution for TEE to discriminate patients with a reduced LAAPV.

  6. Characterization of a blood-meal-responsive proton-dependent amino acid transporter in the disease vector, Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Amy M.; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary After anautogenous mosquitoes ingest the required blood meal, proteins in it are rapidly cleaved, yielding a large pool of amino acids. Transport of these amino acids into gut epithelial cells and their subsequent translocation into other tissues is critical for oogenesis and other physiological processes. We have identified a proton amino acid transporter (PAT) in Aedes aegypti (AaePAT1, AAEL007191) which facilitates this transport and is expressed in epithelial cell membranes of larval caecae and the adult midgut. AaePAT1 encodes a 475 amino acid protein showing high similarity to Anopheles gambiae AGAP009896, Culex pipiens CPIJ011438 and Drosophila melanogaster CG7888. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes the transport kinetics showed AaePAT1 is a low affinity transporter with low substrate specificity, having Km and Vmax values of about 7.2 mmol l–1 and 69 pmol oocyte–1 min–1, respectively, for glutamine. A number of other amino acids are also transported by this PAT. In female adult midgut, AaePAT1 transcript levels were induced after ingestion of a blood meal. PMID:19801431

  7. The speed and metabolic cost of digesting a blood meal depends on temperature in a major disease vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Marshall D; Boardman, Leigh; Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Kleynhans, Elsje; Terblanche, John S

    2016-06-15

    The energetics of processing a meal is crucial for understanding energy budgets of animals in the wild. Given that digestion and its associated costs may be dependent on environmental conditions, it is necessary to obtain a better understanding of these costs under diverse conditions and identify resulting behavioural or physiological trade-offs. This study examines the speed and metabolic costs - in cumulative, absolute and relative energetic terms - of processing a bloodmeal for a major zoonotic disease vector, the tsetse fly Glossina brevipalpis, across a range of ecologically relevant temperatures (25, 30 and 35°C). Respirometry showed that flies used less energy digesting meals faster at higher temperatures but that their starvation tolerance was reduced, supporting the prediction that warmer temperatures are optimal for bloodmeal digestion while cooler temperatures should be preferred for unfed or post-absorptive flies. (13)C-Breath testing revealed that the flies oxidized dietary glucose and amino acids within the first couple of hours of feeding and overall oxidized more dietary nutrients at the cooler temperatures, supporting the premise that warmer digestion temperatures are preferred because they maximize speed and minimize costs. An independent test of these predictions using a thermal gradient confirmed that recently fed flies selected warmer temperatures and then selected cooler temperatures as they became post-absorptive, presumably to maximize starvation resistance. Collectively these results suggest there are at least two thermal optima in a given population at any time and flies switch dynamically between optima throughout feeding cycles. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Probabilistic Extraction Of Vectors In PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Probabilistic technique for extraction of velocity vectors in particle-image velocimetry (PIV) implemented with much less computation. Double-exposure photograph of particles in flow illuminated by sheet of light provides data on velocity field of flow. Photograph converted into video image then digitized and processed by computer into velocity-field data. Velocity vectors in interrogation region chosen from magnitude and angle histograms constructed from centroid map of region.

  9. Evaluation of a simple polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-based membrane for blood-feeding of malaria and dengue fever vectors in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Doreen J; Batista, Elis P A; Opiyo, Mercy A; Melo, Elizangela F; Sumaye, Robert D; Ngowo, Halfan S; Eiras, Alvaro E; Okumu, Fredros O

    2018-04-11

    , where DHF is unfeasible. If improved (e.g. minimizing temperature fluctuations), the approach could possibly also support studies where vectors are artificially infected with blood-borne pathogens.

  10. Vector Competence of Anopheles kleini and Anopheles sinensis (Diptera: Culicidae) From the Republic of Korea to Vivax Malaria-Infected Blood From Patients From Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubalee, Ratawan; Kim, Heung-Chul; Schuster, Anthony L; McCardle, Patrick W; Phasomkusolsil, Siriporn; Takhampunya, Ratree; Davidson, Silas A; Lee, Won-Ja; Klein, Terry A

    2016-11-01

    In total, 1,300 each of Anopheles kleini Rueda and Anopheles sinensis Wiedemann sensu stricto (s.s.) females (colonized from the Republic of Korea) and Anopheles dirus Peyton & Harrison (Thai strain) were allowed to feed on blood from Thai malaria patients naturally infected with Plasmodium vivax The overall oocyst infection rates for An. dirus, An. kleini, and An. sinensis s.s. were 77.4, 46.1, and 45.9%, respectively. The mean number of oocysts was significantly higher for An. dirus (82.7) compared with An. kleini (6.1) and An. sinensis s.s. (8.6), whereas the mean number of oocysts for An. kleini and An. sinensis s.s. was similar. The overall sporozoite infection rates for An. dirus, An. kleini, and An. sinensis s.s. dissected on days 14-15, 21, and 28 days post-feed were significantly higher for An. dirus (90.0%) than An. kleini (5.4%), whereas An. kleini sporozoite rates were significantly higher than An. sinensis s.s. (1,000 sporozoites) salivary gland indices were significantly higher for An. dirus (85.7%), compared with An. kleini (47.1%). Only one An. sinensis s.s. had sporozoites (+2; >10-100 sporozoites). These results indicate that An. kleini is a competent vector of vivax malaria. Although An. sinensis s.s. develops relatively high numbers of oocysts, it is considered a very poor vector of vivax malaria due to a salivary gland barrier. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. Natural product of wild Zingiberaceae Elettariopsis slahmong: biopesticide to control the vector of banana blood disease bacterium in West Sumatera, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, N; Dharma, A; Efdi, M; Yuhendra; Eliesti, F

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the most important food crops in Indonesia. Its production is greater than any other agricultural commodity. With the population of 230 million in 2010, banana was consumed up to three million tons in this country. However, Banana Blood Disease Bacterium (BDB), one of the most devastating banana pathogens in the world, which is only found in Indonesia, threatens not only the growth of this plant but also the lives and the livelihoods for most of the Indonesian society. BDB is caused by a lethal bacteria, Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotype-4, which infects a wide range of bananas, from bananas used for consumption to wild bananas. In West Sumatera, the disease killed 1.40% of bananas in 1998, and then increased dramatically to 37.9% in 2003. The total banana production dropped to 62% in this province. The search for controlling the vector has led to the pre-investigation of Wild Zingiberaceae Elettariopsis slahmong C.K. Lim which has a stink bug odour similar to a methidathion insecticide. The plant was collected around the conservation area of Lembah Anal in West Sumatra. The goal of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of natural insecticides compound contained in E. slahmong against D. melanogaster. This study tested the effect of E. slahmong on the mortality, anti-feedant and repellent levels against Drosophila melanogaster, the vector of BDB. The essential oil of E. slahmong was obtained by steam distillation of fresh rhizomes, pseudo stems and leaves. We found that the extract of E. slahmong significantly affected the mortality of D. melanogaster of 30-40% and also acted as an antifeedant (with success rate of 73-93%) and repellent (with success rate of 99-99.6%). The long- term objective of this study is to develop green biopesticide to control BDB in Indonesia, based on an environmentally friendly pest management.

  12. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... production of red blood cells, including: Iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and ... inflammatory bowel disease are especially likely to have iron deficiency anemia. Anemia due to chronic disease. People with chronic ...

  13. Cognition, temperament, and cerebral blood flow velocity in toddlers and preschool children with sleep-disordered breathing or behavioral insomnia of childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Rachael; Lushington, Kurt; Keage, Hannah A D; Blunden, Sarah; Kennedy, J Declan; Schembri, Mark; Wabnitz, David; Martin, A James; Kohler, Mark J

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive decrements, problematic behaviors, and increased cerebral blood flow velocities (CBFVs) have been reported in children aged 3-7 years with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Whether similar impairments exist in younger children or those with behavioral insomnia of childhood (BIC) remains unclear. This study aimed to compare cognition and temperament in children aged 1-5 years with SDB or BIC to healthy control children, and to investigate whether cognitive or behavioral deficits associated with sleep problems are related to changes in CBFV. Toddlers and preschool-aged children (12-67 months) who had been referred for the clinical evaluation of SDB (n = 20) or BIC (n = 13) and a comparative sample of non-snoring healthy sleepers (controls; n = 77) were recruited from the community. Children underwent cognitive assessment (Mullen's Scale of Early Learning) and measurement of resting bilateral CBFV in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) using Transcranial Doppler. Parents completed temperament scales (Early Childhood or Childhood Behavior Questionnaire), a sleep problem questionnaire (Pediatric Sleep Problem Survey Instrument) and performed home-based pediatric sleep monitoring (Actigraphy and Sleep Diary). SDB children demonstrated impaired receptive skills, more hyperactive and energetic temperaments, and higher bilateral CBFV than controls and children with BIC. Logistic regression analyses indicated that impaired cognition, temperamental difficulties, and increased CBFV are independently associated with SDB. During early childhood, problematic temperaments, cognitive deficits, and altered cerebrovascular functioning are associated with SDB but not BIC. CBFV does not appear to mediate these daytime deficits and instead may be an independent outcome of SDB. The findings support the need for an early intervention in pediatric SDB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics…

  15. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels

    2008-01-01

    of the thesis considers a method for estimating the two-dimensional velocity vector within the image plane. This method, called synthetic aperture vector flow imaging, is first shortly reviewed. The main contribution of this work is partly an analysis of the method with respect to focusing effects, motion...... estimation. The method can be used for increasing the frame rate of color flow maps or alternatively for a new imaging modality entitled quadroplex imaging, featuring a color flow map and two independent spectrograms at a high frame rate. The second is an alternative method for ultrasonic vector velocity...

  16. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Newell, Homer E

    2006-01-01

    When employed with skill and understanding, vector analysis can be a practical and powerful tool. This text develops the algebra and calculus of vectors in a manner useful to physicists and engineers. Numerous exercises (with answers) not only provide practice in manipulation but also help establish students' physical and geometric intuition in regard to vectors and vector concepts.Part I, the basic portion of the text, consists of a thorough treatment of vector algebra and the vector calculus. Part II presents the illustrative matter, demonstrating applications to kinematics, mechanics, and e

  17. About vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Banesh

    1975-01-01

    From his unusual beginning in ""Defining a vector"" to his final comments on ""What then is a vector?"" author Banesh Hoffmann has written a book that is provocative and unconventional. In his emphasis on the unresolved issue of defining a vector, Hoffmann mixes pure and applied mathematics without using calculus. The result is a treatment that can serve as a supplement and corrective to textbooks, as well as collateral reading in all courses that deal with vectors. Major topics include vectors and the parallelogram law; algebraic notation and basic ideas; vector algebra; scalars and scalar p

  18. [Spatial vector electrocardiography: technique, perspectives of use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakutskiĭ, V N; Volobuev, A N; Kriukov, N N; Romanchuk, P I

    2003-01-01

    Potentials of the use of computer synthesis of integral electrical vector of the heart D0 are described. Calculation of spatial angular vector velocity and linear velocity of its movement along trajectory can be carried out in a framework of biophysical dipole model. Spatial presentation of vector is realized and its behavior in accordance with established pathologies discussed. Possible diagnostic value of obtained results and utility of their introduction into clinical practice are stressed.

  19. Minimizing the blood velocity differences between phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics simulation in cerebral arteries and aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Adib, Mohd Azrul Hisham; Ii, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Wada, Shigeo

    2017-09-01

    The integration of phase-contrast magnetic resonance images (PC-MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a way to obtain detailed information of patient-specific hemodynamics. This study proposes a novel strategy for imposing a pressure condition on the outlet boundary (called the outlet pressure) in CFD to minimize velocity differences between the PC-MRI measurement and the CFD simulation, and to investigate the effects of outlet pressure on the numerical solution. The investigation involved ten patient-specific aneurysms reconstructed from a digital subtraction angiography image, specifically on aneurysms located at the bifurcation region. To evaluate the effects of imposing the outlet pressure, three different approaches were used, namely: a pressure-fixed (P-fixed) approach; a flow rate control (Q-control) approach; and a velocity-field-optimized (V-optimized) approach. Numerical investigations show that the highest reduction in velocity difference always occurs in the V-optimized approach, where the mean of velocity difference (normalized by inlet velocity) is 19.3%. Additionally, the highest velocity differences appear near to the wall and vessel bifurcation for 60% of the patients, resulting in differences in wall shear stress. These findings provide a new methodology for PC-MRI integrated CFD simulation and are useful for understanding the evaluation of velocity difference between the PC-MRI and CFD.

  20. Elementary vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wolstenholme, E Œ

    1978-01-01

    Elementary Vectors, Third Edition serves as an introductory course in vector analysis and is intended to present the theoretical and application aspects of vectors. The book covers topics that rigorously explain and provide definitions, principles, equations, and methods in vector analysis. Applications of vector methods to simple kinematical and dynamical problems; central forces and orbits; and solutions to geometrical problems are discussed as well. This edition of the text also provides an appendix, intended for students, which the author hopes to bridge the gap between theory and appl

  1. A molecular marker for the identification of the zoonotic reservoirs of Lyme borreliosis by analysis of the blood meal in its European vector Ixodes ricinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstein, F; Gray, J S

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of the mitochondrially encoded cytochrome b gene as a molecular marker for the discrimination of the reservoir host species of the Lyme borreliosis spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), in its European vector Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) was determined. Degenerate PCR primers were designed which amplified orthologous regions of the cytochrome b gene in several animal species which act as B. burgdorferi s.l. reservoirs and hosts for I. ricinus. PCR products were amplified and characterized by hybridization and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of a 638-bp PCR product with HaeIII and DdeI revealed unique restriction fragment profiles, which allowed the taxonomic identification of animals to the genus level. A system was devised for the detection of the larval host blood meal from the remnants in unfed nymphal I. ricinus ticks by nested PCR amplification. An inverse correlation was demonstrated between amplicon size and successful PCR amplification of host DNA from the nymphal stage of the tick. The stability of the cytochrome b product as a marker for the identification of the larval host species in the nymphal instar was demonstrated up to 200 days after larval ingestion (approximately 165 days after molting) by reverse line blotting with a host-specific probe. This assay has the potential for the determination of the reservoir hosts of B. burgdorferi s.l. by using extracts from the same individual ticks for both the identification of the host species and the detection of the Lyme borreliosis spirochete. PMID:8899988

  2. Orbital velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Modestino, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The trajectory and the orbital velocity are determined for an object moving in a gravitational system, in terms of fundamental and independent variables. In particular, considering a path on equipotential line, the elliptical orbit is naturally traced, verifying evidently the keplerian laws. The case of the planets of the solar system is presented.

  3. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Louis

    2006-01-01

    The use of vectors not only simplifies treatments of differential geometry, mechanics, hydrodynamics, and electrodynamics, but also makes mathematical and physical concepts more tangible and easy to grasp. This text for undergraduates was designed as a short introductory course to give students the tools of vector algebra and calculus, as well as a brief glimpse into these subjects' manifold applications. The applications are developed to the extent that the uses of the potential function, both scalar and vector, are fully illustrated. Moreover, the basic postulates of vector analysis are brou

  4. Absolute Geostrophic Velocity Inverted from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) Joint U.S.-Russian Atlas of the Arctic Ocean with the P-Vector Method (NCEI Accession 0156424)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset (called EWG-V) comprises 3D gridded climatological fields of absolute geostrophic velocity inverted from the Environmental Working Group (EWG) Joint...

