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Sample records for blood haematopoietic progenitors

  1. Making Blood: The Haematopoietic Niche throughout Ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Al-Drees

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one-quarter of all cells in the adult human body are blood cells. The haematopoietic system is therefore massive in scale and requires exquisite regulation to be maintained under homeostatic conditions. It must also be able to respond when needed, such as during infection or following blood loss, to produce more blood cells. Supporting cells serve to maintain haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during homeostatic and pathological conditions. This coalition of supportive cell types, organised in specific tissues, is termed the haematopoietic niche. Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are generated in a number of distinct locations during mammalian embryogenesis. These stem and progenitor cells migrate to a variety of anatomical locations through the conceptus until finally homing to the bone marrow shortly before birth. Under stress, extramedullary haematopoiesis can take place in regions that are typically lacking in blood-producing activity. Our aim in this review is to examine blood production throughout the embryo and adult, under normal and pathological conditions, to identify commonalities and distinctions between each niche. A clearer understanding of the mechanism underlying each haematopoietic niche can be applied to improving ex vivo cultures of haematopoietic stem cells and potentially lead to new directions for transplantation medicine.

  2. Human adipose-tissue derived stromal cells in combination with hypoxia effectively support ex vivo expansion of cord blood haematopoietic progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena R Andreeva

    Full Text Available The optimisation of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion is on demand in modern cell therapy. In this work, haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs have been selected from unmanipulated cord blood mononuclear cells (cbMNCs due to adhesion to human adipose-tissue derived stromal cells (ASCs under standard (20% and tissue-related (5% oxygen. ASCs efficiently maintained viability and supported further HSPC expansion at 20% and 5% O2. During co-culture with ASCs, a new floating population of differently committed HSPCs (HSPCs-1 grew. This suspension was enriched with СD34+ cells up to 6 (20% O2 and 8 (5% O2 times. Functional analysis of HSPCs-1 revealed cobble-stone area forming cells (CAFCs and lineage-restricted colony-forming cells (CFCs. The number of CFCs was 1.6 times higher at tissue-related O2, than in standard cultivation (20% O2. This increase was related to a rise in the number of multipotent precursors - BFU-E, CFU-GEMM and CFU-GM. These changes were at least partly ensured by the increased concentration of MCP-1 and IL-8 at 5% O2. In summary, our data demonstrated that human ASCs enables the selection of functionally active HSPCs from unfractionated cbMNCs, the further expansion of which without exogenous cytokines provides enrichment with CD34+ cells. ASCs efficiently support the viability and proliferation of cord blood haematopoietic progenitors of different commitment at standard and tissue-related O2 levels at the expense of direct and paracrine cell-to-cell interactions.

  3. Radiosensitivity of human haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kengo; Kashiwakura, Ikuo; Omori, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    The haematopoietic system is regenerative tissue with a high proliferative potential; therefore, haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are sensitive to extracellular oxidative stress caused by radiation and chemotherapeutic agents. An understanding of this issue can help predict haematopoietic recovery from radiation exposure as well as the extent of radiation damage to the haematopoietic system. In the present study, the radiosensitivity of human lineage-committed myeloid haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), including colony-forming unit–granulocyte macrophage, burst-forming unit–erythroid and colony-forming unit–granulocyte–erythroid–macrophage–megakaryocyte cells, which are contained in adult individual peripheral blood (PB) and fetus/neonate placental/umbilical cord blood (CB), were studied. The PB of 59 healthy individual blood donors and the CB of 42 neonates were investigated in the present study. HSPCs prepared from PB and CB were exposed to 0.5 or 2 Gy x-irradiation. The results showed that large individual differences exist in the surviving fraction of cells. In the case of adult PB, a statistically significant negative correlation was observed between the surviving fraction observed at a dose of 0.5 Gy and the age of the blood donors; however, none of these correlations were observed after 2 Gy x-irradiation. In addition, seasonal and gender variation were observed in the surviving fraction of CB HSPCs. The present results suggest that there are large individual differences in the surviving fraction of HSPCs contained in both adult PB and fetus/neonate CB. In addition, some factors, including the gender, age and season of birth, affect the radiosensitivity of HSPCs, especially with a relatively low-dose exposure. (paper)

  4. In vitro toxicity of trichothecenes on rat haematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent-Massin, D; Thouvenot, D

    1995-01-01

    The fusarial toxicosis induced by trichothecenes is characterized by common syndromes such as vomiting, inflammation, haemorrhages, diarrhoea and haematological changes. Subchronic ingestion of trichothecenes causes a decrease in circulating white cells. This leukopenic change of animals is reported as a characteristic feature in the best known human disorder: Alimentary Toxic Aleukia (ATA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the haematologic disorders imputed to trichothecenes were a result of myelotoxicity by investigating in an in vitro model. Rat haematopoietic progenitors, Colony Forming Units-Granulocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GM), were cultured in the presence of several concentrations of four trichothecenes; T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) and deoxynivalenol (DON). All these trichothecenes were cytotoxic to rat haematopoietic progenitor cells. It is concluded that haematological disorders observed during trichothecene intoxication of animals are caused by the destruction of haematopoietic progenitors such as CFU-GM cells.

  5. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor mm9 TFs and others Pluripot...ent stem cell mESC derived haematopoietic progenitor SRX310196,SRX825828,SRX825829,SRX021436,SRX310197,SRX37...iencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor mm9 No description Pluripot...ent stem cell mESC derived haematopoietic progenitor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor mm9 TFs and others Pluripot...ent stem cell mESC derived haematopoietic progenitor SRX825828,SRX310197,SRX310196,SRX825829,SRX021436,SRX37...iencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent s...tem cell mESC derived haematopoietic progenitor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripot...ent stem cell mESC derived haematopoietic progenitor http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor mm9 TFs and others Pluripot...ent stem cell mESC derived haematopoietic progenitor SRX310196,SRX825828,SRX825829,SRX021436,SRX310197,SRX82...iencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor.bed ...

  11. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas [Hema-Quebec, Research and Development Department, Quebec City, G1V 5C3, PQ (Canada); Mantovani, Diego, E-mail: nicolas.pineault@hema-quebec.qc.ca [Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Materials Engineering and University Hospital Research Center, Laval University, Quebec City, G1V 0A6, PQ (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  12. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celebi, Betuel; Pineault, Nicolas; Mantovani, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein.

  13. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor mm9 Unclassified Pluripoten...t stem cell mESC derived haematopoietic progenitor SRX021809,SRX021816,SRX472603,SRX021810,SRX021813,SRX0218...15,SRX021808,SRX021811,SRX021818,SRX021814,SRX021817,SRX021812 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor mm9 Input control Pluripote...nt stem cell mESC derived haematopoietic progenitor SRX282673,SRX021433,SRX021434,SRX118006,SRX180154 http:/.../dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_haematopoietic_progenitor.bed ...

  15. Survival of cord blood haematopoietic stem cells in a hyaluronan hydrogel for ex vivo biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Elise; Kassim, Yusra; Petit, Cyrille; Buquet, Catherine; Dulong, Virginie; Cerf, Didier Le; Buchonnet, Gérard; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) grow in a specified niche in close association with the microenvironment, the so-called 'haematopoietic niche'. Scaffolds have been introduced to overcome the liquid culture limitations, mimicking the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study the hyaluronic acid scaffold, already developed in the laboratory, has been used for the first time to maintain long-term cultures of CD34⁺ haematopoietic cells obtained from human cord blood. One parameter investigated was the impact on ex vivo survival of CD34⁺ cord blood cells (CBCs) on the hyaluronic acid surface, immobilized with peptides containing the RGD motif. This peptide was conjugated by coating the hyaluronan hydrogel and cultured in serum-free liquid phase complemented with stem cell factor (SCF), a commonly indispensable cytokine for haematopoiesis. Our work demonstrated that these hyaluronan hydrogels were superior to traditional liquid cultures by maintaining and expanding the HPCs without the need for additional cytokines, and a colonization of 280-fold increment in the hydrogel compared with liquid culture after 28 days of ex vivo expansion. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Absence of a relationship between immunophenotypic and colony enumeration analysis of endothelial progenitor cells in clinical haematopoietic cell sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Marc L

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of adult endothelial progenitor cells (EPC offers potential for vascular regenerative therapies. The expression of CD34 and VEGFR2 by EPC indicates a close relationship with haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC, and HPC-rich sources have been used to treat cardiac and limb ischaemias with apparent clinical benefit. However, the laboratory characterisation of the vasculogenic capability of potential or actual therapeutic cell autograft sources is uncertain since the description of EPC remains elusive. Various definitions of EPC based on phenotype and more recently on colony formation (CFU-EPC have been proposed. Methods We determined EPC as defined by proposed phenotype definitions (flow cytometry and by CFU-EPC in HPC-rich sources: bone marrow (BM; cord blood (CB; and G-CSF-mobilised peripheral blood (mPB, and in HPC-poor normal peripheral blood (nPB. Results As expected, the highest numbers of cells expressing the HPC markers CD34 or CD133 were found in mPB and least in nPB. The proportions of CD34+ cells co-expressing CD133 is of the order mPB>CB>BM≈nPB. CD34+ cells co-expressing VEGFR2 were also most frequent in mPB. In contrast, CFU-EPC were virtually absent in mPB and were most readily detected in nPB, the source lowest in HPC. Conclusion HPC sources differ in their content of putative EPC. Normal peripheral blood, poor in HPC and in HPC-related phenotypically defined EPC, is the richest source of CFU-EPC, suggesting no direct relationship between the proposed EPC immunophenotypes and CFU-EPC potential. It is not apparent whether either of these EPC measurements, or any, is an appropriate indicator of the therapeutic vasculogenic potential of autologous HSC sources.

  17. Haematopoietic stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells in healthy men: effect of aging and training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Vos, J.B.; Verseyden, C.; Zonneveld, A.J. van; Smits, P.; Sweep, C.G.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Boer, H.C. de

    2006-01-01

    The number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) is thought to be a marker for neovascularization and vascular repair. Because physical inactivity and aging are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, these factors may influence the numbers of HSCs and EPCs.

  18. Haemopoietic progenitor cells in human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaan, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation reported is to purify haemopoietic progenitor cells from human peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation in order to isolate a progenitor cell fraction without immunocompetent cells. The purification technique of peripheral blood flow colony forming unit culture (CFU-c) by means of density gradient centrifugation and a combined depletion of various rosettes is described. The results of several 'in vitro' characteristics of purified CFU-c suspensions and of the plasma clot diffusion chamber culture technique are presented. Irradiation studies revealed that for both human bone marrow and peripheral blood the CFU-c were less radioresistant than clusters. Elimination of monocytes (and granulocytes) from the test suspensions induced an alteration in radiosensitivity pararmeters. The results obtained with the different techniques are described by analysing peripheral progenitor cell activity in myeloproliferative disorders. (Auth.)

  19. Collection, processing and testing of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood and haematopoietic stem cells by European Blood Alliance members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Närhi, M; Natri, O; Desbois, I

    2013-01-01

    A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB) and......) and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in order to identify different practices and to explore whether recommendations can be made for harmonization.......A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB...

  20. Collection, processing and testing of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood and haematopoietic stem cells by European Blood Alliance members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Närhi, M; Natri, O; Desbois, I; Kinggaard Holm, D; Galea, G; Aranko, K; Korhonen, M; Nordstrom, K

    2013-11-01

    A questionnaire study was carried out in collaboration with the European Blood Alliance (EBA) Tissues and Cells (T&C) working group. The aim was to assess the level of involvement and commonality of processes on the procurement, testing and storage of bone, corneas, umbilical cord blood (UCB) and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in order to identify different practices and to explore whether recommendations can be made for harmonization. An online questionnaire was used for data collection in 2011, and 43 replies were received covering 71 product answers from 13 countries. Estimated percentages of tissue and cell banking covered by EBA member blood banks as a proportion of all collections of each individual country varied markedly. There were also major differences in the amounts of products collected and discarded and in proportions tissues provided for grafting. However, discarding of certain collections also reflects the practice of increasing the likelihood of the very best units being used for transplantation. Harmonization of possible practices should focus on matching supply with demand and on identifying the most efficient operators. This could allow for the development of practices for minimizing unnecessary collections. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  1. Haematopoietic SCT in severe autoimmune diseases: updated guidelines of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, J A; Saccardi, R; Allez, M; Ardizzone, S; Arnold, R; Cervera, R; Denton, C; Hawkey, C; Labopin, M; Mancardi, G; Martin, R; Moore, J J; Passweg, J; Peters, C; Rabusin, M; Rovira, M; van Laar, J M; Farge, D

    2012-01-01

    In 1997, the first consensus guidelines for haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) in autoimmune diseases (ADs) were published, while an international coordinated clinical programme was launched. These guidelines provided broad principles for the field over the following decade and were accompanied by comprehensive data collection in the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) AD Registry. Subsequently, retrospective analyses and prospective phase I/II studies generated evidence to support the feasibility, safety and efficacy of HSCT in several types of severe, treatment-resistant ADs, which became the basis for larger-scale phase II and III studies. In parallel, there has also been an era of immense progress in biological therapy in ADs. The aim of this document is to provide revised and updated guidelines for both the current application and future development of HSCT in ADs in relation to the benefits, risks and health economic considerations of other modern treatments. Patient safety considerations are central to guidance on patient selection and HSCT procedural aspects within appropriately experienced and Joint Accreditation Committee of International Society for Cellular Therapy and EBMT accredited centres. A need for prospective interventional and non-interventional studies, where feasible, along with systematic data reporting, in accordance with EBMT policies and procedures, is emphasized. PMID:22002489

  2. Characterization of erythroid and granulocyte monocyte progenitors in human cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issaragrisil, S; Grilli, G; Nothdurft, W; Fliedner, T M

    1984-09-01

    Some characteristics of both erythroid and granulocyte monocyte progenitors in human cord blood were compared to those in adult blood and bone marrow. The number of progenitors in cord blood was higher than that in adult blood and bone marrow. Most colonies in cord blood culture were monocyte-macrophage, whereas those from adult blood were largely eosinophilic. Cord blood progenitors had a slower sedimentation velocity than that reported for marrow, but sedimented faster than that for adult blood. A significant proportion of progenitors in cord blood as well as adult marrow was found to be in the DNA synthetic phase of the cell cycle whereas progenitors in adult blood were not. Cord blood BFU-E were more resistant than adult blood BFU-E but cord blood CFU-GM were not different from adult blood CFU-GM with regard to radiation sensitivity. Cord blood CFU-GM appeared to be more radio-resistant than adult marrow GFU-GM. From these results is seems clear that progenitors in cord blood differ in some aspects from those in adult blood and bone marrow.

  3. Do trichothecenes reduce viability of circulating blood cells and modify haemostasis parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froquet, R; Arnold, F; Batina, P; Parent-Massin, D

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript describes the results of experiments conducted using human blood cells to determine the ability of T-2 toxin and DON to cause changes in clotting time, platelet aggregation, red blood cell haemolysis, RBC glucose content, lactate release, glutathione depletion, as well as white blood cell viability. In vitro results showed that haemostasis parameters and erythrocytes were not affected at concentrations able to induce inhibition of haematopoietic progenitor proliferation. In the presence of 10(-8) M and 10(-6) M T-2, the leucocyte number decreased at 24 h by 30% and 50% respectively. A 50% decrease in leucocyte number was observed for 10(-5) M DON. Results were compared with haematopoietic progenitor sensitivities. Due to the differences in sensitivities between mature blood cells and haematopoietic progenitors, haematological problems associated with trichothecene intoxication could be attributed to haematopoiesis inhibition.

  4. Plerixafor enables the safe, rapid, efficient mobilization of haematopoietic stem cells in sickle cell disease patients after exchange transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Lefrère, François; Magrin, Elisa; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Romano, Oriana; Weber, Leslie; Magnani, Alessandra; Sadek, Hanem; Plantier, Clémence; Gabrion, Aurélie; Ternaux, Brigitte; Félix, Tristan; Couzin, Chloé; Stanislas, Aurélie; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Lamhaut, Lionel; Joseph, Laure; Delville, Marianne; Miccio, Annarita; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Cavazzana, Marina

    2018-02-22

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by chronic anaemia and vaso-occlusive crises, which eventually lead to multi-organ damage and premature death. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only curative treatment but it is limited by toxicity and poor availability of HLA-compatible donors. A gene therapy approach based on the autologous transplantation of lentiviral-corrected haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was shown to be efficacious in one patient. However, alterations of the bone marrow environment and the red blood cells' properties hamper the harvesting and immunoselection of patient stem cells from bone marrow. The use of Filgrastim to mobilize large numbers of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) in the circulation has been associated with severe adverse events in sickle cell patients. Thus, broader application of the gene therapy approach requires the development of alternative mobilization methods. We set up a Phase I/II clinical trial whose primary objective was to assess the safety of a single injection of Plerixafor in sickle cell patients under RBC exchanges to decrease Haemoglobin S level below 30%. The secondary objective was to measure the efficiency of HSPC mobilization and isolation. No adverse events were observed. Large numbers of CD34+ cells were mobilized extremely quickly. Importantly, the mobilized cells contained high numbers of haematopoietic stem cells, expressed high levels of stemness genes, and engrafted very efficiently in immunodeficient mice. Thus, Plerixafor can be safely used to mobilize haematopoietic stem cells in sickle cell patients; this finding opens up new avenues for treatment approaches based on gene addition and genome editing. Copyright © 2018, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  5. Promotion of haematopoietic activity in embryonic stem cells by the aorta-gonad-mesonephros microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krassowska, Anna; Gordon-Keylock, Sabrina; Samuel, Kay; Gilchrist, Derek; Dzierzak, Elaine; Oostendorp, Robert; Forrester, Lesley M.; Ansell, John D.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether the in vitro differentiation of ES cells into haematopoietic progenitors could be enhanced by exposure to the aorta-gonadal-mesonephros (AGM) microenvironment that is involved in the generation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) during embryonic development. We established a co-culture system that combines the requirements for primary organ culture and differentiating ES cells and showed that exposure of differentiating ES cells to the primary AGM region results in a significant increase in the number of ES-derived haematopoietic progenitors. Co-culture of ES cells on the AM20-1B4 stromal cell line derived from the AGM region also increases haematopoietic activity. We conclude that factors promoting the haematopoietic activity of differentiating ES cells present in primary AGM explants are partially retained in the AM20.1B4 stromal cell line and that these factors are likely to be different to those required for adult HSC maintenance

  6. Infusion of megakaryocytic progenitor products generated from cord blood hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells: results of the phase 1 study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafei Xi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, a constant shortage in the supply of platelets has become an important medical and society challenge, especially in developing country, and the in vitro production of megakaryocytic progenitor cells (MPs from cord blood could represent an effective platelet substitute. In the present study, our objective was to determine the safety and feasibility of ex vivo generated MPs in patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: MPs were produced and characterized from cord blood mononuclear cells under a serum free medium with cytokines. We investigated the feasibility of expansion and infusion of cord blood-derived MPs in 24 patients with advanced hematological malignancies. The primary end point was the safety and tolerability of the infusion of cord blood-derived MPs. No adverse effects were observed in patients who received ex vivo-generated cells at concentrations of up to a median value of 5.45 × 10(6cells/kg of body weight. With one year follow-up, acute and chronic GVHD had not been observed among patients who received MPs infusion, even without ABO blood group and HLA typing matching. CONCLUSIONS: These initial results in patients are very encouraging. They suggest that infusion of cord blood-derived MPs appears safe and feasible for treatment of thrombocytopenia.

  7. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyo Eun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do-Sun, E-mail: dslmd@kumc.or.kr [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  8. Mouse lung contains endothelial progenitors with high capacity to form blood and lymphatic vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barleon Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs have been successfully isolated from whole bone marrow, blood and the walls of conduit vessels. They can, therefore, be classified into circulating and resident progenitor cells. The differentiation capacity of resident lung endothelial progenitor cells from mouse has not been evaluated. Results In an attempt to isolate differentiated mature endothelial cells from mouse lung we found that the lung contains EPCs with a high vasculogenic capacity and capability of de novo vasculogenesis for blood and lymph vessels. Mouse lung microvascular endothelial cells (MLMVECs were isolated by selection of CD31+ cells. Whereas the majority of the CD31+ cells did not divide, some scattered cells started to proliferate giving rise to large colonies (> 3000 cells/colony. These highly dividing cells possess the capacity to integrate into various types of vessels including blood and lymph vessels unveiling the existence of local microvascular endothelial progenitor cells (LMEPCs in adult mouse lung. EPCs could be amplified > passage 30 and still expressed panendothelial markers as well as the progenitor cell antigens, but not antigens for immune cells and hematopoietic stem cells. A high percentage of these cells are also positive for Lyve1, Prox1, podoplanin and VEGFR-3 indicating that a considerabe fraction of the cells are committed to develop lymphatic endothelium. Clonogenic highly proliferating cells from limiting dilution assays were also bipotent. Combined in vitro and in vivo spheroid and matrigel assays revealed that these EPCs exhibit vasculogenic capacity by forming functional blood and lymph vessels. Conclusion The lung contains large numbers of EPCs that display commitment for both types of vessels, suggesting that lung blood and lymphatic endothelial cells are derived from a single progenitor cell.

  9. Endothelial progenitor cells promote efficient ex vivo expansion of cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Qi; Liu, Limin; Chen, Guanghua; Xu, Yang; Wu, Xiaojin; Wu, Depei

    2016-03-01

    Cord blood (CB) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has often been limited by the scarcity of stem cells. Therefore, the number of CB hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) should be increased while maintaining the stem cell characteristics. We designed an ex vivo culture system using endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) as stroma to determine the capacity of expanding CB-HSPCs in a defined medium, the effect on engraftment of the expanded cells in a mouse model and the underlying mechanism. After 7 days of culture, compared with those cultured with cytokines alone (3.25 ± 0.59), CD34+ cells under contact and non-contact co-culture with EPCs were expanded by 5.38 ± 0.61 (P = 0.003) and 4.06 ± 0.43 (P = 0.025)-fold, respectively. Direct cell-to-cell contact co-culture with EPCs resulted in more primitive CD34+ CD38- cells than stroma-free culture (156.17 ± 21.32 versus 79.12 ± 19.77-fold; P = 0.010). Comparable engraftment of day 7 co-cultured HSPCs with respect to HSPCs at day 0 in nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency disease (NOD/SCID) mice was measured as a percentage of chimerism (13.3% ± 11.0% versus 16.0% ± 14.3%; P = 0.750). EPCs highly expressed interleukin 6 (IL6) and angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1), the hematopoietic- related cytokines. A higher transcriptional level of WNT5A genes in EPCs and co-cultured HSPCs suggests that the activation of Wnt signaling pathway may play a role in HSPCs' expansion ex vivo. These data demonstrated that EPCs improve the CD34+ population but do not compromise the repopulating efficacy of the amplified HSPCs, possibly via cytokine secretion and Wnt signaling pathway activation. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Haematopoietic ESL-1 enables stem cell proliferation in the bone marrow by limiting TGFβ availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Magdalena; Quintana, Juan A; Ligos, José M; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2016-01-08

    The life-long maintenance of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) critically relies on environmental signals produced by cells that constitute the haematopoietic niche. Here we report a cell-intrinsic mechanism whereby haematopoietic cells limit proliferation within the bone marrow, and show that this pathway is repressed by E-selectin ligand 1 (ESL-1). Mice deficient in ESL-1 display aberrant HSPC quiescence, expansion of the immature pool and reduction in niche size. Remarkably, the traits were transplantable and dominant when mutant and wild-type precursors coexisted in the same environment, but were independent of E-selectin, the vascular receptor for ESL-1. Instead, quiescence is generated by unrestrained production of the cytokine TGFβ by mutant HSPC, and in vivo or in vitro blockade of the cytokine completely restores the homeostatic properties of the haematopoietic niche. These findings reveal that haematopoietic cells, including the more primitive compartment, can actively shape their own environment.

  11. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic cells in the treatment of accidental irradiation-induced aplasia. Feasibility Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierry, D.; Bertho, J.M.; Chapel, A.; Gourmelon, P. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fountenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2000-05-01

    The lessons learnt from the treatment of previous radiation accidents using either bone marrow transplantation or growth factor therapy suggest that it is of importance to investigate new therapeutic regiments. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic stem cells, precursors and differentiated cells is a new approach of growth factor therapy which may be of interest for the treatment of patients with irradiation-induced bone marrow aplasia. Ex vivo expanded maturing cells could be used to limit the early risks bound to aplasia (infections related to granulocytopaenia, bleedings associated with thrombocytopaenia), whereas expanded immature cells could hasten haematopoietic recovery. Indeed, it is possible to culture from the blood or bone marrow the cells able to proliferate and differentiate. A sufficient quantity of cells to cover the transfusion needs of a radiation victim through an aplasia episode can be produced, in presence of a specific growth factor combination. Qualitative studies shows that the expanded cells exhibit a close to normal functionality. Long-term culture techniques demonstrate the expansion of immature cells. We have set up a high dose total body irradiation non-human primate model in order to study the therapeutic potential of ex vivo expansion of autologous progenitors and differentiating cells. All the steps of the process (sampling, positive selection of the immature cells, ex vivo expansion, irradiation of the animals, reinjection of the cultured cells and study of the outcome) are established. In order to allow the long term follow up of the ex vivo expanded haematopoietic cells (homing to the bone marrow or localization to specific organs for example), a retroviral gene transfer technique for transduction of green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene toward the selected immature blood or bone marrow cells is under development in this model. Taken together these elements will allow establishing the feasibility of ex vivo expansion of

  12. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic cells in the treatment of accidental irradiation-induced aplasia. Feasibility Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, D.; Bertho, J.M.; Chapel, A.; Gourmelon, P.

    2000-01-01

    The lessons learnt from the treatment of previous radiation accidents using either bone marrow transplantation or growth factor therapy suggest that it is of importance to investigate new therapeutic regiments. Ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic stem cells, precursors and differentiated cells is a new approach of growth factor therapy which may be of interest for the treatment of patients with irradiation-induced bone marrow aplasia. Ex vivo expanded maturing cells could be used to limit the early risks bound to aplasia (infections related to granulocytopaenia, bleedings associated with thrombocytopaenia), whereas expanded immature cells could hasten haematopoietic recovery. Indeed, it is possible to culture from the blood or bone marrow the cells able to proliferate and differentiate. A sufficient quantity of cells to cover the transfusion needs of a radiation victim through an aplasia episode can be produced, in presence of a specific growth factor combination. Qualitative studies shows that the expanded cells exhibit a close to normal functionality. Long-term culture techniques demonstrate the expansion of immature cells. We have set up a high dose total body irradiation non-human primate model in order to study the therapeutic potential of ex vivo expansion of autologous progenitors and differentiating cells. All the steps of the process (sampling, positive selection of the immature cells, ex vivo expansion, irradiation of the animals, reinjection of the cultured cells and study of the outcome) are established. In order to allow the long term follow up of the ex vivo expanded haematopoietic cells (homing to the bone marrow or localization to specific organs for example), a retroviral gene transfer technique for transduction of green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene toward the selected immature blood or bone marrow cells is under development in this model. Taken together these elements will allow establishing the feasibility of ex vivo expansion of

  13. Influence of 90Sr, adult thymectomy and antilymphocyteglobulin on haematopoietic tissues and peripheral blood leucocytes in CBA mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierke, P.

    1986-01-01

    The role or long-time immune suppression in carcinogenesis induced by the long-lived internal emitter 90 Sr, is investigated in an ongoing study. The experimental design is based on the assumption that impaired immune responsiveness, by other means than 90 Sr, might increase the neoplastic response in exposed individuals, and thus reflect a protective function, if existing. Intercomparison is made of the tumour yield in mice exposed to different single doses of 90 Sr and simultaneously subjected or not to long-term immune suppression by adult thymectomy (ATx) and/or antilymphocyteglobulin (ALG) treatment. Information on the general condition and responsiveness of the immune system, in the respective models, during tumour expectancy time, is essential for a conclusive evaluation of the results. To meet theses demands the present paper reports on histopathologic alternations in immune organs and changes in white blood cell counts, induced by the different combinations of 90 Sr, ATx + ALG treatment. The results confirm the prediction, that ATx + ALG is an efficient and, with respect to the purpose of the study, suitable treatment for additive long-term depression of the immune system in 90 Sr irradiated mice, evidenced in particular by increased depletion of monomorphonuclear cells (MNC) in lymphoid organs and peripheral blood. Subsequent reports will deal with functional immune parameters. (orig.)

  14. Establishment of immortalized human erythroid progenitor cell lines able to produce enucleated red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kurita

    Full Text Available Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs is a standard and indispensable therapy in current clinical practice. In vitro production of RBCs offers a potential means to overcome a shortage of transfusable RBCs in some clinical situations and also to provide a source of cells free from possible infection or contamination by microorganisms. Thus, in vitro production of RBCs may become a standard procedure in the future. We previously reported the successful establishment of immortalized mouse erythroid progenitor cell lines that were able to produce mature RBCs very efficiently. Here, we have developed a reliable protocol for establishing immortalized human erythroid progenitor cell lines that are able to produce enucleated RBCs. These immortalized cell lines produce functional hemoglobin and express erythroid-specific markers, and these markers are upregulated following induction of differentiation in vitro. Most importantly, these immortalized cell lines all produce enucleated RBCs after induction of differentiation in vitro, although the efficiency of producing enucleated RBCs remains to be improved further. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the feasibility of using immortalized human erythroid progenitor cell lines as an ex vivo source for production of enucleated RBCs.

  15. Stem Cells and Progenitors in Human Peripheral Blood Get Activated by Extremely Active Resveratrol (XAR™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vinaykumar; Chhabria, Sagar; Jadhav, Vaibhav; Bhartiya, Deepa; Tripathi, Ashish

    2017-11-24

    Resveratrol generated enormous interest as it improved functions of multiple organs and could delay aging in animal models. However, basic mechanism of action was not understood and due to poor bioavailability, it has failed to enter the market. A highly active nano-formulation of resveratrol (XAR™) with enhanced bioavailability is now available. Present study was undertaken to evaluate its effects on stem cells biology in the human peripheral blood. Twelve healthy participants were enrolled of which five received XAR™, five were age-matched placebo controls and two were 76 and 85 years old. Peripheral blood was processed to study serum profile to monitor cardiac and pancreatic functions and subjected to density gradient centrifugation to enrich pluripotent (VSELs) and adult stem cells that get enriched along with red blood cells and in the Buffy coat respectively on Day 2 and Day 15 after XAR™ treatment. The XAR™ treatment resulted in an increased expression of pluripotency transcripts specific for VSELs (Oct-4A, Nanog and Sox2) on D2; specific transcripts for differentiation in the progenitors including Oct-4, Ikaros, CD14, CD90 on D15, and anti-ageing and tumor suppressor transcripts NAD, SIRT1, SIRT6 and p53 in both stem cells and progenitors. An improvement of cardiac and pancreatic markers in serum profile was also observed on D15. The decline in VSELs numbers with age and beneficial effects of the XAR™ treatment were evident by up-regulation of specific transcripts and on serum profile. XAR™ is a promising molecule that has the potential to activate pluripotent VSELs and tissue committed adult stem cells 'progenitors' resulting in the rejuvenation of various body tissues and for improved, cancer-free health with advanced age.

  16. Preterm Cord Blood Contains a Higher Proportion of Immature Hematopoietic Progenitors Compared to Term Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Podestà

    Full Text Available Cord blood contains high number of hematopoietic cells that after birth disappear. In this paper we have studied the functional properties of the umbilical cord blood progenitor cells collected from term and preterm neonates to establish whether quantitative and/or qualitative differences exist between the two groups.Our results indicate that the percentage of total CD34+ cells was significantly higher in preterm infants compared to full term: 0.61% (range 0.15-4.8 vs 0.3% (0.032-2.23 p = 0.0001 and in neonates <32 weeks of gestational age (GA compared to those ≥32 wks GA: 0.95% (range 0.18-4.8 and 0.36% (0.15-3.2 respectively p = 0.0025. The majority of CD34+ cells co-expressed CD71 antigen (p<0.05 preterm vs term and grew in vitro large BFU-E, mostly in the second generation. The subpopulations CD34+CD38- and CD34+CD45- resulted more represented in preterm samples compared to term, conversely, Side Population (SP did not show any difference between the two group. The absolute number of preterm colonies (CFCs/10microL resulted higher compared to term (p = 0.004 and these progenitors were able to grow until the third generation maintaining an higher proportion of CD34+ cells (p = 0.0017. The number of colony also inversely correlated with the gestational age (Pearson r = -0.3001 p<0.0168.We found no differences in the isolation and expansion capacity of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs from cord blood of term and preterm neonates: both groups grew in vitro large number of endothelial cells until the third generation and showed a transitional phenotype between mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial progenitors (CD73, CD31, CD34 and CD144The presence, in the cord blood of preterm babies, of high number of immature hematopoietic progenitors and endothelial/mesenchymal stem cells with high proliferative potential makes this tissue an important source of cells for developing new cells therapies.

  17. Ginsenoside Rg1 improves bone marrow haematopoietic activity via extramedullary haematopoiesis of the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Hsing; Chen, Fei-Peng; Liu, Rong-Kai; Lin, Chun-Lin; Chang, Ko-Tung

    2015-11-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY) is a chemotherapeutic agent used for cancer and immunological diseases. It induces cytotoxicity of bone marrow and causes myelosuppression and extramedullary haematopoiesis (EMH) in treated patients. EMH is characterized with the emergence of multipotent haematopoietic progenitors most likely in the spleen and liver. Previous studies indicated that a Chinese medicine, ginsenoside Rg1, confers a significant effect to elevate the number of lineage (Lin(-) ) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and restore the function of bone marrow in CY-treated myelosuppressed mice. However, whether the amelioration of bone marrow by Rg1 accompanies an alleviation of EMH in the spleen was still unknown. In our study, the cellularity and weight of the spleen were significantly reduced after Rg1 treatment in CY-treated mice. Moreover, the number of c-Kit(+) HSPCs was significantly decreased but not as a result of apoptosis, indicating that Rg1 alleviated EMH of the spleen induced by CY. Unexpectedly, the proliferation activity of c-Kit(+) HSPCs was only up-regulated in the spleen, but not in the bone marrow, after Rg1 treatment in CY-treated mice. We also found that a fraction of c-Kit(+) /CD45(+) HSPCs was simultaneously increased in the circulation after Rg1 treatment. Interestingly, the effects of Rg1 on the elevation of HSPCs in bone marrow and in the peripheral blood were suppressed in CY-treated splenectomized mice. These results demonstrated that Rg1 improves myelosuppression induced by CY through its action on the proliferation of HSPCs in EMH of the spleen and migration of HSPCs from the spleen to the bone marrow. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  18. Neural differentiation of novel multipotent progenitor cells from cryopreserved human umbilical cord blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myoung Woo; Moon, Young Joon; Yang, Mal Sook; Kim, Sun Kyung; Jang, In Keun; Eom, Young-woo; Park, Joon Seong; Kim, Hugh C.; Song, Kye Yong; Park, Soon Cheol; Lim, Hwan Sub; Kim, Young Jin

    2007-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells, with practical and ethical advantages. To date, the presence of other stem cells in UCB remains to be established. We investigated whether other stem cells are present in cryopreserved UCB. Seeded mononuclear cells formed adherent colonized cells in optimized culture conditions. Over a 4- to 6-week culture period, colonized cells gradually developed into adherent mono-layer cells, which exhibited homogeneous fibroblast-like morphology and immunophenotypes, and were highly proliferative. Isolated cells were designated 'multipotent progenitor cells (MPCs)'. Under appropriate conditions for 2 weeks, MPCs differentiated into neural tissue-specific cell types, including neuron, astrocyte, and oligodendrocyte. Differentiated cells presented their respective markers, specifically, NF-L and NSE for neurons, GFAP for astrocytes, and myelin/oligodendrocyte for oligodendrocytes. In this study, we successfully isolated MPCs from cryopreserved UCB, which differentiated into the neural tissue-specific cell types. These findings suggest that cryopreserved human UCB is a useful alternative source of neural progenitor cells, such as MPCs, for experimental and therapeutic applications

  19. Generation of a novel regulatory NK cell subset from peripheral blood CD34+ progenitors promoted by membrane-bound IL-15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giuliani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NK cells have been long time considered as cytotoxic lymphocytes competent in killing virus-infected cells and tumors. However, NK cells may also play essential immuno-regulatory functions. In this context, the real existence of a defined NK subset with negative regulatory properties has been hypothesized but never clearly demonstrated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we show the in vitro generation from human peripheral blood haematopoietic progenitors (PB-HP, of a novel subset of non-cytolytic NK cells displaying a mature phenotype and remarkable immuno-regulatory functions (NK-ireg. The main functional hallmark of these NK-ireg cells is represented by the surface expression/release of HLA-G, a major immunosuppressive molecule. In addition, NK-ireg cells secrete two powerful immuno-regulatory factors: IL-10 and IL-21. Through these factors, NK-ireg cells act as effectors of the down-regulation of the immune response: reconverting mature myeloid DC (mDC into immature/tolerogenic DC, blocking cytolytic functions on conventional NK cells and inducing HLA-G membrane expression on PB-derived monocytes. The generation of "NK-ireg" cells is obtained, by default, in culture conditions favouring cell-to-cell contacts, and it is strictly dependent on reciprocal trans-presentation of membrane-bound IL-15 forms constitutively and selectively expressed by human CD34(+ PB-HP. Finally, a small subset of NKp46(+ HLA-G(+ IL-10(+ is detected within freshly isolated decidual NK cells, suggesting that these cells could represent an in vivo counterpart of the NK-ireg cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, NK-ireg cells represent a novel truly differentiated non-cytolytic NK subset with a self-sustainable phenotype (CD56(+ CD16(+ NKp30(+ NKp44(+ NKp46(+ CD94(+ CD69(+ CCR7(+ generated from specific pSTAT6(+ GATA3(+ precursors. NK-ireg cells could be employed to develop new immuno-suppressive strategies in autoimmune diseases, transplant

  20. Genotoxic consequences of endogenous aldehydes on mouse haematopoietic stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaycoechea, Juan I; Crossan, Gerry P; Langevin, Frederic; Daly, Maria; Arends, Mark J; Patel, Ketan J

    2012-09-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) regenerate blood cells throughout the lifespan of an organism. With age, the functional quality of HSCs declines, partly owing to the accumulation of damaged DNA. However, the factors that damage DNA and the protective mechanisms that operate in these cells are poorly understood. We have recently shown that the Fanconi anaemia DNA-repair pathway counteracts the genotoxic effects of reactive aldehydes. Mice with combined inactivation of aldehyde catabolism (through Aldh2 knockout) and the Fanconi anaemia DNA-repair pathway (Fancd2 knockout) display developmental defects, a predisposition to leukaemia, and are susceptible to the toxic effects of ethanol-an exogenous source of acetaldehyde. Here we report that aged Aldh2(-/-) Fancd2(-/-) mutant mice that do not develop leukaemia spontaneously develop aplastic anaemia, with the concomitant accumulation of damaged DNA within the haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) pool. Unexpectedly, we find that only HSPCs, and not more mature blood precursors, require Aldh2 for protection against acetaldehyde toxicity. Additionally, the aldehyde-oxidizing activity of HSPCs, as measured by Aldefluor stain, is due to Aldh2 and correlates with this protection. Finally, there is more than a 600-fold reduction in the HSC pool of mice deficient in both Fanconi anaemia pathway-mediated DNA repair and acetaldehyde detoxification. Therefore, the emergence of bone marrow failure in Fanconi anaemia is probably due to aldehyde-mediated genotoxicity restricted to the HSPC pool. These findings identify a new link between endogenous reactive metabolites and DNA damage in HSCs, and define the protective mechanisms that counteract this threat.

  1. Restrictive versus liberal red blood cell transfusion strategies for people with haematological malignancies treated with intensive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, with or without haematopoietic stem cell support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Malouf, Reem; Trivella, Marialena; Fergusson, Dean A; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F

    2017-01-01

    Background Many people diagnosed with haematological malignancies experience anaemia, and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion plays an essential supportive role in their management. Different strategies have been developed for RBC transfusions. A restrictive transfusion strategy seeks to maintain a lower haemoglobin level (usually between 70 g/L to 90 g/L) with a trigger for transfusion when the haemoglobin drops below 70 g/L), whereas a liberal transfusion strategy aims to maintain a higher haemoglobin (usually between 100 g/L to 120 g/L, with a threshold for transfusion when haemoglobin drops below 100 g/L). In people undergoing surgery or who have been admitted to intensive care a restrictive transfusion strategy has been shown to be safe and in some cases safer than a liberal transfusion strategy. However, it is not known whether it is safe in people with haematological malignancies. Objectives To determine the efficacy and safety of restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion strategies for people diagnosed with haematological malignancies treated with intensive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, with or without a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised trials (NRS) in MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1982), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 6), and 10 other databases (including four trial registries) to 15 June 2016. We also searched grey literature and contacted experts in transfusion for additional trials. There was no restriction on language, date or publication status. Selection criteria We included RCTs and prospective NRS that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal RBC transfusion strategy in children or adults with malignant haematological disorders or undergoing HSCT. Data collection and analysis We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Main results

  2. Restrictive versus liberal red blood cell transfusion strategies for people with haematological malignancies treated with intensive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, with or without haematopoietic stem cell support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Malouf, Reem; Trivella, Marialena; Fergusson, Dean A; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F

    2017-01-27

    Many people diagnosed with haematological malignancies experience anaemia, and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion plays an essential supportive role in their management. Different strategies have been developed for RBC transfusions. A restrictive transfusion strategy seeks to maintain a lower haemoglobin level (usually between 70 g/L to 90 g/L) with a trigger for transfusion when the haemoglobin drops below 70 g/L), whereas a liberal transfusion strategy aims to maintain a higher haemoglobin (usually between 100 g/L to 120 g/L, with a threshold for transfusion when haemoglobin drops below 100 g/L). In people undergoing surgery or who have been admitted to intensive care a restrictive transfusion strategy has been shown to be safe and in some cases safer than a liberal transfusion strategy. However, it is not known whether it is safe in people with haematological malignancies. To determine the efficacy and safety of restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion strategies for people diagnosed with haematological malignancies treated with intensive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, with or without a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised trials (NRS) in MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1982), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 6), and 10 other databases (including four trial registries) to 15 June 2016. We also searched grey literature and contacted experts in transfusion for additional trials. There was no restriction on language, date or publication status. We included RCTs and prospective NRS that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal RBC transfusion strategy in children or adults with malignant haematological disorders or undergoing HSCT. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We identified six studies eligible for inclusion in this review; five RCTs and one NRS. Three

  3. Elevation of extracellular adenosine mobilizes haematopoietic progenitor cells and granulocytes into peripheral blood and enhances the mobilizing effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Weiterová, Lenka; Vacek, Antonín; Znojil, V.; Pospíšil, Milan; Vácha, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 3 (2003), s. 204-210 ISSN 0902-4441 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/0423; GA AV ČR IBS5004009; GA AV ČR KSK5011112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : extracellular adenosine * dipyridamole * adenosine monophosphate Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.714, year: 2003

  4. Efficient removal of platelets from peripheral blood progenitor cell products using a novel micro-chip based acoustophoretic platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Dykes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive collection of platelets is an unwanted side effect in current centrifugation-based peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC apheresis. We investigated a novel microchip-based acoustophoresis technique, utilizing ultrasonic standing wave forces for the removal of platelets from PBPC products. By applying an acoustic standing wave field onto a continuously flowing cell suspension in a micro channel, cells can be separated from the surrounding media depending on their physical properties. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: PBPC samples were obtained from patients (n = 15 and healthy donors (n = 6 and sorted on an acoustophoresis-chip. The acoustic force was set to separate leukocytes from platelets into a target fraction and a waste fraction, respectively. The PBPC samples, the target and the waste fractions were analysed for cell recovery, purity and functionality. RESULTS: The median separation efficiency of leukocytes to the target fraction was 98% whereas platelets were effectively depleted by 89%. PBPC samples and corresponding target fractions were similar in the percentage of CD34+ hematopoetic progenitor/stem cells as well as leukocyte/lymphocyte subset distributions. Median viability was 98%, 98% and 97% in the PBPC samples, the target and the waste fractions, respectively. Results from hematopoietic progenitor cell assays indicated a preserved colony-forming ability post-sorting. Evaluation of platelet activation by P-selectin (CD62P expression revealed a significant increase of CD62P+ platelets in the target (19% and waste fractions (20%, respectively, compared to the PBPC input samples (9%. However, activation was lower when compared to stored blood bank platelet concentrates (48%. CONCLUSION: Acoustophoresis can be utilized to efficiently deplete PBPC samples of platelets, whilst preserving the target stem/progenitor cell and leukocyte cell populations, cell viability and progenitor cell colony-forming ability

  5. Collagen-Coated Polytetrafluoroethane Membrane Inserts Enhances Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cord Blood Multi-Lineage Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Samir; Søballe, Kjeld; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael

    Background: Articular chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are the favoured cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Umbilical cord blood has proven an alternative source of MSCs and moreover they may be more potent chondroprogenitor cells than bonemarrow...... MSCs. Purpose / Aim of Study: Multilineage progenitor cells (MLPCs) are clonal cord blood-derived MSCs and may therefore provide a cell source with more reproducible outcomes compared to heterogeneous primary MSC cultures. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the chondrogenic potency of MLPCs...... is an obvious next step since direct seeding of MLPCs on CPP did not yield satisfactory biphasic constructs....

  6. Pneumonia Caused by Moraxella Catarrhalis in Haematopoietic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with haematopoietic stem cell transplant who developed pneumonia caused by M. catarrhalis at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Riyadh are reported and the literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, these are the first case reports of M. catarrhalis pneumonia in haematopoietic stem cell ...

  7. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and drugs elevating extracellular adenosine synergize to enhance haematopoietic reconstitution in irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospisil, M.; Hofer, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Vacek, A. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Inst. of Biophysics, Brno (Czech Republic); Znojil, V.; Vacha, J. [Masaryk Univ., Medical Faculty, Brno (Czech Republic)

    1998-03-01

    The activation of adenosine receptors has recently been demonstrated to stimulate haematopoiesis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of drugs elevating extracellular adenosine to influence curative effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mice exposed to a sublethal dose of 4 Gy of {sup 60}Co radiation. Elevation of extracellular adenosine in mice was induced by the combined administration of dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, and adenosine monophosphate (AMP), an adenosine prodrug. The effects of dipyridamole plus AMP, and G-CSF, administered either alone or in combination, were evaluated. The drugs were injected to mice in a 4-d treatment regimen starting on d 3 after irradiation and the haematopoietic response was evaluated on d 7, 10, 14, 18 and 24 after irradiation. While the effects of G-CSF on the late maturation stages of blood cells, appearing shortly after the completion of the treatment, were not influenced by dipyridamole plus AMP, positive effects of the combination therapy occurred in the post-irradiation recovery phase which is dependent on the repopulation of haematopoietic stem cells. This was indicated by the significant elevation of counts of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) and granulocytic cells in the bone marrow (d 14), of GM-CFC (d 14), granulocytic and erythroid cells (d 14 and 18) in the spleen, and of neutrophils (d 18), monocytes (d 14 and 18) and platelets (d 18) in the peripheral blood. These effects suggest that the repopulation potential of the combination therapy lies in a common multi-lineage cell population. The results of this study implicate the promising possibility to enhance the curative effects of G-CSF under conditions of myelosuppressive state induced by radiation exposure. (au) 43 refs.

  8. The unfolded protein response governs integrity of the haematopoietic stem-cell pool during stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Galen, Peter; Kreso, Antonija; Mbong, Nathan; Kent, David G; Fitzmaurice, Timothy; Chambers, Joseph E; Xie, Stephanie; Laurenti, Elisa; Hermans, Karin; Eppert, Kolja; Marciniak, Stefan J; Goodall, Jane C; Green, Anthony R; Wouters, Bradly G; Wienholds, Erno; Dick, John E

    2014-06-12

    The blood system is sustained by a pool of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that are long-lived due to their capacity for self-renewal. A consequence of longevity is exposure to stress stimuli including reactive oxygen species (ROS), nutrient fluctuation and DNA damage. Damage that occurs within stressed HSCs must be tightly controlled to prevent either loss of function or the clonal persistence of oncogenic mutations that increase the risk of leukaemogenesis. Despite the importance of maintaining cell integrity throughout life, how the HSC pool achieves this and how individual HSCs respond to stress remain poorly understood. Many sources of stress cause misfolded protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and subsequent activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) enables the cell to either resolve stress or initiate apoptosis. Here we show that human HSCs are predisposed to apoptosis through strong activation of the PERK branch of the UPR after ER stress, whereas closely related progenitors exhibit an adaptive response leading to their survival. Enhanced ER protein folding by overexpression of the co-chaperone ERDJ4 (also called DNAJB9) increases HSC repopulation capacity in xenograft assays, linking the UPR to HSC function. Because the UPR is a focal point where different sources of stress converge, our study provides a framework for understanding how stress signalling is coordinated within tissue hierarchies and integrated with stemness. Broadly, these findings reveal that the HSC pool maintains clonal integrity by clearance of individual HSCs after stress to prevent propagation of damaged stem cells.

  9. Polylox barcoding reveals haematopoietic stem cell fates realized in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Weike; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rössler, Jens; Wang, Xi; Postrach, Daniel; Busch, Katrin; Rode, Immanuel; Klapproth, Kay; Dietlein, Nikolaus; Quedenau, Claudia; Chen, Wei; Sauer, Sascha; Wolf, Stephan; Höfer, Thomas; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2017-08-24

    Developmental deconvolution of complex organs and tissues at the level of individual cells remains challenging. Non-invasive genetic fate mapping has been widely used, but the low number of distinct fluorescent marker proteins limits its resolution. Much higher numbers of cell markers have been generated using viral integration sites, viral barcodes, and strategies based on transposons and CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing; however, temporal and tissue-specific induction of barcodes in situ has not been achieved. Here we report the development of an artificial DNA recombination locus (termed Polylox) that enables broadly applicable endogenous barcoding based on the Cre-loxP recombination system. Polylox recombination in situ reaches a practical diversity of several hundred thousand barcodes, allowing tagging of single cells. We have used this experimental system, combined with fate mapping, to assess haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) fates in vivo. Classical models of haematopoietic lineage specification assume a tree with few major branches. More recently, driven in part by the development of more efficient single-cell assays and improved transplantation efficiencies, different models have been proposed, in which unilineage priming may occur in mice and humans at the level of HSCs. We have introduced barcodes into HSC progenitors in embryonic mice, and found that the adult HSC compartment is a mosaic of embryo-derived HSC clones, some of which are unexpectedly large. Most HSC clones gave rise to multilineage or oligolineage fates, arguing against unilineage priming, and suggesting coherent usage of the potential of cells in a clone. The spreading of barcodes, both after induction in embryos and in adult mice, revealed a basic split between common myeloid-erythroid development and common lymphocyte development, supporting the long-held but contested view of a tree-like haematopoietic structure.

  10. Polycomb Cbx family members mediate the balance between haematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klauke, Karin; Radulović, Višnja; Broekhuis, Mathilde

    2013-01-01

    The balance between self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells is essential for tissue homeostasis. Here we show that in the haematopoietic system this process is governed by polycomb chromobox (Cbx) proteins. Cbx7 is specifically expressed in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and its...... overexpression enhances self-renewal and induces leukaemia. This effect is dependent on integration into polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and requires H3K27me3 binding. In contrast, overexpression of Cbx2, Cbx4 or Cbx8 results in differentiation and exhaustion of HSCs. ChIP-sequencing analysis shows that Cbx......7 and Cbx8 share most of their targets; we identified approximately 200 differential targets. Whereas genes targeted by Cbx8 are highly expressed in HSCs and become repressed in progenitors, Cbx7 targets show the opposite expression pattern. Thus, Cbx7 preserves HSC self-renewal by repressing...

  11. Plerixafor Salvage Is Safe and Effective in Hard-to-Mobilize Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy and Filgrastim-Based Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cell Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrukh T. Awan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of filgrastim (G-CSF and plerixafor is currently approved for mobilizing peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma undergoing autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, chemotherapy and G-CSF-based mobilization remains a widely used strategy for peripheral blood progenitor cell collection. In this paper we describe our experience from two North American transplant centers in a series of patients who received salvage plerixafor while failing chemotherapy and G-CSF mobilization. Patients received a median of two doses of plerixafor salvage upon failure to mobilize adequate number of peripheral blood progenitor cells at neutrophil recovery. The use of plerixafor was associated with a 2.4-fold increase in peripheral blood CD34+ cell count and 3.9-fold increase in total CD34+ cell yield. All patients were able to collect ≥2×106 CD34+ cells/kg with this approach. These results were more pronounced in patients with a higher CD34+ cell count at the time of the first plerixafor dose. Interestingly, peripheral blood white blood cell count was not shown to correlate with a response to plerixafor. Our results provide safety and efficacy data for the use of plerixafor in patients who are destined to fail chemomobilization.

  12. Myeloid and lymphoid contribution to non-haematopoietic lineages through irradiation-induced heterotypic cell fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygren, J.M.; Liuba, K.; Breitbach, M.

    2008-01-01

    is induced by organ-specific injuries or whole-body irradiation, which has been used in previous studies to condition recipients of bone marrow transplants. Our findings demonstrate that blood cells of the lymphoid and myeloid lineages contribute to various non-haematopoietic tissues by forming rare fusion...

  13. S phase entry of neural progenitor cells correlates with increased blood flow in the young subventricular zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Lacar

    Full Text Available The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ contains proliferating neural progenitor cells in close proximity to blood vessels. Insults and drug treatments acutely stimulate cell proliferation in the SVZ, which was assessed by labeling cells entering S phase. Although G1-to-S progression is metabolically demanding on a minute-to-hour time scale, it remains unknown whether increased SVZ cell proliferation is accompanied by a local hemodynamic response. This neurovascular coupling provides energy substrates to active neuronal assemblies. Transcardial dye perfusion revealed the presence of capillaries throughout the SVZ that constrict upon applications of the thromboxane A(2 receptor agonist U-46119 in acute brain slice preparations. We then monitored in vivo blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry via a microprobe located either in the SVZ or a mature network. U-46119 injections into the lateral ventricle decreased blood flow in the SVZ and the striatum, which are near the ventricle. A 1-hour ventricular injection of epidermal and basic fibroblast growth factor (EGF and bFGF significantly increased the percentage of Sox2 transcription factor-positive cells in S phase 1.5 hours post-injection. This increase was accompanied by a sustained rise in blood flow in the SVZ but not in the striatum. Direct growth factor injections into the cortex did not alter local blood flow, ruling out direct effects on capillaries. These findings suggest that an acute increase in the number of G1-to-S cycling SVZ cells is accompanied by neurometabolic-vascular coupling, which may provide energy and nutrient for cell cycle progression.

  14. Long-term leukocyte reconstitution in NSG mice transplanted with human cord blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigé, Annette; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Li, Duo; Ivic, Sandra; Fahrny, Audrey; Muller, Christina K S; Gers-Huber, Gustavo; Myburgh, Renier; Bredl, Simon; Schlaepfer, Erika; Scherrer, Alexandra U; Kuster, Stefan P; Speck, Roberto F

    2017-05-30

    Humanized mice (hu mice) are based on the transplantation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into immunodeficient mice and have become important pre-clinical models for biomedical research. However, data about their hematopoiesis over time are scarce. We therefore characterized leukocyte reconstitution in NSG mice, which were sublethally irradiated and transplanted with human cord blood-derived CD34+ cells at newborn age, longitudinally in peripheral blood and, for more detailed analyses, cross-sectionally in peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow at different time points. Human cell chimerism and absolute human cell count decreased between week 16 and 24 in the peripheral blood of hu mice, but were stable thereafter as assessed up to 32 weeks. Human cell chimerism in spleen and bone marrow was maintained over time. Notably, human cell chimerism in peripheral blood and spleen as well as bone marrow positively correlated with each other. Percentage of B cells decreased between week 16 and 24, whereas percentage of T cells increased; subsequently, they levelled off with T cells clearly predominating at week 32. Natural killer cells, monocytes and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) as well as CD1c + and CD141+ myeloid DCs were all present in hu mice. Proliferative responses of splenic T cells to stimulation were preserved over time. Importantly, the percentage of more primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in bone marrow was maintained over time. Overall, leukocyte reconstitution was maintained up to 32 weeks post-transplantation in our hu NSG model, possibly explained by the maintenance of HSCs in the bone marrow. Notably, we observed great variation in multi-lineage hematopoietic reconstitution in hu mice that needs to be taken into account for the experimental design with hu mice.

  15. Management of adenovirus infection in patients after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: State-of-the-art and real-life current approach: A position statement on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Kosulin, Karin; Cesaro, Simone; Mikulska, Malgorzata; Styczynski, Jan; Wynn, Robert; Lion, Thomas

    2018-04-16

    The important insights gained over the past years in diagnosis and treatment of invasive adenoviral infections provide new paradigms for the monitoring and clinical management of these life-threatening complications. A meeting was held to discuss and subsequently disseminate the current advances in our understanding of the aetiology/pathogenesis and future treatment options facilitating effective control or prevention of adenovirus-related diseases in the allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant setting. Invited experts in the field discussed recent progress with leading members of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation at the "State-of-the-art" Meeting in Poznan, Poland, in October 2017. In this review article, the panel of experts presents a concise summary of the current evidence based on published data from the last 15 years and on recent achievements resulting from real-life practice. The present position statement reflects an expert opinion on current approaches to clinical management of adenovirus infections in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant and provides graded recommendations of the panel for diagnostic approaches and preemptive therapy reflecting the present state of knowledge. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Human haemato-endothelial precursors: cord blood CD34+ cells produce haemogenic endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Pelosi

    Full Text Available Embryologic and genetic evidence suggest a common origin of haematopoietic and endothelial lineages. In the murine embryo, recent studies indicate the presence of haemogenic endothelium and of a common haemato-endothelial precursor, the haemangioblast. Conversely, so far, little evidence supports the presence of haemogenic endothelium and haemangioblasts in later stages of development. Our studies indicate that human cord blood haematopoietic progenitors (CD34+45+144-, triggered by murine hepatocyte conditioned medium, differentiate into adherent proliferating endothelial precursors (CD144+CD105+CD146+CD31+CD45- capable of functioning as haemogenic endothelium. These cells, proven to give rise to functional vasculature in vivo, if further instructed by haematopoietic growth factors, first switch to transitional CD144+45+ cells and then to haematopoietic cells. These results highlight the plasticity of haemato-endhothelial precursors in human post-natal life. Furthermore, these studies may provide highly enriched populations of human post-fetal haemogenic endothelium, paving the way for innovative projects at a basic and possibly clinical level.

