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Sample records for blood cell proteome

  1. In-Depth Profiling of the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Proteome for Clinical Blood Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Saša Končarević; Christopher Lößner; Karsten Kuhn; Thorsten Prinz; Ian Pike; Hans-Dieter Zucht

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are an easy accessible cellular part of the blood organ and, along with platelets, represent the only site of active gene expression in blood. These cells undergo immunophenotypic changes in various diseases and represent a peripheral source of monitoring gene expression and posttranslational modifications relevant to many diseases. Little is known about the source of many blood proteins and we hypothesise that release from PBMCs through active and p...

  2. Deep coverage mouse red blood cell proteome: a first comparison with the human red blood cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Erica M; Kirkegaard, Morten; Salerno, Doris;

    2008-01-01

    Mice have close genetic/physiological relationships to humans, breed rapidly, and can be genetically modified, making them the most used mammal in biomedical research. Because the red blood cell (RBC) is the sole gas transporter in vertebrates, diseases of the RBC are frequently severe; much...... identified, and polypeptides migrating with anomalous apparent molecular weights were grouped into putatively ubiquitinated or partially degraded complexes. Overall there was close concordance between mouse and human proteomes, confirming the unexpected RBC complexity. Several novel findings in the human...

  3. Proteomic Profiling of Ex Vivo Expanded CD34-Positive Haematopoetic Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood

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    Heiner Falkenberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ex vivo expansion of haematopoetic cells by application of specific cytokines is one approach to overcome boundaries in cord blood transplantation due to limited numbers of haematopoetic stem cells. While many protocols describe an effective increase of total cell numbers and the amount of CD34-positive cells, it still remains unclear if and how the procedure actually affects the cells’ properties. In the presented publications, CD34-positive cells were isolated from cord blood and expanded for up to 7 days in media supplemented with stem cell factor (SCF, thrombopoietin (THPO, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FLT3lg. At days 3 and 7, expanded cells were harvested and analyzed by flow cytometry and quantitative proteomics. 2970 proteins were identified, whereof proteomic analysis showed 440 proteins significantly changed in abundance during ex vivo expansion. Despite the fact that haematopoetic cells still expressed CD34 on the surface after 3 days, major changes in regard to the protein profile were observed, while further expansion showed less effect on the proteome level. Enrichment analysis of biological processes clearly showed a proteomic change toward a protein biosynthesis phenotype already within the first three days of expression.

  4. Modulation of the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1 infected patients by drugs of abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica L. Reynolds; Supriya D Mahajan; Aalinkeel, Ravikunar; Nair, Bindukumar; Sykes, Donald E; Agosto-Mujica, Arnadri; Hsiao, Chiu Bin; Schwartz, Stanley A.

    2009-01-01

    We used proteomic analyses to assess how drug abuse modulates immunologic responses to infections with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Two dimensional (2D) difference gel electrophoresis was utilized to determine changes in the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from HIV-1 positive donors that occurred after treatment with cocaine or methamphetamine. Both drugs differentially regulated the expression of several functional classes of proteins. We fu...

  5. Proteomic biomarkers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from postmenopausal women undergoing an intervention with soy isoflavones

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, D; Vafeiadou, K.; Hall, W.L.; Daniel, H; Williams, C.M.; Schroot, J.H.; Wenzel, U.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The incidence of cardiovascular diseases increases after menopause, and soy consumption is suggested to inhibit disease development. Objective: The objective was to identify biomarkers of response to a dietary supplementation with an isoflavone extract in postmenopausal women by proteome analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Design: The study with healthy postmenopausal woman was performed in a placebo-controlled sequential design. Peripheral mononuclear blood cells were...

  6. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease.

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    Nisha Jain Garg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30-40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30 and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25 or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28 with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE. After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, p93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting seropositive individuals at risk of developing cardiomyopathy.

  7. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Nisha Jain; Soman, Kizhake V; Zago, Maria P; Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi; Stafford, Susan; Blell, Zinzi N; Gupta, Shivali; Nuñez Burgos, Julio; Barrientos, Natalia; Brasier, Allan R; Wiktorowicz, John E

    2016-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30-40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30) and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25) or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28) with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol) and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, psurvival and free radical scavenging capacity in C/S (but not C/A) subjects. The MYC/SP1 transcription factors that regulate hypoxia and oxidative/inflammatory stress were predicted to be key targets in the context of control of Chagas disease severity. Further, MARS-modeling identified a panel of proteins that had >93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting seropositive individuals at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. PMID:26919708

  8. STEM CELLS AND PROTEOMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yong-ming; GUO Tian-nan; HUANG Shi-ang

    2006-01-01

    The distinctive features of proteomics are large-scale and high throughput. The key techniques of proteomics are two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Stem cell can differentiate into all kinds of cells, tissues and organs. There are many proteins and cytokines involved in the process of differentiation. Applying proteomics techniques to the research of the complex process of stem cell differentiation is of great importance to study the mechanism and applications of stem cell differentiation.

  9. Proteomic responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) after perfluorooctane sulfonate exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, Kathleen, E-mail: kathleen.roland@fundp.ac.be [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), Narilis (Namur Research Institute for Lifesciences), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000, Namur (Belgium); Kestemont, Patrick; Hénuset, Laurence; Pierrard, Marie-Aline [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), Narilis (Namur Research Institute for Lifesciences), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000, Namur (Belgium); Raes, Martine; Dieu, Marc [Research Unit in Cellular Biology (URBC) Narilis (Namur Research Institute for Lifesciences), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000, Namur (Belgium); Silvestre, Frédéric [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), Narilis (Namur Research Institute for Lifesciences), University of Namur - FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000, Namur (Belgium)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► We have evaluating the toxicity of eel peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed during 48 h to 10 μg and 1 mg perfluoroctane sulfonate/L. ► After in vitro contaminations, the post-nuclear fraction was isolated and a proteomic analysis using 2D-DIGE was performed. ► 48 different proteins were identified and classified into main functional classes which provide clues on the cellular pathways mainly affected by PFOS. -- Abstract: Since the 1980s, the stocks of European eel have been declining in most of their geographical distribution area. Many factors can be attributed to this decline such as pollution by xenobiotics like perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). This study aimed at evaluating the in vitro toxicity of eel peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to PFOS. Exposure time and two concentrations were chosen to avoid cell mortality (48 h exposure at 10 μg PFOS/L and 1 mg PFOS/L). After in vitro contaminations, the post-nuclear fraction was isolated and a proteomic analysis using 2D-DIGE was performed to compare PBMC from the control group with cells exposed to the pollutant. On the 158 spots that were significantly affected by PFOS exposure, a total of 48 different proteins were identified using nano-LCESI-MS/MS and the Peptide and Protein Prophet of Scaffold software. These proteins can be categorized into diverse functional classes, related to cytoskeleton, protein folding, cell signaling, proteolytic pathway and carbohydrate and energy metabolism, which provide clues on the cellular pathways mainly affected by PFOS. Some of the identified proteins are rarely found in other ecotoxicological proteomic studies and could constitute potential biomarkers of exposure to PFOS in fish.

  10. Proteomic responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) after perfluorooctane sulfonate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Kathleen; Kestemont, Patrick; Hénuset, Laurence; Pierrard, Marie-Aline; Raes, Martine; Dieu, Marc; Silvestre, Frédéric

    2013-03-15

    Since the 1980s, the stocks of European eel have been declining in most of their geographical distribution area. Many factors can be attributed to this decline such as pollution by xenobiotics like perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). This study aimed at evaluating the in vitro toxicity of eel peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to PFOS. Exposure time and two concentrations were chosen to avoid cell mortality (48 h exposure at 10 μg PFOS/L and 1mg PFOS/L). After in vitro contaminations, the post-nuclear fraction was isolated and a proteomic analysis using 2D-DIGE was performed to compare PBMC from the control group with cells exposed to the pollutant. On the 158 spots that were significantly affected by PFOS exposure, a total of 48 different proteins were identified using nano-LCESI-MS/MS and the Peptide and Protein Prophet of Scaffold software. These proteins can be categorized into diverse functional classes, related to cytoskeleton, protein folding, cell signaling, proteolytic pathway and carbohydrate and energy metabolism, which provide clues on the cellular pathways mainly affected by PFOS. Some of the identified proteins are rarely found in other ecotoxicological proteomic studies and could constitute potential biomarkers of exposure to PFOS in fish. PMID:23261670

  11. A novel method for sample preparation of fresh lung cancer tissue for proteomics analysis by tumor cell enrichment and removal of blood contaminants

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    Orre Lotta

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In-depth proteomics analyses of tumors are frequently biased by the presence of blood components and stromal contamination, which leads to large experimental variation and decreases the proteome coverage. We have established a reproducible method to prepare freshly collected lung tumors for proteomics analysis, aiming at tumor cell enrichment and reduction of plasma protein contamination. We obtained enriched tumor-cell suspensions (ETS from six lung cancer cases (two adenocarcinomas, two squamous-cell carcinomas, two large-cell carcinomas and from two normal lung samples. The cell content of resulting ETS was evaluated with immunocytological stainings and compared with the histologic pattern of the original specimens. By means of a quantitative mass spectrometry-based method we evaluated the reproducibility of the sample preparation protocol and we assessed the proteome coverage by comparing lysates from ETS samples with the direct lysate of corresponding fresh-frozen samples. Results Cytological analyses on cytospin specimens showed that the percentage of tumoral cells in the ETS samples ranged from 20% to 70%. In the normal lung samples the percentage of epithelial cells was less then 10%. The reproducibility of the sample preparation protocol was very good, with coefficient of variation at the peptide level and at the protein level of 13% and 7%, respectively. Proteomics analysis led to the identification of a significantly higher number of proteins in the ETS samples than in the FF samples (244 vs 109, respectively. Albumin and hemoglobin were among the top 5 most abundant proteins identified in the FF samples, showing a high contamination with blood and plasma proteins, whereas ubiquitin and the mitochondrial ATP synthase 5A1 where among the top 5 most abundant proteins in the ETS samples. Conclusion The method is feasible and reproducible. We could obtain a fair enrichment of cells but the major benefit of the method

  12. Proteomic analysis of ERK1/2-mediated human sickle red blood cell membrane protein phosphorylation

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    Soderblom Erik J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sickle cell disease (SCD, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK ERK1/2 is constitutively active and can be inducible by agonist-stimulation only in sickle but not in normal human red blood cells (RBCs. ERK1/2 is involved in activation of ICAM-4-mediated sickle RBC adhesion to the endothelium. However, other effects of the ERK1/2 activation in sickle RBCs leading to the complex SCD pathophysiology, such as alteration of RBC hemorheology are unknown. Results To further characterize global ERK1/2-induced changes in membrane protein phosphorylation within human RBCs, a label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis was applied to sickle and normal RBC membrane ghosts pre-treated with U0126, a specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, the upstream kinase of ERK1/2, in the presence or absence of recombinant active ERK2. Across eight unique treatment groups, 375 phosphopeptides from 155 phosphoproteins were quantified with an average technical coefficient of variation in peak intensity of 19.8%. Sickle RBC treatment with U0126 decreased thirty-six phosphopeptides from twenty-one phosphoproteins involved in regulation of not only RBC shape, flexibility, cell morphology maintenance and adhesion, but also glucose and glutamate transport, cAMP production, degradation of misfolded proteins and receptor ubiquitination. Glycophorin A was the most affected protein in sickle RBCs by this ERK1/2 pathway, which contained 12 unique phosphorylated peptides, suggesting that in addition to its effect on sickle RBC adhesion, increased glycophorin A phosphorylation via the ERK1/2 pathway may also affect glycophorin A interactions with band 3, which could result in decreases in both anion transport by band 3 and band 3 trafficking. The abundance of twelve of the thirty-six phosphopeptides were subsequently increased in normal RBCs co-incubated with recombinant ERK2 and therefore represent specific MEK1/2 phospho-inhibitory targets mediated via ERK2

  13. Accessing to the minor proteome of red blood cells through the influence of the nanoparticle surface properties on the corona composition

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    Zaccaria A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Affif Zaccaria,1,* Florence Roux-Dalvai,2,3,* Ali Bouamrani,1 Adrien Mombrun,1 Pascal Mossuz,4 Bernard Monsarrat,2,3 François Berger1 1Clinatec CEA-LETI, Grenoble, 2CNRS, IPBS (Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, 3Université de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, Toulouse, 4TIMC-Therex UMR 5525 CNRS, UJF, CHU Grenoble, Grenoble, France *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nanoparticle (NP–protein interactions in complex samples have not yet been clearly understood. Nevertheless, several studies demonstrated that NP’s physicochemical features significantly impact on the protein corona composition. Taking advantage of the NP potential to harvest different subsets of proteins, we assessed for the first time the capacity of three kinds of superparamagnetic NPs to highlight the erythrocyte minor proteome. Using both qualitative and quantitative proteomics approaches, nano-liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry allowed the identification of 893 different proteins, confirming the reproducible capacity of NPs to increase the number of identified proteins, through a reduction of the sample concentration range and the capture of specific proteins on the three different surfaces. These NP-specific protein signatures revealed significant differences in their isoelectric point and molecular weight. Moreover, this NP strategy offered a deeper access to the erythrocyte proteome highlighting several signaling pathways implicated in important erythrocyte functions. The automated potentiality, the reproducibility, and the low-consuming sample demonstrate the strong compatibility of our strategy for large-scale clinical studies and may become a standardized sample preparation in future erythrocyte-associated proteomics studies. Keywords: nanoparticles, red blood cells, mass spectrometry, quantitative proteomics, protein corona, minor proteome 

  14. The pancreatic beta cell surface proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Stützer, I.; Esterházy, D.; Stoffel, M.

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic beta cell is responsible for maintaining normoglycaemia by secreting an appropriate amount of insulin according to blood glucose levels. The accurate sensing of the beta cell extracellular environment is therefore crucial to this endocrine function and is transmitted via its cell surface proteome. Various surface proteins that mediate or affect beta cell endocrine function have been identified, including growth factor and cytokine receptors, transporters, ion channels and prote...

  15. Cell death proteomics database: consolidating proteomics data on cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Bull, Vibeke H; Thiede, Bernd

    2013-05-01

    Programmed cell death is a ubiquitous process of utmost importance for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. More than 10 different types of programmed cell death forms have been discovered. Several proteomics analyses have been performed to gain insight in proteins involved in the different forms of programmed cell death. To consolidate these studies, we have developed the cell death proteomics (CDP) database, which comprehends data from apoptosis, autophagy, cytotoxic granule-mediated cell death, excitotoxicity, mitotic catastrophe, paraptosis, pyroptosis, and Wallerian degeneration. The CDP database is available as a web-based database to compare protein identifications and quantitative information across different experimental setups. The proteomics data of 73 publications were integrated and unified with protein annotations from UniProt-KB and gene ontology (GO). Currently, more than 6,500 records of more than 3,700 proteins are included in the CDP. Comparing apoptosis and autophagy using overrepresentation analysis of GO terms, the majority of enriched processes were found in both, but also some clear differences were perceived. Furthermore, the analysis revealed differences and similarities of the proteome between autophagosomal and overall autophagy. The CDP database represents a useful tool to consolidate data from proteome analyses of programmed cell death and is available at http://celldeathproteomics.uio.no. PMID:23537399

  16. Proteomic biomarkers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from postmenopausal women undergoing an intervention with soy isoflavones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuchs, D.; Vafeiadou, K.; Hall, W.L.; Daniel, H.; Williams, C.M.; Schroot, J.H.; Wenzel, U.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The incidence of cardiovascular diseases increases after menopause, and soy consumption is suggested to inhibit disease development. Objective: The objective was to identify biomarkers of response to a dietary supplementation with an isoflavone extract in postmenopausal women by proteome

  17. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Yanagawa, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improv...

  18. Proteomics Study of Cotton Fiber Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-yuan

    2008-01-01

    @@ A comparative proteomic analysis was applied to explore the mechanism of fiber cell development in cotton.Initially,an efficient protein preparation method was established for proteomic analysis of developing cotton fibers by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis,and a microwave enhanced ink staining technique also was created for fast and sensitive protein quantification in proteomic studies.