  5. Electron velocity and momentum density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    A null 4-vector eta + sigma/sub μ/based on Dirac's relativistic electron equation, is shown explicitly for a plane wave and various Coulomb states. This 4-vector constitutes a mechanical ''model'' for the electron in those staes, and expresses the important spinor quantities represented conventionally by n, f, g, m, j, kappa, l, and s. The model for a plane wave agrees precisely with the relation between velocity and phase gradient customarily used in quantum theory, but the models for Coulomb states contradict that relation

  6. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  7. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  8. Hybrid PIV-PTV technique for measuring blood flow in rat mesenteric vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-11-01

    The micro-particle tracking velocimetry (μ-PTV) technique is used to obtain the velocity fields of blood flow in the microvasculature under in vivo conditions because it can provide the blood velocity distribution in microvessels with high spatial resolution. The in vivo μ-PTV technique usually requires a few to tens of seconds to obtain a whole velocity profile across the vessel diameter because of the limited number density of tracer particles under in vivo conditions. Thus, the μ-PTV technique alone is limited in measuring unsteady blood flows that fluctuate irregularly due to the heart beating and muscle movement in surrounding tissues. In this study, a new hybrid PIV-PTV technique was established by combining PTV and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques to resolve the drawbacks of the μ-PTV method in measuring blood flow in microvessels under in vivo conditions. Images of red blood cells (RBCs) and fluorescent particles in rat mesenteric vessels were obtained simultaneously. Temporal variations of the centerline blood velocity were monitored using a fast Fourier transform-based cross-correlation PIV method. The fluorescence particle images were analyzed using the μ-PTV technique to extract the spatial distribution of the velocity vectors. Data from the μ-PTV and PIV methods were combined to obtain a better estimate of the velocity profile in actual blood flow. This technique will be useful in investigating hemodynamics in microcirculation by measuring unsteady irregular blood flows more accurately. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  10. Waves with negative group velocity. Conditions of their existence in a isotropic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, V.P.; Rukhadze, A.A.; Samokhin, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of the frequency and spatial dispersions of the dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability of an isotropic medium are carried out in the (E-vector, B-vector, D-vector) and (E-vector, B-vector, D-vector, H-vector) approaches of electrodynamics. The conditions under which the phase and group velocities of transverse electromagnetic waves have opposite directions are clarified, and the consequences arised are discussed

  11. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Töger, Johannes; Carlsson, Marcus; Söderlind, Gustaf; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar

    2011-01-01

    Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR) can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking complements and provides incremental information compared to particle

  12. Problems and worked solutions in vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Shorter, LR

    2014-01-01

    ""A handy book like this,"" noted The Mathematical Gazette, ""will fill a great want."" Devoted to fully worked out examples, this unique text constitutes a self-contained introductory course in vector analysis for undergraduate and graduate students of applied mathematics.Opening chapters define vector addition and subtraction, show how to resolve and determine the direction of two or more vectors, and explain systems of coordinates, vector equations of a plane and straight line, relative velocity and acceleration, and infinitely small vectors. The following chapters deal with scalar and vect

  13. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Recio-Rodríguez, José I; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Emiliano; Castaño-Sánchez, Yolanda; de Cabo-Laso, Angela; Sánchez-Salgado, Benigna; Rodríguez-Martín, Carmela; Castaño-Sánchez, Carmen; Gómez-Sánchez, Leticia; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2010-03-18

    Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home) blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The medication used for diabetes, arterial hypertension and hyperlipidemia will be registered, together

  14. New candidate vaccines against blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria: prime-boost immunization regimens incorporating human and simian adenoviral vectors and poxviral vectors expressing an optimized antigen based on merozoite surface protein 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodman, Anna L.; Epp, C.; Moss, D.; Holder, A. A.; Wilson, J. M.; Gao, G. P.; Long, C. A.; Remarque, E. J.; Thomas, A. W.; Ammendola, V.; Colloca, S.; Dicks, M. D. J.; Biswas, S.; Seibel, D.; van Duivenvoorde, L. M.; Gilbert, S. C.; Hill, A. V. S.; Draper, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Although merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) is a leading candidate vaccine antigen for blood-stage malaria, its efficacy in clinical trials has been limited in part by antigenic polymorphism and potentially by the inability of protein-in-adjuvant vaccines to induce strong cellular immunity. Here we

  15. Volume Tracking: A new method for quantitative assessment and visualization of intracardiac blood flow from three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-component magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arheden Håkan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional and morphological changes of the heart influence blood flow patterns. Therefore, flow patterns may carry diagnostic and prognostic information. Three-dimensional, time-resolved, three-directional phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (4D PC-CMR can image flow patterns with unique detail, and using new flow visualization methods may lead to new insights. The aim of this study is to present and validate a novel visualization method with a quantitative potential for blood flow from 4D PC-CMR, called Volume Tracking, and investigate if Volume Tracking complements particle tracing, the most common visualization method used today. Methods Eight healthy volunteers and one patient with a large apical left ventricular aneurysm underwent 4D PC-CMR flow imaging of the whole heart. Volume Tracking and particle tracing visualizations were compared visually side-by-side in a visualization software package. To validate Volume Tracking, the number of particle traces that agreed with the Volume Tracking visualizations was counted and expressed as a percentage of total released particles in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Two independent observers described blood flow patterns in the left ventricle using Volume Tracking visualizations. Results Volume Tracking was feasible in all eight healthy volunteers and in the patient. Visually, Volume Tracking and particle tracing are complementary methods, showing different aspects of the flow. When validated against particle tracing, on average 90.5% and 87.8% of the particles agreed with the Volume Tracking surface in mid-diastole and end-diastole respectively. Inflow patterns in the left ventricle varied between the subjects, with excellent agreement between observers. The left ventricular inflow pattern in the patient differed from the healthy subjects. Conclusion Volume Tracking is a new visualization method for blood flow measured by 4D PC-CMR. Volume Tracking

  16. Notes from 1999 on computational algorithm of the Local Wave-Vector (LWV) model for the dynamical evolution of the second-rank velocity correlation tensor starting from the mean-flow-coupled Navier-Stokes equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemach, Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kurien, Susan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These notes present an account of the Local Wave Vector (LWV) model of a turbulent flow defined throughout physical space. The previously-developed Local Wave Number (LWN) model is taken as a point of departure. Some general properties of turbulent fields and appropriate notation are given first. The LWV model is presently restricted to incompressible flows and the incompressibility assumption is introduced at an early point in the discussion. The assumption that the turbulence is homogeneous is also introduced early on. This assumption can be relaxed by generalizing the space diffusion terms of LWN, but the present discussion is focused on a modeling of homogeneous turbulence.

  17. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  18. 3D vector flow using a row-column addressed CMUT array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbek, Simon; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Engholm, Mathias; Lei, Anders; Stuart, Mathias Bo; Beers, Christopher; Moesner, Lars Nordahl; Bagge, Jan Peter; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an in-house developed 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) applied for 3-D blood flow estimation. The probe breaks with conventional transducers in two ways; first, the ultrasonic pressure field is generated from thousands of small vibrating micromachined cells, and second, elements are accessed by row and/or column indices. The 62+62 2-D row-column addressed prototype CMUT probe was used for vector flow estimation by transmitting focused ultrasound into a flow-rig with a fully developed parabolic flow. The beam-to-flow angle was 90°. The received data was beamformed and processed offline. A transverse oscillation (TO) velocity estimator was used to estimate the 3-D vector flow along a line originating from the center of the transducer. The estimated velocities in the lateral and axial direction were close to zero as expected. In the transverse direction a characteristic parabolic velocity profile was estimated with a peak velocity of 0.48 m/s +/- 0.02 m/s in reference to the expected 0.54 m/s. The results presented are the first 3-D vector flow estimates obtained with a row-column CMUT probe, which demonstrates that the CMUT technology is feasible for 3-D flow estimation.

  19. Towards a Proteomic Catalogue and Differential Annotation of Salivary Gland Proteins in Blood Fed Malaria Vector Anopheles culicifacies by Mass Spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Rawal

    Full Text Available In order to understand the importance of functional proteins in mosquito behavior, following blood meal, a baseline proteomic dataset is essential for providing insights into the physiology of blood feeding. Therefore, in this study as first step, in solution and 1-D electrophoresis digestion approach combined with tandem mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS and computational bioinformatics for data mining was used to prepare a baseline proteomic catalogue of salivary gland proteins of sugar fed An. culicifacies mosquitoes. A total of 106 proteins were identified and analyzed by SEQUEST algorithm against mosquito protein database from Uniprot/NCBI. Importantly, D7r1, D7r2, D7r4, salivary apyrase, anti-platelet protein, calreticulin, antigen 5 family proteins were identified and grouped on the basis of biological and functional roles. Secondly, differential protein expression and annotations between salivary glands of sugar fed vs blood fed mosquitoes was analyzed using 2-Delectrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The alterations in the differential expression of total 38 proteins was observed out of which 29 proteins like beclin-1, phosphorylating proteins, heme oxygenase 1, ferritin, apoptotic proteins, coagulation and immunity like, serine proteases, serpins, c-type lectin and protein in regulation of blood feeding behavior were found to be up regulated while 9 proteins related to blood feeding, juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase ii, odorant binding proteins and energy metabolic enzymes were found to be down regulated. To our knowledge, this study provides a first time baseline proteomic dataset and functional annotations of An. culicifacies salivary gland proteins that may be involved during the blood feeding. Identification of differential salivary proteins between sugar fed and blood fed mosquitoes and their plausible role may provide insights into the physiological processes associated with feeding behavior and sporozoite

  20. VECTOR INTEGRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, E. G. F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of integration of scalar functions with respect to a measure with values in a, not necessarily locally convex, topological vector space. It focuses on the extension of such integrals from bounded measurable functions to the class of integrable functions, proving

  1. Directional Transverse Oscillation Vector Flow Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2017-01-01

    A method for estimating vector velocities using transverse oscillation (TO) combined with directional beamforming is presented. In Directional Transverse Oscillation (DTO) a normal focused field is emitted and the received signals are beamformed in the lateral direction transverse to the ultrasound...... beam to increase the amount of data for vector velocity estimation. The approach is self-calibrating as the lateral oscillation period is estimated from the directional signal through a Fourier transform to yield quantitative velocity results over a large range of depths. The approach was extensively...

  2. An introduction to vectors, vector operators and vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Joag, Pramod S

    2016-01-01

    Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students of science and engineering, this book covers fundamental concepts of vectors and their applications in a single volume. The first unit deals with basic formulation, both conceptual and theoretical. It discusses applications of algebraic operations, Levi-Civita notation, and curvilinear coordinate systems like spherical polar and parabolic systems and structures, and analytical geometry of curves and surfaces. The second unit delves into the algebra of operators and their types and also explains the equivalence between the algebra of vector operators and the algebra of matrices. Formulation of eigen vectors and eigen values of a linear vector operator are elaborated using vector algebra. The third unit deals with vector analysis, discussing vector valued functions of a scalar variable and functions of vector argument (both scalar valued and vector valued), thus covering both the scalar vector fields and vector integration.

  3. Vibration-related extrusion of capillary blood from the calf musculature depends upon directions of vibration of the leg and of the gravity vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakar, Halil Ibrahim; Doğan, Serfiraz; Kara, Sadık; Rittweger, Jörn; Rawer, Rainer; Zange, Jochen

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of vibration of the whole lower leg on the content and the oxygenation of hemoglobin in the unloaded relaxed lateral gastrocnemius muscle. Vibration was applied orthogonal to and in parallel with leg axis to examine whether the extrusion of blood depends on an alignment of main vessel direction, axis of vibration and gravity. The blood volume in the muscles was altered by horizontal and 30° upright body posture. Fifteen male subjects were exposed to 4 sets of experiments with both vibration directions and both tilt angles applied in permutated order. The absence of voluntary muscular activity and the potential occurrence of compound action potentials by stretch reflexes were monitored using electromyography. Total hemoglobin and tissue saturation index were measured with near infrared spectroscopy. Changes of lower leg circumference were measured with strain gauge system placed around the calf. Vibration caused decrease in tHb and increase in TSI indicating extrusion of predominantly venous blood from the muscle. In 30° tilted position, muscles contained more blood at baseline and vibration ejected more blood from the muscle compared with horizontal posture (p < 0.01). At 30° tilting deeper drop in tHb and steeper increase in TSI (p < 0.01) were observed when vibration was applied in parallel with the length axis of muscle. It is concluded that the vibration extrudes more blood in 30° head up posture and the vibration applied in parallel with the length axis of the muscle is more effective than orthogonal vibration.

  4. Experimental investigation of ultrasonic velocity anisotropy in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/077/02/0345-0355. Keywords. Magnetic fluids; ultrasonic wave; sound velocity; anisotropy. Abstract. Magnetic field-induced dispersion of ultrasonic velocity in a Mn0.7Zn0.3Fe2O4 fluid (applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the ultrasonic propagation vector) is ...

  5. Experimental investigation of ultrasonic velocity anisotropy in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/077/02/0345-0355. Keywords. Magnetic fluids; ultrasonic wave; sound velocity; anisotropy. Abstract. Magnetic field-induced dispersion of ultrasonic velocity in a Mn0.7Zn0.3Fe2O4 fluid (applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the ultrasonic propagation vector) is ...

  6. Velocidade da onda de pulso, pressão arterial e adipocitocinas em adultos jovens: estudo do Rio de Janeiro Pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and adipocytokines in young adults: the Rio de Janeiro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Pizzi

    2012-01-01

    identificação do acometimento vascular nessa faixa etária.BACKGROUND: Data on noninvasive vascular assessment and their association with cardiovascular risk variables are scarce in young individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between pulse wave velocity and blood pressure, anthropometric and metabolic variables, including adipocytokines, in young adults. METHODS: A total of 96 individuals aged 26 to 35 years (mean 30.09 ± 1.92; 51 males were assessed in the Rio de Janeiro study. Pulse wave velocity (Complior method, blood pressure, body mass index, glucose, lipid profile, leptin, insulin, adiponectin and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR were analyzed. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to the PWV tertile for each gender. RESULTS: The group with the highest pulse wave velocity (PWV tertile showed higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, body mass index, insulin, and HOMA-IR, as well as lower mean adiponectin; higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus/glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. There was a significant positive correlation of PWV with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean blood pressure, body mass index, and LDL-cholesterol, and a negative correlation with HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment of HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and adiponectin for gender, age, body mass index and mean blood pressure, only the male gender and mean blood pressure remained significantly correlated with PWV. CONCLUSION: PWV in young adults showed a significant association with cardiovascular risk variables, especially in the male gender, and mean blood pressure as important determinant variables. The findings suggest that PWV measurement can be useful for the identification of vascular impairment in this age group.

  7. Velocidade da onda de pulso, pressão arterial e adipocitocinas em adultos jovens: estudo do Rio de Janeiro Pulse wave velocity, blood pressure and adipocytokines in young adults: the Rio de Janeiro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Luiz Pizzi

    2013-01-01

    identificação do acometimento vascular nessa faixa etária.BACKGROUND: Data on noninvasive vascular assessment and their association with cardiovascular risk variables are scarce in young individuals. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between pulse wave velocity and blood pressure, anthropometric and metabolic variables, including adipocytokines, in young adults. METHODS: A total of 96 individuals aged 26 to 35 years (mean 30.09 ± 1.92; 51 males were assessed in the Rio de Janeiro study. Pulse wave velocity (Complior method, blood pressure, body mass index, glucose, lipid profile, leptin, insulin, adiponectin and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR were analyzed. Subjects were stratified into three groups according to the PWV tertile for each gender. RESULTS: The group with the highest pulse wave velocity (PWV tertile showed higher mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, body mass index, insulin, and HOMA-IR, as well as lower mean adiponectin; higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus/glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. There was a significant positive correlation of PWV with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and mean blood pressure, body mass index, and LDL-cholesterol, and a negative correlation with HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment of HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and adiponectin for gender, age, body mass index and mean blood pressure, only the male gender and mean blood pressure remained significantly correlated with PWV. CONCLUSION: PWV in young adults showed a significant association with cardiovascular risk variables, especially in the male gender, and mean blood pressure as important determinant variables. The findings suggest that PWV measurement can be useful for the identification of vascular impairment in this age group.

  8. Determining cardiac velocity fields and intraventricular pressure distribution from a sequence of ultrafast CT cardiac images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S M; Leahy, R M; Boyd, D P; Brundage, B H; Napel, S

    1994-01-01

    A method of computing the velocity field and pressure distribution from a sequence of ultrafast CT (UFCT) cardiac images is demonstrated. UFCT multi-slice cine imaging gives a series of tomographic slices covering the volume of the heart at a rate of 17 frames per second. The complete volume data set can be modeled using equations of continuum theory and through regularization, velocity vectors of both blood and tissue can be determined at each voxel in the volume. The authors present a technique to determine the pressure distribution throughout the volume of the left ventricle using the computed velocity field. A numerical algorithm is developed by discretizing the pressure Poisson equation (PPE), which Is based on the Navier-Stokes equation. The algorithm is evaluated using a mathematical phantom of known velocity and pressure-Couette flow. It is shown that the algorithm based on the PPE can reconstruct the pressure distribution using only the velocity data. Furthermore, the PPE is shown to be robust in the presence of noise. The velocity field and pressure distribution derived from a UFCT study of a patient are also presented.

  9. Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) as a potential West Nile virus vector in Tucson, Arizona: Blood meal analysis indicates feeding on both humans and birds

    OpenAIRE

    Zinser, Margaret; Ramberg, Frank; Willott, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Most reports from the United States suggest Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes feed minimally on humans. Given the abundance of C. quinquefasciatus in residential Tucson and parts of metropolitan Phoenix, and the arrival of West Nile virus to this area, discovering the blood meal hosts of the local population is important. Using a sandwich ELISA technique, the local C. quinquefasciatus were found to feed on both humans and birds. This suggests they should be considered potential West Nile viru...

  10. Climate change velocity underestimates climate change exposure in mountainous regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon Z. Dobrowski; Sean A. Parks

    2016-01-01

    Climate change velocity is a vector depiction of the rate of climate displacement used for assessing climate change impacts. Interpreting velocity requires an assumption that climate trajectory length is proportional to climate change exposure; longer paths suggest greater exposure. However, distance is an imperfect measure of exposure because it does not...