  17. HEMATOPOIETIC PROGENITOR CELLS AS A PREDICTIVE OF CD34+ ENUMERATION PRIOR TO PERIPHERAL BLOOD STEM CELLS HARVESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zulkafli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date, the CD34+ cell enumeration has relied predominantly on flow cytometry technique. However, flow cytometry is time consuming and operator dependent. The application of the hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs channel in Sysmex XE-2100, a fully automated hematology analyzer offers an alternative approach, which is with minimal sample manipulation and less operator dependent. This study evaluates the utility of HPC counts as a predictive of CD34+ enumeration prior to peripheral blood stem cells harvesting. Materials and methods: HPC, CD34+, white blood cell (WBC, reticulocytes (retic, immature platelet fraction (IPF and immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF were determined in 61 samples from 19 patients with hematological malignancies (15 lymphoma and 4 multiple myeloma patients at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (Hospital USM who had received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF and planned for autologous transplantation. Results: CD34+ count showed strong and significant correlation with HPC. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analysis revealed that HPC count > 21.5 x 106 / L can predicts a pre harvest CD34+ count of >20 x 106 / L with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 64% and area under the curve (AUC of 0.802. Conclusion: We concluded that HPC count can be a useful potential parameter in optimizing timing for CD34+ enumeration prior to leukapheresis.

  18. Erythropoietin-enhanced endothelial progenitor cell recruitment in peripheral blood and renal vessels during experimental acute kidney injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakiroglu, Figen; Enders-Comberg, Sora Maria; Pagel, Horst; Rohwedel, Jürgen; Lehnert, Hendrik; Kramer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Beneficial effects of erythropoietin (EPO) have been reported in acute kidney injury (AKI) when administered prior to induction of AKI. We studied the effects of EPO administration on renal function shortly after ischemic AKI. For this purpose, rats were subjected to renal ischemia for 30 min and EPO was administered at a concentration of 500 U/kg either i.v. as a single shot directly after ischemia or with an additional i.p. dose until 3 days after surgery. The results were compared with AKI rats without EPO application and a sham-operated group. Renal function was assessed by measurement of serum biochemical markers, histological grading, and using an isolated perfused kidney (IPK) model. Furthermore, we performed flow cytometry to analyze the concentration of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the peripheral blood and renal vessels. Following EPO application, there was only a statistically non-significant tendency of serum creatinine and urea to improve, particularly after daily EPO application. Renal vascular resistance and the renal perfusion rate were not significantly altered. In the histological analysis, acute tubular necrosis was only marginally ameliorated following EPO administration. In summary, we could not demonstrate a significant improvement in renal function when EPO was applied after AKI. Interestingly, however, EPO treatment resulted in a highly significant increase in CD133- and CD34-positive EPC both in the peripheral blood and renal vessels. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  19. Lin- CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ cells in human blood constitute a rare population of mast cell progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Malinovschi, Andrei; Öhrvik, Helena; Sandelin, Martin; Janson, Christer; Alving, Kjell; Hallgren, Jenny

    2016-01-28

    Mast cells are rare tissue-resident immune cells that are involved in allergic reactions, and their numbers are increased in the lungs of asthmatics. Murine lung mast cells arise from committed bone marrow-derived progenitors that enter the blood circulation, migrate through the pulmonary endothelium, and mature in the tissue. In humans, mast cells can be cultured from multipotent CD34(+) progenitor cells. However, a population of distinct precursor cells that give rise to mast cells has remained undiscovered. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human lineage-negative (Lin(-)) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) progenitor cells, which represented only 0.0053% of the isolated blood cells in healthy individuals. These cells expressed integrin β7 and developed a mast cell-like phenotype, although with a slow cell division capacity in vitro. Isolated Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells had an immature mast cell-like appearance and expressed high levels of many mast cell-related genes as compared with human blood basophils in whole-transcriptome microarray analyses. Furthermore, serglycin, tryptase, and carboxypeptidase A messenger RNA transcripts were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Altogether, we propose that the Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells are closely related to human tissue mast cells and likely constitute an immediate precursor population, which can give rise to predominantly mast cells. Furthermore, asthmatics with reduced lung function had a higher frequency of Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood mast cell progenitors than asthmatics with normal lung function. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Lin− CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ cells in human blood constitute a rare population of mast cell progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joakim S.; Malinovschi, Andrei; Öhrvik, Helena; Sandelin, Martin; Janson, Christer; Alving, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are rare tissue-resident immune cells that are involved in allergic reactions, and their numbers are increased in the lungs of asthmatics. Murine lung mast cells arise from committed bone marrow–derived progenitors that enter the blood circulation, migrate through the pulmonary endothelium, and mature in the tissue. In humans, mast cells can be cultured from multipotent CD34+ progenitor cells. However, a population of distinct precursor cells that give rise to mast cells has remained undiscovered. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human lineage-negative (Lin−) CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ progenitor cells, which represented only 0.0053% of the isolated blood cells in healthy individuals. These cells expressed integrin β7 and developed a mast cell–like phenotype, although with a slow cell division capacity in vitro. Isolated Lin− CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ blood cells had an immature mast cell–like appearance and expressed high levels of many mast cell–related genes as compared with human blood basophils in whole-transcriptome microarray analyses. Furthermore, serglycin, tryptase, and carboxypeptidase A messenger RNA transcripts were detected by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Altogether, we propose that the Lin− CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ blood cells are closely related to human tissue mast cells and likely constitute an immediate precursor population, which can give rise to predominantly mast cells. Furthermore, asthmatics with reduced lung function had a higher frequency of Lin− CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ blood mast cell progenitors than asthmatics with normal lung function. PMID:26626992

  1. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A., E-mail: rschulz@nd.edu

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche.

  2. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche

  3. The human umbilical cord blood: a potential source for osteoblast progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Cecilia Rosada; Melsvik, Dorte; Ebbesen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The presence of non-hematopoietic stem cells in the human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) is debated. In this study, we report the isolation of a population of fibroblast-like cells with osteogenic and adipogenic potential that resembles the stromal stem cells found in the bone marrow. Low...

  4. Use of human umbilical cord blood-derived progenitor cells for tissue-engineered heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodian, Ralf; Schaefermeier, Philipp; Abegg-Zips, Sybille; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Daebritz, Sabine; Ziegelmueller, Johannes; Schmitz, Christoph; Reichart, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    Tissue engineering of autologous heart valves with the potential to grow and to remodel represents a promising concept. Here we describe the use of cryopreserved umbilical cord blood-derived CD133(+) cells as a single cell source for the tissue engineering of heart valves. After expansion and differentiation of CD133(+) cells, phenotypes were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and cryopreserved. Heart valve scaffolds fabricated from a biodegradable polymer (n = 8) were seeded with blood-derived myofibroblasts and subsequently coated with blood-derived endothelial cells. Afterward, the heart valve constructs were grown in a pulse duplicator system. Analysis of all heart valves, including histology, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, fluorescence imaging, and biochemical and biomechanical examination, was performed. The tissue-engineered heart valves showed endothelialized layered tissue formation including connective tissue between the inside and the outside of the scaffold. The notion of an intact endothelial phenotype was substantiated by fluorescence imaging studies of cellular nitric oxide production and Ca(2+) signaling. Electron microscopy showed that the cells had grown into the pores and formed a confluent tissue layer. Biochemical examination showed extracellular matrix formation (77% +/- 9% collagen of human pulmonary leaflet tissue [HPLT], 85% +/- 61% glycosaminoglycans of HPLT and 67% +/- 17% elastin of HPLT). Importantly, this study demonstrates in vitro generation of viable human heart valves based on CD133(+) cells derived from umbilical cord blood. These findings constitute a significant step forward in the development of new clinical strategies for the treatment of congenital defects. 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic correction of p67phox deficient chronic granulomatous disease using peripheral blood progenitor cells as a target for retrovirus mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, W M; Linton, G F; Whiting-Theobald, N; Vowells, S J; Rafferty, S P; Li, F; Malech, H L

    1997-03-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) can result from any of four single gene defects involving the components of the superoxide (O-2) generating phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. We show that transduction of peripheral blood CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors from a p67phox deficient CGD patient with replication defective amphotropic retrovirus encoding p67phox (MFGS-p67phox) significantly corrected the CGD functional defect in phagocyte oxidase activity in vitro. Using a chemiluminescence assay of oxidase activity, we showed that transduced patient CD34+ progenitors differentiating to myeloid cells in culture produced 25% of the total superoxide produced by normal CD34+ progenitors differentiating in culture. A flow cytometric assay of oxidase activity used to assess the oxidase function of individual cells in the cultures indicated that up to 32% of maturing granulocytes derived from transduced CD34+ progenitors from the p67phox CGD patient were oxidase positive with the average level of correction per granulocyte of 85% of that seen with granulocytes in similar cultures of CD34+ progenitors from normal volunteers. Nitroblue tetrazolium dye reduction assays of colonies of transduced progenitors in soft agar indicated that in some studies restoration of oxidase activity occurred in myeloid cells within 44% of granulocyte-erythrocyte-monocyte colonies, and within 28% of the combined group of granulocyte colonies/monocyte colonies/granulocyte monocyte colonies. These high correction rates were achieved without any selective regimen to enrich for transduced cells. This study provides a basis for development of gene therapy for the p67phox deficient form of CGD.

  6. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of endothelial progenitor cells derived from umbilical cord blood and adult peripheral blood: Implications for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiugong Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs offer the potential to generate tissues with ethnic diversity enabling toxicity testing on selected populations. Recently, it has been reported that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs derived from umbilical cord blood (CB or adult peripheral blood (PB afford a practical and efficient cellular substrate for iPSC generation. However, differences between EPCs from different blood sources have rarely been studied. In the current study, we derived EPCs from blood mononuclear cells (MNCs and reprogrammed EPCs into iPSCs. We also explored differences between CB-EPCs and PB-EPCs at the molecular and cellular levels through a combination of transcriptomic analysis and cell biology techniques. EPC colonies in CB-MNCs emerged 5–7 days earlier, were 3-fold higher in number, and consistently larger in size than in PB-MNCs. Similarly, iPSC colonies generated from CB-EPCs was 2.5-fold higher in number than from PB-EPCs, indicating CB-EPCs have a higher reprogramming efficiency than PB-EPCs. Transcriptomic analysis using microarrays found a total of 1133 genes differentially expressed in CB-EPCs compared with PB-EPCs, with 675 genes upregulated and 458 downregulated. Several canonical pathways were impacted, among which the human embryonic stem cell pluripotency pathway was of particular interest. The differences in the gene expression pattern between CB-EPCs and PB-EPCs provide a molecular basis for the discrepancies seen in their derivation and reprogramming efficiencies, and highlight the advantages of using CB as the cellular source for the generation of iPSCs and their derivative tissues for ethnic-related toxicological applications.

  7. Pneumonia Caused by Moraxella Catarrhalis in Haematopoietic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a gram negative diplococcus that causes a variety of upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Patients with malignant, hematological disorders treated with intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy, and recipients of various forms of haematopoietic stem cell transplant receiving immunosuppressive ...

  8. Inhibition of MEK/ERK signalling pathway promotes erythroid differentiation and reduces HSCs engraftment in ex vivo expanded haematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Morteza; Afzal, Elaheh; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein; Mohammad, Monireh; Es, Hamidreza Aboulkheyr; Ebrahimi, Marzieh

    2018-03-01

    The MEK/ERK pathway is found to be important in regulating different biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation and survival in a wide variety of cells. However, its role in self-renewal of haematopoietic stem cells is controversial and remains to be clarified. The aim of this study was to understand the role of MEK/ERK pathway in ex vivo expansion of mononuclear cells (MNCs) and purified CD34 + cells, both derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB). Based on our results, culturing the cells in the presence of an inhibitor of MEK/ERK pathway-PD0325901 (PD)-significantly reduces the expansion of CD34 + and CD34 +  CD38 - cells, while there is no change in the expression of stemness-related genes (HOXB4, BMI1). Moreover, in vivo analysis demonstrates that PD reduces engraftment capacity of ex vivo expanded CD34 + cells. Notably, when ERK pathway is blocked in UCB-MNCs, spontaneous erythroid differentiation is promoted, found in concomitant with increasing number of burst-forming unit-erythroid colony (BFU-E) as well as enhancement of erythroid glycophorin-A marker. These results are in total conformity with up-regulation of some erythroid enhancer genes (TAL1, GATA2, LMO2) and down-regulation of some erythroid repressor genes (JUN, PU1) as well. Taken together, our results support the idea that MEK/ERK pathway has a critical role in achieving the correct balance between self-renewal and differentiation of UCB cells. Also, we suggest that inhibition of ERK signalling could likely be a new key for erythroid induction of UCB-haematopoietic progenitor cells. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. Assessments of proliferation capacity and viability of New Zealand rabbit peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells labeled with superparamagnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Xiao-Li; Ma, Zhan-Long; Sun, Jun-Hui; Ju, Sheng-Hong; Ma, Ming; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven to be effective in tracking the distribution of transplanted stem cells to target organs by way of labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO). However, the effect of SPIO upon labeled cells is still unclear on a cellular level. With this study, the proliferation and viability of New Zealand rabbit peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) labeled with SPIO were evaluated and in vitro images were obtained using a 1.5 T MR scanner. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from peripheral blood of the adult New Zealand rabbit and cultured in fibronectin-coated culture flasks, in which EPCs were identified from cell morphology, outgrowth characteristics, and internalization of DiI-Ac-LDL and binding to FITC-UEA I. EPCs were incubated with the self-synthesized poly-L-lysine-conjugated SPIO (PLL-SPIO) particles in a range of concentrations. The prevalence of iron-containing vesicles or endosomes in the cytoplasm of labeled cells was confirmed with Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy. Tetrazolium salt (MTT) assay, cell apoptosis, and cycle detection were assessed to evaluate proliferation and function of various concentrations, magnetically labeled EPCs. The quantity of iron per cell was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The cells underwent MRI with different sequences. The result showed that rabbit EPCs were efficiently labeled with the home synthesized PLL-SPIO. There was found to be no statistically significant difference in the MTT values of light absorption measured on the third and fifth days. Between labeled and unlabeled cells, there were also no aberrations found in the cell cycles, apoptosis, or growth curves. The atomic absorption spectrophotometer showed that the intracellular content of Fe decreased as more time elapsed after labeling. The labeled EPCs demonstrated a loss of MRI signal intensity (SI) when compared with the SI of unlabeled cells

  10. Human cord blood progenitors with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity improve vascular density in a model of acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creer Michael H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human stem cells from adult sources have been shown to contribute to the regeneration of muscle, liver, heart, and vasculature. The mechanisms by which this is accomplished are, however, still not well understood. We tested the engraftment and regenerative potential of human umbilical cord blood-derived ALDHhiLin-, and ALDHloLin- cells following transplantation to NOD/SCID or NOD/SCID β2m null mice with experimentally induced acute myocardial infarction. We used combined nanoparticle labeling and whole organ fluorescent imaging to detect human cells in multiple organs 48 hours post transplantation. Engraftment and regenerative effects of cell treatment were assessed four weeks post transplantation. We found that ALDHhiLin- stem cells specifically located to the site of injury 48 hours post transplantation and engrafted the infarcted heart at higher frequencies than ALDHloLin- committed progenitor cells four weeks post transplantation. We found no donor derived cardiomyocytes and few endothelial cells of donor origin. Cell treatment was not associated with any detectable functional improvement at the four week endpoint. There was, however, a significant increase in vascular density in the central infarct zone of ALDHhiLin- cell-treated mice, as compared to PBS and ALDHloLin- cell-treated mice. Conclusions Our data indicate that adult human stem cells do not become a significant part of the regenerating tissue, but rapidly home to and persist only temporarily at the site of hypoxic injury to exert trophic effects on tissue repair thereby enhancing vascular recovery.

  11. The influence of gender- and age-related differences in the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells detected in steady-state human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kengo; Kashiwakura, Ikuo; Kuwabara, Mikinori

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the importance of gender and aging on the individual radiosensitivity of lineage-committed myeloid hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) detected in mononuclear cells (MNCs) of steady-state human peripheral blood (PB), the clonogenic survival of HPCs, including colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage; burst-forming unit-erythroid; colony-forming unit-granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte cells derived from MNCs exposed to 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy X-irradiation were estimated. MNCs were prepared from the buffy-coats of 59 healthy individual blood donors. The results showed that large individual differences exist in the number of HSPCs, as well as in the surviving fraction of cells. Furthermore, the number of progenitor cells strongly correlated with their surviving fraction, suggesting that the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells decreases with the number of cells in the 10 5 cells population. A statistically significant negative correlation was observed between the surviving fraction observed at a dose of 0.5 Gy and the age of an individual, however, none of these correlations were observed after 2 Gy irradiation. No statistically significant difference was observed in individual radiosensitivity between males and females at either radiation dose. The present results indicated a correlation between the individual responsiveness of HSPCs to ionizing irradiation, especially to low dose irradiation, and aging. (author)

  12. A defined, feeder-free, serum-free system to generate in vitro hematopoietic progenitors and differentiated blood cells from hESCs and hiPSCs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Salvagiotto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Human ESC and iPSC are an attractive source of cells of high quantity and purity to be used to elucidate early human development processes, for drug discovery, and in clinical cell therapy applications. To efficiently differentiate pluripotent cells into a pure population of hematopoietic progenitors we have developed a new 2-dimensional, defined and highly efficient protocol that avoids the use of feeder cells, serum or embryoid body formation. Here we showed that a single matrix protein in combination with growth factors and a hypoxic environment is sufficient to generate from pluripotent cells hematopoietic progenitors capable of differentiating further in mature cell types of different lineages of the blood system. We tested the differentiation method using hESCs and 9 iPSC lines generated from different tissues. These data indicate the robustness of the protocol providing a valuable tool for the generation of clinical-grade hematopoietic cells from pluripotent cells.

  13. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Veronica R; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2013-09-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but one patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 10(6) /kg of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non-hematologic toxic effects were observed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. BMP signalling differentially regulates distinct haematopoietic stem cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela); P. Solaimani Kartalaei (Parham); C.S. Vink (Chris); T. Yamada-Inagawa (Tomoko); K. Bollerot (Karine); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); R. Van Der Linden (Reinier); S.C. de Sousa Lopes (Susana Chuva); R. Monteiro (Rui); C.L. Mummery (Christine); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAdult haematopoiesis is the outcome of distinct haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subtypes with self-renewable repopulating ability, but with different haematopoietic cell lineage outputs. The molecular basis for this heterogeneity is largely unknown. BMP signalling regulates HSCs as they

  15. Health-care professionals' perspective on discussing sexual issues in adult patients after haematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeltink, Corien M; Witte, Birgit I; Stringer, Jacqui; Liptrott, Sarah; Babic, Aleksandra; Greenfield, Diana M; Salooja, Nina; Incrocci, Luca; Visser, Otto; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Duarte, Rafael F; Zweegman, Sonja

    2018-03-01

    The majority of adult patients have sexual concerns after post-haematopoietic cell transplantation. Even so, health-care professionals (HCP) do not routinely discuss these problems. We, therefore, surveyed all the members of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation to evaluate the barriers and facilitators to discussing sexual issues. The 73-item web-survey was completed by 166 registered nurses (RNs) and 126 medical doctors (MDs). Sixty-eight percent reported that they seldom discussed sexual issues. Younger MDs (p issues (p issues were discussed in the presence of a relative (60% RNs, 67% MDs) and that professionals prefer patients to raise sexual issues themselves (54% RNs, 44% MDs). The most important perceived facilitator was for the patient to initiate discussion (≥ 90% for RNs and MDs). Overall, haematopoietic cell transplantation survivors may not be receiving the support on sexual issues they probably need.

  16. Imaging in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.; Steward, C.G.; Lyburn, I.D.; Grier, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a wide range of malignant and non-malignant haematological conditions, solid malignancies, and metabolic and autoimmune diseases. Although imaging has a limited role before SCT, it is important after transplantation when it may support the clinical diagnosis of a variety of complications. It may also be used to monitor the effect of therapy and to detect recurrence of the underlying disease if the transplant is unsuccessful. We present a pictorial review of the imaging of patients who have undergone SCT, based upon 15 years experience in a large unit performing both adult and paediatric transplants

  17. Comparative outcome of reduced intensity and myeloablative conditioning regimen in HLA identical sibling allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients older than 50 years of age with acute myeloblastic leukaemia: a retrospective survey from the Acute Leukemia Working Party (ALWP) of the European group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoudjhane, M; Labopin, M; Gorin, N C; Shimoni, A; Ruutu, T; Kolb, H-J; Frassoni, F; Boiron, J M; Yin, J L; Finke, J; Shouten, H; Blaise, D; Falda, M; Fauser, A A; Esteve, J; Polge, E; Slavin, S; Niederwieser, D; Nagler, A; Rocha, V

    2005-12-01

    Results of reduced intensity conditioning regimen (RIC) in the HLA identical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting have not been compared to those after myeloablative (MA) regimen HSCT in patients with acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML) over 50 years of age. With this aim, outcomes of 315 RIC were compared with 407 MA HSCT recipients. The majority of RIC was fludarabine-based regimen associated to busulphan (BU) (53%) or low-dose total body irradiation (24%). Multivariate analyses of outcomes were used adjusting for differences between both groups. The median follow-up was 13 months. Cytogenetics, FAB classification, WBC count at diagnosis and status of the disease at transplant were not statistically different between the two groups. However, RIC patients were older, transplanted more recently, and more frequently with peripheral blood allogeneic stem cells as compared to MA recipients. In multivariate analysis, acute GVHD (II-IV) and transplant-related mortality were significantly decreased (P=0.01 and P<10(-4), respectively) and relapse incidence was significantly higher (P=0.003) after RIC transplantation. Leukaemia-free survival was not statistically different between the two groups. These results may set the grounds for prospective trials comparing RIC with other strategies of treatment in elderly AML.

  18. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for thalassaemia in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C K; Lee, Vincent; Shing, Matthew M K; Leung, T F

    2009-06-01

    Beta thalassaemia major is a common hereditary haematological disease in southern Chinese. Advances in transfusion and iron chelation improve survival but haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is still the only curative treatment. Due to repeated blood transfusion and iron overload, thalassaemia patients undergoing HSCT are at a higher risk of graft rejection and transplant-related mortality. The prognostic factors identified to be affecting transplant outcome include hepatomegaly, hepatic fibrosis, and compliance to chelation therapy. Patients can be classified into three classes and conditioning regimens are modified according to the risk. Early stage patients have 85 to 90% chance of disease-free survival, whereas advance stage only has 60% disease-free survival. Mixed chimerism is common after HSCT but majority have satisfactory erythropoiesis without need for further transfusion. Sibling cord blood and bone marrow transplantation has similar outcome. Recently alternative donor transplant has been performed in patients without human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical siblings. The result of unrelated-donor bone marrow transplantation is in general inferior but extended HLA matching may improve outcome. The use of unrelated cord blood transplant from a single-centre study showed promising result. The survivors require iron depletion to remove excessive iron store and some may require hormonal replacement therapy. Most of the patients have good quality of life after successful HSCT.

  19. Factors controlling the recirculation of haematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, R.V.; Khaitov, R.M.; Alejnikova, N.V.; Gulak, L.V.

    1976-01-01

    Influence of thymectomy on the rate of migration and differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells from a shielded part of the bone marrow has been studied on mice X-irradiated with a lethal dose. Inhibition of the migration rate and delay in differentiation of stem cells into colonies of granuloid type have been detected in the thymectomized mice. Transplantation of syngeneic cells of the thymus or lymph nodes to thymectomized mice increases the number of colonies in the spleen and restores the routine way of differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells. It is concluded that the processes of migration and differentiation of haematopoietic stem cells are thymus-dependent

  20. Overexpression of ERG in cord blood progenitors promotes expansion and recapitulates molecular signatures of high ERG leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursky, M L; Beck, D; Thoms, J A I; Huang, Y; Kumari, A; Unnikrishnan, A; Knezevic, K; Evans, K; Richards, L A; Lee, E; Morris, J; Goldberg, L; Izraeli, S; Wong, J W H; Olivier, J; Lock, R B; MacKenzie, K L; Pimanda, J E

    2015-04-01

    High expression of the ETS family transcription factor ERG is associated with poor clinical outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). In murine models, high ERG expression induces both T-ALL and AML. However, no study to date has defined the effect of high ERG expression on primary human hematopoietic cells. In the present study, human CD34+ cells were transduced with retroviral vectors to elevate ERG gene expression to levels detected in high ERG AML. RNA sequencing was performed on purified populations of transduced cells to define the effects of high ERG on gene expression in human CD34+ cells. Integration of the genome-wide expression data with other data sets revealed that high ERG drives an expression signature that shares features of normal hematopoietic stem cells, high ERG AMLs, early T-cell precursor-ALLs and leukemic stem cell signatures associated with poor clinical outcome. Functional assays linked this gene expression profile to enhanced progenitor cell expansion. These results support a model whereby a stem cell gene expression network driven by high ERG in human cells enhances the expansion of the progenitor pool, providing opportunity for the acquisition and propagation of mutations and the development of leukemia.

  1. The biocompatibility of titanium cardiovascular devices seeded with autologous blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells: EPC-seeded antithrombotic Ti implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achneck, Hardean E; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M; Jantzen, Alexandra E; Haseltine, Justin M; Lane, Whitney O; Huang, Jessica K; Galinat, Lauren J; Serpe, Michael J; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Li, Madison; Parikh, Amar; Ma, Liqiao; Chen, Tao; Sileshi, Bantayehu; Milano, Carmelo A; Wallace, Charles S; Stabler, Thomas V; Allen, Jason D; Truskey, George A; Lawson, Jeffrey H

    2011-01-01

    Implantable and extracorporeal cardiovascular devices are commonly made from titanium (Ti) (e.g. Ti-coated Nitinol stents and mechanical circulatory assist devices). Endothelializing the blood-contacting Ti surfaces of these devices would provide them with an antithrombogenic coating that mimics the native lining of blood vessels and the heart. We evaluated the viability and adherence of peripheral blood-derived porcine endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), seeded onto thin Ti layers on glass slides under static conditions and after exposure to fluid shear stresses. EPCs attached and grew to confluence on Ti in serum-free medium, without preadsorption of proteins. After attachment to Ti for 15 min, less than 5% of the cells detached at a shear stress of 100 dyne / cm(2). Confluent monolayers of EPCs on smooth Ti surfaces (Rq of 10 nm), exposed to 15 or 100 dyne/cm(2) for 48 h, aligned and elongated in the direction of flow and produced nitric oxide dependent on the level of shear stress. EPC-coated Ti surfaces had dramatically reduced platelet adhesion when compared to uncoated Ti surfaces. These results indicate that peripheral blood-derived EPCs adhere and function normally on Ti surfaces. Therefore EPCs may be used to seed cardiovascular devices prior to implantation to ameliorate platelet activation and thrombus formation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fusion genes in malignant neoplastic disorders of haematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohamed; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd

    2016-10-01

    The new World Health Organization's (WHO) classification of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissue neoplasms incorporating the recurrent fusion genes as the defining criteria for different haematopoietic malignant phenotypes is reviewed. The recurrent fusion genes incorporated in the new WHO's classification and other chromosomal rearrangements of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissue neoplasms are reviewed. Cytokines and transcription factors in haematopoiesis and leukaemic mechanisms are described. Genetic features and clinical implications due to the encoded chimeric neoproteins causing malignant haematopoietic disorders are reviewed. Multiple translocation partner genes are well known for leukaemia such as MYC, MLL, RARA, ALK, and RUNX1. With the advent of more sophisticated diagnostic tools and bioinformatics algorithms, an exponential growth in fusion genes discoveries is likely to increase. Demonstration of fusion genes and their specific translocation breakpoints in malignant haematological disorders are crucial for understanding the molecular pathogenesis and clinical phenotype of cancer, determining prognostic indexes and therapeutic responses, and monitoring residual disease and relapse status.

  3. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halter, Joerg P.; Schuepbach, W. Michael M.; Mandel, Hanna; Casali, Carlo; Orchard, Kim; Collin, Matthew; Valcarcel, David; Rovelli, Attilio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Dotti, Maria T.; Marotta, Giuseppe; Pintos, Guillem; Barba, Pere; Accarino, Anna; Ferra, Christelle; Illa, Isabel; Beguin, Yves; Bakker, Jaap A.; Boelens, Jaap J.; de Coo, Irenaeus F. M.; Fay, Keith; Sue, Carolyn M.; Nachbaur, David; Zoller, Heinz; Sobreira, Claudia; Simoes, Belinda Pinto; Hammans, Simon R.; Savage, David; Marti, Ramon; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Elhasid, Ronit; Gratwohl, Alois; Hirano, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been proposed as treatment for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, a rare fatal autosomal recessive disease due to TYMP mutations that result in thymidine phosphorylase deficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all known

  4. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Halter (Joerg P.); W. Michael; M. Schüpbach; H. Mandel (Hanna); C. Casali (carlo); K. Orchard (Kim); M. Collin (Matthew); D. Valcarcel (David); A. Rovelli (Attilio); M. Filosto (Massimiliano); M.T. Dotti (Maria Teresa); G. Marotta (Giuseppe); G. Pintos (Guillem); P. Barba (Pere); A. Accarino (Anna); C. Ferra (Christelle); I. Illa (Isabel); Y. Beguin (Yves); J.A. Bakker (Jaap A.); J.J. Boelens (Jaap Jan); I.F.M. de Coo (René); K. Fay (Keith); C.M. Sue (Carolyn M.); D. Nachbaur (David); H. Zoller (Heinz); C. Sobreira (Claudia); B. Pinto Simoes (Belinda); S.R. Hammans (Simon R.); D. Savage (David); R. Martí (Ramon); P.F. Chinnery (Patrick); R. Elhasid (Ronit); A. Gratwohl (Alois); M. Hirano (Michio); G. Barros Navarro; J.F. Benoist; J. Bierau (Jörgen); A. Bucalossi; M.A. Carluccio; J. Coll-Canti; M.S. Cotelli; T. Diesch; R. Di Fabio (Roberto); M.A. Donati (Maria); J.H. Garvin; K. Hill; L. Kappeler; T. Ku Hne; M.C. Lara; M. Lenoci; G. Lucchini (Giovanna); W. Marques; H. Mattle; A. Meyer; R. Parini; J. Passweg (Jakob Robert); F. Pieroni; A. Rodriguez-Palmero; F. Santus; M. Scarpelli; P. Schlesser; F. Sicurelli; M. Stern; A.B. Stracieri; P. Tonin; J. Torres-Torronteras; J.C. Voltarelli; I. Zaidman

    2015-01-01

    textabstractHaematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been proposed as treatment for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, a rare fatal autosomal recessive disease due to TYMP mutations that result in thymidine phosphorylase deficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis of

  5. Haematopoietic Cell Transplants in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Robert Peter; Seber, Adriana; Bonfim, Carmem; Pasquini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplants are done by more than 1500 transplant centres in 75 countries, mostly for life-threatening haematological disorders. However, transplant technology and access are not uniformly-distributed worldwide. Most transplants are done in predominately Europe, North America and some Asian countries. We review transplants activity in Latin America, a geographic region with a population of more than 600 million persons living in countries with diverse economic and social development levels. The data indicate a 20-40-fold lower frequency of transplants in Latin America compared with Europe and North America. We show that although economics, infrastructure and expertise are important limitations, other variables also operate. Changes in several of these variables may substantially increase transplant activity in Latin America. PMID:26999468

  6. Cord Blood-Derived Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells: Current Challenges in Engraftment, Infection, and Ex Vivo Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Kita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood has served as an alternative to bone marrow for hematopoietic transplantation since the late 1980s. Numerous clinical studies have proven the efficacy of umbilical cord blood. Moreover, the possible immaturity of cells in umbilical cord blood gives more options to recipients with HLA mismatch and allows for the use of umbilical cord blood from unrelated donors. However, morbidity and mortality rates associated with hematopoietic malignancies still remain relatively high, even after cord blood transplantation. Infections and relapse are the major causes of death after cord blood transplantation in patients with hematopoietic diseases. Recently, new strategies have been introduced to improve these major problems. Establishing better protocols for simple isolation of primitive cells and ex vivo expansion will also be very important. In this short review, we discuss several recent promising findings related to the technical improvement of cord blood transplantation.

  7. Hemopoietic progenitor cell identification in fetal and adult blood Célula progenitora hamatopoética - identificação em sangue fetal e de adulto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixa Müller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemopoietic progenitor cells give rise to all cellular elements of the blood and are of importance as a potential source of cells used for correction of various pathological conditions. The main objective of this study was to identify and quantitative hemopoietic progenitor cell in antenatal fetal blood, in cord blood at the time of delivery and in adult blood, using monoclonal antibodies to surface markers and flow cytometry. CD34+ cells, most of them probably representing progenitor cells, were detected in prenatal fetal blood as early as the 17th week of gestation. The proportion of these cells showed a tendency to decrease as the pregnancy progressed. Within the population of CD34+ cells, a relatively low proportion (less than 1% were negative for the surface marker CD33 or HLA-Dr, indicating a population of primitive stem cells, i.e., progenitor cells no committed to a specific lineage. On the contrary, another group coexpressed CD33 or HLA-Dr, being more mature progenitor cells already committed to differentiate along a specific lineage. The percentage of CD34+ obtained in blood of adult patients after mobilization with chemotherapeutic agents and growth factors showed an average value of 2.7± 3.1%. The percentage of CD34+ in the apheresis products of various patients varied from 0.58 to 1.48. In some cases the cells were reinfused in the patient with good results. Our findings are in agreement with previous studies suggesting that CD34+ stem cells is a heterogeneous population, with each subset having variable degree o commitment to differentiate toward a specific cell lineage.As células progenitoras hematopoéticas são as responsáveis pela produção de todos os elementos do sangue e são as potenciais fontes de células usadas para o tratamento de várias condições patológicas. O principal objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar e quantificar as células progenitoras hematopoiéticas no sangue fetal do período pré-natal, no

  8. Use of autologous blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells at point-of-care to protect against implant thrombosis in a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Alexandra E; Lane, Whitney O; Gage, Shawn M; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M; Haseltine, Justin M; Galinat, Lauren J; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Lawson, Jeffrey H; Truskey, George A; Achneck, Hardean E

    2011-11-01

    Titanium (Ti) is commonly utilized in many cardiovascular devices, e.g. as a component of Nitinol stents, intra- and extracorporeal mechanical circulatory assist devices, but is associated with the risk of thromboemboli formation. We propose to solve this problem by lining the Ti blood-contacting surfaces with autologous peripheral blood-derived late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) after having previously demonstrated that these EPCs adhere to and grow on Ti under physiological shear stresses and functionally adapt to their environment under flow conditions ex vivo. Autologous fluorescently-labeled porcine EPCs were seeded at the point-of-care in the operating room onto Ti tubes for 30 min and implanted into the pro-thrombotic environment of the inferior vena cava of swine (n = 8). After 3 days, Ti tubes were explanted, disassembled, and the blood-contacting surface was imaged. A blinded analysis found all 4 cell-seeded implants to be free of clot, whereas 4 controls without EPCs were either entirely occluded or partially thrombosed. Pre-labeled EPCs had spread and were present on all 4 cell-seeded implants while no endothelial cells were observed on control implants. These results suggest that late outgrowth autologous EPCs represent a promising source of lining Ti implants to reduce thrombosis in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Latin America: the next region for haematopoietic transplant progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimovich, G; Martinez Rolon, J; Baldomero, H; Rivas, M; Hanesman, I; Bouzas, L; Bonfim, C; Palma, J; Kardus-Urueta, A; Ubidia, D; Bujan-Boza, W; Gonzalez-Ramella, O; Ruiz-Argüelles, G; Gomez-Almaguer, D; Espino, G; Fanilla, E; Gonzalez, D; Carrasco, A; Galeano, S; Borelli, G; Hernandez-Gimenez, M; Pasquini, M; Kodera, Y; Gratwohl, A; Gratwohl, M; Nuñez, J; Szer, J; Gale, R P; Niederwieser, D; Seber, A

    2017-05-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplant activity in the 28 countries comprising Latin America is poorly defined. We conducted a voluntary survey of members of the Latin American Bone Marrow Transplantation Group regarding transplant activity 2009-2012. Collated responses were compared with data of transplant rates from the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation for other geographic regions. Several socio-economic variables were analysed to determine correlations with transplant rates. In total, 94 teams from 12 countries reported 11 519 transplants including 7033 autotransplants and 4486 allotransplants. Annual activity increased from 2517 transplants in 2009 to 3263 in 2012, a 30% increase. Median transplants rate (transplant per million inhabitants) in 2012 was 64 (autotransplants, median 40; allotransplants, median 24). This rate is substantially lower than that in North America and European regions (482 and 378) but higher than that in the Eastern Mediterranean and Asia Pacific regions (30 and 45). However, the Latin America transplant rate is 5-8-fold lower than that in America and Europe, suggesting a need to increase transplant availability. Transplant team density in Latin America (teams per million population; 1.8) is 3-4-fold lower than that in North America (6.2) or Europe (7.6). Within Latin America, there is substantial diversity in transplant rates by country partially explained by diverse socio-economic variables including per capita gross national income, health expenditure and physician density. These data should help inform future health-care policy in Latin America.

  10. The influence of BDNF on human umbilical cord blood stem/progenitor cells: implications for stem cell-based therapy of neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowska, Edyta; Łuczkowska, Karolina; Piecyk, Katarzyna; Rogińska, Dorota; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Ustianowski, Przemysław; Cecerska, Elżbieta; Dołęgowska, Barbara; Celewicz, Zbigniew; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived stem/progenitor cells (SPCs) have demonstrated the potential to improve neurologic function in different experimental models. SPCs can survive after transplantation in the neural microenvironment and indu ce neuroprotection, endogenous neurogenesis by secreting a broad repertoire of trophic and immunomodulatory cytokines. In this study, the influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pre-treatment was comprehensively evaluated in a UCB-derived lineage-negative (Lin-) SPC population. UCB-derived Lin- cells were evaluated with respect to the expression of (i) neuronal markers using immunofluorescence staining and (ii) specific (TrkB) receptors for BDNF using flow cytometry. Next, after BDNF pre-treatment, Lin- cells were extensively assessed with respect to apoptosis using Western blotting and proliferation via BrdU incorporation. Furthermore, NT-3 expression levels in Lin- cells using RQ PCR and antioxidative enzyme activities were assessed. We demonstrated neuronal markers as well as TrkB expression in Lin- cells and the activation of the TrkB receptor by BDNF. BDNF pre-treatment diminished apoptosis in Lin- cells and influenced the proliferation of these cells. We observed significant changes in antioxidants as well as in the increased expression of NT-3 in Lin- cells following BDNF exposure. Complex global miRNA and mRNA profiling analyses using microarray technology and GSEA revealed the differential regulation of genes involved in the proliferation, gene expression, biosynthetic processes, translation, and protein targeting. Our results support the hypothesis that pre-treatment of stem/progenitor cells could be beneficial and may be used as an auxiliary strategy for improving the properties of SPCs.

  11. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials. ©AlphaMed Press.

  12. Immunization with viral antigens: Infectious haematopoietic necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, J.R.; Midtlyng, Paul J.; Brown, F.

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  13. IN UTERO HAEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION (IUHSCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Concetta Renda

    2009-12-01

    Among 46 cases of  IUHSCT reported in humans, successful engraftment  was obtained only in cases of  X-SCID. Useful levels of chimerism has not been achieved in non-immunodeficiency diseases, and  a detectable engrafment , was  reported only in one case  of  ß-thalassemia transplanted at 12 weeks of gestation  by fetal liver cells  In one a-thalassemia case, where a-globin-dependent hemoglobin production and anemia are present during fetal period, microchimerism  and tolerance were suggested . To overcome the IUHSCT engraftment barriers , it is necessary to develop strategies to improve the competitive capacity of donor cells and  to define the gestational age of the possible immunological “window of opportunity” in the human fetus. In utero haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (IUHSCT is a non-myeloablative promising approach for the prenatal treatment of a variety of genetic disorders and  could be an alternative  option to therapeutical abortion in some congenital diseases like haematological hereditary  syndromes.

  14. Increased number of endothelial progenitors in peripheral blood as a possible early marker of tumour growth in post-menopausal breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhone, P; Ruszkowska-Ciastek, B; Celmer, M; Brkic, A; Bielawski, K; Boinska, J; Zarychta, E; Rosc, D

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (circulating EPCs) in the blood of patients diagnosed with breast cancer and to make an attempt at finding associations with the number of circulating EPCs and selected clinic-pathological factors; TNM and histological grading, molecular subtype of breast cancer, hormonal status, the expression of Ki-67 and the size of tumour. The study involved 96 Caucasian ethnicity post-menopausal women. Sixty-six women aged 48 - 63 (mean age 55) with breast cancer diagnosis without distant metastases (M0). The median value of the tumour diameter was 1.51 cm. The control group consisted of 30 healthy, non-smoking, post-menopausal women, mean age 49, range 44 - 54 years of age. The exclusion criteria for all the participants were hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia, acute and chronic infection. With regard to the fresh blood samples the number of circulating endothelial progenitors was determined using flow cytometry. The fluorescence of 100,000 cells was measured during the analysis. Circulating EPCs were identified with the immune-phenotype CD45 - , CD34 + , CD133 + , CD31 + . A significantly higher number of circulating EPCs in the study group, as compared to the controls (P = 0.0001) and a significantly higher number of circulating EPCs in women over 60 with breast cancer than in the younger women (P = 0.0029) were reported. A positive correlation was noted between circulating EPCs and age as well as between circulating EPCs and HER-2 (P = 0.0231, P = 0.0414, respectively), and a negative correlation between circulating EPCs and histological grading of breast cancer (P = 0.0272). The study has shown a higher number of circulating EPCs in breast cancer patients, which indicates stimulation of neovascularization. Additionally, since bone morrow-derived circulating EPCs are more intensively mobilised in older and overweight breast cancer patients, we can speculate that more

  15. Endometrial aspiration biopsy: a non-invasive method of obtaining functional lymphoid progenitor cells and mature natural killer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMenamin, Moya

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of endometrial aspiration biopsy (EAB) with the more traditional dilatation and curettage (D&C) for the procurement of lymphoid progenitor cells and uterine natural killer (NK) populations in endometrial tissue. This prospective observational study conducted in a tertiary referral university hospital examined endometrium obtained from 32 women admitted for laparoscopic gynaecological procedures. Each participant had endometrium sampled using both EAB and D&C. Both methods were assessed as a source of uterine NK and lymphoid progenitor cells. Similar proportions of mature CD45+CD56+ NK cells (range 25.4-36.2%) and CD45+CD34+ lymphoid progenitors (range 1.2-2.0%) were found in tissue obtained using both EAB and D&C. These cells were adequate for flow cytometric analysis, magnetic bead separation and culture. Colony formation by the CD34+ population demonstrated maturational potential. Tissues obtained via endometrial biopsy and D&C are equivalent, by analysis of uterine NK and lymphoid progenitor cells. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of endometrial sampling - endometrial aspiration biopsy and traditional dilatation and curettage - for the procurement of haematopoietic stem cells and uterine natural killer (NK) populations in endometrial tissue. Thirty-two women who had gynaecological procedures in a tertiary referral hospital participated in this study and had endometrial tissue collected via both methods. Similar populations of mature NK cells and haematopoietic stem cells were found in tissue obtained using both endometrial aspiration biopsy and dilatation and curettage. Tissue obtained via endometrial aspiration biopsy was adequate for the culture and growth of haematopoietic stem cells. We conclude that tissue obtained via endometrial biopsy and dilatation and curettage is equivalent, by analysis of uterine NK and haematopoietic stem cells using flow cytometry. This has implications for further

  16. Rituximab for lymphoproliferative disease prior to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trahair, Toby N; Wainstein, Brynn; Manton, Nicholas; Bourne, Anthony J; Ziegler, John B; Rice, Michael; Russell, Susan J

    2008-02-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) is a complication of congenital and acquired immunodeficiency states. There are a number of treatment options for LPD arising after haematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation including reduction of immunosuppression, targeted therapies, such as the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, and EBV specific cytotoxic lymphocytes. Treatment of LPD in children with congenital immunodeficiency syndromes remains unsatisfactory and is associated with a high mortality rate. We recently managed an infant found to have polymorphic LPD concurrent with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) had to be deferred because of progressive LPD. Treatment with rituximab resulted in regression of the LPD following which the patient received a 5/6 HLA matched umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplant. The patient remains well 20 months following transplantation. Rituximab treatment may have a useful role in the control of LPD associated with congenital immunodeficiency prior to HSCT. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gang G.; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L.; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David; (MSKCC); (Scripps); (Rockefeller)

    2009-07-21

    Histone H3 lysine4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

  18. Further phenotypic characterization of the primitive lineage− CD34+CD38−CD90+CD45RA− hematopoietic stem cell/progenitor cell sub-population isolated from cord blood, mobilized peripheral blood and patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisniewski, D; Affer, M; Willshire, J; Clarkson, B

    2011-01-01

    The most primitive hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)/progenitor cell (PC) population reported to date is characterized as being Lin−CD34+CD38−CD90+CD45R. We have a long-standing interest in comparing the characteristics of hematopoietic progenitor cell populations enriched from normal subjects and patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In order to investigate further purification of HSCs and for potential targetable differences between the very primitive normal and CML stem/PCs, we have phenotypically compared the normal and CML Lin−CD34+CD38−CD90+CD45RA− HSC/PC populations. The additional antigens analyzed were HLA-DR, the receptor tyrosine kinases c-kit and Tie2, the interleukin-3 cytokine receptor, CD33 and the activation antigen CD69, the latter of which was recently reported to be selectively elevated in cell lines expressing the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase. Notably, we found a strikingly low percentage of cells from the HSC/PC sub-population isolated from CML patients that were found to express the c-kit receptor (<1%) compared with the percentages of HSC/PCs expressing the c-kitR isolated from umbilical cord blood (50%) and mobilized peripheral blood (10%). Surprisingly, Tie2 receptor expression within the HSC/PC subset was extremely low from both normal and CML samples. Using in vivo transplantation studies, we provide evidence that HLA-DR, c-kitR, Tie2 and IL-3R may not be suitable markers for further partitioning of HSCs from the Lin−CD34+CD38−CD90+CD45RA− sub-population

  19. Central and haematopoietic interleukin-1 both contribute to ischaemic brain injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Denes

    2013-07-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1 is a key regulator of inflammation and ischaemic brain injury, but the contribution of central and peripheral sources of IL-1 to brain injury is not well understood. Here we show that haematopoietic-derived IL-1 is a key driver of ischaemic brain injury. Wild type (WT mice transplanted with IL-1αβ-deficient bone marrow displayed a significant (40% reduction in brain injury induced by focal cerebral ischaemia compared with WT mice transplanted with WT bone marrow. This was paralleled by improved neurological outcome and the almost complete absence of splenic-derived, but not liver-derived, IL-1α after stroke in WT mice lacking haematopoietic-derived IL-1. IL-1αβ knockout (KO mice transplanted with IL-1αβ-deficient bone marrow showed a 60% reduction in brain injury compared with WT mice receiving WT bone marrow. Transplantation of WT bone marrow in IL-1αβ KO mice resulted in a similar level of blood-brain-barrier injury to that observed in WT mice receiving IL-1αβ-deficient bone marrow. Cerebral oedema after brain injury was reduced in IL-1αβ KO recipients irrespective of donor-derived IL-1, but a lack of haematopoetic IL-1 has also been associated with smaller brain oedema independently of recipient status. Thus, both central and haematopoietic-derived IL-1 are important contributors to brain injury after cerebral ischaemia. Identification of the cellular sources of IL-1 in the periphery could allow targeted interventions at these sites.

  20. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Perea-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNFα, and IFNγ was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells.

  1. Involvement of placental/umbilical cord blood acid-base status and gas values on the radiosensitivity of human fetal/neonatal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masaru; Ebina, Satoko; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Arterial cord blood (CB) acid-base status and gas values, such as pH, PCO 2 , PO 2 , HCO 3 - and base excess, provide useful information on the fetal and neonatal condition. However, it remains unknown whether these values affect the radiosensitivity of fetal/neonatal hematopoiesis. The present study evaluated the relationship between arterial CB acid-base status, gas values, and the radiosensitivity of CB hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). A total of 25 CB units were collected. The arterial CB acid-base status and gas values were measured within 30 min of delivery. The CD34 + HSPCs obtained from CB were exposed to 2 Gy X-irradiation, and then assayed for colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage, burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E), and colony-forming unit-granulocyte erythroid, macrophage and megakaryocyte cells. Acid-base status and gas values for PCO 2 and HCO 3 - showed a statistically significant negative correlation with the surviving fraction of BFU-E. In addition, a significant positive correlation was observed between gestational age and PCO 2 . Moreover, the surviving fraction of BFU-E showed a significant negative correlation with gestational age. Thus, HSPCs obtained from CB with high PCO 2 /HCO 3 - levels were sensitive to X-irradiation, which suggests that the status of arterial PCO 2 /HCO 3 - influences the radiosensitivity of fetal/neonatal hematopoiesis, especially erythropoiesis. (author)

  2. The Haematopoietic Stem Cell Niche: New Insights into the Mechanisms Regulating Haematopoietic Stem Cell Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Lilly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the haematopoietic stem cell (HSC niche was formulated by Schofield in the 1970s, as a region within the bone marrow containing functional cell types that can maintain HSC potency throughout life. Since then, ongoing research has identified numerous cell types and a plethora of signals that not only maintain HSCs, but also dictate their behaviour with respect to homeostatic requirements and exogenous stresses. It has been proposed that there are endosteal and vascular niches within the bone marrow, which are thought to regulate different HSC populations. However, recent data depicts a more complicated picture, with functional crosstalk between cells in these two regions. In this review, recent research into the endosteal/vascular cell types and signals regulating HSC behaviour are considered, together with the possibility of a single subcompartmentalised niche.

  3. Targeted genome editing in human repopulating haematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Genovese (Pietro); G. Schiroli (Giulia); G. Escobar (Giulia); T. Di Tomaso (Tiziano); C. Firrito (Claudia); A. Calabria (Andrea); D. Moi (Davide); R. Mazzieri (Roberta); C. Bonini (Chiara); M.V. Holmes (Michael); P.D. Gregory (Philip); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); B. Gentner (Bernhard); E. Montini (Eugenio); A. Lombardo (Angelo); L. Naldini (Luigi)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTargeted genome editing by artificial nucleases has brought the goal of site-specific transgene integration and gene correction within the reach of gene therapy. However, its application to long-term repopulating haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has remained elusive. Here we show that

  4. Dysregulation of neurotrophic and haematopoietic growth factors in Alzheimer's disease: from pathophysiology to novel treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopova, Kateryna; Gatsiou, Katerina; Stellos, Konstantinos; Laske, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. Growth factors have been demonstrated to act in a synergistic way in angiogenesis and neurogenesis contributing to self-healing powers of the adult human brain. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that levels of many growth factors (neurotrophins and hematopoietins) are altered in cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood from AD patients and in animal models of AD. The present review summarizes the role of several neurotrophic growth factors (e.g., BDNF, SCF, NGF, GDNF) and haematopoietic growth factors (e.g., G-CSF, VEGF, SDF-1) in AD. Moreover, we summarize recent studies evaluating the diagnostic and prognostic value of growth factor levels in blood and cerebrospinal fluid in patients with AD and discuss the potential role of these growth factors as a promising new therapeutic approach in AD.

  5. Progenitor cells are mobilized by acute psychological stress but not beta-adrenergic receptor agonist infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Natalie E; Burns, Victoria E; Wallace, Graham R; Edwards, Kate M; Drayson, Mark; Redwine, Laura S; Hong, Suzi; Bui, Jack C; Fischer, Johannes C; Mills, Paul J; Bosch, Jos A

    2015-10-01

    Stimuli that activate the sympathetic nervous system, such as acute psychological stress, rapidly invoke a robust mobilization of lymphocytes into the circulation. Experimental animal studies suggest that bone marrow-derived progenitor cells (PCs) also mobilize in response to sympathetic stimulation. Here we tested the effects of acute psychological stress and brief pharmacological β-adrenergic (βAR) stimulation on peripheral PC numbers in humans. In two studies, we investigated PC mobilization in response to an acute speech task (n=26) and βAR-agonist (isoproterenol) infusion (n=20). A subset of 8 participants also underwent the infusion protocol with concomitant administration of the βAR-antagonist propranolol. Flow cytometry was used to enumerate lymphocyte subsets, total progenitor cells, total haematopoietic stem cells (HSC), early HSC (multi-lineage potential), late HSC (lineage committed), and endothelial PCs (EPCs). Both psychological stress and βAR-agonist infusion caused the expected mobilization of total monocytes and lymphocytes and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Psychological stress also induced a modest, but significant, increase in total PCs, HSCs, and EPC numbers in peripheral blood. However, infusion of a βAR-agonist did not result in a significant change in circulating PCs. PCs are rapidly mobilized by psychological stress via mechanisms independent of βAR-stimulation, although the findings do not exclude βAR-stimulation as a possible cofactor. Considering the clinical and physiological relevance, further research into the mechanisms involved in stress-induced PC mobilization seems warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Training practices of hematopoietic progenitor cell-apheresis and -cord blood collection staff: analysis of a survey by the Alliance for Harmonisation of Cellular Therapy Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celluzzi, Christina M; Keever-Taylor, Carolyn; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Alurf, Mahmoud; Koh, Mickey B C; Rabe, Fran; Rebulla, Paolo; Sacchi, Nicoletta; Sanders, Jean; McGrath, Eoin; Loper, Kathy

    2014-12-01

    As hematopoietic stem cell transplantation expands globally, identification of the key elements that make up high-quality training programs will become more important to optimizing collection practices and quality of the products collected. Multiple-choice and open questions to identify training practices of those collecting hematopoietic progenitor cell-apheresis [HPC(A)] and -cord blood [HPC(CB)] products were distributed via an electronic survey tool worldwide. Data were collected on facility demographics, job descriptions, and the content of training programs including general practices, staff assessment, retraining, and unique program features. Respondents from more than 50 countries predominantly associating with facilities in North America and Europe represented transplant centers or transfusion services also performing collections. For the majority of staff performing HPC(A) collections (50%), initial training required as many procedures as necessary be done until competency was achieved. Competency was evaluated by direct observation comparing performance to written procedures or protocol steps (47%), combination of written assessment and observation (45%), evaluation of product quality (40%), and written assessment alone (12%). Staff retraining was customized on a case-by-case basis (42%). Similar criteria were placed on HPC(CB) training, with an emphasis on product quality measured by sterility, CD34+ cell collection efficiency, hematocrit, volume, and mononuclear cell count. Observation, practice, evaluation, and retraining until competency is achieved marked the training programs. Success was based on the ability of staff to execute procedures ultimately measured in product quality. Identified features may assist facilities in further developing and strengthening their own training programs. © 2014 AABB.

  7. Characterization and clinical application of human CD34+ stem/progenitor cell populations mobilized into the blood by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Myrtle Y; Levicar, Natasa; Pai, Madhava; Bachellier, Philippe; Dimarakis, Ioannis; Al-Allaf, Faisal; M'Hamdi, Hanane; Thalji, Tamara; Welsh, Jonathan P; Marley, Stephen B; Davies, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Marelli-Berg, Federica; Tait, Paul; Playford, Raymond; Jiao, Long; Jensen, Steen; Nicholls, Joanna P; Ayav, Ahmet; Nohandani, Mahrokh; Farzaneh, Farzin; Gaken, Joop; Dodge, Rikke; Alison, Malcolm; Apperley, Jane F; Lechler, Robert; Habib, Nagy A

    2006-07-01

    A phase I study was performed to determine the safety and tolerability of injecting autologous CD34(+) cells into five patients with liver insufficiency. The study was based on the hypothesis that the CD34(+) cell population in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized blood contains a subpopulation of cells with the potential for regenerating damaged tissue. We separated a candidate CD34(+) stem cell population from the majority of the CD34(+) cells (99%) by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The adherent and nonadherent CD34(+) cells were distinct in morphology, immunophenotype, and gene expression profile. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-based gene expression analysis indicated that the adherent CD34(+) cells had the potential to express determinants consistent with liver, pancreas, heart, muscle, and nerve cell differentiation as well as hematopoiesis. Overall, the characteristics of the adherent CD34(+) cells identify them as a separate putative stem/progenitor cell population. In culture, they produced a population of cells exhibiting diverse morphologies and expressing genes corresponding to multiple tissue types. Encouraged by this evidence that the CD34(+) cell population contains cells with the potential to form hepatocyte-like cells, we gave G-CSF to five patients with liver insufficiency to mobilize their stem cells for collection by leukapheresis. Between 1 x 10(6) and 2 x 10(8) CD34(+) cells were injected into the portal vein (three patients) or hepatic artery (two patients). No complications or specific side effects related to the procedure were observed. Three of the five patients showed improvement in serum bilirubin and four of five in serum albumin. These observations warrant further clinical trials.

  8. High-dose cyclophosphamide followed by autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation improves the salvage treatment for persistent or sensitive relapsed malignant lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldissera R.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Trials have demonstrated that high-dose escalation followed by autologous transplantation can promote better long-term survival as salvage treatment in malignant lymphomas. The aim of the present nonrandomized clinical trial was to demonstrate the role of high-dose cyclophosphamide (HDCY in reducing tumor burden and also to determine the effectiveness of HDCY followed by etoposide (VP-16 and methotrexate (MTX in Hodgkin's disease plus high-dose therapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC transplantation as salvage treatment. From 1998 to 2000, 33 patients with a median age of 33 years (13-65 affected by aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL (60.6% or persistent or relapsed Hodgkin's disease (39.4% were enrolled and treated using high dose escalation (HDCY + HDVP-16 plus HDMTX in Hodgkin's disease followed by autologous PBPC transplantation. On an "intention to treat" basis, 33 patients with malignant lymphomas were evaluated. The overall median follow-up was 400 days (40-1233. Thirty-one patients underwent autografting and received a median of 6.19 x 10(6/kg (1.07-29.3 CD34+ cells. Patients who were chemosensitive to HDCY (N = 22 and patients who were chemoresistant (N = 11 presented an overall survival of 96 and 15%, respectively (P<0.0001. Overall survival was 92% for chemosensitive patients and 0% for patients who were still chemoresistant before transplantation (P<0.0001. Toxicity-related mortality was 12% (four patients, related to HDCY in two cases and to transplant in the other two. HDCY + HDVP-16 plus HDMTX in only Hodgkin's disease followed by autologous PBPC proved to be effective and safe as salvage treatment for chemosensitive patients affected by aggressive NHL and Hodgkin's disease, with acceptable mortality rates related to sequential treatment.