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O’Meally, Robert N.; Krag, Sharon S.; Cole, Robert N.; Palsson, Bernhard; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis......To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis...... identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using the CHO genome exclusively, which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From...

  20. Functional proteomic analysis of Ankaferd® Blood Stopper

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    Duygu Özel Demiralp

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ankaferd® Blood Stopper (ABS comprises a standardized mixture of the plants Thymus vulgaris, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Vitis vinifera, Alpinia officinarum, and Urtica dioica. The basic mechanism of action for ABS is the formation of an encapsulated protein network that provides focal points for vital erythrocyte aggregation. ABS–induced protein network formation with blood cells, particularly erythrocytes, covers the primary and secondary hemostatic system without disturbing individual coagulation factors. Materials and Methods: To understand the effect mechanisms of ABS on hemostasis, a proteomic analysis using 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometer was performed. Results: Proteins of plant origin in Ankaferd® were NADP-dependent-malic enzyme, ribulose bisphosphate-carboxylase-large chain, maturase K, ATP synthase subunit-beta, ATP synthase subunit-alpha, chalcone-flavanone isomerase-1, chalcone-flavanone isomerase-2, and actin-depolymerizing factor. Furthermore, functional proteomic studies revealed that proteins resembling human peptides have been detected within Ankaferd®, including ATP synthase, mucin-16 (CD164 sialomucin-like 2 protein, coiled-coil domain containing 141 hypothetical protein LOC283638 isoform 1, hypothetical protein LOC283638 isoform 2, dynactin 5, complex I intermediate-associated protein 30, mitochondrial, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone 1 alpha subcomplex, TP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial actin binding 1 isoform, LIM domain and actin binding 1 isoform a, LIM domain and actin binding 1 isoform b, spectrin alpha non erythrocytic 1, prolactin releasing hormone receptor, utrophin, tet oncogene family member 2 isoform b, protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, NIMA (never in mitosis gene a-related kinase, ATP-binding cassette protein C12, Homo sapiens malic enzyme 1, mitochondrial NADP(+-dependent malic enzyme 3, ME2 protein, nuclear factor 1 B-type, abhydrolase domain-containing protein 12B, E

  1. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølbøll, Trine Højgaard; Danscher, Anne Mette; Andersen, Pia Haubro;

    2012-01-01

    grouped manually to one or more of five major functional groups related to metabolism, cell structure, immunity, apoptosis and angiogenesis. These were chosen to represent basic cell functions and biological processes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of CHD. The LC–MS/MS-based proteomic analysis...... presented here is the largest published survey, so far, of the bovine claw tissue proteome....

  2. Proteomic analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan E; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O'Meally, Robert N; Krag, Sharon S; Cole, Robert N; Palsson, Bernhard O; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2012-11-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimensional liquid chromatography, and solid phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG). From the 120 different mass spectrometry analyses generating 682,097 MS/MS spectra, 93,548 unique peptide sequences were identified with at most 0.02 false discovery rate (FDR). A total of 6164 grouped proteins were identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using the CHO genome exclusively, which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis but depletion of proteins involved in steroid hormone and glycosphingolipid metabolism. Five-hundred four of the detected proteins included N-acetylation modifications, and 1292 different proteins were observed to be N-glycosylated. This first large-scale proteomic analysis will enhance the knowledge base about CHO capabilities for recombinant expression and provide information useful in cell engineering efforts aimed at modifying CHO cellular functions. PMID:22971049

  3. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D; Kornblum, Harley I

    2016-02-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and give rise to the major cell types of the CNS. Studies of NSCs include the investigation of primary, CNS-derived cells as well as animal and human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources. NSCs provide a means with which to study normal neural development, neurodegeneration, and neurological disease and are clinically relevant sources for cellular repair to the damaged and diseased CNS. Proteomics studies of NSCs have the potential to delineate molecules and pathways critical for NSC biology and the means by which NSCs can participate in neural repair. In this review, we provide a background to NSC biology, including the means to obtain them and the caveats to these processes. We then focus on advances in the proteomic interrogation of NSCs. This includes the analysis of posttranslational modifications (PTMs); approaches to analyzing different proteomic compartments, such the secretome; as well as approaches to analyzing temporal differences in the proteome to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation. We also discuss some of the methods that will undoubtedly be useful in the investigation of NSCs but which have not yet been applied to the field. While many proteomics studies of NSCs have largely catalogued the proteome or posttranslational modifications of specific cellular states, without delving into specific functions, some have led to understandings of functional processes or identified markers that could not have been identified via other means. Many challenges remain in the field, including the precise identification and standardization of NSCs used for proteomic analyses, as well as how to translate fundamental proteomics studies to functional biology. The next level of investigation will require interdisciplinary approaches, combining the skills of those interested in the biochemistry of proteomics with those interested in modulating NSC function. PMID:26494823

  4. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and Proteomics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D.; Kornblum, Harley I.

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and give rise to the major cell types of the CNS. Studies of NSCs include the investigation of primary, CNS-derived cells as well as animal and human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources. NSCs provide a means with which to study normal neural development, neurodegeneration, and neurological disease and are clinically relevant sources for cellular repair to the damaged and diseased CNS. Proteomics studies of NSCs have the potential to delineate molecules and pathways critical for NSC biology and the means by which NSCs can participate in neural repair. In this review, we provide a background to NSC biology, including the means to obtain them and the caveats to these processes. We then focus on advances in the proteomic interrogation of NSCs. This includes the analysis of posttranslational modifications (PTMs); approaches to analyzing different proteomic compartments, such the secretome; as well as approaches to analyzing temporal differences in the proteome to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation. We also discuss some of the methods that will undoubtedly be useful in the investigation of NSCs but which have not yet been applied to the field. While many proteomics studies of NSCs have largely catalogued the proteome or posttranslational modifications of specific cellular states, without delving into specific functions, some have led to understandings of functional processes or identified markers that could not have been identified via other means. Many challenges remain in the field, including the precise identification and standardization of NSCs used for proteomic analyses, as well as how to translate fundamental proteomics studies to functional biology. The next level of investigation will require interdisciplinary approaches, combining the skills of those interested in the biochemistry of proteomics with those interested in modulating NSC function. PMID:26494823

  5. Effect of IL-6R Inhibition with Tocilizumab on the Proteome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Michael Kruse; Andersen, Marlene; Bennike, Tue Bjerg;

    2015-01-01

    monoclonal antibody against the IL-6 receptor. Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from one rheumatoid arthritis patient with poor response to conventional DMARD, before biological treatment and 4 months after. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were extracted and separated into CD14+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19...... regulators, including Interleukin (IL)-6 are intimately associated with rheumatoid arthritis disease progression. In this proof-of-concept case study we assess the immunological changes in multiple important immune cell populations to treatment with the commonly applied bDMARD tocilizumab, a humanized......+ cells were the most responsive to therapy, and proteins involved in the JAK/STAT and MAPK signaling pathways were less abundant. Conclusion: Our data support that effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with tocilizumab causes decrease in the JAK/STAT and modulation of the MAPK signaling pathways...

  6. Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Svend; Stougaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is an efficient tool to identify proteins present in specific tissues, cell types, or organelles. The resulting proteome reference maps and/or comparative analyses provide overviews of regulated proteins between wild type and mutants or between different conditions together with a...... comprehensive list of proteins. Post translation modifications (PTMs), such as glycosylation and phosphorylation, are pivotal for protein stability and function. Several strategies for enrichment of PTMs have been developed where targeted proteomic approaches are used to identify these PTMs. The sequenced and...... annotated Lotus japonicus (Lotus) genome has been essential for obtaining high-quality protein identifications from proteomics studies. Furthermore, additional genomics and transcriptomics studies from several Lotus species/ecotypes support putative gene structures and these can be further supported using...

  7. Proteomics of cell-cell interactions in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindoso, Rafael S; Sandim, Vanessa; Collino, Federica; Carvalho, Adriana B; Dias, Juliana; da Costa, Milene R; Zingali, Russolina B; Vieyra, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell-cell communications are now under intense study by proteomic approaches. Proteomics has unraveled changes in protein profiling as the result of cell interactions mediated by ligand/receptor, hormones, soluble factors, and the content of extracellular vesicles. Besides being a brief overview of the main and profitable methodologies now available (evaluating theory behind the methods, their usefulness, and pitfalls), this review focuses on-from a proteome perspective-some signaling pathways and post-translational modifications (PTMs), which are essential for understanding ischemic lesions and their recovery in two vital organs in mammals, the heart, and the kidney. Knowledge of misdirection of the proteome during tissue recovery, such as represented by the convergence between fibrosis and cancer, emerges as an important tool in prognosis. Proteomics of cell-cell interaction is also especially useful for understanding how stem cells interact in injured tissues, anticipating clues for rational therapeutic interventions. In the effervescent field of induced pluripotency and cell reprogramming, proteomic studies have shown what proteins from specialized cells contribute to the recovery of infarcted tissues. Overall, we conclude that proteomics is at the forefront in helping us to understand the mechanisms that underpin prevalent pathological processes. PMID:26552723

  8. Proteomic responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) after perfluorooctane sulfonate exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Roland, K.; Kestemont, P.; Henuset, L.; Pierrard, M.-A.; Raes, M.; Dieu, M.; Silvestre, F.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s, the stocks of European eel have been declining in most of their geographical distribution area. Many factors can be attributed to this decline such as pollution by xenobiotics like perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). This study aimed at evaluating the in vitro toxicity of eel peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to PFOS. Exposure time and two concentrations were chosen to avoid cell mortality (48 h exposure at 10 mu g PFOS/L and 1 mg PFOS/L). After in vitro contami...

  9. Membrane proteomic analysis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaojun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors due to its high potential of local invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study was to characterize the membrane proteomes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells of primary and metastatic origins, and to identify potential target proteins related to metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Methods Membrane/membrane-associated proteins were isolated from AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells and identified with a proteomic approach based on SDS-PAGE, in-gel tryptic digestion and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. X! Tandem was used for database searching against the SwissProt human protein database. Results We identified 221 & 208 proteins from AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, respectively, most of which are membrane or membrane-associated proteins. A hundred and nine proteins were found in both cell lines while the others were present in either AsPC-1 or BxPC-3 cells. Differentially expressed proteins between two cell lines include modulators of cell adhesion, cell motility or tumor invasion as well as metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, or nucleotide/lipid metabolism. Conclusion Membrane proteomes of AsPC-1 (metastatic and BxPC-3 (primary cells are remarkably different. The differentially expressed membrane proteins may serve as potential targets for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

  10. Blood-Brain Barrier Genomics, Proteomics, and New Transporter Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Shusta, Eric V.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an impermeable cellular interface that physically separates the blood from the interstices of the brain. The endothelial cells lining the brain blood vessels form the principle barrier, and their unique phenotype is a consequence of dynamic interactions with several perivascular cell types present in the brain parenchyma. In addition, BBB dysfunction has been observed in the large majority of neurological diseases, but the causes of aberrant vascular ...

  11. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon;

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem....../progenitor cells (HSPCs, Lin(neg)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) or myeloid committed precursors (Lin(neg)Sca-1(-)c-Kit(+)). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5,000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical...

  12. Blood cell labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labelling of blood cells in vitro for subsequent in vivo studies was one of the earliest applications of radioactive tracers in clinical medicine and laid the foundations for many important contributions to the advancement of knowledge of human blood cell pathophysiology. The characteristics required for satisfactory clinical studies, the mechanisms of cell labelling, the problems of radiation or chemical damage to the labelled cells and some examples of modern clinical applications are described and discussed. (Author)

  13. Proteomic analysis of blood level of proteins before and after operation in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma at high-incidence area in Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Ye An; Zong-Min Fan; Ze-Hao Zhuang; Yan-Ru Qin; Shan-Shan Gao; Ji-Lin Li; Li-Dong Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the protein files in blood from same patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC)before and after operation at the high-incidence area for ESCC in Henan Province, China.METHODS: Two-dimensional electrophoresis, silver staining and ImageMaster 2-DE analysis software were applied to the determination of protein files in the blood obtained from normal controls and ESCC patients before and after operation.RESULTS: A total of 655, 662 and 677 protein spots were identified, respectively, from the normal controls and ESCC patients before and after operation. No significant difference in the number of protein spots was observed between the normal group and ESCC patients. A total of seven protein spots were identified with a dramatic difference among the samples before and after operation. Six protein spots were up-regulated and one protein spot was down-regulated in the group after operation compared with those in normal and before operation. Three protein spots were further characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flying mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The proteins from these three spots were identified as serum amyloid A(SAA), amyloid related serum protein and haptoglobin.CONCLUSION: Serum amyloid A, amyloid related serum protein and haptoglobin may be related with ESCC and/or surgery. The significance of these proteins needs to be further characterized. The present study provides informative data for the establishment of serum protein profiles related with ESCC.

  14. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Sebastian; Dengjel, Jörn; Brummer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is driven by the oncogenic fusion kinase Bcr-Abl, which organizes its own signaling network with various proteins. These proteins, their interactions, and their role in relevant signaling pathways can be analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) approaches in various models systems, e.g., in cell culture models. In this chapter, we describe in detail immunoprecipitations and quantitative proteomics analysis using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) of components of the Bcr-Abl signaling pathway in the human CML cell line K562. PMID:27581145

  15. Donating Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page Print this page Donating peripheral blood stem cells Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is a nonsurgical procedure to collect ... Donating bone marrow Donor experiences videos Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is one of two methods of ...

  16. Comparison of the Proteome of Adult and Cord Erythroid Cells, and Changes in the Proteome Following Reticulocyte Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marieangela C; Trakarnsanga, Kongtana; Heesom, Kate J; Cogan, Nicola; Green, Carole; Toye, Ashley M; Parsons, Steve F; Anstee, David J; Frayne, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Cord blood stem cells are an attractive starting source for the production of red blood cells in vitro for therapy because of additional expansion potential compared with adult peripheral blood progenitors and cord blood banks usually being more representative of national populations than blood donors. Consequently, it is important to establish how similar cord RBCs are to adult cells. In this study, we used multiplex tandem mass tag labeling combined with nano-LC-MS/MS to compare the proteome of adult and cord RBCs and reticulocytes. 2838 unique proteins were identified, providing the most comprehensive compendium of RBC proteins to date. Using stringent criteria, 1674 proteins were quantified, and only a small number differed in amount between adult and cord RBC. We focused on proteins critical for RBC function. Of these, only the expected differences in globin subunits, along with higher levels of carbonic anhydrase 1 and 2 and aquaporin-1 in adult RBCs would be expected to have a phenotypic effect since they are associated with the differences in gaseous exchange between adults and neonates. Since the RBC and reticulocyte samples used were autologous, we catalogue the change in proteome following reticulocyte maturation. The majority of proteins (>60% of the 1671 quantified) reduced in abundance between 2- and 100-fold following maturation. However, ∼5% were at a higher level in RBCs, localized almost exclusively to cell membranes, in keeping with the known clearance of intracellular recycling pools during reticulocyte maturation. Overall, these data suggest that, with respect to the proteome, there is no barrier to the use of cord progenitors for the in vitro generation of RBCs for transfusion to adults other than the expression of fetal, not adult, hemoglobin. PMID:27006477

  17. Proteomics of neural stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Vodička, Petr; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2008), s. 175-186. ISSN 1478-9450 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : cell-based regnerative and reparative therapy * conditioned media * differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.848, year: 2008

  18. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). ... abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in this photomicrograph.

  19. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translation...

  20. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics in cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, T. C.; Mann, M

    2010-01-01

    The global analysis of protein composition, modifications, and dynamics are important goals in cell biology. Mass spectrometry (MS)–based proteomics has matured into an attractive technology for this purpose. Particularly, high resolution MS methods have been extremely successful for quantitative analysis of cellular and organellar proteomes. Rapid advances in all areas of the proteomic workflow, including sample preparation, MS, and computational analysis, should make the technology more eas...