  11. Experimental investigation of transverse velocity estimation using cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerngaard, Rasmus; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    A technique for estimating the full flow velocity vector has previously been presented by our group. Unlike conventional estimators, that only detect the axial component of the flow, this new method is capable of estimating the transverse velocity component. The method uses focusing along the flow....... A mean parabolic velocity profile was obtained for purely transverse flow with a mean bias to the true profile of -2.5% relative to the peak velocity and a standard deviation of 13.3% relative to the peak velocity. Twenty pulse-echo lines were used for each estimate and 18 profiles were obtained...... and the flow at an angle of 701 was successfully estimated....

  12. Effects of intermittent pneumatic compression of the thigh on blood flow velocity in the femoral and popliteal veins: developing a new physical prophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis in patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Keisuke; Takahira, Naonobu; Sakamoto, Miki; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Katagiri, Masato; Kitagawa, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the lower limb have an estimated venous thromboembolism rate of 2.5 % without prophylaxis, which includes many fatal cases. However, there is no practical physical prophylaxis for deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in these patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of intermittent pneumatic compression on the thigh alone (IPC to the thigh) on peak blood velocity (PBV) in the legs and to consider the possibility that IPC of the thigh could be used as physical prophylaxis for DVT in patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the lower leg. Nine healthy male volunteers and eighteen elderly males were recruited. We immobilized each subject's right lower leg and ankle with a plaster splint, and applied the ActiveCare+S.F.T.(®) (Medical Compression Systems, Inc.) device to each subject's right thigh. The PBV in the superficial femoral vein (PBVFV) and the popliteal vein (PBVPV) were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasonography. IPC to the thigh resulted in a 2.3-fold increase in PBVFV and a 3.0-fold increase in PBVPV compared with resting at supine in the elderly group. Although IPC to the thigh also increased PBVFV and PBVPV significantly in the sitting position, the change ratios of PBV in the supine and sitting positions were equal (2.6-fold increase in PBVFV and 2.9-fold increase in PBVPV). IPC to the thigh in supine and sitting positions significantly increased PBVFV and PBVPV, and could be a useful prophylaxis for DVT in patients with plaster-cast immobilization of the lower leg.

  13. Teaching Universal Gravitation with Vector Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Like many high school and college physics teachers, I have found playing vector games to be a useful way of illustrating the concepts of inertia, velocity, and acceleration. Like many, I have also had difficulty in trying to get students to understand Newton's law of universal gravitation, specifically the inverse-square law and its application to…

  14. Axisymmetric thrust-vectoring nozzle performance prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E. A.; Adler, D.; Bar-Yoseph, P.Z

    1998-01-01

    Throat-hinged geometrically variable converging-diverging thrust-vectoring nozzles directly affect the jet flow geometry and rotation angle at the nozzle exit as a function of the nozzle geometry, the nozzle pressure ratio and flight velocity. The consideration of nozzle divergence in the effective-geometric nozzle relation is theoretically considered here for the first time. In this study, an explicit calculation procedure is presented as a function of nozzle geometry at constant nozzle pressure ratio, zero velocity and altitude, and compared with experimental results in a civil thrust-vectoring scenario. This procedure may be used in dynamic thrust-vectoring nozzle design performance predictions or analysis for civil and military nozzles as well as in the definition of initial jet flow conditions in future numerical VSTOL/TV jet performance studies

  15. Raster images vectorization system

    OpenAIRE

    Genytė, Jurgita

    2006-01-01

    The problem of raster images vectorization was analyzed and researched in this work. Existing vectorization systems are quite expensive, the results are inaccurate, and the manual vectorization of a large number of drafts is impossible. That‘s why our goal was to design and develop a new raster images vectorization system using our suggested automatic vectorization algorithm and the way to record results in a new universal vectorial file format. The work consists of these main parts: analysis...

  16. Kochen-Specker vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicic, Mladen; Merlet, Jean-Pierre; McKay, Brendan; Megill, Norman D

    2005-01-01

    We give a constructive and exhaustive definition of Kochen-Specker (KS) vectors in a Hilbert space of any dimension as well as of all the remaining vectors of the space. KS vectors are elements of any set of orthonormal states, i.e., vectors in an n-dimensional Hilbert space, H n , n≥3, to which it is impossible to assign 1s and 0s in such a way that no two mutually orthogonal vectors from the set are both assigned 1 and that not all mutually orthogonal vectors are assigned 0. Our constructive definition of such KS vectors is based on algorithms that generate MMP diagrams corresponding to blocks of orthogonal vectors in R n , on algorithms that single out those diagrams on which algebraic (0)-(1) states cannot be defined, and on algorithms that solve nonlinear equations describing the orthogonalities of the vectors by means of statistically polynomially complex interval analysis and self-teaching programs. The algorithms are limited neither by the number of dimensions nor by the number of vectors. To demonstrate the power of the algorithms, all four-dimensional KS vector systems containing up to 24 vectors were generated and described, all three-dimensional vector systems containing up to 30 vectors were scanned, and several general properties of KS vectors were found

  17. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper we have demonstrated that the velocity can be estimated for a plug flow using recursive ultrasound imaging [1]. The approach involved the estimation of the velocity at every emission and using the estimates for motion compensation. An error in the estimates, however, would lead...... to an error in the compensation further increasing the error in the estimates. In this paper the approach is further developed such that no motion compensation is necessary. In recursive ultrasound imaging a new high resolution image is created after every emission. The velocity was estimated by cross...... and significantly improves the velocity estimates. The approach is verified using simulations with the program Field II and measurements on a blood-mimicking phantom. The estimates from the simulations have a bias of -3.5% and a mean standard deviation less than 2.0% for a parabolic velocity profile. The estimates...

  18. The Role of the Harmonic Vector Average in Motion Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eJohnston

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The local speeds of object contours vary systematically with the cosine of the angle between the normal component of the local velocity and the global object motion direction. An array of Gabor elements whose speed changes with local spatial orientation in accordance with this pattern can appear to move as a single surface. The apparent direction of motion of plaids and Gabor arrays has variously been proposed to result from feature tracking, vector addition and vector averaging in addition to the geometrically correct global velocity as indicated by the intersection of constraints (IOC solution. Here a new combination rule, the harmonic vector average (HVA, is introduced, as well as a new algorithm for computing the IOC solution. The vector sum can be discounted as an integration strategy as it increases with the number of elements. The vector average over local vectors that vary in direction always provides an underestimate of the true global speed. The harmonic vector average however provides the correct global speed and direction for an unbiased sample of local velocities with respect to the global motion direction, as is the case for a simple closed contour. The HVA over biased samples provides an aggregate velocity estimate that can still be combined through an IOC computation to give an accurate estimate of the global velocity, which is not true of the vector average. Psychophysical results for type II Gabor arrays show perceived direction and speed falls close to the intersection of constraints direction for Gabor arrays having a wide range of orientations but the IOC prediction fails as the mean orientation shifts away from the global motion direction and the orientation range narrows. In this case perceived velocity generally defaults to the harmonic vector average.

  19. Synthesis of star-branched PLA-b-PMPC copolymer micelles as long blood circulation vectors to enhance tumor-targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Li-xia [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhao, Jin, E-mail: zhaojin@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li, Ke; He, Li-gang; Qian, Xiao-ming; Liu, Chao-yong; Wang, Li-mei; Yang, Xin-qi [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Sun, Jinjin [Department of General Surgery, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300211 (China); Ren, Yu [Tianjin Research Center of Basic Medical Science, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Kang, Chun-sheng, E-mail: kang97061@yahoo.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Yuan, Xu-bo, E-mail: xbyuan@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-09-01

    Star-branched amphiphilic copolymer nanocarriers with high-density zwitterionic shell show great promise in drug delivery due to their controllable small size and excellent anti-biofouling properties. This gives the hydrophobic cargo with high stability and long blood circulation in vivo. In the present study, star-branched polylactic acid and poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) copolymers with (AB{sub 3}){sub 3}–type architecture (PLA-b-PMPC{sub 3}){sub 3} were conceived as drug vectors, and the copolymers were synthesized by an “arm-first” approach via the combination of ring opening polymerization (ROP), atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and the click reaction. The self-assembled star-branched copolymer micelles (sCPM) had an average diameter of about 64.5 nm and exhibited an ultra-hydrophilic surface with an ultralow water contact angle of about 12.7°, which efficiently suppressed the adhesion of serum proteins. In vivo experiments showed that the sCPM loading strongly enhanced the blood circulation time of DiI and the plasma half-life of DiI in sCPM was 19.3 h. The relative accumulation concentration in tumor of DiI delivered by sCPM was 2.37-fold higher than that of PLA-PEG, at 4 h after intravenous injection. These results demonstrated that the star-branched copolymer (PLA-b-PMPC{sub 3}){sub 3} is a promising alternative carrier material for intravenous delivery versus classic PEG-modified strategies. - Highlights: • Star-branched amphiphilic copolymer micelles (sCPM) with zwitterionic shells were prepared. • sCPM possess an ultra-hydrophilic surface and thus inhibited the protein absorption. • sCPM can effectively prolong the cargo’s plasma circulation time. • sCPM can enhance the cargo’s passive tumor-targeted delivery.

  20. Vector regression introduced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mok Tik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study formulates regression of vector data that will enable statistical analysis of various geodetic phenomena such as, polar motion, ocean currents, typhoon/hurricane tracking, crustal deformations, and precursory earthquake signals. The observed vector variable of an event (dependent vector variable is expressed as a function of a number of hypothesized phenomena realized also as vector variables (independent vector variables and/or scalar variables that are likely to impact the dependent vector variable. The proposed representation has the unique property of solving the coefficients of independent vector variables (explanatory variables also as vectors, hence it supersedes multivariate multiple regression models, in which the unknown coefficients are scalar quantities. For the solution, complex numbers are used to rep- resent vector information, and the method of least squares is deployed to estimate the vector model parameters after transforming the complex vector regression model into a real vector regression model through isomorphism. Various operational statistics for testing the predictive significance of the estimated vector parameter coefficients are also derived. A simple numerical example demonstrates the use of the proposed vector regression analysis in modeling typhoon paths.

  1. Simultaneous measurements with 3D PIV and Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanckaert, K.J.F.; McLelland, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous velocity measurements were taken using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP) in a sharp open-channel bend with an immobile gravel bed. The PIV measures 3D velocity vectors in a vertical plane (~40cm x 20cm) at a frequency of 7.5 Hz, whereas

  2. Light axial vector mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kan; Pang, Cheng-Qun; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the abundant experimental observation of axial-vector states, we study whether the observed axial-vector states can be categorized into the conventional axial-vector meson family. In this paper we carry out an analysis based on the mass spectra and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decays. Besides testing the possible axial-vector meson assignments, we also predict abundant information for their decays and the properties of some missing axial-vector mesons, which are valuable for further experimental exploration of the observed and predicted axial-vector mesons.

  3. VectorBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VectorBase is a Bioinformatics Resource Center for invertebrate vectors. It is one of four Bioinformatics Resource Centers funded by NIAID to provide web-based...

  4. Custodial vector model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becciolini, Diego; Franzosi, Diogo Buarque; Foadi, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology of heavy vector resonances with a $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R$ spectral global symmetry. This symmetry partially protects the electroweak S-parameter from large contributions of the vector resonances. The resulting custodial vector model spectrum...

  5. 3-D Velocity Estimation for Two Planes in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Ewertsen, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    3-D velocity vectors can provide additional flow information applicable for diagnosing cardiovascular diseases e.g. by estimating the out-of-plane velocity component. A 3-D version of the Transverse Oscillation (TO) method has previously been used to obtain this information in a carotid flow....... In the longitudinal plane, average maximum peak velocity in flow direction was 65.2 14.0 cm/s at peak-systole and 33.6 4.3 cm/s at end-diastole. A commercial BK Medical ProFocus UltraView scanner using a spectral estimator gave 79.3 cm/s and 14.6 cm/s for the same volunteer. This demonstrates that real-time 3-D...... vector velocity imaging without ECG gating yields quantitative in vivo estimations on flow direction and magnitude...

  6. Adenovirus vector-mediated ex vivo gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) tohuman umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) promotescrush-injured rat sciatic nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Wei-Hong; Almansoori, Akram A; Sung, Mi-Ae; Ju, Kyung-Won; Seo, Nari; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Bong-Ju; Kim, Soung-Min; Jahng, Jeong Won; He, Hong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-03-16

    This study was designed toinvestigate the efficacy of adenovirus vector-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) ex vivo gene transfer to human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) in a rat sciatic nerve crush injury model. BDNF protein and mRNA expression after infection was checked through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250g, 6 weeks old) were distributed into threegroups (n=20 each): the control group, UCB-MSC group, and BDNF-adenovirus infected UCB-MSC (BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC) group. UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat) or BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat)were transplantedinto the rats at the crush site immediately after sciatic nerve injury. Cell tracking was done with PKH26-labeled UCB-MSCs and BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat). The rats were monitored for 4 weeks post-surgery. Results showed that expression of BDNF at both the protein and mRNA levels was higher inthe BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC group compared to theUCB-MSC group in vitro.Moreover, BDNF mRNA expression was higher in both UCB-MSC group and BDNF-Ad+ UCB-MSC group compared tothe control group, and BDNF mRNA expression in theBDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC group was higher than inboth other groups 5days after surgeryin vivo. Labeled neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), axon counts, axon density, and sciatic function index were significantly increased in the UCB-MSC and BDNF-Ad+ UCB-MSCgroupscompared to the controlgroup four weeksaftercell transplantation. Importantly,the BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCgroup exhibited more peripheral nerve regeneration than the other two groups.Our results indicate thatboth UCB-MSCs and BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCscan improve rat sciatic nerve regeneration, with BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCsshowing a greater effectthan UCB-MSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. PIV Investigations of the Flow Field in the Volute of a Rotary Blood Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankovic, John M.; Kadambi, Jaikrishnan R.; Smith, William A.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    A full-size acrylic model of a rotary blood pump was developed in order to utilize Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to make measurements of the fluid velocities and turbulent stresses throughout the device. The development of an understanding of the hemodynamics within the blood pump is critical to the development and validation of computational models. A blood analog solution, consisting of sodium iodide solution and glycerin, was developed to match physiological kinematic viscosity. The refractive indices of the fluid, the pump casing, and the impeller were matched to facilitate the use of PIV to make velocity measurements. Velocity measurements made in the volute exit/diffuser region are presented for pumps speeds of 3000-3850 rpm. At each speed data were obtained at a physiological pressure of 12 kPa and at a maximum flow condition. Four hundred data pairs were used for each resultant mean velocity vector value, representing greater than an order of magnitude more data pairs than reported previously in the literature on similar devices and resulting in velocity uncertainty levels of approximately 22.9%.

  8. Electromagnetic radiation in a medium with a velocity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, V. O.; Tereshin, A. A.; Bazleva, D. D.

    2016-04-01

    A relativistic expression has been obtained for the curvature of trajectory of the wave vector of an electromagnetic wave in a moving optically transparent medium. It has been shown that the curvature of the trajectory and angular deviation of rays appear in a homogeneous isotropic medium if the gradient of the velocity field in the medium is nonzero. The bending of the trajectory in the medium with the velocity gradient is a firstorder effect in the ratio u/ c.

  9. Detection probabilities for time-domain velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1991-01-01

    Estimation of blood velocities by time-domain cross-correlation of successive high frequency sampled ultrasound signals is investigated. It is shown that any velocity can result from the estimator regardless of the true velocity due to the nonlinear technique employed. Using a simple simulation...... as a filter with a transfer function depending on the actual velocity. This influences the detection probability, which gets lower at certain velocities. An index directly reflecting the probability of detection can easily be calculated from the cross-correlation estimated. This makes it possible to assess...

  10. ON THE ISSUE OF VECTOR CONTROL OF THE ASYNCHRONOUS MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Firago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the issue of one of the widespread types of vector control realization for the asynchronous motors with a short-circuited rotor. Of all more than 20 vector control types known presently, the following are applied most frequently: direct vector control with velocity pickup (VP, direct vector control without VP, indirect vector control with VP and indirect vector control without VP. Despite the fact that the asynchronous-motor indirect vector control without VP is the easiest and most spread, the absence of VP does not allow controlling the motor electromagnetic torque at zero velocity. This is the reason why for electric motor drives of such requirements they utilize the vector control with a velocity transducer. The systems of widest dissemination became the direct and indirect vector control systems with X-axis alignment of the synchronously rotating x–y-coordinate frame along the rotor flux-linkage vector inasmuch as this provides the simplest correlations for controlling variables. Although these two types of vector control are well presented in literature, a number of issues concerning their realization and practical application require further elaboration. These include: the block schemes adequate representation as consisted with the modern realization of vector control and clarification of the analytical expressions for evaluating the regulator parameters.The authors present a technique for evaluating the dynamics of an asynchronous electric motor drive with direct vector control and x-axis alignment along the vector of rotor flux linkage. The article offers a generalized structure of this vector control type with detailed description of its principal blocks: controlling system, frequency converter, and the asynchronous motor.The paper presents a direct vector control simulating model developed in the MatLab environment on the grounds of this structure. The authors illustrate the described technique with the results

  11. Inferring Lower Boundary Driving Conditions Using Vector Magnetic Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James; MacNeice, Peter; Allred, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Low-beta coronal MHD simulations of realistic CME events require the detailed specification of the magnetic fields, velocities, densities, temperatures, etc., in the low corona. Presently, the most accurate estimates of solar vector magnetic fields are made in the high-beta photosphere. Several techniques have been developed that provide accurate estimates of the associated photospheric plasma velocities such as the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms and the Poloidal/Toroidal Decomposition. Nominally, these velocities are consistent with the evolution of the radial magnetic field. To evolve the tangential magnetic field radial gradients must be specified. In addition to estimating the photospheric vector magnetic and velocity fields, a further challenge involves incorporating these fields into an MHD simulation. The simulation boundary must be driven, consistent with the numerical boundary equations, with the goal of accurately reproducing the observed magnetic fields and estimated velocities at some height within the simulation. Even if this goal is achieved, many unanswered questions remain. How can the photospheric magnetic fields and velocities be propagated to the low corona through the transition region? At what cadence must we observe the photosphere to realistically simulate the corona? How do we model the magnetic fields and plasma velocities in the quiet Sun? How sensitive are the solutions to other unknowns that must be specified, such as the global solar magnetic field, and the photospheric temperature and density?