  9. Human XCR1+ dendritic cells derived in vitro from CD34+ progenitors closely resemble blood dendritic cells, including their adjuvant responsiveness, contrary to monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Sreekumar; Ollion, Vincent; Colletti, Nicholas; Chelbi, Rabie; Montanana-Sanchis, Frédéric; Liu, Hong; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Sanchez, Cindy; Savoret, Juliette; Perrot, Ivan; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Fossum, Even; Bechlian, Didier; Chabannon, Christian; Bogen, Bjarne; Asselin-Paturel, Carine; Shaw, Michael; Soos, Timothy; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny; Dalod, Marc

    2014-08-15

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) have been used in the clinic with moderately encouraging results. Mouse XCR1(+) DC excel at cross-presentation, can be targeted in vivo to induce protective immunity, and share characteristics with XCR1(+) human DC. Assessment of the immunoactivation potential of XCR1(+) human DC is hindered by their paucity in vivo and by their lack of a well-defined in vitro counterpart. We report in this study a protocol generating both XCR1(+) and XCR1(-) human DC in CD34(+) progenitor cultures (CD34-DC). Gene expression profiling, phenotypic characterization, and functional studies demonstrated that XCR1(-) CD34-DC are similar to canonical MoDC, whereas XCR1(+) CD34-DC resemble XCR1(+) blood DC (bDC). XCR1(+) DC were strongly activated by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid but not LPS, and conversely for MoDC. XCR1(+) DC and MoDC expressed strikingly different patterns of molecules involved in inflammation and in cross-talk with NK or T cells. XCR1(+) CD34-DC but not MoDC efficiently cross-presented a cell-associated Ag upon stimulation by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid or R848, likewise to what was reported for XCR1(+) bDC. Hence, it is feasible to generate high numbers of bona fide XCR1(+) human DC in vitro as a model to decipher the functions of XCR1(+) bDC and as a potential source of XCR1(+) DC for clinical use. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    -induced CD34(+) progenitor chemotaxis. These chemotactic attracted CD34(+) progenitors are colony-forming units-granulocyte-macrophage. gamma IP-10 and Mig also induced GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitor adhesion and aggregation by means of CXCR3, a finding confirmed by the observation that anti-CXCR3 m......Ab blocked these functions of gammaIP-10 and Mig but not of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. gamma IP-10-induced and Mig-induced up-regulation of integrins (CD49a and CD49b) was found to play a crucial role in adhesion of GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. Moreover, gamma IP-10 and Mig...... stimulated CXCR3 redistribution and cellular polarization in GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. These results indicate that CXCR3-gamma IP-10 and CXCR3-Mig receptor-ligand pairs, as well as the effects of GM-CSF on them, may be especially important in the cytokine/chemokine environment...

  11. Humoral activity of cord blood-derived stem/progenitor cells: implications for stem cell-based adjuvant therapy of neurodegenerative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Paczkowska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stem/progenitor cells (SPCs demonstrate neuro-regenerative potential that is dependent upon their humoral activity by producing various trophic factors regulating cell migration, growth, and differentiation. Herein, we compared the expression of neurotrophins (NTs and their receptors in specific umbilical cord blood (UCB SPC populations, including lineage-negative, CD34(+, and CD133(+ cells, with that in unsorted, nucleated cells (NCs. METHODS AND RESULTS: The expression of NTs and their receptors was detected by QRT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescent staining in UCB-derived SPC populations (i.e., NCs vs. lineage-negative, CD34(+, and CD133(+ cells. To better characterize, global gene expression profiles of SPCs were determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Furthermore, the intracellular production of crucial neuro-regenerative NTs (i.e., BDNF and NT-3 was assessed in NCs and lineage-negative cells after incubation for 24, 48, and 72 h in both serum and serum-free conditions. We discovered significantly higher expression of NTs and NT receptors at both the mRNA and protein level in lineage-negative, CD34(+, and CD133(+ cells than in NCs. Global gene expression analysis revealed considerably higher expression of genes associated with the production and secretion of proteins, migration, proliferation, and differentiation in lineage-negative cells than in CD34(+ or CD133(+ cell populations. Notably, after short-term incubation under serum-free conditions, lineage-negative cells and NCs produced significantly higher amounts of BDNF and NT-3 than under steady-state conditions. Finally, conditioned medium (CM from lineage-negative SPCs exerted a beneficial impact on neural cell survival and proliferation. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our findings demonstrate that UCB-derived SPCs highly express NTs and their relevant receptors under steady-state conditions, NT expression is greater under stress-related conditions and

  12. Humoral activity of cord blood-derived stem/progenitor cells: implications for stem cell-based adjuvant therapy of neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowska, Edyta; Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Rogińska, Dorota; Kawa, Miłosz; Ustianowski, Przemysław; Safranow, Krzysztof; Celewicz, Zbigniew; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2013-01-01

    Stem/progenitor cells (SPCs) demonstrate neuro-regenerative potential that is dependent upon their humoral activity by producing various trophic factors regulating cell migration, growth, and differentiation. Herein, we compared the expression of neurotrophins (NTs) and their receptors in specific umbilical cord blood (UCB) SPC populations, including lineage-negative, CD34(+), and CD133(+) cells, with that in unsorted, nucleated cells (NCs). The expression of NTs and their receptors was detected by QRT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescent staining in UCB-derived SPC populations (i.e., NCs vs. lineage-negative, CD34(+), and CD133(+) cells). To better characterize, global gene expression profiles of SPCs were determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Furthermore, the intracellular production of crucial neuro-regenerative NTs (i.e., BDNF and NT-3) was assessed in NCs and lineage-negative cells after incubation for 24, 48, and 72 h in both serum and serum-free conditions. We discovered significantly higher expression of NTs and NT receptors at both the mRNA and protein level in lineage-negative, CD34(+), and CD133(+) cells than in NCs. Global gene expression analysis revealed considerably higher expression of genes associated with the production and secretion of proteins, migration, proliferation, and differentiation in lineage-negative cells than in CD34(+) or CD133(+) cell populations. Notably, after short-term incubation under serum-free conditions, lineage-negative cells and NCs produced significantly higher amounts of BDNF and NT-3 than under steady-state conditions. Finally, conditioned medium (CM) from lineage-negative SPCs exerted a beneficial impact on neural cell survival and proliferation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that UCB-derived SPCs highly express NTs and their relevant receptors under steady-state conditions, NT expression is greater under stress-related conditions and that CM from SPCs favorable influence neural cell

  13. The influence of prenatal exposure to trans-fatty acids for development of childhood haematopoietic neoplasms (EnTrance): a natural societal experiment and a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Ina Olmer; Huybrechts, Inge; Frederiksen, Peder; Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; Chajes, Veronique; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2018-01-24

    Little is known about the causes of childhood cancer, partly as not many children develop cancer, although childhood cancer is a leading cause of death by disease in the young. The young age of the children suggests that risk factors for childhood cancer may be present during pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that exposure to trans-fat, a type of unsaturated fat common in industrially produced foods (iTFA), has adverse health effects in adults, including the risk of developing cancer. Haematopoietic neoplasms are the most common cancer types among European children under the age of 15 years. This study will bring new knowledge as to whether trans-fat and other fatty acids may also increase the risk of developing haematopoietic neoplasms during childhood. We will investigate if the Danish iTFA legislation ban, which radically reduced the use of iTFA in foodstuffs, influenced the risk of childhood haematopoietic neoplasms in children born either before or after the change in legislation, adjusting for relevant secular trends. Further, in a case-control study, we will examine if levels of fatty acids in dried blood spots from newborns can predict the risk of developing childhood haematopoietic neoplasms. Permission from the Danish Data Protection Agency and the Ethical Committee has been granted. The results from this study will provide important information about fatty acids in the mother's diet as a contributor to development of haematopoietic neoplasms during childhood, which may result in relevant preventive action. Not relevant.

  14. Incidence of human herpes virus-6 and human cytomegalovirus infections in donated bone marrow and umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad-Behbahani A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the incidence of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections that are potentially transmitted to haematopoietic stem cells (HSC transplant recipients via bone marrow (BM or umbilical cord blood (UCB. Bone marrow progenitor cells were collected from 30 allogenic BM donors. UCB HSC were collected from 34 subjects. The extracted DNA was then processed using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR technique. HCMV and HHV-6 serological status were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Nested PCR identified HCMV in 22 (73% of 30 samples of BM progenitor cells but in only eight (23.5% of 34 samples of UBC HSC ( P = 0.001. HHV-6 DNA was detected in 11 (36.6% of 30 BM progenitor cells and in only one (2.9% of 34 UBC cells ( P = 0.002. Both HHV-6 and HCMV infections were determined in nine (26.5% of 34 bone marrow samples. The results indicate that, the risk of HCMV and HHV-6 via BM progenitor cells is higher than transmission by UCB cells ( P= 0.04.

  15. The TEAD family transcription factor Scalloped regulates blood progenitor maintenance and proliferation in Drosophila through PDGF/VEGFR receptor (Pvr) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Gabriel B; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2017-05-01

    The Drosophila lymph gland is a well-characterized hematopoietic organ in which a population of multipotent stem-like progenitors is maintained by a combination of signals from different cellular populations within the organ. The lymph gland serves as an ideal model both for the interrogation of signaling mechanisms involved in progenitor maintenance as well as a tool for the identification of novel regulatory mechanisms in the highly conserved process of hematopoiesis. Here, we demonstrate a requirement for the TEAD transcription factor Scalloped in the maintenance and proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors. We have characterized a novel population of hemocytes in the early lymph gland identified by the expression of Hand, Scalloped, and the PVR ligand PVF2. In this unique population, we show that Scalloped maintains PVF2 expression, which is required for hemocyte proliferation and achievement of normal lymph gland size. We further demonstrate that STAT signaling marks actively proliferating hemocytes in the early lymph gland, and inhibition of this pathway causes decreased lymph gland growth similar to loss of Scalloped and PVF2, demonstrating a requirement for PVR/STAT signaling in the regulation of lymph gland size. Finally, we demonstrate that Scalloped regulates PVR expression and the maintenance of progenitors downstream of PVR/STAT/ADGF signaling. These findings further establish the role of the TEAD family transcription factors in the regulation of important signaling molecules, and expand our mechanistic insight into the balance between progenitor maintenance and proliferation required for the regulation of lymph gland homeostasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The small GTPase RhoH is an atypical regulator of haematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubatzky Katharina F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases are a distinct subfamily of the superfamily of Ras GTPases. The best-characterised members are RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 that regulate many diverse actions such as actin cytoskeleton reorganisation, adhesion, motility as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and gene transcription. Among the 20 members of that family, only Rac2 and RhoH show an expression restricted to the haematopoietic lineage. RhoH was first discovered in 1995 as a fusion transcript with the transcriptional repressor LAZ3/BCL6. It was therefore initially named translation three four (TTF but later on renamed RhoH due to its close relationship to the Ras/Rho family of GTPases. Since then, RhoH has been implicated in human cancer as the gene is subject to somatic hypermutation and by the detection of RHOH as a translocation partner for LAZ3/BCL6 or other genes in human lymphomas. Underexpression of RhoH is found in hairy cell leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Some of the amino acids that are crucial for GTPase activity are mutated in RhoH so that the protein is a GTPase-deficient, so-called atypical Rho GTPase. Therefore other mechanisms of regulating RhoH activity have been described. These include regulation at the mRNA level and tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein's unique ITAM-like motif. The C-terminal CaaX box of RhoH is mainly a target for farnesyl-transferase but can also be modified by geranylgeranyl-transferase. Isoprenylation of RhoH and changes in subcellular localisation may be an additional factor to fine-tune signalling. Little is currently known about its signalling, regulation or interaction partners. Recent studies have shown that RhoH negatively influences the proliferation and homing of murine haematopoietic progenitor cells, presumably by acting as an antagonist for Rac1. In leukocytes, RhoH is needed to keep the cells in a resting, non-adhesive state, but the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. RhoH has also been

  17. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Tove; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Batts, William

    2009-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13/98 11...

  18. Lymph node tuberculosis after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an atypical presentation of an uncommon complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sánchez, Guillermo; Drake-Pérez, Marta; Rodriguez, José Luis; Yañez, Lucrecia; Insunza, Andrés; Richard, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections are uncommon complications in the haematopoietic stem cell post-transplant period. Most cases are reactivations of latent infections affecting the lung. We present an atypical case of isolated lymph node tuberculosis after an allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which highlights the importance of having a high suspicion index, even in non-endemic countries.

  19. Chronic interleukin-1 exposure drives haematopoietic stem cells towards precocious myeloid differentiation at the expense of self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Eric M; Mirantes-Barbeito, Cristina; Fong, Sarah; Loeffler, Dirk; Kovtonyuk, Larisa V; Zhang, SiYi; Lakshminarasimhan, Ranjani; Chin, Chih Peng; Techner, José-Marc; Will, Britta; Nerlov, Claus; Steidl, Ulrich; Manz, Markus G; Schroeder, Timm; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain lifelong blood production and increase blood cell numbers in response to chronic and acute injury. However, the mechanism(s) by which inflammatory insults are communicated to HSCs and their consequences for HSC activity remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that interleukin-1 (IL-1), which functions as a key pro-inflammatory 'emergency' signal, directly accelerates cell division and myeloid differentiation of HSCs through precocious activation of a PU.1-dependent gene program. Although this effect is essential for rapid myeloid recovery following acute injury to the bone marrow, chronic IL-1 exposure restricts HSC lineage output, severely erodes HSC self-renewal capacity, and primes IL-1-exposed HSCs to fail massive replicative challenges such as transplantation. Importantly, these damaging effects are transient and fully reversible on IL-1 withdrawal. Our results identify a critical regulatory circuit that tailors HSC responses to acute needs, and is likely to underlie deregulated blood homeostasis in chronic inflammation conditions.

  20. A novel in vitro assay for murine haematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, L; Freshney, M; Wright, E G; Sproul, A; Wilkie, N; Pragnell, I B

    1988-12-01

    Study of the biology of haematopoietic stem cells is crucially dependent on the availability of suitable in vitro assays. Existing assays have suffered from the fact that they detect small subcompartments of the total stem cell compartment. This limits experiments where it is required to assay a high proportion of stem cells, e.g. the enumeration of stem cell numbers under varying conditions or the identification and purification of stem cell regulators. We describe an in vitro assay which shows macroscopic colony formation and limited self-renewal capacity in vitro. The detected cell (CFU-A) has a low cycling status in normal bone marrow (NBM) and responds to known stem cell regulators. The incidence (100-200 per 10(5) in NBM), the proliferative characteristics under stress and some of the physical properties are similar to stem cells detected by colony formation after transplantation into lethally irradiated recipients (CFU-S). These data indicate that our assay detects a high proportion of haematopoietic stem cells in vitro. This will facilitate experiments on stem cell behaviour which have previously been difficult to conduct.

  1. Enforced ROR(gamma)t expression in haematopoietic stem cells increases regulatory T cell number, which reduces immunoreactivity and attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Nabekura, Tsukasa; Kawachi, Yasuhiro; Otsuka, Fujio; Onodera, Masafumi

    2011-03-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gammat (ROR(gamma)t) is a key transcription factor involved in the generation of T-helper 17 (Th17) cells, which mediate tissue inflammation and autoimmunity. However, recent studies indicated that less than half of all ROR(gamma)t(+) Talphabeta cells express IL-17, while the others are Foxp3(+) Talphabeta cells expressing IL-10. These observations raise questions regarding the role of ROR(gamma)t in the early differentiation process of T cells from haematopoietic stem cells. To examine the role of RORyt in T cell differentiation, mice were reconstituted with ROR(gamma)t cDNA-transduced haematopoietic stem cells and the role of ROR(gamma)t in T cell differentiation was studied in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model in vivo. While the number of Th17 cells increased with the reduction in Thl cell number in transplanted mice, peripheral blood Foxp3(+) Talphabeta cell number also increased, which attenuated the severity of contact hypersensitivity on skin exposed to 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene. The number of non-transduced Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) also increased in these mice. These observations suggest that the enforced expression of ROR(gamma)t in haematopoietic stem cells induces differentiation of Thl7 cells and results in an increase in Foxp3(+) Treg cell number to limit self-tissue damage.

  2. Controle de esterilidade de produtos de células progenitoras hematopoéticas do sangue periférico Sterility control of hematopoietic progenitor cells from peripheral blood products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor D. Almeida

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A taxa de contaminação microbiana dos produtos de células progenitoras hematopoéticas do sangue periférico é baixa. Neste estudo pesquisou-se a prevalência de hemoculturas positivas em células progenitoras hematopoéticas do sangue periférico (CPHSP no Serviço de Hemoterapia do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. Do total de 618 coletas realizadas no período de 2000 a 2007, 26 (4,2% apresentaram contaminação por bactérias. O Staphylococcus coagulase-negativo foi predominantemente isolado nas hemoculturas. A antibioticoterapia pré e pós-infusão foi estabelecida de acordo com o microorganismo e seu antibiograma, sendo que, em cinco das doze infusões contaminadas realizadas, não foram administrados antimicrobianos profilaticamente. Episódios febris foram observados em sete pacientes (58%, enquanto cinco (42% não apresentaram febre. Das doze infusões contaminadas realizadas, seis (50% apresentaram hemocultura pós-descongelamento positivas, enquanto as restantes (50% foram negativas. Isto se deve às propriedades bactericidas do DMSO, de células fagocitose-ativas e de temperaturas muito baixas atingidas na criopreservação. Autores têm relatado sucesso neste procedimento após a infusão desses produtos contaminados com o mínimo de consequências clínicas.The rate of microbial contamination of hematopoietic progenitor cell products from peripheral blood is low. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of positive blood cultures of hematopoietic progenitor cells from peripheral blood in a hemotherapy service. Of a total of 618 samples taken during the period from 2000 to 2007, 26 (4.2% were contaminated by bacteria. Staphylococcus coagulase-negative was the predominant bacterium isolated in blood cultures. Pre- and post-infusion antibiotic therapy was established depending on the microorganism and antibiogram, whereas in five out of twelve contaminated infusions, no antibiotics were administered prophylactically

  3. Transfusion of ABO non-identical platelets does not influence the clinical outcome of patients undergoing autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solves, Pilar; Carpio, Nelly; Balaguer, Aitana; Romero, Samuel; Iacoboni, Gloria; Gómez, Inés; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Jaime; Lopez, Francisca; Martin, Guillermo; Jarque, Isidro; Montesinos, Pau; de la Rubia, Javier; Sanz, Guillermo; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are ABO antigens on the surface of platelets, but whether ABO compatible platelets are necessary for transfusions is a matter of ongoing debate. We retrospectively reviewed the ABO matching of platelet transfusions in a subset of patients undergoing autologous haematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation during a 14-year period. Our aim was to analyse the characteristics and outcomes of patients who received platelet transfusions that were or were not ABO identical. Material and methods We analysed 529 consecutive patients with various haematological and non-haematological diseases who underwent 553 autologous progenitor stem cell transplants at the University Hospital la Fe between January 2000 and December 2013. We retrospectively analysed and compared transfusion and clinical outcomes of patients according to the ABO match of the platelet transfusions received. The period analysed was the time from transplantation until discharge. Results The patients received a total of 2,772 platelet concentrates, of which 2,053 (74.0%) were ABO identical and 719 (26.0%) ABO non-identical; of these latter 309 were compatible and 410 incompatible with the patients’ plasma. Considering all transplants, 36 (6.5%) did not require any platelet transfusions, while in 246 (44.5%) cases, the patients were exclusively transfused with ABO identical platelets and in 47 (8.5%) cases they received only ABO non-identical platelet transfusions. The group of patients who received both ABO identical and ABO non-identical platelet transfusions had higher transfusion needs and worse clinical outcomes compared to patients who received only ABO identical or ABO non-identical platelets. Discussion In our hospital, patients undergoing autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation who received ABO identical or ABO non-identical platelet transfusions had similar transfusion and clinical outcomes. The isolated fact of receiving ABO non-identical platelets did not influence

  4. The Development and Application of Cellular Sensitivity Biomarkers for the Detection and Measurement of Toxic Effects in Normal and Malignant Cells From Patients Receiving High-Dose Meiphalan (L-PAM) With Autologous Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cell Rescue in the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Toxic Effects in Normal and Malignant Cells From Patients Receiving High-Dose Melphalan (L-PAM) With Autologous Peripheral Blood Peripheral Blood...Progenitor Cell Rescue in the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Atif M. Hussein, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Duke University...for the Detection and Measurement of Toxic Effects in Normal and Malignant DAMD17-94-J-4285 Cells From Patients Receiving High-Dose Melphalan... 6

  5. Xerostomia and chronic oral complications among patients treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Bots, C.P.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the severity of xerostomia (subjective dry mouth) in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients and to investigate the association of xerostomia with other chronic oral complications. Design: Cross-sectional study. Study participants and methods: Participants were

  6. Haematopoietic stem cell niches: new insights inspire new questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Fernando; Forsberg, E Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches provide an environment essential for life-long HSC function. Intense investigation of HSC niches both feed off and drive technology development to increase our capability to assay functionally defined cells with high resolution. A major driving force behind the desire to understand the basic biology of HSC niches is the clear implications for clinical therapies. Here, with particular emphasis on cell type-specific deletion of SCL and CXCL12, we focus on unresolved issues on HSC niches, framed around some very recent advances and novel discoveries on the extrinsic regulation of HSC maintenance. We also provide ideas for possible paths forward, some of which are clearly within reach while others will require both novel tools and vision. PMID:24022369

  7. Platelet-biased stem cells reside at the apex of the haematopoietic stem-cell hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Macaulay, Iain C; Jensen, Christina T; Woll, Petter S; Luis, Tiago C; Mead, Adam; Moore, Susan; Carella, Cintia; Matsuoka, Sahoko; Bouriez Jones, Tiphaine; Chowdhury, Onima; Stenson, Laura; Lutteropp, Michael; Green, Joanna C A; Facchini, Raffaella; Boukarabila, Hanane; Grover, Amit; Gambardella, Adriana; Thongjuea, Supat; Carrelha, Joana; Tarrant, Paul; Atkinson, Deborah; Clark, Sally-Ann; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W

    2013-10-10

    The blood system is maintained by a small pool of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are required and sufficient for replenishing all human blood cell lineages at millions of cells per second throughout life. Megakaryocytes in the bone marrow are responsible for the continuous production of platelets in the blood, crucial for preventing bleeding--a common and life-threatening side effect of many cancer therapies--and major efforts are focused at identifying the most suitable cellular and molecular targets to enhance platelet production after bone marrow transplantation or chemotherapy. Although it has become clear that distinct HSC subsets exist that are stably biased towards the generation of lymphoid or myeloid blood cells, we are yet to learn whether other types of lineage-biased HSC exist or understand their inter-relationships and how differently lineage-biased HSCs are generated and maintained. The functional relevance of notable phenotypic and molecular similarities between megakaryocytes and bone marrow cells with an HSC cell-surface phenotype remains unclear. Here we identify and prospectively isolate a molecularly and functionally distinct mouse HSC subset primed for platelet-specific gene expression, with enhanced propensity for short- and long-term reconstitution of platelets. Maintenance of platelet-biased HSCs crucially depends on thrombopoietin, the primary extrinsic regulator of platelet development. Platelet-primed HSCs also frequently have a long-term myeloid lineage bias, can self-renew and give rise to lymphoid-biased HSCs. These findings show that HSC subtypes can be organized into a cellular hierarchy, with platelet-primed HSCs at the apex. They also demonstrate that molecular and functional priming for platelet development initiates already in a distinct HSC population. The identification of a platelet-primed HSC population should enable the rational design of therapies enhancing platelet output.

  8. Tug of war in the haematopoietic stem cell niche: do myeloma plasma cells compete for the HSC niche?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, J E; Williams, S A; Purton, L E; Zannettino, A C W

    2012-09-14

    In the adult mammal, normal haematopoiesis occurs predominantly in the bone marrow, where primitive haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny reside in specialised microenvironments. The bone marrow microenvironment contains specific anatomical areas (termed niches) that are highly specialised for the development of certain blood cell types, for example HSCs. The HSC niche provides important cell-cell interactions and signalling molecules that regulate HSC self-renewal and differentiation processes. These same signals and interactions are also important in the progression of haematological malignancies, such as multiple myeloma (MM). This review provides an overview of the bone marrow microenvironment and its involvement in normal, physiological HSC maintenance and plasma cell growth throughout MM disease progression.

  9. Mumps virus encephalomyelitis in a 19-year old male patient with an undefined severe combined immunodeficiency post-haematopoietic bone marrow transplantation: a rare fatal complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Toby A; Pelosi, Emanuela; McQuaid, Stephen; Richardson, Deborah; Newman, Joan; Hill, Kate; Veys, Paul; Davies, Graham; Orchard, Kim H

    2013-06-01

    We describe a rare case of fatal mumps encephalomyelitis occurring in 19-year old male following matched unrelated donor peripheral blood haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The indication for HSCT was for an undefined form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Molecular typing of the mumps viral RNA isolated from neural tissue indicated that the infection was acquired at the time of a mumps outbreak in England and Wales that occurred between 2004 and 2006. This case highlights the importance of considering mumps in the differential diagnosis of central nervous system infection in highly immunosuppressed patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective uptake of boronophenylalanine by glioma stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ting; Zhou, Youxin; Xie, Xueshun; Chen, Guilin; Li, Bin; Wei, Yongxin; Chen, Jinming; Huang, Qiang; Du, Ziwei

    2012-01-01

    The success of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) depends on the amount of boron in cells and the tumor/blood and tumor/(normal tissue) boron concentration ratios. For the first time, measurements of boron uptake in both stem/progenitor and differentiated glioma cells were performed along with measurements of boron biodistribution in suitable animal models. In glioma stem/progenitor cells, the selective accumulation of boronophenylalanine (BPA) was lower, and retention of boron after BPA removal was longer than in differentiated glioma cells in vitro. However, boron biodistribution was not statistically significantly different in mice with xenografts. - Highlights: ► Uptake of BPA was analyzed in stem/progenitor and differentiated glioma cells. ► Selective accumulation of BPA was lower in glioma stem/progenitor cells. ► Retention of boron after BPA removal was longer in glioma stem/progenitor cells. ► Boron biodistribution was not statistically different in mice with xenografts.

  11. Angiogenesis & Vasculogenesis: Inducing the growth of new blood vessels and wound healing by stimulation of Bone Marrow Derived Progenitor Cell Mobilization and Homing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Omaida C.

    2009-01-01

    During embryonic development, the vasculature is among the first organs to form and is in charge of maintaining metabolic homeostasis by supplying oxygen and nutrients and removing waste products. As one would expect, blood vessels are critical not only for organ growth in the embryo, but also for repair of wounded tissue in the adult. An imbalance in ‘Angiogenesis’ (a time-honored term that globally refers to the growth of new blood vessels) contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous malignant, inflammatory, ischemic, infectious, immune, and wound healing disorders. In this review, we will focus on the central role of the growth of new blood vessels in ischemic and diabetic wound healing. We define the most current nomenclature that describes the neovascularization process in wounds. There are now two well defined, distinct, yet interrelated processes for the formation of post-natal new blood vessels, angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. We review recent new data on vasculogenesis that promises to advance the field of wound healing. PMID:17544023

  12. Effects of Ionizing Radiations on the Haematopoietic Tissue. Proceedings of a Panel on the Effects of Various Types of Ionizing Radiations from Different Sources on Haematopoietic Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The atomic energy industry and the medical sciences are making increasing use of gamma and X-irradiation as well as neutron, proton and mixed irradiation of high-energy particles from reactors, both in research work and in the treatment of patients. For this reason the need for a more detailed investigation of the influence of different sources of irradiation on the haematopoietic tissue becomes more urgent from day to day. This task should no longer be considered as a purely scientific one, but rather as a matter of practical application, since an understanding of the radiosensitivity of haematopoietic tissue is essential in treating patients by X-ray or other radioactive therapies, as well as in treating persons involved in radiation accidents, particularly where bone-marrow or organ transplantation is necessary. A panel of experts on ''The Effects of Various Types of Ionizing Radiations from Different Sources on Haematopoietic Tissue'' was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency at its headquarters in Vienna from 17 to 20 May, 1966. The meeting was attended by 22 experts from 13 countries. The object was to discuss (1) the facts and concepts of normal haematopoiesis and its regulation, (2) the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the effects of conventional radiation sources on haematopoiesis, and (3) the comparative reactions of haematopoietic tissue from different animals after irradiation. The meeting produced a stimulating exchange of ideas, as is witnessed by this publication, which contains all the papers and discussions

  13. T cell reconstitution in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, K; Jordan, K K; Uhlving, H H

    2015-01-01

    Infections and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) are major causes of treatment-related mortality and morbidity following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Both complications depend on reconstitution of the T-lymphocyte population based on donor T cells. Although...... it is well established that Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine essential for de novo T cell development in the thymus and homoeostatic peripheral expansion of T cells, associations between circulating levels of IL-7 and T cell reconstitution following HSCT have not been investigated previously. We...... in patients treated with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) compared with those not treated with ATG (P = 0.0079). IL-7 levels at day +7 were negatively associated with T cell counts at day +30 to +60 (at day +60: CD3(+) : β = -10.6 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.0030; CD8(+) : β = -8.4 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.061; CD4...

  14. Differential cytokine contributions of perivascular haematopoietic stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Noboru; Kunisaki, Yuya; Pierce, Halley; Wang, Zichen; Fernandez, Nicolas F; Birbrair, Alexander; Ma'ayan, Avi; Frenette, Paul S

    2017-03-01

    Arterioles and sinusoids of the bone marrow (BM) are accompanied by stromal cells that express nerve/glial antigen 2 (NG2) and leptin receptor (LepR), and constitute specialized niches that regulate quiescence and proliferation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, how niche cells differentially regulate HSC functions remains unknown. Here, we show that the effects of cytokines regulating HSC functions are dependent on the producing cell sources. Deletion of chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 12 (Cxcl12) or stem cell factor (Scf) from all perivascular cells marked by nestin-GFP dramatically depleted BM HSCs. Selective Cxcl12 deletion from arteriolar NG2 + cells, but not from sinusoidal LepR + cells, caused HSC reductions and altered HSC localization in BM. By contrast, deletion of Scf in LepR + cells, but not NG2 + cells, led to reductions in BM HSC numbers. These results uncover distinct contributions of cytokines derived from perivascular cells in separate vascular niches to HSC maintenance.

  15. Short-term effects of early-acting and multilineage hematopoietic growth factors on the repair and proliferation of irradiated pure cord blood (CB) CD34 hematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, Benedikt L.; Sandor, Peter S.; Plappert, Ulla; Thoma, Stefan; Mueller, Robert; Bock, Thomas; Thomas, Christian A.; Nothdurft, Wilhelm; Fliedner, Theodor M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic growth factor(s) (GF) may exert positive effects in vitro or in vivo on the survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells after accidental or therapeutic total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: We studied the clonogenic survival and DNA repair of irradiated (0.36, 0.73, and 1.46 Gy) CD34 + cord blood (CB) cells after short-term incubation (24 h) with GFs. CD34 + cells were stimulated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), stem cell factor/c-kit ligand (SCF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-6, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) alone or in combination in short-term serum-free liquid suspension cultures (LSC) immediately after irradiation and then assayed for clonogenic progenitors. DNA repair was evaluated by analysis of DNA strand breaks using the comet assay. Survival of CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Mix was determined and dose-response curves were fitted to the data. Results: The radiobiological parameters (D 0 and n) showed significant GF(s) effects. Combination of IL-3 with IL-6, SCF or GM-CSF resulted in best survival for CFU-GM BFU-E and CFU-Mix, respectively. Combinations of three or more GFs did not increase the survival of clonogenic CD34 + cells compared to optimal two-factor combinations. The D 0 values for CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Mix ranged between 0.56-1.15, 0.41-2.24, and 0.56-1.29 Gy, respectively. As for controls, the curves remained strictly exponential, i.e., all survival curves were strictly exponential without any shoulder (extrapolation numbers n = 1 for all tested GF(s). DNA repair capacity of CD34 + cells determined by comet assay, was measured before, immediately after irradiation, as well as 30 and 120 min after irradiation at 1 Gy. Notably, after irradiation the 2-h repair of cytokine-stimulated and unstimulated CD34 + cells was similar. Conclusion: Our data indicate that increased survival of irradiated CB CD34 + cells after short-term GF treatment is

  16. Direct Conversion of Fibroblasts to Megakaryocyte Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Pulecio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Current sources of platelets for transfusion are insufficient and associated with risk of alloimmunization and blood-borne infection. These limitations could be addressed by the generation of autologous megakaryocytes (MKs derived in vitro from somatic cells with the ability to engraft and differentiate in vivo. Here, we show that overexpression of a defined set of six transcription factors efficiently converts mouse and human fibroblasts into MK-like progenitors. The transdifferentiated cells are CD41+, display polylobulated nuclei, have ploidies higher than 4N, form MK colonies, and give rise to platelets in vitro. Moreover, transplantation of MK-like murine progenitor cells into NSG mice results in successful engraftment and further maturation in vivo. Similar results are obtained using disease-corrected fibroblasts from Fanconi anemia patients. Our results combined demonstrate that functional MK progenitors with clinical potential can be obtained in vitro, circumventing the use of hematopoietic progenitors or pluripotent stem cells.

  17. Non-circadian rhythm in proliferation of haematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Necas, E.; Znojil, V.

    1988-01-01

    The proportion of haematopoietic stem cells (CFU-s) engaged in DNA synthesis was determined by means of the [ 3 H]-thymidine ([ 3 H]TdR) suicide technique during recovery of bone marrow from the damage caused by a sublethal total body irradiation. In contrast with previous reports the [ 3 H]TdR suicide rate was not permanently increased. It was observed that CFU-s passed through S phase in synchronous waves, following a dose of irradiation of 1.5 Gy. After a dose of 2.6 Gy, there was only one initial wave of increased CFU-s sensitivity to the action of [ 3 H]TdR. Following the depression occurring 26 hr after the irradiation with 2.6 Gy, the proportion of CFU-s killed by the [ 3 H]TdR was permanently increased until 5-6 days after irradiation. Thereafter large differences in the [ 3 H]TdR suicide data were observed among individual mice. Evidence was obtained that individual mice, which had been irradiated by a dose of 2.6 Gy 8-9 days before, had identical values of the CFU-s [ 3 H]TdR suicide rate in the bone marrow from different bones of the lower extremities. The recurrence of the synchronous waves in CFU-s passage through the cell cycle was recorded when the CFU-s population regenerated to only about 10% of its normal value. It is concluded that the synchronous waves in which CFU-s proliferation occurred reflected the action of the control mechanism on CFU-s proliferation. (author)

  18. Neuroprotective properties of a novel, non-haematopoietic agonist of the erythropoietin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Kiryushko, Dar'Ya; Sonn, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    they are involved in tissue protection. However, the use of erythropoietin as a neuroprotective agent may be hampered by its erythropoietic activity. Therefore, developing non-haematopoietic erythropoietin mimetics is important. Based on the crystal structure of the complex of erythropoietin and its receptor, we...... attenuated seizures, decreased mortality and reduced neurodegeneration in an in vivo model of kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast to erythropoietin, Epotris did not stimulate erythropoiesis upon chronic administration. Thus, Epotris is a novel neuroprotective non-haematopoietic erythropoietin...

  19. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) suppresses benzene-induced cytopenia by modulating haematopoietic cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenting; Wang, Shuo; Jiang, Lulu; Wang, Hui; Li, Ming; Wang, Xujing; Xie, Keqin

    2017-12-01

    Benzene is a well-known occupational and environmental toxicant associated with cytopenia, which is characterized by a disorder in the peripheral blood cell counts. However, no effective preventive strategy has been developed yet to tackle the exposure to benzene in daily life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of diallyl trisulfide (DATS) on benzene-induced haematopoietic damage and to reveal its potential mechanisms of action. In our study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups. Rats were administered with benzene (1.3 g/kg BW by gavage) to establish the benzene poisoning model, while the DATS treatment groups were treated with benzene plus DATS (15 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg, 45 mg/kg, respectively, by gavage) for 28 days. Our results demonstrated that the counts of peripheral blood WBC and RBC decreased to 31.0% and 79.2%, respectively, in the benzene poisoning model group compared to the control. However, blood cell counts were restored by DATS treatment (30 mg/kg, 45 mg/kg). The apoptosis rates of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and bone marrow cells (BMCs) were increased to 274% and 284%, respectively, following benzene exposure. Furthermore, expression levels of Bcl-2, PI3K and p-Akt were downregulated and those of Bax were upregulated in both cell types. Moreover, the oxidative parameters (oxygen species, malonaldehyde) were significantly increased, while the non-enzymatic GSH/GSSG ratios and the activities of enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase) were decreased. Interestingly, DATS treatment can restore the WBC number by 267.1% and 304.8% while RBC number by 108.6% and 117.7% in 30,45 mg/k DATS treated groups. In summary, we demonstrated that benzene-induced cytopenia was related to the apoptosis of PBMCs and BMCs, and DATS treatment could prevent benzene-induced cytopenia by suppressing oxidative stress-mediated cell apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt pathway. Copyright

  20. A Multi-Lineage Screen Reveals mTORC1 Inhibition Enhances Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Mesendoderm and Blood Progenitor Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Joseph Paul Nazareth

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs exist in heterogeneous micro-environments with multiple subpopulations, convoluting fate-regulation analysis. We patterned hPSCs into engineered micro-environments and screened responses to 400 small-molecule kinase inhibitors, measuring yield and purity outputs of undifferentiated, neuroectoderm, mesendoderm, and extra-embryonic populations. Enrichment analysis revealed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibition as a strong inducer of mesendoderm. Dose responses of mTOR inhibitors such as rapamycin synergized with Bone Morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 and activin A to enhance the yield and purity of BRACHYURY-expressing cells. Mechanistically, small interfering RNA knockdown of RAPTOR, a component of mTOR complex 1, phenocopied the mesendoderm-enhancing effects of rapamycin. Functional analysis during mesoderm and endoderm differentiation revealed that mTOR inhibition increased the output of hemogenic endothelial cells 3-fold, with a concomitant enhancement of blood colony-forming cells. These data demonstrate the power of our multi-lineage screening approach and identify mTOR signaling as a node in hPSC differentiation to mesendoderm and its derivatives.

  1. Repopulation dynamics of single haematopoietic stem cells in mouse transplantation experiments: Importance of stem cell composition in competitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Hideo; Uchinomiya, Kouki; Morita, Yohei; Suda, Toshio; Iwasa, Yoh

    2016-04-07

    The transplantation of blood tissues from bone marrow into a lethally irradiated animal is an experimental procedure that is used to study how the blood system is reconstituted by haematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In a competitive repopulation experiment, a lethally irradiated mouse was transplanted with a single HSC as a test cell together with a number of bone marrow cells as competitor cells, and the fraction of the test cell progeny (percentage of chimerism) was traced over time. In this paper, we studied the stem cell kinetics in this experimental procedure. The balance between symmetric self-renewal and differentiation divisions in HSC determined the number of cells which HSC produce and the length of time for which HSC live after transplantation. The percentage of chimerism depended on the type of test cell (long-, intermediate-, or short-term HSC), as well as the type and number of HSC included in competitor cells. We next examined two alternative HSC differentiation models, one-step and multi-step differentiation models. Although these models differed in blood cell production, the percentage of chimerism appeared very similar. We also estimated the numbers of different types of HSC in competitor cells. Based on these results, we concluded that the experimental results inevitably include stochasticity with regard to the number and the type of HSC in competitor cells, and that, in order to detect different types of HSC, an appropriate number of competitor cells needs to be used in transplantation experiments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Radiation-induced apoptosis of stem/progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood is associated with alterations in reactive oxygen and intracellular pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Tomonori [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan)]. E-mail: tomo@rerf.or.jp; Hayashi, Ikue [Central Research Laboratory, Hiroshima University Faculty of Dentistry, Hiroshima (Japan); Shinohara, Tomoko [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Morishita, Yukari [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagamura, Hiroko [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusunoki, Yoichiro [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Kyoizumi, Seishi [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan); Seyama, Toshio [Yasuda Women' s University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakachi, Kei [Department of Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hijyama Park, Minami Ward, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2004-11-22

    To investigate the sensitivity of human hematopoietic stem cell populations to radiation and its relevance to intracellular events, specifically alteration in cellular energy production systems, we examined the frequency of apoptotic cells, generation of superoxide anions (O2-), and changes in cytosol pH in umbilical cord blood (UCB) CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -}, CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup +} and CD34{sup -}/CD38{sup +} cells before and after 5Gy of X-irradiation. Human UCB mononucleated cells were used in this study. After X-irradiation and staining subgroups of the cells with fluorescence (FITC, PE, or CY)-labeled anti-CD34 and anti-CD38 antibodies, analyses were performed by FACScan using as stains 7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) for the detection of apoptosis, and hydroethidine (HE) for the measurement of O2- generation in the cells. For intracellular pH, image analysis was conducted using confocal laser microscopy after irradiation and staining with carboxy-SNAFR-1. The frequency of apoptotic cells, as determined by cell staining with 7-AAD, was highest in the irradiated CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -} cell population, where the level of O2- detected by the oxidation of HE was also most highly elevated. Intracellular pH measured with carboxy-SNARF-1-AM by image cytometer appeared to be lowest in the same irradiated CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -} cell population, and this intracellular pH decreased as early as 4h post-irradiation, virtually simultaneous with the significant elevation of O2- generation. These results suggest that the CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup -} stem cell population is sensitive to radiation-induced apoptosis as well as production of intracellular O2-, compare to more differentiated CD34{sup +}/CD38{sup +} and CD34{sup -}/CD38{sup +} cells and that its intracellular pH declines at an early phase in the apoptosis process.

  3. Optimization of the freezing process for hematopoietic progenitor cells: effect of precooling, initial dimethyl sulfoxide concentration, freezing program, and storage in vapor-phase or liquid nitrogen on in vitro white blood cell quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra-Tiekstra, Margriet J; Setroikromo, Airies C; Kraan, Marcha; Gkoumassi, Effimia; de Wildt-Eggen, Janny

    2014-12-01

    Adding dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) causes an exothermic reaction, potentially affecting their viability. The freezing method might also influence this. The aim was to investigate the effect of 1) precooling of DMSO and plasma (D/P) and white blood cell (WBC)-enriched product, 2) DMSO concentration of D/P, 3) freezing program, and 4) storage method on WBC quality. WBC-enriched product without CD34+ cells was used instead of HPCs. This was divided into six or eight portions. D/P (20 or 50%; precooled or room temperature [RT]) was added to the WBC-enriched product (precooled or RT), resulting in 10% DMSO, while monitoring temperature. The product was frozen using controlled-rate freezing ("fast-rate" or "slow-rate") and placed in vapor-phase or liquid nitrogen. After thawing, WBC recovery and viability were determined. Temperature increased most for precooled D/P to precooled WBC-enriched product, without influence of 20 or 50% D/P, but remained for all variations below 30°C. WBC recovery for both freezing programs was more than 95%. Recovery of WBC viability was higher for slow-rate freezing compared to fast-rate freezing (74% vs. 61%; p Effect of precooling D/P or WBC-enriched product and of storage in vapor-phase or liquid nitrogen was marginal. Based on these results, precooling is not necessary. Fifty percent D/P is preferred over 20% D/P. Slow-rate freezing is preferred over fast-rate freezing. For safety reasons storage in vapor-phase nitrogen is preferred over storage in liquid nitrogen. Additional testing using real HPCs might be necessary. © 2014 AABB.

  4. Aerobic exercise capacity at long-term follow-up after paediatric allogeneic haematopoietic SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, S; Uhlving, H H; Buchvald, F

    2014-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), a measure of aerobic exercise capacity, predicts mortality and morbidity in healthy and diseased individuals. Our aim was to determine VO2peak years after paediatric allogeneic haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) and to identify associations with baseline patient and donor...

  5. Optimization of pediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplant outcomes through the application of pharmacokinetics and supportive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupuis, L.L.E.

    2013-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aims to optimize drug-related outcomes in children undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). The use of pharmacokinetics to individualize exposure to busulfan and cyclosporine; the assessment of the symptom burden of children receiving chemotherapy

  6. Xerostomia and chronic oral complications among patients treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H. S.; Bots, C. P.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the severity of xerostomia (subjective dry mouth) in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients and to investigate the association of xerostomia with other chronic oral complications. Cross-sectional study.Study participants and methods Participants were 48 patients with a

  7. Reconstitution of Th17, Tc17 and Treg cells after paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, Katrine; Ryder, Lars P; Lennox-Hvenekilde, David

    2018-01-01

    Successful reconstitution of T lymphocytes after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is needed to establish the graft-versus-leukaemia effect and an effective anti-microbial defense, but the ratio between functionally different T-cell subsets needs to be balanced to avoid...

  8. Growth, endocrine function and quality of life after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Boudewijn

    2006-01-01

    This thesis contains the results of several studies on the long-term consequences of the myeloablative conditioning for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) during infancy and childhood, with the emphasis on late effects on endocrine functions. After a general introduction, effects of

  9. Monitoring of very long-chain fatty acids levels in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and Lorenzo's Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stradomska, Teresa J; Drabko, Katarzyna; Moszczyńska, Elżbieta; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a rare, neurodegenerative peroxisomal disorder connected with mutation in the ABCD1 gene, causing impairment of the peroxisomal β-oxidation process and in consequence, accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) in blood and tissues. In this study we present serum very long-chain fatty acids levels during clinical course in an X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy patient after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and on Lorenzo's Oil in a 11 years' period. The patient was diagnosed at the age of 8 months by family screening. The administration of LO was started at 2 years of age. HSCT from a family donor was performed twice. VLCFA serum levels were detected by the GC method. Chimaerism subsequent to HSCT was also analyzed. Increasing very long-chain fatty acids levels correlate with a decreasing chimaerism level after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The sequential monitoring of very long-chain fatty acids serum levels is important and useful for assessment of engraftment, graft failure or rejection.

  10. Effects of low-level radiation upon the haematopoietic stem cell. Implications for leukaemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Bond, V.P.; Carsten, A.L.; Miller, M.E.; Bullis, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    These studies address first the effect of single small doses of X-rays upon murine haematopoietic stem cells to obtain a better estimate of the Dsub(q). It is small, of the order of 20 rad. Second, a dose fractionation schedule that does not kill or perturb the kinetics of haematopoietic cell proliferation was sought to investigate the leukaemogenic potential of low-level radiation upon an unperturbed haematopoietic system. Doses used by others in past radiation leukaemogenesis studies clearly perturb haematopoiesis and kill a detectable fraction of stem cells. The studies reported in the paper show that 1.25 rad every day decreases the CFU-S content of bone marrow by the time 80 rad are accumulated. Higher daily doses as used in published studies on radiation leukaemogenesis produce greater effects. Studies of the effect of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 rad three times per week are under way. Two rad three times per week produce a modest decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow after an accumulation of 68 rad. With 3.0 rad three times per week, an accumulation of 102 rad produces a significant decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow. Dose fractionation at 0.5 and 1.0 rad three times per week has not produced a CFU-S depression after accumulation of 17 and 34 rad. Radiation leukaemogenesis studies published to date have used single doses and chronic exposure schedules that probably have significantly perturbed the kinetics of haematopoietic stem cells. Whether radiation will produce leukaemia in animal models with dose schedules that do not perturb the kinetics of haematopoietic stem cells remains to be seen. (author)

  11. klf2ash317 Mutant Zebrafish Do Not Recapitulate Morpholino-Induced Vascular and Haematopoietic Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Novodvorsky

    Full Text Available The zinc-finger transcription factor Krϋppel-like factor 2 (KLF2 transduces blood flow into molecular signals responsible for a wide range of responses within the vasculature. KLF2 maintains a healthy, quiescent endothelial phenotype. Previous studies report a range of phenotypes following morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-induced klf2a knockdown in zebrafish. Targeted genome editing is an increasingly applied method for functional assessment of candidate genes. We therefore generated a stable klf2a mutant zebrafish and characterised its cardiovascular and haematopoietic development.Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN we generated a klf2a mutant (klf2ash317 with a 14bp deletion leading to a premature stop codon in exon 2. Western blotting confirmed loss of wild type Klf2a protein and the presence of a truncated protein in klf2ash317 mutants. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutants exhibit no defects in vascular patterning, survive to adulthood and are fertile, without displaying previously described morphant phenotypes such as high-output cardiac failure, reduced haematopoetic stem cell (HSC development or impaired formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutation did not reduce angiogenesis in zebrafish with homozygous mutations in von Hippel Lindau (vhl, a form of angiogenesis that is dependent on blood flow. We examined expression of three klf family members in wildtype and klf2ash317 zebrafish. We detected vascular expression of klf2b (but not klf4a or biklf/klf4b/klf17 in wildtypes but found no differences in expression that might account for the lack of phenotype in klf2ash317 mutants. klf2b morpholino knockdown did not affect heart rate or impair formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch in either wildtypes or klf2ash317 mutants.The klf2ash317 mutation produces a truncated Klf2a protein but, unlike morpholino induced klf2a knockdown, does not affect cardiovascular development.

  12. SCA-1 Expression Level Identifies Quiescent Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morcos, Mina N.F.; Schoedel, Kristina B.; Hoppe, Anja; Behrendt, Rayk; Basak, Onur; Clevers, Hans C.; Roers, Axel; Gerbaulet, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Blood cell generation depends on continuous cellular output by the sequential hierarchy of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and progenitor populations that all contain quiescent and actively cycling cells. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) express the surface molecule Stem cell antigen 1

  13. Masses of supernova progenitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinsley, B.M.

    1977-01-01

    The possible nature and masses of supernovae progenitors, and the bearing of empirical results on some unsolved theoretical problems concerning the origin of supernovae, are discussed. The author concentrates on two main questions: what is the lower mass limit for stars to die explosively and what stars initiate type I supernovae. The evidence considered includes local supernova rates, empirical estimates of msub(w) (the upper mass limit for death as a white dwarf), the distributions of supernovae among stellar populations in galaxies and the colors of supernova producing galaxies. (B.D.)

  14. Endothelial progenitor cell biology in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Inderjeet; Syngle, Ashit; Krishan, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are unique populations which have reparative potential in overcoming endothelial damage and reducing cardiovascular risk. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial progenitor cell population in AS patients and its potential relationships with disease variables. Endothelial progenitor cells were measured in peripheral blood samples from 20 AS and 20 healthy controls by flow cytometry on the basis of CD34 and CD133 expression. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Functional ability was monitored by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). EPCs were depleted in AS patients as compared to healthy controls (CD34(+) /CD133(+) : 0.027 ± 0.010% vs. 0.044 ± 0.011%, P < 0.001). EPC depletions were significantly associated with disease duration (r = -0.52, P = 0.01), BASDAI (r = -0.45, P = 0.04) and C-reactive protein (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate endothelial progenitor cell depletion in AS patients. EPC depletions inversely correlate with disease duration, disease activity and inflammation, suggesting the pivotal role of inflammation in depletion of EPCs. EPC would possibly also serve as a therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular disease in AS. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Urological management (medical and surgical of BK-virus associated haemorrhagic cystitis in children following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Vasdev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC is uncommon and in its severe form potentially life threatening complication of Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in children. We present our single centre experience in the urological management of this clinically challenging condition. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients were diagnosed with BK-Virus HC in our centre. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.8 years (range, 3.2-18.4 years. The mean number of days post-BMT until onset of HC was 20.8 (range, 1 – 51. While all patients tested urine positive for BKV at the clinical onset of HC, only four patients had viral quantification, with viral loads ranging from 97,000 to >1 billion/ml. 8 patients had clinical HC. Ten patients experienced acute GVHD (grade I: 6 patients, grade II: 3 patients, grade 4: 1 patient.Results: Four patients received medical management for their HC. Treatments included hyperhydration, MESNA, blood and platelet transfusion, premarin and oxybutynin (Table 6.  Two patients received both medical and surgical management which included cystoscopy with clot evacuation, bladder irrigation and supra-pubic catheter insertion. One patient received exclusive surgical management. Seven patients were treated conservatively. Conclusion: There is limited available evidence for other potential therapeutic strategies highlighting the need for more research into the pathophysiology of HSCT-associated HC. Commonly used interventions with possible clinical benefit (e.g. cidofovir, ciprofloxacin still require to be evaluated in multi-centre, high-quality studies. Potential future preventative and therapeutic options, such as modulation of conditioning, immunosuppression and engraftment, new antiviral and anti-inflammatory and less nephrotoxic agents need to be assessed.---------------------------Cite this article as:Vasdev N, Davidson A, Harkensee C, Slatter M, Gennery A, Willetts I, Thorpe A.Urological management (medical and surgical of BK

  16. Autologous Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AHSCT) in Severe Crohn's Disease: A Review on Behalf of ECCO and EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, John A; Panés, Julián; Alexander, Tobias; Allez, Matthieu; Ardizzone, Sandro; Dierickx, Daan; Finke, Jürgen; Hasselblatt, Peter; Hawkey, Chris; Kazmi, Majid; Lindsay, James O; Onida, Francesco; Salas, Azucena; Saccardi, Riccardo; Vermeire, Severine; Rovira, Montserrat; Ricart, Elena

    2018-03-28

    Despite the major recent progress in the treatment of Crohn's disease [CD], there is a subset of patients in whom the disease runs an aggressive course with progressive tissue damage requiring early and repeated surgical management. Increasing evidence supports sustained and profound improvement in gastrointestinal parameters and quality of life following high-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation [AHSCT] compared to standard therapy in this context. In addition, international transplant registry data reflect the use of AHSCT in CD outside of trials in selected patients. However, AHSCT may be associated with significant treatment-related complications with risk of transplant-related mortality. In a joint initiative, the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation [ECCO] and the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation [EBMT] have produced a state-of-the-art review of the rationale, evaluation, patient selection, stem cell mobilization and transplant procedures and long-term follow up. Given the unique spectrum of issues, we recommend that AHSCT should only be performed in experienced centres with expertise in both haematological and gastroenterological aspects of the procedure. Where possible, patients should be enrolled on clinical trials and data registered centrally. Future development should be coordinated at both national and international levels.

  17. Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Lineage Commitment in Myeloid Progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Franziska; Arkin, Ya'ara; Giladi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Within the bone marrow, stem cells differentiate and give rise to diverse blood cell types and functions. Currently, hematopoietic progenitors are defined using surface markers combined with functional assays that are not directly linked with in vivo differentiation potential or gene regulatory m...

  18. Ethical and regulatory issues surrounding umbilical cord blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent medical advances in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue transplantation have highlighted the importance of umbilical cord blood (UCB) as a valuable alternative source of haematopoietic stem cells, which are potentially life-saving in a vast array of clinical applications. Although less controversial than the ...

  19. Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... production of red blood cells, including: Iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and ... inflammatory bowel disease are especially likely to have iron deficiency anemia. Anemia due to chronic disease. People with chronic ...

  20. Omega 3 fatty acids reduce myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow of mice and promote progenitor cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sollars Vincent E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Omega 3 fatty acids have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and promote differentiation in various cell types. The processes of cell survival, expansion, and differentiation are of key importance in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We investigated the role of omega 3 fatty acids in controlling the frequency of various myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Increased progenitor cell frequency and blocked differentiation are characteristics of hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage, such as myeloproliferative diseases and myeloid leukemias. Results We found that increasing the proportion of omega 3 fatty acids relative to the proportion of omega 6 fatty acids in the diet caused increased differentiation and reduced the frequency of myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Furthermore, this had no adverse effect on peripheral white blood cell counts. Conclusion Our results indicate that omega 3 fatty acids impact hematopoietic differentiation by reducing myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow and promoting progenitor cell differentiation. Further exploration of this discovery could lead to the use of omega 3 fatty acids as a therapeutic option for patients that have various disorders of hematopoiesis.