  1. Proteomes and Neural Stem Cells: cellular signalling during differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Halada, Petr; Vodička, Petr; Motlík, Jan; Horning, O.; Jensen, O. N.; Gadher, S. J.; Pelech, S.; Kovářová, Hana

    Cambridge : -, 2007, s. 1-1. [BSPR-EBI Meeting: Integrative Proteomics: From Molecules to Systems,. Cambridge (GB), 25.07.2007-27.07.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : neural stem cells * differentiation * signalling * proteome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Systems analysis of endothelial cell plasma membrane proteome of rat lung microvasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witkiewicz Halina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial cells line all blood vessels to form the blood-tissue interface which is critical for maintaining organ homeostasis and facilitates molecular exchange. We recently used tissue subcellular fractionation combined with several multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based techniques to enhance identification of lipid-embedded proteins for large-scale proteomic mapping of luminal endothelial cell plasma membranes isolated directly from rat lungs in vivo. The biological processes and functions of the proteins expressed at this important blood-tissue interface remain unexplored at a large scale. Results We performed an unbiased systems analysis of the endothelial cell surface proteome containing over 1800 proteins to unravel the major functions and pathways apparent at this interface. As expected, many key functions of plasma membranes in general (i.e., cell surface signaling pathways, cytoskeletal organization, adhesion, membrane trafficking, metabolism, mechanotransduction, membrane fusion, and vesicle-mediated transport and endothelial cells in particular (i.e., blood vessel development and maturation, angiogenesis, regulation of endothelial cell proliferation, protease activity, and endocytosis were significantly overrepresented in this proteome. We found that endothelial cells express multiple proteins that mediate processes previously reported to be restricted to neuronal cells, such as neuronal survival and plasticity, axon growth and regeneration, synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter metabolic process. Surprisingly, molecular machinery for protein synthesis was also detected as overrepresented, suggesting that endothelial cells, like neurons, can synthesize proteins locally at the cell surface. Conclusion Our unbiased systems analysis has led to the potential discovery of unexpected functions in normal endothelium. The discovery of the existence of protein synthesis at the plasma membrane in endothelial

  3. Proteomics Applied to Porcine and Human Neural Stem Cell Differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mairychová, Kateřina; Skalníková, Helena; Tylečková, Jiřina; Halada, Petr; Marsala, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Liběchov : Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics AS CR, v.v.i, 2010. s. 61-61. [Informal Proteomic Meeting 2010. 09.11.2010-10.11.2010, Liblice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : proteomics * cell differentiation * neural stem cell s Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  4. The cell-surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnenberg, Albert D; Meyer, E Michael; Rubin, J Peter; Donnenberg, Vera S

    2015-07-01

    In this technical note we describe a method to evaluate the cell surface proteome of human primary cell cultures and cell lines. The method utilizes the BD Biosciences lyoplate, a system covering 242 surface proteins, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids plus relevant isotype controls, automated plate-based flow cytometry, conventional file-level analysis and unsupervised K-means clustering of markers on the basis of percent of positive events and mean fluorescence intensity of positive and total clean events. As an example, we determined the cell surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells (ASC) derived from 5 independent clinical isolates. Between-sample agreement of very strongly expressed (n = 32) and strongly expressed (n =16) markers was excellent, constituting a reliable profile for ASC identification and determination of functional properties. Known mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105) were among the identified strongly expressed determinants. Among other strongly expressed markers are several that are potentially immunomodulatory including three proteins that protect from complement mediated effects (CD46, CD55, and CD59), two that regulate apoptosis (CD77 and CD95) and several with ectoenzymatic (CD10, CD26, CD13, CD73, and CD143) or receptor tyrosine kinase (CD140b (PDGFR), CD340 (Her-2), EGFR) activity, suggesting mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory and tissue remodeling properties of ASC. Because variables are standardized for K-means clustering, results generated using this methodology should be comparable between instrumentation platforms. It is widely generalizable to human primary explant cultures and cells lines and will prove useful to determine how cell passage, culture interventions, and gene expression and silencing affect the cell-surface proteome. PMID:25929697

  5. Identification of Residual Blood Proteins in Ticks by Mass Spectrometry Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Bunikis, Jonas; Wysocki, Vicki; Barbour, Alan G.

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectrometry–based proteomics of individual ticks demonstrated persistence of mammalian host blood components, including α- and β-globin chains, histones, and mitochondrial enzymes, in Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum ticks for months after molting. Residual host proteins may identify sources of infection for ticks.

  6. Blood-brain barrier proteomics: towards the understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Yannis; Gosselet, Fabien; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Cecchelli, Roméo

    2014-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulates the passage of endogenous and exogenous compounds and thus contributes to the brain homeostasis with the help of well-known proteins such as tight junction proteins, plasma membrane transporters and metabolic barrier proteins. In the last decade, proteomics have emerged as supplementary tools for BBB research. The development of proteomic technologies has provided several means to extend knowledge on the BBB and to investigate additional routes for the bypass of this barrier. Proteomics approaches have been used in vivo and also using in vitro BBB models to decipher the physiological characteristics and, under stress conditions, to understand the molecular mechanisms of brain diseases. This work has demonstrated that both quantitative global and targeted proteomics approaches are powerful and provide significant information on the brain microvessel endothelium. However, current knowledge is only partial and it is necessary to increase the studies using proteomics tools that will provide additional information concerning brain pathologies or BBB metabolism. Highly sensitive, accurate and specific protein quantification by quantitative targeted proteomics appears as an essential methodology for human BBB studies. PMID:25446619

  7. Drafting the proteome landscape of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, María; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Zudaire, Maribel; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Perez-Valderrama, Estela; Zabaleta, Aintzane; Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of cells that are defined by their myeloid origin, immature state, and ability to potently suppress T-cell responses. They regulate immune responses and the population significantly increases in the tumor microenvironment of patients with glioma and other malignant tumors. For their study, MDSCs are usually isolated from the spleen or directly of tumors from a large number of tumor-bearing mice although promising ex vivo differentiated MDSC production systems have been recently developed. During the last years, proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to analyze MDSCs proteomes using shotgun-based mass spectrometry (MS), providing functional information about cellular homeostasis and metabolic state at a global level. Here, we will revise recent proteome profiling studies performed in MDSCs from different origins. Moreover, we will perform an integrative functional analysis of the protein compilation derived from these large-scale proteomic studies in order to obtain a comprehensive view of MDSCs biology. Finally, we will also discuss the potential application of high-throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and post-translational modifications (PTMs) during the differentiation process of MDSCs that will greatly boost the identification of novel MDSC-specific therapeutic targets to apply in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26403437

  8. WallProtDB, a database resource for plant cell wall proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    San Clemente, Hélène; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background During the last fifteen years, cell wall proteomics has become a major research field with the publication of more than 50 articles describing plant cell wall proteomes. The WallProtDB database has been designed as a tool to facilitate the inventory, the interpretation of cell wall proteomics data and the comparisons between cell wall proteomes. Results WallProtDB (http://www.polebio.lrsv.ups-tlse.fr/WallProtDB/) presently contains 2170 proteins and ESTs identified experimentally i...

  9. Advancing cell biology through proteomics in space and time (PROSPECTS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamond, A.I.; Uhlen, M.; Horning, S.;

    2012-01-01

    a range of sensitive and quantitative approaches for measuring protein structures and dynamics that promise to revolutionize our understanding of cell biology and molecular mechanisms in both human cells and model organisms. The Proteomics Specification in Time and Space (PROSPECTS) Network is a unique EU...

  10. The cell surface proteome of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreisbach, Annette; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Buist, Girbe

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a wide spread opportunistic pathogen that can cause a range of life-threatening diseases. To obtain a better understanding of the global mechanisms for pathogenesis and to identify novel targets for therapeutic interventions, the S. aureus proteom

  11. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  12. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  13. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  14. Characterization of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by calorimetric analysis of blood serum proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Barceló

    Full Text Available Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS is a premalignant proliferative disorder that may progress to multiple myeloma, a malignant plasma cell neoplasia. We evaluated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC as an experimental tool for differentiating serum samples of MGUS patients from healthy individuals. DSC thermograms can be used for monitoring changes in the serum proteome associated with MGUS. MGUS patients showed great variability in serum thermogram characteristics, which depended on the IgG, IgA or IgM isotypes and/or the κ or λ light chains. Thermogram feature parameters distinguished patients with MGUS from healthy people. Serum samples, named as non-MGUS, were also collected from patients with subjacent immunological pathologies who were discarded of having MGUS through serum immunofixation. They were used to verify the sensitivity of DSC for discriminating MGUS from related blood dyscrasias. Only some DSC thermogram feature parameters differentiated, to a lesser extent, between MGUS and non-MGUS individuals. We contemplate DSC as a tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of MGUS.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Human Blastocoel Fluid and Blastocyst Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert Jensen, Pernille; Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen;

    cells of the blastocyst are exposed. The ICM is the starting point for the development of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which posses the potential to develop into any cell type present in the adult human body [1,2]. This ability makes hESCs a potential source of cells for...... blastocoel fluid (1-8 nanoliters per blastocyst), has hampered an in-depth study of the human blastocyst proteome. However, recent developments in mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques allow the identification and characterization of thousands of proteins from low microgram levels of protein extracted......The human blastocyst consists of 100-200 cells that are organized in an outer layer of differentiated trophectoderm (TE) cells lining the blastocyst cavity into which the undifferentiated inner cell mass (ICM) protrudes. The cavity of the blastocyst is filled with blastocoel fluid to which all the...

  16. Global Screening of Human Cord Blood Proteomes for Biomarkers of Toxic Exposure and Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Colquhoun, David R.; Goldman, Lynn R.; Cole, Robert N.; Gucek, Marjan; Mansharamani, Malini; Witter, Frank R.; Apelberg, Benjamin J.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposures of pregnant women to natural and manmade chemicals can lead to negative health effects in the baby, ranging from low birth weight to developmental defects. In some cases, diseases were postulated to have their basis in toxic exposure in utero or in early childhood. Therefore, an understanding of fetal responses to environmental exposures is essential. To that end, cord blood is a readily accessible biofluid whose proteomic makeup remains mostly unexplored when compared wi...

  17. White Blood Cell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... where they are needed, and then kill and digest the harmful organism or substance (see White blood ... Patel Hello Everyone! Hello to all of you readers! I know you will be seeing my biography, ...

  18. Proteomics of CDK inhibition in cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Hana; Skalníková, Helena; Halada, Petr; Strnad, M.; Hajdúch, M.

    Olomouc: -, 2007, s. 1-1. [Symposium and Workshop on Molecular Pathology /3./. Olomouc (CZ), 04.05.2007-05.05.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/05/0418; GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors * cancer * proteomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. Proteomic techniques for characterisation of mesenchymal stem cell secretome.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupcová Skalníková, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 12 (2013), s. 2196-2211. ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * secretome * exosome * conditioned medium * proteomics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.123, year: 2013

  20. The time is right: proteome biology of stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whetton, A.D.; Williamson, A.J.K.; Krijgsveld, J.; Lee, B.H.; Lemischka, I.; Oh, S.; Pera, M.; Mummery, C.L.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2008-01-01

    In stem cell biology, there is a growing need for advanced technologies that may help to unravel the molecular mechanisms of self-renewal and differentiation. Proteomics, the comprehensive analysis of proteins, is such an emerging technique. To facilitate interactions between specialists in proteomi

  1. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Mateos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies.

  2. Learning robust cell signalling models from high throughput proteomic data

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Mitchell; Broom, Bradley M.; Subramanian, Devika

    2009-01-01

    We propose a framework for learning robust Bayesian network models of cell signalling from high-throughput proteomic data. We show that model averaging using Bayesian bootstrap resampling generates more robust structures than procedures that learn structures using all of the data. We also develop an algorithm for ranking the importance of network features using bootstrap resample data. We apply our algorithms to derive the T-cell signalling network from the flow cytometry data of Sachs et al....

  3. Proteome analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage in pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary Langerhans-cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare interstitial lung disease characterized by clusters of Langerhans cells, organized in granulomas, in the walls of distal bronchioles. It is a diffuse lung disease related to tobacco smoking but otherwise of unknown etiopathogenesis. Methods In this study we used a proteomic approach to analyze BAL protein composition of patients with PLCH and of healthy smoker and non-smoker controls to obtain insights into the pathogenetic m...

  4. Global Proteome Analysis of the NCI-60 Cell Line Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Moghaddas Gholami

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The NCI-60 cell line collection is a very widely used panel for the study of cellular mechanisms of cancer in general and in vitro drug action in particular. It is a model system for the tissue types and genetic diversity of human cancers and has been extensively molecularly characterized. Here, we present a quantitative proteome and kinome profile of the NCI-60 panel covering, in total, 10,350 proteins (including 375 protein kinases and including a core cancer proteome of 5,578 proteins that were consistently quantified across all tissue types. Bioinformatic analysis revealed strong cell line clusters according to tissue type and disclosed hundreds of differentially regulated proteins representing potential biomarkers for numerous tumor properties. Integration with public transcriptome data showed considerable similarity between mRNA and protein expression. Modeling of proteome and drug-response profiles for 108 FDA-approved drugs identified known and potential protein markers for drug sensitivity and resistance. To enable community access to this unique resource, we incorporated it into a public database for comparative and integrative analysis (http://wzw.tum.de/proteomics/nci60.

  5. Cigarette smoking increases white blood cell aggregation in whole blood.

    OpenAIRE

    Bridges, A B; Hill, A; Belch, J J

    1993-01-01

    We studied the effect of chronic cigarette smoking on white blood cell aggregation, increased aggregation predisposes to microvascular occlusion and damage. Current smokers had significantly increased white blood cell aggregation when compared with non smokers. The presence of chronically activated white blood cells in current smokers may be relevant in the pathogenesis of ischaemic vascular disease.

  6. Differential proteome analysis of chikungunya virus infection on host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Li-Ping Thio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused multiple unprecedented and re-emerging outbreaks in both tropical and temperate countries. Despite ongoing research efforts, the underlying factors involved in facilitating CHIKV replication during early infection remains ill-characterized. The present study serves to identify host proteins modulated in response to early CHIKV infection using a proteomics approach. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The whole cell proteome profiles of CHIKV-infected and mock control WRL-68 cells were compared and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE. Fifty-three spots were found to be differentially modulated and 50 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Eight were significantly up-regulated and 42 were down-regulated. The mRNA expressions of 15 genes were also found to correlate with the corresponding protein expression. STRING network analysis identified several biological processes to be affected, including mRNA processing, translation, energy production and cellular metabolism, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP and cell cycle regulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study constitutes a first attempt to investigate alteration of the host cellular proteome during early CHIKV infection. Our proteomics data showed that during early infection, CHIKV affected the expression of proteins that are involved in mRNA processing, host metabolic machinery, UPP, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 regulation (in favour of virus survival, replication and transmission. While results from this study complement the proteomics results obtained from previous late host response studies, functional characterization of these proteins is warranted to reinforce our understanding of their roles during early CHIKV infection in humans.

  7. Proteomics analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) after treatment with low molecular weight heparin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanPAN; Jun-huaWANG; He-mingYU; Xue-junLI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The endothelium is involved in the generation and the regulation of multiple physiological and pathological processes of blood vessels. Previously we confirmed low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) could inhibit tumor metastasis by protecting human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). To understand the effects of LMWH on the protein expression of HUVEC, we performed a comprehensive proteomics to survey global changes in proteins after LMWH treatment in HUVEC cells. METHODS:

  8. What Is Cancer Proteomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is Proteomics? Video Tutorial What is Cancer Proteomics? Print This Page The term "proteome" refers to ... that a cell or organism undergoes. The term "proteomics" is a large-scale comprehensive study of a ...

  9. Characterization of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by calorimetric analysis of blood serum proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Barceló, Francisca; Cerdà, Joan J.; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Jiménez-Marco, Teresa; Durán, Maria Antònia; Novo, Andrés; Ros, Teresa; Sampol, Antonia; Portugal, José

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Barceló et al. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant proliferative disorder thatmay progress to multiplemyeloma, a malignant plasma cell neoplasia.We evaluated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as an experimental tool for differentiating serum samples of MGUS patients from healthy individuals. DSC thermograms can be used for monitoring changes in the serum proteome associated with MGUS. MGUS patients showed great variability in serum thermogr...