  12. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  13. Antarctic Ice Velocity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This compilation of recent ice velocity data of the Antarctic ice sheet is intended for use by the polar scientific community. The data are presented in tabular form...

  14. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  15. NMR blood vessel imaging method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riederer, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    A high speed method of forming computed images of blood vessels based on measurements of characteristics of a body is described comprising the steps of: subjecting a predetermined body area containing blood vessels of interest to, successively, applications of a short repetition time (TR) NMR pulse sequence during the period of high blood velocity and then to corresponding applications during the period of low blood velocity for successive heart beat cycles; weighting the collected imaging data from each application of the NMR pulse sequence according to whether the data was acquired during the period of high blood velocity or a period of low blood velocity of the corresponding heart beat cycle; accumulating weighted imaging data from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to high blood velocity periods and from a plurality of NMR pulse sequences corresponding to low blood velocity periods; subtracting the weighted imaging data corresponding to each specific phase encoding acquired during the high blood velocity periods from the weighted imaging data for the same phase encoding corresponding to low blood velocity periods in order to compute blood vessel imaging data; and forming an image of the blood vessels of interest from the blood vessel imaging data

  16. Evidence that cell surface charge reduction modifes capillary red cell velocity-flux relationships in hamster cremaster muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, H.; Wieringa, P. A.; Spaan, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    1. From capillary red cell velocity (V)-flux (F) relationships of hamster cremaster muscle a yield velocity (VF = 0) can be derived at which red cell flux is zero. Red cell velocity becomes intermittent and/or red blood cells come to a complete standstill for velocities close to this yield velocity,

  17. Supergravity inspired vector curvaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    It is investigated whether a massive Abelian vector field, whose gauge kinetic function is growing during inflation, can be responsible for the generation of the curvature perturbation in the Universe. Particle production is studied and it is shown that the vector field can obtain a scale-invariant superhorizon spectrum of perturbations with a reasonable choice of kinetic function. After inflation the vector field begins coherent oscillations, during which it corresponds to pressureless isotropic matter. When the vector field dominates the Universe, its perturbations give rise to the observed curvature perturbation following the curvaton scenario. It is found that this is possible if, after the end of inflation, the mass of the vector field increases at a phase transition at temperature of order 1 TeV or lower. Inhomogeneous reheating, whereby the vector field modulates the decay rate of the inflaton, is also studied

  18. Laser Doppler anemometer measurements using nonorthogonal velocity components: error estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orloff, K L; Snyder, P K

    1982-01-15

    Laser Doppler anemometers (LDAs) that are arranged to measure nonorthogonal velocity components (from which orthogonal components are computed through transformation equations) are more susceptible to calibration and sampling errors than are systems with uncoupled channels. In this paper uncertainty methods and estimation theory are used to evaluate, respectively, the systematic and statistical errors that are present when such devices are applied to the measurement of mean velocities in turbulent flows. Statistical errors are estimated for two-channel LDA data that are either correlated or uncorrelated. For uncorrelated data the directional uncertainty of the measured velocity vector is considered for applications where mean streamline patterns are desired.

  19. Orthogonalisation of Vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The vectors aI, a2 are lin- early independent and each of them has norm 1. How- ever, they are not orthogonal to each other. The Gram-. Schmidt process applied to them gives the vectors ql == (1,0), q2 = (0,1). The distance between the pair {all a2} and the pair {q I' q2} is (t) ~. Can we find another pair of orthonormal vectors ...

  20. 3-D Vector Flow Using a Row-Column Addressed CMUT Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Engholm, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an in-house developed 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) appliedfor 3-D blood flow estimation. The probe breaks with conventional transducers in two ways; first, the ultrasonicpressure field is generated from thousands of small vibrating micromachined...... cells, and second, elements areaccessed by row and/or column indices. The 62+62 2-D row-column addressed prototype CMUT probe was usedfor vector flow estimation by transmitting focused ultrasound into a flow-rig with a fully developed parabolicflow. The beam-to-flow angle was 90◦. The received data...... a characteristic parabolic velocity profile was estimated with a peak velocity of 0.48m/s ± 0.02 m/s in reference to the expected 0.54 m/s. The results presented are the first 3-D vector flow estimates obtained with a row-column CMUT probe, which demonstrates that the CMUT technology is feasiblefor 3-D flow...

  1. Angular velocity determination of spinning solar sails using only a sun sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The direction of the sun is the easiest and most reliable observation vector for a solar sail running in deep space exploration. This paper presents a new method using only raw measurements of the sun direction vector to estimate angular velocity for a spinning solar sail. In cases with a constant spin angular velocity, the estimation equation is formed based on the kinematic model for the apparent motion of the sun direction vector; the least-squares solution is then easily calculated. A performance criterion is defined and used to analyze estimation accuracy. In cases with a variable spin angular velocity, the estimation equation is developed based on the kinematic model for the apparent motion of the sun direction vector and the attitude dynamics equation. Simulation results show that the proposed method can quickly yield high-precision angular velocity estimates that are insensitive to certain measurement noises and modeling errors.

  2. Vectors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pettofrezzo, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate students, this text illustrates the use of vectors as a mathematical tool in plane synthetic geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, and analytic geometry of two- and three-dimensional space. Its rigorous development includes a complete treatment of the algebra of vectors in the first two chapters.Among the text's outstanding features are numbered definitions and theorems in the development of vector algebra, which appear in italics for easy reference. Most of the theorems include proofs, and coordinate position vectors receive an in-depth treatment. Key concept

  3. Determination of key parameters of vector multifractal vector fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2017-12-01

    For too long time, multifractal analyses and simulations have been restricted to scalar-valued fields (Schertzer and Tchiguirinskaia, 2017a,b). For instance, the wind velocity multifractality has been mostly analysed in terms of scalar structure functions and with the scalar energy flux. This restriction has had the unfortunate consequences that multifractals were applicable to their full extent in geophysics, whereas it has inspired them. Indeed a key question in geophysics is the complexity of the interactions between various fields or they components. Nevertheless, sophisticated methods have been developed to determine the key parameters of scalar valued fields. In this communication, we first present the vector extensions of the universal multifractal analysis techniques to multifractals whose generator belong to a Levy-Clifford algebra (Schertzer and Tchiguirinskaia, 2015). We point out further extensions noting the increased complexity. For instance, the (scalar) index of multifractality becomes a matrice. Schertzer, D. and Tchiguirinskaia, I. (2015) `Multifractal vector fields and stochastic Clifford algebra', Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, 25(12), p. 123127. doi: 10.1063/1.4937364. Schertzer, D. and Tchiguirinskaia, I. (2017) `An Introduction to Multifractals and Scale Symmetry Groups', in Ghanbarian, B. and Hunt, A. (eds) Fractals: Concepts and Applications in Geosciences. CRC Press, p. (in press). Schertzer, D. and Tchiguirinskaia, I. (2017b) `Pandora Box of Multifractals: Barely Open ?', in Tsonis, A. A. (ed.) 30 Years of Nonlinear Dynamics in Geophysics. Berlin: Springer, p. (in press).

  4. On magnetic field strength effect on velocity and turbulence characterization using Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Amili, Omid; Coletti, Filippo; Toloui, Mostafa

    2017-11-01

    Cardiovascular flows are predominantly laminar. Nevertheless, transient and even turbulent flows have been observed in the vicinity of the heart (e.g. valves, ascending aorta, valvular/vascular stenosis). Effective in-vivo hemodynamic-based diagnostics in these sites require both high-resolution velocity measurements (especially in the near-vessel wall regions) and accurate evaluation of blood flow turbulence level (e.g. in terms of TKE). In addition to phase contrast (PC), appropriately designed PC-MRI sequences provide intravoxel incoherent motion encoding, a unique tool for simultaneous, non-invasive evaluation of velocity 3D vector fields and Reynolds stresses in cardiovascular flows in vivo. However, limited spatial and temporal resolution of PC-MRI result in inaccuracies in the estimation of hemodynamics (e.g. WSS) and of flow turbulence characteristics. This study aims to assess whether SNR gains at higher magnetic field could overcome these limits, providing more accurate velocity and turbulence characterization at higher spatial resolution. Experiments are conducted on MR Scanners at 3 and 7 Tesla with a U-bent pipe flow shaped phantom. 3D velocity fields, Reynolds stresses and TKE are analyzed and compared to a reference PIV experiments.

  5. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  6. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...... description of this momentum flow. The Prescribed Velocity Method is a practical method for the description of an Air Terminal Device which will save grid points close to the opening and ensure the right level of the momentum flow....

  7. Vector-Vector Scattering on the Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-López, Fernando; Urbach, Carsten; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2018-03-01

    In this work we present an extension of the LüScher formalism to include the interaction of particles with spin, focusing on the scattering of two vector particles. The derived formalism will be applied to Scalar QED in the Higgs Phase, where the U(1) gauge boson acquires mass.

  8. De Vector wetenschappelijk bekeken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, D.E.; van der Weijden, F.

    2009-01-01

    In juni 2008 heeft de sectie Parodontologie van ACTA een systematische review gepubliceerd over het effect van de Vector®. De vraagstelling luidde: Wat is het effect van het gebruik van de Vector® op (menselijke) gebitselementen vergeleken met ultrasone apparatuur of handinstrumentarium op

  9. Brane vector phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.; Nitta, Muneto; Veldhuis, T. ter; Xiong, C.

    2009-01-01

    Local oscillations of the brane world are manifested as massive vector fields. Their coupling to the Standard Model can be obtained using the method of nonlinear realizations of the spontaneously broken higher-dimensional space-time symmetries, and to an extent, are model independent. Phenomenological limits on these vector field parameters are obtained using LEP collider data and dark matter constraints

  10. Advancing vector biology research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohl, Alain; Pondeville, Emilie; Schnettler, Esther; Crisanti, Andrea; Supparo, Clelia; Christophides, George K.; Kersey, Paul J.; Maslen, Gareth L.; Takken, Willem; Koenraadt, Constantianus J.M.; Oliva, Clelia F.; Busquets, Núria; Abad, F.X.; Failloux, Anna Bella; Levashina, Elena A.; Wilson, Anthony J.; Veronesi, Eva; Pichard, Maëlle; Arnaud Marsh, Sarah; Simard, Frédéric; Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Vector-borne pathogens impact public health, animal production, and animal welfare. Research on arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges which transmit pathogens to humans and economically important animals is crucial for development of new control measures that target

  11. Vector mesons in matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One consequence of the chiral restoration is the mixing of parity partners. We look for a possible signature of the mixing of vector and axial vector mesons in heavy-ion collisions. We suggest an experimental method for its observation. The dynamical evolution of the heavy-ion collision is described by a transport equation of ...

  12. Architecture and Vector Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Knols, Bart GJ; Kirby, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The character of buildings plays a major role in disease control. It is understood that water supply and sanitation are critical for the well-being of residents. Current vector control programs aim to prevent the access of vector to the human host. This can be achieved through screened windows, c...

  13. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    The two branches of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions...... or meromorphic (allowing poles as singularities) functions. There already exists a well-developed theory for iterative holomorphic dynamical systems, and successful relations found between iteration theory and flows of vector fields have been one of the main motivations for the recent interest in holomorphic...... vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...

  14. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...... of parameter spaces into structurally stable domains, and a description of the bifurcations. For this reason, the talk will focus on these questions for complex polynomial vector fields.......The two branches of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions...

  15. High frame rate synthetic aperture vector flow imaging for transthoracic echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagómez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Bechsgaard, Thor; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the first in vivo results of 2-D high frame rate vector velocity imaging for transthoracic cardiac imaging. Measurements are made on a healthy volunteer using the SARUS experimental ultrasound scanner connected to an intercostal phased-array probe. Two parasternal long-axis view (PLAX) are obtained, one centred at the aortic valve and another centred at the left ventricle. The acquisition sequence was composed of 3 diverging waves for high frame rate synthetic aperture flow imaging. For verification a phantom measurement is performed on a transverse straight 5 mm diameter vessel at a depth of 100 mm in a tissue-mimicking phantom. A flow pump produced a 2 ml/s constant flow with a peak velocity of 0.2 m/s. The average estimated flow angle in the ROI was 86.22° +/- 6.66° with a true flow angle of 90°. A relative velocity bias of -39% with a standard deviation of 13% was found. In-vivo acquisitions show complex flow patterns in the heart. In the aortic valve view, blood is seen exiting the left ventricle cavity through the aortic valve into the aorta during the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle. In the left ventricle view, blood flow is seen entering the left ventricle cavity through the mitral valve and splitting in two ways when approximating the left ventricle wall. The work presents 2-D velocity estimates on the heart from a non-invasive transthoracic scan. The ability of the method detecting flow regardless of the beam angle could potentially reveal a more complete view of the flow patterns presented on the heart.

  16. Revisiting the vector and axial-vector vacuum susceptibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Lei; Liu Yuxin; Sun Weimin; Zong Hongshi

    2008-01-01

    We re-investigate the vector and axial-vector vacuum susceptibilities by taking advantage of the vector and axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identities. We show analytically that, in the chiral limit, the vector vacuum susceptibility is zero and the axial-vector vacuum susceptibility equals three fourths of the square of the pion decay constant. Besides, our analysis reproduces the Weinberg sum rule

  17. Velocity estimation using recursive ultrasound imaging and spatially encoded signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    is subtracted yielding a new frame at every pulse emission. In this paper the method is extended to blood velocity estimation, where a new color flow mapping (CFM) image is created after every pulse emission. The underlying assumption is that the velocity is constant between two pulse emissions and the current...... estimates can therefore be used for compensation of the motion artifacts in the data acquired in the next emission. Two different transmit strategies are investigated in this paper: (a) using a single defocused active aperture in transmit, and (b) emitting with all active transmit sub-apertures at the same...... time using orthogonal spatial encoding signals. The method was applied on data recorded by an experimental system. The estimates of the blood velocity for both methods had a bias less than 3% and a standard deviation around 2% making them a feasible approach for blood velocity estimations...

  18. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  19. In-vivo examples of synthetic aperture vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2007-01-01

    are processed, and movies of full vector flow images are generated. This paper presents still frames from different time instances of these movies. The movie from the femoral data tracks the accelerating velocity in the femoral artery during systole and a backwards flow at the end of the systole. A complex flow...... would be needed. Synthetic aperture vector flow imaging could potentially provide this. The purpose of this paper is to test the synthetic aperture vector flow imaging method on challenging in-vivo data. Two synthetic aperture in-vivo data sets are acquired using a commercial linear array transducer...

  20. Vectoring of parallel synthetic jets: A parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Tim; Gomit, Guillaume; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2016-11-01

    The vectoring of a pair of parallel synthetic jets can be described using five dimensionless parameters: the aspect ratio of the slots, the Strouhal number, the Reynolds number, the phase difference between the jets and the spacing between the slots. In the present study, the influence of the latter four on the vectoring behaviour of the jets is examined experimentally using particle image velocimetry. Time-averaged velocity maps are used to study the variations in vectoring behaviour for a parametric sweep of each of the four parameters independently. A topological map is constructed for the full four-dimensional parameter space. The vectoring behaviour is described both qualitatively and quantitatively. A vectoring mechanism is proposed, based on measured vortex positions. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC Grant Agreement No. 277472).