  1. The level of circulating endothelial progenitor cells may be associated with the occurrence and recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The onset of chronic subdural hematoma may be associated with direct or indirect minor injuries to the head or a poorly repaired vascular injury. Endothelial progenitor cells happen to be one of the key factors involved in hemostasis and vascular repair. This study was designed to observe the levels of endothelial progenitor cells, white blood cells, platelets, and other indicators in the peripheral blood of patients diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma to determine the possible relationship between the endothelial progenitor cells and the occurrence, development, and outcomes of chronic subdural hematoma. METHOD: We enrolled 30 patients with diagnosed chronic subdural hematoma by computer tomography scanning and operating procedure at Tianjin Medical University General Hospital from July 2009 to July 2011. Meanwhile, we collected 30 cases of peripheral blood samples from healthy volunteers over the age of 50. Approximately 2 ml of blood was taken from veins of the elbow to test the peripheral blood routine and coagulation function. The content of endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The level of endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood was significantly lower in preoperational patients with chronic subdural hematomas than in controls. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the blood routine and coagulation function. However, the levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells were significantly different between the recurrent group and the non-recurrent group. CONCLUSIONS: The level of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in chronic subdural hematoma patients was significantly lower than the level in healthy controls. Meanwhile, the level of endothelial progenitor cells in recurrent patients was significantly lower than the level in patients without recurrence. Endothelial progenitor cells may be related to the

  2. Autografting of peripheral-blood progenitor cells early in chronic myeloid Leukemia Transplante autólogo de células progenitoras em fase crônica precoce da Leucemia mielóide crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo V. B. Carvalho

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of peripheral-blood progenitor cell (PBPC transplantation as a treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients remains uncertain. We presented herein 11 CML patients treated with autografting of PBPC in early chronic phase followed by interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha. Bone marrow samples obtained at diagnosis and during follow-up after autografting as well as leukapheresis products were analyzed by cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The median follow-up of patients after autografting was 22 months (range: 1-49. Two treatment-related deaths occurred in patients enrolled in the study. Eight out of 9 (88.9% and 7 out of 9 (77.8% patients achieved hematologic and cytogenetic responses, respectively. Molecular cytogenetic and molecular responses were seen in all 7 patients analyzed (100.0% and in one single patient (11.1%, respectively. The median percentages of Ph+ (78.0% metaphases obtained after 6 months of autografting was lower than those obtained at diagnosis (100.0%, P=0.04. The median percentages of FISH+ nuclei obtained at 3 (4.0%, 6 (7.3% and 9 (14.7% months after autografting were also lower than that obtained at diagnosis (82.5%; P=0.002; P=0.003; P=0.030, respectively. At the end of the study, 9 patients (81.8% were alive in chronic phase, 4 of them presenting hematologic, cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic responses. We conclude that autografting performed with PBPC in early chronic phase of CML followed by IFN-alpha results in lower numbers of Ph+ and FISH+ cells in bone marrow.O papel do transplante de célula progenitora periférica (CPP como tratamento de pacientes com leucemia mielóide crônica (LMC permanece incerto. Nós apresentamos neste estudo 11 pacientes com LMC tratados com o transplante autólogo (TMO-auto de CPP durante a fase crônica precoce, seguido de interferon-alfalfa (IFN-alfa. Amostras de medula óssea, obtidas ao diagn

  3. Increased chemotaxis and activity of circulatory myeloid progenitor cells may contribute to enhanced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss in the C57BL/6 mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikić Matijašević, M; Flegar, D; Kovačić, N; Katavić, V; Kelava, T; Šućur, A; Ivčević, S; Cvija, H; Lazić Mosler, E; Kalajzić, I; Marušić, A; Grčević, D

    2016-12-01

    Our study aimed to determine the functional activity of different osteoclast progenitor (OCP) subpopulations and signals important for their migration to bone lesions, causing local and systemic bone resorption during the course of collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice. Arthritis was induced with chicken type II collagen (CII), and assessed by clinical scoring and detection of anti-CII antibodies. We observed decreased trabecular bone volume of axial and appendicular skeleton by histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography as well as decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption rate in arthritic mice in vivo. In the affected joints, bone loss was accompanied with severe osteitis and bone marrow hypercellularity, coinciding with the areas of active osteoclasts and bone erosions. Flow cytometry analysis showed increased frequency of putative OCP cells (CD3 - B220 - NK1.1 - CD11b -/lo CD117 + CD115 + for bone marrow and CD3 - B220 - NK1.1 - CD11b + CD115 + Gr-1 + for peripheral haematopoietic tissues), which exhibited enhanced differentiation potential in vitro. Moreover, the total CD11b + population was expanded in arthritic mice as well as CD11b + F4/80 + macrophage, CD11b + NK1.1 + natural killer cell and CD11b + CD11c + myeloid dendritic cell populations in both bone marrow and peripheral blood. In addition, arthritic mice had increased expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, CC chemokine ligand-2 (Ccl2) and Ccl5, with increased migration and differentiation of circulatory OCPs in response to CCL2 and, particularly, CCL5 signals. Our study characterized the frequency and functional properties of OCPs under inflammatory conditions associated with arthritis, which may help to clarify crucial molecular signals provided by immune cells to mediate systemically enhanced osteoresorption. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  4. A somatic mutation in erythro-myeloid progenitors causes neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Elvira; Jacome-Galarza, Christian E; Blank, Thomas; Lazarov, Tomi; Durham, Benjamin H; Ozkaya, Neval; Pastore, Alessandro; Schwabenland, Marius; Chung, Young Rock; Rosenblum, Marc K; Prinz, Marco; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Geissmann, Frederic

    2017-09-21

    The pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases is poorly understood and there are few therapeutic options. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction and loss, and chronic glial activation. Whether microglial activation, which is generally viewed as a secondary process, is harmful or protective in neurodegeneration remains unclear. Late-onset neurodegenerative disease observed in patients with histiocytoses, which are clonal myeloid diseases associated with somatic mutations in the RAS-MEK-ERK pathway such as BRAF(V600E), suggests a possible role of somatic mutations in myeloid cells in neurodegeneration. Yet the expression of BRAF(V600E) in the haematopoietic stem cell lineage causes leukaemic and tumoural diseases but not neurodegenerative disease. Microglia belong to a lineage of adult tissue-resident myeloid cells that develop during organogenesis from yolk-sac erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) distinct from haematopoietic stem cells. We therefore hypothesized that a somatic BRAF(V600E) mutation in the EMP lineage may cause neurodegeneration. Here we show that mosaic expression of BRAF(V600E) in mouse EMPs results in clonal expansion of tissue-resident macrophages and a severe late-onset neurodegenerative disorder. This is associated with accumulation of ERK-activated amoeboid microglia in mice, and is also observed in human patients with histiocytoses. In the mouse model, neurobehavioural signs, astrogliosis, deposition of amyloid precursor protein, synaptic loss and neuronal death were driven by ERK-activated microglia and were preventable by BRAF inhibition. These results identify the fetal precursors of tissue-resident macrophages as a potential cell-of-origin for histiocytoses and demonstrate that a somatic mutation in the EMP lineage in mice can drive late-onset neurodegeneration. Moreover, these data identify activation of the MAP kinase pathway in microglia as a cause of neurodegeneration and this offers

  5. Progenitor cell populations in the periodontal ligament of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Stem cells in a variety of renewal tissues exhibit a slow rate of cell proliferation. The periodontal ligament of mouse molars was examined for the presence of slowly cycling progenitor cells to provide evidence for the existence of stem cells in this tissue. A pulse injection of 3 H-thymidine was administered and mice were sacrificed between 1 hour and 14 days after injection. Analysis of radioautographs using percentage of labeled cells and grain counts demonstrated that a population of label-retaining cells within 10 micron of blood vessels traversed the cell cycle more slowly than proliferating cells located greater than 10 micron from blood vessels. These data suggest that there is a slowly dividing population of progenitor cells in paravascular sites in mouse molar periodontal ligament which may be stem cells

  6. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells for autologous transportation: consensus recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Barroso Duarte

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Selected patients with certain hematological malignancies and solid tumors have the potential to achieve long-term survival with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant. The collection of these cells in peripheral blood avoids multiple bone marrow aspirations, results in faster engraftment and allows treatment of patients with infection, fibrosis, or bone marrow hypocellularity. However, for the procedure to be successful, it is essential to mobilize a sufficient number of progenitor cells from the bone marrow into the blood circulation. Therefore, a group of Brazilian experts met in order to develop recommendations for mobilization strategies adapted to the reality of the Brazilian national health system, which could help minimize the risk of failure, reduce toxicity and improve the allocation of financial resources.

  7. Prodigiosin from the supernatant of Serratia marcescens induces apoptosis in haematopoietic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaner, B; Navarro, S; Piqué, M; Vilaseca, M; Martinell, M; Giralt, E; Gil, J; Pérez-Tomás, R

    2000-10-01

    The effects of supernatant from the bacterial strain Serratia marcescens 2170 (CS-2170) on the viability of different haematopoietic cancer cell lines (Jurkat, NSO, HL-60 and Ramos) and nonmalignant cells (NIH-3T3 and MDCK) was studied. We examined whether this cytotoxic effect was due to apoptosis, and we purified the molecule responsible for this effect and determined its chemical structure. Using an MTT assay we showed a rapid (4 h) decrease in the number of viable cells. This cytotoxic effect was due to apoptosis, according to the fragmentation pattern of DNA, Hoechst 33342 staining and FACS analysis of the phosphatidylserine externalization. This apoptosis was blocked by using the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk, indicating the involvement of caspases. Prodigiosin is a red pigment produced by various bacteria including S. marcescens. Using mutants of S. marcescens (OF, WF and 933) that do not synthesize prodigiosin, we further showed that prodigiosin is involved in this apoptosis. This evidence was corroborated by spectroscopic analysis of prodigiosin isolated from S. marcescens. These results indicate that prodigiosin, an immunosuppressor, induces apoptosis in haematopoietic cancer cells with no marked toxicity in nonmalignant cells, raising the possibility of its therapeutic use as an antineoplastic drug.

  8. Manganese effects on haematopoietic cells and circulating coelomocytes of Asterias rubens (Linnaeus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oweson, Carolina; Skoeld, Helen [Department of Marine Ecology, Goeteborg University, Kristineberg 566, 45034 Fiskebaeckskil (Sweden); Pinsino, Annalisa; Matranga, Valeria [Istituto di Biomedicina e Immunologia Molecolare ' A. Monroy' , Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Hernroth, Bodil [The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Kristineberg 566, 45034 Fiskebaeckskil (Sweden)], E-mail: bodil.hernroth@marecol.gu.se

    2008-08-29

    Manganese (Mn) is a naturally abundant metal in marine sediments where it mainly occurs as MnO{sub 2}. During hypoxic conditions it is converted into a bioavailable state, Mn{sup 2+}, and can reach levels that previously have shown effects on immune competent cells of the crustacean, Nephrops norvegicus. Here we investigated if Mn also affects circulating coelomocytes and their renewal in the common sea star, Asterias rubens, when exposed to concentrations of Mn that can be found in nature. When the sea stars were exposed to Mn it accumulated in the coelomic fluid and the number of circulating coelomocytes, in contrast to what was recorded in Nephrops, increased significantly. By using the substitute nucleotide, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, BrdU, for tracing cell division and by recording mitotic index by nuclei staining, we found that Mn induced proliferation of cells from a putative haematopoietic tissue, the coelomic epithelium. In addition, the haematopoietic tissue and coelomocytes showed stress response in terms of changes in HSP70 levels and protein carbonyls, as judged by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Measurement of dehydrogenase activity, using MTS/PMS, revealed that Mn showed cytotoxic properties. We also found that the phagocytotic capacity of coelomocytes was significantly inhibited by Mn. It was concluded that the exposure of A. rubens to Mn induced renewal of coelomocytes and impaired their immune response.

  9. Manganese effects on haematopoietic cells and circulating coelomocytes of Asterias rubens (Linnaeus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oweson, Carolina; Skoeld, Helen; Pinsino, Annalisa; Matranga, Valeria; Hernroth, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a naturally abundant metal in marine sediments where it mainly occurs as MnO 2 . During hypoxic conditions it is converted into a bioavailable state, Mn 2+ , and can reach levels that previously have shown effects on immune competent cells of the crustacean, Nephrops norvegicus. Here we investigated if Mn also affects circulating coelomocytes and their renewal in the common sea star, Asterias rubens, when exposed to concentrations of Mn that can be found in nature. When the sea stars were exposed to Mn it accumulated in the coelomic fluid and the number of circulating coelomocytes, in contrast to what was recorded in Nephrops, increased significantly. By using the substitute nucleotide, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, BrdU, for tracing cell division and by recording mitotic index by nuclei staining, we found that Mn induced proliferation of cells from a putative haematopoietic tissue, the coelomic epithelium. In addition, the haematopoietic tissue and coelomocytes showed stress response in terms of changes in HSP70 levels and protein carbonyls, as judged by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Measurement of dehydrogenase activity, using MTS/PMS, revealed that Mn showed cytotoxic properties. We also found that the phagocytotic capacity of coelomocytes was significantly inhibited by Mn. It was concluded that the exposure of A. rubens to Mn induced renewal of coelomocytes and impaired their immune response

  10. Spinal osteomyelitis due to Aspergillus flavus in a child: a rare complication after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beluffi, Giampiero [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico ' S.Matteo' , Section of Paediatric Radiology, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Pavia PV (Italy); Bernardo, Maria E.; Locatelli, Franco [University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico ' S.Matteo' , Department of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology, Pavia (Italy); Meloni, Giulia [University of Pavia, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico ' S.Matteo' , Institute of Radiology, Pavia (Italy); Spinazzola, Angelo [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico ' S.Matteo' , Section of Paediatric Radiology, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Pavia PV (Italy); Ospedale Maggiore, Crema CR (Italy)

    2008-06-15

    We report the case of a child affected by acute myeloid leukaemia who was treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and developed cervicothoracic spinal osteomyelitis due to Aspergillus flavus. The diagnosis was difficult on a clinical basis, but made possible by conventional radiography and MRI. (orig.)

  11. Host defence during Klebsiella pneumonia relies on haematopoietic-expressed Toll-like receptors 4 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieland, C. W.; van Lieshout, M. H. P.; Hoogendijk, A. J.; van der Poll, T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the relative roles of Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were investigated independently and together. Moreover, we studied the role of haematopoietic compartment in anti-Klebsiella host defence. We infected TLR2 and TLR4 single-, and TLR2×4 double knockout (KO) animals with different

  12. Oral complaints and dental care of haematopoietic stem cell transplant patients: a qualitative survey of patients and their dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-den Braber, J.; Potting, C.M.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Little is known about the understanding of the oral and dental needs of haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients or about dentists' views and experiences regarding this patient group. This information is essential if we want to improve the standard of peri-HSCT dental care. The

  13. Circulating granulocytic and erythroid progenitor cells in chronic granulocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, J M; Shiota, F; Th'ng, K H; Orchard, K H

    1980-09-01

    We used a standard methyl cellulose method to assay erythroid progenitor cells in the blood of 35 patients with untreated CGL and of 18 normal controls. In 28 patients we simultaneously assayed granulocyte/monocyte committed progenitor cells (CFU-c) by an agar method. Circulating erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-e) in CGL were increased above normal by a factor of about 180; CFU-c were increased by a factor of about 9000. Both BFU-e and CFU-c numbers were linearly related to the total leucocyte count in individual patients but not to numbers of circulating blast cells. There was a positive correlation in individual patients between CFU-c and BFU-e numbers. Circulating BFU-e and erythroid colony-forming cells (CFU-e) were unable to proliferate in vitro in the absence of erythropoietin. We conclude that erythroid progenitor cells are involved in the 'clonal expansion' that characterizes CGL, but apparently to a lesser extent than are granulocyte/moonocyte progenitor cells.

  14. Dysregulation of Vascular Endothelial Progenitor Cells Lung-Homing in Subjects with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany M. Salter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by fixed airflow limitation and progressive decline of lung function and punctuated by occasional exacerbations. The disease pathogenesis may involve activation of the bone marrow stimulating mobilization and lung-homing of progenitor cells. We investigated the hypothesis that lower circulating numbers of vascular endothelial progenitor cells (VEPCs are a consequence of increased lung-sequestration in COPD. Nonatopic, current or ex-smokers with diagnosed COPD and nonatopic, nonsmoking normal controls were enrolled. Blood and induced sputum extracted primitive hemopoietic progenitors (HPCs and VEPC were enumerated by flow cytometry. Migration and adhesive responses to fibronectin were assessed. In sputum, VEPC numbers were significantly greater in COPD compared to normal controls. In blood, VEPCs were significantly lower in COPD versus normal controls. There were no differences in HPC levels between the two groups in either compartment. Functionally, there was a greater migrational responsiveness of progenitors from COPD subjects to stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1α compared to normal controls. This was associated with greater numbers of CXCR4+ progenitors in sputum from COPD. Increased migrational responsiveness of progenitor cells may promote lung-homing of VEPC in COPD which may disrupt maintenance and repair of the airways and contribute to COPD disease pathogenesis.

  15. Socially disadvantaged parents of children treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Hanne Bækgaard; Heilmann, Carsten; Johansen, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to test a daily Family Navigator Nurse (FNN) conducted intervention program, to support parents during the distressful experience of their child's Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). METHODS: A qualitative analysis of the supportive...... intervention program for parents whose child is under HSCT treatment while hospitalized. Parents to 25 children were included in the intervention group. Twenty-five parents were included in a participant observational study and 21 of these completed a semi-structured interview 100 days following HSCT. RESULTS......: Three main problems faced by all parents included 1) the emotional strain of the child's HSCT; 2) re-organizing of the family's daily life to include hospitalization with the child; and 3) the financial strain of manoeuvring within the Danish welfare system. The FNN performed daily intervention rounds...

  16. Prognosis of Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgaard, Sidsel Christy; Nielsen, Jonas; Lindmark, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a procedure with inherent complications and intensive care may be necessary. We evaluated the short- and long-term outcomes of the HSCT recipients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We...... ventilation had a statistically significant effect on in-ICU (p = 0.02), 6-month (p = 0.049) and 1-year (p = 0.014) mortality. Renal replacement therapy also had a statistically significant effect on in-hospital (p = 0.038) and 6-month (p = 0.026) mortality. Short ICU admissions, i.e. ... to the ICU was confirmed in our study. Mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy and an ICU admission of ≥10 days were each risk factors for mortality in the first year after ICU admission....

  17. Patients' experience of sexuality 1-year after allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Kristina H; Schmidt, Mette; Jarden, Mary

    2015-01-01

    body image, which directly or indirectly resulted in sexual dysfunction or problems with intimacy. Symptoms related to chronic GVHD, could explain experiences of sexual dysfunction. Sexual needs were deprioritized as survival became paramount. The experience of changed social roles, both in family life...... and social network, affected self-image and identity. Finally, communication about sexuality and sexual needs was of significant importance to the current state of their relationship. CONCLUSION: Physical body alterations, challenges in mastering their new life situation and identity changes affected......PURPOSE: This study explores how patients' experience of sexuality is influenced by physical, psychological and social changes one year after undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). METHODS: A qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews. The respondents (n = 9...

  18. First Record of Infectious Haematopoietic Necrosis Virus in Rainbow Trout Fry in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vardić

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the first diagnosis of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV in Croatia. The viral causative agent was detected in pooled organ samples from the imported rainbow trout fry on the fish farm. Reverse transcriptase - semi-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT- snPCR was applied directly on the infected tissue for rapid virus detection. After isolation on cell cultures, IHNV isolate was characterised on the basis of the 303 nt region of the glycoprotein gene (Mid-G sequence. Phylogenetic comparison to North American and European IHNV isolates revealed that this Croatian isolate belongs to the M genogroup, confirming the prediction of the M genogroup origin of European IHNV isolates. The introduction of the virus presents a threat of further spreading of the disease in Croatia, as the infected farm is in a direct contact with the open waters.

  19. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, António; Martins, Paula; Paiva, Artur; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Marques, Margarida; Castela, Eduardo; Sena, Cristina; Seiça, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between circulating endothelial progenitor cell count and endothelial activation in a pediatric population with obesity. Observational and transversal study, including 120 children and adolescents with primary obesity of both sexes, aged 6-17 years, who were recruited at this Cardiovascular Risk Clinic. The control group was made up of 41 children and adolescents with normal body mass index. The variables analyzed were: age, gender, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipid profile, leptin, adiponectin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, E-selectin, asymmetric dimethylarginine and circulating progenitor endothelial cell count. Insulin resistance was correlated to asymmetric dimethylarginine (ρ=0.340; p=0.003), which was directly, but weakly correlated to E-selectin (ρ=0.252; p=0.046). High sensitivity C-reactive protein was not found to be correlated to markers of endothelial activation. Systolic blood pressure was directly correlated to body mass index (ρ=0.471; p<0.001) and the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (ρ=0.230; p=0.012), and inversely correlated to adiponectin (ρ=-0.331; p<0.001) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (ρ=-0.319; p<0.001). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count was directly, but weakly correlated, to body mass index (r=0.211; p=0.016), leptin (ρ=0.245; p=0.006), triglyceride levels (r=0.241; p=0.031), and E-selectin (ρ=0.297; p=0.004). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count is elevated in obese children and adolescents with evidence of endothelial activation, suggesting that, during infancy, endothelial repairing mechanisms are present in the context of endothelial activation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Human fetal cardiac progenitors: The role of stem cells and progenitors in the fetal and adult heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatovic, Ivana; Månsson-Broberg, Agneta; Sylvén, Christer; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The human fetal heart is formed early during embryogenesis as a result of cell migrations, differentiation, and formative blood flow. It begins to beat around gestation day 22. Progenitor cells are derived from mesoderm (endocardium and myocardium), proepicardium (epicardium and coronary vessels), and neural crest (heart valves, outflow tract septation, and parasympathetic innervation). A variety of molecular disturbances in the factors regulating the specification and differentiation of these cells can cause congenital heart disease. This review explores the contribution of different cardiac progenitors to the embryonic heart development; the pathways and transcription factors guiding their expansion, migration, and functional differentiation; and the endogenous regenerative capacity of the adult heart including the plasticity of cardiomyocytes. Unfolding these mechanisms will become the basis for understanding the dynamics of specific congenital heart disease as well as a means to develop therapy for fetal as well as postnatal cardiac defects and heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Haematopoietic depletion in vaccine-induced neonatal pancytopenia depends on both the titre and specificity of alloantibody and levels of MHC I expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Charlotte R; MacHugh, Niall D; Connelley, Timothy K; Degnan, Kathryn; Morrison, W Ivan

    2015-07-09

    Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP) is a disease of calves characterised by haematopoietic depletion, mediated by ingestion of alloantibodies in colostrum. It has been linked epidemiologically to vaccination of the dams of affected calves with a particular vaccine (Pregsure) containing a novel adjuvant. Evidence suggests that BNP-alloantibodies are directed against MHC I molecules, induced by contaminant bovine cellular material from Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells used in the vaccine's production. We aimed to investigate the specificity of BNP-alloantibody for bovine MHC I alleles, particularly those expressed by MDBK cells, and whether depletion of particular cell types is due to differential MHC I expression levels. A complement-mediated cytotoxicity assay was used to assess functional serum alloantibody titres in BNP-dams, Pregsure-vaccinated dams with healthy calves, cows vaccinated with an alternative product and unvaccinated controls. Alloantibody specificity was investigated using transfected mouse lines expressing the individual MHC I alleles identified from MDBK cells and MHC I-defined bovine leukocyte lines. All BNP-dams and 50% of Pregsure-vaccinated cows were shown to have MDBK-MHC I specific alloantibodies, which cross-reacted to varying degrees with other MHC I genotypes. MHC I expression levels on different blood cell types, assessed by flow cytometry, were found to correlate with levels of alloantibody-mediated damage in vitro and in vivo. Alloantibody-killed bone marrow cells were shown to express higher levels of MHC I than undamaged cells. The results provide evidence that MHC I-specific alloantibodies play a dominant role in the pathogenesis of BNP. Haematopoietic depletion was shown to be dependent on the titre and specificity of alloantibody produced by individual cows and the density of surface MHC I expression by different cell types. Collectively, the results support the hypothesis that MHC I molecules originating from MDBK cells

  2. Tunnelled Central Venous Catheter-Related Problems in the Early Phase of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Effects on Transplant Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Yeral

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Haematopoietic stem cell recipients need central venous catheters (CVCs for easy administration of intravenous fluid, medications, apheresis, or dialysis procedures. However, CVCs may lead to infectious or non-infectious complications such as thrombosis. The effect of these complications on transplantation outcome is not clear. This manuscript presents the complication rates of double-lumen tunnelled CVCs and their effect on transplantation outcome. METHODS: Data from 111 consecutive patients, of whom 75 received autologous and 36 received allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, were collected retrospectively. The data were validated by the Record Inspection Group of the related JACIE-accredited transplantation centre. RESULTS: Thrombosis developed in 2.7% of recipients (0.9 per 1000 catheter days. Catheter-related infection was identified in 14 (12.6% patients (3.6 per 1000 catheter days. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most common causative agent. Engraftment time, rate of 100-day mortality, and development of grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease were not found to be associated with catheter-related complications. CONCLUSION: Sonuçlarımız nakil hastalarında tünelli SVK komplikasyonlarının yönetilebilir olduğunu ve bu komplikasyonların nakil üzerine olumsuz bir etki yaratmadığını göstermektedir.

  3. Fifteen-year follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia and extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Krings, T.; Thron, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, RWTH-Aachen Hosital (Germany); Hans, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, RWTH Aachen Hospital (Germany); 1

    2005-04-01

    A long-term follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia with intra- and extraspinal extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord is presented. Extramedullary haematopoietic nodules are a rare cause of spinal cord compression and should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients from Mediterranean countries. Treatment with radiation therapy solely failed, giving rise to the need of surgical intervention. Surgical decompression of the spine and the removal of the culprit lesion compressing the spine were performed. Postinterventional radiation therapy was applied to the spine. A relapse had to be treated again by surgical means combined with postinterventional radiation therapy. A complete relief of the symptoms and control of the lesion could be obtained.

  4. Fifteen-year follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia and extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niggemann, P.; Krings, T.; Thron, A.; Hans, F.

    2005-01-01

    A long-term follow-up of a patient with beta thalassaemia with intra- and extraspinal extramedullary haematopoietic tissue compressing the spinal cord is presented. Extramedullary haematopoietic nodules are a rare cause of spinal cord compression and should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients from Mediterranean countries. Treatment with radiation therapy solely failed, giving rise to the need of surgical intervention. Surgical decompression of the spine and the removal of the culprit lesion compressing the spine were performed. Postinterventional radiation therapy was applied to the spine. A relapse had to be treated again by surgical means combined with postinterventional radiation therapy. A complete relief of the symptoms and control of the lesion could be obtained

  5. Impact of oral gut decontamination on Staphylococcus aureus colonisation in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, C Matthias; Weber, Isabel; Seidl, Kati; Rachmühl, Carole; Holzmann-Bürgel, Anne; Müller, Antonia M S; Kuster, Stefan P; Schanz, Urs; Zinkernagel, Annelies S

    2017-12-01

    Recipients of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are severely immunocompromised and are at increased risk of infection. In this prospective, observational, single-centre study including 110 allo-HSCT recipients, the rate of Staphylococcus aureus colonisation was reduced from 11.8% to 0% (P <0.001) following peritransplant oral gut decontamination. No invasive S. aureus infections were observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  6. A non-fatal case of invasive zygomycete (Lichtheimia corymbifera) infection in an allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eickhardt, Steffen; Braendstrup, Peter; Clasen-Linde, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant infections in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients often have severe consequences. This is especially the case when dealing with zygomycete infections where the result is often fatal. A major problem when dealing with zygomycete infections is the need...... for an accurate and fast diagnosis as the phylum is highly resistant towards the conventional antifungals. We herein describe a non-fatal case of Lichtheimia corymbifera infection in an allo-HCT recipient....

  7. A comparison of the observed and the expected cancers of the haematopoietic and lymphatic systems among workers at Windscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolphin, G.W.

    1976-12-01

    Data are given about the cases of cancers of the haematopoietic and lymphatic systems among workers at Windscale Works, BNFL during the period 1950 to 1974. The number of cancers of these types expected to occur in the working population at Windscale has been estimated for the same period. For none of these types is the observed number of cancers significantly different at the 95% confidence level from that expected. (author)

  8. Best practice for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization and collection in adults and children: results of a Società Italiana Di Emaferesi e Manipolazione Cellulare (SIDEM) and Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO) consensus process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierelli, Luca; Perseghin, Paolo; Marchetti, Monia; Accorsi, Patrizia; Fanin, Renato; Messina, Chiara; Olivieri, Attilio; Risso, Marco; Salvaneschi, Laura; Bosi, Alberto

    2012-04-01

    A large heterogeneity in current mobilization and collection practices is perceived. Moreover, recent evidence introduced novel issues into some specific topics. Optimization of the clinical practice, through the adoption of clinical practice guidelines, previously proved to reduce health care resource use. Two Italian scientific societies, Società Italiana Di Emaferesi e Manipolazione Cellulare (SIDEM) and Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO), perceived the need of hematologists and transfusionists to share a common paradigm in the setting of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). The aim of the current position paper is to provide common definitions and criteria for mobilization and collection of peripheral blood stem cells both in autologous and in the allogeneic setting. Current international and national standards (i.e., International Society of Hematotherapy and Graft Engineering) and recommendations (i.e., European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation) were harmonized with the Panel recommendations. The Expert Panel consisted of nine members (five transfusionists and four hematologists with both clinical and scientific experience of SCT in both pediatric and adult setting) and one methodologist and first convened on April 19, 2010: they in turn agreed on the questions to be answered by the project. Available literature was reviewed by one expert and the methodologist and presented to the other members. Statements were then formulated. SIDEM and GITMO planned an informal meeting of the Panel every 2 years to discuss relevant updates and possible changes to the recommendations. The efforts of the expert panel members allowed to set up and share a common approach to the mobilization, enumeration, and collection issues in the field of both autologous and allogeneic peripheral blood SCT. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. Religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, Christopher F C; O'Connor, Michelle A C; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Cameron, Andrew; Keown, Damien; Lawrence, Rabbi Jeremy; McGarrity, Andrew; Sachedina, Abdulaziz; Tobin, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a valuable source of haematopoietic stem cells. There is little information about whether religious affiliations have any bearing on attitudes to and decisions about its collection, donation and storage. The authors provided information about umbilical cord blood banking to expert commentators from six major world religions (Catholicism, Anglicanism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) and asked them to address a specific set of questions in a commentary. The commentaries suggest there is considerable support for umbilical cord blood banking in these religions. Four commentaries provide moral grounds for favouring public donation over private storage. None attach any particular religious significance to the umbilical cord or to the blood within it, nor place restrictions on the ethnicity or religion of donors and recipients. Views on ownership of umbilical cord blood vary. The authors offer a series of general points for those who seek a better understanding of religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

  10. How much blood is needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifried, E; Klueter, H; Weidmann, C; Staudenmaier, T; Schrezenmeier, H; Henschler, R; Greinacher, A; Mueller, M M

    2011-01-01

    Demographic changes in developed countries as their populations age lead to a steady increase in the consumption of standard blood components. Complex therapeutic procedures like haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cardiovascular surgery and solid organ transplantation are options for an increasing proportion of older patients nowadays. This trend is likely to continue in coming years. On the other hand, novel aspects in transplant regimens, therapies for malignant diseases, surgical procedures and perioperative patient management have led to a moderate decrease in blood product consumption per individual procedure. The ageing of populations in developed countries, intra-society changes in the attitude towards blood donation as an important altruistic behaviour and the overall alterations in our societies will lead to a decline in regular blood donations over the next decades in many developed countries. Artificial blood substitutes or in vitro stem cell-derived blood components might also become alternatives in the future. However, such substitutes are still in early stages of development and will therefore probably not alleviate this problem within the next few years. Taken together, a declining donation rate and an increase in the consumption of blood components require novel approaches on both sides of the blood supply chain. Different blood donor groups require specific approaches and, for example, inactive or deferred donors must be re-activated. Optimal use of blood components requires even more attention. © 2010 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2010 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  11. Pulpal progenitors and dentin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harichane, Y; Hirata, A; Dimitrova-Nakov, S; Granja, I; Goldberg, A; Kellermann, O; Poliard, A

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are present in the dental pulp. They have been shown to contribute to dentin-like tissue formation in vitro and to participate in bone repair after a mandibular lesion. However, their capacity to contribute efficiently to reparative dentin formation after pulp lesion has never been explored. After pulp exposure, we have identified proliferative cells within 3 zones. In the crown, zone I is near the cavity, and zone II corresponds to the isthmus between the mesial and central pulp. In the root, zone III, near the apex, at a distance from the inflammatory site, contains mitotic stromal cells which may represent a source of progenitor cells. Stem-cell-based strategies are promising treatments for tissue injury in dentistry. Our experiments focused on (1) location of stem cells induced to leave their quiescent state early after pulp injury and (2) implantation of pulp progenitors, a substitute for classic endodontic treatments, paving the way for pulp stem-cell-based therapies.

  12. Endothelial Progenitor Cells for Diagnosis and Prognosis in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Oriana Aragona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify, evaluate, and synthesize evidence on the predictive power of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in cardiovascular disease, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources. MEDLINE was searched using keywords related to “endothelial progenitor cells” and “endothelium” and, for the different categories, respectively, “smoking”; “blood pressure”; “diabetes mellitus” or “insulin resistance”; “dyslipidemia”; “aging” or “elderly”; “angina pectoris” or “myocardial infarction”; “stroke” or “cerebrovascular disease”; “homocysteine”; “C-reactive protein”; “vitamin D”. Study Selection. Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 927 database hits, 43 quantitative studies were included. Data Syntheses. EPC count has been suggested for cardiovascular risk estimation in the clinical practice, since it is currently accepted that EPCs can work as proangiogenic support cells, maintaining their importance as regenerative/reparative potential, and also as prognostic markers. Conclusions. EPCs showed an important role in identifying cardiovascular risk conditions, and to suggest their evaluation as predictor of outcomes appears to be reasonable in different defined clinical settings. Due to their capability of proliferation, circulation, and the development of functional progeny, great interest has been directed to therapeutic use of progenitor cells in atherosclerotic diseases. This trial is registered with registration number: Prospero CRD42015023717.

  13. Transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitors into the adult CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R.J.M.; Blakemore, W.F.; Cambridge Univ.

    1997-01-01

    This review covers a number of aspects of the behaviour of oligodendrocyte progenitors following transplantation into the adult CNS. First, an account is given of the ability of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors, grown in tissue culture in the presence of PDGF and bFGF, to extensively remyelinate focal areas of persistent demyelination. Secondly, we describe how transplanted clonal cell lines of oligodendrocyte progenitors will differentiate in to astrocytes as will oligodendrocytes following transplantation into pathological environments in which both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are absent, thereby manifesting the bipotentially demonstrable in vitro but not during development. Finally, a series of studies examining the migratory behaviour of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors (modelled using the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4) are described. (author)

  14. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor recruitment of CD34+ progenitors to peripheral blood: impaired mobilization in chronic granulomatous disease and adenosine deaminase--deficient severe combined immunodeficiency disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhsaria, S; Fleisher, T A; Vowells, S; Brown, M; Miller, J; Gordon, I; Blaese, R M; Dunbar, C E; Leitman, S; Malech, H L

    1996-08-01

    Peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells mobilized by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration are potentially useful for transplantation and as a target of gene transfer for therapy of hematopoietic disorders. Efficient harvest and planning for clinical use of PB CD34+ cells ideally requires foreknowledge of the expected mobilization kinetics and yield. We developed a sensitive flow cytometric assay for accurately enumerating CD34+ cells throughout the range seen at baseline to peak mobilization. We used this assay to assess the kinetics of G-CSF-mediated mobilization of CD34+ cells to PB in normal volunteers and in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) or adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Two dose levels of G-CSF were examined (5 and 10 micrograms/kg/d for 7 days). Both doses were well tolerated. For normal subjects and patients an increase in PB CD34+ cells was first detected only preceding the third dose of G-CSF (day 3), peaked transiently on day 5 or 6, and then decreased thereafter despite additional doses of G-CSF. With 32 normal volunteers mean peak CD34+ cell counts were 57 and 76 cells/mm2 of blood (5 and 10 micrograms doses, respectively), whereas for 18 CGD patients the mean peaks were 31 and 40 cells/mm2 of blood. For 2 ADA-deficient SCID patients studied at a G-CSF dose of 5 micrograms/kg/d, the average peak was 16 cells/mm2 of blood. For both of these patient groups mobilization of CD34+ cells to PB was impaired compared with similarly treated normal subjects (P 48%. Thus, ANC is not a reliable surrogate to predict peak PB CD34+ cell counts and direct enumeration of PB CD34+ counts should be undertaken in decisions regarding timing and duration of apheresis to harvest a specific number of these cells. Finally, unexpected, but significant differences in the PB CD34+ cell mobilization between normal subjects and patients with inherited disorders can occur and underscores the

  15. Drugs elevating extracellular adenosine promote regeneration of haematopoietic progenitor cells in severely myelosuppressed mice: their comparison and joint effects with the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Znojil, V.; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterová, Lenka; Holá, Jiřina; Vácha, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 1 (2002), s. 4-11 ISSN 0902-4441 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA306/99/0027; GA AV ČR IBS5004009; GA AV ČR KSK5011112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : extracellular adenosine * dipyridamole * adenosine monophosphate Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.807, year: 2002

  16. Tocopherol succinate mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vijay S.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of a-tocopherol succinate (TS)-mobilized progenitors in mitigating the ionizing radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome in mice, We demonstrate the efficacy of a bridging-therapy which will allow the lymphohematopoietic system of severely immunocomprised victims exposed to ionizing radiation to recover from high doses of radiation. The hematopoietic progenitors in blood from TS-injected mice were analyzed by flow cytometry. CD2F1 mice were irradiated with a dose of radiation causing GI syndrome (11 Gy, cobalt-60 gamma-radiation) and then transfused intravenously (retro-orbital sinus) with whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC )from TS-injected mice 2, 24, or 48 h post-irradiation and monitored for 30-day survival, Jejunum sections were analyzed for tissue area, surviving crypts, villi, mitotic figures, basal lamina enterocytes, and apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis of mobilized cells suggested that hematopoietic progenitors were mobilized from bone marrow into the peripheral blood of TS-injected mice, infusion of whole blood or PBMC from TS-injected mice significantly improved survival of mice receiving a high dose of radiation. Histopathology and immunostaining of jejunum from irradiated and TS-mobilized PBMC-transfused mice revealed significant protection of GI tissue from radiation injury, including inhibition of apoptosis. We demonstrate that TS mobilizes progenitors into peripheral circulation and that the infusion of mobilized progenitor-containing blood or PBMC acts as a bridging therapy for immune-system recovery in mice exposed to high, potentially fatal doses of ionizing radiation. (author)

  17. Progenitors mobilized by gamma-tocotrienol as an effective radiation countermeasure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K Singh

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of gamma-tocotrienol (GT3-mobilized progenitors in mitigating damage to mice exposed to a supralethal dose of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation. CD2F1 mice were transfused 24 h post-irradiation with whole blood or isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from donors that had received GT3 72 h prior to blood collection and recipient mice were monitored for 30 days. To understand the role of GT3-induced granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF in mobilizing progenitors, donor mice were administered a neutralizing antibody specific to G-CSF or its isotype before blood collection. Bacterial translocation from gut to heart, spleen and liver of irradiated recipient mice was evaluated by bacterial culture on enriched and selective agar media. Endotoxin in serum samples also was measured. We also analyzed the colony-forming units in the spleens of irradiated mice. Our results demonstrate that whole blood or PBMC from GT3-administered mice mitigated radiation injury when administered 24 h post-irradiation. Furthermore, administration of a G-CSF antibody to GT3-injected mice abrogated the efficacy of blood or PBMC obtained from such donors. Additionally, GT3-mobilized PBMC inhibited the translocation of intestinal bacteria to the heart, spleen, and liver, and increased colony forming unit-spleen (CFU-S numbers in irradiated mice. Our data suggests that GT3 induces G-CSF, which mobilizes progenitors and these progenitors mitigate radiation injury in recipient mice. This approach using mobilized progenitor cells from GT3-injected donors could be a potential treatment for humans exposed to high doses of radiation.

  18. JAK-STAT and AKT pathway-coupled genes in erythroid progenitor cells through ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cokic Vladan P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-AKT signaling pathway regulates erythropoietin (EPO-induced survival, proliferation, and maturation of early erythroid progenitors. Erythroid cell proliferation and survival have also been related to activation of the JAK-STAT pathway. The goal of this study was to observe the function of EPO activation of JAK-STAT and PI3K/AKT pathways in the development of erythroid progenitors from hematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells, as well as to distinguish early EPO target genes in human erythroid progenitors during ontogeny. Methods Hematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells, isolated from fetal and adult hematopoietic tissues, were differentiated into erythroid progenitor cells. We have used microarray analysis to examine JAK-STAT and PI3K/AKT related genes, as well as broad gene expression modulation in these human erythroid progenitor cells. Results In microarray studies, a total of 1755 genes were expressed in fetal liver, 3844 in cord blood, 1770 in adult bone marrow, and 1325 genes in peripheral blood-derived erythroid progenitor cells. The erythroid progenitor cells shared 1011 common genes. Using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis software, we evaluated the network pathways of genes linked to hematological system development, cellular growth and proliferation. The KITLG, EPO, GATA1, PIM1 and STAT3 genes represent the major connection points in the hematological system development linked genes. Some JAK-STAT signaling pathway-linked genes were steadily upregulated throughout ontogeny (PIM1, SOCS2, MYC, PTPN11, while others were downregulated (PTPN6, PIAS, SPRED2. In addition, some JAK-STAT pathway related genes are differentially expressed only in some stages of ontogeny (STATs, GRB2, CREBB. Beside the continuously upregulated (AKT1, PPP2CA, CHUK, NFKB1 and downregulated (FOXO1, PDPK1, PIK3CG genes in the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway, we also observed intermittently

  19. Microbial contamination of hematopoietic progenitor cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdaroğlu, Sinem; Tekgündüz, Emre; Bozdağ, Sinem Civriz; Durgun, Gamze; Sarıca, Abdurrahman; Demiriz, Itır Şirinoğlu; Koçubaba, Serife; Iskender, Gülşen; Kayıkçı, Omür; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2013-06-01

    Microbial screening for contamination is a part of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) collection and infusion procedure. We aimed to find out our microbial contamination rates during collection, processing and infusion steps of HPC products. We also evaluated the clinical course of patients who received contaminated HPC products. We retrospectively analyzed microbial contamination records of HPC grafts between 2010 and 2012. HPC products of autologous donors were evaluated for contamination at three steps: at the end of mobilization, following processing with DMSO and just before stem cell infusion. Grafts of allogeneic donors were assessed only before HPC transplantation (HCT). Microbiological analysis of HPC samples were performed with an automated system (BacT/Alert®). During the study period a total of 492 mobilization procedures were performed on 329 (214 autologous and 115 allogeneic) donors. Bacterial contamination has been detected in 103 of 1630 samples (6%). Ninety-seven out of 1162 blood samples (8%) from 265 patients who were treated with HCT were contaminated. Forty-six patients (41 autologous and 5 allogeneic) were transplanted with contaminated HPC products. During HCT 42 patients experienced febrile neutropenic attack and 34 of them had positive blood culture results. In none of these 34 patients the isolated pathogens were the same organisms with those found in the final contaminated stem cell product before stem cell infusion. None of the patients who received contaminated products died because of sepsis within the posttransplant 30days. There was no significant difference between patients who received contaminated and non-contaminated products in terms of the first day of fever, duration of fever, engraftment kinetics and duration of hospitalization. Our results suggest that microbial contamination of HPC products is an issue to be prevented, although it may not have a major impact on the general success of HCT. Copyright © 2013. Published by

  20. Red supergiants as supernova progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ben

    2017-10-28

    It is now well-established from pre-explosion imaging that red supergiants (RSGs) are the direct progenitors of Type-IIP supernovae. These images have been used to infer the physical properties of the exploding stars, yielding some surprising results. In particular, the differences between the observed and predicted mass spectrum has provided a challenge to our view of stellar evolutionary theory. However, turning what is typically a small number of pre-explosion photometric points into the physical quantities of stellar luminosity and mass requires a number of assumptions about the spectral appearance of RSGs, as well as their evolution in the last few years of life. Here I will review what we know about RSGs, with a few recent updates on how they look and how their appearance changes as they approach supernova.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Differential genomic targeting of the transcription factor TAL1 in alternate haematopoietic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palii, Carmen G; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Yao, Zizhen; Cao, Yi; Dai, Fengtao; Davison, Jerry; Atkins, Harold; Allan, David; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gentleman, Robert; Tapscott, Stephen J; Brand, Marjorie

    2011-02-02

    TAL1/SCL is a master regulator of haematopoiesis whose expression promotes opposite outcomes depending on the cell type: differentiation in the erythroid lineage or oncogenesis in the T-cell lineage. Here, we used a combination of ChIP sequencing and gene expression profiling to compare the function of TAL1 in normal erythroid and leukaemic T cells. Analysis of the genome-wide binding properties of TAL1 in these two haematopoietic lineages revealed new insight into the mechanism by which transcription factors select their binding sites in alternate lineages. Our study shows limited overlap in the TAL1-binding profile between the two cell types with an unexpected preference for ETS and RUNX motifs adjacent to E-boxes in the T-cell lineage. Furthermore, we show that TAL1 interacts with RUNX1 and ETS1, and that these transcription factors are critically required for TAL1 binding to genes that modulate T-cell differentiation. Thus, our findings highlight a critical role of the cellular environment in modulating transcription factor binding, and provide insight into the mechanism by which TAL1 inhibits differentiation leading to oncogenesis in the T-cell lineage.

  2. Immunohistochemistry analysis of bone marrow biopsies in multiple sclerosis patients undergoing autologous haematopoietic stem cells transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrai, Valentina; Donnini, Irene; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Alterini, Renato; Amato, Maria Pia; Barilaro, Alessandro; Bosi, Alberto; Massacesi, Luca; Portaccio, Emilio; Repice, Anna Maria; Rotunno, Giada; Saccardi, Riccardo

    2013-07-01

    Recently autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) has been introduced for the treatment of severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). As little data are available on bone marrow (BM) of MS patients undergoing AHSCT, we investigated the morphological and phenotypic characteristics of MS BM. BM biopsies of 14 MS patients screened for AHSCT and 10 control patients were evaluated to assess cellularity, morphology, immunological profile and bone marrow microenvironment. Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD68, CD45, MMP-9. 8 out of 14 MS (57%) patients showed a reduction of age-related bone marrow cellularity, possibly due to previous immunosuppressive therapies. There were no differences in the T CD3+ lymphocyte expression rate amongst MS and the control patients, the CD4/CD8 ratio (2:1) was maintained as was the rate of B lymphocytes. We found an increased, although not significant, MMP-9 expression (9.2%) in the bone marrow of MS patients, when compared to the control patients (6.3%). The BM of MS patients showed a reduced cellularity and CD45+ cells content in comparison to the controls. A slightly increased expression of MMP-9 was also shown, possibly confirming an involvement of this compartment in the pathogenesis of the disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Varicella zoster virus encephalomyelitis as a late complication following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, Lokesh

    2014-12-19

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes the primary infection manifesting as varicella or chickenpox, with possibility of reactivation later in life. A 71-year-old man presented with headache and lower extremity weakness. There was no evidence of skin lesions to suggest a recent zoster infection. The patient had a history of multiple myeloma diagnosed 2 years earlier, treated with chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. Antimicrobial prophylaxis was discontinued 12 months after the transplant. MRI of the brain demonstrated areas of T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensity in bilateral cerebral white matter and MRI of the spine demonstrated enhancement along the cauda equine. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed lymphocytic pleocytosis and VZV DNA was detected by PCR in the CSF. The patient was treated with 8 weeks of antiviral therapy with complete resolution of symptoms. VZV should be considered in patients with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation presenting with similar neurological manifestations even in the absence of dermatological signs. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Increased circulating progenitor cells in Alzheimer's disease patients with moderate to severe dementia: evidence for vascular repair and tissue regeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellos, Konstantinos; Panagiota, Victoria; Sachsenmaier, Saskia; Trunk, Theresia; Straten, Guido; Leyhe, Thomas; Seizer, Peter; Geisler, Tobias; Gawaz, Meinrad; Laske, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular dysfunction is a common finding in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may contribute to cognitive decline. Abundant evidence suggests that vascular and neuronal repair mechanisms are mediated by circulating progenitor cells in vivo. Whether CD34+ and, specifically, CD34+/CD133+ progenitor cells are involved in the pathophysiology of AD is poorly understood so far. In the present study, peripheral blood concentrations of circulating CD34+/CD133+ and CD34+ progenitor cells were measured in 45 AD patients and in 30 healthy elderly controls by flow cytometry. The severity of dementia was assessed by Mini-Mental Status Examination and Clinical Dementia Rating scale. AD patients were stratified into two groups showing mild (n=17) and moderate to severe (n= 28) dementia. In the present study, AD patients with moderate to severe dementia, but not those with mild dementia, showed significantly increased circulating CD34+/CD133+ and CD34+ progenitor cells compared to healthy elderly controls independent of cardiovascular risk factors and medication. In addition, the number of circulating CD34+/CD133+ progenitor cells in AD patients was significantly inversely correlated with cognitive function, age, and plasma levels of SDF-1, the most potent chemokine for progenitor cells. Our findings suggest a stage-dependent upregulation of circulating CD34+/CD133+ and CD34+ progenitor cells in AD patients, which could take part in tissue healing processes of the brain in AD.

  5. Characterization of a resident population of adventitial macrophage progenitor cells in postnatal vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Puranik, Amrutesh S; Spoon, Daniel B; Chue, Colin D; Hoffman, Scott J; Witt, Tyra A; Delacroix, Sinny; Kleppe, Laurel S; Mueske, Cheryl S; Pan, Shuchong; Gulati, Rajiv; Simari, Robert D

    2014-07-18

    Macrophages regulate blood vessel structure and function in health and disease. The origins of tissue macrophages are diverse, with evidence for local production and circulatory renewal. We identified a vascular adventitial population containing macrophage progenitor cells and investigated their origins and fate. Single-cell disaggregates from adult C57BL/6 mice were prepared from different tissues and tested for their capacity to form hematopoietic colony-forming units. Aorta showed a unique predilection for generating macrophage colony-forming units. Aortic macrophage colony-forming unit progenitors coexpressed stem cell antigen-1 and CD45 and were adventitially located, where they were the predominant source of proliferating cells in the aortic wall. Aortic Sca-1(+)CD45(+) cells were transcriptionally and phenotypically distinct from neighboring cells lacking stem cell antigen-1 or CD45 and contained a proliferative (Ki67(+)) Lin(-)c-Kit(+)CD135(-)CD115(+)CX3CR1(+)Ly6C(+)CD11b(-) subpopulation, consistent with the immunophenotypic profile of macrophage progenitors. Adoptive transfer studies revealed that Sca-1(+)CD45(+) adventitial macrophage progenitor cells were not replenished via the circulation from bone marrow or spleen, nor was their prevalence diminished by depletion of monocytes or macrophages by liposomal clodronate treatment or genetic deficiency of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Rather adventitial macrophage progenitor cells were upregulated in hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) and LDL-R(-/-) mice, with adventitial transfer experiments demonstrating their durable contribution to macrophage progeny particularly in the adventitia, and to a lesser extent the atheroma, of atherosclerotic carotid arteries. The discovery and characterization of resident vascular adventitial macrophage progenitor cells provides new insight into adventitial biology and its participation in atherosclerosis and provokes consideration of the broader existence of local macrophage

  6. Associations between levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 and sinusoidal obstruction syndrome after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischendorff, Sarah; Kielsen, Katrine; Sengeløv, H

    2017-01-01

    Allogeneic myeloablative haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is challenged by severe adverse events, as cytotoxic effects of the conditioning may result in systemic inflammation, leaky epithelial barriers and organ toxicities, contributing to treatment-related morbidity and mortality...... SDS decrease in IGF-1 (95% CI: 1.45-16.67), P=0.011 and OR=5.00 (1.37-20.00), P=0.015, respectively). Furthermore, low pre-transplant levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were associated with increased fluid retention during the first 21 days post transplant (OR=7.69 (95% CI: 1.59-33.33), P=0.012, and OR=2...

  7. A non-fatal case of invasive zygomycete (Lichtheimia corymbifera) infection in an allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickhardt, Steffen; Braendstrup, Peter; Clasen-Linde, Erik; Jensen, Karl E; Alhede, Morten; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Høiby, Niels; Vindeløv, Lars; Moser, Claus

    2013-05-01

    Post-transplant infections in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients often have severe consequences. This is especially the case when dealing with zygomycete infections where the result is often fatal. A major problem when dealing with zygomycete infections is the need for an accurate and fast diagnosis as the phylum is highly resistant towards the conventional antifungals. We herein describe a non-fatal case of Lichtheimia corymbifera infection in an allo-HCT recipient. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  8. Caphosol for prevention of oral mucositis in pediatric myeloablative haematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, Nathaniel; Nieder, Michael; Baggott, Christina; Olson, Ellen; Chen, Lu; Dang, Ha; Krailo, Mark; August, Amanda; Sung, Lillian

    2017-01-03

    The primary objective was to determine whether topically administered Caphosol, rinsed orally four times daily at the initiation of conditioning, reduces the duration of severe oral mucositis (OM) compared with placebo among children and adolescents undergoing haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This was a Children's Oncology Group multicentre randomised double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial. Patients between the ages of 4 and 21 years who were scheduled to undergo myeloablative HCT for any indication were randomised to Caphosol or placebo saline rinses four times daily from initiation of conditioning through day +20. Subjects were assessed daily for OM using the World Health Organisation (WHO) Oral Toxicity Scale, Mouth Pain Categorical Scale (0-10) and the Oral Mucositis Daily Questionnaire (OMDQ). The primary end point was duration of severe OM (WHO ⩾3). The study enrolled 220 participants with a median age of 13.7 years (range 4.0-21.9); 163 (74%) received allogeneic HCT. The mean (±s.d.) duration of severe OM was not reduced among Caphosol (4.5±5.0 days) vs placebo (4.5±4.8; P=0.99) recipients. The incidence of severe OM in the Caphosol and placebo arms was 63% (57 out of 91) and 68% (62 out of 91), respectively (P=0.44). There were no significant differences in any of the secondary end points between the groups. Caphosol did not reduce severe OM when compared with placebo among children and adolescents undergoing myeloablative HCT. Studies to identify effective interventions for OM are needed in this population.

  9. SEVERE (GRADE III-IV ACUTE GRAFT VERSUS HOST DISEASE AFTER ALLOGENEIC HAEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Preložnik-Zupan

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Beside greater susceptibility to infections, acute graft host disease is a consequence of the activation of donor T-cells against host antigens. Most common target organs are skin, liver and intestinal mucosis.Methods. In the 6-year period between January 1995 and December 2000, 49 patients were treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT in Transplant unit, Department of Hematology, Clinical Centre Ljubljana. The standard GVHD prophylaxis regimen consisted of cyclosporine and short-course methotrexate. Severe, grade III-IV aGVHD with skin and/or gastrointestinal and/or liver involvement appeared in 16 (32% of the 49 patients.Results. Among the 16 patients with severe aGVHD, 14 had liver involvement, ten gastrointestinal and eight skin involvement. One patient had skin involvement only, the rest of them had combined involvement of two or three organ systems. Routine first-line treatment for aGVHD, given to all 16 pts with severe forms of the disease, was methylprednisolone (MP 2mg/ kg. Six patients with predominant skin involvement responded to MP. Other ten patients with mainly liver and gastrointestinal involvement needed second or even third line aGVHD treatment. These were anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG and/or monoclonal antibodies (OKT3 and/or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF and/or FK506 (tacrolimus. Seven patients died of advanced aGVHD and treatment related infection.Conclusions. Based on our experiences, we conclude that in critically ill patients with severe aGVHD, neutropenia and high risk for opportunistic infection, each day of ineffective MP therapy may have fatal consequences. Simultaneous institution of a combination of corticosteroids and a second-line drug might prove more appropriate for patients with a severe form of aGVHD.

  10. [Nosocomial infection in patients receiving a solid organ transplant or haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Camacho, Asunción; Ruiz Camps, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the most common infections in solid organ transplant recipients. These infections occur mainly in the first month after transplantation and are hospital-acquired. Nosocomial infections cause significant morbidity and are the most common cause of mortality in this early period of transplantation. These infections are caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, mainly Gram-negative enterobacteria, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, enterococci, and staphylococci. The patients at risk of developing nosocomial bacterial infections are those previously colonized with MDR bacteria while on the transplant waiting list. Intravascular catheters, the urinary tract, the lungs, and surgical wounds are the most frequent sources of infection. Preventive measures are the same as those applied in non-immunocompromised, hospitalized patients except in patients at high risk for developing fungal infection. These patients need antifungal therapy during their hospitalization, and for preventing some bacterial infections in the early transplant period, patients need vaccinations on the waiting list according to the current recommendations. Although morbidity and mortality related to infectious diseases have decreased during the last few years in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, they are still one of the most important complications in this population. Furthermore, as occurs in the general population, the incidence of nosocomial infections has increased during the different phases of transplantation. It is difficult to establish general preventive measures in these patients, as there are many risk factors conditioning these infections. Firstly, they undergo multiple antibiotic treatments and interventions; secondly, there is a wide variability in the degree of neutropenia and immunosuppression among patients, and finally they combine hospital and home stay during the transplant process. However, some simple measures could be

  11. Genetic and haematopoietic effects of long-term tritiated water ingestion in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of large amounts of tritiated water (HTO) from reactors on the environment is evaluated. Randomly bred mice of the Hale-Stoner-Brookhaven strain have been maintained on HTO (3 μCi/mlitre) for extended periods. First-generation animals on HTO from four weeks of age have been evaluated for changes in growth pattern, and second-generation animals (also on HTO) for breeding efficiency, dominant lethal mutation rate and bone-marrow integrity. A total of 18831 embryos were examined. Statistical analysis of these results using either Student's ''t'' test or Kruskal and Wallis rank test indicates that there was a significant (p<0.01) reduction in viable embryos and an increase in early deaths in matings involving animals drinking HTO. Beginning at eight weeks of age and monthly thereafter, the haematopoietic stem cell content of the bone marrow was determined using the exogenous spleen colony technique. Although the total cellularity of the bone marrow remains comparable in the control and treated groups, the total number of stem cells (CFU) was reduced beginning after approximately 12-20 weeks on the tritium regime. These findings indicate a reduction in the total number of pluripotent stem cells in the marrow together with the ability of this reduced number of cells to maintain normal levels of total cellularity in the bone marrow. Thus, continuous ingestion of HTO at a concentration of 3 μCi/mlitre by mice results in: (1) Reduction in number of viable embryos present in the female at late pregnancy from matings when either the female or both parents have been on HTO; (2) Increase in number of early post-implantation deaths when both parents are on HTO; (3) Reduction in bone-marrow stem cell content after 12 weeks or longer on HTO; (4) No apparent effect on breeding efficiency (percentage of females pregnant) or body weight. These results are discussed in relation to the accumulated radiation dose

  12. NK cells and other innate lymphoid cells in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eVacca

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells play a major role in the T-cell depleted haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT to cure high-risk leukemias. NK cells belong to the expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILC. At variance with NK cells, the other ILC populations (ILC1/2/3 are non-cytolytic, while they secrete different patterns of cytokines. ILC provide host defences against viruses, bacteria and parasites, drive lymphoid organogenesis, and contribute to tissue remodelling. In haplo-HSCT patients, the extensive T-cell depletion is required to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD but increases risks of developing a wide range of life-threatening infections. However, these patients may rely on innate defences that are reconstituted more rapidly than the adaptive ones. In this context, ILC may represent important players in the early phases following transplantation. They may contribute to tissue homeostasis/remodelling and lymphoid tissue reconstitution. While the reconstitution of NK cell repertoire and its role in haplo-HSCT have been largely investigated, little information is available on ILC. Of note, CD34+ cells isolated from different sources of HSC, may differentiate in vitro towards various ILC subsets. Moreover, cytokines released from leukemia blasts (e.g. IL-1β may alter the proportions of NK cells and ILC3, suggesting the possibility that leukemia may skew the ILC repertoire. Further studies are required to define the timing of ILC development and their potential protective role after HSCT.