  10. Characterization of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance by Calorimetric Analysis of Blood Serum Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Barceló, Francisca; Cerdà, Joan J.; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Jimenez-Marco, Teresa; Durán, M. Antonia; Novo, Andrés; Ros, Teresa; Sampol, Antonia; Portugal, José

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant proliferative disorder that may progress to multiple myeloma, a malignant plasma cell neoplasia. We evaluated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as an experimental tool for differentiating serum samples of MGUS patients from healthy individuals. DSC thermograms can be used for monitoring changes in the serum proteome associated with MGUS. MGUS patients showed great variability in serum thermogram characteristics,...

  11. Multiplexed immunofluorescence delineates proteomic cancer cell states associated with metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Anup; Miller, Alexandra M.; Brogi, Edi; Sui, Yunxia; Armenia, Joshua; McDonough, Elizabeth; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Carlin, Sean; Stamper, Aleksandra; Campos, Carl; Pang, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; Port, Elisa; Graeber, Thomas G.; Schultz, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The phenotypic diversity of cancer results from genetic and nongenetic factors. Most studies of cancer heterogeneity have focused on DNA alterations, as technologies for proteomic measurements in clinical specimen are currently less advanced. Here, we used a multiplexed immunofluorescence staining platform to measure the expression of 27 proteins at the single-cell level in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from treatment-naive stage II/III human breast cancer. Unsupervised cluster...

  12. Towards an animal model of ovarian cancer: cataloging chicken blood proteins using combinatorial peptide ligand libraries coupled with shotgun proteomic analysis for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingying; Sun, Zeyu; de Matos, Ricardo; Zhang, Jing; Odunsi, Kunle; Lin, Biaoyang

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer around the world, with high morbidity in industrialized countries. Early diagnosis is key in reducing its morbidity rate. Yet, robust biomarkers, diagnostics, and animal models are still limited for ovarian cancer. This calls for broader omics and systems science oriented diagnostics strategies. In this vein, the domestic chicken has been used as an ovarian cancer animal model, owing to its high rate of developing spontaneous epithelial ovarian tumors. Chicken blood has thus been considered a surrogate reservoir from which cancer biomarkers can be identified. However, the presence of highly abundant proteins in chicken blood has compromised the applicability of proteomics tools to study chicken blood owing to a lack of immunodepletion methods. Here, we demonstrate that a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) can efficiently remove highly abundant proteins from chicken blood samples, consequently doubling the number of identified proteins. Using an integrated CPLL-1DGE-LC-MSMS workflow, we identified a catalog of 264 unique proteins. Functional analyses further suggested that most proteins were coagulation and complement factors, blood transport and binding proteins, immune- and defense-related proteins, proteases, protease inhibitors, cellular enzymes, or cell structure and adhesion proteins. Semiquantitative spectral counting analysis identified 10 potential biomarkers from the present chicken ovarian cancer model. Additionally, many human homologs of chicken blood proteins we have identified have been independently suggested as diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, further triangulating our novel observations reported here. In conclusion, the CPLL-assisted proteomic workflow using the chicken ovarian cancer model provides a feasible platform for translational research to identify ovarian cancer biomarkers and understand ovarian cancer biology. To the best of our knowledge, we report here

  13. Mass spectrometry based proteomics for absolute quantification of proteins from tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Sam

    2015-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of the proteome and sub-proteomes of tumor cells has relevance to tumor classification, the development of novel therapeutics, and of prognostic and predictive markers and to disease monitoring. In particular the tumor cell surface represents a highly relevant compartment for the development of targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy. We have developed a proteomic platform to profile tumor cells that encompasses enrichment of surface membrane proteins, intact p...

  14. Quantitative measurement of blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We are observing and measuring the varying development reaction stages of blood cells to different saline solutions. The imaging process is based on a common path interferometer which is realized with a spatial light modulator (SLM) in the Fourier plane after the microscope objective. With the SLM we can shift the phase of the transmitted light with respect to the phase of signal wave. This principle is used for the phase contrast microscopy method where we take four pictures of the same image with different phase shifts in order to calculate the complex field of the measured cell. This microscope technique obtains quantitative data about the blood cell's surface in different development stages, amplitude and phase differences inside the cell itself. (author)

  15. Mass spectrometry based proteomics in cell biology and signaling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Proteomics is one of the most powerful post-genomics technologies. Recently accomplishments include large scale protein-protein interaction mapping, large scale mapping of phosphorylation sites and the cloning of key signaling molecules. In this talk, current state of the art of the technology will be reviewed. Applications of proteomics to the mapping of multiprotein complexes will be illustrated with recent work on the spliceosome and the nucleolus. More than 300 proteins have been mapped to each of these complexes. Quantitative techniques are becoming more and more essential in proteomics. They are usually performed by the incorporation of stable isotopes - a light form in cell state 'A' and a heavy form in cell state 'E' - and subsequent comparison of mass spectrometric peak heights. A new technique called, SILAC for Stable isotope Incorporation by Amino acids in Cell culture, has been applied to studying cell differentiation and mapping secreted proteins from adipocytes. A number of known and novel proteins important in adipocyte differentiation have been identified by this technique. Some of these proved to be upregulated at the 1 mRNA level, too, whereas others appear to be regulated post-translationally. We have also applied the SILAC method to protein-protein interaction mapping. For example, we compared immunoprecipitates from stimulated and non-stimulated cells to find binding partners recruited to the bait due to the stimulus. Several novel substrates in the EGF pathway were found in this way. An important application of proteomics in the signaling field is the mapping of post-translational modifications. In particular, there are a number of techniques for phosphotyrosine phosphorylation mapping which have proven very useful. Making use of the mass deficiency of the phosphogroup, 'parent ion scans' con be performed, which selectively reveal phosphotyrosine peptides from complex peptides mixtures. This technique has been used to clone several

  16. Application of proteomics in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, William C S

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease with diverse pathological features. Clinical proteomics allows the discovery of molecular markers and new therapeutic targets for this most prevalent type of lung cancer. Some of them may be used to detect early lung cancer, while others may serve as predictive markers of resistance to different therapies. Therapeutic targets and prognostic markers in NSCLC have also been discovered. These proteomics biomarkers may help to pair the individual NSCLC patient with the best treatment option. Despite the fact that implementation of these biomarkers in the clinic appears to be scarce, the recently launched Precision Medicine Initiative may encourage their translation into clinical practice. PMID:26577456

  17. A proteomic approach for the rapid, multi-informative and reliable identification of blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, E; Cicatiello, P; Deininger, L; Clench, M R; Marino, G; Giardina, P; Langenburg, G; West, A; Marshall, P; Sears, V; Francese, S

    2016-01-01

    Blood evidence is frequently encountered at the scene of violent crimes and can provide valuable intelligence in the forensic investigation of serious offences. Because many of the current enhancement methods used by crime scene investigators are presumptive, the visualisation of blood is not always reliable nor does it bear additional information. In the work presented here, two methods employing a shotgun bottom up proteomic approach for the detection of blood are reported; the developed protocols employ both an in solution digestion method and a recently proposed procedure involving immobilization of trypsin on hydrophobin Vmh2 coated MALDI sample plate. The methods are complementary as whilst one yields more identifiable proteins (as biomolecular signatures), the other is extremely rapid (5 minutes). Additionally, data demonstrate the opportunity to discriminate blood provenance even when two different blood sources are present in a mixture. This approach is also suitable for old bloodstains which had been previously chemically enhanced, as experiments conducted on a 9-year-old bloodstain deposited on a ceramic tile demonstrate. PMID:26596622

  18. Proteomics and glycoproteomics of pluripotent stem-cell surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are a unique cell type with promising potential in regenerative and personalized medicine. Yet the difficulty to understand and coax their seemingly stochastic differentiation and spontaneous self-renewal have largely limited their clinical applications. A call has been made by numerous researchers for a better characterization of surface proteins on these cells, in search of biomarkers that can dictate developmental stages and lineage specifications, and can help formulate mechanistic insight of stem-cell fate choices. In the past two decades, proteomics has gained significant recognition in profiling surface proteins at high throughput. This review will summarize the impact of these studies on stem-cell biology, and discuss the used proteomic techniques. A systematic comparison of all the techniques and their results is also attempted here to help reveal pros, cons, and the complementarity of the existing methods. This awareness should assist in selecting suitable strategies for stem-cell related research, and shed light on technical improvements that can be explored in the future. PMID:25211708

  19. Human fallopian tube proteome shows high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyuan; Liu, Yang; Chang, Cheng; Wu, Songfeng; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yingjie; Zhong, Fan; Deng, Gaopi

    2016-01-01

    The object of this research was to report a draft proteome of human fallopian tube (hFT) comprises 5416 identified proteins, which could be considered as a physiological reference to complement Human Proteome Draft. The proteomic raw data and metadata were stored in an integrated proteome resources centre iProX (IPX00034300). This hFT proteome contains many hFT markers newly identified by mass spectrum. This hFT proteome comprises 660 high-, 3605 medium- and 1181 low-abundant proteins. Ribosome, cytoskeleton, vesicle and protein folding associated proteins showed obvious tendency to be higher abundance in hFT. The extraordinary high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-associated proteins were identified in this hFT proteome, which highly supported that hFT should contain a plenty of MSCs. PMID:26759384

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 352 352 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 361 361 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 361 361 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  3. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell ...

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 350 350 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 350 350 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  6. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation ( ...

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 351 351 Loading... ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 351 351 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 360 360 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  10. A Proteomic Study of Human Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qiang; Byrum, Stephanie D; Moreland, Linley E; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Kannan, Aarthi; Lin, Zhenyu; Morgan, Michael; Stack, Brendan C; Cornelius, Lynn A; Tackett, Alan J; Gao, Ling

    2013-11-25

    Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine cancer of the skin. The incidence has been quadrupled with a 5-year mortality rate of 46%, presently there is no cure for metastatic disease. Despite the contribution of Merkel cell polyomavirus, the molecular events of MCC carcinogenesis are poorly defined. To better understand MCC carcinogensis, we have performed the first quantitative proteomic comparison of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) MCC tissues using another neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid tumor of the lung) as controls. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data has revealed that MCCs carry distinct protein expression patterns. Further analysis of significantly over-expressed proteins suggested the involvement of MAPK, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, wnt, and apoptosis signaling pathways. Our previous study and that from others have shown mTOR activation in MCCs. Therefore, we have focused on two downstream molecules of the mTOR pathway, lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB) and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNPF). We confirm over-expression of LDHB and hnRNPF in two primary human MCC cell lines, 16 fresh tumors, and in the majority of 80 tissue microarray samples. Moreover, mTOR inhibition suppresses LDHB and hnRNPF expression in MCC cells. The results of the current study provide insight into MCC carcinogenesis and provide rationale for mTOR inhibition in pre-clinical studies. PMID:25284964

  11. Intriguing bronchoalveolar lavage proteome in a case of pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ghafouri, Bijar; Persson, H Lennart; Tagesson, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) is a rare interstitial lung disease associated with tobacco smoke exposure. New insights into its pathogenesis and how it differs from that of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be provided by proteomic studies on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Case Report: We present the BALF proteome in a biopsy-proven case of PLCH and compare it with typical proteomes of COPD and of the healthy lung. The BALF proteins were separ...

  12. Proteome of leukaemic cells after cisplatin treatment - comparison of three independent analytical techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinková, Jiřina; Skalníková, Helena; Hrabáková, Rita; Novák, Petr; Man, Petr; Pompach, Petr; Strohalm, Martin; Havlíček, Vladimír; Džubák, P.; Hajdúch, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Budapest : Hungarian proteomic society, 2009, s. 56-56. ISBN 978-963-9319-99-8. [3rd Central and Eastern European Proteomics Conference. Budapešť (HU), 06.10.2009-09.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Proteomics * Cis-platin * Leukaemic cells Subject RIV: FK - Gynaecology, Childbirth

  13. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. PMID:26661933

  14. Proteomic analysis of osteogenic differentiation of dental follicle precursor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsczeck, Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Völlner, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in unravelling the molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways controlling the differentiation and proliferation of human stem cell lines. Proteome analysis has proven to be an effective approach to comprehensive analysis of the regulatory network of...... after osteogenic differentiation. We also identified regulatory proteins, such as the transcription factors TP53 and Sp-1, associated with the differentiation process. Further studies will investigate the impact of identified regulatory proteins for cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in...... differentiation. In the present study we applied 2-DE combined with capillary-LC-MS/MS analysis to profile differentially regulated proteins upon differentiation of dental follicle precursor cells (DFPCs). Out of 115 differentially regulated proteins, glutamine synthetase, lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B...

  15. Development of a laser capture microscope-based single-cell-type proteomics tool for studying proteomes of individual cell layers of plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingde; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Zhou, Suping; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell-type proteomics provides the capability to revealing the genomic and proteomics information at cell-level resolution. However, the methodology for this type of research has not been well-developed. This paper reports developing a workflow of laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by gel-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)-based proteomics analysis for the identification of proteomes contained in individual cell layers of tomato roots. Thin-sections (~10-μm thick, 10 sections per root tip) were prepared for root tips of tomato germinating seedlings. Epidermal and cortical cells (5000–7000 cells per tissue type) were isolated under a LCM microscope. Proteins were isolated and then separated by SDS–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel-tryptic digestion. The MS and MS/MS spectra generated using nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of the tryptic peptides were searched against ITAG2.4 tomato protein database to identify proteins contained in each single-cell-type sample. Based on the biological functions, proteins with proven functions in root hair development were identified in epidermal cells but not in the cortical cells. Several of these proteins were found in Al-treated roots only. The results demonstrated that the cell-type-specific proteome is relevant for tissue-specific functions in tomato roots. Increasing the coverage of proteomes and reducing the inevitable cross-contamination from adjacent cell layers, in both vertical and cross directions when cells are isolated from slides prepared using intact root tips, are the major challenges using the technology in proteomics analysis of plant roots. PMID:27280026

  16. Iron overload in human hepatoma cells - proteomic analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrák, J.; Myslivcová, D.; Man, Petr; Babušiak, M.; Vyoral, D.

    Lednice, 2005, s. 38-38. [Czech Proteomic Conference /2./. Lednice (CZ), 17.10.2005-20.10.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : iron * proteomic analysis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  17. Proteomics analysis reveals a Th17-prone cell population in presymptomatic graft-versus-host disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Liu, Liangyi; Gomez, Aurelie; Zhang, Jilu; Ramadan, Abdulraouf; Zhang, Qing; Choi, Sung W.; Zhang, Peng; Greenson, Joel K.; Liu, Chen; Jiang, Di; Virts, Elizabeth; Kelich, Stephanie L.; Chu, Hong Wei; Flynn, Ryan; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hanash, Samir; Paczesny, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal graft-versus-host-disease (GI-GVHD) is a life-threatening complication occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and a blood biomarker that permits stratification of HCT patients according to their risk of developing GI-GVHD would greatly aid treatment planning. Through in-depth, large-scale proteomic profiling of presymptomatic samples, we identified a T cell population expressing both CD146, a cell adhesion molecule, and CCR5, a chemokine receptor that is upregulated as early as 14 days after transplantation in patients who develop GI-GVHD. The CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cell population is Th17 prone and increased by ICOS stimulation. shRNA knockdown of CD146 in T cells reduced their transmigration through endothelial cells, and maraviroc, a CCR5 inhibitor, reduced chemotaxis of the CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cell population toward CCL14. Mice that received CD146 shRNA–transduced human T cells did not lose weight, showed better survival, and had fewer CD4+CD146+CCR5+ T cells and less pathogenic Th17 infiltration in the intestine, even compared with mice receiving maraviroc with control shRNA– transduced human T cells. Furthermore, the frequency of CD4+CD146+CCR5+ Tregs was increased in GI-GVHD patients, and these cells showed increased plasticity toward Th17 upon ICOS stimulation. Our findings can be applied to early risk stratification, as well as specific preventative therapeutic strategies following HCT. PMID:27195312

  18. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campa, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-05-01

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 14/C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with /sup 14/C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine.