  1. Near Wall Velocity and Vorticity Measurements, In A Very High R(theta) Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-15

    velocity and vorticity. Extensive work has been carried out at low Reynolds numbers including Balint et al (1990) who studied statistical properties of...boundary layers." J. Fluid Mech. 439, 131-163. Balint , J., Wallace, J.M. & Vukoslavcevic, P. 1991 "The velocity and vorticity vector fields of a turbulent

  2. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    array probe is used along with two different estimators based on the correlation of the received signal. They can estimate the velocity spectrum as a function of time as for ordinary spectrograms, but they also work at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The approach is validated using simulations of pulsatile...... flow using the Womersly–Evans flow model. The relative bias of the mean estimated frequency is 13.6% and the mean relative standard deviation is 14.3% at 90°, where a traditional estimator yields zero velocity. Measurements have been conducted with an experimental scanner and a convex array transducer....... A pump generated artificial femoral and carotid artery flow in the phantom. The estimated spectra degrade when the angle is different from 90°, but are usable down to 60° to 70°. Below this angle the traditional spectrum is best and should be used. The conventional approach can automatically be corrected...

  3. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Noncausal Bayesian Vector Autoregression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanne, Markku; Luoto, Jani

    We propose a Bayesian inferential procedure for the noncausal vector autoregressive (VAR) model that is capable of capturing nonlinearities and incorporating effects of missing variables. In particular, we devise a fast and reliable posterior simulator that yields the predictive distribution...

  5. Tagged Vector Contour (TVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Tagged Vector Contour (TVC) dataset consists of digitized contours from the 7.5 minute topographic quadrangle maps. Coverage for the state is incomplete....

  6. Vector hysteresis models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Pavel

    1991-01-01

    Roč. 2, - (1991), s. 281-292 ISSN 0956-7925 Keywords : vector hysteresis operator * hysteresis potential * differential inequality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.math.cas.cz/~krejci/b15p.pdf

  7. Support vector machines applications

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Support vector machines (SVM) have both a solid mathematical background and good performance in practical applications. This book focuses on the recent advances and applications of the SVM in different areas, such as image processing, medical practice, computer vision, pattern recognition, machine learning, applied statistics, business intelligence, and artificial intelligence. The aim of this book is to create a comprehensive source on support vector machine applications, especially some recent advances.

  8. Vector financial rogue waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-01-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black–Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields. -- Highlights: ► We investigate the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model. ► We analytically present vector financial rogue waves. ► The vector financial rogue waves may be used to describe the extreme events in financial markets. ► This results may excite the relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves.

  9. 3C velocity field measurement in microscale using time resolved micro-PIV

    OpenAIRE

    N., Erkan; K., Okamoto; Dept. of Quantum Eng. and Sys. Science, The University of Tokyo; Inst. of Env. Studies, The University of Tokyo

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of the 3C velocity field in the microfluidic devices with the conventional techniques and conventional micro-PIV is still difficult due to the limited optical access to the microscale flow fields. Mainly micro PIV vector field realizations have been remained limited to 2C velocities. In this study, 3C velocity measurement in microscale using 2-dimentional time-resolved micro PIV images is proposed. The method is based on the PIV performs cross-correlation (CC) peak height tracking...

  10. Laser transit anemometer measurements of a JANNAF nozzle base velocity flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Russ, C. E., Jr.; Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Velocity flow fields of a nozzle jet exhausting into a supersonic flow were surveyed. The measurements were obtained with a laser transit anemometer (LTA) system in the time domain with a correlation instrument. The LTA data is transformed into the velocity domain to remove the error that occurs when the data is analyzed in the time domain. The final data is shown in velocity vector plots for positions upstream, downstream, and in the exhaust plane of the jet nozzle.

  11. CAN THE CURRICULUM BE USED TO ESTIMATE CRITICAL VELOCITY IN YOUNG COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to assess critical velocity using the swimmer curriculum in front crawl events and to compare critical velocity to the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and to the velocity of a 30 min test. The sample included 24 high level male swimmers ranged between 14 and 16 years old. For each subject the critical velocity, the velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration and the mean velocity of a 30 min test were determined. The critical velocity was also estimated by considering the best performance of a swimmer over several distances based on the swimmer curriculum. Critical velocity including 100, 200 and 400 m events was not different from the velocity of 4 mmol·l-1 of blood lactate concentration. Critical velocity including all the swimmer events was not different from the velocity of a 30 min test. The assessment of critical velocity based upon the swimmer curriculum would therefore seem to be a good approach to determine the aerobic ability of a swimmer. The selection of the events to be included in critical velocity assessment must be a main concern in the evaluation of the swimmer

  12. Dynamical creation of complex vector solitons in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Bo; Gong Jiangbin

    2010-01-01

    By numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field equations, we show that the dynamical creation of stable complex vector solitons in a homogeneous spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate can be achieved by applying a localized magnetic field for a certain duration, with the initial uniform density prepared differently for the formation of different vector solitons. In particular, it is shown that stable dark-bright-dark vector solitons, dark-bright-bright vector solitons, and other analogous solutions can be dynamically created. It is also found that the peak intensity and the group velocity of the vector solitons thus generated can be tuned by adjusting the applied magnetic field. Extensions of our approach also allow for the creation of vector-soliton chains or the pumping of many vector solitons. The results can be useful for possible vector-soliton-based applications of dilute Bose-Einstein condensates.

  13. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drive Home Types of Blood Donations Blood Types Blood Types Not all blood is alike. There are eight ... African descent. Learn More About Blood and Diversity Blood Types and Transfusion There are very specific ways in ...

  14. Support Vector Machine Based Monitoring of Cardio-Cerebrovascular Reserve during Simulated Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn J. P. van der Ster

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the initial phase of hypovolemic shock, mean blood pressure (BP is maintained by sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction rendering BP monitoring insensitive to detect blood loss early. Late detection can result in reduced tissue oxygenation and eventually cellular death. We hypothesized that a machine learning algorithm that interprets currently used and new hemodynamic parameters could facilitate in the detection of impending hypovolemic shock.Method: In 42 (27 female young [mean (sd: 24 (4 years], healthy subjects central blood volume (CBV was progressively reduced by application of −50 mmHg lower body negative pressure until the onset of pre-syncope. A support vector machine was trained to classify samples into normovolemia (class 0, initial phase of CBV reduction (class 1 or advanced CBV reduction (class 2. Nine models making use of different features were computed to compare sensitivity and specificity of different non-invasive hemodynamic derived signals. Model features included: volumetric hemodynamic parameters (stroke volume and cardiac output, BP curve dynamics, near-infrared spectroscopy determined cortical brain oxygenation, end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure, thoracic bio-impedance, and middle cerebral artery transcranial Doppler (TCD blood flow velocity. Model performance was tested by quantifying the predictions with three methods: sensitivity and specificity, absolute error, and quantification of the log odds ratio of class 2 vs. class 0 probability estimates.Results: The combination with maximal sensitivity and specificity for classes 1 and 2 was found for the model comprising volumetric features (class 1: 0.73–0.98 and class 2: 0.56–0.96. Overall lowest model error was found for the models comprising TCD curve hemodynamics. Using probability estimates the best combination of sensitivity for class 1 (0.67 and specificity (0.87 was found for the model that contained the TCD cerebral blood flow velocity

  15. Support Vector Machine Based Monitoring of Cardio-Cerebrovascular Reserve during Simulated Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ster, Björn J P; Bennis, Frank C; Delhaas, Tammo; Westerhof, Berend E; Stok, Wim J; van Lieshout, Johannes J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the initial phase of hypovolemic shock, mean blood pressure (BP) is maintained by sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction rendering BP monitoring insensitive to detect blood loss early. Late detection can result in reduced tissue oxygenation and eventually cellular death. We hypothesized that a machine learning algorithm that interprets currently used and new hemodynamic parameters could facilitate in the detection of impending hypovolemic shock. Method: In 42 (27 female) young [mean (sd): 24 (4) years], healthy subjects central blood volume (CBV) was progressively reduced by application of -50 mmHg lower body negative pressure until the onset of pre-syncope. A support vector machine was trained to classify samples into normovolemia (class 0), initial phase of CBV reduction (class 1) or advanced CBV reduction (class 2). Nine models making use of different features were computed to compare sensitivity and specificity of different non-invasive hemodynamic derived signals. Model features included : volumetric hemodynamic parameters (stroke volume and cardiac output), BP curve dynamics, near-infrared spectroscopy determined cortical brain oxygenation, end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure, thoracic bio-impedance, and middle cerebral artery transcranial Doppler (TCD) blood flow velocity. Model performance was tested by quantifying the predictions with three methods : sensitivity and specificity, absolute error, and quantification of the log odds ratio of class 2 vs. class 0 probability estimates. Results: The combination with maximal sensitivity and specificity for classes 1 and 2 was found for the model comprising volumetric features (class 1: 0.73-0.98 and class 2: 0.56-0.96). Overall lowest model error was found for the models comprising TCD curve hemodynamics. Using probability estimates the best combination of sensitivity for class 1 (0.67) and specificity (0.87) was found for the model that contained the TCD cerebral blood flow velocity derived

  16. Cosmological Solutions of Tensor–Vector Theories of Gravity by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider tensor–vector theories by varying the space-time–matter coupling constant (varying Einstein velocity) in a spatially flat FRW universe.We examine the dynamics of this model by dynamical system method assuming a CDM background and we find some exact solutions by considering the character of critical ...

  17. High Frame Rate Synthetic Aperture 3D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Holbek, Simon; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    , current volumetric ultrasonic flow methods are limited to one velocity component or restricted to a reduced field of view (FOV), e.g. fixed imaging planes, in exchange for higher temporal resolutions. To solve these problems, a previously proposed accurate 2-D high frame rate vector flow imaging (VFI...

  18. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Han, Dietbert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Materials and Methods:We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG - triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Results:Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6 - fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Conclusion: Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity

  19. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Wech, Tobias; Hahn, Dietbert; Köstler, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG-triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6-fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity distribution in vessels in the order of the voxel size. Thus

  20. Accelerated radial Fourier-velocity encoding using compressed sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Han, Dietbert [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Wech, Tobias; Koestler, Herbert [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Comprehensive Heart Failure Center (CHFC)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose:Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a tool for non-invasive determination of flow velocities inside blood vessels. Because Phase Contrast MRI only measures a single mean velocity per voxel, it is only applicable to vessels significantly larger than the voxel size. In contrast, Fourier Velocity Encoding measures the entire velocity distribution inside a voxel, but requires a much longer acquisition time. For accurate diagnosis of stenosis in vessels on the scale of spatial resolution, it is important to know the velocity distribution of a voxel. Our aim was to determine velocity distributions with accelerated Fourier Velocity Encoding in an acquisition time required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Materials and Methods:We imaged the femoral artery of healthy volunteers with ECG - triggered, radial CINE acquisition. Data acquisition was accelerated by undersampling, while missing data were reconstructed by Compressed Sensing. Velocity spectra of the vessel were evaluated by high resolution Phase Contrast images and compared to spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoding. By means of undersampling, it was possible to reduce the scan time for Fourier Velocity Encoding to the duration required for a conventional Phase Contrast image. Results:Acquisition time for a fully sampled data set with 12 different Velocity Encodings was 40 min. By applying a 12.6 - fold retrospective undersampling, a data set was generated equal to 3:10 min acquisition time, which is similar to a conventional Phase Contrast measurement. Velocity spectra from fully sampled and undersampled Fourier Velocity Encoded images are in good agreement and show the same maximum velocities as compared to velocity maps from Phase Contrast measurements. Conclusion: Compressed Sensing proved to reliably reconstruct Fourier Velocity Encoded data. Our results indicate that Fourier Velocity Encoding allows an accurate determination of the velocity

  1. Antigenic variation in vector-borne pathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbour, A. G.; Restrepo, B. I.

    2000-01-01

    Several pathogens of humans and domestic animals depend on hematophagous arthropods to transmit them from one vertebrate reservoir host to another and maintain them in an environment. These pathogens use antigenic variation to prolong their circulation in the blood and thus increase the likelihood of transmission. By convergent evolution, bacterial and protozoal vector-borne pathogens have acquired similar genetic mechanisms for successful antigenic variation. Borrelia spp. and Anaplasma marg...

  2. On the pressure velocity and temperature factors and the effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By this, explicit results about the pressure, velocity and temperature distributions are obtained. It is observed that viscosity reduces the pressure, hence, the velocity and temperature distributions. Our results may find relevance in the medical treatment of high blood-pressure problem. Keywords: Viscosity pressure, velocity, ...

  3. About the velocity operator for spinning particles in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesi, Giovanni; Recami, Erasmo; Rodrigues Junior, Waldyr A.

    1995-12-01

    Starting from the formal expressions of the hydrodynamical (or local) quantities employed in the applications of Clifford Algebras to quantum mechanics, we introduce - in terms of the ordinary tensorial framework - a new definition for the field of a generic quantity. By translating from Clifford into sensor algebra, we also propose a new (non-relativistic) velocity operator for a spin 1/2 particle. This operator is the sum of the ordinary part p/m describing the mean motion (the motion of the center-of-mass), and of a second part associated with the so-called Zitterbewegung, which is the spin internal motion observed in the center-of-mass frame. This spin component of the velocity operator is non-zero not only in the Pauli theoretical framework in presence of external magnetic fields and spin precession, but also in the Schroedinger case, when the wave-function is a spin eigenstate. In the latter case, one gets a decomposition of the velocity field for the Madelueng fluid into two distinct parts: which constitutes the non-relativistic analogue of the Gordon decomposition for the Dirac current. We find furthermore that the Zitterbewegung motion involves a velocity field which is solenoidal, and that the local angular velocity is parallel to the spin vector. In presence of a non-constant spin vector (Pauli case) we have, besides the component normal to spin present even in the Schroedinger theory, also a component of the local velocity which is parallel to the rotor of the spin vector. (author). 19 refs

  4. Exceptional Ground Accelerations and Velocities Caused by Earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, John

    2008-01-17

    This project aims to understand the characteristics of the free-field strong-motion records that have yielded the 100 largest peak accelerations and the 100 largest peak velocities recorded to date. The peak is defined as the maximum magnitude of the acceleration or velocity vector during the strong shaking. This compilation includes 35 records with peak acceleration greater than gravity, and 41 records with peak velocities greater than 100 cm/s. The results represent an estimated 150,000 instrument-years of strong-motion recordings. The mean horizontal acceleration or velocity, as used for the NGA ground motion models, is typically 0.76 times the magnitude of this vector peak. Accelerations in the top 100 come from earthquakes as small as magnitude 5, while velocities in the top 100 all come from earthquakes with magnitude 6 or larger. Records are dominated by crustal earthquakes with thrust, oblique-thrust, or strike-slip mechanisms. Normal faulting mechanisms in crustal earthquakes constitute under 5% of the records in the databases searched, and an even smaller percentage of the exceptional records. All NEHRP site categories have contributed exceptional records, in proportions similar to the extent that they are represented in the larger database.

  5. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along theultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. Ifattenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler.

  6. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along the ultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. If attenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler

  7. Multithreading in vector processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Kim, Changhoan; Nair, Ravi

    2018-01-16

    In one embodiment, a system includes a processor having a vector processing mode and a multithreading mode. The processor is configured to operate on one thread per cycle in the multithreading mode. The processor includes a program counter register having a plurality of program counters, and the program counter register is vectorized. Each program counter in the program counter register represents a distinct corresponding thread of a plurality of threads. The processor is configured to execute the plurality of threads by activating the plurality of program counters in a round robin cycle.

  8. Twisting of paramodular vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson-Leung, Jennifer; Roberts, Brooks

    2013-01-01

    Let $F$ be a non-archimedean local field of characteristic zero, let $(\\pi,V)$ be an irreducible, admissible representation of $\\GSp(4,F)$ with trivial central character, and let $\\chi$ be a quadratic character of $F^\\times$ with conductor $c(\\chi)>1$. We define a twisting operator $T_\\chi$ from paramodular vectors for $\\pi$ of level $n$ to paramodular vectors for $\\chi \\otimes \\pi$ of level $\\max(n+2c(\\chi),4c(\\chi))$, and prove that this operator has properties analogous to the well-known $...

  9. Matrix vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenman, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    This outstanding text and reference applies matrix ideas to vector methods, using physical ideas to illustrate and motivate mathematical concepts but employing a mathematical continuity of development rather than a physical approach. The author, who taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy, dispenses with the artificial barrier between vectors and matrices--and more generally, between pure and applied mathematics.Motivated examples introduce each idea, with interpretations of physical, algebraic, and geometric contexts, in addition to generalizations to theorems that reflect the essential structur

  10. Sums and Gaussian vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Yurinsky, Vadim Vladimirovich

    1995-01-01

    Surveys the methods currently applied to study sums of infinite-dimensional independent random vectors in situations where their distributions resemble Gaussian laws. Covers probabilities of large deviations, Chebyshev-type inequalities for seminorms of sums, a method of constructing Edgeworth-type expansions, estimates of characteristic functions for random vectors obtained by smooth mappings of infinite-dimensional sums to Euclidean spaces. A self-contained exposition of the modern research apparatus around CLT, the book is accessible to new graduate students, and can be a useful reference for researchers and teachers of the subject.