  13. Real time imaging of human progenitor neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Keenan

    Full Text Available Human neural progenitors are increasingly being employed in drug screens and emerging cell therapies targeted towards neurological disorders where neurogenesis is thought to play a key role including developmental disorders, Alzheimer's disease, and depression. Key to the success of these applications is understanding the mechanisms by which neurons arise. Our understanding of development can provide some guidance but since little is known about the specifics of human neural development and the requirement that cultures be expanded in vitro prior to use, it is unclear whether neural progenitors obey the same developmental mechanisms that exist in vivo. In previous studies we have shown that progenitors derived from fetal cortex can be cultured for many weeks in vitro as undifferentiated neurospheres and then induced to undergo neurogenesis by removing mitogens and exposing them to supportive substrates. Here we use live time lapse imaging and immunocytochemical analysis to show that neural progenitors use developmental mechanisms to generate neurons. Cells with morphologies and marker profiles consistent with radial glia and recently described outer radial glia divide asymmetrically and symmetrically to generate multipolar intermediate progenitors, a portion of which express ASCL1. These multipolar intermediate progenitors subsequently divide symmetrically to produce CTIP2(+ neurons. This 3-cell neurogenic scheme echoes observations in rodents in vivo and in human fetal slice cultures in vitro, providing evidence that hNPCs represent a renewable and robust in vitro assay system to explore mechanisms of human neurogenesis without the continual need for fresh primary human fetal tissue. Knowledge provided by this and future explorations of human neural progenitor neurogenesis will help maximize the safety and efficacy of new stem cell therapies by providing an understanding of how to generate physiologically-relevant cell types that maintain their

  14. RUNX1 regulates the CD34 gene in haematopoietic stem cells by mediating interactions with a distal regulatory element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levantini, Elena; Lee, Sanghoon; Radomska, Hanna S; Hetherington, Christopher J; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Amabile, Giovanni; Zhang, Pu; Gonzalez, David A; Zhang, Junyan; Basseres, Daniela S; Wilson, Nicola K; Koschmieder, Steffen; Huang, Gang; Zhang, Dong-Er; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Bonifer, Constanze; Okuno, Yutaka; Gottgens, Bertie; Tenen, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor RUNX1 is essential to establish the haematopoietic gene expression programme; however, the mechanism of how it activates transcription of haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) genes is still elusive. Here, we obtained novel insights into RUNX1 function by studying regulation of the human CD34 gene, which is expressed in HSCs. Using transgenic mice carrying human CD34 PAC constructs, we identified a novel downstream regulatory element (DRE), which is bound by RUNX1 and is necessary for human CD34 expression in long-term (LT)-HSCs. Conditional deletion of Runx1 in mice harbouring human CD34 promoter–DRE constructs abrogates human CD34 expression. We demonstrate by chromosome conformation capture assays in LT-HSCs that the DRE physically interacts with the human CD34 promoter. Targeted mutagenesis of RUNX binding sites leads to perturbation of this interaction and decreased human CD34 expression in LT-HSCs. Overall, our in vivo data provide novel evidence about the role of RUNX1 in mediating interactions between distal and proximal elements of the HSC gene CD34. PMID:21873977

  15. Prevalence and development of orthopaedic symptoms in the dutch hurler patient population after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, F J; Kruyt, M C; van der Linden, M H; Sakkers, R J B; van Hasselt, P M; Castelein, R M C

    2013-01-01

    Hurler syndrome (MPS-IH) is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. Besides a variety of other features, Hurler syndrome is characterized by a range of skeletal abnormalities known as dysostosis multiplex. Despite the successful effect of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation on the other features, dysostosis remains a disabling symptom of the disease. This study analyzed the status and development of the orthopaedic manifestations of 14 Dutch Hurler patients after stem cell transplantation.Data were obtained retrospectively by reviewing patients' charts, radiographs and MRIs. Existing methods to measure the deficiencies were modified to optimally address the dysostosis. These measurements were done by two of the authors independently. The odontoïd/body ratio, kyphotic angle, scoliotic angle and parameters for hip dysplasia and genu valgum were measured and plotted against age. The degree of progression was determined. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to determine the reliability of the measurements.All patients showed hypoplasia of the odontoïd, which significantly improved during growth. Kyphosis in the thoracolumbar area was present in 13 patients and proved to be progressive. Scoliosis was observed in eight patients. Hip dysplasia was present in all patients and showed no tendency of improvement. In all but one patient, knee valgus remained more than two standard deviations above normal.Dysostosis remains a major problem after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Hurler patients. Moreover, except for dens hypoplasia, it appears to be progressive and therefore surgical interventions may be necessary in the majority of these patients.

  16. A human postnatal lymphoid progenitor capable of circulating and seeding the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, Emmanuelle M; Bonhomme, Delphine; Monteiro, Marta; Beldjord, Kheira; Jurkowska, Monika; Cordier-Garcia, Corinne; Garrigue, Alexandrine; Dal Cortivo, Liliane; Rocha, Benedita; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; André-Schmutz, Isabelle

    2007-12-24

    Identification of a thymus-seeding progenitor originating from human bone marrow (BM) constitutes a key milestone in understanding the mechanisms of T cell development and provides new potential for correcting T cell deficiencies. We report the characterization of a novel lymphoid-restricted subset, which is part of the lineage-negative CD34(+)CD10(+) progenitor population and which is distinct from B cell-committed precursors (in view of the absence of CD24 expression). We demonstrate that these Lin(-)CD34(+)CD10(+)CD24(-) progenitors have a very low myeloid potential but can generate B, T, and natural killer lymphocytes and coexpress recombination activating gene 1, terminal deoxynucleotide transferase, PAX5, interleukin 7 receptor alpha, and CD3epsilon. These progenitors are present in the cord blood and in the BM but can also be found in the blood throughout life. Moreover, they belong to the most immature thymocyte population. Collectively, these findings unravel the existence of a postnatal lymphoid-polarized population that is capable of migrating from the BM to the thymus.

  17. Heterogeneity of limbal basal epithelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Yasutaka; Li, Wei; Chen, Ying-Ting; He, Hua; Chen, Szu-yu; Kheirkah, Ahmad; Zhu, Ying-Tien; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2010-11-01

    Although corneal epithelial stem cells (SCs) are located at the limbus between the cornea and the conjunctiva, not all limbal basal epithelial cells are SCs. Using 2 dispase digestions to remove different amounts of limbal basal epithelial cells for cross-sections, flat mounts, and cytospin preparations, double immunostaining to pancytokeratins (PCK) and vimentin (Vim) identified 3 p63+ epithelial progenitors such as PCK-/Vim+, PCK/Vim, and PCK-/Vim+ and 1 p63+ mesenchymal cell, PCK-/Vim+. PCK-/Vim- progenitors had the smallest cell size were 10-20 times more enriched on collagen I-coated dishes in the 5-minute rapid adherent fraction that contained the highest percentage of p63+ cells but the lowest percentage of cytokeratin12+ cells, and gave rise to high Ki67 labeling and vivid clonal growth. In contrast, PCK+/Vim+ and PCK+/Vim- progenitors were found more in the slow-adherent fraction and yielded poor clonal growth. PCK/Vim progenitors and clusters of PCK-/Vim+ mesenchymal cells, which were neither melanocytes nor Langerhans cells, were located in the limbal basal region. Therefore, differential expression of PCK and Vim helps identify small PCK-/Vim- cells as the most likely candidate for SCs among a hierarchy of heterogeneous limbal basal progenitors, and their close association with PCK-/Vim+ presumed "niche" cells.

  18. Economic evaluation of targeted treatments of invasive aspergillosis in adult haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients in the Netherlands: a modelling approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, A.J.; Hubben, M.W.; Verweij, P.E.; Groot, R. de; Warris, A.; Donnelly, J.P.; Wout, J. van 't; Severens, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of a targeted treatment model of antifungal treatment strategies for adult haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients in the Netherlands from a hospital perspective, using a decision analytic modelling approach.

  19. Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) polymorphism in Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) : The effect of KIR gene and genotype polymorphism on clinical outcome after HSCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) often is a final treatment option for patients suffering from haematological malignancies and metabolic disorders. When HSCT is applied to treat leukaemia, relapse of the disease is a recurrent complication. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) with T cells

  20. Bioengineered fibrin-based niche to direct outgrowth of circulating progenitors into neuron-like cells for potential use in cellular therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara, S.; Krishnan, Lissy K.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Autologous cells are considered to be the best choice for use in transplantation therapy. However, the challenges and risks associated with the harvest of transplantable autologous cells limit their successful therapeutic application. The current study explores the possibility of isolating neural progenitor cells from circulating multipotent adult progenitor cells for potential use in cell-based and patient-specific therapy for neurological diseases. Approach. To enable the selection of neural progenitor cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and to support their lineage maintenance, the composition of a fibrin-based niche was optimized. Morphological examination and specific marker analysis were carried out, employing a qualitative/quantitative polymerase chain reaction followed by immunocytochemistry to: (i) characterize neural progenitor cells in culture; (ii) monitor proliferation/survival; and (iii) track their differentiation status. Main results. The presence of neural progenitors in circulation was confirmed by the presence of nestin+ cells at the commencement of the culture. The isolation, proliferation and differentiation of circulating neural progenitors to neuron-like cells were directed by the engineered niche. Neural cell isolation to near homogeneity was confirmed by the expression of β-III tubulin in ∼95% of cells, whereas microtubule associated protein-2 expression confirmed their ability to differentiate. The concentration of potassium chloride in the niche was found to favour neuron-like cell lengthening, cell-cell contact, and expressions of synaptophysin and tyrosine hydroxylase. Significance. The purpose of this research was to find out if peripheral blood could serve as a potential source of neural progenitors for cell based therapy. The study established that neural progenitors could be selectively isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells using a biomimetic niche. The selected cells could multiply and

  1. Comparative study of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells between sexes in mice under physiological conditions along time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasco, Samanta; Rando, Amaya; Zaragoza, Pilar; García-Redondo, Alberto; Calvo, Ana Cristina; Osta, Rosario

    2017-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are attractive targets in regenerative medicine, although the differences in their homeostatic maintenance between sexes along time are still under debate. We accurately monitored hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs), and common myeloid progenitors (CMPs) frequencies by flow cytometry, by performing serial peripheral blood extractions from male and female B6SJL wild-type mice and found no significant differences. Only modest differences were found in the gene expression profile of Slamf1 and Gata2. Our findings suggest that both sexes could be used indistinctly to perform descriptive studies in the murine hematopoietic system, especially for flow cytometry studies in peripheral blood. This would allow diminishing the number of animals needed for the experimental procedures. In addition, the use of serial extractions in the same animals drastically decreases the number of animals needed. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  2. Fractalkine expression induces endothelial progenitor cell lysis by natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilyana Todorova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circulating CD34(+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that CD34(+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34(+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34(+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34(+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34(+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. CONCLUSIONS: Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34(+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients.

  3. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea and endothelial progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Qing Wang,1,* Qi Wu,2,* Jing Feng,3,4 Xin Sun5 1The Second Respiratory Department of the First People's Hospital of Kunming, Yunnan, People's Republic of China; 2Tianjin Haihe Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 3Respiratory Department of Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 5Respiratory Department of Tianjin Haihe Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA occurs in 4% of middle-aged men and 2% of middle-aged women in the general population, and the prevalence is even higher in specific patient groups. OSA is an independent risk factor for a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial injury could be the pivotal determinant in the development of cardiovascular pathology in OSA. Endothelial damage ultimately represents a dynamic balance between the magnitude of injury and the capacity for repair. Bone marrow–derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs within adult peripheral blood present a possible means of vascular maintenance that could home to sites of injury and restore endothelial integrity and normal function. Methods: We summarized pathogenetic mechanisms of OSA and searched for available studies on numbers and functions of EPCs in patients with OSA to explore the potential links between the numbers and functions of EPCs and OSA. In particular, we tried to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the effects of OSA on EPCs. Conclusion: Intermittent hypoxia cycles and sleep fragmentation are major pathophysiologic characters of OSA. Intermittent hypoxia acts as a trigger of oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and sympathetic activation. Sleep fragmentation is associated with a burst of sympathetic activation and systemic inflammation. In most studies, a reduction in circulating EPCs has

  5. Biology and clinical utilization of mesenchymal progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Minguell

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the complex cellular arrangement found in the bone marrow stroma there exists a subset of nonhematopoietic cells referred to as mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC. These cells can be expanded ex vivo and induced, either in vitro or in vivo, to terminally differentiate into at least seven types of cells: osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, tenocytes, myotubes, astrocytes and hematopoietic-supporting stroma. This broad multipotentiality, the feasibility to obtain MPC from bone marrow, cord and peripheral blood and their transplantability support the impact that the use of MPC will have in clinical settings. However, a number of fundamental questions about the cellular and molecular biology of MPC still need to be resolved before these cells can be used for safe and effective cell and gene therapies intended to replace, repair or enhance the physiological function of the mesenchymal and/or hematopoietic systems.

  6. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of T progenitors: from biology to clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genescà, Eulàlia; Ribera, Jordi; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2015-03-09

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children and the main cause of morbidity among childhood blood disorders. There are 2 subtypes according to the affected lymphoid progenitor: B-ALL and T-ALL. The T-ALL is the less common and, although historically was associated with poor prognosis in both adults and children, at present, treatment outcomes do not differ significantly between the 2 types of ALL. The T-ALL subtype is the most complex and heterogeneous at the genetic level and currently the one with less new therapeutic alternatives available. This trend is changing thanks to the remarkable progress upon understanding its biology. This review summarizes the most recent and important biological findings in T-ALL and their possible therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. RHEX, a novel regulator of human erythroid progenitor cell expansion and erythroblast development

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Rakesh; Su, Su; McCrann, Donald J.; Green, Jennifer M.; Leu, Karen; Young, Peter R.; Schatz, Peter J.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Wojchowski, Don M.

    2014-01-01

    Ligation of erythropoietin (EPO) receptor (EPOR) JAK2 kinase complexes propagates signals within erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) that are essential for red blood cell production. To reveal hypothesized novel EPOR/JAK2 targets, a phosphotyrosine (PY) phosphoproteomics approach was applied. Beyond known signal transduction factors, 32 new targets of EPO-modulated tyrosine phosphorylation were defined. Molecular adaptors comprised one major set including growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 ...

  8. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-04-24

    Apr 24, 2009 ... Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in ...

  9. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    exploring alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for cell based therapy in diabetes. Since in vitro culture of islet β-cells demonstrates loss in insulin (Beattie et al. 1999), several attempts have been made to identify stem / progenitor cells capable of differentiation into insulin-producing cells. Embryonic stem cells, which ...

  10. Cataclysmic Variables as Supernova Ia Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Kafka

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the identification of the progenitors of type Ia supernovae (SNeIa remains controversial, it is generally accepted that they originate from binary star systems in which at least one component is a carbon-oxygen white dwarf (WD; those systems are grouped under the wide umbrella of cataclysmic variables. Current theories for SNeIa progenitors hold that, either via Roche lobe overflow of the companion or via a wind, the WD accumulates hydrogen or helium rich material which is then burned to C and O onto the WD’s surface. However, the specifics of this scenario are far from being understood or defined, allowing for a wealth of theories fighting for attention and a dearth of observations to support them. I discuss the latest attempts to identify and study those controversial SNeIa progenitors. I also introduce the most promising progenitor in hand and I present observational diagnostics that can reveal more members of the category.

  11. Estradiol-induced, endothelial progenitor cell-mediated neovascularization in male mice with hind-limb ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruifrok, Willem-Peter T.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Iwakura, Atsushi; Silver, Marcy; Kusano, Kengo; Tio, Rene A.; Losordo, Douglas W.

    We investigated whether administration of estradiol to male mice augments mobilization of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) and incorporation into foci of neovascularization after hind-limb ischemia, thereby contributing to blood flow restoration. Mice were randomized and

  12. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington Seattle, Box 351580, WA 98195 (United States); Murphy, Jeremiah W. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: zachjenn@uw.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  13. Functional Definition of Progenitors Versus Mature Endothelial Cells Reveals Key SoxF-Dependent Differentiation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jatin; Seppanen, Elke J; Rodero, Mathieu P; Wong, Ho Yi; Donovan, Prudence; Neufeld, Zoltan; Fisk, Nicholas M; Francois, Mathias; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2017-02-21

    During adult life, blood vessel formation is thought to occur via angiogenic processes involving branching from existing vessels. An alternate proposal suggests that neovessels form from endothelial progenitors able to assemble the intimal layers. We here aimed to define vessel-resident endothelial progenitors in vivo in a variety of tissues in physiological and pathological situations such as normal aorta, lungs, and wound healing, tumors, and placenta, as well. Based on protein expression levels of common endothelial markers using flow cytometry, 3 subpopulations of endothelial cells could be identified among VE-Cadherin+ and CD45- cells. Lineage tracing by using Cdh5cre ERt2 /Rosa-YFP reporter strategy demonstrated that the CD31-/loVEGFR2lo/intracellular endothelial population was indeed an endovascular progenitor (EVP) of an intermediate CD31intVEGFR2lo/intracellular transit amplifying (TA) and a definitive differentiated (D) CD31hiVEGFR2hi/extracellular population. EVP cells arose from vascular-resident beds that could not be transferred by bone marrow transplantation. Furthermore, EVP displayed progenitor-like status with a high proportion of cells in a quiescent cell cycle phase as assessed in wounds, tumors, and aorta. Only EVP cells and not TA and D cells had self-renewal capacity as demonstrated by colony-forming capacity in limiting dilution and by transplantation in Matrigel plugs in recipient mice. RNA sequencing revealed prominent gene expression differences between EVP and D cells. In particular, EVP cells highly expressed genes related to progenitor function including Sox9 , Il33 , Egfr , and Pdfgrα. Conversely, D cells highly expressed genes related to differentiated endothelium including Ets1&2 , Gata2 , Cd31 , Vwf , and Notch . The RNA sequencing also pointed to an essential role of the Sox18 transcription factor. The role of SOX18 in the differentiation process was validated by using lineage-tracing experiments based on S ox18Cre ERt2 /Rosa

  14. Experimental infection with epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum and European perch (Perca fluviatilis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borzym Ewa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the determination of the susceptibility of Polish farmed redfin perch (Perca fluviatilis L. and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum to experimental infection with haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV. A bath challenge model was tested at two temperature ranges: 13-15°C and 20-22°C. After 7 d, the first clinical signs and mortality were observed in fish kept at these temperatures. Significantly more mortality cases were reported in the redfin perch population, reaching a maximum of 24% compared with 12% in the rainbow trout group at 20-22°C. EHNV was reisolated from redfin perch and rainbow trout tissue in cell culture and the infection was confirmed by a molecular method and histopathology during the duration of the experiment. This study revealed that fish from Polish farms can be susceptible to EHNV even at lower temperatures.

  15. Finding the Progenitors to Today's Fossil Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lucas Edward; Irwin, Jimmy; White, Raymond; Wong, Ka-Wah; Maksym, Walter Peter; Dupke, Renato; Miller, Eric; Carrasco, Eleazar

    2018-01-01

    Fossil galaxy systems are classically thought to be the end result of galaxy group and cluster evolution, as galaxies experiencing dynamical friction sink to the center of the group potential and merge into a single, giant elliptical that dominates the rest of the members in both mass and luminosity. Most fossil systems discovered lie within z fossil progenitors are expected to be systems with imminent or ongoing major merging near the brightest group galaxy (BGG) that, when concluded, will meet the fossil criteria within the look back time. Since strong gravitational lensing preferentially selects groups merging along the line of sight, or systems with a high mass concentration like fossil systems, we searched the CASSOWARY survey of strong lensing events with the goal of determining if lensing systems have any predisposition to being fossil systems or progenitors. We present an analysis of 53 systems from the CASSOWARY catalog of strong lenses with redshifts ranging from 0.1 fossils while only 3% of non-lensing control groups are. We also find that 23% of the lensing groups are traditional fossil progenitors compared to 17% for the control sample. This suggests that searching for groups that exhibit strong gravitational lensing may be a more efficient way of finding fossil and pre-fossil systems. Cumulative galaxy luminosity functions of the lensing and non-lensing groups also indicate there may be, on average, a fundamental difference between the initial conditions of strong lensing and non-lensing systems for fossils, fossil progenitors, and even normal galaxy systems. This could point to not fossils but lensing systems as possibly having different initial group conditions than non-lensing systems. Future work will involve studying recently obtained Chandra and HST snapshots of eight previously unobserved fossil progenitors in the CASSOWARY catalog to see how the hot gas evolves as a function of time until fossil BGG formation.

  16. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  17. Long-term outcomes of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adult cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Jörn-Sven; Suarez, Felipe; Gillett, Godfrey T; Hemmati, Philipp G; Snowden, John A; Stadler, Michael; Vuong, Giang L; Aubourg, Patrick; Köhler, Wolfgang; Arnold, Renate

    2017-04-01

    The adult cerebral inflammatory form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease, as devastating as childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been demonstrated to provide long-term neurological benefits for boys with the childhood cerebral form, but results in adults are sparse and inconclusive. We analysed data from 14 adult males with adult cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation on a compassionate basis in four European centres. All presented with cerebral demyelinating lesions and gadolinium enhancement. Median age at diagnosis of adult cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy was 33 years (range 21-48 years). In addition to cerebral inflammation, five patients had established severe motor disability from adrenomyeloneuropathy affecting only the spinal cord and peripheral nerves (Expanded Disability Status Scale score ≥ 6). Eight patients survived (estimated survival 57 ± 13%) with a median follow-up of 65 months (minimum 38 months). Death was directly transplant-/infection-related (n = 3), due to primary disease progression in advanced adult cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (n = 1), or secondary disease progression (n = 2) after transient multi-organ failure or non-engraftment. Specific complications during stem cell transplantation included deterioration of motor and bladder functions (n = 12) as well as behavioural changes (n = 8). Arrest of progressive cerebral demyelination and prevention of severe loss of neurocognition was achieved in all eight survivors, but deterioration of motor function occurred in the majority (n = 5). Limited motor dysfunction (Expanded Disability Status Scale score stem cell transplantation in adult cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Further studies are warranted to attempt to improve outcomes through patient selection and optimization of transplantation protocols. © The Author (2017). Published

  18. CXCR4-Related Increase of Circulating Human Lymphoid Progenitors after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauzy, Salomé; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Larghero, Jérôme; Ezine, Sophie; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Moins-Teisserenc, Hélène; Servais, Sophie; Robin, Marie; Socié, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Immune recovery after profound lymphopenia is a major challenge in many clinical situations, such as allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Recovery depends, in a first step, on hematopoietic lymphoid progenitors production in the bone marrow (BM). In this study, we characterized CD34+Lin−CD10+ lymphoid progenitors in the peripheral blood of allo-HSCT patients. Our data demonstrate a strong recovery of this population 3 months after transplantation. This rebound was abolished in patients who developed acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). A similar recovery profile was found for both CD24+ and CD24− progenitor subpopulations. CD34+lin−CD10+CD24− lymphoid progenitors sorted from allo-HSCT patients preserved their T cell potentiel according to in vitro T-cell differentiation assay and the expression profile of 22 genes involved in T-cell differentiation and homing. CD34+lin−CD10+CD24− cells from patients without aGVHD had reduced CXCR4 gene expression, consistent with an enhanced egress from the BM. CCR7 gene expression was reduced in patients after allo-HSCT, as were its ligands CCL21 and CCL19. This reduction was particularly marked in patients with aGVHD, suggesting a possible impact on thymic homing. Thus, the data presented here identify this population as an important early step in T cell reconstitution in humans and so, an important target when seeking to enhance immune reconstitution. PMID:24621606

  19. PTEN Signaling in the Postnatal Perivascular Progenitor Niche Drives Medulloblastoma Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo; Rankin, Sherri L; Larson, Jon D; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chow, Lionel M L; Qu, Chunxu; Zhang, Jinghui; Ellison, David W; Baker, Suzanne J

    2017-01-01

    Loss of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN exerts diverse outcomes on cancer in different developmental contexts. To gain insight into the effect of its loss on outcomes in the brain, we conditionally inactivated the murine Pten gene in neonatal neural stem/progenitor cells. Pten inactivation created an abnormal perivascular proliferative niche in the cerebellum that persisted in adult animals but did not progress to malignancy. Proliferating cells showed undifferentiated morphology and expressed the progenitor marker Nestin but not Math1, a marker of committed granule neuron progenitors. Codeletion of Pten and Trp53 resulted in fully penetrant medulloblastoma originating from the perivascular niche, which exhibited abnormal blood vessel networks and advanced neuronal differentiation of tumor cells. EdU pulse-chase experiments demonstrated a perivascular cancer stem cell population in Pten/Trp53 double mutant medulloblastomas. Genetic analyses revealed recurrent somatic inactivations of the tumor suppressor gene Ptch1 and a recapitulation of the sonic hedgehog subgroup of human medulloblastomas. Overall, our results showed that PTEN acts to prevent the proliferation of a progenitor niche in postnatal cerebellum predisposed to oncogenic induction of medulloblastoma. Cancer Res; 77(1); 123-33. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Derivation of myoepithelial progenitor cells from bipotent mammary stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangshan Zhao

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that breast and other cancers originate from and are maintained by a small fraction of stem/progenitor cells with self-renewal properties. Recent molecular profiling has identified six major subtypes of breast cancer: basal-like, ErbB2-overexpressing, normal breast epithelial-like, luminal A and B, and claudin-low subtypes. To help understand the relationship among mammary stem/progenitor cells and breast cancer subtypes, we have recently derived distinct hTERT-immortalized human mammary stem/progenitor cell lines: a K5(+/K19(- type, and a K5(+/K19(+ type. Under specific culture conditions, bipotent K5(+/K19(- stem/progenitor cells differentiated into stable clonal populations that were K5(-/K19(- and exhibit self-renewal and unipotent myoepithelial differentiation potential in contrast to the parental K5(+/K19(- cells which are bipotent. These K5(-/K19(- cells function as myoepithelial progenitor cells and constitutively express markers of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and show high invasive and migratory abilities. In addition, these cells express a microarray signature of claudin-low breast cancers. The EMT characteristics of an un-transformed unipotent mammary myoepithelial progenitor cells together with claudin-low signature suggests that the claudin-low breast cancer subtype may arise from myoepithelial lineage committed progenitors. Availability of immortal MPCs should allow a more definitive analysis of their potential to give rise to claudin-low breast cancer subtype and facilitate biological and molecular/biochemical studies of this disease.

  1. Endothelial progenitor cells in diabetes complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sergeevna Michurova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM have a 2- to 4-times higher risk of developing cardiovascular complications compared with non-diabetic controls. Hyperglycemia activates pathophysiological mechanisms that damage the endothelium. According to the current views, circulating progenitor cells derived from bone marrow repair the damage. These cells, known as endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, maintain endothelial homeostasis and contribute to the formation of new vessels. Many clinical studies have reported that EPC population is dysfunctional and declines in numbers in patients with type 1 and type 2 DM. In addition, bone marrow doesn’t respond adequately to mobilizing stimuli in DM. Therefore, EPC alterations might have a pathogenic role in the complications of DM. In this review, EPC alterations will be examined in the context of macrovascular and microvascular complications of DM, highlighting their roles and functions in the progression of the disease.

  2. THE AGES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Aubourg, Eric; Strauss, Michael A.; Tojeiro, Rita; Heavens, Alan; Jimenez, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Using light curves and host galaxy spectra of 101 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with redshift z ∼ 2.4 Gyr. We find that each channel contributes roughly half of the Type Ia rate in our reference sample. We also construct the average spectra of high-stretch and low-stretch SN Ia host galaxies, and find that the difference of these spectra looks like a main-sequence B star with nebular emission lines indicative of star formation. This supports our finding that there are two populations of SNe Ia, and indicates that the progenitors of high-stretch supernovae are at the least associated with very recent star formation in the last few tens of Myr. Our results provide valuable constraints for models of Type Ia progenitors and may help improve the calibration of SNe Ia as standard candles.

  3. Interneuron progenitor transplantation to treat CNS dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad O Chohan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field.

  4. Endothelial progenitor cells in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Michael; Quintavalle, Cristina; Chiariello, Giovanni Alfonso; Condorelli, Gerolama; Briguori, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    In the last two decades a great deal of evidence has been collected on the key role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in the mechanisms of vascular healing. The role of EPC as a marker of vascular health and prognosis of cardiovascular disease is already consolidated. This review aims to examine and evaluate recent data regarding EPC, as biomarkers, prognostic factor and potential therapy in cardiovascular disease.

  5. Observational Investigations of the Progenitors of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, J. D.

    2014-03-01

    Supernovae (SNe) are the spectacular deaths of stars and have shaped the universe we see today. Their far-reaching influence affects the chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies, star formation, neutron star and black hole formation, and they are largely responsible for most of the heavy elements that make up the universe, including around 90 per cent of the reader. They also provide laboratories of nuclear and particle physics far beyond what we can construct on Earth and act as probes of extreme density and energy. This thesis presents new research into understanding the nature of the progenitor systems of various types of SNe, as well as presenting results that will allow their study to be more productive in the future, through use of automated pipelines and methods to increase the science value of discovered SNe. An environmental study of two peculiar types of transients ('Calcium-rich' and '2002cx-like'), which may not be true SNe, reveals extremely different ages of the exploding systems that will constrain the current theoretical effort into discovering the progenitor systems. The GRB-SN 120422A/2012bz is investigated and found to be an extremely luminous and energetic SN, even amongst the infamously bright GRB-SNe. A method is presented that allows an accurate reconstruction of the bolometric light curve of a core-collapse SN, which relies on only two optical filter observations - this will hugely reduce the observational cost of constructing bolometric light curves, a tool of great importance when hoping to constrain the nature of a SN explosion and hence its progenitor. Finally, this method is utilised to construct the largest bolometric CCSN bolometric light curve sample to date, and these are analytically modelled to reveal population statistics of the explosions, thus informing on the nature of the progenitors.

  6. Alpha-tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation combined injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vijay K.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Beattie, Lindsay A.; Ducey, Elizabeth J.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of alpha-tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors in mitigating combined injury associated with acute radiation exposure in combination with secondary physical wounding. CD2F1 mice were exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and then transfused intravenously with 5 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from TS- and AMD3100-injected mice after irradiation. Within 1 h after irradiation, mice were exposed to secondary wounding. Mice were observed for 30 d after irradiation and cytokine analysis was conducted by multiplex Luminex assay at various time-points after irradiation and wounding. Our results initially demonstrated that transfusion of TS-mobilized progenitors from normal mice enhanced survival of acutely irradiated mice exposed 24 h prior to transfusion to supralethal doses (11.5–12.5 Gy) of 60 Co gamma-radiation. Subsequently, comparable transfusions of TS-mobilized progenitors were shown to significantly mitigate severe combined injuries in acutely irradiated mice. TS administered 24 h before irradiation was able to protect mice against combined injury as well. Cytokine results demonstrated that wounding modulates irradiation-induced cytokines. This study further supports the conclusion that the infusion of TS-mobilized progenitor-containing PBMCs acts as a bridging therapy in radiation-combined-injury mice. We suggest that this novel bridging therapeutic approach involving the infusion of TS-mobilized hematopoietic progenitors following acute radiation exposure or combined injury might be applicable to humans. (author)

  7. Persistence of Recipient Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) Antibodies and Production of Donor HLA antibodies Following Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fasano, Ross M.; Mamcarz, Ewelina; Adams, Sharon; Jerussi, Theresa Donohue; Sugimoto, Kyoko; Tian, Xin; Flegel, Willy A.; Childs, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) on human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-alloimmunization and platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT) are unknown. We studied HLA-alloantibodies in a cohort of 16 patients (8 HLA-alloimmunized with pre-transplant histories of PTR and 8 non-alloimmunized controls) undergoing Allo-HSCT using fludarabine/cyclophosphamide-based RIC. Pre- and post-transplant serum samples were an...

  8. Constraints on the masses of supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.

    1984-02-01

    Star formation rates (SFR) for 175 nearby galaxies, derived from H-alpha emission data, are combined with the mean SN II rate to estimate the critical initial mass for a SN II progenitor. The best fitting SFR models, when combined with the observed SN II rate in face-on Sc galaxies, yield a lower limit mass for SN II progenitors of about 8 plus or minus 1 solar masses. A systematic underestimation of either the supernova rate or the Hubble constant used may lower this limit to 5-6 solar mases, but it is unlikely that the critical mass is lower than 5 or higher than 12 solar masses. The distribution of SN II in spiral arms of galaxies, and the low Galactic supernova rate, also suggest a mass limit of 8 plus or minus 3 solar masses. These limits are generally consistent with the recently determined progenitor masses of white dwarfs (Anthony-Twarog, 1982) and pulsars (Shipman and Green, 1980).

  9. Uncaria tomentosa stimulates the proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Iria; do Carmo Araújo, Maria; Zimmermann, Estevan Sonego; Dalmora, Sergio Luiz; Benedetti, Aloisio Luiz; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Asbahr, Ana Carolina Cavazzin; Bertol, Gustavo; Farias, Júlia; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2011-09-01

    The Asháninkas, indigenous people of Peru, use cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa) to restore health. Uncaria tomentosa has antioxidant activity and works as an agent to repair DNA damage. It causes different effects on cell proliferation depending on the cell type involved; specifically, it can stimulate the proliferation of myeloid progenitors and cause apoptosis of neoplastic cells. Neutropenia is the most common collateral effect of chemotherapy. For patients undergoing cancer treatment, the administration of a drug that stimulates the proliferation of healthy hematopoietic tissue cells is very desirable. It is important to assess the acute effects of Uncaria tomentosa on granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) and in the recovery of neutrophils after chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, by establishing the correlation with filgrastim (rhG-CSF) treatment to evaluate its possible use in clinical oncology. The in vivo assay was performed in ifosfamide-treated mice receiving oral doses of 5 and 15 mg of Uncaria tomentosa and intraperitoneal doses of 3 and 9 μg of filgrastim, respectively, for four days. Colony-forming cell (CFC) assays were performed with human hematopoietic stem/precursor cells (hHSPCs) obtained from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Bioassays showed that treatment with Uncaria tomentosa significantly increased the neutrophil count, and a potency of 85.2% was calculated in relation to filgrastim at the corresponding doses tested. An in vitro CFC assay showed an increase in CFU-GM size and mixed colonies (CFU-GEMM) size at the final concentrations of 100 and 200 μg extract/mL. At the tested doses, Uncaria tomentosa had a positive effect on myeloid progenitor number and is promising for use with chemotherapy to minimize the adverse effects of this treatment. These results support the belief of the Asháninkas, who have classified Uncaria tomentosa as a 'powerful plant'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radial glial neural progenitors regulate nascent brain vascular network stabilization via inhibition of Wnt signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Ma

    Full Text Available The cerebral cortex performs complex cognitive functions at the expense of tremendous energy consumption. Blood vessels in the brain are known to form stereotypic patterns that facilitate efficient oxygen and nutrient delivery. Yet little is known about how vessel development in the brain is normally regulated. Radial glial neural progenitors are well known for their central role in orchestrating brain neurogenesis. Here we show that, in the late embryonic cortex, radial glial neural progenitors also play a key role in brain angiogenesis, by interacting with nascent blood vessels and regulating vessel stabilization via modulation of canonical Wnt signaling. We find that ablation of radial glia results in vessel regression, concomitant with ectopic activation of Wnt signaling in endothelial cells. Direct activation of Wnt signaling also results in similar vessel regression, while attenuation of Wnt signaling substantially suppresses regression. Radial glial ablation and ectopic Wnt pathway activation leads to elevated endothelial expression of matrix metalloproteinases, while inhibition of metalloproteinase activity significantly suppresses vessel regression. These results thus reveal a previously unrecognized role of radial glial progenitors in stabilizing nascent brain vascular network and provide novel insights into the molecular cascades through which target neural tissues regulate vessel stabilization and patterning during development and throughout life.

  11. [Protective effects of amifostine on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells against chemotherapeutic damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bao-An; Li, Cui-Ping; Zhou, Min; Gao, Chong; Ding, Jia-Hua

    2004-12-01

    The aim was to study the protective effects of amifostine (AMF) on normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells against the chemotherapeutic damage from etoposide (VP-16). The cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMNC), fresh and frozen peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC), and HL-60 cells were divided into AMF, AMF + VP-16, VP-16 and control groups, each group cell viability was determined by using trypan blue exclusion test, the CFU-GM culture was used to count cells, the apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. The results showed that in CBMNC, fresh and frozen PBSC samples, cell viability and the number of CFU-GM in AMF + VP-16 group were all significantly higher than those in VP-16 group (P GFU-GM life in AMF + VP-16 group was also longer than that of latter, in CBMNC samples, the number of CFU-GM in AMF groups was higher than that in control group, but there was no statistical significance between the two groups (P > 0.05), in HL-60 cell apoptotic rate in AMF + VP-16 group was little higher than that in VP-16 group, but no statistical significance between these two groups (P > 0.05). It is concluded that AMF can significantly protect normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells against the damage from VP-16. Moreover, AMF does not affect cytotoxity of VP-16 on HL-60 cells, and can not stimulate the growth and differentiation of cord hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells directly.

  12. Panax Notoginseng Saponins Promote Endothelial Progenitor Cell Mobilization and Attenuate Atherosclerotic Lesions in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs derived from the bone marrow (BM play a key role in the homeostasis of vascular repair by enhanced reendothelialization. Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS, a highly valued traditional Chinese medicine, has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality from coronary artery disease. The present research was designed to explore the contribution of progenitor cells to the progression of atherosclerotic plaques and the possible modulatory role of PNS in this process. Methods: PNS (60 or 120 mg/kg via intraperitoneal injection was administered over 8 weeks in apolipoprotein E knockout mice on an atherogenic diet. The sizes and histochemical alteration of atherosclerotic lesions and numbers of EPCs in BM and peripheral blood were analyzed. The expression of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α and its receptor, CXCR4, was monitored as well. Results: PNS significantly reduced the lesion area and intima-to-media ratio compared to vehicle treatment. PNS also augmented endothelialization and reduced the smooth muscle cell (SMCs content of the lesions. The number of c-kit and sca-1 double-positive progenitor cells and flk-1 and sca-1 double-positive progenitor cells were significantly increased in the BM and the peripheral blood of the PNS-treated groups. PNS treatment increased the plasma levels of SDF-1α and SCF as well as the BM levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9. Moreover, the mRNA levels of SDF-1α and protein levels of CXCR4 were both increased in the BM of mice treated with PNS, while SDF-1α expression decreased. Conclusion: PNS reduce the size of atherosclerotic plaques, and this effect appears to involve progenitor cell mobilization. SDF-1α-CXCR4 interactions and the possible modulatory role of PNS in this process may contribute to the increased progenitor cell mobilization.

  13. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells as Effectors in Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Granick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shed light on novel functions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC. While they are critical for maintenance and replenishment of blood cells in the bone marrow, these cells are not limited to the bone marrow compartment and function beyond their role in hematopoiesis. HSPC can leave bone marrow and circulate in peripheral blood and lymph, a process often manipulated therapeutically for the purpose of transplantation. Additionally, these cells preferentially home to extramedullary sites of inflammation where they can differentiate to more mature effector cells. HSPC are susceptible to various pathogens, though they may participate in the innate immune response without being directly infected. They express pattern recognition receptors for detection of endogenous and exogenous danger-associated molecular patterns and respond not only by the formation of daughter cells but can themselves secrete powerful cytokines. This paper summarizes the functional and phenotypic characterization of HSPC, their niche within and outside of the bone marrow, and what is known regarding their role in the innate immune response.

  14. Formation of large coronary arteries by cardiac progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmanns, Jochen; Rota, Marcello; Hosoda, Toru; Misao, Yu; Esposito, Grazia; Gonzalez, Arantxa; Vitale, Serena; Parolin, Carola; Yasuzawa-Amano, Saori; Muraski, John; De Angelis, Antonella; LeCapitaine, Nicole; Siggins, Robert W.; Loredo, Maria; Bearzi, Claudia; Bolli, Roberto; Urbanek, Konrad; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the most common cause of cardiac failure in the Western world, and to date there is no alternative to bypass surgery for severe coronary atherosclerosis. We report that c-kit-positive cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) activated with insulin-like growth factor 1 and hepatocyte growth factor before their injection in proximity of the site of occlusion of the left coronary artery in rats, engrafted within the host myocardium forming temporary niches. Subsequently, CPCs divided and differentiated into endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells and, to a lesser extent, into cardiomyocytes. The acquisition of vascular lineages appeared to be mediated by the up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, which promoted the synthesis and secretion of stromal-derived factor 1 from hypoxic coronary vessels. Stromal-derived factor 1 was critical in the conversion of CPCs to the vascular fate. CPCs formed conductive and intermediate-sized coronary arteries together with resistance arterioles and capillaries. The new vessels were connected with the primary coronary circulation, and this increase in vascularization more than doubled myocardial blood flow in the infarcted myocardium. This beneficial effect, together with myocardial regeneration attenuated postinfarction dilated myopathy, reduced infarct size and improved function. In conclusion, locally delivered activated CPCs generate de novo coronary vasculature and may be implemented clinically for restoration of blood supply to the ischemic myocardium. PMID:18216245

  15. Endothelial progenitor cell subsets and preeclampsia: Findings and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Attar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular remodeling is an essential component of gestation. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs play an important role in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. The results of studies measuring the number of EPCs in normal pregnancies and in preeclampsia have been highly controversial or even contradictory because of some variations in technical issues and different methodologies enumerating three distinct subsets of EPCs: circulating angiogenic cells (CAC, colony forming unit endothelial cells (CFU-ECs, and endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs. In general, most studies have shown an increase in the number of CACs in the maternal circulation with a progression in the gestational age in normal pregnancies, while functional capacities measured by CFU-ECs and ECFCs remain intact. In the case of preeclampsia, mobilization of CACs and ECFCs occurs in the peripheral blood of pregnant women, but the functional capacities shown by culture of the derived colony-forming assays (CFU-EC and ECFC assays are altered. Furthermore, the number of all EPC subsets will be reduced in umbilical cord blood in the case of preeclampsia. As EPCs play an important role in the homeostasis of vascular networks, the difference in their frequency and functionality in normal pregnancies and those with preeclampsia can be expected. In this review, there was an attempt to provide a justification for these controversies.

  16. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  17. Reverse-D-4F Increases the Number of Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improves Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunctions in High Fat Diet Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nana, Yang; Peng, Jiao; Jianlin, Zhang; Xiangjian, Zhang; Shutong, Yao; Enxin, Zhan; Bin, Li; Chuanlong, Zong; Hua, Tian; Yanhong, Si; Yunsai, Du; Shucun, Qin; Hui, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Although high density lipoprotein (HDL) improves the functions of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), the effect of HDL ApoAI mimetic peptide reverse-D-4F (Rev-D4F) on EPC mobilization and repair of EPC dysfunctions remains to be studied. In this study, we investigated the effects of Rev-D4F on peripheral blood cell subpopulations in C57 mice treated with a high fat diet and the mechanism of Rev-D4F in improving the function of EPCs impaired by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The high fat diet significantly decreased the number of EPCs, EPC migratory functions, and the percentage of lymphocytes in the white blood cells. However, it significantly increased the number of white blood cells, the percentage of monocytes in the white blood cells, and the level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and TNF-α in the plasma. Rev-D4F clearly inhibited the effect of the high fat diet on the quantification of peripheral blood cell subpopulations and cytokine levels, and increased stromal cell derived factor 1α (SDF-1α) in the plasma. We provided in vitro evidence that TNF-α impaired EPC proliferation, migration, and tube formation through inactive AKT and eNOS, which was restored by Rev-D4F treatment. In contrast, both the PI3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002) and AKT inhibitor (perifosine) obviously inhibited the restoration of Rev-4F on EPCs impaired by TNF-α. Our results suggested that Rev-D4F increases the quantity of endothelial progenitor cells through increasing the SDF-1α levels and decreasing the TNF-α level of peripheral blood in high fat diet-induced C57BL/6J mice, and restores TNF-α induced dysfunctions of EPCs partly through stimulating the PI3K/AKT signal pathway.

  18. Different Ia antigen characterization between granulocyte progenitor cells (CFC-G) and monocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (CFC-M).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, M; Koizumi, S; Horita, S; Ueno, Y; Yamagami, M; Taniguchi, N

    1985-09-01

    Ia-like antigen-positive (Ia+) and -negative (Ia-) cell populations were separated from human cord blood cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells by a rosette technique with a combined use of staphylococcal protein-A-coated bovine red blood cells and the monoclonal OKIa 1 antibody, or by using a cell-sorting technique. Colony-forming units-granulocytes-monocytes-macrophages (GFU-GM) were assayed in a semisolid agar culture, and colony-forming cells-granulocytes (CFC-G) were differentiated from colony-forming cells-monocytes-macrophages (CFC-M) by double staining for esterase activity. The majority of CFC-G in cord blood was grown in the Ia+ fraction; Ia+ CFC-G/Ia- CFC-G = 1.62 +/- 0.34 (mean +/- SD), which was similar to the ratio in bone marrow (Ia+/Ia- = 1.80 +/- 0.37). In contrast, the majority of CFC-M in cord blood was grown in the Ia- fraction; Ia+/Ia- for CFC-M = 0.50 +/- 0.09. The predominance of CFC-G in the Ia+ fraction in contrast to predominance of CFC-M in the Ia- fraction was confirmed by using a cell-sorting technique. T-lymphocyte depletion and the culture supernatants of Ia+ and Ia- cells did not affect differentiation of CFC-G and CFC-M. These data suggest that there are potent differences in the expression of Ia-like antigens between CFC-G and CFC-M, indicating that the Ia+ progenitor cell population generates predominantly CFC-G, whereas the Ia- population generates mainly CFC-M during the maturation process in granulopoiesis.

  19. Multicentre standardisation of a clinical grade procedure for the preparation of allogeneic platelet concentrates from umbilical cord blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebulla, Paolo; Pupella, Simonetta; Santodirocco, Michele; Greppi, Noemi; Villanova, Ida; Buzzi, Marina; De Fazio, Nicola; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Background In addition to a largely prevalent use for bleeding prophylaxis, platelet concentrates from adult blood have also been used for many years to prepare platelet gels for the repair of topical skin ulcers. Platelet gel can be obtained by activation of fresh, cryopreserved, autologous or allogeneic platelet concentrates with calcium gluconate, thrombin and/or batroxobin. The high content of tissue regenerative factors in cord blood platelets and the widespread availability of allogeneic cord blood units generously donated for haematopoietic transplant but unsuitable for this use solely because of low haematopoietic stem cell content prompted us to develop a national programme to standardise the production of allogeneic cryopreserved cord blood platelet concentrates (CBPC) suitable for later preparation of clinical-grade cord blood platelet gel. Materials and methods Cord blood units collected at public banks with total nucleated cell counts 150×109/L and volume >50 mL, underwent soft centrifugation within 48 hours of collection. Platelet-rich plasma was centrifuged at high speed to obtain a CBPC with target platelet concentration of 800–1,200×109/L, which was cryopreserved, without cryoprotectant, below −40 °C. Results During 14 months, 13 banks produced 1,080 CBPC with mean (± standard deviation) volume of 11.4±4.4 mL and platelet concentration of 1,003±229×109/L. Total platelet count per CBPC was 11.3±4.9×109. Platelet recovery from cord blood was 47.7±17.8%. About one-third of cord blood units donated for haematopoietic transplant could meet the requirements for preparation of CBPC. The cost of preparation was € 160.92/CBPC. About 2 hours were needed for one technician to prepare four CBPC. Discussion This study yielded valuable scientific and operational information regarding the development of clinical trials using allogeneic CBPC. PMID:26509822

  20. State-of-the-art fertility preservation in children and adolescents undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalle, J-H; Lucchini, G; Balduzzi, A

    2017-01-01

    preservation in both boys and girls. Access to these procedures as well as their financing differs significantly throughout Europe. As all European children and adolescents should have the same possibility, the Paediatric Diseases Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation...

  1. Global analysis of the haematopoietic and endothelial transcriptome during zebrafish development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, J E; Place, E S; Eve, A M J; Bradshaw, C R; Sesay, A; Morrell, N W; Smith, J C

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we use zebrafish embryos to characterise the transcriptome of the developing blood and endothelium, two cell types that are closely associated during development. High-throughput sequencing identified 754 genes whose transcripts are enriched threefold or more in blood and/or vascular endothelial cells compared with the rest of the embryo at 26-28 h post fertilisation. Of these genes, 388 were classified as novel to these cell types after cross-reference with PubMed and the zebrafish information network (ZFIN). Analysis by quantitative PCR and in situ hybridisation showed that 83% (n=41) of these novel genes are expressed in blood or vascular endothelium. Of 10 novel genes selected for knockdown by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, we confirmed that two, tmem88a and trim2a, are required for primitive erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis. Our results provide a catalogue of genes whose expression is enriched in the developing blood and endothelium in zebrafish, many of which will be required for the development of those cell types, both in fish and in mammals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy, safety and feasibility of antifungal prophylaxis with posaconazole tablet in paediatric patients after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Michaela; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Queudeville, Manon; Feucht, Judith; Blaeschke, Franziska; Schlegel, Patrick; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Lang, Peter; Müller, Ingo; Handgretinger, Rupert; Heinz, Werner J

    2017-07-01

    Paediatric recipients of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have a high risk for invasive fungal infections. Posaconazole oral suspension has proven to be effective in antifungal prophylaxis in adult and paediatric patients. A new posaconazole tablet formulation with absorption independent of the gastric conditions was approved by the FDA in 2013. This is the first report on the use of posaconazole tablets in paediatric patients. This single-centre study included 63 paediatric patients with haemato-oncological malignancies who received posaconazole for antifungal prophylaxis after HSCT. They were analysed for efficacy, feasibility and the safety of posaconazole. Out of 63 patients, 31 received posaconazole oral suspension and 32 received posaconazole tablets up to 200 days after transplantation. Analyses of the posaconazole trough levels were determined. No possible, probable or proven invasive fungal infection was observed in either group. Posaconazole trough levels were significantly higher in the tablet group than in the suspension group at all analysed time points. Drug-related adverse events were similarly low in both groups. Posaconazole tablets are effective in preventing invasive fungal infections in paediatric patients. As early as day 3 after starting posaconazole tablets, over 50% of the posaconazole trough levels were >500 ng/mL, while this was observed on day 14 after start with posaconazole suspension. The administration of posaconazole tablets was safe, effective and feasible as antifungal prophylaxis in paediatric patients after HSCT.

  3. Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Arrests the Progression of Neurodegenerative Disease in Late-Onset Tay-Sachs Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Karolina M; Lum, Su Han; Wraith, J Edmond; Hendriksz, Christian J; Church, Heather J; Priestman, David; Platt, Frances M; Jones, Simon; Jovanovic, Ana; Wynn, Robert

    2017-12-07

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare metabolic disease caused by a deficiency of hexosaminidase A that leads to accumulation of GM2 gangliosides predominantly in neural tissue. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease variant is associated with a higher level of residual HexA activity. Treatment options are limited, and there are a few described cases who have undergone haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with variable outcome.We describe a case of a 23-year-old male patient who presented with a long-standing tremor since 7 years of age. He had gait ataxia, a speech stammer and swallowing problems. His condition had had a static course apart from his tremor that had been gradually deteriorating. Because of the deterioration in his neurological function, the patient had an uneventful, matched-sibling donor bone marrow transplant at the age of 15 years. Eight years post-HSCT, at the age of 23, he retains full donor engraftment, and his white cell beta-HexA of 191 nmol/mg/h is comparable to normal controls (in-assay control = 187). He continues to experience some intentional tremor that is tolerable for daily life and nonprogressive since HSCT. HSCT is a potential treatment option which might arrest neurodegeneration in patients with LOTS.

  4. BKV-specific T cells in the treatment of severe refractory haemorrhagic cystitis after HLA-haploidentical haematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pello, Oscar M; Innes, Andrew J; Bradshaw, Anne; Finn, Sally-Anne; Uddin, Shab; Bray, Emma; Olavarria, Eduardo; Apperley, Jane F; Pavlů, Jiří

    2017-06-01

    Haemorrhagic cystitis caused by BK virus (BKV) is a known complication of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and is relatively common following HLA-haploidentical transplantation. Adoptive immunotransfer of virus-specific T cells from the donor is a promising therapeutic approach, although production of these cells is challenging, particularly when dealing with low-frequency T cells such as BKV-specific T cells. Here, we present a patient who, following haploidentical HCT, developed severe BKV haemorrhagic cystitis, resistant to standard therapy. He responded well to adoptive transfer of donor cells enriched in BKV-specific T cells using the new second-generation CliniMACS Prodigy and the Cytokine Capture System from Miltenyi Biotec. Treatment led to full resolution of both the symptoms and viraemia without unwanted complications. Our observations suggest that use of products enriched with BKV-specific T cells generated using this system is safe and efficient in HLA-haploidentical HCT where BKV cystitis can be a serious complication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Identification of resident and inflammatory bone marrow derived cells in the sclera by bone marrow and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisatomi, Toshio; Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Qiao, Hong; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Toru; Noda, Kousuke; Miyahara, Shinsuke; Harada, Mine; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W

    2007-04-01

    To characterise bone marrow derived cells in the sclera under normal and inflammatory conditions, we examined their differentiation after transplantation from two different sources, bone marrow and haematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Bone marrow and HSC from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice were transplanted into irradiated wild-type mice. At 1 month after transplantation, mice were sacrificed and their sclera examined by histology, immunohistochemistry (CD11b, CD11c, CD45), and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. To investigate bone marrow derived cell recruitment under inflammatory conditions, experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) was induced in transplanted mice. GFP positive cells were distributed in the entire sclera and comprised 22.4 (2.8)% (bone marrow) and 28.4 (10.9)% (HSC) of the total cells in the limbal zone and 18.1 (6.7)% (bone marrow) and 26.3 (3.4)% (HSC) in the peripapillary zone. Immunohistochemistry showed that GFP (+) CD11c (+), GFP (+) CD11b (+) cells migrated in the sclera after bone marrow and HSC transplantation. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed antigen presenting cells among the scleral fibroblasts. In EAU mice, vast infiltration of GFP (+) cells developed into the sclera. We have provided direct and novel evidence for the migration of bone marrow and HSC cells into the sclera differentiating into macrophages and dendritic cells. Vast infiltration of bone marrow and HSC cells was found to be part of the inflammatory process in EAU.

  6. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Enter the Aging Arena.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate eWilliamson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Age is a significant risk factor for the development of vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Although pharmacological treatments, including statins and anti-hypertensive drugs, have improved the prognosis for patients with cardiovascular disease, it remains a leading cause of mortality in those aged 65 years and over. Furthermore, given the increased life expectancy of the population in developed countries, there is a clear need for alternative treatment strategies. Consequently, the relationship between aging and progenitor cell-mediated repair is of great interest. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs play an integral role in the cellular repair mechanisms for endothelial regeneration and maintenance. However, EPCs are subject to age-associated changes that diminish their number in circulation and function, thereby enhancing vascular disease risk. A great deal of research is aimed at developing strategies to harness the regenerative capacity of these cells.In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the cells termed ‘EPCs’, examine the impact of age on EPC-mediated repair and identify therapeutic targets with potential for attenuating the age-related decline in vascular health via beneficial actions on EPCs.

  7. Neutrino emission from nearby supernova progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    Neutrinos have an important role for energy loss process during advanced evolution of massive stars. Although the luminosity and average energy of neutrinos during the Si burning are much smaller than those of supernova neutrinos, these neutrinos are expected to be detected by the liquid scintillation neutrino detector KamLAND if a supernova explosion occurs at the distance of ~100 parsec. We investigate the neutrino emission from massive stars during advanced evolution. We calculate the evolution of the energy spectra of neutrinos produced through electron-positron pair-annihilation in the supernova progenitors with the initial mass of 12, 15, and 20 M ⊙ during the Si burning and core-collapse stages. The neutrino emission rate increases from ~ 1050 s-1 to ~ 1052 s-1. The average energy of electron-antineutrinos is about 1.25 MeV during the Si burning and gradually increases until the core-collapse. For one week before the supernova explosion, the KamLAND detector is expected to observe 12-24 and 6-13 v¯e events in the normal and inverted mass hierarchies, respectively, if a supernova explosion of a 12-20 M ⊙ star occurs at the distance of 200 parsec, corresponding to the distance to Betelgeuse. Observations of neutrinos from SN progenitors have a possibility to constrain the core structure and the evolution just before the core collapse of massive stars.

  8. Dysfunctional Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and confers an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. A key early event in atherosclerosis is endothelial dysfunction. Numerous groups have reported endothelial dysfunction in MetS. However, the measurement of endothelial function is far from optimum. There has been much interest recently in a subtype of progenitor cells, termed endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), that can circulate, proliferate, and dfferentiate into mature endothelial cells. EPCs can be characterized by the assessment of surface markers, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, VEGFR-2 (KDR). The CD34+KDR+ phenotype has been demonstrated to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular outcomes. MetS patients without diabetes or cardiovascular diseases have decreased EPC number and functionality as evidenced by decreased numbers of colony forming units, decreased adhesion and migration, and decreased tubule formation. Strategies that have been shown to upregulate and enhance EPC number and functionality include statins, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and peroxisome-proliferator-activating-receptor gamma agonists. Mechanisms by which they affect EPC number and functionality need to be studied. Thus, EPC number and/or functionality could emerge as novel cellular biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease risk in MetS. PMID:21941528

  9. Predicting the nature of supernova progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, Jose H

    2017-10-28

    Stars more massive than about 8 solar masses end their lives as a supernova (SN), an event of fundamental importance Universe-wide. The physical properties of massive stars before the SN event are very uncertain, both from theoretical and observational perspectives. In this article, I briefly review recent efforts to predict the nature of stars before death, in particular, by performing coupled stellar evolution and atmosphere modelling of single stars in the pre-SN stage. These models are able to predict the high-resolution spectrum and broadband photometry, which can then be directly compared with the observations of core-collapse SN progenitors. The predictions for the spectral types of massive stars before death can be surprising. Depending on the initial mass and rotation, single star models indicate that massive stars die as red supergiants, yellow hypergiants, luminous blue variables and Wolf-Rayet stars of the WN and WO subtypes. I finish by assessing the detectability of SN Ibc progenitors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Endothelial progenitor cells and revascularization following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feifei; Morancho, Anna; Montaner, Joan; Rosell, Anna

    2015-10-14

    Brain injury after ischemia induces the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a population of bone marrow-derived cells with angio-vasculogenic capabilities. These cells have been also tested in pre-clinical models and proposed for neurorepair therapy aiming to treat patients in the delayed phases of stroke disease. Promising results in the pre-clinical field encourage the translation into a clinical therapeutic approach. In this review, we will describe EPCs actions for enhanced revascularization and neurorepair, which on one hand are by their direct incorporation into new vascular networks/structures or by direct cell-cell interactions with other brain cells, but also to indirect cell-cell communication thorough EPCs secreted growth factors. All these actions contribute to potentiate neurovascular remodeling and neurorepair. The data presented in this review encourages for a deep understanding of the mechanisms of the cross-talks between EPCs and other brain and progenitor cells, which deserves additional investigations and efforts that may lead to new EPCs-based therapies for stroke patients. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Lavik, Erin B

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the survival, integration, and differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells after transplantation to the subretinal space of adult pigs.......To investigate the survival, integration, and differentiation of mouse retinal progenitor cells after transplantation to the subretinal space of adult pigs....

  12. Pigment Cell Progenitors in Zebrafish Remain Multipotent through Metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Dinwiddie, April; Mahalwar, Prateek; Schach, Ursula; Linker, Claudia; Irion, Uwe; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-08-08

    The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population in vertebrates giving rise to diverse cell types in adults via intermediate progenitors. The in vivo cell-fate potential and lineage segregation of these postembryonic progenitors is poorly understood, and it is unknown if and when the progenitors become fate restricted. We investigate the fate restriction in the neural crest-derived stem cells and intermediate progenitors in zebrafish, which give rise to three distinct adult pigment cell types: melanophores, iridophores, and xanthophores. By inducing clones in sox10-expressing cells, we trace and quantitatively compare the pigment cell progenitors at four stages, from embryogenesis to metamorphosis. At all stages, a large fraction of the progenitors are multipotent. These multipotent progenitors have a high proliferation ability, which diminishes with fate restriction. We suggest that multipotency of the nerve-associated progenitors lasting into metamorphosis may have facilitated the evolution of adult-specific traits in vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, among other ligands; (b the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases.