  19. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 370C in the presence of 14C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with 14C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine

  20. Proteomic assessment of a cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kelvin H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion or mutation(s of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a neuromuscular disease characterized by spinal motor neuron death and muscle paralysis. Complete loss of the SMN protein is embryonically lethal, yet reduced levels of this protein result in selective death of motor neurons. Why motor neurons are specifically targeted by SMN deficiency remains to be determined. In this study, embryonic stem (ES cells derived from a severe SMA mouse model were differentiated into motor neurons in vitro by addition of retinoic acid and sonic hedgehog agonist. Proteomic and western blot analyses were used to probe protein expression alterations in this cell-culture model of SMA that could be relevant to the disease. Results When ES cells were primed with Noggin/fibroblast growth factors (bFGF and FGF-8 in a more robust neural differentiation medium for 2 days before differentiation induction, the efficiency of in vitro motor neuron differentiation was improved from ~25% to ~50%. The differentiated ES cells expressed a pan-neuronal marker (neurofilament and motor neuron markers (Hb9, Islet-1, and ChAT. Even though SMN-deficient ES cells had marked reduced levels of SMN (~20% of that in control ES cells, the morphology and differentiation efficiency for these cells are comparable to those for control samples. However, proteomics in conjunction with western blot analyses revealed 6 down-regulated and 14 up-regulated proteins with most of them involved in energy metabolism, cell stress-response, protein degradation, and cytoskeleton stability. Some of these activated cellular pathways showed specificity for either undifferentiated or differentiated cells. Increased p21 protein expression indicated that SMA ES cells were responding to cellular stress. Up-regulation of p21 was confirmed in spinal cord tissues from the same SMA mouse model from which the ES cells were derived. Conclusion SMN

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis on radioresistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discover radioresistance-associated proteins by performing comparative proteomic analysis on nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. Methods: The total proteins were extracted from radioresistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R and its parental cell line CNE-2, respectively. These proteins were separated by high quality two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and then the 2-DE profiles were screened for differentially expressed protein spots by the Image Master 5.0 software. Those spots were identified by a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry. Results: 32 significantly differentially expressed protein spots were screened in two different radiosensitivity cell lines and 11 proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry, among which 3 proteins were up-regulated in radioresistant human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE-2R and the other 8 proteins were down-regulated. Conclusions: The differentially expressed proteins of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells with different radiosensitivity were mainly involved in apoptosis regulation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle regulation, RNA transcription, cell signaling, cytoskeleton formation and radiation stress responses. (authors)

  2. Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Human Pancreatic and Hepatic Stellate Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo, Joao A.; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin L; Steen, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the liver and the pancreas differ; however, chronic inflammation in both organs is associated with fibrosis. Evidence suggests that fibrosis in both organs is partially regulated by organ-specific stellate cells. We explore the proteome of human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC) and human pancreatic stellate cells (hPaSC) using mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics to investigate pathophysiologic mechanisms. Proteins were isolated from whole cell lysates of immorta...

  3. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics and N-terminal Analysis of Human Metastatic Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Hophil; Han, Dohyun; Kim, Yikwon; Cho, Jee Yeon; Jin, Jonghwa; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis is helpful in identifying cancer-associated proteins that are differentially expressed and fragmented that can be annotated as dysregulated networks and pathways during metastasis. To examine meta-static process in lung cancer, we performed a proteomics study by label-free quantitative analysis and N-terminal analysis in 2 human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines with disparate metastatic potentials—NCI-H1703 (primary cell, stage I) and NCI-H1755 (metastatic cell, stage ...

  4. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Ba...

  5. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  6. Low molecular weight blood plasma proteome – a source of differential diagnostic biomarkers of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ye. Shevchenko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available At present, there is no screening test for the early detecting of ovarian cancer, one of the most lethal form of gynaecological malignancy in the worldwide. In this study the new methodology for the search of tumor markers of ovarian cancer, involving profiling the low-molecular blood plasma proteomes, is developed, unified and approved. The given approach included three basic components: pre-preparation of samples, matrix-assisted laser desorption / ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and bioinformatics software for mass spectral data processing. Opportunities and prospects of the developed approach for the detection of potential ovarian cancer markers were shown. For search of potential tumor markers, screening of 56 blood plasma samples from ovarian cancer patients and 36 benign ovarian neoplasia samples were carried out.As a result of the present research, peptides / polypeptides which can be used in future for detecting this pathology were found out.

  7. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 26,035 views 49:19 Scott: Donating Blood ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 27,845 views 49:19 Scott: Donating Blood ...

  10. Identification of proteins enriched in rice egg or sperm cells by single-cell proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafumi Abiko

    Full Text Available In angiosperms, female gamete differentiation, fertilization, and subsequent zygotic development occur in embryo sacs deeply embedded in the ovaries. Despite their importance in plant reproduction and development, how the egg cell is specialized, fuses with the sperm cell, and converts into an active zygote for early embryogenesis remains unclear. This lack of knowledge is partly attributable to the difficulty of direct analyses of gametes in angiosperms. In the present study, proteins from egg and sperm cells obtained from rice flowers were separated by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and globally identified by highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectroscopy. Proteome analyses were also conducted for seedlings, callus, and pollen grains to compare their protein expression profiles to those of gametes. The proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000265. A total of 2,138 and 2,179 expressed proteins were detected in egg and sperm cells, respectively, and 102 and 77 proteins were identified as preferentially expressed in egg and sperm cells, respectively. Moreover, several rice or Arabidopsis lines with mutations in genes encoding the putative gamete-enriched proteins showed clear phenotypic defects in seed set or seed development. These results suggested that the proteomic data presented in this study are foundational information toward understanding the mechanisms of reproduction and early development in angiosperms.

  11. Proteomic Studies of Cholangiocarcinoma and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Secretomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantragan Srisomsap

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC occur with relatively high incidence in Thailand. The secretome, proteins secreted from cancer cells, are potentially useful as biomarkers of the diseases. Proteomic analysis was performed on the secreted proteins of cholangiocarcinoma (HuCCA-1 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC-S102, HepG2, SK-Hep-1, and Alexander cell lines. The secretomes of the five cancer cell lines were analyzed by SDS-PAGE combined with LC/MS/MS. Sixty-eight proteins were found to be expressed only in HuCCA-1. Examples include neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (lipocalin 2, laminin 5 beta 3, cathepsin D precursor, desmoplakin, annexin IV variant, and annexin A5. Immunoblotting was used to confirm the presence of lipocalin 2 in conditioned media and cell lysate of 5 cell lines. The results showed that lipocalin 2 was a secreted protein which is expressed only in the conditioned media of the cholangiocarcinoma cell line. Study of lipocalin 2 expression in different types of cancer and normal tissues from cholangiocarcinoma patients showed that lipocalin 2 was expressed only in the cancer tissues. We suggest that lipocalin 2 may be a potential biomarker for cholangiocarcinoma.

  12. MAPU: Max-Planck Unified database of organellar, cellular, tissue and body fluid proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yong; Adachi, Jun;

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become a powerful technology to map the protein composition of organelles, cell types and tissues. In our department, a large-scale effort to map these proteomes is complemented by the Max-Planck Unified (MAPU) proteome database. MAPU contains several...... body fluid proteomes; including plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Cell lines have been mapped to a depth of several thousand proteins and the red blood cell proteome has also been analyzed in depth. The liver proteome is represented with 3200 proteins. By employing high resolution MS and......://www.mapuproteome.com using a clickable interface of cell or body parts. Proteome data can be queried across proteomes by protein name, accession number, sequence similarity, peptide sequence and annotation information. More than 4500 mouse and 2500 human proteins have already been identified in at least one proteome. Basic...

  13. Understanding the rules of the road: proteomic approaches to interrogate the blood brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Torbett, Bruce E.; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often regarded as a passive barrier that protects brain parenchyma from toxic substances, circulating leukocytes, while allowing the passage of selected molecules. Recently, a combination of molecular profiling techniques have characterized the constituents of the BBB based on in vitro models using isolated endothelial cells and ex vivo models analyzing isolated blood vessels. Characterization of gene expression profiles that are specific to the endothelium of...

  14. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; De Castillia, Caterina Strambio; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize mass spectrometry coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilisation and denaturation methods were ...

  15. When Blood Cells Bend: Understanding Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe When Blood Cells Bend Understanding Sickle Cell Disease For people who don’t suspect they ... Cells Bend Wise Choices Links Living with Sickle Cell Disease See a sickle cell disease expert regularly. ...

  16. Proteomic study of cancer cells response to anthracycline anticancer treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tylečková, Jiřina; Hrabáková, Rita; Mairychová, Kateřina; Halada, Petr; Radová, L.; Džubák, P.; Hajduch, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Berlin : Freie Universität Berlin, 2011. s. 225-225. [Proteomic Forum 2011. 3.4.2011-7.4.2011, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA MŠk MSM6198959216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : anticancer research * anthracycline * proteomics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry http://www.proteomic-forum.de/images/stories/pics/proteomic%20forum%202011%20-%20abstract%20book.pdf

  17. Multiplexed immunofluorescence delineates proteomic cancer cell states associated with metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Anup; Miller, Alexandra M.; Brogi, Edi; Sui, Yunxia; Armenia, Joshua; McDonough, Elizabeth; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Carlin, Sean; Stamper, Aleksandra; Campos, Carl; Pang, Zhengyu; Li, Qing; Port, Elisa; Graeber, Thomas G.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Ginty, Fiona; Larson, Steven M.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.

    2016-01-01

    The phenotypic diversity of cancer results from genetic and nongenetic factors. Most studies of cancer heterogeneity have focused on DNA alterations, as technologies for proteomic measurements in clinical specimen are currently less advanced. Here, we used a multiplexed immunofluorescence staining platform to measure the expression of 27 proteins at the single-cell level in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from treatment-naive stage II/III human breast cancer. Unsupervised clustering of protein expression data from 638,577 tumor cells in 26 breast cancers identified 8 clusters of protein coexpression. In about one-third of breast cancers, over 95% of all neoplastic cells expressed a single protein coexpression cluster. The remaining tumors harbored tumor cells representing multiple protein coexpression clusters, either in a regional distribution or intermingled throughout the tumor. Tumor uptake of the radiotracer 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose was associated with protein expression clusters characterized by hormone receptor loss, PTEN alteration, and HER2 gene amplification. Our study demonstrates an approach to generate cellular heterogeneity metrics in routinely collected solid tumor specimens and integrate them with in vivo cancer phenotypes. PMID:27182557

  18. Integrative proteomics and tissue microarray profiling indicate the association between overexpressed serum proteins and non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansheng Liu

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Clinically, the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC can be improved by the early detection and risk screening among population. To meet this need, here we describe the application of extensive peptide level fractionation coupled with label free quantitative proteomics for the discovery of potential serum biomarkers for lung cancer, and the usage of Tissue microarray analysis (TMA and Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM assays for the following up validations in the verification phase. Using these state-of-art, currently available clinical proteomic approaches, in the discovery phase we confidently identified 647 serum proteins, and 101 proteins showed a statistically significant association with NSCLC in our 18 discovery samples. This serum proteomic dataset allowed us to discern the differential patterns and abnormal biological processes in the lung cancer blood. Of these proteins, Alpha-1B-glycoprotein (A1BG and Leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1, two plasma glycoproteins with previously unknown function were selected as examples for which TMA and MRM verification were performed in a large sample set consisting about 100 patients. We revealed that A1BG and LRG1 were overexpressed in both the blood level and tumor sections, which can be referred to separate lung cancer patients from healthy cases.

  19. Optimized method for identification of the proteomes secreted by cardiac cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Van Eyk, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1005, č. 1005 (2013), s. 225-235. ISSN 1940-6029 Institutional support : RVO:68081715 Keywords : cardiac cells * secreted proteins * proteomic technology Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  20. Cell wall proteomics of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Chlorophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Bing; Hu, Qiang; Sommerfeld, Milton; Chen, Feng

    2004-03-01

    The green microalga Haematococcus pluvialis can synthesize and accumulate large amounts of the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin, and undergo profound changes in cell wall composition and architecture during the cell cycle and in response to environmental stresses. In this study, cell wall proteins (CWPs) of H. pluvialis were systematically analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) coupled with peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and sequence-database analysis. In total, 163 protein bands were analyzed, which resulted in positive identification of 81 protein orthologues. The highly complex and dynamic composition of CWPs is manifested by the fact that the majority of identified CWPs are differentially expressed at specific stages of the cell cycle along with a number of common wall-associated 'housekeeping' proteins. The detection of cellulose synthase orthologue in the vegetative cells suggested that the biosynthesis of cellulose occurred during primary wall formation, in contrast to earlier observations that cellulose was exclusively present in the secondary wall of the organism. A transient accumulation of a putative cytokinin oxidase at the early stage of encystment pointed to a possible role in cytokinin degradation while facilitating secondary wall formation and/or assisting in cell expansion. This work represents the first attempt to use a proteomic approach to investigate CWPs of microalgae. The reference protein map constructed and the specific protein markers obtained from this study provide a framework for future characterization of the expression and physiological functions of the proteins involved in the biogenesis and modifications in the cell wall of Haematococcus and related organisms. PMID:14997492

  1. Proteome characterization of sea star coelomocytes--the innate immune effector cells of echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Catarina F; Santos, Romana; Coelho, Ana V

    2011-09-01

    Sea star coelomic fluid is in contact with all internal organs, carrying signaling molecules and a large population of circulating cells, the coelomocytes. These cells, also known as echinoderm blood cells, are responsible for the innate immune responses and are also known to have an important role in the first stage of regeneration, i.e. wound closure, necessary to prevent disruption of the body fluid balance and to limit the invasion of pathogens. This study focuses on the proteome characterization of these multifunctional cells. The identification of 358 proteins was achieved using a combination of two techniques for protein separation (1-D SDS-PAGE followed by nanoLC and 2-D SDS-PAGE) and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS for protein identification. To our knowledge, the present report represents the first comprehensive list of sea star coelomocyte proteins, constituting an important database to validate many echinoderm-predicted proteins. Evidence for new pathways in these particular echinoderm cells are also described, and thus representing a valuable resource to stimulate future studies aiming to unravel the homology with vertebrate immune cells and particularly the origins of the immune system itself. PMID:21751360

  2. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  3. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells ...

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 25,312 views 49:19 23. Stem Cells - ...

  6. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Duration: 3:35. hemaquebec1998 667 views 3:35 Bone Marrow/Stem Cell ... Jeff, peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 22,203 ...

  7. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 26,239 views 49:19 23. Stem Cells - ...

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) ... Medicine Clinics 225,676 views 6:18 Alicia's bone marrow donation - Duration: 8:33. ... Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 15:50. Dartmouth-Hitchcock 2,764 views ...