  11. Host life history strategy, species diversity, and habitat influence Trypanosoma cruzi vector infection in Changing landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Gottdenker

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama.R. pallescens vectors (N = 643 were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3% vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3% dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as r(max, the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase, and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of r(max were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site.In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T. cruzi, potentially by changing host community structure to favor hosts

  12. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The

  13. Global velocity constrained cloud motion prediction for short-term solar forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanjun; Li, Wei; Zhang, Chongyang; Hu, Chuanping

    2016-09-01

    Cloud motion is the primary reason for short-term solar power output fluctuation. In this work, a new cloud motion estimation algorithm using a global velocity constraint is proposed. Compared to the most used Particle Image Velocity (PIV) algorithm, which assumes the homogeneity of motion vectors, the proposed method can capture the accurate motion vector for each cloud block, including both the motional tendency and morphological changes. Specifically, global velocity derived from PIV is first calculated, and then fine-grained cloud motion estimation can be achieved by global velocity based cloud block researching and multi-scale cloud block matching. Experimental results show that the proposed global velocity constrained cloud motion prediction achieves comparable performance to the existing PIV and filtered PIV algorithms, especially in a short prediction horizon.

  14. Measurement of Plasma Ion Temperature and Flow Velocity from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    304. Xu Wei where ν0 is the flow velocity vector. The uniform flow in the absence of any other mechanism is delta function (Xu 2003): f (λ) = δ. [ λ − λc. (. 1 − ν0 c cos θ. )] = δ. [ x + λc ν0 c cos θ. ] , where x = λ − λc. The line profile due to Doppler broadening and Doppler shift is the convolution of the two profile functions: f (y) =.

  15. Application of Bred Vectors To Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, M.; Kalnay, E.; Patil, Dj

    We introduced a statistic, the BV-dimension, to measure the effective local finite-time dimensionality of the atmosphere. We show that this dimension is often quite low, and suggest that this finding has important implications for data assimilation and the accuracy of weather forecasting (Patil et al, 2001). The original database for this study was the forecasts of the NCEP global ensemble forecasting system. The initial differences between the control forecast and the per- turbed forecasts are called bred vectors. The control and perturbed initial conditions valid at time t=n(t are evolved using the forecast model until time t=(n+1) (t. The differences between the perturbed and the control forecasts are scaled down to their initial amplitude, and constitute the bred vectors valid at (n+1) (t. Their growth rate is typically about 1.5/day. The bred vectors are similar by construction to leading Lya- punov vectors except that they have small but finite amplitude, and they are valid at finite times. The original NCEP ensemble data set has 5 independent bred vectors. We define a local bred vector at each grid point by choosing the 5 by 5 grid points centered at the grid point (a region of about 1100km by 1100km), and using the north-south and east- west velocity components at 500mb pressure level to form a 50 dimensional column vector. Since we have k=5 global bred vectors, we also have k local bred vectors at each grid point. We estimate the effective dimensionality of the subspace spanned by the local bred vectors by performing a singular value decomposition (EOF analysis). The k local bred vector columns form a 50xk matrix M. The singular values s(i) of M measure the extent to which the k column unit vectors making up the matrix M point in the direction of v(i). We define the bred vector dimension as BVDIM={Sum[s(i)]}^2/{Sum[s(i)]^2} For example, if 4 out of the 5 vectors lie along v, and one lies along v, the BV- dimension would be BVDIM[sqrt(4), 1, 0

  16. Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood, as discussed in the following paragraphs. Red Blood Cells Red blood cells carry oxygen from ... leaks out, and its levels in your blood rise. For example, blood levels of troponin rise when ...

  17. Nuclear medium effects via quasielastic (p vector, p vector') and (p vector, n vector) scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillhouse, G.C.; Ventel, B.I.S. van der; Wyngaardt, S.M.; De Kock, P.R.

    1997-01-01

    For a 40 Ca target at a fixed momentum transfer of 1.97 fm -1 , and incident energies between 135 and 300 MeV, we quantitatively investigate the sensitivity of complete sets of quasielastic (p vector, p vector') and (p vector, n vector) spin observables to medium effects, pseudoscalar versus pseudovector forms of the πNN vertex, and exchange contributions to the NN amplitudes using a relativistic PWIA. The qualitative nature of previous studies failed to give an indication of the experimental statistical uncertainty required for distinguishing between the various model predictions. New Horowitz-Love-Franey relativistic NN amplitudes have been generated in order to yield improved and more quantitative spin observable values than before. This study indicates at which energies particular spin observables need to be measured in order to test current nuclear models. A comparison to the limited available data indicates that the relativistic parametrization of the NN scattering amplitudes in terms of only the five Fermi invariants (the SVPAT form) is questionable. (author)

  18. Orthogonalisation of Vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    converting these vectors to orthonormal ones demanded by the model. The process of finding the closest or- thonormal basis is called the Lowdin orthogonalisation after the Swedish chemist P 0 Lowdin who introduced it. This is related to one of the basic theorems in linear algebra as we will see. Matrix Approximation ...

  19. Calculus with vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Treiman, Jay S

    2014-01-01

    Calculus with Vectors grew out of a strong need for a beginning calculus textbook for undergraduates who intend to pursue careers in STEM. fields. The approach introduces vector-valued functions from the start, emphasizing the connections between one-variable and multi-variable calculus. The text includes early vectors and early transcendentals and includes a rigorous but informal approach to vectors. Examples and focused applications are well presented along with an abundance of motivating exercises. All three-dimensional graphs have rotatable versions included as extra source materials and may be freely downloaded and manipulated with Maple Player; a free Maple Player App is available for the iPad on iTunes. The approaches taken to topics such as the derivation of the derivatives of sine and cosine, the approach to limits, and the use of "tables" of integration have been modified from the standards seen in other textbooks in order to maximize the ease with which students may comprehend the material. Additio...

  20. Sesquilinear uniform vector integral

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    absolute integral which generalizes the Lebesgue integral and is more easy to manipulate. We speak so far about scalar integrals (scalar functions integrated with respect to positive measures-speaking approximately). The idea of integrating vector functions with respect to scalar measures came naturally on the scene of ...

  1. Vector-borne Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-18

    This podcast discusses emerging vector-borne pathogens, their role as prominent contributors to emerging infectious diseases, how they're spread, and the ineffectiveness of mosquito control methods.  Created: 4/18/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2011.

  2. Seasonal changes in the apparent position of the Sun as elementary applications of vector operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Many introductory courses in physics face an unpleasant chicken-and-egg problem. One might choose to introduce students to physical quantities such as velocity, acceleration, and momentum in over-simplified one-dimensional applications before introducing vectors and their manipulation; or one might first introduce vectors as mathematical objects and defer demonstration of their physical utility. This paper offers a solution to this pedagogical problem: elementary vector operations can be used without mechanics concepts to understand variations in the solar latitude, duration of daylight, and orientation of the rising and setting Sun. I show how sunrise and sunset phenomena lend themselves to exercises with scalar products, vector products, unit vectors, and vector projections that can be useful for introducing vector analysis in the context of physics. (paper)

  3. Spacecraft attitude and velocity control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszek, Michael A. (Inventor); Piper, Jr., George E. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A spacecraft attitude and/or velocity control system includes a controller which responds to at least attitude errors to produce command signals representing a force vector F and a torque vector T, each having three orthogonal components, which represent the forces and torques which are to be generated by the thrusters. The thrusters may include magnetic torquer or reaction wheels. Six difference equations are generated, three having the form ##EQU1## where a.sub.j is the maximum torque which the j.sup.th thruster can produce, b.sub.j is the maximum force which the j.sup.th thruster can produce, and .alpha..sub.j is a variable representing the throttling factor of the j.sup.th thruster, which may range from zero to unity. The six equations are summed to produce a single scalar equation relating variables .alpha..sub.j to a performance index Z: ##EQU2## Those values of .alpha. which maximize the value of Z are determined by a method for solving linear equations, such as a linear programming method. The Simplex method may be used. The values of .alpha..sub.j are applied to control the corresponding thrusters.

  4. Introduction to Vector Field Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, David; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Vector field visualization techniques are essential to help us understand the complex dynamics of flow fields. These can be found in a wide range of applications such as study of flows around an aircraft, the blood flow in our heart chambers, ocean circulation models, and severe weather predictions. The vector fields from these various applications can be visually depicted using a number of techniques such as particle traces and advecting textures. In this tutorial, we present several fundamental algorithms in flow visualization including particle integration, particle tracking in time-dependent flows, and seeding strategies. For flows near surfaces, a wide variety of synthetic texture-based algorithms have been developed to depict near-body flow features. The most common approach is based on the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm. There also exist extensions of LIC to support more flexible texture generations for 3D flow data. This tutorial reviews these algorithms. Tensor fields are found in several real-world applications and also require the aid of visualization to help users understand their data sets. Examples where one can find tensor fields include mechanics to see how material respond to external forces, civil engineering and geomechanics of roads and bridges, and the study of neural pathway via diffusion tensor imaging. This tutorial will provide an overview of the different tensor field visualization techniques, discuss basic tensor decompositions, and go into detail on glyph based methods, deformation based methods, and streamline based methods. Practical examples will be used when presenting the methods; and applications from some case studies will be used as part of the motivation.

  5. Preliminary examples of 3D vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents 3D vector flow images obtained using the 3D Transverse Oscillation (TO) method. The method employs a 2D transducer and estimates the three velocity components simultaneously, which is important for visualizing complex flow patterns. Data are acquired using the experimental ult...... as opposed to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results demonstrate that the 3D TO method is capable of performing 3D vector flow imaging.......This paper presents 3D vector flow images obtained using the 3D Transverse Oscillation (TO) method. The method employs a 2D transducer and estimates the three velocity components simultaneously, which is important for visualizing complex flow patterns. Data are acquired using the experimental...... ultrasound scanner SARUS on a flow rig system with steady flow. The vessel of the flow-rig is centered at a depth of 30 mm, and the flow has an expected 2D circular-symmetric parabolic prole with a peak velocity of 1 m/s. Ten frames of 3D vector flow images are acquired in a cross-sectional plane orthogonal...

  6. Reproduction of pressure field in ultrasonic-measurement-integrated simulation of blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonic-measurement-integrated (UMI) simulation of blood flow is used to analyze the velocity and pressure fields by applying feedback signals of artificial body forces based on differences of Doppler velocities between ultrasonic measurement and numerical simulation. Previous studies have revealed that UMI simulation accurately reproduces the velocity field of a target blood flow, but that the reproducibility of the pressure field is not necessarily satisfactory. In the present study, the reproduction of the pressure field by UMI simulation was investigated. The effect of feedback on the pressure field was first examined by theoretical analysis, and a pressure compensation method was devised. When the divergence of the feedback force vector was not zero, it influenced the pressure field in the UMI simulation while improving the computational accuracy of the velocity field. Hence, the correct pressure was estimated by adding pressure compensation to remove the deteriorating effect of the feedback. A numerical experiment was conducted dealing with the reproduction of a synthetic three-dimensional steady flow in a thoracic aneurysm to validate results of the theoretical analysis and the proposed pressure compensation method. The ability of the UMI simulation to reproduce the pressure field deteriorated with a large feedback gain. However, by properly compensating the effects of the feedback signals on the pressure, the error in the pressure field was reduced, exhibiting improvement of the computational accuracy. It is thus concluded that the UMI simulation with pressure compensation allows for the reproduction of both velocity and pressure fields of blood flow. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Spacecraft Angular Velocity Estimation Algorithm Based on Orientation Quaternion Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The spacecraft (SC mission involves providing the appropriate orientation and stabilization of the associated axes in space. One of the main sources of information for the attitude control system is the angular rate sensor blocks. One way to improve a reliability of the system is to provide a back up of the control algorithms in case of failure of these blocks. To solve the problem of estimation of SP angular velocity vector in the inertial system of coordinates with a lack of information from the angular rate sensors is supposed the use of orientation data from the star sensors; in this case at each clock of the onboard digital computer. The equations in quaternions are used to describe the kinematics of rotary motion. Their approximate solution is used to estimate the angular velocity vector. Methods of modal control and multi-dimensional decomposition of a control object are used to solve the problem of observation and identification of the angular rates. These methods enabled us to synthesize the SP angular velocity vector estimation algorithm and obtain the equations, which relate the error quaternion with the calculated estimate of the angular velocity. Mathematical modeling was carried out to test the algorithm. Cases of different initial conditions were simulated. Time between orientation quaternion measurements and angular velocity of the model was varied. The algorithm was compared with a more accurate algorithm, built on more complete equations. Graphs of difference in angular velocity estimation depending on the number of iterations are presented. The difference in angular velocity estimation is calculated from results of the synthesized algorithm and the algorithm for more accurate equations. Graphs of error distribution for angular velocity estimation with initial conditions being changed are also presented, and standard deviations of estimation errors are calculated. The synthesized algorithm is inferior in accuracy assessment to

  8. Control rod velocity limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Carruth, J.C.; Dixon, R.C.; Spencer, S.S.; Zuloaga, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a velocity control arrangement for a reciprocable, vertically oriented control rod for use in a nuclear reactor in a fluid medium, the control rod including a drive hub secured to and extending from one end therefrom. The control device comprises: a toroidally shaped control member spaced from and coaxially positioned around the hub and secured thereto by a plurality of spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the toroidal member spaced therefrom in coaxial position. The side of the control member toward the control rod has a smooth generally conical surface. The side of the control member away from the control rod is formed with a concave surface constituting a single annular groove. The device also comprises inner and outer annular vanes radially spaced from one another and spaced from the side of the control member away from the control rod and positioned coaxially around and spaced from the hub and secured thereto by spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the vanes. The vanes are angled toward the control member, the outer edge of the inner vane being closer to the control member and the inner edge of the outer vane being closer to the control member. When the control rod moves in the fluid in the direction toward the drive hub the vanes direct a flow of fluid turbulence which provides greater resistance to movement of the control rod in the direction toward the drive hub than in the other direction

  9. Deterministic hydrodynamics: Taking blood apart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John A.; Inglis, David W.; Morton, Keith J.; Lawrence, David A.; Huang, Lotien R.; Chou, Stephen Y.; Sturm, James C.; Austin, Robert H.

    2006-10-01

    We show the fractionation of whole blood components and isolation of blood plasma with no dilution by using a continuous-flow deterministic array that separates blood components by their hydrodynamic size, independent of their mass. We use the technology we developed of deterministic arrays which separate white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets from blood plasma at flow velocities of 1,000 μm/sec and volume rates up to 1 μl/min. We verified by flow cytometry that an array using focused injection removed 100% of the lymphocytes and monocytes from the main red blood cell and platelet stream. Using a second design, we demonstrated the separation of blood plasma from the blood cells (white, red, and platelets) with virtually no dilution of the plasma and no cellular contamination of the plasma. cells | plasma | separation | microfabrication

  10. Vector-borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    More, Simon J.; Bicout, Dominique; Bøtner, Anette

    2017-01-01

    After a request from the Europea n Commission, EFSA’s Panel on Animal Health and Welfaresummarised the main characteristics of 36 vector-borne disease s (VBDs) in 36 web-based storymaps.The risk of introduction in the EU through movement of livestock or pets was assessed for eac h of the36 VBDs...... individually, using a semiquantitative Metho d to INTegrate all relevant RISK aspects(MINTRI SK model), which was further modified to a European scale into the EFSA-VBD-RISK-m odel .Only eight of the 36 VBD-agents had an overall rate of introduction in the EU (being the combinationof the rate of entry, vector...... transmission and establishment) which was estimated to be above 0.001introductions per year. These were Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, bluetongue virus, WestNile virus, Schmallenberg virus, Hepatozoon canis, Leishmania infantum, Bunyamwera virus andHighlands J. virus. For these eight dise ases...

  11. Tensor Calculus: Unlearning Vector Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wha-Suck; Engelbrecht, Johann; Moller, Rita

    2018-01-01

    Tensor calculus is critical in the study of the vector calculus of the surface of a body. Indeed, tensor calculus is a natural step-up for vector calculus. This paper presents some pitfalls of a traditional course in vector calculus in transitioning to tensor calculus. We show how a deeper emphasis on traditional topics such as the Jacobian can…

  12. Propagating Gateway Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2018-01-02

    Generating stocks of Entry and Destination vectors for use in the Gateway recombinatorial cloning system requires transforming them into Escherichia coli strain DB3.1, where they can replicate because this strain is immune to the effects of the ccdB gene carried in the Gateway cassette. However, mutations in the ccdB gene can arise at low frequency, and these mutant plasmids will consequently allow growth of standard cloning strains of E. coli (e.g., DH5α). Therefore, after making new stocks of Gateway plasmids, their ability to grow in cloning strains of E. coli must be tested. This involves obtaining multiple stocks of vector, each arising from a single plasmid grown in a single DB3.1 bacterial colony, and transforming each stock into both DB3.1 and the preferred cloning strain of E. coli in a controlled fashion. Only vector stocks that effectively kill the standard cloning strain (i.e., no or few colonies are obtained after transformation) should be used in Gateway cloning reactions. The sequence can be performed in 3 d. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Day-Ahead Wind Speed Forecasting Using Relevance Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of wind power technology, the security of the power system, power quality, and stable operation will meet new challenges. So, in this paper, we propose a recently developed machine learning technique, relevance vector machine (RVM, for day-ahead wind speed forecasting. We combine Gaussian kernel function and polynomial kernel function to get mixed kernel for RVM. Then, RVM is compared with back propagation neural network (BP and support vector machine (SVM for wind speed forecasting in four seasons in precision and velocity; the forecast results demonstrate that the proposed method is reasonable and effective.