  14. Carica papaya induces in vitro thrombopoietic cytokines secretion by mesenchymal stem cells and haematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Jazli; Abu Kassim, Noor Lide; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Haque, Nazmul; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2015-07-08

    Use of Carica papaya leaf extracts, reported to improve thrombocyte counts in dengue patients, demands further analysis on the underlying mechanism of its thrombopoietic cytokines induction In vitro cultures of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) were treated with unripe papaya pulp juice (UPJ) to evaluate its potential to induce thrombopoietic cytokines (IL-6 and SCF) RESULTS: In vitro scratch gap closure was significantly faster (p papaya to induce thrombopoietic cytokines synthesis in cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin.

  15. Non-cultured adipose-derived CD45(-) side population cells are enriched for progenitors that give rise to myofibres in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Schrøder, Henrik D; Jensen, Charlotte H

    2008-01-01

    Side population (SP) cells are highly able to exclude the Hoechst 33342 dye through membrane transporters, a feature associated with cell immaturity and therefore proposed as a marker of stem cells. Herein we demonstrate that the adipose tissue derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) contains...... with myoblasts. Furthermore, immediate intramuscular engraftment of non-cultured SPCD45(-) cells gave rise to myofibres andcells lining blood vessels, whereas the SVF only provided donor derived mononuclear cells. We therefore conclude that the SPCD45(-) fraction of adipose-derived SVF is enriched for cells...... a novel population of non-haematopoietic "side population" (SPCD45(-)) cells. Simultaneous qRT-PCR of 64 genes revealed that the freshly isolated SPCD45(-) was highly enriched for cells expressing genes related to stem cells, the Notch pathway, and early vascular precursors. Notably, the expression...

  16. Multimodal Imaging of Neural Progenitor Cell Fate in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannic Waerzeggers

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available For clinical application of stem cell–based therapies, noninvasive detection of applied stem cells is of high importance. We report on the feasibility of detecting implanted neural progenitor cells (NPCs noninvasively and follow their fate and functional status by sequential multimodal molecular imaging and reporter gene technology. We investigated C17.2 cells stably expressing herpes simplex virus type 1–thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk and green fluorescent protein (gfp (C17.2-tkIRESgfp = C17.2-TIG or HSV-1-tk, gfp, and firefly luciferase (luc (C17.2-lucIREStkgfp = C17.2-LITG and determined the detection sensitivity of positron emission tomography (PET and bioluminescence imaging (BLI for these cells in culture and in vivo in subcutaneous and intracranial glioma models. In addition, PET and BLI were used to further investigate and follow the fate of implanted C17.2-LITG cells in an intracranial glioma model. We show that both imaging modalities are sensitive in detecting reporter gene expressing NPCs; however, PET, by the use of 9-[4-[18F]fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG, detects NPCs only at sites of disrupted blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, both imaging modalities can be used to detect stem cell fate and migration and indicate excessive proliferation and aberrant migration. In conclusion, multimodal imaging can be used for longitudinal noninvasive monitoring of grafted NPCs in rodents.

  17. PRDM11 is dispensable for the maintenance and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoren, Lina A; Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC)(1) supply organisms with life-long output of mature blood cells. To do so, the HSC pool size has to be maintained by HSC self-renewing divisions. PRDM3 and PRDM16 have been documented to regulate HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function. We found Prdm11 to have...... similar expression patterns in the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) compartments as Prdm3 and Prdm16. Therefore, we undertook experiments to test if PRDM11 regulates HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function by investigating the Prdm11(-/-) mice. Our data shows that phenotypic HSPCs...

  18. [Circulating endothelial progenitor cell levels in treated hypertensive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroun-Eid, C; Ortega-Hernández, A; Abad, M; García-Donaire, J A; Barbero, A; Reinares, L; Martell-Claros, N; Gómez-Garre, D

    2015-01-01

    Most optimally treated hypertensive patients still have an around 50% increased risk of any cardiovascular event, suggesting the possible existence of unidentified risk factors. In the last years there has been evidence of the essential role of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the maintenance of endothelial integrity and function, increasing the interest in their involvement in cardiovascular disease. In this study, the circulating levels of EPCs and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are investigated in treated hypertensive patients with adequate control of blood pressure (BP). Blood samples were collected from treated hypertensive patients with controlled BP. Plasma levels of EPCs CD34+/KDR+ and CD34+/VE-cadherin+ were quantified by flow cytometry. Plasma concentration of VEGF was determined by ELISA. A group of healthy subjects without cardiovascular risk factors was included as controls. A total of 108 hypertensive patients were included (61±12 years, 47.2% men) of which 82.4% showed BP<140/90 mmHg, 91.7% and 81.5% controlled diabetes (HbA1c <7%) and cLDL (<130 or 100 mg/dL), respectively, and 85.2% were non-smokers. Around 45% of them were obese. Although patients had cardiovascular parameters within normal ranges, they showed significantly lower levels of CD34+/KDR+ and CD34+/VE-cadherin+ compared with healthy control group, although plasma VEGF concentration was higher in patients than in controls. Despite an optimal treatment, hypertensive patients show a decreased number of circulating EPCs that could be, at least in part, responsible for their residual cardiovascular risk, suggesting that these cells could be a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  20. [Use of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein as infection markers in febrile neutropenic patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Yepes, Marina; Aznar-Oroval, Eduardo; Lorente-Alegre, Pablo; García-Lozano, Tomás; Picón-Roig, Isabel; Pérez-Ballestero, Pilar; Ortiz-Muñoz, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Neutropenia is a frequent sign in patients who are going to have a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Infection is an important complication in these patients, which is favoured by immunosuppression and the degree of neutropenia. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in onco-haematological patients undergoing chemotherapy and HSCT to determine the origin of the fever. PCT and CRP values were measured in 30 episodes of febrile neutropenia: before starting chemotherapy, appearance of neutropenia, onset of fever, days 1, 2, 3 and 6 after the onset of fever, and when the febrile episode ended. The episodes were classified as 5 bacteraemia, 3 microbiologically documented infections, 10 clinical infections, and 12 fevers of unknown origin. The highest PCT mean values corresponded to the group of patients with bacteraemia. Statistically significant differences (P=.04) were found on the second day after the onset of fever. The cut-off point of 0.5ng/ml showed a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 75%. PCR results showed statistically significant differences on days 1, 2 and 3 after the onset of fever (P=.01, P=.003, and P=.002, respectively). The cut-off point of 7.5mg/L had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 58%. The combination of PCT and CRP is an insufficient method to detect bacterial infections and may not replace the proper clinical and microbiological diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Whole body proton irradiation causes acute damage to bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to proton irradiation during missions in deep space can lead to bone marrow injury. The acute effects of proton irradiation on hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells remain undefined and thus were investigated. We exposed male C57BL/6 mice to 0.5 and 1.0 Gy proton total body irradiation (proton-TBI, 150 MeV) and examined changes in peripheral blood cells and bone marrow (BM) progenitors and LSK cells 2 weeks after exposure. 1.0 Gy proton-TBI significantly reduced the numbers of peripheral blood cells compared to 0.5 Gy proton-TBI and unirradiated animals, while the numbers of peripheral blood cell counts were comparable between 0.5 Gy proton-TBI and unirradiated mice. The frequencies and numbers of LSK cells and CMPs in BM of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy irradiated mice were decreased in comparison to those of normal controls. LSK cells and CMPs and their progeny exhibited a radiation-induced impairment in clonogenic function. Exposure to 1.0 Gy increased cellular apoptosis but not the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CMPs two weeks after irradiation. LSK cells from irradiated mice exhibited an increase in ROS production and apoptosis. Exposure to proton-TBI can induce acute damage to BM progenitors and LSK cells.

  2. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-01-01

    The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive 'tracking' of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to stem cell imaging

  3. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  4. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Extraction from Human Auricles

    KAUST Repository

    Di Nardo, Paolo

    2017-02-22

    For many years, myocardial tissue has been considered terminally differentiated and, thus, incapable of regenerating. Recent studies have shown, instead, that cardiomyocytes, at least in part, are slowly substituted by new cells originating by precursor cells mostly embedded into the heart apex and in the atria. We have shown that an elective region of progenitor cell embedding is represented by the auricles, non-contractile atria appendages that can be easily sampled without harming the patient. The protocol here reported describes how from auricles a population of multipotent, cardiogenic cells can be isolated, cultured, and differentiated. Further studies are needed to fully exploit this cell population, but, sampling auricles, it could be possible to treat cardiac patients using their own cells circumventing rejection or organ shortage limitations.

  5. THE PROGENITOR OF THE TYPE IIb SN 2008ax REVISITED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folatelli, Gastón; Bersten, Melina C.; Benvenuto, Omar G. [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (Argentina); Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken’ichi, E-mail: gaston@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations of the site of the supernova (SN) SN 2008ax obtained in 2011 and 2013 reveal that the possible progenitor object detected in pre-explosion images was in fact multiple. Four point sources are resolved in the new, higher-resolution images. We identify one of the sources with the fading SN. The other three objects are consistent with single supergiant stars. We conclude that their light contaminated the previously identified progenitor candidate. After subtraction of these stars, the progenitor appears to be significantly fainter and bluer than previously measured. Post-explosion photometry at the SN location indicates that the progenitor object has disappeared. If single, the progenitor is compatible with a supergiant star of B to mid-A spectral type, while a Wolf–Rayet (W-R) star would be too luminous in the ultraviolet to account for the observations. Moreover, our hydrodynamical modeling shows that the pre-explosion mass was 4–5 M{sub ⊙} and the radius was 30–50 R{sub ⊙}, which is incompatible with a W-R progenitor. We present a possible interacting binary progenitor computed with our evolutionary models that reproduces all the observational evidence. A companion star as luminous as an O9–B0 main-sequence star may have remained after the explosion.

  6. Ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, A.; Zhou, D.; Geiger, H.; Zant, G.V.

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this study was to determine if ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in hematopoietic stem (HSC) and progenitor cells. Lin-cells were isolated from mouse bone marrow (BM) and pretreated with vehicle or 100 μM z-VAD 1 h prior to exposure to 4 Gy IR. The apoptotic and/or necrotic responses of these cells to IR were analyzed by measuring the annexin V and/or 7-AAD staining in HSC and progenitor populations using flow cytometry, and hematopoietic function of these cells was determined by CAFC assay. Exposure of Lin-cells to IR selectively decreased the numbers of HSC and progenitors in association with an increase in apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment of Lin- cells with z-VAD significantly inhibited IR-induced apoptosis and the decrease in the numbers of HSC and progenitors. However, IR alone or in combination with z-VAD did not lead to a significant increase in necrotic cell death in either HSC or progenitors. In addition, pretreatment of BM cells with z-VAD significantly attenuated IR-induced reduction in the frequencies of day-7, -28 and -35 CAFC. Exposure of HSC and progenitors to IR induces apoptosis. The induction of HSC and progenitor apoptosis contributes to IR-induced suppression of their hematopoietic function

  7. Awareness, Knowledge, and Acceptance of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Anaemia in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewumi Adediran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sickle cell anaemia (SCA is an inherited condition whose clinical manifestations arise from the tendency of haemoglobin to polymerize and deform red blood cells into characteristic sickle shape. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation offers a cure. The aim of this study was to determine the level of awareness, knowledge, and acceptance of this beneficial procedure in Nigeria. Materials and Methods. This multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in 7 tertiary hospitals in Nigeria in 2015. Approval was obtained from each institution’s research and ethics committee. A pretested structured questionnaire was administered to respondents aged 18 years and above and to the parents or guardians of those below 18 years of age. Results. There were 265 respondents comprising 120 males and 145 females. One hundred and seventy-one (64.5% respondents were aware of BMT for the treatment of SCA. About 67.8% (116 of 171 of those who were aware believed SCA can be cured with BMT (p=0.001 and 49.7% (85 of 171 of the respondents accepted BMT (p=0.001. Conclusion. Awareness of BMT in Nigeria is low when compared with reports from developed countries. The knowledge is poor and acceptance is low. With adequate information, improved education, and psychological support, more Nigerians will embrace BMT.

  8. Stromal Cells Act as Guardians for Endothelial Progenitors by Reducing Their Immunogenicity After Co-Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souidi, Naima; Stolk, Meaghan; Rudeck, Juliane; Strunk, Dirk; Schallmoser, Katharina; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Seifert, Martina

    2017-05-01

    Regeneration of injured tissues requires effective therapeutic strategies supporting vasculogenesis. The lack of instantly available autologous cell sources and immunogenicity of allogeneic endothelial (progenitor) cells limits clinical progress. Based on the immunosuppressive potency of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs), we investigated whether crosstalk between endothelial colony-forming progenitor cells (ECFCs) and MSCs during vasculogenesis could lower allogeneic T cell responses against ECFCs allowing long-term engraftment in vivo. Immunodeficient mice received subcutaneous grafts containing human ECFCs alone, or pairs of human ECFCs/MSCs from the same umbilical cord (UC) to study vasculogenesis in the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In vitro, cell surface marker changes due to interferon gamma (IFNγ) stimulation during ECFC/MSC coculture were determined and further effects on allostimulated T cell proliferation and cytotoxic lysis were measured. IFNγ-induced HLA-DR expression on ECFCs and MSCs, but both cell types had significantly less HLA-DR in cocultures. ECFC-induced T cell proliferation was abolished after MSC coculture as a result of HLA-DR downregulation and indolamin-2,3-dioxygenase activation. Additionally, allospecific CD8 + T cell-mediated lysis of ECFCs was reduced in cocultures. ECFC/MSC coapplication in immunodeficient mice not only promoted the generation of improved blood vessel architecture after 6 weeks, but also reduced intragraft immune cell infiltration and endothelial HLA-DR expression following PBMC reconstitution. Crosstalk between UC-derived ECFCs and MSCs after combined transplantation can lower the risk of ECFC rejection, thus enabling their coapplication for therapeutic vasculogenesis. Stem Cells 2017;35:1233-1245. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Lineage tracing of neuromesodermal progenitors reveals novel Wnt-dependent roles in trunk progenitor cell maintenance and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garriock, Robert J; Chalamalasetty, Ravindra B; Kennedy, Mark W; Canizales, Lauren C; Lewandoski, Mark; Yamaguchi, Terry P

    2015-05-01

    In the development of the vertebrate body plan, Wnt3a is thought to promote the formation of paraxial mesodermal progenitors (PMPs) of the trunk region while suppressing neural specification. Recent lineage-tracing experiments have demonstrated that these trunk neural progenitors and PMPs derive from a common multipotent progenitor called the neuromesodermal progenitor (NMP). NMPs are known to reside in the anterior primitive streak (PS) region; however, the extent to which NMPs populate the PS and contribute to the vertebrate body plan, and the precise role that Wnt3a plays in regulating NMP self-renewal and differentiation are unclear. To address this, we used cell-specific markers (Sox2 and T) and tamoxifen-induced Cre recombinase-based lineage tracing to locate putative NMPs in vivo. We provide functional evidence for NMP location primarily in the epithelial PS, and to a lesser degree in the ingressed PS. Lineage-tracing studies in Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling pathway mutants provide genetic evidence that trunk progenitors normally fated to enter the mesodermal germ layer can be redirected towards the neural lineage. These data, combined with previous PS lineage-tracing studies, support a model that epithelial anterior PS cells are Sox2(+)T(+) multipotent NMPs and form the bulk of neural progenitors and PMPs of the posterior trunk region. Finally, we find that Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling directs trunk progenitors towards PMP fates; however, our data also suggest that Wnt3a positively supports a progenitor state for both mesodermal and neural progenitors. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Vitamin D Status in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Inflammation, Arterial Stiffness and Circulating Progenitor Cell Number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lo Gullo

    Full Text Available Suboptimal vitamin D status was recently acknowledged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality in several clinical settings, and its serum levels are commonly reduced in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA. Patients affected by RA present accelerated atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with respect to the general population. In RA, it has been reported an impairment of the number and the activity of circulating proangiogenic haematopoietic cells (PHCs, including CD34+, that may play a role in endothelial homeostasis. The purpose of the study is to investigate the association between vitamin D levels and PHCs, inflammatory markers, and arterial stiffening in patients with RA.CD34+ cells were isolated from 27 RA patients and 41 controls. Vitamin D levels, C-reactive protein (CRP, fibrinogen, pulse wave velocity (PWV, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT were also evaluated. CD34+ count and vitamin D levels were lower in RA patients as compared to controls, while fibrinogen, CRP, PWV and cIMT were higher in RA patients. CD34+ cell number appeared to be associated with vitamin D levels, and negatively correlated to fibrinogen and early atherosclerosis markers (PWV and cIMT; vitamin D levels appear also to be inversely associated to fibrinogen.RA patients with moderate disease activity presented with low vitamin D levels, low CD34+ cell count, increased PWV and cIMT; we found that vitamin D deficiency is associated to CD34+ cell reduction in peripheral blood, and with fibrinogen levels. This suggests that vitamin D might contribute to endothelial homeostasis in patients with RA.

  11. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drive Home Types of Blood Donations Blood Types Blood Types Not all blood is alike. There are eight ... African descent. Learn More About Blood and Diversity Blood Types and Transfusion There are very specific ways in ...

  12. Standard graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis with or without anti-T-cell globulin in haematopoietic cell transplantation from matched unrelated donors: a randomised, open-label, multicentre phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Jürgen; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Schmoor, Claudia; Ottinger, Hellmut D; Stelljes, Matthias; Zander, Axel R; Volin, Liisa; Ruutu, Tapani; Heim, Dominik A; Schwerdtfeger, Rainer; Kolbe, Karin; Mayer, Jiri; Maertens, Johan A; Linkesch, Werner; Holler, Ernst; Koza, Vladimir; Bornhäuser, Martin; Einsele, Hermann; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Bertz, Hartmut; Egger, Matthias; Grishina, Olga; Socié, Gérard

    2009-09-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation from unrelated donors. Anti-T-cell globulins (ATGs) might lower the incidence of GVHD. We did a prospective, randomised, multicentre, open-label, phase 3 trial to compare standard GVHD prophylaxis with ciclosporin and methotrexate with or without anti-Jurkat ATG-Fresenius (ATG-F). Between May 26, 2003, and Feb 8, 2007, 202 patients with haematological malignancies were centrally randomly assigned using computer-generated centre-stratified block randomisation between treatment groups receiving ciclosporin and methotrexate with or without additional ATG-F. One patient in the ATG-F group did not undergo transplantation, thus 201 patients who underwent transplantation with peripheral blood (n=164; 82%) or bone marrow (n=37; 18%) grafts from unrelated donors after myeloablative conditioning were included in the full analysis set, and were analysed according to their randomly assigned treatment (ATG-F n=103, control n=98). The primary endpoint was severe acute GVHD (aGVHD) grade III-IV or death within 100 days of transplantation. The trial is registered with the numbers DRKS00000002 and NCT00655343. The number of patients in the ATG-F group who had severe aGVHD grade III-IV or who died within 100 days of transplantation was 12 and 10 (21.4%, 95% CI 13.4-29.3), respectively, compared with 24 and nine (33.7%, 24.3-43.0) patients, respectively, in the control group (adjusted odds ratio 0.59, 95% CI 0.30-1.17; p=0.13). The cumulative incidence of aGVHD grade III-IV was 11.7% (95% CI 6.8-19.8) in the ATG-F group versus 24.5% (17.3-34.7) in the control group (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.50, 95% CI 0.25-1.01; p=0.054), and cumulative incidence of aGVHD grade II-IV was 33.0% (n=34; 95% CI 25.1-43.5) in the ATG-F group versus 51.0% (n=50; 95% CI 42.0-61.9) in the control group (adjusted HR 0.56, 0.36-0.87; p=0.011). The 2-year cumulative incidence of

  13. Reporter-Based Isolation of Developmental Myogenic Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyemen Kheir

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation and activity of mammalian tissues entail finely regulated processes, involving the concerted organization and interaction of multiple cell types. In recent years the prospective isolation of distinct progenitor and stem cell populations has become a powerful tool in the hands of developmental biologists and has rendered the investigation of their intrinsic properties possible. In this protocol, we describe how to purify progenitors with different lineage history and degree of differentiation from embryonic and fetal skeletal muscle by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. The approach takes advantage of a panel of murine strains expressing fluorescent reporter genes specifically in the myogenic progenitors. We provide a detailed description of the dissection procedures and of the enzymatic dissociation required to maximize the yield of mononucleated cells for subsequent FACS-based purification. The procedure takes ~6–7 h to complete and allows for the isolation and the subsequent molecular and phenotypic characterization of developmental myogenic progenitors.

  14. Documentation of normal and leukemic myelopoietic progenitor cells with high-resolution phase-contrast time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, I T

    2001-08-01

    The high-resolution phase-contrast, time-lapse cinematography using oil immersion lenses and 16-mm film demonstrates the kinetic cell events as maturation, locomotion, mitosis, and apoptosis of cells cultivated at 37 degrees C for up to 10 days. 0.5 v/v frozen-thawed sera with presumably high cytokine concentrations were added to the plasma or agar clot. Vital progenitor cells from human bone marrow and blood have a large, bright, unstructured nucleus with a large nucleolus and a narrow rim of cytoplasm (nuclear/cytoplasmic volume ratio = 0.7). Their nuclei are 6-14 micrometer in diameter and double their volume within 8 h. Many (70%) move at a mean speed of 2 micrometer/min, and many (30%) multiply with alpha-2alpha mitoses, generating progenitor cell families. Various disturbances during the course of mitosis lead to the formation of polyploid cells, thereby yielding the megakaryocytic cell line. Some of the progenitor cells undergo asymmetric alpha-alphan mitoses: One of the two initially identical daughter cells remains a progenitor cell in the morphological sense, whereas the other daughter cell - depending on the size of its mother cell - matures in the same culture medium to form a granulocytopoietic, monocytopoietic or erythrocytopoietic cell line. - In acute myeloid leukemias (AML), the blasts and their nuclei are slightly larger than the corresponding progenitor cells and move faster (5 micrometer/min). Symmetric alpha-2alpha mitoses permit unlimited multiplication of the leukemic blasts if contact with cytotoxic lymphocytes does not render them apoptotic. This results in more stromal cells than normal. Granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and anemia occur due to the genetic impairment of signaling control for asymmetric alpha-alphan mitoses, and thrombocytopenia occurs due to the reduction in polyploidization. Copyright 2001 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  15. Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus genogroup-specific virulence mechanisms in sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), from Redfish Lake, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, M.K.; Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.; Elliott, D.G.; Kurath, G.

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) field isolates from North America has established three main genogroups (U, M and L) that differ in host-specific virulence. In sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka, the U genogroup is highly virulent, whereas the M genogroup is nearly non-pathogenic. In this study, we sought to characterize the virus-host dynamics that contribute to genogroup-specific virulence in a captive stock of sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake in Idaho. Juvenile sockeye salmon were challenged by immersion and injection with either a representative U or M viral strain and sampled periodically until 14 days post-infection (p.i.). Fish challenged with each strain had positive viral titre by day 3, regardless of challenge route, but the fish exposed to the M genogroup virus had significantly lower virus titres than fish exposed to the U genogroup virus. Gene expression analysis by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR was used to simultaneously assess viral load and host interferon (IFN) response in the anterior kidney. Viral load was significantly higher in the U-challenged fish relative to M-challenged fish. Both viruses induced expression of the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), but expression was usually significantly lower in the M-challenged group, particularly at later time points (7 and 14 days p.i.). However, ISG expression was comparable with 3 days post-immersion challenge despite a significant difference in viral load. Our data indicated that the M genogroup virus entered the host, replicated and spread in the sockeye salmon tissues, but to a lesser extent than the U genogroup. Both virus types induced a host IFN response, but the high virulence strain (U) continued to replicate in the presence of this response, whereas the low virulence strain (M) was cleared below detectable levels. We hypothesize that high virulence is associated with early in vivo replication allowing the virus to achieve a threshold level, which the

  16. Production of endothelial progenitor cells obtained from human Wharton's jelly using different culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, S A; Gaafar, T M; Samy, R M; Sabry, D; Nasr, A S; Maksoud, Fa Abdel

    2016-11-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) participate in revascularization and angiogenesis. EPC can be cultured in vitro from mononuclear cells of peripheral blood, umbilical cord blood or bone marrow; they also can be transdifferentiated from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We isolated EPCs from Wharton's jelly (WJ) using two methods. The first method was by obtaining MSC from WJ and characterizing them by flow cytometry and their adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation, then applying endothelial growth differentiating media. The second method was by direct culture of cells derived from WJ into endothelial differentiating media. EPCs were characterized by morphology, Dil-LDL uptake/UEA-1 immunostaining and testing the expression of endothelial markers by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. We found that MSC derived from WJ differentiated into endothelial-like cells using simple culture conditions with endothelium induction agents in the medium.

  17. NG2-glia, More Than Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenín-von Bernhardi, Jaime; Dimou, Leda

    2016-01-01

    NG2-glia are a mysterious and ubiquitous glial population with a highly branched morphology. Initial studies suggested that their unique function is the generation and maintenance of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS), important for proper myelination and therefore for axonal support and fast conduction velocity. Over the last years this simplistic notion has been dramatically changed: the wide and homogeneous distribution of NG2-glia within all areas of the developing CNS that is maintained during the whole lifespan, their potential to also differentiate into other cell types in a spatiotemporal manner, their active capability of maintaining their population and their dynamic behavior in altered conditions have raised the question: are NG2-glia simple progenitor cells or do they play further major roles in the normal function of the CNS? In this chapter, we will discuss some important features of NG2-glia like their homeostatic distribution in the CNS and their potential to differentiate into diverse cell types. Additionally, we will give some further insights into the properties that these cells have, like the ability to form synapses with neurons and their plastic behavior triggered by neuronal activity, suggesting that they may play a role specifically in myelin and more generally in brain plasticity. Finally, we will briefly review their behavior in disease models suggesting that their function is extended to repair the brain after insult.

  18. Harmine stimulates proliferation of human neural progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Dakic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Harmine is the β-carboline alkaloid with the highest concentration in the psychotropic plant decoction Ayahuasca. In rodents, classical antidepressants reverse the symptoms of depression by stimulating neuronal proliferation. It has been shown that Ayahuasca presents antidepressant effects in patients with depressive disorder. In the present study, we investigated the effects of harmine in cell cultures containing human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs, 97% nestin-positive derived from pluripotent stem cells. After 4 days of treatment, the pool of proliferating hNPCs increased by 71.5%. Harmine has been reported as a potent inhibitor of the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase (DYRK1A, which regulates cell proliferation and brain development. We tested the effect of analogs of harmine, an inhibitor of DYRK1A (INDY, and an irreversible selective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO but not DYRK1A (pargyline. INDY but not pargyline induced proliferation of hNPCs similarly to harmine, suggesting that inhibition of DYRK1A is a possible mechanism to explain harmine effects upon the proliferation of hNPCs. Our findings show that harmine enhances proliferation of hNPCs and suggest that inhibition of DYRK1A may explain its effects upon proliferation in vitro and antidepressant effects in vivo.

  19. Hepatic progenitors for liver disease: current position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alice Conigliaro1, David A Brenner2, Tatiana Kisseleva21University “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia Policlinico Umberto I, V Clinica Medica, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Liver regeneration restores the original functionality of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in response to injury. It is regulated on several levels, with different cellular populations contributing to this process, eg, hepatocytes, liver precursor cells, intrahepatic stem cells. In response to injury, mature hepatocytes have the capability to proliferate and give rise to new hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Meanwhile, liver precursor cells (oval cells have become the most recognized bipotential precursor cells in the damaged liver. They rapidly proliferate, change their cellular composition, and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes to compensate for the cellular loss and maintain liver homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that oval cells originate from the intrahepatic stem cell(s, which in turn give(s rise to epithelial, including oval cells, and/or other hepatic cells of nonepithelial origin. Since there is a close relationship between the liver and hematopoiesis, bone marrow derived cells can also contribute to liver regeneration by the fusion of myeloid cells with damaged hepatocytes, or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. The current review discusses the contribution of different cells to liver regeneration and their characteristics.Keywords: hepatic progenitor, liver disease, liver precursor cells, oval cells, hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cells, cholangiocytes

  20. Endothelial progenitor cells as cellular vehicles to deliver oncolytic virus therapies to metastatic tumors: the "Trojan horse" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Jia, Jun

    2008-01-01

    In view of the limited success of available treatment modalities for metastatic tumor, alternative and complementary strategies need to be developed. Oncolytic viruses are capable of selective replication in malignant cells and therefore offer levels of potency and specificity that are potentially far higher than conventional treatments for tumor. However, lack of systemic delivery technique for therapeutic viruses impacts their application in treating patients with multiple disseminated metastases. Recent studies have demonstrated that when being transplanted, endothelial progenitor cells can migrate via peripheral blood and home exclusively to the site of tumor neovasculature. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cells can act as "Trojan horse" to systemically deliver oncolytic virus to metastases in order to inhibit tumor neovascularization formation and eventually eradicate the metastatic tumor.

  1. Mouse ES cell-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Manzar, Gohar; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Future stem cell-based therapies will benefit from the new discoveries being made on pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells. Understanding the genes regulating pluripotency has opened new opportunities to generate patient-tailored therapies. However, protocols for deriving progenitor cells of therapeutic grade from these pluripotent stem cells are not yet worked out. In particular the potential of these cells in treating diseases when compared to their adult progenitor counterparts is unknown. This is crucial work that needs to be studied in detail because we will need to determine engraftment potential of these cells and their ability for multi-lineage engraftment in the in vivo setting before any clinical applications. The ability of these cells to engraft is dependent on their expression of cell surface markers which guide their homing patterns. In this review, I discuss murine hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from mouse ES cells. Stem cells in the bone marrow are found in the bone marrow niches. Our knowledge of the bone marrow niches is growing and will ultimately lead to improved clinical transplantation of bone marrow cells. We are, however, a long way in appreciating how hematopoietic progenitor cells migrate and populate lymphoid tissues. One of the variables in generating hematopoietic progenitor cells is that different labs use different approaches in generating progenitor cells. In some cases, the ES cell lines used show some variability as well. The cell culture media used by the different investigators highly influence the maturation level of the cells and their homing patterns. Here, mouse ES cell-derived progenitor cells are discussed.

  2. Beyond stem cells: Commitment of progenitor cells to meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Griswold

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The first step in established spermatogenesis is the production of progenitor cells by the stem cell population. The progenitor cells (undifferentiated A spermatogonia expand in number via the formation of syncytial chains by mitosis. The mechanism by which these progenitor cells commit to meiosis and spermatogenesis is tightly controlled and results in complex morphological organization all of which is designed to efficiently achieve large numbers of spermatozoa. The major extrinsic factor that triggers the commitment to meiosis and establishes the structural complexity is retinoic acid (RA. Retinoic acid is produced from retinol via two oxidation steps in low abundance near its site of action. The action of RA on undifferentiated A spermatogonia results in the timed progression of these progenitor cells into the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. We have utilized a drug WIN 18,446 that inhibits the second oxidation step in RA biosynthesis to block the progression of undifferentiated A spermatogonia in the mouse testis. As a result of this block the undifferentiated progenitor cells accumulate but do not differentiate into A1 spermatogonia. When the block is released and a bolus of RA is simultaneously administered the accumulated spermatogonia progress through the differentiation pathway in complete synchrony and maintain that synchrony with regard to stages of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium for several months. This procedure allowed us to accumulate sufficient material to measure retinoic acid levels across the cycle and will allow us to isolate and analyze large number of progenitor cells proceeding synchronously down the pathway to meiosis. We have been able to show that the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium is established and maintained by pulses of RA that appear at stages VIII and IX of the cycle. Keywords: Progenitor cells, Retinoic acid, Synchronous spermatogenesis

  3. Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood, as discussed in the following paragraphs. Red Blood Cells Red blood cells carry oxygen from ... leaks out, and its levels in your blood rise. For example, blood levels of troponin rise when ...

  4. Cord blood banking and transplantation: advances and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Mervin C

    2014-04-01

    A review of articles published since January 2012 on the topic of cord blood banking and cord blood stem cell transplantation was conducted for this the 25th anniversary year of the first cord blood transplant performed in a human. Cord blood banking is performed throughout the world. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation is recognized as an acceptable alternative stem cell source for paediatric and adults requiring a haematopoietic transplant, particularly for patients of racial and ethnic minorities. To further advance the use of UCB, methods to enhance UCB stem cell expansion, engraftment and maintenance may be required. Controversy on the most effective and economically sustainable model for banking and storing an optimal UCB product continues to persist. Cord blood banking and transplantation of cord blood stem cells has advanced rapidly over the initial 25 years, as more than 30 ,000 patients have benefited from the therapy. New concepts on the use of methods to expand UCB stem cells for transplantation and use for nonhaematopoietic indications may increase demand for UCB over the next few decades.

  5. Melatonin attenuates methamphetamine-induced inhibition of proliferation of adult rat hippocampal progenitor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekthuwapranee, Kasima; Sotthibundhu, Areechun; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2015-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an extremely addictive stimulatory drug. A recent study suggested that METH may cause an impairment in the proliferation of hippocampal neural progenitor cells, but the underlying mechanism of this effect remains unknown. Blood and cerebrospinal levels of melatonin derive primarily from the pineal gland, and that performs many biological functions. Our previous study demonstrated that melatonin promotes the proliferation of progenitor cells originating from the hippocampus. In this study, hippocampal progenitor cells from adult Wistar rats were used to determine the effects of METH on cell proliferation and the mechanisms underlying these effects. We investigated the effects of melatonin on the METH-induced alteration in cell proliferation. The results demonstrated that 500 μm METH induced a decrease (63.0%) in neurosphere cell proliferation and altered the expression of neuronal phenotype markers in the neurosphere cell population. Moreover, METH induced an increase in the protein expression of the tumor suppressor p53 (124.4%) and the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CIP) (1) (p21) (128.1%), resulting in the accumulation of p21 in the nucleus. We also found that METH altered the expression of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A (79.6%) and NR2B (126.7%) and Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII) (74.0%). In addition, pretreatment with 1 μm melatonin attenuated the effects induced by METH treatment. According to these results, we concluded that METH induces a reduction in cell proliferation by upregulating the cell cycle regulators p53/p21 and promoting the accumulation of p21 in the nucleus and that melatonin ameliorates these negative effects of METH. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Characterization of Cardiac-Resident Progenitor Cells Expressing High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity

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    Marc-Estienne Roehrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH activity has been associated with stem and progenitor cells in various tissues. Human cord blood and bone marrow ALDH-bright (ALDHbr cells have displayed angiogenic activity in preclinical studies and have been shown to be safe in clinical trials in patients with ischemic cardiovascular disease. The presence of ALDHbr cells in the heart has not been evaluated so far. We have characterized ALDHbr cells isolated from mouse hearts. One percent of nonmyocytic cells from neonatal and adult hearts were ALDHbr. ALDHvery-br cells were more frequent in neonatal hearts than adult. ALDHbr cells were more frequent in atria than ventricles. Expression of ALDH1A1 isozyme transcripts was highest in ALDHvery-br cells, intermediate in ALDHbr cells, and lowest in ALDHdim cells. ALDH1A2 expression was highest in ALDHvery-br cells, intermediate in ALDHdim cells, and lowest in ALDHbr cells. ALDH1A3 and ALDH2 expression was detectable in ALDHvery-br and ALDHbr cells, unlike ALDHdim cells, albeit at lower levels compared with ALDH1A1 and ALDH1A2. Freshly isolated ALDHbr cells were enriched for cells expressing stem cell antigen-1, CD34, CD90, CD44, and CD106. ALDHbr cells, unlike ALDHdim cells, could be grown in culture for more than 40 passages. They expressed sarcomeric α-actinin and could be differentiated along multiple mesenchymal lineages. However, the proportion of ALDHbr cells declined with cell passage. In conclusion, the cardiac-derived ALDHbr population is enriched for progenitor cells that exhibit mesenchymal progenitor-like characteristics and can be expanded in culture. The regenerative potential of cardiac-derived ALDHbr cells remains to be evaluated.

  7. Circulating Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Aging Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Misumi, Munechika; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Hayashi, Tomonori; Imai, Kazue; Ohishi, Waka; Nakachi, Kei; Young, Lauren F; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    It is not yet known whether hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are compromised in the aging population of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors after their exposure nearly 70 years ago. To address this, we evaluated age- and radiation-related changes in different subtypes of circulating HSPCs among the CD34-positive/lineage marker-negative (CD34(+)Lin(-)) cell population in 231 Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. We enumerated functional HSPC subtypes, including: cobblestone area-forming cells; long-term culture-initiating cells; erythroid burst-forming units; granulocyte and macrophage colony-forming units; and T-cell and natural killer cell progenitors using cell culture. We obtained the count of each HSPC subtype per unit volume of blood and the proportion of each HSPC subtype in CD34(+)Lin(-) cells to represent the lineage commitment trend. Multivariate analyses, using sex, age and radiation dose as variables, showed significantly decreased counts with age in the total CD34(+)Lin(-) cell population and all HSPC subtypes. As for the proportion, only T-cell progenitors decreased significantly with age, suggesting that the commitment to the T-cell lineage in HSPCs continuously declines with age throughout the lifetime. However, neither the CD34(+)Lin(-) cell population, nor HSPC subtypes showed significant radiation-induced dose-dependent changes in counts or proportions. Moreover, the correlations of the proportions among HSPC subtypes in the survivors properly revealed the hierarchy of lineage commitments. Taken together, our findings suggest that many years after exposure to radiation and with advancing age, the number and function of HSPCs in living survivors as a whole may have recovered to normal levels.

  8. Isolation and characterization of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells from malignant gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ke-Tai; Juerchott, Kathrin; Fu, Peng; Selbig, Joachim; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Schichor, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly-vascularised tumours. Neoangiogenesis is a crucial factor in the malignant behaviour of tumour and prognosis of patients. Several mechanisms are suspected to lead to neoangiogenesis, one of them is the recruitment of multipotent progenitor cells towards the tumour. Factors such as Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) were described to recruit bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to the glioma stroma and vasculature. Little is known about isolating EPCs from normal or malignant tissues. In this study, we addressed the topic of characterization of tumour-isolated EPCs and re-defined the clonal relationship between EPCs and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in gliomas. We first checked public gene expression data of glioma for putative marker expression, pointing towards a prevalence of EPCs and HSCs in glioma. Immunohistochemical staining of glioma tissue confirmed the higher expression of these progenitor markers in glioma tissue. EPCs and HSCs were consequently isolated and characterized at the phenotypic and functional levels. We applied a new isolation method, for the first time, to specimen from patients with high grade glioma including seven grade IV glioblastoma, five-grade III astrocytoma, and three grade III oligoastrocytoma. In all samples, we were able to isolate the tumour-derived EPCs, which were positive for characteristic markers: CD31, CD34 and VEGFR2. The EPCs formed capillary networks in vitro and had the ability to take up acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Glioma-derived HSCs were positive for CD34 and CD45, but they were unable to form a capillary network in vitro. These findings on tumour-derived EPCs/HSCs were in concordance with the results, derived from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers. In our study, we established a new method for EPC/HSC isolation from human gliomas, defined the contribution of EPCs and HSCs to the tumour tissue, and highlighted the intense in vivo tumour host

  9. PI3 kinase is important for Ras, MEK and Erk activation of Epo-stimulated human erythroid progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Enrico K

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Erythropoietin is a multifunctional cytokine which regulates the number of erythrocytes circulating in mammalian blood. This is crucial in order to maintain an appropriate oxygen supply throughout the body. Stimulation of primary human erythroid progenitors (PEPs with erythropoietin (Epo leads to the activation of the mitogenic kinases (MEKs and Erks. How this is accomplished mechanistically remained unclear. Results Biochemical studies with human cord blood-derived PEPs now show that Ras and the class Ib enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K family, PI3K gamma, are activated in response to minimal Epo concentrations. Surprisingly, three structurally different PI3K inhibitors block Ras, MEK and Erk activation in PEPs by Epo. Furthermore, Erk activation in PEPs is insensitive to the inhibition of Raf kinases but suppressed upon PKC inhibition. In contrast, Erk activation induced by stem cell factor, which activates c-Kit in the same cells, is sensitive to Raf inhibition and insensitive to PI3K and PKC inhibitors. Conclusions These unexpected findings contrast with previous results in human primary cells using Epo at supraphysiological concentrations and open new doors to eventually understanding how low Epo concentrations mediate the moderate proliferation of erythroid progenitors under homeostatic blood oxygen levels. They indicate that the basal activation of MEKs and Erks in PEPs by minimal concentrations of Epo does not occur through the classical cascade Shc/Grb2/Sos/Ras/Raf/MEK/Erk. Instead, MEKs and Erks are signal mediators of PI3K, probably the recently described PI3K gamma, through a Raf-independent signaling pathway which requires PKC activity. It is likely that higher concentrations of Epo that are induced by hypoxia, for example, following blood loss, lead to additional mitogenic signals which greatly accelerate erythroid progenitor proliferation.

  10. Ethical considerations on preimplantation genetic diagnosis for HLA typing to match a future child as a donor of haematopoietic stem cells to a sibling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, G; Schots, R; Liebaers, I

    2002-03-01

    Recently, several requests were made by couples with an affected child who wanted preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to select embryos in the hope of conceiving an HLA identical donor sibling. This article considers the ethical arguments for and against the application of PGD for this goal. Only embryos HLA matched with an existing sibling in need of a compatible donor of haematopoietic stem cells would be transferred. The main arguments are the instrumentalization of the child, the best-interests standard, the postnatal test for acceptability and the experience of the donor child. It is argued that conceiving a child to save a child is a morally defensible decision on the condition that the operation that will be performed on the future child is acceptable to perform on an existing child. The instrumentalization of the donor child does not demonstrate disrespect for its autonomy or its intrinsic worth.

  11. Challenge studies of European stocks of redfin perch, Perca fluviatilis L., and rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), with epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Jensen, Ann Britt Bang

    2009-01-01

    A challenge model for comparison of the virulence of epizootic haematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV) to European stock of redfin perch, Perca fluviatilis L., and rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), was tested. The model investigated intraperitoneal (IP), bath and cohabitation routes at 10......, 15 and 20 C for 5–6 g fish and 15 C for 20 g perch. In the IP challenges of perch, significant mortality occurred at 15 C and 20 C. In challenge trials for rainbow trout, significant mortalities were observed in IP and bath challenges at 20 C. The mortality observed in IP-challenged 20 g perch...... indicate that EHNV does not pose a high risk for wild perch and trout populations in Europe by natural exposure. Mortality appears to be primarily a function of environmental factors, with temperature playing an important role, and not just the presence of the virus in the fish....

  12. Endothelial Cell-Selective Adhesion Molecule Expression in Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Is Essential for Erythropoiesis Recovery after Bone Marrow Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Takao; Yokota, Takafumi; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Ueda, Tomoaki; Ichii, Michiko; Ishibashi, Tomohiko; Isono, Tomomi; Habuchi, Yoko; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Numerous red blood cells are generated every second from proliferative progenitor cells under a homeostatic state. Increased erythropoietic activity is required after myelo-suppression as a result of chemo-radio therapies. Our previous study revealed that the endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM), an authentic hematopoietic stem cell marker, plays essential roles in stress-induced hematopoiesis. To determine the physiological importance of ESAM in erythroid recovery, ESAM-knockout (KO) mice were treated with the anti-cancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). ESAM-KO mice experienced severe and prolonged anemia after 5-FU treatment compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Eight days after the 5-FU injection, compared to WT mice, ESAM-KO mice showed reduced numbers of erythroid progenitors in bone marrow (BM) and spleen, and reticulocytes in peripheral blood. Megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors (MEPs) from the BM of 5-FU-treated ESAM-KO mice showed reduced burst forming unit-erythrocyte (BFU-E) capacities than those from WT mice. BM transplantation revealed that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from ESAM-KO donors were more sensitive to 5-FU treatment than that from WT donors in the WT host mice. However, hematopoietic cells from WT donors transplanted into ESAM-KO host mice could normally reconstitute the erythroid lineage after a BM injury. These results suggested that ESAM expression in hematopoietic cells, but not environmental cells, is critical for hematopoietic recovery. We also found that 5-FU treatment induces the up-regulation of ESAM in primitive erythroid progenitors and macrophages that do not express ESAM under homeostatic conditions. The phenotypic change seen in macrophages might be functionally involved in the interaction between erythroid progenitors and their niche components during stress-induced acute erythropoiesis. Microarray analyses of primitive erythroid progenitors from 5-FU-treated WT and ESAM-KO mice revealed that various signaling

  13. Persistence of recipient human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies and production of donor HLA antibodies following reduced intensity allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Ross M; Mamcarz, Ewelina; Adams, Sharon; Donohue Jerussi, Theresa; Sugimoto, Kyoko; Tian, Xin; Flegel, Willy A; Childs, Richard W

    2014-08-01

    The effects of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) on human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-alloimmunization and platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT) are unknown. We studied HLA-alloantibodies in a cohort of 16 patients (eight HLA-alloimmunized with pre-transplant histories of PTR and eight non-alloimmunized controls) undergoing Allo-HSCT using fludarabine/cyclophosphamide-based RIC. Pre- and post-transplant serum samples were analysed for HLA-antibodies and compared to myeloid, T-cell and bone marrow plasma cell chimaerism. Among alloimmunized patients, the duration that HLA-antibodies persisted post-transplant correlated strongly with pre-transplant HLA-antibody mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) and PRA levels (Spearman's rank correlation = 0·954 (P = 0·0048) and 0·865 (P = 0·0083) respectively). Pre-transplant MFI >10,000 was associated with post-transplant HLA antibody persistence >100 d (P = 0·029). HLA-antibodies persisted ≥100 d in 3/8 patients despite recipient chimaerism being undetectable in all lympho-haematopoietic lineages including plasma cells. Post-transplant de-novo HLA-antibodies developed in three control patients with two developing PTR; the donors for two of these patients demonstrated pre-existing HLA-antibodies of equivalent specificity to those in the patient, confirming donor origin. These data show HLA-antibodies may persist for prolonged periods following RIC. Further study is needed to determine the incidence of post-transplant PTR as a consequence of donor-derived HLA alloimmunization before recommendations on donor HLA-antibody screening can be made. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. BloodSpot: a database of gene expression profiles and transcriptional programs for healthy and malignant haematopoiesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Sasivarevic, Damir; Hadi Sohi, Sina

    2016-01-01

    largely inaccessible. Current databases provide information about gene-expression but fail to answer key questions regarding co-regulation, genetic programs or effect on patient survival. To address these shortcomings, we present BloodSpot (www.bloodspot.eu), which includes and greatly extends our...... previously released database HemaExplorer, a database of gene expression profiles from FACS sorted healthy and malignant haematopoietic cells. A revised interactive interface simultaneously provides a plot of gene expression along with a Kaplan–Meier analysis and a hierarchical tree depicting...

  15. Ultra-endurance exercise induces stress and inflammation and affects circulating hematopoietic progenitor cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, I; Kröpfl, J M; Fuchs, R; Pekovits, K; Mangge, H; Raggam, R B; Gruber, H-J; Prüller, F; Hofmann, P; Truschnig-Wilders, M; Obermayer-Pietsch, B; Haushofer, A C; Kessler, H H; Mächler, P

    2015-10-01

    Although amateur sports have become increasingly competitive within recent decades, there are as yet few studies on the possible health risks for athletes. This study aims to determine the impact of ultra-endurance exercise-induced stress on the number and function of circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells (CPCs) and hematological, inflammatory, clinical, metabolic, and stress parameters in moderately trained amateur athletes. Following ultra-endurance exercise, there were significant increases in leukocytes, platelets, interleukin-6, fibrinogen, tissue enzymes, blood lactate, serum cortisol, and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Ultra-endurance exercise did not influence the number of CPCs but resulted in a highly significant decline of CPC functionality after the competition. Furthermore, Epstein-Barr virus was seen to be reactivated in one of seven athletes. The link between exercise-induced stress and decline of CPC functionality is supported by a negative correlation between cortisol and CPC function. We conclude that ultra-endurance exercise induces metabolic stress and an inflammatory response that affects not only mature hematopoietic cells but also the function of the immature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell fraction, which make up the immune system and provide for regeneration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Hematopoietic Niche - Exploring Biomimetic Cues to Improve the Functionality of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marta H G; de Soure, António M; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo; da Silva, Cláudia L

    2018-02-01

    The adult bone marrow (BM) niche is a complex entity where a homeostatic hematopoietic system is maintained through a dynamic crosstalk between different cellular and non-cellular players. Signaling mechanisms triggered by cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix (ECM), cell-cytokine interactions, and local microenvironment parameters are involved in controlling quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, and migration of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). A promising strategy to more efficiently expand HSPC numbers and tune their properties ex vivo is to mimic the hematopoietic niche through integration of adjuvant stromal cells, soluble cues, and/or biomaterial-based approaches in HSPC culture systems. Particularly, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC), through their paracrine activity or direct contact with HSPC, are thought to be a relevant niche player, positioning HSPC-MSC co-culture as a valuable platform to support the ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitors. To improve the clinical outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), namely when the available HSPC are present in a limited number such is the case of HSPC collected from umbilical cord blood (UCB), ex vivo expansion of HSPC is required without eliminating the long-term repopulating capacity of more primitive HSC. Here, we will focus on depicting the characteristics of co-culture systems, as well as other bioengineering approaches to improve the functionality of HSPC ex vivo. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Vascular pattern of the dentate gyrus is regulated by neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombero, Ana; Garcia-Lopez, Raquel; Estirado, Alicia; Martinez, Salvador

    2018-05-01

    Neurogenesis is a vital process that begins during early embryonic development and continues until adulthood, though in the latter case, it is restricted to the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG). In particular, the DG's neurogenic properties are structurally and functionally unique, which may be related to its singular vascular pattern. Neurogenesis and angiogenesis share molecular signals and act synergistically, supporting the concept of a neurogenic niche as a functional unit between neural precursors cells and their environment, in which the blood vessels play an important role. Whereas it is well known that vascular development controls neural proliferation in the embryonary and in the adult brain, by releasing neurotrophic factors; the potential influence of neural cells on vascular components during angiogenesis is largely unknown. We have demonstrated that the reduction of neural progenitors leads to a significant impairment of vascular development. Since VEGF is a potential regulator in the neurogenesis-angiogenesis crosstalk, we were interested in assessing the possible role of this molecule in the hippocampal neurovascular development. Our results showed that VEGF is the molecule involved in the regulation of vascular development by neural progenitor cells in the DG.

  18. SCA-1 Expression Level Identifies Quiescent Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina N.F. Morcos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood cell generation depends on continuous cellular output by the sequential hierarchy of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC and progenitor populations that all contain quiescent and actively cycling cells. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs express the surface molecule Stem cell antigen 1 (SCA-1/LY6A. Using histone 2B-red fluorescent fusion protein label retention and cell-cycle reporter mice, we demonstrate that high SCA-1 expression (SCA-1hi identifies not only quiescent HSCs but quiescent cells on all hierarchical levels within the lineage−SCA-1+KIT+ (LSK population. Each transplanted SCA-1hi HSPC population also displayed self-renewal potential superior to that of the respective SCA-1lo population. SCA-1 expression is inducible by type I interferon (IFN. We show, however, that quiescence and high self-renewal capacity of cells with brighter SCA-1 expression at steady state were independent of type I IFN signaling. We conclude that SCA-1 expression levels can be used to prospectively isolate functionally heterogeneous HSPC subpopulations.

  19. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a Type Ia supernova rate from z ~ 0.01-0.1 of rV = 4.26$+1.39 +0.10\\atop{-1.93 -0.10}$h3 x 10-4 SNe Ia/yr/Mpc3 from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  20. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-01-01

    analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a Type Ia supernova rate from z ∼ 0.01-0.1 of r V = 4.26 -1.93 -0.10 +1.39 +0.10 h 3 x 10 -4 SNe Ia/yr/Mpc 3 from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae

  1. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Evan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages...... expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how...... the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature...

  2. Establishment of bipotent progenitor cell clone from rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yousuke; Yada, Erica; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2011-12-01

    The present study describes the isolation, cloning and characterization of adipogenic progenitor cells from rat skeletal muscle. Among the obtained 10 clones, the most highly adipogenic progenitor, 2G11 cells, were further characterized. In addition to their adipogenicity, 2G11 cells retain myogenic potential as revealed by formation of multinucleated myotubes when co-cultured with myoblasts. 2G11 cells were resistant to an inhibitory effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on adipogenesis, while adipogenesis of widely used preadipogenic cell line, 3T3-L1 cells, was suppressed almost completely by the same treatment. In vivo transplantation experiments revealed that 2G11 cells are able to possess both adipogenicity and myogenicity in vivo. These results indicate the presence of bipotent progenitor cells in rat skeletal muscle, and suggest that such cells may contribute to ectopic fat formation in skeletal muscle. © 2011 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2011 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Cord blood banking - bio-objects on the borderlands between community and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nik; Williams, Rosalind

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has become the focus of intense efforts to collect, screen and bank haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in hundreds of repositories around the world. UCB banking has developed through a broad spectrum of overlapping banking practices, sectors and institutional forms. Superficially at least, these sectors have been widely distinguished in bioethical and policy literature between notions of the 'public' and the 'private', the commons and the market respectively. Our purpose in this paper is to reflect more critically on these distinctions and to articulate the complex practical and hybrid nature of cord blood as a 'bio-object' that straddles binary conceptions of the blood economies. The paper draws upon Roberto Esposito's reflections on biopolitics and his attempt to transcend the dualistic polarisations of immunity and community, or the private and the public. We suggest that his thoughts on immunitary hospitality resonate with many of the actual features and realpolitik of a necessarily internationalised and globally distributed UCB 'immunitary regime'.

  4. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. Cellular plasticity : the good, the bad, and the ugly? Microenvironmental influences on progenitor cell therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, Jan-Renier A. J.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Krenning, Guido

    Progenitor cell based therapies have emerged for the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular diseases where there is insufficient endogenous repair. However, clinical success has been limited, which challenges the original premise that transplanted progenitor cells would orchestrate repair. In this

  7. Contribution of Implanted, Genetically Modified Muscle Progenitor Cells Expressing BMP-2 to New Bone Formation in a Rat Osseous Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Vega, Rodolfo E; De Padilla, Consuelo Lopez; Trujillo, Miguel; Quirk, Nicholas; Porter, Ryan M; Evans, Christopher H; Ferreira, Elisabeth

    2018-01-03

    Because muscle contains osteoprogenitor cells and has a propensity to form bone, we have explored its utility in healing large osseous defects. Healing is achieved by the insertion of muscle fragments transduced with adenovirus encoding BMP-2 (Ad.BMP-2). However, it is not known whether the genetically modified muscle contributes osteoprogenitor cells to healing defects or merely serves as a local source of BMP-2. This question is part of the larger debate on the fate of progenitor cells introduced into sites of tissue damage to promote regeneration. To address this issue, we harvested fragments of muscle from rats constitutively expressing GFP, transduced them with Ad.BMP-2, and implanted them into femoral defects in wild-type rats under various conditions. GFP + cells persisted within defects for the entire 8 weeks of the experiments. In the absence of bone formation, these cells presented as fibroblasts. When bone was formed, GFP + cells were present as osteoblasts and osteocytes and also among the lining cells of new blood vessels. The genetically modified muscle thus contributed progenitor cells as well as BMP-2 to the healing defect, a property of great significance in light of the extensive damage to soft tissue and consequent loss of endogenous progenitors in problematic fractures. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PlGF repairs myocardial ischemia through mechanisms of angiogenesis, cardioprotection and recruitment of myo-angiogenic competent marrow progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Iwasaki

    Full Text Available Despite preclinical success in regenerating and revascularizing the infarcted heart using angiogenic growth factors or bone marrow (BM cells, recent clinical trials have revealed less benefit from these therapies than expected.We explored the therapeutic potential of myocardial gene therapy of placental growth factor (PlGF, a VEGF-related angiogenic growth factor, with progenitor-mobilizing activity.Myocardial PlGF gene therapy improves cardiac performance after myocardial infarction, by inducing cardiac repair and reparative myoangiogenesis, via upregulation of paracrine anti-apoptotic and angiogenic factors. In addition, PlGF therapy stimulated Sca-1(+/Lin(- (SL BM progenitor proliferation, enhanced their mobilization into peripheral blood, and promoted their recruitment into the peri-infarct borders. Moreover, PlGF enhanced endothelial progenitor colony formation of BM-derived SL cells, and induced a phenotypic switch of BM-SL cells, recruited in the infarct, to the endothelial, smooth muscle and cardiomyocyte lineage.Such pleiotropic effects of PlGF on cardiac repair and regeneration offer novel opportunities in the treatment of ischemic heart disease.