  9. Cadmium uptake by rat red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat red blood cells were employed to study the uptake of cadmium (109Cd). Suspensions of red blood cells were exposed to Cd concentrations (both bound and free) observed following in vivo Cd administration. Cd uptake was biphasic with an initial rapid phase (0C was one-fourth of that at 370C. The metabolic inhibitors: sodium fluoride (1mM), potassium cyanide (1mM) and carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (2μM) and the Na+-K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain (1mM) did not reduce Cd (50μM) uptake into red blood cells. This suggests that the uptake of Cd into red blood cells was not an active process. Incubation of Cd (10μM) with an equimolar concentration of Zn did not alter uptake of Cd into red blood cells, but at 5 and 10 times higher concentrations of Zn, Cd uptake was enhanced 5-fold. Mercury at one-tenth and equimolar concentrations of Cd increased Cd uptake by red blood cells 2-fold. N-Ethylmaleimide (0.5-5mM), which irreversibly inactivates membrane sulfhydryl groups, decreased Cd uptake. The data indicate that Cd uptake into rat red blood cells occurs by passive transport and that alterations of sulfhydryls of red blood cell membrane may modulate the process. (author)

  10. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  11. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs

  12. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Zilm, Peter S; Marino, Victor; Bartold, P Mark; Gronthos, Stan

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein "spots" were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population. PMID:27579043

  13. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  14. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2015-06-30

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  15. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Turek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP, AtPNP-A (At2g18660 were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS. In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014 661 and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  16. Proteomic differences in recombinant CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommeregger, Wolfgang; Mayrhofer, Patrick; Steinfellner, Willibald; Reinhart, David; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula; Kunert, Renate

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian hosts for the production of biopharmaceuticals. To overcome unfavorable features of CHO cells, a lot of effort is put into cell engineering to improve phenotype. "Omics" studies investigating elevated growth rate and specific productivities as well as extracellular stimulus have already revealed many interesting engineering targets. However, it remains largely unknown how physicochemical properties of the recombinant product itself influence the host cell. In this study, we used quantitative label-free LC-MS proteomic analyses to investigate product-specific proteome differences in CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments. We established recombinant CHO cells producing the two antibodies, 3D6 and 2F5, both as single-chain Fv-Fc homodimeric antibody fragments (scFv-Fc). We applied three different vector strategies for transgene delivery (i.e., plasmid, bacterial artificial chromosome, recombinase-mediated cassette exchange), selected two best performing clones from transgene variants and transgene delivery methods and investigated three consecutively passaged cell samples by label-free proteomic analysis. LC-MS-MS profiles were compared in several sample combinations to gain insights into different aspects of proteomic changes caused by overexpression of two different heterologous proteins. This study suggests that not only the levels of specific product secretion but the product itself has a large impact on the proteome of the cell. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1902-1912. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26913574

  17. Proteomics of Neural Stem Cell Differentiation: from Animal Model to Human

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mairychová, Kateřina; Skalníková, Helena; Tylečková, Jiřina; Halada, Petr; Marsala, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Berlin : Freie Universität Berlin, 2011. s. 211-211. [Proteomic Forum 2011. 03.04.2011-07.04.2011, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : stem cell s * differentiation * proteomics Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  18. Proteomics of loosely bound cell wall proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures: a critical analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Borderies, Gisèle; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Jauneau, Alain; Boudart, Georges; Monsarrat, Bernard; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Boudet, Alain; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    The complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome allows the use of the recently developed mass spectrometry techniques to identify the cell wall proteins (CWPs). Most proteomic approaches depend on the quality of sample preparation. Extraction of CWPs is particularly complex since the proteins may be free in the apoplast or are embedded in a polysaccharide matrix where they are retained by Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic or ionic interactions, or cross-linked...

  19. IBCIS:Intelligent blood cell identification system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adnan Khashman

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of blood cells in microscope images can provide useful information concerning the health of patients.There are three major blood cell types,namely,erythrocytes (red),leukocytes (white),and platelets.Manual classification is time consuming and susceptible to error due to the different morphological features of the cells.This paper presents an intelligent system that simulates a human visual inspection and classification of the three blood cell types.The proposed system comprises two phases:The image preprocessing phase where blood cell features are extracted via global pattern averaging,and the neural network arbitration phase where training is the first and then classification is carried out.Experimental results suggest that the proposed method performs well in identifying blood cell types regardless of their irregular shapes,sizes and orientation,thus providing a fast,simple and efficient rotational and scale invariant blood cell identification system which can be used in automating laboratory reporting.

  20. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... are evaluating BMT and PBSCT in clinical trials (research studies) for the treatment ... are the donor’s stem cells matched to the patient’s stem cells in allogeneic ...

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 25,665 views 49:19 Susan Solomon: The ...

  2. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cell donation experience at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD. Bone marrow transplantation ( ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 25,496 views 49:19 Susan Solomon: The ...

  3. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 22,464 views 3:28 Pain Control: Support for People with Cancer - Duration: 11:58. ...

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe ... later? Sign in to add this video to a playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to ...

  5. Functional Proteomics Screen Enables Enrichment of Distinct Cell Types from Human Pancreatic Islets

    OpenAIRE

    Revital Sharivkin; Walker, Michael D.; Yoav Soen

    2015-01-01

    The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates sp...

  6. Proteome alteration induced by hTERT transfection of human fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riou Jean-François

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomerase confers cellular immortality by elongating telomeres, thereby circumventing the Hayflick limit. Extended-life-span cells have been generated by transfection with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene. hTERT transfected cell lines may be of outstanding interest to monitor the effect of drugs targeting the telomerase activity. The incidence of hTERT gene transfection at the proteome level is a prerequisite to that purpose. The effect of the transfection has been studied on the proteome of human fibroblast (WI38. Cytosolic and nuclear fractions of WI38 cells, empty vector transfected WI38 (WI38-HPV and hTERT WI38 cells were submitted to a 2D-DIGE (Two-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis analysis. Only spots that had a similar abundance in WI38 and WI38-HPV, but were differentially expressed in WI38 hTERT were selected for MS identification. This method directly points to the proteins linked with the hTERT expression. Number of false positive differentially expressed proteins has been excluded by using control WI38-HPV cells. The proteome alteration induced by hTERT WI38 transfection should be taken into account in subsequent use of the cell line for anti-telomerase drugs evaluation. Results 2D-DIGE experiment shows that 57 spots out of 2246 are significantly differentially expressed in the cytosolic fraction due to hTERT transfection, and 38 were confidently identified. In the nuclear fraction, 44 spots out of 2172 were selected in the differential proteome analysis, and 14 were identified. The results show that, in addition to elongating telomeres, hTERT gene transfection has other physiological roles, among which an enhanced ER capacity and a potent cell protection against apoptosis. Conclusion We show that the methodology reduces the complexity of the proteome analysis and highlights proteins implicated in other processes than telomere elongation. hTERT induced proteome changes suggest

  7. Immunoscreening of the extracellular proteome of colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of proteins from tumors can trigger an immune response in cancer patients involving T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes, which results in the generation of antibodies to tumor-derived proteins. Many studies aim to use humoral immune responses, namely autoantibody profiles, directly, as clinical biomarkers. Alternatively, the antibody immune response as an amplification system for tumor associated alterations may be used to indicate putative protein biomarkers with high sensitivity. Aiming at the latter approach we here have implemented an autoantibody profiling strategy which particularly focuses on proteins released by tumor cells in vitro: the so-called secretome. For immunoscreening, the extracellular proteome of five colorectal cancer cell lines was resolved on 2D gels, immobilized on PVDF membranes and used for serological screening with individual sera from 21 colorectal cancer patients and 24 healthy controls. All of the signals from each blot were assigned to a master map, and autoantigen candidates were defined based of the pattern of immunoreactivities. The corresponding proteins were isolated from preparative gels, identified by MALDI-MS and/or by nano-HPLC/ESI-MS/MS and exemplarily confirmed by duplex Western blotting combining the human serum samples with antibodies directed against the protein(s) of interest. From 281 secretome proteins stained with autoantibodies in total we first defined the 'background patterns' of frequently immunoreactive extracellular proteins in healthy and diseased people. An assignment of these proteins, among them many nominally intracellular proteins, to the subset of exosomal proteins within the secretomes revealed a large overlap. On this basis we defined and consequently confirmed novel biomarker candidates such as the extreme C-terminus of the extracellular matrix protein agrin within the set of cancer-enriched immunorectivities. Our findings suggest, first, that autoantibody responses may be due, in

  8. The saliva proteome of the blood-feeding insect Triatoma infestans is rich in platelet-aggregation inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charneau, Sébastien; Junqueira, Magno; Costa, Camila M.; Pires, Daniele L.; Fernandes, Ellen S.; Bussacos, Ana C.; Sousa, Marcelo V.; Ricart, Carlos André O.; Shevchenko, Andrej; Teixeira, Antonio R. L.

    2007-12-01

    The saliva of the bloodsucking bug Triatoma infestans vector of Chagas disease contains an anti-hemostatic molecular cocktail that prevents coagulation, vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation in a vertebrate prey. In order to characterize T. infestans saliva proteome, we separated the secreted saliva by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 200 salivary proteins were detected on the 2-DE map, mainly in the alkaline region. By nanoLC-MS/MS analysis using a LTQ-Orbitrap equipment followed by a combination of conventional and sequence-similarity searches, we identified 58 main protein spots. Most of such proteins possess potential blood-feeding associated functions, particularly anti-platelet aggregation proteins belonging to lipocalin and apyrase families. The saliva protein composition indicates a highly specific molecular mechanism of early response to platelet aggregation. This first proteome analysis of the T. infestans secreted saliva provides a basis for a better understanding of this fluid protein composition highly directed to counterpart hemostasis of the prey, thus promoting the bug's blood-feeding.

  9. Feasibility study on blood sample investigations from former Wismut employees with respect to possible biomarkers for arsenic or radiation exposure using proteomics and cDNA microarray technologies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final report on the feasibility of blood sample investigations from former Wismut employees with respect to possible biomarkers for arsenic or radiation exposure using proteomics and cDNA microarray technologies covers the following topics: blood samples; methodologies: 2D gel electrophoresis; protein identification using MALDI-MS; accomplishment and evaluation of the proteomics and cDNA microarray analysis.

  10. 21 CFR 864.9245 - Automated blood cell separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated blood cell separator. 864.9245 Section... Blood and Blood Products § 864.9245 Automated blood cell separator. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell separator is a device that uses a centrifugal or filtration separation principle...

  11. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    CERN Document Server

    Caprio, Di; Higgins, John M; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin in red blood cells. While the oxygen affinity of blood is well understood and is routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of red blood cell volume and hemoglobin concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers and are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume and hemoglobin concentration for individual red blood cells in high-throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.5%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with hemoglobin concentr...

  12. Combined blood/tissue analysis for cancer biomarker discovery: application to renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Prieto, DaRue A; Chan, King C; Ye, Xiaying; Valera, Vladimir A; Simpson, R Mark; Rudnick, Paul A; Xiao, Zhen; Issaq, Haleem J; Linehan, W Marston; Stein, Stephen E; Veenstra, Timothy D; Blonder, Josip

    2010-03-01

    A method that relies on subtractive tissue-directed shot-gun proteomics to identify tumor proteins in the blood of a patient newly diagnosed with cancer is described. To avoid analytical and statistical biases caused by physiologic variability of protein expression in the human population, this method was applied on clinical specimens obtained from a single patient diagnosed with nonmetastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The proteomes extracted from tumor, normal adjacent tissue and preoperative plasma were analyzed using 2D-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The lists of identified proteins were filtered to discover proteins that (i) were found in the tumor but not normal tissue, (ii) were identified in matching plasma, and (iii) whose spectral count was higher in tumor tissue than plasma. These filtering criteria resulted in identification of eight tumor proteins in the blood. Subsequent Western-blot analysis confirmed the presence of cadherin-5, cadherin-11, DEAD-box protein-23, and pyruvate kinase in the blood of the patient in the study as well as in the blood of four other patients diagnosed with RCC. These results demonstrate the utility of a combined blood/tissue analysis strategy that permits the detection of tumor proteins in the blood of a patient diagnosed with RCC. PMID:20121140

  13. Biochemistry, proteomics, and phosphoproteomics of plant mitochondria from non-photosynthetic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper; Thelen, Jay J.; Møller, Ian Max

    2013-01-01

    functions depending on the tissue and cell type, as well as environmental conditions. We will here review the biochemistry and proteomics of mitochondria from non-green cells and organs, which differ from those of photosynthetic organs in a number of respects. We will briefly cover purification of...

  14. Blood Tfh Cells Come with Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Ueno, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Blood CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells share phenotypic and functional similarities with T follicular helper cells. Studies by He et al. (2013) and Locci et al. (2013) in this issue of Immunity provide insight into their ontogeny and functionally distinct subsets. PMID:24138878

  15. Blood cell morphology : controversies and alternatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, Wim van der

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we describe controversial morphologic features in both microscopic and automated differentiation of blood cells. In addition, we have investigated alternative methods to overcome these shortcomings. Furthermore we describe the variance of microscopic counting of band cells and variant

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 074 views 8:21 Bone Marrow/Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 7:24. tannermom80 99,818 views 7: ... 253 views 6:18 Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 15:50. Dartmouth-Hitchcock 2,689 views ...

  17. Haemopoietic progenitor cells in human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the investigation reported is to purify haemopoietic progenitor cells from human peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation in order to isolate a progenitor cell fraction without immunocompetent cells. The purification technique of peripheral blood flow colony forming unit culture (CFU-c) by means of density gradient centrifugation and a combined depletion of various rosettes is described. The results of several 'in vitro' characteristics of purified CFU-c suspensions and of the plasma clot diffusion chamber culture technique are presented. Irradiation studies revealed that for both human bone marrow and peripheral blood the CFU-c were less radioresistant than clusters. Elimination of monocytes (and granulocytes) from the test suspensions induced an alteration in radiosensitivity pararmeters. The results obtained with the different techniques are described by analysing peripheral progenitor cell activity in myeloproliferative disorders. (Auth.)

  18. Deterministic Aperiodic Sickle Cell Blood Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsaves, Louis; Harris, Wesley

    2013-11-01

    In this paper sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries is modeled as a hydrodynamical system. The hydrodynamical system consists of the axisymmetric unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a set of constitutive equations for oxygen transport. Blood cell deformation is not considered in this paper. The hydrodynamical system is reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations that are then transformed into a system of three autonomous non-linear ordinary differential equations and a set of algebraic equations. We examine the hydrodynamical system to discern stable/unstable, periodic/nonperiodic, reversible/irreversible properties of the system. The properties of the solutions are driven in large part by the coefficients of the governing system of equations. These coefficients depend on the physiological properties of the sickle cell blood. The chaotic nature of the onset of crisis in sickle cell patients is identified. Research Assistant.

  19. Proteomics in Cell Culture: From Genomics to Combined ‘Omics for Cell Line Engineering and Bioprocess Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heffner, Kelley; Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Kumar, Amit;

    2015-01-01

    in media development and cell line engineering to improve growth or productivity, delay the onset of apoptosis, or utilize nutrients efficiently. Mass-spectrometry based and other proteomics methods can provide for the detection of thousands of proteins from cell culture and bioinformatics analysis...... protein production has increased significantly because proteomics can track changes in protein levels for different cell lines over time, which can be advantageous for bioprocess development and optimization. Specifically, the identification of proteins that affect cell culture processes can aid efforts...

  20. Automated red blood cell analysis compared with routine red blood cell morphology by smear review

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.Poonam Radadiya; Dr.Nandita Mehta; Dr.Hansa Goswami; Dr.R.N.Gonsai

    2015-01-01

    The RBC histogram is an integral part of automated haematology analysis and is now routinely available on all automated cell counters. This histogram and other associated complete blood count (CBC) parameters have been found abnormal in various haematological conditions and may provide major clues in the diagnosis and management of significant red cell disorders. Performing manual blood smears is important to ensure the quality of blood count results an...

  1. The Transcriptomics to Proteomics of Hair Cell Regeneration: Looking for a Hair Cell in a Haystack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Smith

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mature mammals exhibit very limited capacity for regeneration of auditory hair cells, while all non-mammalian vertebrates examined can regenerate them. In an effort to find therapeutic targets for deafness and balance disorders, scientists have examined gene expression patterns in auditory tissues under different developmental and experimental conditions. Microarray technology has allowed the large-scale study of gene expression profiles (transcriptomics at whole-genome levels, but since mRNA expression does not necessarily correlate with protein expression, other methods, such as microRNA analysis and proteomics, are needed to better understand the process of hair cell regeneration. These technologies and some of the results of them are discussed in this review. Although there is a considerable amount of variability found between studies owing to different species, tissues and treatments, there is some concordance between cellular pathways important for hair cell regeneration. Since gene expression and proteomics data is now commonly submitted to centralized online databases, meta-analyses of these data may provide a better picture of pathways that are common to the process of hair cell regeneration and lead to potential therapeutics. Indeed, some of the proteins found to be regulated in the inner ear of animal models (e.g., IGF-1 have now gone through human clinical trials.

  2. Human Cancer Classification: A Systems Biology- Based Model Integrating Morphology, Cancer Stem Cells, Proteomics, and Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Halliday A Idikio

    2011-01-01

    Human cancer classification is currently based on the idea of cell of origin, light and electron microscopic attributes of the cancer. What is not yet integrated into cancer classification are the functional attributes of these cancer cells. Recent innovative techniques in biology have provided a wealth of information on the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in cancer cells. The emergence of the concept of cancer stem cells needs to be included in a classification model to capture...