  14. New techniques for the scientific visualization of three-dimensional multi-variate and vector fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawfis, Roger A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Volume rendering allows us to represent a density cloud with ideal properties (single scattering, no self-shadowing, etc.). Scientific visualization utilizes this technique by mapping an abstract variable or property in a computer simulation to a synthetic density cloud. This thesis extends volume rendering from its limitation of isotropic density clouds to anisotropic and/or noisy density clouds. Design aspects of these techniques are discussed that aid in the comprehension of scientific information. Anisotropic volume rendering is used to represent vector based quantities in scientific visualization. Velocity and vorticity in a fluid flow, electric and magnetic waves in an electromagnetic simulation, and blood flow within the body are examples of vector based information within a computer simulation or gathered from instrumentation. Understand these fields can be crucial to understanding the overall physics or physiology. Three techniques for representing three-dimensional vector fields are presented: Line Bundles, Textured Splats and Hair Splats. These techniques are aimed at providing a high-level (qualitative) overview of the flows, offering the user a substantial amount of information with a single image or animation. Non-homogenous volume rendering is used to represent multiple variables. Computer simulations can typically have over thirty variables, which describe properties whose understanding are useful to the scientist. Trying to understand each of these separately can be time consuming. Trying to understand any cause and effect relationships between different variables can be impossible. NoiseSplats is introduced to represent two or more properties in a single volume rendering of the data. This technique is also aimed at providing a qualitative overview of the flows.

  15. Leishmaniasis vector behaviour in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutinga, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Leishmaniasis in Kenya exists in two forms: cutaneous and visceral. The vectors of visceral leishmaniasis have been the subject of investigation by various researchers since World War II, when the outbreak of the disease was first noticed. The vectors of cutaneous leishmaniasis were first worked on only a decade ago after the discovery of the disease focus in Mt. Elgon. The vector behaviour of these diseases, namely Phlebotomus pedifer, the vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis, and Phlebotomus martini, the vector of visceral leishmaniasis, are discussed in detail. P. pedifer has been found to breed and bite inside caves, whereas P. martini mainly bites inside houses. (author)

  16. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  17. Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Ricardo Lazzari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology.

  18. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  19. How do biting disease vectors behaviourally respond to host availability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakob, Laith

    2016-08-25

    Ecological theory predicts a diverse range of functional responses of species to resource availability; but in the context of human blood consumption by disease vectors, a simplistic, linear response is ubiquitously assumed. A simple and flexible model formulation is presented that extends the Holling's Types to account for a wider range of qualitatively distinct behaviours, and used to examine the impact of different vector responses to the relative availability of multiple blood-host species. Epidemiological models of falciparum malaria, Chagas disease and Lyme disease demonstrate that the standard, often implicit, assumption of a linear functional response can lead to spurious under- or over-estimates in disease transmission potential, across a full range of pathogen life-cycles. It is shown how the functional response in vector biting can augment disease intervention outcomes. Interactions between vector biting behaviour and uneven pathogen transmission probabilities between alternative hosts, as is the case for Chagas disease, can render infection more resilient to control. Both the novel response formula and the nested vector-borne disease structure offer a flexible framework that can be applied to other vector-borne diseases in assessing the role of this newly identified aspect of biting behavioural ecology.

  20. Energy Based Clutter Filtering for Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Jensen, Jonas; Ewertsen, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    To obtain accurate blood flow velocity estimates it is important to remove the clutter signal originating from tissue. Conventionally, the clutter signal has been separated from the blood signal based on the difference of their spectral frequencies. However, this approach is not enough...... spectrum function to a predetermined threshold. The effect of the clutter filtering is evaluated on a plane wave (PW) scan sequence in combination with transverse oscillation (TO) and directional beamforming (DB) for velocity estimation. The performance of the filter is assessed by comparison...... of the velocity estimates of the proposed filter against a conventional moving average clutter filter. The effect of tissue motion is investigated using a Field II simulation of a straight vessel with moving wall, while the direct effect of the filter on the velocity estimates is evaluated on a CFD model...

  1. On vector equilibrium problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let X be a real topological vector space; K & X be a nonempty closed convex set; ЕYY PЖ be a real ordered ... induced by a solid pointed closed convex cone P, thus x P y@Ay └ x P P, VxY y P Y; f : X ┬ X└3Y with .... tone; VxY y P K, the function t P Й0Y 1К└3gЕty З Е1 └ tЖxY yЖ is continuous at 0З; g is a P-convex and ...

  2. Scalar and vector Galileons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Yeinzon; Navarro, Andrés A.

    2017-03-01

    An alternative for the construction of fundamental theories is the introduction of Galileons. These are fields whose action leads to non higher than second-order equations of motion. As this is a necessary but not sufficient condition to make the Hamiltonian bounded from below, as long as the action is not degenerate, the Galileon construction is a way to avoid pathologies both at the classical and quantum levels. Galileon actions are, therefore, of great interest in many branches of physics, specially in high energy physics and cosmology. This proceedings contribution presents the generalities of the construction of both scalar and vector Galileons following two different but complimentary routes.

  3. Deforestation: effects on vector-borne disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J F; Molyneux, D H; Birley, M H

    1993-01-01

    This review addresses changes in the ecology of vectors and epidemiology of vector-borne diseases which result from deforestation. Selected examples are considered from viral and parasitic infections (arboviruses, malaria, the leishmaniases, filariases, Chagas Disease and schistosomiasis) where disease patterns have been directly or indirectly influenced by loss of natural tropical forests. A wide range of activities have resulted in deforestation. These include colonisation and settlement, transmigrant programmes, logging, agricultural activities to provide for cash crops, mining, hydropower development and fuelwood collection. Each activity influences the prevalence, incidence and distribution of vector-borne disease. Three main regions are considered--South America, West & Central Africa and South-East Asia. In each, documented changes in vector ecology and behaviour and disease pattern have occurred. Such changes result from human activity at the forest interface and within the forest. They include both deforestation and reafforestation programmes. Deforestation, or activities associated with it, have produced new habitats for Anopheles darlingi mosquitoes and have caused malaria epidemics in South America. The different species complexes in South-East Asia (A. dirus, A. minimus, A. balabacensis) have been affected in different ways by forest clearance with different impacts on malaria incidence. The ability of zoophilic vectors to adapt to human blood as an alternative source of food and to become associated with human dwellings (peridomestic behaviour) have influenced the distribution of the leishmaniases in South America. Certain species of sandflies (Lutzomyia intermedia, Lu. longipalpis, Lu. whitmani), which were originally zoophilic and sylvatic, have adapted to feeding on humans in peridomestic and even periurban situations. The changes in behaviour of reservoir hosts and the ability of pathogens to adapt to new reservoir hosts in the newly

  4. Vectors of subsurface stormflow in a layered hillslope during runoff initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Retter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus is the experimental assessment of in-situ flow vectors in a hillslope soil. We selected a 100 m2 trenched hillslope study site. During prescribed sprinkling an obliquely installed TDR wave-guide provides for the velocity of the wetting front in its direction. A triplet of wave-guides mounted along the sides of an hypothetical tetrahedron, with its peak pointing down, produces a three-dimensional vector of the wetting front. The method is based on the passing of wetting fronts. We analysed 34 vectors along the hillslope at distributed locations and at soil depths from 11 cm (representing top soil to 40 cm (close to bedrock interface. The mean values resulted as follows vx=16.1 mm min-1, vy=-0.2 mm min-1, and vz=11.9 mm min-1. The velocity vectors of the wetting fronts were generally gravity dominated and downslope orientated. Downslope direction (x-axis dominated close to bedrock, whereas no preference between vertical and downslope direction was found in vectors close to the surface. The velocities along the contours (y-axis varied widely. The Kruskal-Wallis tests indicated that the different upslope sprinkling areas had no influence on the orientation of the vectors. Vectors of volume flux density were also calculated for each triplet. The lateral velocities of the vector approach are compared with subsurface stromflow collected at the downhill end of the slope. Velocities were 25-140 times slower than lateral saturated tracer movements on top of the bedrock. Beside other points, we conclude that this method is restricted to non-complex substrate (skeleton or portion of big stones.

  5. Utilization of an ultrasound beam steering angle for measurements of tissue displacement vector and lateral displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikayoshi Sumi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chikayoshi SumiDepartment of Information and Communication Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: A number of ultrasonic displacement/velocity measurement methods have been extensively developed for measurements of blood flow, tissue motion, and strain. Lateral modulation (LM methods have also been reported using steered, crossed beams, and these methods permit measurements of displacement vectors. In this report, a new beam steering method for the transmission and reception of ultrasound is proposed, which can enable measurements of lateral displacements and of arbitrary displacement vectors with a very high degree of accuracy. Because this beam steering method uses only a steering angle, this method is referred to as ASTA. With ASTA, the number of available methods to obtain a displacement vector measurement is limited to previously developed block-matching methods, such as the multidimensional cross-spectrum phase gradient method, and the multidimensional autocorrelation method (MAM and the multidimensional Doppler method (MDM using a block-matching method (the methods using block matching are referred to as MAMb and MDMb, respectively. Being dependent on the measurement method, only a lateral displacement measurement can be made even if the methods are multidimensional, ie, previously developed MAM and MDM using a moving average and a mirror setting of the obtained steered beams, and one-dimensional (1D, such as an autocorrelation method. Considerations of beamforming schemes using LM and ASTA show that the simple ASTA beamforming method increases capabilities for real-time measurements and requires a small physical aperture when compared with LM. For lateral displacement measurements (eg, blood flow in a carotid artery, a lateral coordinate must correspond to the direction of the target’s lateral motion, and the steering angle used is as large as possible to increase the measurement accuracy

  6. Malaria Prevalence and Indoor-Biting Mosquito Vector Abundance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper studies malaria prevalence and the abundance of indoor-biting mosquito vectors in Ogbunike community, Oyi Local Government Area of. Anambra State, Nigeria between May and September 2010. Blood samples were collected from 208 healthy participants (94 males and 114 females) selected from the six ...

  7. Malaria Prevalence and Indoor-Biting Mosquito Vector Abundance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-20

    May 20, 2011 ... selected from the six villages of the town. Thick and thin blood films were made, stained with Field's stains A and B and examined microscopically. Indoor-biting mosquito vectors were collected using Pyrethrum Knockdown. Collection method (PKC). Of the 208 participants, 121 (58.2%) were malaria ...

  8. Trypanosoma avium of raptors (Falconiformes): phylogeny and identification of vectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votýpka, Jan; Oborník, Miroslav; Volf, P.; Svobodová, M.; Lukeš, Julius

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 125, č. 3 (2002), s. 253ů263 ISSN 0031-1820 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/00/1212; GA ČR GA206/00/1094 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : phylogeny * blood parasites * insect vectors Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.828, year: 2002

  9. Vertical vector face lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoano, Brian; Chan, Joanna; Morganroth, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation using local anesthesia has evolved in the past decade as a safer option for patients seeking fewer complications and minimal downtime. Mini- and short-scar face lifts using more conservative incision lengths and extent of undermining can be effective in the younger patient with lower face laxity and minimal loose, elastotic neck skin. By incorporating both an anterior and posterior approach and using an incision length between the mini and more traditional face lift, the Vertical Vector Face Lift can achieve longer-lasting and natural results with lesser cost and risk. Submentoplasty and liposuction of the neck and jawline, fundamental components of the vertical vector face lift, act synergistically with superficial musculoaponeurotic system plication to reestablish a more youthful, sculpted cervicomental angle, even in patients with prominent jowls. Dramatic results can be achieved in the right patient by combining with other procedures such as injectable fillers, chin implants, laser resurfacing, or upper and lower blepharoplasties. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Velocity of climate change algorithms for guiding conservation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Andreas; Roberts, David R; Barber, Quinn E; Carroll, Carlos; Nielsen, Scott E

    2015-02-01

    The velocity of climate change is an elegant analytical concept that can be used to evaluate the exposure of organisms to climate change. In essence, one divides the rate of climate change by the rate of spatial climate variability to obtain a speed at which species must migrate over the surface of the earth to maintain constant climate conditions. However, to apply the algorithm for conservation and management purposes, additional information is needed to improve realism at local scales. For example, destination information is needed to ensure that vectors describing speed and direction of required migration do not point toward a climatic cul-de-sac by pointing beyond mountain tops. Here, we present an analytical approach that conforms to standard velocity algorithms if climate equivalents are nearby. Otherwise, the algorithm extends the search for climate refugia, which can be expanded to search for multivariate climate matches. With source and destination information available, forward and backward velocities can be calculated allowing useful inferences about conservation of species (present-to-future velocities) and management of species populations (future-to-present velocities). © 2014 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. In Vivo High Frame Rate Vector Flow Imaging Using Plane Waves and Directional Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    angles) for both slow flow and B-mode. Parabolic flow with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s is measured at beam-to-flow angles of60◦and 90◦. The DB method estimates the angle with a bias and standard deviation (STD) less than 2◦, and the STD of the velocity magnitude is 2.5 %. This is 7 - 8.5 % when using TO...... was used with TO and DB to estimate velocity vectors. The STD of the velocity profile over a cardiac cycle was 6.1 % for TO and 4.9 % for DB....

  12. Settling velocities in batch sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, A.M.; Thompson, B.E.

    1982-10-01

    The sedimentation of mixtures containing one and two sizes of spherical particles (44 and 62 μm in diameter) was studied. Radioactive tracing with 57 Co was used to measure the settling velocities. The ratio of the settling velocity U of uniformly sized particles to the velocity predicted to Stokes' law U 0 was correlated to an expression of the form U/U 0 = epsilon/sup α/, where epsilon is the liquid volume fraction and α is an empirical constant, determined experimentally to be 4.85. No effect of viscosity on the ratio U/U 0 was observed as the viscosity of the liquid medium was varied from 1x10 -3 to 5x10 -3 Pa.s. The settling velocities of particles in a bimodal mixture were fit by the same correlation; the ratio U/U 0 was independent of the concentrations of different-sized particles

  13. Hybrid micro-/nano-particle image velocimetry for 3D3C multi-scale velocity field measurement in microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Young Uk; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2011-01-01

    The conventional two-dimensional (2D) micro-particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique has inherent bias error due to the depth of focus along the optical axis to measure the velocity field near the wall of a microfluidics device. However, the far-field measurement of velocity vectors yields good accuracy for micro-scale flows. Nano-PIV using the evanescent wave of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy can measure near-field velocity vectors within a distance of around 200 nm from the solid surface. A micro-/nano-hybrid PIV system is proposed to measure both near- and far-field velocity vectors simultaneously in microfluidics. A near-field particle image can be obtained by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy using nanoparticles, and the far-field velocity vectors are measured by three-hole defocusing micro-particle tracking velocimetry (micro-PTV) using micro-particles. In order to identify near- and far-field particle images, lasers of different wavelengths are adopted and tested in a straight microchannel for acquiring the three-dimensional three-component velocity field. We found that the new technique gives superior accuracy for the velocity profile near the wall compared to that of conventional nano-PIV. This method has been successfully applied to precisely measure wall shear stress in 2D microscale Poiseulle flows

  14. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Velocity evolution of galaxy clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saslaw, W.C.; Aarseth, S.J.

    1982-02-15

    We have examined the changing velocity distribution of galaxies as they cluster in computer models of the expanding universe. The models are 4000-body numerical simulations of galaxies with a large range of masses interacting gravitationally. Clustering in velocity space is measured by calculating the residual peculiar velocities around the Hubble expansion. These form ''Hubble streaks as clustering progresses. We distinguish isolated field galaxies from clustered galaxies. In contrast to the usual belief, the velocity dispersion of the most extreme field galaxies does not decrease adiabatically. Rather, it is dominated by the perturbations of distant large clusters as they form and it decreases much more slowly than the inverse expansion length scale, R/sup -1/. The velocity dispersion of extreme field galaxies is a good cosmological indicator of ..cap omega.. = rho/rho/sub crit/. Preliminary comparison of several simulations with observtions shows that our universe agrees better with low density models, ..cap omega..< or =0.1. The velocity dispersion of cluster centers of mass is a good cosmological marker as well. We also suggest another new method for estimating ..cap omega.., based on the history of extreme field galaxies.

  16. Optimality Conditions in Vector Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Manuel Arana; Lizana, Antonio Rufián

    2011-01-01

    Vector optimization is continuously needed in several science fields, particularly in economy, business, engineering, physics and mathematics. The evolution of these fields depends, in part, on the improvements in vector optimization in mathematical programming. The aim of this Ebook is to present the latest developments in vector optimization. The contributions have been written by some of the most eminent researchers in this field of mathematical programming. The Ebook is considered essential for researchers and students in this field.