  9. OP9-Lhx2 stromal cells facilitate derivation of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating engraftable hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs is an ideal approach for obtaining induced HSCs for cell therapy. However, the path from PSCs to robustly induced HSCs (iHSCs in vitro remains elusive. We hypothesize that the modification of hematopoietic niche cells by transcription factors facilitates the derivation of induced HSCs from PSCs. The Lhx2 transcription factor is expressed in fetal liver stromal cells but not in fetal blood cells. Knocking out Lhx2 leads to a fetal hematopoietic defect in a cell non-autonomous role. In this study, we demonstrate that the ectopic expression of Lhx2 in OP9 cells (OP9-Lhx2 accelerates the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. OP9-Lhx2 significantly increased the yields of hematopoietic progenitor cells via co-culture with PSCs in vitro. Interestingly, the co-injection of OP9-Lhx2 and PSCs into immune deficient mice also increased the proportion of hematopoietic progenitors via the formation of teratomas. The transplantation of phenotypic HSCs from OP9-Lhx2 teratomas but not from the OP9 control supported a transient repopulating capability. The upregulation of Apln gene by Lhx2 is correlated to the hematopoietic commitment property of OP9-Lhx2. Furthermore, the enforced expression of Apln in OP9 cells significantly increased the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. These results indicate that OP9-Lhx2 is a good cell line for regeneration of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Blood culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  11. Endothelial progenitor cells display clonal restriction in multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Kezhi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In multiple myeloma (MM, increased neoangiogenesis contributes to tumor growth and disease progression. Increased levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs contribute to neoangiogenesis in MM, and, importantly, covary with disease activity and response to treatment. In order to understand the mechanisms responsible for increased EPC levels and neoangiogenic function in MM, we investigated whether these cells were clonal by determining X-chromosome inactivation (XCI patterns in female patients by a human androgen receptor assay (HUMARA. In addition, EPCs and bone marrow cells were studied for the presence of clonotypic immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH gene rearrangement, which indicates clonality in B cells; thus, its presence in EPCs would indicate a close genetic link between tumor cells in MM and endothelial cells that provide tumor neovascularization. Methods A total of twenty-three consecutive patients who had not received chemotherapy were studied. Screening in 18 patients found that 11 displayed allelic AR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and these patients were further studied for XCI patterns in EPCs and hair root cells by HUMARA. In 2 patients whose EPCs were clonal by HUMARA, and in an additional 5 new patients, EPCs were studied for IGH gene rearrangement using PCR with family-specific primers for IGH variable genes (VH. Results In 11 patients, analysis of EPCs by HUMARA revealed significant skewing (≥ 77% expression of a single allele in 64% (n = 7. In 4 of these patients, XCI skewing was extreme (≥ 90% expression of a single allele. In contrast, XCI in hair root cells was random. Furthermore, PCR amplification with VH primers resulted in amplification of the same product in EPCs and bone marrow cells in 71% (n = 5 of 7 patients, while no IGH rearrangement was found in EPCs from healthy controls. In addition, in patients with XCI skewing in EPCs, advanced age was associated with poorer clinical status

  12. Endothelial progenitor cells display clonal restriction in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, Marc; Özçelik, Tayfun; Bağişlar, Sevgi; Vakil, Varsha; Smith, Eric LP; Dai, Kezhi; Akyerli, Cemaliye B; Batuman, Olcay A

    2006-01-01

    In multiple myeloma (MM), increased neoangiogenesis contributes to tumor growth and disease progression. Increased levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to neoangiogenesis in MM, and, importantly, covary with disease activity and response to treatment. In order to understand the mechanisms responsible for increased EPC levels and neoangiogenic function in MM, we investigated whether these cells were clonal by determining X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) patterns in female patients by a human androgen receptor assay (HUMARA). In addition, EPCs and bone marrow cells were studied for the presence of clonotypic immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) gene rearrangement, which indicates clonality in B cells; thus, its presence in EPCs would indicate a close genetic link between tumor cells in MM and endothelial cells that provide tumor neovascularization. A total of twenty-three consecutive patients who had not received chemotherapy were studied. Screening in 18 patients found that 11 displayed allelic AR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and these patients were further studied for XCI patterns in EPCs and hair root cells by HUMARA. In 2 patients whose EPCs were clonal by HUMARA, and in an additional 5 new patients, EPCs were studied for IGH gene rearrangement using PCR with family-specific primers for IGH variable genes (V H ). In 11 patients, analysis of EPCs by HUMARA revealed significant skewing (≥ 77% expression of a single allele) in 64% (n = 7). In 4 of these patients, XCI skewing was extreme (≥ 90% expression of a single allele). In contrast, XCI in hair root cells was random. Furthermore, PCR amplification with V H primers resulted in amplification of the same product in EPCs and bone marrow cells in 71% (n = 5) of 7 patients, while no IGH rearrangement was found in EPCs from healthy controls. In addition, in patients with XCI skewing in EPCs, advanced age was associated with poorer clinical status, unlike patients whose EPCs had random XCI

  13. Pinocembrin ex vivo preconditioning improves the therapeutic efficacy of endothelial progenitor cells in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Rizk, Sherine M; El-Maraghy, Shohda A

    2017-08-15

    Pulmonary hypertension is still not curable and the available current therapies can only alleviate symptoms without hindering the progression of disease. The present study was directed to investigate the possible modulatory effect of pinocembrin on endothelial progenitor cells transplanted in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (60mg/kg). Endothelial progenitor cells were in vitro preconditioned with pinocembrin (25mg/L) for 30min before being i.v. injected into rats 2weeks after monocrotaline administration. Four weeks after monocrotaline administration, blood pressure, electrocardiography and right ventricular systolic pressure were recorded. Rats were sacrificed and serum was separated for determination of endothelin-1 and asymmetric dimethylarginine levels. Right ventricles and lungs were isolated for estimation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta contents as well as caspase-3 activity. Moreover, protein expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in addition to myocardial connexin-43 was assessed. Finally, histological analysis of pulmonary arteries, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area and right ventricular hypertrophy was performed and cryosections were done for estimation of cell homing. Preconditioning with pinocembrin provided a significant improvement in endothelial progenitor cells' effect towards reducing monocrotaline-induced elevation of inflammatory, fibrogenic and apoptotic markers. Furthermore, preconditioned cells induced a significant amelioration of endothelial markers and cell homing and prevented monocrotaline-induced changes in right ventricular function and histological analysis compared with native cells alone. In conclusion, pinocembrin significantly improves the therapeutic efficacy of endothelial progenitor cells in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

  14. Identification of a Bipotent Epithelial Progenitor Population in the Adult Thymus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulyanchenko, Svetlana; O'Neill, Kathy E; Medley, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    epithelial stem cells. Additionally, we identify cTEC-restricted short-term progenitor activity but fail to detect high efficiency mTEC-restricted progenitors in the adult thymus. Our data provide a phenotypically defined adult thymic epithelial progenitor/stem cell that is able to generate both cTECs and m......TECs, opening avenues for improving thymus function in patients....

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  1. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. Changing patterns of radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitors from chronically irradiated dogs prone either to aplastic anemia or to myeloproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, T M; Kaspar, L V

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoietic patterns have been assessed in chronic 60Co gamma irradiated dogs during preclinical phases of evolving aplastic anemia (AA) or myeloproliferative disease (MPD), principally myeloid leukemia. Within the AA-prone dog, a singular phase of progressive decline in blood levels of granulocytes and monocytes was noted along with a similar reduction in marrow progenitors committed to granulocyte/monocyte differentiation (CFU-GM). Measured radioresistance of the preAA CFU-GM in vitro, relative to control CFU-GM from nonirradiated animals, revealed only slightly increased resistance to gamma rays, but significantly increased resistance to fission neutrons. Within the MPD-prone dogs, four preclinical phases (i.e. suppression, partial recovery, accommodation, and preleukemic transition) preceding development of overt MPD were evidenced by the monitored change in blood granulocyte/monocyte counts and marrow progenitor levels. Analysis of radioresistance of preMPD CFU-GM revealed marked changes with time of exposure and, in turn, with preclinical phase transitions. Gamma ray resistance increased in the initial phases of exposure, with maximal levels occurring during the middle phase of exposure (accommodation, phase III) followed by a tailing off of resistance at later times. Resistance to fission neutrons by preMPD CFU-GM was observed as well, but somewhat later in the exposure course and at a much lower, more consistent level. These differential patterns of radioresistance expressed by marrow CFU-GM of chronically irradiated MPD-prone dogs to gamma rays and fission neutrons gave rise to preclinical phase-specific 'relative biological effectiveness' (RBE) values. From these observations, we conclude that: (i) CFU-GM of MPD-prone dogs acquire and maintain marked radioresistance to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays, but only marginally elevated radioresistance to high-LET fission neutrons during the course of chronic gamma ray exposure; and (ii) CFU-GM of

  5. Transplantation of endothelial progenitor cells ameliorates vascular dysfunction and portal hypertension in carbon tetrachloride-induced rat liver cirrhotic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Masaharu; Nakamura, Toru; Torimura, Takuji; Iwamoto, Hideki; Masuda, Hiroshi; Koga, Hironori; Abe, Mitsuhiko; Hashimoto, Osamu; Ueno, Takato; Sata, Michio

    2013-01-01

    In cirrhosis, sinusoidal endothelial cell injury results in increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) and decreased nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, leading to portal hypertension. However, the effects of transplanted endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) on the cirrhotic liver have not yet been clarified. We investigated whether EPC transplantation reduces portal hypertension. Cirrhotic rats were created by the administration of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4) ) twice weekly for 10 weeks. From week 7, rat bone marrow-derived EPCs were injected via the tail vein in this model once a week for 4 weeks. Endothelial NOS (eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and caveolin expressions were examined by Western blots. Hepatic tissue ET-1 was measured by a radioimmunoassay (RIA). Portal venous pressure, mean aortic pressure, and hepatic blood flow were measured. Endothelial progenitor cell transplantation reduced liver fibrosis, α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells, caveolin expression, ET-1 concentration and portal venous pressure. EPC transplantation increased hepatic blood flow, protein levels of eNOS and VEGF. Immunohistochemical analyses of eNOS and isolectin B4 demonstrated that the livers of EPC-transplanted animals had markedly increased vascular density, suggesting reconstitution of sinusoidal blood vessels with endothelium. Transplantation of EPCs ameliorates vascular dysfunction and portal hypertension, suggesting this treatment may provide a new approach in the therapy of portal hypertension with liver cirrhosis. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Strategy to prime the host and cells to augment therapeutic efficacy of progenitor cells for patients with myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeehoon Kang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy in myocardial infarction (MI is an innovative strategy that is regarded as a rescue therapy to repair the damaged myocardium and to promote neovascularization for the ischemic border zone. Among several stem cell sources for this purpose, autologous progenitors from bone marrow or peripheral blood would be the most feasible and safest cell-source. Despite the theoretical benefit of cell therapy, this method is not widely adopted in the actual clinical practice due to its low therapeutic efficacy. Various methods have been used to augment the efficacy of cell therapy in MI, such as using different source of progenitors, genetic manipulation of cells, or priming of the cells or hosts (patients with agents. Among these methods, the strategy to augment the therapeutic efficacy of the autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells by priming agents may be the most feasible and the safest method that can be applied directly to the clinic. In this review, we will discuss the current status and future directions of priming peripheral blood mononuclear cells or patients, as for cell therapy of MI.

  7. Stepwise optimization of the procedure for assessment of circulating progenitor cells in patients with myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Xin Cui

    Full Text Available The number and functional activity of circulating progenitor cells (CPCs is altered in diabetic patients. Furthermore, reduced CPC count has been shown to independently predict cardiovascular events. Validation of CPCs as a biomarker for cardiovascular risk stratification requires rigorous methodology. Before a standard operation protocol (SOP can be designed for such a trial, a variety of technical issues have to be addressed fundamentally, which include the appropriate type of red blood cell lysis buffer, FMO or isotype controls to identify rare cell populations from background noise, optimal antibody dilutions and conditions of sample storage. We herein propose improvements in critical steps of CPC isolation, antigenic characterization and determination of functional competence for final application in a prospective investigation of CPCs as a biomarker of outcome following acute myocardial infarction.In this validation study, we refined the standard operating procedure (SOP for flow cytometry characterisation and functional analysis of CPCs from the first 18 patients of the Progenitor Cell Response after Myocardial Infarction Study (ProMIS. ProMIS aims to verify the prognostic value of CPCs in patients with either ST elevation or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction with or without diabetes mellitus, using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for assessment of ventricular function as a primary endpoint. Results indicate crucial steps for SOP implementation, namely timely cell isolation after sampling, use of appropriate lysis buffer to separate blood cell types and minimize the acquisition events during flow cytometry, adoption of proper fluorophore combination and antibody titration for multiple antigenic detection and introduction of counting beads for precise quantification of functional CPC activity in migration assay.With systematic specification of factors influencing the enumeration of CPC by flow cytometry, the abundance and

  8. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-07-19

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development (2-4). These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity.

  9. Progenitor models of Wolf-Rayet+O binary systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrovic, J.; Langer, N.

    2007-01-01

    Since close WR+O binaries are the result of a strong interaction of both stars in massive close binary systems, they can be used to constrain the highly uncertain mass and angular momentum budget during the major mass- transfer phase. We explore the progenitor evolution of the three best suited WR+O

  10. The progenitor of Nova Cygni 2006 (=V2362 Cyg)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeghs, D.; Greimel, R.; Drew, J.; Irwin, M.; Gaensicke, B.; Groot, P.J.; Knigge, C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the detection of the likely progenitor to Nova Cygni 2006 = V2362 Cyg (IAUC #8697, #8698, ATel #792) using images from the INT Photometric H-Alpha Survey (IPHAS; http://www.iphas.org). The field containing the classical nova was observed as part of our galactic plane survey on Aug. 3rd

  11. Endothelial progenitor cell-based neovascularization : implications for therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenning, Guido; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    Ischemic cardiovascular events are a major cause of death globally. Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-based approaches can result in improvement of vascular perfusion and might offer clinical benefit. However, although functional improvement is observed, the lack of long-term engraftment of EPCs

  12. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the host response to murine retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) following transplantation to the subretinal space (SRS) of the pig. RPCs from GFP mice were transplanted subretinally in 18 nonimmunosuppressed normal or laser-treated pigs. Evaluation of the SRS was performed on hematoxylin...

  13. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials.

  14. Mass Ejection in Failed Supernovae: Variation with Stellar Progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Quataert, Eliot; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Coughlin, Eric R.

    2018-02-01

    We study the ejection of mass during stellar core-collapse when the stalled shock does not revive and a black hole forms. Neutrino emission during the protoneutron star phase causes a decrease in the gravitational mass of the core, resulting in an outward going sound pulse that steepens into a shock as it travels out through the star. We explore the properties of this mass ejection mechanism over a range of stellar progenitors using spherically-symmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations that treat neutrino mass loss parametrically and follow the shock propagation over the entire star. We find that all types of stellar progenitor can eject mass through this mechanism. The ejected mass is a decreasing function of the surface gravity of the star, ranging from several M⊙ for red supergiants to ˜0.1M⊙ for blue supergiants and ˜10-3M⊙ for Wolf-Rayet stars. We find that the final shock energy at the surface is a decreasing function of the core-compactness, and is ≲ 1047 - 1048 erg in all cases. In progenitors with a sufficiently large envelope, high core-compactness, or a combination of both, the sound pulse fails to unbind mass. Successful mass ejection is accompanied by significant fallback accretion that can last from hours to years. We predict the properties of shock breakout and thermal plateau emission produced by the ejection of the outer envelope of blue supergiant and Wolf-Rayet progenitors in otherwise failed supernovae.

  15. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation into Functional Epicardial Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Guadix

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are widely used to study cardiovascular cell differentiation and function. Here, we induced differentiation of hPSCs (both embryonic and induced to proepicardial/epicardial progenitor cells that cover the heart during development. Addition of retinoic acid (RA and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 promoted expression of the mesodermal marker PDGFRα, upregulated characteristic (proepicardial progenitor cell genes, and downregulated transcription of myocardial genes. We confirmed the (proepicardial-like properties of these cells using in vitro co-culture assays and in ovo grafting of hPSC-epicardial cells into chick embryos. Our data show that RA + BMP4-treated hPSCs differentiate into (proepicardial-like cells displaying functional properties (adhesion and spreading over the myocardium of their in vivo counterpart. The results extend evidence that hPSCs are an excellent model to study (proepicardial differentiation into cardiovascular cells in human development and evaluate their potential for cardiac regeneration. : The authors have shown that hPSCs can be instructed in vitro to differentiate into a specific cardiac embryonic progenitor cell population called the proepicardium. Proepicardial cells are required for normal formation of the heart during development and might contribute to the development of cell-based therapies for heart repair. Keywords: human pluripotent stem cells, proepicardium, progenitor cells, cardiovascular, differentiation

  16. Cardiac stem/progenitor cells, secreted proteins, and proteomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Abraham, M.R.; Van Eyk, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 583, č. 11 (2009), s. 1800-1807 ISSN 0014-5793 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : Cardiac stem/progenitor cell * paracrine factor * secretome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.541, year: 2009

  17. Long GRBs from Binary Stars: Runaway, Wolf-Rayet Progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantiello, M.; Yoon, S.C.; Langer, N.; Livio, M.

    2007-01-01

    The collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts requires a rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet star as progenitor. We test the idea of producing rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet stars in massive close binaries through mass accretion and consecutive quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution - the latter had previously

  18. Progenitor cells in the kidney: biology and therapeutic perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rookmaaker, M.B.; Verhaar, M.C.; Zonneveld, A.J. van; Rabelink, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Progenitor cells in the kidney: Biology and therapeutic perspectives. The stem cell may be viewed as an engineer who can read the blue print and become the building. The role of this fascinating cell in physiology and pathophysiology has recently attracted a great deal of interest. The archetype of

  19. Cosmic Supernova Rate History and Type Ia Supernova Progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Chiaki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2001-01-01

    Adopting a single degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernova progenitors with the metallicity effect, we make a prediction of the cosmic supernova rate history as a composite of the supernova rates in spiral and elliptical galaxies, and compare with the recent observational data up to z ~ 0.55.

  20. Characteristics of meniscus progenitor cells migrated from injured meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Dongrim; Zhou, Cheng; Brouillette, Marc J; Song, Ino; Yu, Yin; Choe, Hyeong Hun; Lehman, Abigail D; Jang, Kee W; Fredericks, Douglas C; Laughlin, Barbara J; Martin, James A

    2017-09-01

    Serious meniscus injuries seldom heal and increase the risk for knee osteoarthritis; thus, there is a need to develop new reparative therapies. In that regard, stimulating tissue regeneration by autologous stem/progenitor cells has emerged as a promising new strategy. We showed previously that migratory chondrogenic progenitor cells (CPCs) were recruited to injured cartilage, where they showed a capability in situ tissue repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the meniscus contains a similar population of regenerative cells. Explant studies revealed that migrating cells were mainly confined to the red zone in normal menisci: However, these cells were capable of repopulating defects made in the white zone. In vivo, migrating cell numbers increased dramatically in damaged meniscus. Relative to non-migrating meniscus cells, migrating cells were more clonogenic, overexpressed progenitor cell markers, and included a larger side population. Gene expression profiling showed that the migrating population was more similar to CPCs than other meniscus cells. Finally, migrating cells equaled CPCs in chondrogenic potential, indicating a capacity for repair of the cartilaginous white zone of the meniscus. These findings demonstrate that, much as in articular cartilage, injuries to the meniscus mobilize an intrinsic progenitor cell population with strong reparative potential. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1966-1972, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cellular therapy after spinal cord injury using neural progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of cell-based therapies after spinal cord injury are explored. Particularly, the potential of adult derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) grafts to function as a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration was investigated. It was found that syngenic

  2. On the Progenitor of Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. 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E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. 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M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    On 2017 August 17 the merger of two compact objects with masses consistent with two neutron stars was discovered through gravitational-wave (GW170817), gamma-ray (GRB 170817A), and optical (SSS17a/AT 2017gfo) observations. The optical source was associated with the early-type galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of just ˜40 Mpc, consistent with the gravitational-wave measurement, and the merger was localized to be at a projected distance of ˜2 kpc away from the galaxy’s center. We use this minimal set of facts and the mass posteriors of the two neutron stars to derive the first constraints on the progenitor of GW170817 at the time of the second supernova (SN). We generate simulated progenitor populations and follow the three-dimensional kinematic evolution from binary neutron star (BNS) birth to the merger time, accounting for pre-SN galactic motion, for considerably different input distributions of the progenitor mass, pre-SN semimajor axis, and SN-kick velocity. Though not considerably tight, we find these constraints to be comparable to those for Galactic BNS progenitors. The derived constraints are very strongly influenced by the requirement of keeping the binary bound after the second SN and having the merger occur relatively close to the center of the galaxy. These constraints are insensitive to the galaxy’s star formation history, provided the stellar populations are older than 1 Gyr.

  3. Retinoic acid postconsolidation therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma patients treated with autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinemann, Frank; van Dalen, Elvira C; Enk, Heike; Berthold, Frank

    2017-08-25

    Neuroblastoma is a rare malignant disease and mainly affects infants and very young children. The tumours mainly develop in the adrenal medullary tissue, with an abdominal mass as the most common presentation. About 50% of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis. The high-risk group is characterised by metastasis and other features that increase the risk of an adverse outcome. High-risk patients have a five-year event-free survival of less than 50%. Retinoic acid has been shown to inhibit growth of human neuroblastoma cells and has been considered as a potential candidate for improving the outcome of patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of additional retinoic acid as part of a postconsolidation therapy after high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), compared to placebo retinoic acid or to no additional retinoic acid in people with high-risk neuroblastoma (as defined by the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) classification system). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library (2016, Issue 11), MEDLINE in PubMed (1946 to 24 November 2016), and Embase in Ovid (1947 to 24 November 2016). Further searches included trial registries (on 22 December 2016), conference proceedings (on 23 March 2017) and reference lists of recent reviews and relevant studies. We did not apply limits by publication year or languages. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating additional retinoic acid after HDCT followed by HSCT for people with high-risk neuroblastoma compared to placebo retinoic acid or to no additional retinoic acid. Primary outcomes were overall survival and treatment-related mortality. Secondary outcomes were progression-free survival, event-free survival, early toxicity, late toxicity, and health-related quality of life. We used standard

  4. The direct identification of core-collapse supernova progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D

    2017-10-28

    To place core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in context with the evolution of massive stars, it is necessary to determine their stellar origins. I describe the direct identification of SN progenitors in existing pre-explosion images, particularly those obtained through serendipitous imaging of nearby galaxies by the Hubble Space Telescope I comment on specific cases representing the various core-collapse SN types. Establishing the astrometric coincidence of a SN with its putative progenitor is relatively straightforward. One merely needs a comparably high-resolution image of the SN itself and its stellar environment to perform this matching. The interpretation of these results, though, is far more complicated and fraught with larger uncertainties, including assumptions of the distance to and the extinction of the SN, as well as the metallicity of the SN environment. Furthermore, existing theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks exhibit significant variations one from the next. Nonetheless, it appears fairly certain that Type II-P (plateau) SNe arise from massive stars in the red supergiant phase. Many of the known cases are associated with subluminous Type II-P events. The progenitors of Type II-L (linear) SNe are less established. Among the stripped-envelope SNe, there are now a number of examples of cool, but not red, supergiants (presumably in binaries) as Type IIb progenitors. We appear now finally to have an identified progenitor of a Type Ib SN, but no known example yet for a Type Ic. The connection has been made between some Type IIn SNe and progenitor stars in a luminous blue variable phase, but that link is still thin, based on direct identifications. Finally, I also describe the need to revisit the SN site, long after the SN has faded, to confirm the progenitor identification through the star's disappearance and potentially to detect a putative binary companion that may have survived the explosion.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from

  5. α-Ketoglutarate Promotes Pancreatic Progenitor-Like Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Ma, Dongshen; Xing, Yun; Tang, Shanshan; Alahdal, Murad; Guo, Jiamin; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Yanfeng; Shen, Yumeng; Wu, Qiong; Lu, Zhou; Jin, Liang

    2018-03-22

    A major source of β cell generation is pancreatic progenitor-like cell differentiation. Multiple studies have confirmed that stem cell metabolism plays important roles in self-renewal and proliferation. In the absence of glucose, glutamine provides the energy for cell division and growth. Furthermore, α-ketoglutarate (αKG), a precursor for glutamine synthesis, is sufficient for enabling glutamine-independent cell proliferation. We have demonstrated that αKG contributes to the large-scale proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells that can provide an ample amount of clinically relevant β cells. We compared the mRNA expression of a subset of genes, the abundance of ATP, reactive oxide species, mitochondrial number, and the colony-forming frequency between mouse pancreatic CD133⁺ and CD133 - cells. We employed Real-Time PCR, immunostaining and passage assays to investigate self-renewal and proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells in a 3D culture system in the presence and absence of αKG. The energy metabolism of CD133⁺ cells was more prone to oxidative phosphorylation. However, in the 3D culture system, when αKG was supplemented to the culture medium, the proliferation of the pancreatic progenitor-like cells was significantly elevated. We confirmed that the presence of αKG correlated with the up-regulation of Ten-Eleven Translocation (Tet). αKG can promote the proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells via the up-regulation of Tet.

  6. α-Ketoglutarate Promotes Pancreatic Progenitor-Like Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A major source of β cell generation is pancreatic progenitor-like cell differentiation. Multiple studies have confirmed that stem cell metabolism plays important roles in self-renewal and proliferation. In the absence of glucose, glutamine provides the energy for cell division and growth. Furthermore, α-ketoglutarate (αKG, a precursor for glutamine synthesis, is sufficient for enabling glutamine-independent cell proliferation. We have demonstrated that αKG contributes to the large-scale proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells that can provide an ample amount of clinically relevant β cells. We compared the mRNA expression of a subset of genes, the abundance of ATP, reactive oxide species, mitochondrial number, and the colony-forming frequency between mouse pancreatic CD133+ and CD133− cells. We employed Real-Time PCR, immunostaining and passage assays to investigate self-renewal and proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells in a 3D culture system in the presence and absence of αKG. The energy metabolism of CD133+ cells was more prone to oxidative phosphorylation. However, in the 3D culture system, when αKG was supplemented to the culture medium, the proliferation of the pancreatic progenitor-like cells was significantly elevated. We confirmed that the presence of αKG correlated with the up-regulation of Ten-Eleven Translocation (Tet. αKG can promote the proliferation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells via the up-regulation of Tet.

  7. MiR-128-2 inhibits common lymphoid progenitors from developing into progenitor B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huo; Fei, Xia; Tang, YuXu; Yan, Yunqiu; Zhang, Huimin; Zhang, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of studies revealed that B cell development is finely regulated by transcription factors (TFs). Recent studies suggested that TFs are coordinated with microRNAs to control the development of B cells in numerous checkpoints. In the present study, we first found that miR-128-2 was differentially expressed in various immune organs and immunocytes. B cell development was inhibited in miR-128-2-overexpressed chimera and transgenic (TG) mice in bone marrow with decreased preproB, preB, proB, immature B, and recirculating B cells, as well as increased common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). Further experiments showed that the apoptosis of CLP decreased, but proliferation was not altered in miR-128-2-overexpressed mice. Extensive studies suggested that the inhibition of apoptosis of CLP may be caused by miR-128-2 targeting A2B and MALT1, thereby increasing the phosphorylation of ERK and P38 MAPK. Such findings have prompted future investigations on the function of miR-128-2 in lymph genesis. PMID:27008703

  8. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Haytham; Galal, Omima; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan; Abdelrahim, Eman; Ono, Yusuke; Mostafa, Emtethal; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2014-09-26

    Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30min before exposure to 50mGy γ-ray daily for 30days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5Gy). Mice were victimized 24h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit(+) stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60-90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit(+) stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Heterogeneity and Fgf dependence of adult neural progenitors in the zebrafish telencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Julia; Kaslin, Jan; Hochmann, Sarah; Freudenreich, Dorian; Brand, Michael

    2010-08-15

    Adult telencephalic neurogenesis is a conserved trait of all vertebrates studied. It has been investigated in detail in rodents, but very little is known about the composition of neurogenic niches and the cellular nature of progenitors in nonmammalian vertebrates. To understand the components of the progenitor zones in the adult zebrafish telencephalon and the link between glial characteristics and progenitor state, we examined whether canonical glial markers are colocalized with proliferation markers. In the adult zebrafish telencephalon, we identify heterogeneous progenitors that reside in two distinct glial domains. We find that the glial composition of the progenitor zone is linked to its proliferative behavior. Analyzing both fast-cycling proliferating cells as well as slowly cycling progenitors, we find four distinct progenitor types characterized by differential expression of glial markers. Importantly, a significant proportion of progenitors do not display typical radial glia characteristics. By blocking or activating Fgf signaling by misexpression of a dominant negative Fgf-receptor 1 or Fgf8a, respectively, we find that ventral and dorsal progenitors in the telencephalon also differ in their requirement for Fgf signaling. Together with data on the expression of Fgf signaling components in the ventricular zone of the telencephalon, this suggests that Fgf signaling directly regulates proliferation of specific subsets of adult telencephalic progenitors in vivo. Taken together our results show that adult neural progenitor cells are heterogeneous with their respect to distribution into two distinct glial domains and their dependence upon Fgf signaling as a proliferative cue in the zebrafish telencephalon.

  10. Uncovering the Number and Clonal Dynamics of Mesp1 Progenitors during Heart Morphogenesis

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    Samira Chabab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The heart arises from distinct sources of cardiac progenitors that independently express Mesp1 during gastrulation. The precise number of Mesp1 progenitors that are specified during the early stage of gastrulation, and their clonal behavior during heart morphogenesis, is currently unknown. Here, we used clonal and mosaic tracing of Mesp1-expressing cells combined with quantitative biophysical analysis of the clonal data to define the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth during heart development. Our data indicate that the myocardial layer of the heart derive from ∼250 Mesp1-expressing cardiac progenitors born during gastrulation. Despite arising at different time points and contributing to different heart regions, the temporally distinct cardiac progenitors present very similar clonal dynamics. These results provide insights into the number of cardiac progenitors and their mode of growth and open up avenues to decipher the clonal dynamics of progenitors in other organs and tissues.

  11. Blood typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood typing is a method to tell what type of blood you have. Blood typing is done so you can safely donate your blood or receive a blood transfusion. It is also done to see if you have a substance called Rh factor on the surface of your red ...

  12. Blood Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KidsHealth / For Teens / Blood Types What's in this article? Four Blood Groups... Plus Rh Factor... ...Make Eight Blood Types Why Blood Type Matters Print en español Tipos de sangre About 5 million Americans need blood transfusions every ...

  13. La violencia de hijos adolescentes contra sus progenitores La violencia de hijos adolescentes contra sus progenitores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Aroca Montolío

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available According to Prosecutor’s Office of the Minor, the accusation interposed by mothers and/or fathers victims by theirs children, along 2007 were 2603, in 2008 amounted 4.211, in 2009 there were 5.209 and in 2010 there were 8.000 accusations. Suede this worrying increase, the principal aim of our article is to check the scientific international and national documentation, from 1957 until the year 2010 that analyses the phenomenon of the adolescent violence against parents, to achieve an approximation to its keys that there allows us the comprehension and analysis of this serious familiar problem. For it we will analyse: (a the importance of this crime by means of criminological mediators: prevalence and incidence; (b the age and sex variables’ aggressors to be able to establish a basic profile about theirs and, (c the violence types that the teenagers wield to damage, prejudice and suffering against their progenitors, with the aim to obtain what they want. The information obtained in this research review and qualitative analysis, change in base to the methodology used and the type of sample under study to obtain conclusions. Even though, we wantto do research into needs to investigate this type of familiar violence, and from there, to do researches with rigorous scientific methodologies, unifying criteria and variables to be investigating, to be able to anticipate in this increasing problem that the parents have. Según la Fiscalía del Menor en el año 2007, las denuncias interpuestas por madres y/o padres, víctimas de malos tratos por sus hijos e hijas menores de edad, fueron 2.683. En 2008 ascendieron a 4.211, en 2009 se presentaron 5.209 y en el año 2010 se registraron 8.000 denuncias. Ante éste preocupante incremento, el objetivo principal de nuestro artículo es revisar la documentación científica que analiza la violencia filio-parental,  desde 1957 hasta el año 2011, para lograr una aproximación a sus claves que nos permita la

  14. Benzene-Induced Aberrant miRNA Expression Profile in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haiyan; Zhang, Juan; Tan, Kehong; Sun, Rongli; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-11-12

    Benzene is a common environmental pollutant that causes hematological alterations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may play a role in benzene-induced hematotoxicity. In this study, C57BL/6 mice showed significant hematotoxicity after exposure to 150 mg/kg benzene for 4 weeks. Benzene exposure decreased not only the number of cells in peripheral blood but also hematopoietic progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Meanwhile, RNA from Lin(-) cells sorted from the bone marrow was applied to aberrant miRNA expression profile using Illumina sequencing. We found that 5 miRNAs were overexpressed and 45 miRNAs were downregulated in the benzene exposure group. Sequencing results were confirmed through qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we also identified five miRNAs which significantly altered in Lin(-)c-Kit⁺ cells obtained from benzene-exposed mice, including mmu-miR-34a-5p; mmu-miR-342-3p; mmu-miR-100-5p; mmu-miR-181a-5p; and mmu-miR-196b-5p. In summary, we successfully established a classical animal model to induce significant hematotoxicity by benzene injection. Benzene exposure may cause severe hematotoxicity not only to blood cells in peripheral circulation but also to hematopoietic cells in bone marrow. Benzene exposure also alters miRNA expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells. This study suggests that benzene induces alteration in hematopoiesis and hematopoiesis-associated miRNAs.

  15. Is black-hole ringdown a memory of its progenitor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaretsos, Ioannis; Hannam, Mark; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2012-10-05

    We perform an extensive numerical study of coalescing black-hole binaries to understand the gravitational-wave spectrum of quasinormal modes excited in the merged black hole. Remarkably, we find that the masses and spins of the progenitor are clearly encoded in the mode spectrum of the ringdown signal. Some of the mode amplitudes carry the signature of the binary's mass ratio, while others depend critically on the spins. Simulations of precessing binaries suggest that our results carry over to generic systems. Using Bayesian inference, we demonstrate that it is possible to accurately measure the mass ratio and a proper combination of spins even when the binary is itself invisible to a detector. Using a mapping of the binary masses and spins to the final black-hole spin allows us to further extract the spin components of the progenitor. Our results could have tremendous implications for gravitational astronomy by facilitating novel tests of general relativity using merging black holes.

  16. THE POPULATION OF HELIUM-MERGER PROGENITORS: OBSERVATIONAL PREDICTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz; Berger, Edo; Thöne, Christina; Ellinger, Carola

    2013-01-01

    The helium-merger gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor is produced by the rapid accretion onto a compact remnant (neutron star or black hole) when it undergoes a common envelope inspiral with its companion's helium core. This merger phase produces a very distinct environment around these outbursts and recent observations suggest that, in some cases, we are detecting the signatures of the past merger in the GRB afterglow. These observations allow us, for the first time, to study the specific features of the helium-merger progenitor. In this paper, we couple population synthesis calculations to our current understanding of GRB engines and common envelope evolution to make observational predictions for the helium-merger GRB population. Many mergers do not produce GRB outbursts and we discuss the implications of these mergers with the broader population of astrophysical transients.

  17. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion at Adherens Junctions (AJs) and its dynamic connections with the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton are important regulators of cellular architecture. However, the functional relevance of these interactions and the molecular players involved in different cellular contexts...... and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT...... dynamics and AJ functionality. These findings represent a novel mechanism of MT targeting to AJs that may be relevant for the maintenance of proper epidermal progenitor cell homeostasis. We also discuss the potential implication of other MT binding proteins previously associated to AJs in the wider context...

  18. Epigenetic Reprogramming of Muscle Progenitors: Inspiration for Clinical Therapies

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    Silvia Consalvi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of regenerative medicine, based on the potential of stem cells to restore diseased tissues, epigenetics is becoming a pivotal area of interest. Therapeutic interventions that promote tissue and organ regeneration have as primary objective the selective control of gene expression in adult stem cells. This requires a deep understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms controlling transcriptional programs in tissue progenitors. This review attempts to elucidate the principle epigenetic regulations responsible of stem cells differentiation. In particular we focus on the current understanding of the epigenetic networks that regulate differentiation of muscle progenitors by the concerted action of chromatin-modifying enzymes and noncoding RNAs. The novel exciting role of exosome-bound microRNA in mediating epigenetic information transfer is also discussed. Finally we show an overview of the epigenetic strategies and therapies that aim to potentiate muscle regeneration and counteract the progression of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD.

  19. Methylene blue promotes quiescence of rat neural progenitor cells

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    LUOKUN eXIE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cell-based treatment holds a new therapeutic opportunity for neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the effect of methylene blue on proliferation and differentiation of rat neural progenitor cells (NPCs both in vitro and in vivo. We found that methylene blue inhibited proliferation and promoted quiescence of NPCs in vitro without affecting committed neuronal differentiation. Consistently, intracerebroventricular infusion of methylene blue significantly inhibited neural progenitor cell proliferation at the subventricular zone (SVZ. Methylene blue inhibited mTOR signaling along with down-regulation of cyclins in NPCs in vitro and in vivo. In summary, our study indicates that methylene blue may delay NPC senescence through enhancing NPCs quiescence.

  20. Pericytes Stimulate Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Differentiation during CNS Remyelination

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    Alerie Guzman De La Fuente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the neurovascular niche in CNS myelin regeneration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that, upon demyelination, CNS-resident pericytes (PCs proliferate, and parenchymal non-vessel-associated PC-like cells (PLCs rapidly develop. During remyelination, mature oligodendrocytes were found in close proximity to PCs. In Pdgfbret/ret mice, which have reduced PC numbers, oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC differentiation was delayed, although remyelination proceeded to completion. PC-conditioned medium accelerated and enhanced OPC differentiation in vitro and increased the rate of remyelination in an ex vivo cerebellar slice model of demyelination. We identified Lama2 as a PC-derived factor that promotes OPC differentiation. Thus, the functional role of PCs is not restricted to vascular homeostasis but includes the modulation of adult CNS progenitor cells involved in regeneration.

  1. The anti-microbial peptide SR-0379 stimulates human endothelial progenitor cell-mediated repair of peripheral artery diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Wook; Heo, Soon Chul; Kwon, Yang Woo; Park, Gyu Tae; Yoon, Jung Won; Kim, Seung-Chul; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Jae Ho

    2017-10-01

    Ischemia is a serious disease, characterized by an inadequate blood supply to an organ or part of the body. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of the anti-microbial peptide SR-0379 on the stem cell-mediated therapy of ischemic diseases. The migratory and tube-forming abilities of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were enhanced by treatment with SR-0379 in vitro. Intramuscular administration of SR-0379 into a murine ischemic hindlimb significantly enhanced blood perfusion, decreased tissue necrosis, and increased the number of blood vessels in the ischemic muscle. Moreover, co-administration of SR-0379 with EPCs stimulated blood perfusion in an ischemic hindlimb more than intramuscular injection with either SR-0379 or EPCs alone. This enhanced blood perfusion was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of CD31- and α-SMApositive blood vessels in ischemic hindlimb. These results suggest that SR-0379 is a potential drug candidate for potentiating EPC-mediated therapy of ischemic diseases. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(10): 504-509].

  2. Autologous bone marrow-derived progenitor cell transplantation for myocardial regeneration after acute infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović Slobodan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Experimental and first clinical studies suggest that the transplantation of bone marrow derived, or circulating blood progenitor cells, may beneficially affect postinfarction remodelling processes after acute myocardial infarction. Aim. This pilot trial reports investigation of safety and feasibility of autologous bone marrow-derived progenitor cell therapy for faster regeneration of the myocardium after infarction. Methods and results. Four male patients (age range 47-68 years with the first extensive anterior, ST elevation, acute myocardial infarction (AMI, were treated by primary angioplasty. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were administered by intracoronary infusion 3-5 days after the infarction. Bone marrow was harvested by multiple aspirations from posterior cristae iliacae under general anesthesia, and under aseptic conditions. After that, cells were filtered through stainless steel mesh, centrifuged and resuspended in serum-free culture medium, and 3 hours later infused through the catheter into the infarct-related artery in 8 equal boluses of 20 ml. Myocardial viability in the infarcted area was confirmed by dobutamin stress echocardiography testing and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT 10-14 days after infarction. One patient had early stent thrombosis immediately before cell transplantation, and was treated successfully with second angioplasty. Single average ECG revealed one positive finding at discharge, and 24-hour Holter ECG showed only isolated ventricular ectopic beats during the follow-up period. Early findings in two patients showed significant improvement of left ventricular systolic function 3 months after the infarction. There were no major cardiac events after the transplantation during further follow-up period (30-120 days after infarction. Control SPECT for the detection of ischemia showed significant improvement in myocardial perfusion in two patients 4 months after the infarction

  3. Virulence of a chimeric recombinant infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus expressing the spring viraemia of carp virus glycoprotein in salmonid and cyprinid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmenegger, Eveline; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Mérour, Emilie; Glenn, Jolene. A; Palmer, Alexander D.; Brémont, Michel; Kurath, Gael

    2018-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and spring viraemia of carp virus (SVCV) are both rhabdoviruses of fish, listed as notifiable disease agents by the World Organization for Animal Health. Recombinant rhabdoviruses with heterologous gene substitutions have been engineered to study genetic determinants and assess the potential of these recombinant viruses for vaccine development. A recombinant IHNV (rIHNV), containing the full-length genome of a European IHNV strain, was modified by deleting the glycoprotein (G) gene and replacing it with a European SVCV G-gene to make the rIHNV-Gsvcv. The chimeric rIHNV-Gsvcv level of virulence in rainbow trout, common carp and koi was assessed, and its ability to induce a protective immune response in surviving koi against wild-type SVCV infection was tested. The rIHNV-Gsvcv infection of trout led to high mortality, ranging from 78% to 92.5%, after immersion. In contrast, no deaths occurred in juvenile common carp after infection with rIHNV-Gsvcv by either immersion or intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Similarly, koi infected with rIHNV-Gsvcv via IP injection had little to no mortality (≤9%). Koi that survived initial infection with a high dose of recombinant virus rIHNV-Gsvcv were protected against a virulent SVCV challenge resulting in a high relative per cent survival of 82.5%.

  4. Long-Term Effects of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation after Pediatric Cancer: A Qualitative Analysis of Life Experiences and Adaptation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Lahaye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT improves the survival rate of children and adolescents with malignant and non-malignant conditions; however, the physical, psychological and social burden of such a procedure is considerable both during and after treatment. The present qualitative study investigated the long-term effects of HSCT after pediatric cancer. Thirty adolescent and young adult (AYA survivors (Mage = 23.61 years, SD = 5.21 participated in individual interviews and were invited to speak about their life experiences following their treatment and strategies they use to deal with their past medical experiences and the long-term sequelae. Our results showed the presence of ongoing physical and psychosocial consequences of their past illness and its treatments with wide ranging psychosocial impacts, such as affected self-image, social withdrawal, sense of lack of choice, and need for specific attention. Different strategies were reported to overcome these consequences, such as talking about illness, giving a sense to their past medical experiences, and developing meaningful social relationships. Clinical and research implications are also discussed.

  5. Susceptibility to an inoculum of infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) in three batches of whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo-Bonilla, César Marcial; Rangel, José Luis Ibarra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The present study evaluated the susceptibility of three different batches of whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei from Mexico to an inoculum of infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV). Each of the three shrimp batches came from a different hatchery. Because of their origin, it was possible that the genetic makeup of these batches was different among each other. The three batches tested showed differences in IHHNV susceptibility. Here, susceptibility is defined as the capacity of the host to become infected, and it can be measured by the infectivity titer. Susceptibility to IHHNV was observed in decreasing order in shrimp from batch 1 (hatchery from El Rosario, Sinaloa), batch 3 (hatchery from Nayarit) and batch 2 (hatchery from El Walamo, Sinaloa), respectively. The largest susceptibility difference between batches was 5012 times, and that between early and late juveniles from the same batch was 25 times. These results indicate that within a species, susceptibility to a pathogen such as IHHNV can have large differences. Susceptibility to pathogens is an important trait to consider before performing studies on pathogenesis. It may influence virological parameters such as speed of replication, pathogenicity and virus titer. In order to evaluate the potential use of IHHNV as a natural control agent against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), it is necessary to know host susceptibility and the kinetics of IHHNV infection. These features can help to determine the conditions in which IHHNV could be used as antagonist in a WSSV infection. PMID:25561847

  6. Synergistic effect of KIR ligands missing and cytomegalovirus reactivation in improving outcomes of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation from HLA-matched sibling donor for treatment of myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Marangon, Amanda Vansan; da Silva, Rodrigo Fernandes; Aranha, Francisco José Penteado; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Bonon, Sandra Helena Alves; Costa, Sandra Cecília Botelho; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; de Souza, Carmino Antonio; Guimarães, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of KIR-HLA genotypes on the outcome of patients undergoing treatment for haematological malignancies by non-T-depleted lymphocyte haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from HLA-matched sibling donors. The prospective study was conducted at the Center of Hematology, University of Campinas, and 50 patients and their donors were followed up from 2008 to 2014. KIR and HLA class I genes were genotyped and patients grouped based on the presence of KIR ligands combined with KIR genotype of their respective donors. Patients with all KIR ligands present (n=13) had a significantly higher (p=0.04) incidence of acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) than patients with one or more KIR ligands missing (n=37). The overall survival following transplantation of patients with myeloid malignancies (n=27) was significantly higher (p=0.035) in the group with one or more KIR ligands missing (n=18) than in the group with all ligands present (n=9). Presence of KIR2DS2 was associated with a worsening of HSCT outcome while reactivation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection improved the outcome of patients with one or more KIR ligands missing. Our results indicate that KIR-HLA interactions affect the outcome of the HLA-matched transplantation, particularly in patients with myeloid malignancies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Optimisation of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based strategy for the detection and quantification of human herpesvirus 6 DNA in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam YH Ueda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6 may cause severe complications after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Monitoring this virus and providing precise, rapid and early diagnosis of related clinical diseases, constitute essential measures to improve outcomes. A prospective survey on the incidence and clinical features of HHV-6 infections after HSCT has not yet been conducted in Brazilian patients and the impact of this infection on HSCT outcome remains unclear. A rapid test based on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR has been optimised to screen and quantify clinical samples for HHV-6. The detection step was based on reaction with TaqMan® hydrolysis probes. A set of previously described primers and probes have been tested to evaluate efficiency, sensitivity and reproducibility. The target efficiency range was 91.4% with linearity ranging from 10-106 copies/reaction and a limit of detection of five copies/reaction or 250 copies/mL of plasma. The qPCR assay developed in the present study was simple, rapid and sensitive, allowing the detection of a wide range of HHV-6 loads. In conclusion, this test may be useful as a practical tool to help elucidate the clinical relevance of HHV-6 infection and reactivation in different scenarios and to determine the need for surveillance.

  8. Susceptibility to an inoculum of infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) in three batches of whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeusvannamei (Boone, 1931).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo-Bonilla, César Marcial; Rangel, José Luis Ibarra

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the susceptibility of three different batches of whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeusvannamei from Mexico to an inoculum of infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV). Each of the three shrimp batches came from a different hatchery. Because of their origin, it was possible that the genetic makeup of these batches was different among each other. The three batches tested showed differences in IHHNV susceptibility. Here, susceptibility is defined as the capacity of the host to become infected, and it can be measured by the infectivity titer. Susceptibility to IHHNV was observed in decreasing order in shrimp from batch 1 (hatchery from El Rosario, Sinaloa), batch 3 (hatchery from Nayarit) and batch 2 (hatchery from El Walamo, Sinaloa), respectively. The largest susceptibility difference between batches was 5012 times, and that between early and late juveniles from the same batch was 25 times. These results indicate that within a species, susceptibility to a pathogen such as IHHNV can have large differences. Susceptibility to pathogens is an important trait to consider before performing studies on pathogenesis. It may influence virological parameters such as speed of replication, pathogenicity and virus titer. In order to evaluate the potential use of IHHNV as a natural control agent against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), it is necessary to know host susceptibility and the kinetics of IHHNV infection. These features can help to determine the conditions in which IHHNV could be used as antagonist in a WSSV infection.

  9. Extracoporeal photopheresis treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling M. Flinn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD continues to be a major obstacle to allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Thymic damage secondary to aGvHD along with corticosteroids and other non-selective T lymphocyte-suppressive agents used in the treatment of aGvHD concurrently impair thymopoiesis and negatively impact on immunoreconstitution of the adaptive immune compartment and ultimately adversely affect clinical outcome. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP is an alternative therapeutic strategy that appears to act in an immunomodulatory fashion, potentially involving regulatory T lymphocytes and dendritic cells. By promoting immune tolerance and simultaneously avoiding systemic immunosuppression, ECP could reduce aGvHD and enable a reduction in other immunosuppression, allowing thymic recovery, restoration of normal T lymphopoiesis, and complete immunoreconstitution with improved clinical outcome. Although the safety and efficacy of ECP has been demonstrated, further randomised controlled studies are needed as well as elucidation of the underlying mechanisms responsible and the effect of ECP on thymic recovery.

  10. Age- and weight-dependent susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to isolates of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) of varying virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, S.M.; Fichtner, D.; Skall, Helle Frank

    2003-01-01

    The virulence of 5 European and 1 North American isolate of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was compared by infecting female sibling rainbow trout ('lsle of Man' strain) of different weights and ages (2, 20 and 50 g). The fish were exposed to 104 TCID50 IHNV per ml of water...... recognising the viral G protein. The results showed that IHNV isolates of high or low virulence persisted in rainbow trout of all ages/weights for 28 d, with the exception of fish over 15 g in the eel IHNV (DF [diagnostic fish] 13/98)-infected groups from which the virus could not be reisolated on Day 28......-13/95 viruses caused mortality in fish independent of their weight or age. The isolates FR-32/87 and I-4008 were virulent in fish up to a weight of 20 g and caused no mortality in larger fish. In the IHNV HAG- and DF 13/98 (eel)-infected rainbow trout, no signs of disease were observed in fish...

  11. The Progenitor Dependence of Core-collapse Supernovae from Three-dimensional Simulations with Progenitor Models of 12–40 M ⊙

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Christian D.; Roberts, Luke F.; da Silva Schneider, André; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Haas, Roland; Schnetter, Erik

    2018-03-01

    We present a first study of the progenitor star dependence of the three-dimensional (3D) neutrino mechanism of core-collapse supernovae. We employ full 3D general-relativistic multi-group neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics and simulate the postbounce evolutions of progenitors with zero-age main sequence masses of 12, 15, 20, 27, and 40 M ⊙. All progenitors, with the exception of the 12 M ⊙ star, experience shock runaway by the end of their simulations. In most cases, a strongly asymmetric explosion will result. We find three qualitatively distinct evolutions that suggest a complex dependence of explosion dynamics on progenitor density structure, neutrino heating, and 3D flow. (1) Progenitors with massive cores, shallow density profiles, and high post-core-bounce accretion rates experience very strong neutrino heating and neutrino-driven turbulent convection, leading to early shock runaway. Accretion continues at a high rate, likely leading to black hole formation. (2) Intermediate progenitors experience neutrino-driven, turbulence-aided explosions triggered by the arrival of density discontinuities at the shock. These occur typically at the silicon/silicon–oxygen shell boundary. (3) Progenitors with small cores and density profiles without strong discontinuities experience shock recession and develop the 3D standing-accretion shock instability (SASI). Shock runaway ensues late, once declining accretion rate, SASI, and neutrino-driven convection create favorable conditions. These differences in explosion times and dynamics result in a non-monotonic relationship between progenitor and compact remnant mass.

  12. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osório, M. Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The childhood leukodystrophies comprise a group of hereditary disorders characterized by the absence, malformation or destruction of myelin. These disorders share common clinical, radiological and pathological features, despite their diverse molecular and genetic etiologies. Oligodendrocytes...... stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group...

  13. Regulation of Mammary Progenitor Cells by p53 and Parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    5G ). The elucidation of mammary stem cells and breast cancer stem cells has stimulated greatly the discussion of the cellular origins of breast...stem/progenitor cells (Fig. 5G ). Researchers have tried to apply GSI on breast cancer treatment and showed that GSI is effective in suppression of...adult muscle satellite cells. NAT. CELL BIOL. 2006;8(7):677-687. 33. Smith GH. Label-retaining epithelial cells in mouse mammary gland divide

  14. Types of Blood Donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ill patients. Blood Donation 101 Blood Donation FAQs Types of Blood Donations The Foundation for America's Blood Centers Donate Blood Blood Donation 101 Blood Donation FAQs Types of Blood Donations About Blood What is Blood? ...

  15. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Haytham [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Galal, Omima [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Abdelrahim, Eman [Department of Medical Histology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Ono, Yusuke [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Mostafa, Emtethal [Department of Medical Physiology and Cell Biology, Qena Faculty of Medicine, South Valley University (Egypt); Li, Tao-Sheng, E-mail: litaoshe@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit{sup +} stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms.

  16. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Haytham; Galal, Omima; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan; Abdelrahim, Eman; Ono, Yusuke; Mostafa, Emtethal; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit + stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit + stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit + stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms

  17. Decrease in immune activation in HIV-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy correlates with the function of hematopoietic progenitor cells and the number of naive CD4+ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Sørensen, T U; Ersbøll, A K

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the impact of immune activation, cytokine production and apoptosis on the naive CD4+ cell count and the function of hematopoietic progenitor cells during the initial phase of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Blood samples from 11 HIV...... determined. During the study period, the naive CD4+ count and the cloning efficiency increased significantly. Immune activation was found in HIV-infected patients and decreased during HAART. The level of immune activation correlated negatively with both the naive CD4+ count and the function of progenitor......-infected patients were collected prior to HAART and after 4 and 12 weeks of therapy. Flow cytometry was used to determine the naive CD4+ count and activated T cells. The cloning efficiency of progenitor cells was determined using a colony-forming cells assay. Finally, apoptosis and cytokine production were...

  18. Constraints on the Progenitor System of SN 2016gkg from a Comprehensive Statistical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sravan, Niharika; Marchant, Pablo; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Margutti, Raffaella

    2018-01-01

    Type IIb supernovae (SNe) present a unique opportunity for understanding the progenitors of stripped-envelope SNe because the stellar progenitor of several SNe IIb have been identified in pre-explosion images. In this paper, we use Bayesian inference and a large grid of non-rotating solar-metallicity single and binary stellar models to derive the associated probability distributions of single and binary progenitors of the SN IIb 2016gkg using existing observational constraints. We find that potential binary star progenitors have smaller pre-SN hydrogen-envelope and helium-core masses than potential single-star progenitors typically by 0.1 M ⊙ and 2 M ⊙, respectively. We find that, a binary companion, if present, is a main-sequence or red-giant star. Apart from this, we do not find strong constraints on the nature of the companion star. We demonstrate that the range of progenitor helium-core mass inferred from observations could help improve constraints on the progenitor. We find that the probability that the progenitor of SN 2016gkg was a binary is 22% when we use constraints only on the progenitor luminosity and effective temperature. Imposing the range of pre-SN progenitor hydrogen-envelope mass and radius inferred from SN light curves, the probability that the progenitor is a binary increases to 44%. However, there is no clear preference for a binary progenitor. This is in contrast to binaries being the currently favored formation channel for SNe IIb. Our analysis demonstrates the importance of statistical inference methods to constrain progenitor channels.

  19. Impact of obesity control on circulating level of endothelial progenitor cells and angiogenesis in response to ischemic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yung-Lung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim We tested the hypothesis that obesity reduced circulating number of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, angiogenic ability, and blood flow in ischemic tissue that could be reversed after obesity control. Methods 8-week-old C57BL/6J mice (n = 27 were equally divided into group 1 (fed with 22-week control diet, group 2 (22-week high fat diet, and group 3 (14-week high fat diet, followed by 8-week control diet. Critical limb ischemia (CLI was induced at week 20 in groups 2 and 3. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 22 weeks. Results Heart weight, body weight, abdominal fat weight, serum total cholesterol level, and fasting blood sugar were highest in group 2 (all p  Conclusion Obesity suppressed abilities of angiogenesis and recovery from CLI that were reversed by obesity control.

  20. Possibility of mixed progenitor cells in sea star arm regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernroth, Bodil; Farahani, Farhad; Brunborg, Gunnar; Dupont, Sam; Dejmek, Annika; Sköld, Helen Nilsson

    2010-09-15

    In contrast to most vertebrates, invertebrate deuterostome echinoderms, such as the sea star Asterias rubens, undergo regeneration of lost body parts. The current hypothesis suggests that differentiated cells are the main source for regenerating arm in sea stars, but there is little information regarding the origin and identity of these cells. Here, we show that several organs distant to the regenerating arm responded by proliferation, most significantly in the coelomic epithelium and larger cells of the pyloric caeca. Analyzing markers for proliferating cells and parameters indicating cell ageing, such as levels of DNA damage, pigment, and lipofuscin contents as well as telomere length and telomerase activity, we suggest that cells contributing to the new arm likely originate from progenitors rather than differentiated cells. This is the first study showing that cells of mixed origin may be recruited from more distant sources of stem/progenitor cells in a sea star, and the first described indication of a role for pyloric caeca in arm regeneration. Data on growth rate during arm regeneration further indicate that regeneration is at the expense of whole animal growth. We propose a new working hypothesis for arm regeneration in sea stars involving four phases: wound healing by coelomocytes, migration of distant progenitor cells of mixed origin including from pyloric caeca, proliferation in these organs to compensate for cell loss, and finally, local proliferation in the regenerating arm. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Local Klotho enhances neuronal progenitor proliferation in the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salech, Felipe; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Arredondo, Sebastián B; Bustamante, Daniel B; Andaur, Gabriela A; Cisneros, Rodrigo; Ponce, Daniela P; Ayala, Patricia; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Valdés, José L; Behrens, María I; Couve, Andrés

    2017-12-30

    Klotho is an aging-related protein associated with hippocampal cognitive performance in mammals. Klotho regulates progenitor cell proliferation in non-neuronal tissues, but its role in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) has not been explored. Klotho expression in the adult mouse hippocampus was examined by immunofluorescence and PCR. AHN was evaluated in the hippocampus of klotho knock-out mice (KO), klotho KO/vitamin D-receptor mutant mice, and in a model of local klotho hippocampal knockdown. The recombinant Klotho effect on proliferation was measured in mouse-derived hippocampal neural progenitor cells. Hippocampal-dependent memory was assessed by a dry-land version of the Morris water maze. Klotho was expressed in the granular cell layer of the adult Dentate Gyrus. AHN was increased in klotho KO mice, but not in klotho KO/vitamin D-receptor mutant mice. Inversely, local downregulation of hippocampal Klotho diminished AHN. Recombinant Klotho increased the proliferation rate of neural progenitors. Downregulation of hippocampal Klotho correlated with a decreased performance in hippocampal dependent memory. These results suggest that Klotho directly participates in regulating AHN. Our observations indicate that Klotho promotes proliferation, AHN and hippocampal dependent cognition. Increased neurogenesis in klotho KO mice may be secondary to the activation of other pathways altered in the model, such as vitamin D. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. No hot and luminous progenitor for Tycho's supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T. E.; Ghavamian, P.; Badenes, C.; Gilfanov, M.

    2017-11-01

    Type Ia supernovae have proven vital to our understanding of cosmology, both as standard candles and for their role in galactic chemical evolution; however, their origin remains uncertain. The canonical accretion model implies a hot and luminous progenitor that would ionize the surrounding gas out to a radius of 10-100 pc for 100,000 years after the explosion. Here, we report stringent upper limits on the temperature and luminosity of the progenitor of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572), determined using the remnant itself as a probe of its environment. Hot, luminous progenitors that would have produced a greater hydrogen ionization fraction than that measured at the radius of the present remnant ( 3 pc) can thus be excluded. This conclusively rules out steadily nuclear-burning white dwarfs (supersoft X-ray sources), as well as disk emission from a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf accreting approximately greater than 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 (recurrent novae; M⊙ is equal to one solar mass). The lack of a surrounding Strömgren sphere is consistent with the merger of a double white dwarf binary, although other more exotic scenarios may be possible.

  3. Dendritic Cell Lineage Potential in Human Early Hematopoietic Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Helft

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional dendritic cells (cDCs are thought to descend from a DC precursor downstream of the common myeloid progenitor (CMP. However, a mouse lymphoid-primed multipotent progenitor has been shown to generate cDCs following a DC-specific developmental pathway independent of monocyte and granulocyte poiesis. Similarly, here we show that, in humans, a large fraction of multipotent lymphoid early progenitors (MLPs gives rise to cDCs, in particular the subset known as cDC1, identified by co-expression of DNGR-1 (CLEC9A and CD141 (BDCA-3. Single-cell analysis indicates that over one-third of MLPs have the potential to efficiently generate cDCs. cDC1s generated from CMPs or MLPs do not exhibit differences in transcriptome or phenotype. These results demonstrate an early imprinting of the cDC lineage in human hematopoiesis and highlight the plasticity of developmental pathways giving rise to human DCs.