  3. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs

  4. Detailed Functional and Proteomic Characterization of Fludarabine Resistance in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Lorkova

    Full Text Available Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is a chronically relapsing aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma considered incurable by currently used treatment approaches. Fludarabine is a purine analog clinically still widely used in the therapy of relapsed MCL. Molecular mechanisms of fludarabine resistance have not, however, been studied in the setting of MCL so far. We therefore derived fludarabine-resistant MCL cells (Mino/FR and performed their detailed functional and proteomic characterization compared to the original fludarabine sensitive cells (Mino. We demonstrated that Mino/FR were highly cross-resistant to other antinucleosides (cytarabine, cladribine, gemcitabine and to an inhibitor of Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK ibrutinib. Sensitivity to other types of anti-lymphoma agents was altered only mildly (methotrexate, doxorubicin, bortezomib or remained unaffacted (cisplatin, bendamustine. The detailed proteomic analysis of Mino/FR compared to Mino cells unveiled over 300 differentially expressed proteins. Mino/FR were characterized by the marked downregulation of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK and BTK (thus explaining the observed crossresistance to antinucleosides and ibrutinib, but also by the upregulation of several enzymes of de novo nucleotide synthesis, as well as the up-regulation of the numerous proteins of DNA repair and replication. The significant upregulation of the key antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in Mino/FR cells was associated with the markedly increased sensitivity of the fludarabine-resistant MCL cells to Bcl-2-specific inhibitor ABT199 compared to fludarabine-sensitive cells. Our data thus demonstrate that a detailed molecular analysis of drug-resistant tumor cells can indeed open a way to personalized therapy of resistant malignancies.

  5. Whole Blood Cell Staining Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Clift, Vaughan L.; McDonald, Kelly E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for staining particular cell markers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a flexible tube that is reversibly pinched into compartments with one or more clamps. Each compartment of the tube contains a separate reagent and is in selective fluid communication with adjoining compartments.

  6. Leukemic cell kinetics in peripheral blood, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vivo kinetics of autologous leukemic cells labeled in vitro with indium-111-oxine was studied in 10 patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL), consisting of 7 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), 2 with acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMML) and 1 with acute monocytic leukemia (AMoL). Leukemic cell disappearance curves showed a single exponential line. The half tims of disappearance (T1/2) in AML was 18.6 +- 8.3 hours (mean +- s.d.), and was longer than that of normal neutrophils. In AMML and AMoL, T1/2 was 11.5 +- 1.4 hours, and tended to be shorter than that in AML (p < 0.1). Total blood leukemic cell pool (TBLCP) size correlated with blood leukemic cell count (LC) (Y = 1.11 + 2.01X, r = 0.95). The ratio of marginal (MLCP) to circulating leukemic cell pool (CLCP) size was 2.38 +- 0.99 in AML. There was no significant correlation between leukemic cell turnover rate (LCTR) and TBLCP size. As for organ distribution, labeled leukemic cells passed immediately through lungs, are then accumulated markedly in the spleen and liver in that order. Initial pulmonary radioactivity was observed in only one of the AMML patients. Only in AMoL, hepatic radioactivity 30 minutes after the injection surpassed splenic radioactivity. Accumulation of radioactivity in the bone marrow was observed in 6 out of 8 patients studied. Radioactivity of the leukemic cells isolated from the bone marrow in 4 patients was larger than that expected from mixing of peripheral blood leukemic cells, suggesting that a portion of blood leukemic cells returned to the bone marrow. (author)

  7. Proteomic profiling of acrolein adducts in human lung epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Spiess, Page C; Deng, Bin; Hondal, Robert J.; Matthews, Dwight E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Acrolein (2,3-propenal) is a major indoor and outdoor air pollutant originating largely from tobacco smoke or organic combustion. Given its high reactivity, the adverse effects of inhaled acrolein are likely due to direct interactions with the airway epithelium, resulting in altered epithelial function, but only limited information exists to date regarding the primary direct cellular targets for acrolein. Here, we describe a global proteomics approach to characterize the spectrum of airway ep...

  8. Integration of genomics, proteomics, and imaging for cardiac stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac stem cell therapy is beginning to mature as a valid treatment for heart disease. As more clinical trials utilizing stem cells emerge, it is imperative to establish the mechanisms by which stem cells confer benefit in cardiac diseases. In this paper, we review three methods - molecular cellular imaging, gene expression profiling, and proteomic analysis - that can be integrated to provide further insights into the role of this emerging therapy. (orig.)

  9. Effects of retinoic acid isomers on proteomic pattern in human breast cancer MCF-7 cell line

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flodrová, Dana; Benkovská, Dagmar; Macejová, D.; Bialešová, L.; Bobálová, Janette; Brtko, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2013), s. 205-209. ISSN 1210-0668 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK151 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : retinoic acid isomers * retinoid * breast cancer * malignant cells * proteomic analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  10. Specificity of secreted proteomes from cardiac stem cells and neonatal myocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Chimenti, I.; Marban, E.; Van Eyk, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Suppl.1 (2009), s. 346. ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress /34./. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : cardiac stem cells * secreted paracrine/autocrine factors * proteomics Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  11. Kinomic and phospho-proteomic analysis of breast cancer stem-like cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Christensen, Anne Geske Lindhard; Ehmsen, Sidse;

    Kinomic and phospho-proteomic analysis of breast cancer stem-like cells Rikke Leth-Larsen1, Anne G Christensen1, Sidse Ehmsen1, Mark Møller1, Giuseppe Palmisano2, Martin R Larsen2, Henrik J Ditzel1,3 1Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark 2Institute of...

  12. Identification and functionality of proteomes secreted by rat cardiac stem cells and neonatal cardiomyocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šťastná, Miroslava; Chimenti, I.; Marban, E.; Van Eyk, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2010), s. 245-253. ISSN 1615-9853 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : animal proteomics * cardiac stem cells * neonatal cardiomyocytes Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.815, year: 2010

  13. System-wide temporal characterization of the proteome and phosphoproteome of human embryonic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T.G.; Prokhorova, Tatyana; Akimov, Vyacheslav;

    2011-01-01

    To elucidate cellular events underlying the pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we performed parallel quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of hESCs during differentiation initiated by a diacylglycerol analog or transfer to media that had not been conditioned by...

  14. Proteomics analysis of human endothelial cells after shortterm exposure to mobile phone radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobile phones have been a part of our everyday life in the developed world since the late 1990s. This has raised concerns over the potential health risks of mobile phone use. Biological and health effects potentially caused by mobile phone radiation have been extensively studied and several biological and medical endpoints have been examined. So far, results have not been conclusive on the potential effects of mobile phone radiation. Mobile phones generate a modulated radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF), which is a form of non-ionizing radiation. This means that mobile phone radiation does not have enough energy to ionize atoms and it cannot break chemical bonds directly (e.g., in DNA strands). There could, however, be other mechanisms by which mobile phone radiation may affect cellular and physiological functions. Whether these mechanisms exist is unknown. In this thesis, large-scale screening techniques, such as proteomics, were applied to examine changes on the proteome level after exposure to mobile phone radiation. Proteomics techniques allow the screening of several hundreds, and even thousands, of proteins simultaneously, and are thus more efficient than single endpoint techniques. Four different types of human endothelial cells (two cell lines, two types of primary cells) were exposed to two types of mobile phone radiation (900 and 1800 MHz GSM). The proteome of these cells was examined immediately after short-term exposure using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Two protein detection/analysis techniques were used: silver staining for the cell line samples and difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) for the primary cells. 2DE-DIGE technology is currently a state-of-the-art technique in 2DE studies. Several changes were found in the proteome of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy926 after exposure to 900 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation. In addition, the proteome of a variant of the same cell line, the EA.hy926v1, was affected after 900 MHz

  15. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... identify human blood-group antibodies. (b) Source. Reagent Red Blood Cells shall be prepared from human... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells §...

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Duration: 3:35. hemaquebec1998 667 views 3:35 Bone Marrow/Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 7:24. tannermom80 99,818 views 7:24 Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 15:50. Dartmouth-Hitchcock 2,689 views 15:50 ... Working... Sign in to add this to Watch Later Add to Loading playlists...

  17. Photomodification of human immunocompetent blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, processes of photomodification of lymphoid cells in human blood, developing immediately after exposure to visible radiation and also in the late stages after irradiation, were investigated by methods of spontaneous and immune rosette formation and the blast transformation test, combined with treatment with the antioxidant alpha-tocopherol and the radioactive assessment of spontaneous and stimulated DNA synthesis by tritium-thymidine-labelled cells

  18. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosland, Ragnhild G; Hagen, Marte U; Haase, Nicolai;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. METHODS: We did a prospective cohort study at 7...

  19. Colour measurement and white blood cell recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Gelsema, E S

    1972-01-01

    As a part of a collaboration with NEMCH aimed at the automation of the differential white blood cell count, studies have been made of the different possibilities for using colour to help in the recognition process. Results are presented comparing data obtained with a microspectrophotometer and with a simulated three-colour scanner.

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... Monks 3,700 views 4:41 Stem Cell Basics - How Blood is Made. - Duration: 10:58. Vernon ...

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 23,393 ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Try something new! Loading... Working... Sign ...

  2. Sorting white blood cells in microfabricated arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelino, Judith Andrea Rose

    Fractionating white cells in microfabricated arrays presents the potential for detecting cells with abnormal adhesive or deformation properties. A possible application is separating nucleated fetal red blood cells from maternal blood. Since fetal cells are nucleated, it is possible to extract genetic information about the fetus from them. Separating fetal cells from maternal blood would provide a low cost noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for genetic defects, which is not currently available. We present results showing that fetal cells penetrate further into our microfabricated arrays than adult cells, and that it is possible to enrich the fetal cell fraction using the arrays. We discuss modifications to the array which would result in further enrichment. Fetal cells are less adhesive and more deformable than adult white cells. To determine which properties limit penetration, we compared the penetration of granulocytes and lymphocytes in arrays with different etch depths, constriction size, constriction frequency, and with different amounts of metabolic activity. The penetration of lymphocytes and granulocytes into constrained and unconstrained arrays differed qualitatively. In constrained arrays, the cells were activated by repeated shearing, and the number of cells stuck as a function of distance fell superexponentially. In unconstrained arrays the number of cells stuck fell slower than an exponential. We attribute this result to different subpopulations of cells with different sticking parameters. We determined that penetration in unconstrained arrays was limited by metabolic processes, and that when metabolic activity was reduced penetration was limited by deformability. Fetal cells also contain a different form of hemoglobin with a higher oxygen affinity than adult hemoglobin. Deoxygenated cells are paramagnetic and are attracted to high magnetic field gradients. We describe a device which can separate cells using 10 μm magnetic wires to deflect the paramagnetic

  3. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window. PMID:26096663

  4. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  5. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  6. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  7. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  8. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated

  9. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types. PMID:27327609

  10. Contribution of MS-based proteomics to the understanding of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 interaction with host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EnriqueSantamaría

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Like other DNA viruses, Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1 replicates and proliferates in host cells continuously modulating the host molecular environment. Following a sophisticated temporal expression pattern, HSV-1 encodes at least 89 multifunctional proteins that interplay with and modify the host cell proteome. During the last decade, advances in mass spectrometry applications coupled to the development of proteomic separation methods have allowed to partially monitor the impact of HSV-1 infection in human cells. In this review, we discuss the current use of different proteome fractionation strategies to define HSV-1 targets on two major application areas: i viral protein interactomics to decipher viral protein interactions in host cells and ii differential quantitative proteomics to analyse the virally induced changes in the cellular proteome. Moreover, we will also discuss the potential application of high throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and also post-translational modifications in HSV-1-infected cells, what will greatly improved our molecular knowledge of HSV-1 infection.

  11. Identification of thalidomide-specific transcriptomics and proteomics signatures during differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesavan Meganathan

    Full Text Available Embryonic development can be partially recapitulated in vitro by differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Thalidomide is a developmental toxicant in vivo and acts in a species-dependent manner. Besides its therapeutic value, thalidomide also serves as a prototypical model to study teratogenecity. Although many in vivo and in vitro platforms have demonstrated its toxicity, only a few test systems accurately reflect human physiology. We used global gene expression and proteomics profiling (two dimensional electrophoresis (2DE coupled with Tandem Mass spectrometry to demonstrate hESC differentiation and thalidomide embryotoxicity/teratogenecity with clinically relevant dose(s. Proteome analysis showed loss of POU5F1 regulatory proteins PKM2 and RBM14 and an over expression of proteins involved in neuronal development (such as PAK2, PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 after 14 days of differentiation. The genomic and proteomic expression pattern demonstrated differential expression of limb, heart and embryonic development related transcription factors and biological processes. Moreover, this study uncovered novel possible mechanisms, such as the inhibition of RANBP1, that participate in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of proteins and inhibition of glutathione transferases (GSTA1, GSTA2, that protect the cell from secondary oxidative stress. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated that a combination of transcriptomics and proteomics, along with consistent differentiation of hESCs, enabled the detection of canonical and novel teratogenic intracellular mechanisms of thalidomide.

  12. Bovine neonatal pancytopenia - Comparative proteomic characterization of two BVD vaccines and the producer cell surface proteome (MDBK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euler Kerstin N

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP is a disease syndrome in newborn calves of up to four weeks of age, first observed in southern Germany in 2006. By now, cases have been reported in several countries around the globe. Many affected calves die within days due to multiple haemorrhages, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia and bone marrow depletion. A certain vaccine directed against Bovine Virus Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV was recently shown to be associated with BNP pathogenesis. Immunized cows develop alloantibodies that are transferred to newborn calves via colostrum intake. In order to further elucidate BNP pathogenesis, the purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the protein composition of the associated vaccine to another vaccine directed against BVDV not related to BNP and the cell surface proteome of MDBK (Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney cells, the cell line used for production of the associated vaccine. Results By SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, we were able to detect several coagulation-related and immune modulatory proteins, as well as cellular and serum derived molecules being shared between the associated vaccine and MDBK cells. Furthermore, the number of proteins identified in the BNP related vaccine was almost as high as the number of surface proteins detected on MDBK cells and exceeded the amount of proteins identified in the non-BNP related vaccine over 3.5 fold. The great amount of shared cellular and serum derived proteins confirm that the BNP associated vaccine contained many molecules originating from MDBK cells and vaccine production. Conclusions The respective vaccine was not purified enough to prevent the development of alloantibodies. To narrow down possible candidate proteins, those most likely to represent a trigger for BNP pathogenesis are presented in this study, giving a fundament for further analysis in future research.