  17. Symmetric vectors and algebraic classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibowitz, E.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of symmetric vector field in Riemannian manifolds, which arises in the study of relativistic cosmological models, is analyzed. Symmetric vectors are tied up with the algebraic properties of the manifold curvature. A procedure for generating a congruence of symmetric fields out of a given pair is outlined. The case of a three-dimensional manifold of constant curvature (''isotropic universe'') is studied in detail, with all its symmetric vector fields being explicitly constructed

  18. Vector continued fractions using a generalized inverse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, Roger; Nex, C M M; Wexler, Geoffrey

    2004-01-01

    A real vector space combined with an inverse (involution) for vectors is sufficient to define a vector continued fraction whose parameters consist of vector shifts and changes of scale. The choice of sign for different components of the vector inverse permits construction of vector analogues of the Jacobi continued fraction. These vector Jacobi fractions are related to vector and scalar-valued polynomial functions of the vectors, which satisfy recurrence relations similar to those of orthogonal polynomials. The vector Jacobi fraction has strong convergence properties which are demonstrated analytically, and illustrated numerically

  19. Blood typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood typing is a method to tell what type of blood you have. Blood typing is done so you can safely donate your blood or receive a blood transfusion. It is also done to see if you have a substance called Rh factor on the surface of your red ...

  20. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KidsHealth / For Teens / Blood Types What's in this article? Four Blood Groups... Plus Rh Factor... ...Make Eight Blood Types Why Blood Type Matters Print en español Tipos de sangre About 5 million Americans need blood transfusions every ...

  1. Vector Rotators of Rigid Body Dynamics with Coupled Rotations around Axes without Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katica R. (Stevanović Hedrih

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vector method based on mass moment vectors and vector rotators coupled for pole and oriented axes is used for obtaining vector expressions for kinetic pressures on the shaft bearings of a rigid body dynamics with coupled rotations around axes without intersection. Mass inertia moment vectors and corresponding deviational vector components for pole and oriented axis are defined by K. Hedrih in 1991. These kinematical vectors rotators are defined for a system with two degrees of freedom as well as for rheonomic system with two degrees of mobility and one degree of freedom and coupled rotations around two coupled axes without intersection as well as their angular velocities and intensity. As an example of defined dynamics, we take into consideration a heavy gyrorotor disk with one degree of freedom and coupled rotations when one component of rotation is programmed by constant angular velocity. For this system with nonlinear dynamics, a series of tree parametric transformations of system nonlinear dynamics are presented. Some graphical visualization of vector rotators properties are presented too.

  2. Covariant Lyapunov vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginelli, Francesco; Politi, Antonio; Chaté, Hugues; Livi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs) which span local intrinsic directions in the phase space of chaotic systems. Here, we review the basic results of ergodic theory, with a specific reference to the implications of Oseledets’ theorem for the properties of the CLVs. We then present a detailed description of a ‘dynamical’ algorithm to compute the CLVs and show that it generically converges exponentially in time. We also discuss its numerical performance and compare it with other algorithms presented in the literature. We finally illustrate how CLVs can be used to quantify deviations from hyperbolicity with reference to a dissipative system (a chain of Hénon maps) and a Hamiltonian model (a Fermi–Pasta–Ulam chain). This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’. (paper)

  3. Covariant Lyapunov vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginelli, Francesco; Chaté, Hugues; Livi, Roberto; Politi, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing interest in covariant Lyapunov vectors (CLVs) which span local intrinsic directions in the phase space of chaotic systems. Here, we review the basic results of ergodic theory, with a specific reference to the implications of Oseledets’ theorem for the properties of the CLVs. We then present a detailed description of a ‘dynamical’ algorithm to compute the CLVs and show that it generically converges exponentially in time. We also discuss its numerical performance and compare it with other algorithms presented in the literature. We finally illustrate how CLVs can be used to quantify deviations from hyperbolicity with reference to a dissipative system (a chain of Hénon maps) and a Hamiltonian model (a Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain). This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Lyapunov analysis: from dynamical systems theory to applications’.

  4. Chameleon vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Ann E.; Walsh, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    We show that for a force mediated by a vector particle coupled to a conserved U(1) charge, the apparent range and strength can depend on the size and density of the source, and the proximity to other sources. This chameleon effect is due to screening from a light charged scalar. Such screening can weaken astrophysical constraints on new gauge bosons. As an example we consider the constraints on chameleonic gauged B-L. We show that although Casimir measurements greatly constrain any B-L force much stronger than gravity with range longer than 0.1 μm, there remains an experimental window for a long-range chameleonic B-L force. Such a force could be much stronger than gravity, and long or infinite range in vacuum, but have an effective range near the surface of the earth which is less than a micron.

  5. ESTIMATING ELECTRIC FIELDS FROM VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM SEQUENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G. H.; Welsch, B. T.; Abbett, W. P.; Bercik, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the electric field distribution on the Sun's photosphere is essential for quantitative studies of how energy flows from the Sun's photosphere, through the corona, and into the heliosphere. This electric field also provides valuable input for data-driven models of the solar atmosphere and the Sun-Earth system. We show how observed vector magnetogram time series can be used to estimate the photospheric electric field. Our method uses a 'poloidal-toroidal decomposition' (PTD) of the time derivative of the vector magnetic field. These solutions provide an electric field whose curl obeys all three components of Faraday's Law. The PTD solutions are not unique; the gradient of a scalar potential can be added to the PTD electric field without affecting consistency with Faraday's Law. We then present an iterative technique to determine a potential function consistent with ideal MHD evolution; but this field is also not a unique solution to Faraday's Law. Finally, we explore a variational approach that minimizes an energy functional to determine a unique electric field, a generalization of Longcope's 'Minimum Energy Fit'. The PTD technique, the iterative technique, and the variational technique are used to estimate electric fields from a pair of synthetic vector magnetograms taken from an MHD simulation; and these fields are compared with the simulation's known electric fields. The PTD and iteration techniques compare favorably to results from existing velocity inversion techniques. These three techniques are then applied to a pair of vector magnetograms of solar active region NOAA AR8210, to demonstrate the methods with real data. Careful examination of the results from all three methods indicates that evolution of the magnetic vector by itself does not provide enough information to determine the true electric field in the photosphere. Either more information from other measurements, or physical constraints other than those considered here are necessary to find

  6. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Measuring Velocity and Altitude of Space and Arial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Hines, Glenn D.; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar has been developed to support future NASA missions to planetary bodies. The lidar transmits three laser beams and measures line-of-sight range and velocity along each beam using a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique. Accurate altitude and velocity vector data, derived from the line-of-sight measurements, enables the landing vehicle to precisely navigate from several kilometers above the ground to the designated location and execute a gentle touchdown. The same lidar sensor can also benefit terrestrial applications that cannot rely on GPS or require surface-relative altitude and velocity data.

  7. Velocity distribution in snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.; Ito, Y.

    1997-12-01

    In order to investigate the detailed structure of snow avalanches, we have made snow flow experiments at the Miyanomori ski jump in Sapporo and systematic observations in the Shiai-dani, Kurobe Canyon. In the winter of 1995-1996, a new device to measure static pressures was used to estimate velocities in the snow cloud that develops above the flowing layer of avalanches. Measurements during a large avalanche in the Shiai-dani which damaged and destroyed some instruments indicate velocities increased rapidly to more than 50 m/s soon after the front. Velocities decreased gradually in the following 10 s. Velocities of the lower flowing layer were also calculated by differencing measurement of impact pressure. Both recordings in the snow cloud and in the flowing layer changed with a similar trend and suggest a close interaction between the two layers. In addition, the velocity showed a periodic change. Power spectrum analysis of the impact pressure and the static pressure depression showed a strong peak at a frequency between 4 and 6 Hz, which might imply the existence of either ordered structure or a series of surges in the flow.

  8. Simplified Representation of Vector Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    1999-01-01

    Vector field visualization remains a difficult task. Although many local and global visualization methods for vector fields such as flow data exist, they usually require extensive user experience on setting the visualization parameters in order to produce images communicating the desired insight. We

  9. The Neural Support Vector Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Marco; van der Ree, Michiel; Embrechts, Mark; Stollenga, Marijn; Meijster, Arnold; Nolte, A; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new machine learning algorithm for regression and dimensionality reduction tasks. The Neural Support Vector Machine (NSVM) is a hybrid learning algorithm consisting of neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). The output of the NSVM is given by SVMs that take a

  10. Estimation of Motion Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the estimation of 2-D motion vector fields from time varying image sequences. We use a piecewise smooth model based on coupled vector/binary Markov random fields. We find the maximum a posteriori solution by simulated annealing. The algorithm generate sample...

  11. Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    vector of urban plague in Peru is the Oriental rat flea, Xenopsylla cheopis. The human flea, Pulex irritans, although biologically an inefficient vector...TEL: (215) 688-4400 Peru - 10 Instituto Nacional de Hygiene Lima, Peru Peru – 11 Institutos Nacionales de Salud Departamento de Animales

  12. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  13. Archimedeanization of ordered vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Emelyanov, Eduard Yu.

    2014-01-01

    In the case of an ordered vector space with an order unit, the Archimedeanization method has been developed recently by V.I Paulsen and M. Tomforde. We present a general version of the Archimedeanization which covers arbitrary ordered vector spaces.

  14. Velocity Gradient Maps Directly Measured by PLF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintella, Cristina M.; Gonçalves, Cristiane C.; Lima, Angelo Mv; Pepe, Iuri M.

    2000-11-01

    Flows are macroscopically classified as laminar or turbulent due to their velocity distributions, nevertheless most chemical and biological phenomena are yield or enhanced by intermolecular orientation and microscopic turbulence. Here was studied a 100micra liquid sheet produced by a slit nozzle, both flowing freely into air and over a borosilicate surface (roughness bellow 5nm), ranging from 17 to 36Re (143 to 297cm/s, similar to muscles and brain blood flow). Mono ethylene glycol was used either pure, or with sodium alkyl benzene sulfated (ABS) surfactant (24.5mol/L, submicellar), or with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) (1409ppm, 4millions aw). Velocity gradients were directly measured by 514nm polarized laser induced fluorescence (PLF) with R6G as probe. Intermolecular alignment (IA) maps were obtained all over the flow (about 1,950 points, 0.02mm2 precision). The free jet average IA has increased 57% when flowing over borosilicate. With ABS, the IA increased, suggesting wall drag reduction. With PEO the IA decreases due to solvent intermolecular forces attenuation, generating wider turbulent areas. PLF proved to be an excellent method to evaluate IA within liquid thin flows. Chosen solute additions permits IA control over wide regions.

  15. Velocity measurement accuracy in optical microhemodynamics: experiment and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chayer, Boris; Cloutier, Guy; L Pitts, Katie; Fenech, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Micro particle image velocimetry (µPIV) is a common method to assess flow behavior in blood microvessels in vitro as well as in vivo. The use of red blood cells (RBCs) as tracer particles, as generally considered in vivo, creates a large depth of correlation (DOC), even as large as the vessel itself, which decreases the accuracy of the method. The limitations of µPIV for blood flow measurements based on RBC tracking still have to be evaluated. In this study, in vitro and in silico models were used to understand the effect of the DOC on blood flow measurements using µPIV RBC tracer particles. We therefore employed a µPIV technique to assess blood flow in a 15 µm radius glass tube with a high-speed CMOS camera. The tube was perfused with a sample of 40% hematocrit blood. The flow measured by a cross-correlating speckle tracking technique was compared to the flow rate of the pump. In addition, a three-dimensional mechanical RBC-flow model was used to simulate optical moving speckle at 20% and 40% hematocrits, in 15 and 20 µm radius circular tubes, at different focus planes, flow rates and for various velocity profile shapes. The velocity profiles extracted from the simulated pictures were compared with good agreement with the corresponding velocity profiles implemented in the mechanical model. The flow rates from both the in vitro flow phantom and the mathematical model were accurately measured with less than 10% errors. Simulation results demonstrated that the hematocrit (paired t tests, p = 0.5) and the tube radius (p = 0.1) do not influence the precision of the measured flow rate, whereas the shape of the velocity profile (p < 0.001) and the location of the focus plane (p < 0.001) do, as indicated by measured errors ranging from 3% to 97%. In conclusion, the use of RBCs as tracer particles makes a large DOC and affects the image processing required to estimate the flow velocities. We found that the current µPIV method is acceptable to estimate the flow rate

  16. O centro instantâneo de movimento e vetor velocidade em joelhos submetidos a incisuroplastia troclear e estabilização articular após transecção do ligamento cruzado cranial em cães Instantaneous center of motion and velocity vector in stifle of dogs undergoing intercondylar notchplasty and articular repair following transection of the cranial cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Selmi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o centro instantâneo de movimento e vetor velocidade após a transecção do ligamento cruzado cranial (LCCr, seguida da substituição ligamentar por retalho de fáscia lata, associada ou não a incisuroplastia troclear (ITR em nove cães adultos. O joelho direito (GI foi submetido a ITR e posterior estabilização articular, e o joelho esquerdo submetido somente a substituição ligamentar (GC. Os animais foram avaliados nos períodos pré-operatório, pós-operatório imediato e aos 30, 90 e 180 de pós-operatório, correspondente ao momento de eutanásia de subgrupos de três animais. O centro instantâneo de movimento (CIM e o vetor velocidade (Vv resultante foram determinados por meio do deslocamento de pontos a partir da análise radiográfica dos joelhos. Todas as articulações apresentavam CIM e Vv normais antes da transecção do ligamento cruzado cranial. Após a estabilização articular, acompanhada ou não de ITR, observou-se o posicionamento normal do CIM e Vv resultante, em todos os períodos de avaliação, apesar da presença de movimento de gaveta em três animais de GC e dois de GI no pós-operatório imediato, em dois animais de cada grupo, aos 30 dias de avaliação, e em um animal em cada grupo nas avaliações subseqüentes. Conclui-se que a estabilização articular com retalho de fáscia lata, associada ou não a ITR, mantém a integridade biomecânica do joelho, quando considerados o CIM e o Vv.The instantaneous center of motion (ICM and velocity vector (Vv, after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL followed by a fascial strip reconstruction in association with intercondylar notchplasty (IN, were studied in nine adult dogs. The right stifle was submitted to IN followed by fascial strip reconstruction of the CCL (GI while in the left stifle IN was not performed (GC. Dogs were evaluated the day prior to surgery, immediately after surgery and at 30, 90 and 180 days postoperatively (po, time at

  17. Types of Blood Donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ill patients. Blood Donation 101 Blood Donation FAQs Types of Blood Donations The Foundation for America's Blood Centers Donate Blood Blood Donation 101 Blood Donation FAQs Types of Blood Donations About Blood What is Blood? ...

  18. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Although retroviral vector systems have been found to efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vitro, the use of vectors based on murine leukemia virus in preclinical models of somatic gene therapy has led to the identification of transcriptional silencing in vivo as an important problem....... Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t...

  19. Vector superconductivity in cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvali, G.R.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1992-03-01

    We argue that in most realistic cases, the usual Witten-type bosonic superconductivity of the cosmic string is automatically (independent of the existence of superconducting currents) accompanied by the condensation of charged gauge vector bosons in the core giving rise to a new vector type superconductivity. The value of the charged vector condensate is related with the charged scalar expectation value, and vanishes only if the latter goes to zero. The mechanism for the proposed vector superconductivity, differing fundamentally from those in the literature, is delineated using the simplest realistic example of the two Higgs doublet standard model interacting with the extra cosmic string. It is shown that for a wide range of parameters, for which the string becomes scalarly superconducting, W boson condensates (the sources of vector superconductivity) are necessarily excited. (author). 14 refs

  20. Hemodynamic study of ischemic limb by velocity measurement in foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shionoya, S.; Hirai, M.; Kawai, S.; Ohta, T.; Seko, T.

    1981-01-01

    By means of a tracer technique with 99mTc-pertechnetate, provided with seven zonal regions of interest, 6 mm in width, placed at equal spaces of 18 mm, from the toe tip to the midfoot at a right angle to the long axis of the foot, arterial flow velocity in the foot during reactive hyperemia was measured. The mean velocity in the foot was 5.66 +/- 1.78 cm/sec in 14 normal limbs, 1.58 +/- 1.07 cm/sec in 29 limbs with distal thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), 0.89 +/- 0.61 cm/sec in 13 limbs with proximal TAO, and 0.97 +/- 0.85 cm/sec in 15 limbs with arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO). The velocity returned to normal in all 12 limbs after successful arterial reconstruction, whereas the foot or toe blood pressure remained pathologic in 9 of the 12 limbs postoperatively; the velocity reverted to normal in 4 of 13 limbs after lumbar sympathectomy. When the velocity was normalized after operation, the ulceration healed favorably, and the ischemic limb was salvaged. The most characteristic feature of peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremity was a stagnation of arterial circulation in the foot, and the flow velocity in the foot was a sensitive predictive index of limb salvage