  4. Requirement of mouse BCCIP for neural development and progenitor proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Yuan Huang

    Full Text Available Multiple DNA repair pathways are involved in the orderly development of neural systems at distinct stages. The homologous recombination (HR pathway is required to resolve stalled replication forks and critical for the proliferation of progenitor cells during neural development. BCCIP is a BRCA2 and CDKN1A interacting protein implicated in HR and inhibition of DNA replication stress. In this study, we determined the role of BCCIP in neural development using a conditional BCCIP knock-down mouse model. BCCIP deficiency impaired embryonic and postnatal neural development, causing severe ataxia, cerebral and cerebellar defects, and microcephaly. These development defects are associated with spontaneous DNA damage and subsequent cell death in the proliferative cell populations of the neural system during embryogenesis. With in vitro neural spheroid cultures, BCCIP deficiency impaired neural progenitor's self-renewal capability, and spontaneously activated p53. These data suggest that BCCIP and its anti-replication stress functions are essential for normal neural development by maintaining an orderly proliferation of neural progenitors.

  5. Genetic analysis of Lrp5 function in osteoblast progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay K; Arantes, Henrique Pierotti; Barros, Elizabete Ribeiro; Lazaretti-Castro, Marise; Ducy, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (Lrp)-5 regulates osteoblast proliferation and bone formation through its expression in duodenum by modifying the gut serotonin-bone endocrine axis. However, its direct role, if any, in osteoblast progenitor cells has not been studied thus far. Here, we show that mice with a Dermo1-Cre-mediated disruption of Lrp5 in osteoblast progenitor cells have normal embryonic skeletogenesis and normal skeletal growth and development postnatally. Histomorphometric analysis of 3-month-old adult mice revealed normal osteoblast numbers, bone formation rate, and bone mass in Lrp5(Dermo)(-/-) mice. In addition, analysis of two osteoporosis pseudoglioma (OPPG) patients revealed a three- to fivefold increase in their serum serotonin levels compared to age-matched controls. These results rule out a direct function of Lrp5 in osteoblast progenitor cells and add further support to the notion that dysregulation of serotonin synthesis is involved in bone mass abnormalities observed in OPPG patients.

  6. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, M Joana; Goldman, Steven A

    2016-09-01

    The childhood leukodystrophies comprise a group of hereditary disorders characterized by the absence, malformation or destruction of myelin. These disorders share common clinical, radiological and pathological features, despite their diverse molecular and genetic etiologies. Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are the major affected cell populations, and are either structurally impaired or metabolically compromised through cell-intrinsic pathology, or are the victims of mis-accumulated toxic byproducts of metabolic derangement. In either case, glial cell replacement using implanted tissue or pluripotent stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group of non-lysosomal metabolic leukodystrophies, may all be appropriate candidates for glial progenitor cell-based treatment. Nonetheless, a variety of specific challenges remain before this therapeutic strategy can be applied to children. These include timely diagnosis, before irreparable neuronal injury has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions; designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe genetic editing of pluripotent stem cells. Yet these challenges notwithstanding, the promise of glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood myelin disorders offers hope to the many victims of this otherwise largely untreatable class of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. RHEX, a novel regulator of human erythroid progenitor cell expansion and erythroblast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rakesh; Su, Su; McCrann, Donald J; Green, Jennifer M; Leu, Karen; Young, Peter R; Schatz, Peter J; Silva, Jeffrey C; Stokes, Matthew P; Wojchowski, Don M

    2014-08-25

    Ligation of erythropoietin (EPO) receptor (EPOR) JAK2 kinase complexes propagates signals within erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) that are essential for red blood cell production. To reveal hypothesized novel EPOR/JAK2 targets, a phosphotyrosine (PY) phosphoproteomics approach was applied. Beyond known signal transduction factors, 32 new targets of EPO-modulated tyrosine phosphorylation were defined. Molecular adaptors comprised one major set including growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2)-associated binding proteins 1-3 (GAB1-3), insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), docking protein 1 (DOK1), Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein 1 (SHC1), and sprouty homologue 1 (SPRY1) as validating targets, and SPRY2, SH2 domain containing 2A (SH2D2A), and signal transducing adaptor molecule 2 (STAM2) as novel candidate adaptors together with an ORF factor designated as regulator of human erythroid cell expansion (RHEX). RHEX is well conserved in Homo sapiens and primates but absent from mouse, rat, and lower vertebrate genomes. Among tissues and lineages, RHEX was elevated in EPCs, occurred as a plasma membrane protein, was rapidly PY-phosphorylated >20-fold upon EPO exposure, and coimmunoprecipitated with the EPOR. In UT7epo cells, knockdown of RHEX inhibited EPO-dependent growth. This was associated with extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1,2 (ERK1,2) modulation, and RHEX coupling to GRB2. In primary human EPCs, shRNA knockdown studies confirmed RHEX regulation of erythroid progenitor expansion and further revealed roles in promoting the formation of hemoglobinizing erythroblasts. RHEX therefore comprises a new EPO/EPOR target and regulator of human erythroid cell expansion that additionally acts to support late-stage erythroblast development. © 2014 Verma et al.

  8. Clodronate Improves Survival of Transplanted Hoxb8 Myeloid Progenitors with Constitutively Active GMCSFR in Immunocompetent Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New methods to produce large numbers of myeloid progenitor cells, precursors to macrophages (MΦs, by maintaining Hoxb8 transcription factor activity1 has reinvigorated interest in MΦ cell therapies. We generated Hoxb8-dependent myeloid progenitors (HDPs by transducing lineage-negative bone marrow cells with a constitutively expressed Hoxb8 flanked by loxP. HDPs proliferate indefinitely and differentiate into MΦ when Hoxb8 is removed by a tamoxifen-inducible Cre. We genetically modified HDPs with a constitutively active GMCSF receptor and the tamoxifen-induced transcription factor IRF8, which we have termed “HDP-on.” The HDP-on proliferates without GMCSF and differentiates into the MΦ upon exposure to tamoxifen and ruxolitinib (GMCSF inhibitor via JAK1/2 blockade. We quantified the biodistribution of HDPs transplanted via intraperitoneal injection into immunodeficient NCG mice with a luciferase reporter; HDPs are detected for 14 days in the peritoneal cavity, liver, spleen, kidney, bone marrow, brain, lung, heart, and blood. In immunocompetent BALB/c mice, HDP-on cells, but not HDPs, are detected 1 day post-transplantation in the peritoneal cavity. Pretreatment of BALB/c mice with liposomal clodronate significantly enhances survival at day 7 for HDPs and HDP-on cells in the peritoneal cavity, spleen, and liver, but cells are undetectable at day 14. Short-term post-transplantation survival of HDPs is significantly improved using HDP-on and liposomal clodronate, opening a path for MΦ-based therapeutics.

  9. Manipulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell Homing with Sphingosine-1-Phosphate for Terapeutic Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Priscilla Anne

    Ischemic vascular diseases are the main cause of mortality worldwide and yet current therapies only delay disease progression and improve quality of life without addressing the fundamental problem of tissue loss. Within the field of tissue engineering, therapeutic angiogenesis provides a promising approach to alternatively provide new blood vessel formation via spatiotemporally controlled delivery of proangiogenic agents. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lysophospholipid that is upregulated under ischemic conditions, has recently gained great enthusiasm as a potential mediator in neovascularization strategies given its essential roles in promoting both neovessel formation and stabilization, and cellular trafficking along highly regulated endogenous gradients. Herein, the governing hypothesis guiding this dissertation is that local biomaterial-controlled delivery of S1P may be used to enhance migration and recruitment of vascular progenitor cells for enhanced therapeutic angiogenesis within ischemic tissue. The initial work in this dissertation investigated the effect of hypoxia on the angiogenic response of both mature and progenitor endothelial cells to S1P stimulation in vitro. Outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) were isolated from human umbilical cord blood to provide a clinically relevant source of vascular progenitor cells for the studies conducted within this dissertation. S1P stimulation promoted angiogenic activity of both ECs and OECs under both ambient and hypoxic (1%) oxygen tensions. Furthermore, dual therapy with the combination of S1P and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) further enhanced cellular responses. Interestingly, hypoxia substantially augmented the functional response of OECs to S1P, resulting in 25-fold and 6.5-fold increases in directed migration and sprouting, respectively. Thus, these studies highlighted the potential for S1P as a therapeutic agent for treatment of ischemic diseases. An injectable biomaterial system

  10. Fetal progenitor cell transplantation treats methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, Nicole E.; Pennell, Samuel D.; Wood, Leonie R.; Pitt, James J.; Allen, Katrina J.; Peters, Heidi L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fetal cells were transplanted into a methylmalonic acid mouse model. ► Cell engraftment was detected in liver, spleen and bone marrow. ► Biochemical disease correction was measured in blood samples. ► A double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) proved more effective. ► Higher levels of engraftment may be required for greater disease correction. -- Abstract: Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder caused by an inborn error of organic acid metabolism. Current treatment options are limited and generally focus on disease management. We aimed to investigate the use of fetal progenitor cells to treat this disorder using a mouse model with an intermediate form of methylmalonic aciduria. Fetal liver cells were isolated from healthy fetuses at embryonic day 15–17 and intravenously transplanted into sub-lethally irradiated mice. Liver donor cell engraftment was determined by PCR. Disease correction was monitored by urine and blood methylmalonic acid concentration and weight change. Initial studies indicated that pre-transplantation sub-lethal irradiation followed by transplantation with 5 million cells were suitable. We found that a double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) provided a more effective treatment. Donor cell liver engraftment of up to 5% was measured. Disease correction, as defined by a decrease in blood methylmalonic acid concentration, was effected in methylmalonic acid mice transplanted with a double dose of cells and who showed donor cell liver engraftment. Mean plasma methylmalonic acid concentration decreased from 810 ± 156 (sham transplanted) to 338 ± 157 μmol/L (double dose of 5 million cells) while mean blood C3 carnitine concentration decreased from 20.5 ± 4 (sham transplanted) to 5.3 ± 1.9 μmol/L (double dose of 5 million cells). In conclusion, higher levels of engraftment may be required for greater disease correction; however these studies show promising results for cell transplantation biochemical

  11. Erythrocyte enrichment in hematopoietic progenitor cell cultures based on magnetic susceptibility of the hemoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Jin

    Full Text Available Using novel media formulations, it has been demonstrated that human placenta and umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells can be expanded and differentiated into erythroid cells with high efficiency. However, obtaining mature and functional erythrocytes from the immature cell cultures with high purity and in an efficient manner remains a significant challenge. A distinguishing feature of a reticulocyte and maturing erythrocyte is the increasing concentration of hemoglobin and decreasing cell volume that results in increased cell magnetophoretic mobility (MM when exposed to high magnetic fields and gradients, under anoxic conditions. Taking advantage of these initial observations, we studied a noninvasive (label-free magnetic separation and analysis process to enrich and identify cultured functional erythrocytes. In addition to the magnetic cell separation and cell motion analysis in the magnetic field, the cell cultures were characterized for cell sedimentation rate, cell volume distributions using differential interference microscopy, immunophenotyping (glycophorin A, hemoglobin concentration and shear-induced deformability (elongation index, EI, by ektacytometry to test for mature erythrocyte attributes. A commercial, packed column high-gradient magnetic separator (HGMS was used for magnetic separation. The magnetically enriched fraction comprised 80% of the maturing cells (predominantly reticulocytes that showed near 70% overlap of EI with the reference cord blood-derived RBC and over 50% overlap with the adult donor RBCs. The results demonstrate feasibility of label-free magnetic enrichment of erythrocyte fraction of CD34+ progenitor-derived cultures based on the presence of paramagnetic hemoglobin in the maturing erythrocytes.

  12. The Use of Endothelial Progenitor Cells for the Regeneration of Musculoskeletal and Neural Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naosuke Kamei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs derived from bone marrow and blood can differentiate into endothelial cells and promote neovascularization. In addition, EPCs are a promising cell source for the repair of various types of vascularized tissues and have been used in animal experiments and clinical trials for tissue repair. In this review, we focused on the kinetics of endogenous EPCs during tissue repair and the application of EPCs or stem cell populations containing EPCs for tissue regeneration in musculoskeletal and neural tissues including the bone, skeletal muscle, ligaments, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. EPCs can be mobilized from bone marrow and recruited to injured tissue to contribute to neovascularization and tissue repair. In addition, EPCs or stem cell populations containing EPCs promote neovascularization and tissue repair through their differentiation to endothelial cells or tissue-specific cells, the upregulation of growth factors, and the induction and activation of endogenous stem cells. Human peripheral blood CD34(+ cells containing EPCs have been used in clinical trials of bone repair. Thus, EPCs are a promising cell source for the treatment of musculoskeletal and neural tissue injury.

  13. Rai is a new regulator of neural progenitor migration and glioblastoma invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortensi, Barbara; Osti, Daniela; Pellegatta, Serena; Pisati, Federica; Brescia, Paola; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Levi, Daniel; Gaetani, Paolo; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Ferri, Anna; Nicolis, Silvia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2012-05-01

    The invasive nature of glioblastoma (GBM) is one important reason for treatment failure. GBM stem/progenitor cells retain the migratory ability of normal neural stem/progenitor cells and infiltrate the brain parenchyma. Here, we identify Rai (ShcC/N-Shc), a member of the family of Shc-like adaptor proteins, as a new regulator of migration of normal and cancer stem/progenitor cells. Rai is expressed in neurogenic areas of the brain and its knockdown impairs progenitor migration to the olfactory bulb. Its expression is retained in GBM stem/progenitor cells where it exerts the same promigratory activity. Rai silencing in cancer stem/progenitor cells isolated from different patients causes significant decrease in cell migration and invasion, both in vitro and in vivo, providing survival benefit. Rai depletion is associated with alteration of multiple-signaling pathways, yet it always leads to reduced expression of proinvasive genes. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  14. In Vitro Modeling of Brain Progenitor Cell Development under the Effect of Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvacheva, N V; Morgun, A V; Komleva, Yu K; Khilazheva, E D; Gorina, Ya V; Lopatina, O L; Arutyunyan, S A; Salmina, A B

    2015-08-01

    We studied in vitro development of brain progenitor cells isolated from healthy 7-9-month-old Wistar rats and rats with experimental Alzheimer's disease kept under standard conditions and in enriched (multistimulus) environment in vivo. Progenitor cells from healthy animals more rapidly formed neurospheres. Considerable changes at the early stages of in vitro development of brain progenitor cells were observed in both groups kept in enriched environment.

  15. Immuno-Magnetic Isolation and Thermogenic Differentiation of White Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Rohollah; Bayindir-Buchhalter, Irem; Meln, Irina; Vegiopoulos, Alexandros

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate cell models are necessary for the investigation of thermogenic beige adipocyte differentiation from progenitor cells. Here, we describe a primary cell culture method that is based on defined progenitor cells from murine white adipose tissue and aims at minimizing confounding factors including cell heterogeneity and nonphysiological differentiation inducers. Adipocyte progenitor cells are enriched by immuno-magnetic separation, expanded minimally, and induced for beige adipocyte differentiation with carbaprostacyclin, a stable analogue of the endogenous mediator PGI 2 .

  16. Does the Mouse Mammary Gland Arise from Unipotent or Multipotent Mammary Stem/Progenitor Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gilbert H; Medina, Daniel

    2018-04-11

    The presence of long-lived lineage restricted progenitor and multipotent progenitor cells in adult mouse mammary gland for cancer development is compelling. Mammary cancers are phenotypically diverse This might be explained by transformation of long-lived, lineage-limited progenitor subpopulations. Mammary multipotent epithelial stem cells and their environmental niches must be considered, since their niche(s), once empty might be occupied by lineage-limited progenitors that are proximal. The existence of premalignant mammary populationst that manifest characteristics of lineage limitation argues strongly for this proposition.

  17. Cellular function reinstitution of offspring red blood cells cloned from the sickle cell disease patient blood post CRISPR genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianguo; Tao, Wenjing; Hao, Suyang; Zu, Youli

    2017-06-13

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a disorder of red blood cells (RBCs) expressing abnormal hemoglobin-S (HbS) due to genetic inheritance of homologous HbS gene. However, people with the sickle cell trait (SCT) carry a single allele of HbS and do not usually suffer from SCD symptoms, thus providing a rationale to treat SCD. To validate gene therapy potential, hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from the SCD patient blood and treated with CRISPR/Cas9 approach. To precisely dissect genome-editing effects, erythroid progenitor cells were cloned from single colonies of CRISPR-treated cells and then expanded for simultaneous gene, protein, and cellular function studies. Genotyping and sequencing analysis revealed that the genome-edited erythroid progenitor colonies were converted to SCT genotype from SCD genotype. HPLC protein assays confirmed reinstallation of normal hemoglobin at a similar level with HbS in the cloned genome-edited erythroid progenitor cells. For cell function evaluation, in vitro RBC differentiation of the cloned erythroid progenitor cells was induced. As expected, cell sickling assays indicated function reinstitution of the genome-edited offspring SCD RBCs, which became more resistant to sickling under hypoxia condition. This study is an exploration of genome editing of SCD HSPCs.

  18. Cellular function reinstitution of offspring red blood cells cloned from the sickle cell disease patient blood post CRISPR genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Wen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickle cell disease (SCD is a disorder of red blood cells (RBCs expressing abnormal hemoglobin-S (HbS due to genetic inheritance of homologous HbS gene. However, people with the sickle cell trait (SCT carry a single allele of HbS and do not usually suffer from SCD symptoms, thus providing a rationale to treat SCD. Methods To validate gene therapy potential, hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from the SCD patient blood and treated with CRISPR/Cas9 approach. To precisely dissect genome-editing effects, erythroid progenitor cells were cloned from single colonies of CRISPR-treated cells and then expanded for simultaneous gene, protein, and cellular function studies. Results Genotyping and sequencing analysis revealed that the genome-edited erythroid progenitor colonies were converted to SCT genotype from SCD genotype. HPLC protein assays confirmed reinstallation of normal hemoglobin at a similar level with HbS in the cloned genome-edited erythroid progenitor cells. For cell function evaluation, in vitro RBC differentiation of the cloned erythroid progenitor cells was induced. As expected, cell sickling assays indicated function reinstitution of the genome-edited offspring SCD RBCs, which became more resistant to sickling under hypoxia condition. Conclusions This study is an exploration of genome editing of SCD HSPCs.

  19. Mobilization of endogenous bone marrow derived endothelial progenitor cells and therapeutic potential of parathyroid hormone after ischemic stroke in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wang

    Full Text Available Stroke is a major neurovascular disorder threatening human life and health. Very limited clinical treatments are currently available for stroke patients. Stem cell transplantation has shown promising potential as a regenerative treatment after ischemic stroke. The present investigation explores a new concept of mobilizing endogenous stem cells/progenitor cells from the bone marrow using a parathyroid hormone (PTH therapy after ischemic stroke in adult mice. PTH 1-34 (80 µg/kg, i.p. was administered 1 hour after focal ischemia and then daily for 6 consecutive days. After 6 days of PTH treatment, there was a significant increase in bone marrow derived CD-34/Fetal liver kinase-1 (Flk-1 positive endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in the peripheral blood. PTH treatment significantly increased the expression of trophic/regenerative factors including VEGF, SDF-1, BDNF and Tie-1 in the brain peri-infarct region. Angiogenesis, assessed by co-labeled Glut-1 and BrdU vessels, was significantly increased in PTH-treated ischemic brain compared to vehicle controls. PTH treatment also promoted neuroblast migration from the subventricular zone (SVZ and increased the number of newly formed neurons in the peri-infarct cortex. PTH-treated mice showed significantly better sensorimotor functional recovery compared to stroke controls. Our data suggests that PTH therapy improves endogenous repair mechanisms after ischemic stroke with functional benefits. Mobilizing endogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells/progenitor cells using PTH and other mobilizers appears an effective and feasible regenerative treatment after ischemic stroke.

  20. Late Release of Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells after Chemotherapy Predicts Response and Survival in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine M. Roodhart

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We and others have previously demonstrated that the acute release of progenitor cells in response to chemotherapy actually reduces the efficacy of the chemotherapy. Here, we take these data further and investigate the clinical relevance of circulating endothelial (progenitor cells (CE(PCs and modulatory cytokines in patients after chemotherapy with relation to progression-free and overall survival (PFS/OS. Patients treated with various chemotherapeutics were included. Blood sampling was performed at baseline, 4 hours, and 7 and 21 days after chemotherapy. The mononuclear cell fraction was analyzed for CE(PC by FACS analysis. Plasma was analyzed for cytokines by ELISA or Luminex technique. CE(PCs were correlated with response and PFS/OS using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. We measured CE(PCs and cytokines in 71 patients. Only patients treated with paclitaxel showed an immediate increase in endothelial progenitor cell 4 hours after start of treatment. These immediate changes did not correlate with response or survival. After 7 and 21 days of chemotherapy, a large and consistent increase in CE(PC was found (P < .01, independent of the type of chemotherapy. Changes in CE(PC levels at day 7 correlated with an increase in tumor volume after three cycles of chemotherapy and predicted PFS/OS, regardless of the tumor type or chemotherapy. These findings indicate that the late release of CE(PC is a common phenomenon after chemotherapeutic treatment. The correlation with a clinical response and survival provides further support for the biologic relevance of these cells in patients' prognosis and stresses their possible use as a therapeutic target.

  1. The effects of X-irradiation on ex vivo expansion of cryopreserved human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Naoki; Takahashi, Kenji; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    In our previous study (Life Sciences 84: 598, 2009), we demonstrated that placental/umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell-like stromal cells have the effect to support the regeneration of freshly prepared X-irradiated hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Generally, HSPCs are supplied from companies, institutions, and cell banks that cryopreserve them for clinical and experimental use. In this study, the influence of cryopreservation on the responses of HSPCs to irradiation and co-culture with stromal cells is assessed. After cryopreservation with the optimal procedure, 2 Gy-irradiated HSPCs were cultured with or without stromal cells supplemented with combination of interleukin-3, stem cell factor, and thrombopoietin. The population of relatively immature CD34 + /CD38 - cells in cryopreserved cells was significantly higher than in fresh cells prior to cryopreservation; furthermore, the hematopoietic progenitor populations of CD34 + /CD45RA + cells and CD34 + /CD117 + cells in cryopreserved cells were significantly lower than that in fresh cells. However, the rate of expansion in the cryopreserved HSPCs was lower than in the fresh HSPCs. In the culture of cryopreserved cells irradiated with 2 Gy, the growth rates of CD34 + cells, CD34 + /CD38 - cells, and hematopoietic progenitors were greater than growth rates of their counter parts in the culture of fresh cells. Surprisingly, the effect to support the hematopoiesis in co-culture with stromal cells was never observed in the X-irradiated HSPCs after cryopreservation. The present results demonstrated that cryopreserving process increased the rate of immature and radio-resistant HSPCs but decreased the effects to support the hematopoiesis by stromal cells, thus suggesting that cryopreservation changes the character of HSPCs. (author)

  2. Differential growth of U and M type infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in a rainbow trout–derived cell line, RTG-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Purcell, Maureen K.; Wargo, Andrew; Park, Jeong Woo; Moon, Chang Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is one of the most important viral pathogens of salmonids. In rainbow trout, IHNV isolates in the M genogroup are highly pathogenic, while U genogroup isolates are significantly less pathogenic. We show here that, at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1, a representative U type strain yielded 42-fold less infectious virus than an M type strain in the rainbow trout–derived RTG-2 cell line at 24 h post-infection (p.i.). However, at an MOI of 10, there was only fivefold difference in the yield of infectious virus between the U and M strains. Quantification of extracellular viral genomic RNA suggested that the number of virus particles released from cells infected with the U strain at a MOI of 1 was 47-fold lower than from M-infected cells, but U and M virions were equally infectious by particle to infectivity ratios. At an MOI of 1, U strain intracellular viral genome accumulation and transcription were 37- and 12-fold lower, respectively, than those of the M strain at 24 h p.i. Viral nucleocapsid (N) protein accumulation in U strain infections was fivefold lower than in M strain infections. These results suggest that the block in U type strain growth in RTG-2 cells was because of the effects of reduced genome replication and transcription. The reduced growth of the U strain does not seem to be caused by defective genes, because the U and M strains grew equally well in the permissive epithelioma papulosum cyprini cell line at an MOI of 1. This suggests that host-specific factors in RTG-2 cells control the growth of the IHNV U and M strains differently, leading to growth restriction of the U type virus during the RNA synthesis step.

  3. Hepatitis B reactivation in HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: risk factors and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulska, M; Nicolini, L; Signori, A; Rivoli, G; Del Bono, V; Raiola, A M; Di Grazia, C; Dominietto, A; Varaldo, R; Ghiso, A; Bacigalupo, A; Viscoli, C

    2014-10-01

    HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are at high risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation. Allogeneic HSCT recipients from years 2000 to 2010 were evaluated in order to study the impact of being HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive in this population. Overall, 137 of 764 patients (18%) were HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive before HSCT. Overall survival, non-relapse mortality (NRM), acute and chronic graft-vs.-host disease were similar in HBcAb-positive and HBcAb-negative patients. Reactivation occurred in 14 patients (10%) within a median of 19 months after HSCT (range 9-77). Cause-specific hazard for reactivation was decreased in the case of an HBV-immune/exposed donor (HRadjusted = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.02-0.96; p 0.045) and increased in patients who received rituximab treatment (HRadjusted = 2.91; 95%CI, 0.77-10.97; p 0.11). Competing risk analyses documented a protective role of an HBV-immune/exposed donor (p 0.041) and an increased probability associated with the length of treatment with cyclosporine (p <0.001) and treatment with rituximab (but not with low-dose rituximab prophylaxis, p <0.001 at each landmark point). No differences in overall survival and NRM were found between patients with and without HBV reactivation. The donor's immunity was independently and consistently associated with a decreased risk of HBV reactivation, while rituximab and cyclosporine treatments increased the probability. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  4. Ontogeny of the granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cell (GM-CFC) pools in the beagle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, W; Braasch, E; Calvo, W; Prümmer, O; Carbonell, F; Grilli, G; Fliedner, T M

    1984-04-01

    The pattern of development of the granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cell (GM-CFC) pools in the course of canine ontogeny was studied by means of the agar culture technique. Colony formation was stimulated by colony stimulating activity (CSA) in serum from lethally irradiated dogs in combination with erythrocyte-depleted peripheral blood leukocytes from normal adult dogs. The colonies thus obtained in cultures from the different organs were in general large (estimated maximum 50 000 cells) and consisted predominantly of mononucleated macrophages, suggesting that, in these studies, a progenitor cell with high proliferative potential (HPP-CFC) has been monitored. In the yolk sac, a transitory GM-CFC pool became established between day 23 and day 48 of gestation, reaching maximum numbers of approximately 41 X 10(3) per organ on days 36/37. At the same time the GM-CFC concentration in blood collected from the heart also reached a maximum of about 31 X 10(3)/ml, indicating its carrier function for the migration of GM-CFC. In the liver a quasi-exponential increase in the GM-CFC numbers took place between days 36/37 and days 57 to 59 when a total of about 15.2 X 10(6) was found but thereafter and up to day 4 post partum the GM-CFC numbers decreased by almost two orders of magnitude. A continuous increase in the GM-CFC numbers was found in the spleen between day 42 of gestation and day 4 post partum when a maximum of 5.1 X 10(6) to 8.7 X 10(6) was reached. In contrast to the GM-CFC numbers in the liver, the splenic GM-CFC dropped only by 50% of peak values when the dogs reached adulthood. The bone marrow always had the highest incidence of GM-CFC, the concentration per 10(6) cells being 18.7 X 10(3)/10(6) cells on days 45/46, the earliest time point at which cultures could be set up. The absolute GM-CFC numbers in the two femora increased continuously between days 45/46 and day 4 post partum in parallel with the growth of the bones. In the thymus a relatively small

  5. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this page, ... There are many reasons you may need a blood transfusion: After knee or hip replacement surgery, or other ...

  6. Blood Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A, B, AB or O — and your Rh factor. The Rh factor refers to the presence or absence of a ... information is important because your blood type and Rh factor must be compatible with the blood type and ...

  7. What's Blood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toes. Let's find out more about each ingredient. Red Blood Cells Red blood cells (also called erythrocytes, ... after you are better, B cells can become memory cells that remember how to make the special ...

  8. Donating Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... KidsHealth / For Teens / Donating Blood What's in this article? Who Can Donate Blood? Before Donating Are There Any Risks? Print en español Donar sangre According to the American Red Cross, there's a ...

  9. Vomiting Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if vomiting blood causes dizziness after standing, rapid, shallow breathing or other signs of shock. Call 911 ... severe blood loss or shock, such as: Rapid, shallow breathing Dizziness or lightheadedness after standing up Blurred ...

  10. Enrichment of rat oligodendrocyte progenitor cells by magnetic cell sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížková, D.; Čížek, M.; Nagyová, M.; Slovinská, L.; Novotná, I.; Jergová, S.; Radoňák, J.; Hlučilová, Jana; Vanický, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 1 (2009), s. 88-94 ISSN 0165-0270 R&D Projects: GA MŠk MEB0808108 Grant - others:Agentúra na podporu výskumu a vývoja(SK) APVV-51002105; Agentúra na podporu výskumu a vývoja(SK) APVV SK-CZ-0045-07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Oligodendrocytes progenitors Lineage * Magnetic separation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.295, year: 2009

  11. Retinal progenitor cell xenografts to the pig retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Klassen, Henry

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the host response to murine retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) following transplantation to the subretinal space (SRS) of the pig. RPCs from GFP mice were transplanted subretinally in 18 nonimmunosuppressed normal or laser-treated pigs. Evaluation of the SRS was performed on hematoxylin...... mononuclear infiltration in the choroid with graft rejection occurring over 2-5 weeks. Serum analysis confirmed that mice and pigs are discordant species; however, a cell-mediated acute mechanism appears to be responsible, rather than an antibody-mediated rejection....

  12. Dynamically constrained pipeline for tracking neural progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders; Holm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    tracking methods are fundamental building blocks of setting up multi purpose pipelines. Segmentation by discriminative dictionary learning and a graph formulated tracking method constraining the allowed topology changes are combined here to accommodate for highly irregular cell shapes and movement patterns...... pipeline by tracking pig neural progenitor cells through a time lapse experiment consisting of 825 images collected over 69 hours. Each step of the tracking pipeline is validated separately by comparison with manual annotations. The number of tracked cells increase from approximately 350 to 650 during...

  13. PW1 gene/paternally expressed gene 3 (PW1/Peg3) identifies multiple adult stem and progenitor cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Vanessa; Smeriglio, Piera; Wegener, Amélie; Relaix, Frédéric; Nait Oumesmar, Brahim; Sassoon, David A.; Marazzi, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    A variety of markers are invaluable for identifying and purifying stem/progenitor cells. Here we report the generation of a murine reporter line driven by Pw1 that reveals cycling and quiescent progenitor/stem cells in all adult tissues thus far examined, including the intestine, blood, testis, central nervous system, bone, skeletal muscle, and skin. Neurospheres generated from the adult PW1-reporter mouse show near 100% reporter-gene expression following a single passage. Furthermore, epidermal stem cells can be purified solely on the basis of reporter-gene expression. These cells are clonogenic, repopulate the epidermal stem-cell niches, and give rise to new hair follicles. Finally, we demonstrate that only PW1 reporter-expressing epidermal cells give rise to follicles that are capable of self-renewal following injury. Our data demonstrate that PW1 serves as an invaluable marker for competent self-renewing stem cells in a wide array of adult tissues, and the PW1-reporter mouse serves as a tool for rapid stem cell isolation and characterization. PMID:21709251

  14. Fetal cells in the pregnant mouse are diverse and express a variety of progenitor and differentiated cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Yutaka; Johnson, Kirby L; Peter, Inga; Tighiouart, Hocine; Bianchi, Diana W

    2009-07-01

    To better understand fetomaternal cell trafficking during pregnancy, we used a mouse model to determine the cell surface markers expressed on fetal cells, based on the hypothesis that fetal progenitor cells have the capacity to repair maternal organs, whereas more differentiated cells might initiate graft versus host disease. Wild-type females were mated to either homozygous or hemizygous transgenic males and euthanized in the peripartum period. Using dual color flow cytometry, we analyzed fetal transgene positive cells for the presence of nine markers (ITGAM, ITGB1, PECAM, CD34, CD44, PTPRC, ENG, SLAMF1, and CXCR4) to begin to identify the phenotype and degree of differentiation of fetal cells in nine maternal organs (lung, liver, spleen, blood, bone marrow, kidney, heart, thymus, and brain). Fetal cells were found in all maternal organs following either type of mating, albeit always at a higher frequency following mating with homozygous males. Some organs (e.g., lung and liver) had a wide variety of fetal cell markers present, while other organs (e.g., bone marrow and spleen) had a skewed distribution of fetal cell markers. Fetal cells in the murine pregnant female are diverse. Our results suggest that the fetal cells comprise a mixed population of progenitor and differentiated cells, with different relative proportions in different maternal organs. Future studies will address whether fetal cells cross the placental barrier in a differentiated state or as a homogenous population and subsequently differentiate in target maternal organs.

  15. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Activation during the Granulopoietic Response to Systemic Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin; Wei, Shengcai; Simms, Kevin J; Cumpston, Devan N; Ewing, Thomas J; Zhang, Ping

    2018-01-01

    of increase in blood granulocytes following bacteremia. Our results indicate that SHH signaling is critically important in the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell activation and reprogramming during the granulopoietic response to serious bacterial infection.

  16. Comparative transcriptomic analysis identifies genes differentially expressed in human epicardial progenitors and hiPSC-derived cardiac progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synnergren, Jane; Drowley, Lauren; Plowright, Alleyn T; Brolén, Gabriella; Goumans, Marie-José; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Sartipy, Peter; Wang, Qing-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Regenerative therapies hold great potential to change the treatment paradigm for cardiac diseases. Human cardiac progenitor cells can be used for drug discovery in this area and also provide a renewable source of cardiomyocytes. However, a better understanding of their characteristics is critical for interpreting data obtained from drug screening using these cells. In the present study, we performed global transcriptional analysis of two important sources of cardiac progenitors, i.e., patient epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) and cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we also compared the gene expression profiles of these cells when they were cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We identified 3,289 mRNAs that were differentially expressed between EPDCs and CPCs. Gene ontology annotation and pathway enrichment analyses further revealed possible unique functions of these two cell populations. Notably, the impact of hypoxia vs normoxia on gene expression was modest and only a few genes (e.g., AK4, ALDOC, BNIP3P1, PGK1, and SLC2A1) were upregulated in EPDCs and CPCs after the cells were exposed to low oxygen for 24 h. Finally, we also performed a focused analysis of the gene expression patterns of a predefined set of 92 paracrine factors. We identified 30 of these genes as differentially expressed, and 29 were expressed at higher levels in EPDCs compared with CPCs. Taken together, the results of the present study advance our understanding of the transcriptional programs in EPDCs and CPCs and highlights important differences and similarities between these cell populations. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Using Strong Gravitational Lensing to Identify Fossil Group Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lucas E.; Irwin, Jimmy A.; White, Raymond E., III; Wong, Ka-Wah; Maksym, W. Peter; Dupke, Renato A.; Miller, Eric D.; Carrasco, Eleazar R.

    2018-04-01

    Fossil galaxy systems are classically thought to be the end result of galaxy group/cluster evolution, as galaxies experiencing dynamical friction sink to the center of the group potential and merge into a single, giant elliptical that dominates the rest of the members in both mass and luminosity. Most fossil systems discovered lie within z fossil criteria within the look forward time. Since strong gravitational lensing preferentially selects groups merging along the line of sight, or systems with a high mass concentration like fossil systems, we searched the CASSOWARY survey of strong-lensing events with the goal of determining whether lensing systems have any predisposition to being fossil systems or progenitors. We find that ∼13% of lensing groups are identified as traditional fossils while only ∼3% of nonlensing control groups are. We also find that ∼23% of lensing systems are traditional fossil progenitors compared to ∼17% for the control sample. Our findings show that strong-lensing systems are more likely to be fossil/pre-fossil systems than comparable nonlensing systems. Cumulative galaxy luminosity functions of the lensing and nonlensing groups also indicate a possible, fundamental difference between strong-lensing and nonlensing systems’ galaxy populations, with lensing systems housing a greater number of bright galaxies even in the outskirts of groups.

  18. Tissue engineering bone using autologous progenitor cells in the peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jinhui; Nair, Ashwin; Saxena, Ramesh; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Borrelli, Joseph; Tang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts, there remains a need for novel methods to improve the ossification of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Based on a common phenomenon and known pathological conditions of peritoneal membrane ossification following peritoneal dialysis, we have explored the possibility of regenerating ossified tissue in the peritoneum. Interestingly, in addition to inflammatory cells, we discovered a large number of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the peritoneal lavage fluid from mice with peritoneal catheter implants. The osteogenic potential of these peritoneal progenitor cells was demonstrated by their ability to easily infiltrate decalcified bone implants, produce osteocalcin and form mineralized bone in 8 weeks. Additionally, when poly(l-lactic acid) scaffolds loaded with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (a known osteogenic differentiation agent) were implanted into the peritoneum, signs of osteogenesis were seen within 8 weeks of implantation. The results of this investigation support the concept that scaffolds containing BMP-2 can stimulate the formation of bone in the peritoneum via directed autologous stem and progenitor cell responses.

  19. Pancreatic β-cell regeneration: Facultative or dedicated progenitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afelik, Solomon; Rovira, Meritxell

    2017-04-15

    The adult pancreas is only capable of limited regeneration. Unlike highly regenerative tissues such as the skin, intestinal crypts and hematopoietic system, no dedicated adult stem cells or stem cell niche have so far been identified within the adult pancreas. New β cells have been shown to form in the adult pancreas, in response to high physiological demand or experimental β-cell ablation, mostly by replication of existing β cells. The possibility that new β cells are formed from other sources is currently a point of major controversy. Under particular injury conditions, fully differentiated pancreatic duct and acinar cells have been shown to dedifferentiate into a progenitor-like state, however the extent, to which ductal, acinar or other endocrine cells contribute to restoring pancreatic β-cell mass remains to be resolved. In this review we focus on regenerative events in the pancreas with emphasis on the restoration of β-cell mass. We present an overview of regenerative responses noted within the different pancreatic lineages, following injury. We also highlight the intrinsic plasticity of the adult pancreas that allows for inter-conversion of fully differentiated pancreatic lineages through manipulation of few genes or growth factors. Taken together, evidence from a number of studies suggest that differentiated pancreatic lineages could act as facultative progenitor cells, but the extent to which these contribute to β-cell regeneration in vivo is still a matter of contention. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Metallicity gradient of the thick disc progenitor at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Daisuke; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Brook, Chris B.; Casagrande, Luca; Ciucă, Ioana; Gibson, Brad K.; Grand, Robert J. J.; Hayden, Michael R.; Hunt, Jason A. S.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a novel Markov Chain Monte Carlo chemical 'painting' technique to explore possible radial and vertical metallicity gradients for the thick disc progenitor. In our analysis, we match an N-body simulation to the data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey. We assume that the thick disc has a constant scaleheight and has completed its formation at an early epoch, after which time radial mixing of its stars has taken place. Under these assumptions, we find that the initial radial metallicity gradient of the thick disc progenitor should not be negative, but either flat or even positive, to explain the current negative vertical metallicity gradient of the thick disc. Our study suggests that the thick disc was built-up in an inside-out and upside-down fashion, and older, smaller and thicker populations are more metal poor. In this case, star-forming discs at different epochs of the thick disc formation are allowed to have different radial metallicity gradients, including a negative one, which helps to explain a variety of slopes observed in high-redshift disc galaxies. This scenario helps to explain the positive slope of the metallicity-rotation velocity relation observed for the Galactic thick disc. On the other hand, radial mixing flattens the slope of an existing gradient.

  1. Selection of progenitors for increase in oil content in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Isabela da Silva Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The low genetic diversity brings limitation to breeding, because genetically similar genotypes share alleles in common, causing little complementarity and low vigor due to the low levels of heterozygosity in crosses. The objective of this work was to analyze the oil content and genetic diversity of soybean genotypes (Glycine max (L. Merrill based on QTL regions of this trait for choice of progenitors for increase in oil content. Twenty-two genotypes with wide variation in oil content, including cultivars with high oil contents, were cultivated in different Brazilian conditions and the oil content of the grains was quantified by infrared spectrometry. Microsatellite markers selected based on QTL regions for oil content in soybean were analyzed to estimate the genetic diversity. In these studies, a wide variation in oil content (17.28-23.01% and a reasonable diversity among the genotypes were observed, being PI181544 the most divergent genotype, followed by Suprema. The genotypes PI371610/Suprema and Suprema/CD01RR8384 showed genetic distance and higher oil contents in the grains, while the cultivars Suprema and CD01RR8384 had the highest oil contents and proved to be little genetically related. These genotypes are promising progenitors for selection of high oil content in soybean.

  2. Cord Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abroun

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   Stem cells are naïve or master cells. This means they can transform into special 200 cell types as needed by body, and each of these cells has just one function. Stem cells are found in many parts of the human body, although some sources have richer concentrations than others. Some excellent sources of stem cells, such as bone marrow, peripheral blood, cord blood, other tissue stem cells and human embryos, which last one are controversial and their use can be illegal in some countries. Cord blood is a sample of blood taken from a newborn baby's umbilical cord. It is a rich source of stem cells, umbilical cord blood and tissue are collected from material that normally has no use following a child’s birth. Umbilical cord blood and tissue cells are rich sources of stem cells, which have been used in the treatment of over 80 diseases including leukemia, lymphoma and anemia as bone marrow stem cell potency.  The most common disease category has been leukemia. The next largest group is inherited diseases. Patients with lymphoma, myelodysplasia and severe aplastic anemia have also been successfully transplanted with cord blood. Cord blood is obtained by syringing out the placenta through the umbilical cord at the time of childbirth, after the cord has been detached from the newborn. Collecting stem cells from umbilical blood and tissue is ethical, pain-free, safe and simple. When they are needed to treat your child later in life, there will be no rejection or incompatibility issues, as the procedure will be using their own cells. In contrast, stem cells from donors do have these potential problems. By consider about cord blood potency, cord blood banks (familial or public were established. In IRAN, four cord blood banks has activity, Shariati BMT center cord blood bank, Royan familial cord blood banks, Royan public cord blood banks and Iranian Blood Transfusion Organ cord blood banks. Despite 50,000 sample which storage in these banks, but the

  3. The Rho-GTPase cdc42 regulates neural progenitor fate at the apical surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappello, Silvia; Attardo, Alessio; Wu, Xunwei

    2006-01-01

    the fundamental difference between these progenitors. Here we show that the conditional deletion of the small Rho-GTPase cdc42 at different stages of neurogenesis in mouse telencephalon results in an immediate increase in basal mitoses. Whereas cdc42-deficient progenitors have normal cell cycle length...

  4. Development and application of human adult stem or progenitor cell organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Schutgens, Frans; Verhaar, Marianne C; Clevers, Hans

    Adult stem or progenitor cell organoids are 3D adult-organ-derived epithelial structures that contain self-renewing and organ-specific stem or progenitor cells as well as differentiated cells. This organoid culture system was first established in murine intestine and subsequently developed for

  5. Inter-progenitor pool wiring: An evolutionarily conserved strategy that expands neural circuit diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takumi; Sato, Makoto

    2017-11-15

    Diversification of neuronal types is key to establishing functional variations in neural circuits. The first critical step to generate neuronal diversity is to organize the compartmental domains of developing brains into spatially distinct neural progenitor pools. Neural progenitors in each pool then generate a unique set of diverse neurons through specific spatiotemporal specification processes. In this review article, we focus on an additional mechanism, 'inter-progenitor pool wiring', that further expands the diversity of neural circuits. After diverse types of neurons are generated in one progenitor pool, a fraction of these neurons start migrating toward a remote brain region containing neurons that originate from another progenitor pool. Finally, neurons of different origins are intermingled and eventually form complex but precise neural circuits. The developing cerebral cortex of mammalian brains is one of the best examples of inter-progenitor pool wiring. However, Drosophila visual system development has revealed similar mechanisms in invertebrate brains, suggesting that inter-progenitor pool wiring is an evolutionarily conserved strategy that expands neural circuit diversity. Here, we will discuss how inter-progenitor pool wiring is accomplished in mammalian and fly brain systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Progress of stem/progenitor cell-based therapy for retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhimin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yuyao; Zhang, Dandan; Shen, Bingqiao; Luo, Min; Gu, Ping

    2017-05-10

    Retinal degeneration (RD), such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa, is one of the leading causes of blindness. Presently, no satisfactory therapeutic options are available for these diseases principally because the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) do not regenerate, although wet AMD can be prevented from further progression by anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Nevertheless, stem/progenitor cell approaches exhibit enormous potential for RD treatment using strategies mainly aimed at the rescue and replacement of photoreceptors and RPE. The sources of stem/progenitor cells are classified into two broad categories in this review, which are (1) ocular-derived progenitor cells, such as retinal progenitor cells, and (2) non-ocular-derived stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells. Here, we discuss in detail the progress in the study of four predominant stem/progenitor cell types used in animal models of RD. A short overview of clinical trials involving the stem/progenitor cells is also presented. Currently, stem/progenitor cell therapies for RD still have some drawbacks such as inhibited proliferation and/or differentiation in vitro (with the exception of the RPE) and limited long-term survival and function of grafts in vivo. Despite these challenges, stem/progenitor cells represent the most promising strategy for RD treatment in the near future.

  7. Are the models for type Ia supernova progenitors consistent with the properties of supernova remnants?,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badenes, C.; Hughes, J.P.; Bravo, E.; Langer, N.

    2007-01-01

    We explore the relationship between the models for progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae and the properties of the supernova remnants that evolve after the explosion. Most models for Type Ia progenitors in the single-degenerate scenario predict substantial outflows during the presupernova

  8. Bobby Sox homology regulates odontoblast differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells/progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcription factors have been implicated in regulating the differentiation of odontoblasts from dental pulp stem cells/progenitors (DPSCs/progenitors), but their regulatory network is not completely understood. Result New transcription factors that control the odontoblast differentiation of human DPSCs/progenitors were analyzed using a microarray. The result revealed bobby sox homolog (BBX) to be expressed most strongly during odontoblast differentiation. Validation using RT-PCR also revealed the strong expression of BBX during the odontoblast differentiation of DPSCs/progenitors. BBX expression was also detected in adult molar odontoblasts and other tissues, including the heart, kidney, testis, and bone marrow. To understand the role of BBX in odontoblast differentiation, BBX variant 1 and 2 cDNA were cloned and overexpressed in DPSCs/progenitors. The results showed that the overexpression of BBX cDNA in DPSCs/progenitors induced substantial mineralization and expression of the odontoblast marker genes, such as ALP, OPN, BSP, DMP1, and DSPP. The knockdown of BBX using shRNA, however, did not affect mineralization, but the expression of ALP and DSPP was decreased substantially. Meanwhile overexpression or knockdown of BBX did not modulate proliferation of DPSCs/progenitors. Conclusion Our results suggest that BBX plays an important role during the odontoblast differentiation of human DPSCs/progenitors. PMID:24885382

  9. FGF/EGF signaling regulates the renewal of early nephron progenitors during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aaron C; Adams, Derek; de Caestecker, Mark; Yang, Xuehui; Friesel, Robert; Oxburgh, Leif

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that nephron progenitor cells of the embryonic kidney are arranged in a series of compartments of an increasing state of differentiation. The earliest progenitor compartment, distinguished by expression of CITED1, possesses greater capacity for renewal and differentiation than later compartments. Signaling events governing progression of nephron progenitor cells through stages of increasing differentiation are poorly understood, and their elucidation will provide key insights into normal and dysregulated nephrogenesis, as well as into regenerative processes that follow kidney injury. In this study, we found that the mouse CITED1(+) progenitor compartment is maintained in response to receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) ligands that activate both FGF and EGF receptors. This RTK signaling function is dependent on RAS and PI3K signaling but not ERK. In vivo, RAS inactivation by expression of sprouty 1 (Spry1) in CITED1(+) nephron progenitors results in loss of characteristic molecular marker expression and in increased death of progenitor cells. Lineage tracing shows that surviving Spry1-expressing progenitor cells are impaired in their subsequent epithelial differentiation, infrequently contributing to epithelial structures. These findings demonstrate that the survival and developmental potential of cells in the earliest embryonic nephron progenitor cell compartment are dependent on FGF/EGF signaling through RAS.

  10. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2011-01-01

    Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression.

  11. Prospect for application of umbilical cord blood to clinical treatment of radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Tingzhen; Ke Xiaoyan

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To look forward to the prospect for application of umbilical cord blood to clinical treatment of radiation sickness by analyzing the results using umbilical cord blood in laboratory experiments and clinical research. Method: The data on umbilical cord blood published in literature are reviewed. Results: The umbilical blood is rich in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, low in immunological activity of lymphocytes, expanded significantly ex vivo under selected culture condition readily available and collected easily. Conclusion: With the above advantages, the prospect for application of umbilical cord blood is encouraging, particularly in the clinical treatment of radiation sickness

  12. Parathyroid hormone receptor signalling in osterix-expressing mesenchymal progenitors is essential for tooth root formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Wanida; Sakagami, Naoko; Nishimori, Shigeki; Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    Dental root formation is a dynamic process in which mesenchymal cells migrate toward the site of the future root, differentiate and secrete dentin and cementum. However, the identities of dental mesenchymal progenitors are largely unknown. Here we show that cells expressing osterix are mesenchymal progenitors contributing to all relevant cell types during morphogenesis. The majority of cells expressing parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) are in the dental follicle and on the root surface, and deletion of its receptor (PPR) in these progenitors leads to failure of eruption and significantly truncated roots lacking periodontal ligaments. The PPR-deficient progenitors exhibit accelerated cementoblast differentiation with upregulation of nuclear factor I/C (Nfic). Deletion of histone deacetylase-4 (HDAC4) partially recapitulates the PPR deletion root phenotype. These findings indicate that PPR signalling in dental mesenchymal progenitors is essential for tooth root formation, underscoring importance of the PTHrP–PPR system during root morphogenesis and tooth eruption. PMID:27068606

  13. Yap controls stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the mouse postnatal epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverdam, Annemiek; Claxton, Christina; Zhang, Xiaomeng; James, Gregory; Harvey, Kieran F; Key, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Tissue renewal is an ongoing process in the epithelium of the skin. We have begun to examine the genetic mechanisms that control stem/progenitor cell activation in the postnatal epidermis. The conserved Hippo pathway regulates stem cell turnover in arthropods through to vertebrates. Here we show that its downstream effector, yes-associated protein (YAP), is active in the stem/progenitor cells of the postnatal epidermis. Overexpression of a C-terminally truncated YAP mutant in the basal epidermis of transgenic mice caused marked expansion of epidermal stem/progenitor cell populations. Our data suggest that the C-terminus of YAP controls the balance between stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in the postnatal interfollicular epidermis. We conclude that YAP functions as a molecular switch of stem/progenitor cell activation in the epidermis. Moreover, our results highlight YAP as a possible therapeutic target for diseases such as skin cancer, psoriasis, and epidermolysis bullosa.

  14. TEAD and YAP regulate the enhancer network of human embryonic pancreatic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebola, Inês; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Cho, Candy H-H; Bessa, José; Rovira, Meritxell; Luengo, Mario; Chhatriwala, Mariya; Berry, Andrew; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Jennings, Rachel E; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Morán, Ignasi; Castro, Natalia; Hanley, Neil A; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Vallier, Ludovic; Ferrer, Jorge

    2015-05-01

    The genomic regulatory programmes that underlie human organogenesis are poorly understood. Pancreas development, in particular, has pivotal implications for pancreatic regeneration, cancer and diabetes. We have now characterized the regulatory landscape of embryonic multipotent progenitor cells that give rise to all pancreatic epithelial lineages. Using human embryonic pancreas and embryonic-stem-cell-derived progenitors we identify stage-specific transcripts and associated enhancers, many of which are co-occupied by transcription factors that are essential for pancreas development. We further show that TEAD1, a Hippo signalling effector, is an integral component of the transcription factor combinatorial code of pancreatic progenitor enhancers. TEAD and its coactivator YAP activate key pancreatic signalling mediators and transcription factors, and regulate the expansion of pancreatic progenitors. This work therefore uncovers a central role for TEAD and YAP as signal-responsive regulators of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, and provides a resource for the study of embryonic development of the human pancreas.

  15. Comparative Quantification of the Surfaceome of Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J. Holley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal progenitor cells have great therapeutic potential, yet incomplete characterization of their cell-surface interface limits their clinical exploitation. We have employed subcellular fractionation with quantitative discovery proteomics to define the cell-surface interface proteome of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs. We compared cell-surface-enriched fractions from MSCs and HUCPVCs (three donors each with adult mesenchymal fibroblasts using eight-channel isobaric-tagging mass spectrometry, yielding relative quantification on >6,000 proteins with high confidence. This approach identified 186 upregulated mesenchymal progenitor biomarkers. Validation of 10 of these markers, including ROR2, EPHA2, and PLXNA2, confirmed upregulated expression in mesenchymal progenitor populations and distinct roles in progenitor cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Our approach has delivered a cell-surface proteome repository that now enables improved selection and characterization of human mesenchymal progenitor populations.

  16. TIMP-3 recruits quiescent hematopoietic stem cells into active cell cycle and expands multipotent progenitor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Ito, Miyuki; Smookler, David S; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Morikawa, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Arai, Fumio; Suda, Toshio; Khokha, Rama; Kitamura, Toshio

    2010-11-25

    Regulating transition of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) between quiescent and cycling states is critical for maintaining homeostasis of blood cell production. The cycling states of HSCs are regulated by the extracellular factors such as cytokines and extracellular matrix; however, the molecular circuitry for such regulation remains elusive. Here we show that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3), an endogenous regulator of metalloproteinases, stimulates HSC proliferation by recruiting quiescent HSCs into the cell cycle. Myelosuppression induced TIMP-3 in the bone marrow before hematopoietic recovery. Interestingly, TIMP-3 enhanced proliferation of HSCs and promoted expansion of multipotent progenitors, which was achieved by stimulating cell-cycle entry of quiescent HSCs without compensating their long-term repopulating activity. Surprisingly, this effect did not require metalloproteinase inhibitory activity of TIMP-3 and was possibly mediated through a direct inhibition of angiopoietin-1 signaling, a critical mediator for HSC quiescence. Furthermore, bone marrow recovery from myelosuppression was accelerated by over-expression of TIMP-3, and in turn, impaired in TIMP-3-deficient animals. These results suggest that TIMP-3 may act as a molecular cue in response to myelosuppression for recruiting dormant HSCs into active cell cycle and may be clinically useful for facilitating hematopoietic recovery after chemotherapy or ex vivo expansion of HSCs.

  17. Effects of Chronic Exercise on Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Microparticles in Professional Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Célia Regina de Oliveira; Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira; França, Carolina Nunes; Schwerz, Valdir Lauro; Póvoa, Rui Manuel Dos Santos; Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein

    2017-03-01

    The effects of chronic exposure to exercise training on vascular biomarkers have been poorly explored. Our study aimed to compare the amounts of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and endothelial (EMP) and platelet (PMP) microparticles between professional runners and healthy controls. Twenty-five half-marathon runners and 24 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in the study. EPCs (CD34+/KDR+, CD133+/KDR+, and CD34+/CD133+), EMP (CD51+) and PMP (CD42+/CD31+) were quantified by flow-cytometry. All blood samples were obtained after 12 h of fasting and the athletes were encouraged to perform their routine exercises on the day before. As compared with controls, the CD34+/KDR+ EPCs (p=0.038) and CD133+/KDR+ EPCs (p=0.018) were increased, whereas CD34+/CD133+ EPCs were not different (p=0.51) in athletes. In addition, there was no difference in MPs levels between the groups. Chronic exposure to exercise in professional runners was associated with higher percentage of EPCs. Taking into account the similar number of MPs in athletes and controls, the study suggests a favorable effect of exercise on these vascular biomarkers.

  18. Effects of Chronic Exercise on Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Microparticles in Professional Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Regina de Oliveira Bittencourt

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The effects of chronic exposure to exercise training on vascular biomarkers have been poorly explored. Objective: Our study aimed to compare the amounts of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, and endothelial (EMP and platelet (PMP microparticles between professional runners and healthy controls. Methods: Twenty-five half-marathon runners and 24 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in the study. EPCs (CD34+/KDR+, CD133+/KDR+, and CD34+/CD133+, EMP (CD51+ and PMP (CD42+/CD31+ were quantified by flow-cytometry. All blood samples were obtained after 12 h of fasting and the athletes were encouraged to perform their routine exercises on the day before. Results: As compared with controls, the CD34+/KDR+ EPCs (p=0.038 and CD133+/KDR+ EPCs (p=0.018 were increased, whereas CD34+/CD133+ EPCs were not different (p=0.51 in athletes. In addition, there was no difference in MPs levels between the groups. Conclusion: Chronic exposure to exercise in professional runners was associated with higher percentage of EPCs. Taking into account the similar number of MPs in athletes and controls, the study suggests a favorable effect of exercise on these vascular biomarkers.

  19. DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications Are the Molecular Lock in Lentivirally Transduced Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Ching Ngai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable introduction of a functional gene in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs has appeared to be an alternative approach to correct genetically linked blood diseases. However, it is still unclear whether lentiviral vector (LV is subjected to gene silencing in HPCs. Here, we show that LV carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene driven by cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter was subjected to transgene silencing after transduction into HPCs. This phenomenon was not due to the deletion of proviral copy number. Study using DNA demethylating agent and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor showed that the drugs could either prevent or reverse the silencing effect. Using sodium bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay, we demonstrated that DNA methylation occurred soon after LV transduction. At the highest level of gene expression, CMV promoter was acetylated and was in a euchromatin state, while GFP reporter gene was acetylated but was strangely in a heterochromatin state. When the expression declined, CMV promoter underwent transition from acetylated and euchromatic state to a heterochromatic state, while the GFP reporter gene was in deacetylated and heterochromatic state. With these, we verify that DNA methylation and dynamic histone modifications lead to transgene silencing in HPCs transduced with LV.

  20. Low antigenicity of hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from human ES cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Mi Kim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Eun-Mi Kim1, Nicholas Zavazava1,21Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa, USA; 2Immunology Graduate Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USAAbstract: Human embryonic stem (hES cells are essential for improved understanding of diseases and our ability to probe new therapies for use in humans. Currently, bone marrow cells and cord blood cells are used for transplantation into patients with hematopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiencies and in some cases for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, due to the high immunogenicity of these hematopoietic cells, toxic regimens of drugs are required for preconditioning and prevention of rejection. Here, we investigated the efficiency of deriving hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs from the hES cell line H13, after co-culturing with the murine stromal cell line OP9. We show that HPCs derived from the H13 ES cells poorly express major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and no detectable class II antigens (HLA-DR. These characteristics make hES cell-derived hematopoietic cells (HPCs ideal candidates for transplantation across MHC barriers under minimal immunosuppression.Keywords: human embryonic stem cells, H13, hematopoiesis, OP9 stromal cells, immunogenicity