  13. Analysis of membrane proteome and secretome in cells over-expressing ADAM17 using quantitative proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) protease is involved in proteolytic ectodomain shedding of several membrane-associated proteins and modulation of key cell signaling pathways in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examined the effect of over-expressing the full length human ADAM17 in membrane and secreted proteins. To this end, we constructed a stable Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cells expressing ADAM17 by tetracycline induction. These cells were grown in Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium containing light lysine, arginine or heavy, L-Arg-13C615N4 and L-Lys -13C615N2 (SILAC: stable isotope labeling with amino acid in cell culture) media and they were treated with an ADAM17 activator, phorbolester (PMA). Controls such as Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cell without PMA treatment and without ADAM17 cloned were cultivated in light medium. The ADAM17 overexpression was induced with tetracycline 500 ng/ml for 24 hours. Cells in a heavy condition were treated with PMA 50 ng/ml for 1 hour and vehicle DMSO was used as control in a light cell condition. The extracellular media were collected, concentrated and used to evaluate the secretome and a cell surface biotinylation-based approach was used to capture cell surface-associated proteins. The biotinylated proteins were eluted with dithiothreitol, alkylated with iodoacetamide and then digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis on an ETD enabled Orbitrap Velos instrument. The results showed different proteins up or down regulated in membrane and secretome analysis which might represent potential molecules involved in signaling or ADAM17 regulation events. (author)

  14. Analysis of membrane proteome and secretome in cells over-expressing ADAM17 using quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawahara, R.; Simabuco, F.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Yokoo, S.; Paes Leme, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Sherman, N. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) protease is involved in proteolytic ectodomain shedding of several membrane-associated proteins and modulation of key cell signaling pathways in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examined the effect of over-expressing the full length human ADAM17 in membrane and secreted proteins. To this end, we constructed a stable Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cells expressing ADAM17 by tetracycline induction. These cells were grown in Dulbeccos modified Eagles medium containing light lysine, arginine or heavy, L-Arg-13C615N4 and L-Lys -13C615N2 (SILAC: stable isotope labeling with amino acid in cell culture) media and they were treated with an ADAM17 activator, phorbolester (PMA). Controls such as Flp-In T-RExHEK293 cell without PMA treatment and without ADAM17 cloned were cultivated in light medium. The ADAM17 overexpression was induced with tetracycline 500 ng/ml for 24 hours. Cells in a heavy condition were treated with PMA 50 ng/ml for 1 hour and vehicle DMSO was used as control in a light cell condition. The extracellular media were collected, concentrated and used to evaluate the secretome and a cell surface biotinylation-based approach was used to capture cell surface-associated proteins. The biotinylated proteins were eluted with dithiothreitol, alkylated with iodoacetamide and then digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis on an ETD enabled Orbitrap Velos instrument. The results showed different proteins up or down regulated in membrane and secretome analysis which might represent potential molecules involved in signaling or ADAM17 regulation events. (author)

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Terminalia chebula Extract-Dependent Changes in Human Lymphoblastic T Cell Protein Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nando Dulal; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Mi Ran; Lee, Hyung Tae; Kim, Moo Sung; Lee, Sang Rin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Terminalia chebula is a native plant from southern Asia to southwestern China that is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of malignant tumors and diabetes. This plant also has antibacterial and immunomodulatory properties. The present study assessed T. chebula extract-dependent protein expression changes in Jurkat cells. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) were performed to assess protein expression and networks, respectively. A comparative proteomic profile was determined in T. chebula extract (50 μg/mL)-treated and control cells; the expressions of β-tubulin, ring finger and CHY zinc finger domain containing 1, and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor kinase were significantly down-regulated in T. chebula extract-treated Jurkat cells. Moreover, the molecular basis for the T. chebula extract-dependent protein expression changes in Jurkat cells was determined by IPA. Treatment with the T. chebula extract significantly inhibited nuclear factor-κB activity and affected the proteomic profile of Jurkat cells. The molecular network signatures and functional proteomics obtained in this study may facilitate the evaluation of potential antitumor therapeutic targets and elucidate the molecular mechanism of T. chebula extract-dependent effects in Jurkat cells. PMID:22471968

  16. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Human Lung Cell Response to Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Edelmann, Mariola J.; Shack, Leslie A; Caitlin D Naske; Walters, Keisha B.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2014-01-01

    Copper (II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NP) are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the...

  17. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  18. Responder individuality in red blood cell alloimmunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körmöczi, Günther F; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2014-11-01

    Many different factors influence the propensity of transfusion recipients and pregnant women to form red blood cell alloantibodies (RBCA). RBCA may cause hemolytic transfusion reactions, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and may be a complication in transplantation medicine. Antigenic differences between responder and foreign erythrocytes may lead to such an immune answer, in part with suspected specific HLA class II associations. Biochemical and conformational characteristics of red blood cell (RBC) antigens, their dose (number of transfusions and pregnancies, absolute number of antigens per RBC) and the mode of exposure impact on RBCA rates. In addition, individual circumstances determine the risk to form RBCA. Responder individuality in terms of age, sex, severity of underlying disease, disease- or therapy-induced immunosuppression and inflammation are discussed with respect to influencing RBC alloimmunization. For particular high-risk patients, extended phenotype matching of transfusion and recipient efficiently decreases RBCA induction and associated clinical risks. PMID:25670932

  19. The Proteome of Native Adult Müller Glial Cells From Murine Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosche, Antje; Hauser, Alexandra; Lepper, Marlen Franziska; Mayo, Rebecca; von Toerne, Christine; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Hauck, Stefanie M

    2016-02-01

    To date, the proteomic profiling of Müller cells, the dominant macroglia of the retina, has been hampered because of the absence of suitable enrichment methods. We established a novel protocol to isolate native, intact Müller cells from adult murine retinae at excellent purity which retain in situ morphology and are well suited for proteomic analyses. Two different strategies of sample preparation - an in StageTips (iST) and a subcellular fractionation approach including cell surface protein profiling were used for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) comparing Müller cell-enriched to depleted neuronal fractions. Pathway enrichment analyses on both data sets enabled us to identify Müller cell-specific functions which included focal adhesion kinase signaling, signal transduction mediated by calcium as second messenger, transmembrane neurotransmitter transport and antioxidant activity. Pathways associated with RNA processing, cellular respiration and phototransduction were enriched in the neuronal subpopulation. Proteomic results were validated for selected Müller cell genes by quantitative real time PCR, confirming the high expression levels of numerous members of the angiogenic and anti-inflammatory annexins and antioxidant enzymes (e.g. paraoxonase 2, peroxiredoxin 1, 4 and 6). Finally, the significant enrichment of antioxidant proteins in Müller cells was confirmed by measurements on vital retinal cells using the oxidative stress indicator CM-H2DCFDA. In contrast to photoreceptors or bipolar cells, Müller cells were most efficiently protected against H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species formation, which is in line with the protein repertoire identified in the proteomic profiling. Our novel approach to isolate intact glial cells from adult retina in combination with proteomic profiling enabled the identification of novel Müller glia specific proteins, which were validated as markers and for their functional impact in glial

  20. Proteomic profiling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells upon TGF-beta stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Park, Jennifer S.; Chu, Julia S.F.; Ari, Krakowski; Luo, Kunxin; Chen, David J.; Li, Song

    2004-08-08

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different types of cells, and have tremendous potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}) plays an important role in cell differentiation and vascular remodeling. We showed that TGF-{beta} induced cell morphology change and an increase in actin fibers in MSCs. To determine the global effects of TGF-{beta} on MSCs, we employed a proteomic strategy to analyze the effect of TGF-{beta} on the human MSC proteome. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and electrospray ionization coupled to Quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometers, we have generated a proteome reference map of MSCs, and identified {approx}30 proteins with an increase or decrease in expression or phosphorylation in response to TGF-{beta}. The proteins regulated by TGF-{beta} included cytoskeletal proteins, matrix synthesis proteins, membrane proteins, metabolic enzymes, etc. TGF-{beta} increased the expression of smooth muscle (SM) {alpha}-actin and decreased the expression of gelsolin. Over-expression of gelsolin inhibited TGF-{beta}-induced assembly of SM {alpha}-actin; on the other hand, knocking down gelsolin expression enhanced the assembly of {alpha}-actin and actin filaments without significantly affecting {alpha}-actin expression. These results suggest that TGF-{beta} coordinates the increase of {alpha}-actin and the decrease of gelsolin to promote MSC differentiation. This study demonstrates that proteomic tools are valuable in studying stem cell differentiation and elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  1. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Andrés Penuela; Fernando Palomino; Lina Andrea Gómez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis) trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods: Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one...

  2. Towards a Proteomic Catalogue and Differential Annotation of Salivary Gland Proteins in Blood Fed Malaria Vector Anopheles culicifacies by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Ritu; Vijay, Sonam; Kadian, Kavita; Singh, Jagbir; Pande, Veena; Sharma, Arun

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the importance of functional proteins in mosquito behavior, following blood meal, a baseline proteomic dataset is essential for providing insights into the physiology of blood feeding. Therefore, in this study as first step, in solution and 1-D electrophoresis digestion approach combined with tandem mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS) and computational bioinformatics for data mining was used to prepare a baseline proteomic catalogue of salivary gland proteins of sugar fed An. culicifacies mosquitoes. A total of 106 proteins were identified and analyzed by SEQUEST algorithm against mosquito protein database from Uniprot/NCBI. Importantly, D7r1, D7r2, D7r4, salivary apyrase, anti-platelet protein, calreticulin, antigen 5 family proteins were identified and grouped on the basis of biological and functional roles. Secondly, differential protein expression and annotations between salivary glands of sugar fed vs blood fed mosquitoes was analyzed using 2-Delectrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The alterations in the differential expression of total 38 proteins was observed out of which 29 proteins like beclin-1, phosphorylating proteins, heme oxygenase 1, ferritin, apoptotic proteins, coagulation and immunity like, serine proteases, serpins, c-type lectin and protein in regulation of blood feeding behavior were found to be up regulated while 9 proteins related to blood feeding, juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase ii, odorant binding proteins and energy metabolic enzymes were found to be down regulated. To our knowledge, this study provides a first time baseline proteomic dataset and functional annotations of An. culicifacies salivary gland proteins that may be involved during the blood feeding. Identification of differential salivary proteins between sugar fed and blood fed mosquitoes and their plausible role may provide insights into the physiological processes associated with feeding behavior and sporozoite transmission during the

  3. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  4. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell wa...

  5. Automated red blood cell analysis compared with routine red blood cell morphology by smear review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Poonam Radadiya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The RBC histogram is an integral part of automated haematology analysis and is now routinely available on all automated cell counters. This histogram and other associated complete blood count (CBC parameters have been found abnormal in various haematological conditions and may provide major clues in the diagnosis and management of significant red cell disorders. Performing manual blood smears is important to ensure the quality of blood count results and to make presumptive diagnosis. In this article we have taken 100 samples for comparative study between RBC histograms obtained by automated haematology analyzer with peripheral blood smear. This article discusses some morphological features of dimorphism and the ensuing characteristic changes in their RBC histograms.

  6. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  7. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  8. Proteome Profiling in Lung Injury after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Viken, Kevin J; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Jagtap, Pratik D; Higgins, LeeAnn; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Kumar, Vipin; Arora, Mukta; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-08-01

    infectious lung injury, 96 proteins were differentially expressed. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed that these proteins participate in biological processes involved in the development of lung injury after HSCT. These include acute phase response signaling, complement system, coagulation system, liver X receptor (LXR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR), and farsenoid X receptor (FXR)/RXR modulation. We identified 2 canonical pathways modulated by TNF-α, FXR/RXR activation, and IL2 signaling in macrophages. The proteins also mapped to blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and wound healing-processes that participate in organ repair. Cell movement was identified as significantly over-represented by proteins with differential expression between IPS and infection. In conclusion, the BALF protein expression in IPS differed significantly from infectious lung injury in HSCT recipients. These differences provide insights into mechanisms that are activated in lung injury in HSCT recipients and suggest potential therapeutic targets to augment lung repair. PMID:27155584

  9. Radiolabeled blood cells: radiation dosimetry and significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few years blood cells labeled with In-111 have become increasingly useful in clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. Indium-111 by the virtue of its physical characteristics and ability to bind to cell cytoplasmic components, provides an excellent cell tracer and thereby, allows investigators to monitor in vivo cell distribution by external imaging and help determine a course of regimen in treating life threatening diseases. Due to natural phenomena such as margination, blood pool, and reticuloendothelial cell activity, in the normal state, depending upon the cell type and the quality of cell preparations, 30%-50% of the administered radioactivity is immediately distributed in the liver, spleen and bone marrow. Over a period of time the radioactivity in these organs slightly increases and decays with a physical half-life of In-111. The resulting radiation dose to these organs ranges between 1-25 rads/mCi In-111 administered. The authors have developed a new In-111 labeling technique which preserves platelet ultrastructure and shown that human lymphocytes labeled with In-111 in mixed leukocytes preparations a) are only 0.003% of the total -body lymphocytes population and b) are killed. The consequence if any may be considered insignificant, particularly because 5.6% metaphases from normal men and 6.5% metaphases from normal women in the US have at least one chromosome aberration. Calculations have shown that the risk of fatal hematological malignancy, over a 30 year period, in recipients of 100 million lymphocytes labeled with 100 μCi In-111 is 1/million patients studied. This risk is less than 0.025% of the 1981 spontaneous cancer patient rate in the country. 32 references, 10 tables

  10. Optical analysis of red blood cell suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szołna, Alicja A.; Grzegorzewski, Bronisław

    2008-12-01

    The optical properties of suspensions of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied. Fresh human venues blood was obtained from adult healthy donors. RBCs were suspended in isotonic salt solution, and in autologous plasma. Suspensions with haematocrit 0.25 - 3% were investigated. Novel technique was proposed to determine the scattering coefficient μs for the suspensions. The intensity of He-Ne laser light transmitted through a wedge-shape container filled with a suspension was recorded. To find the dependence of the intensity on the thickness of the sample the container was moved horizontally. The dependence of μs on the haematocrit was determined for RBCs suspended in the isotonic salt solution. RBCs suspended in plasma tend to form rouleaux. For the RBCs suspended in plasma, the scattering coefficient as a function of time was obtained. It is shown that this technique can be useful in the study of rouleaux formation.

  11. Natural taurine promotes apoptosis of human hepatic stellate cells in proteomics analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Deng, Jian Liang, Zhi-Xiu Lin, Fa-Sheng Wu, Ya-Ping Zhang, Zhi-Wei Zhang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the differential expression of proteins between natural taurine treated hepatic stellate cells and controls, and investigate the underlying regulatory mechanism of natural taurine in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis.METHODS: A proteomic strategy combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was used to study the differential expression of proteins and Western blotting was use...

  12. Proteomic profiling of a robust Wolbachia infection in an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Baldridge, Abigail S.; Witthuhn, Bruce A.; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd W.; FALLON, ANN M.

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis a widespread vertically transmitted intracellular bacterium, provides a tool for insect control through manipulation of host-microbe interactions. We report proteomic characterization of wStr, a Wolbachia strain associated with a strong cytoplasmic incompatibility phenotype in its native host, Laodelphax striatellus. In the Aedes albopictus C/wStr1 mosquito cell line, wStr maintains a robust, persistent infection. MS/MS analyses of gel bands revealed a protein “footprint” ...

  13. Traumatically injured astrocytes release a proteomic signature modulated by STAT3-dependent cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jaclynn; Kwon, Eunice; Paez, Pablo; Yan, Weihong; Czerwieniec, Gregg; Loo, Joseph A; Sofroniew, Michael V; Wanner, Ina-Beate

    2016-05-01

    Molecular markers associated with CNS injury are of diagnostic interest. Mechanical trauma generates cellular deformation associated with membrane permeability with unknown molecular consequences. We used an in vitro model of stretch-injury and proteomic analyses to determine protein changes in murine astrocytes and their surrounding fluids. Abrupt pressure-pulse stretching resulted in the rapid release of 59 astrocytic proteins with profiles reflecting cell injury and cell death, i.e., mechanoporation and cell lysis. This acute trauma-release proteome was overrepresented with metabolic proteins compared with the uninjured cellular proteome, bearing relevance for post-traumatic metabolic depression. Astrocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3-CKO) resulted in reduced stretch-injury tolerance, elevated necrosis and increased protein release. Consistent with more lysed cells, more protein complexes, nuclear and transport proteins were released from STAT3-CKO versus nontransgenic astrocytes. STAT3-CKO astrocytes had reduced basal expression of GFAP, lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), aldolase C (ALDOC), and astrocytic phosphoprotein 15 (PEA15), and elevated levels of tropomyosin (TPM4) and α actinin 4 (ACTN4). Stretching caused STAT3-dependent cellular depletion of PEA15 and GFAP, and its filament disassembly in subpopulations of injured astrocytes. PEA15 and ALDOC signals were low in injured astrocytes acutely after mouse spinal cord crush injury and were robustly expressed in reactive astrocytes 1 day postinjury. In contrast, α crystallin (CRYAB) was present in acutely injured astrocytes, and absent from uninjured and reactive astrocytes, demonstrating novel marker differences among postinjury astrocytes. These findings reveal a proteomic signature of traumatically-injured astrocytes reflecting STAT3-dependent cellular survival with potential diagnostic value. GLIA 2016;64:668-694. PMID:26683444

  14. Identification of Thalidomide-Specific Transcriptomics and Proteomics Signatures during Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kesavan Meganathan; Smita Jagtap; Vilas Wagh; Johannes Winkler; John Antonydas Gaspar; Diana Hildebrand; Maria Trusch; Karola Lehmann; Jürgen Hescheler; Hartmut Schlüter; Agapios Sachinidis

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic development can be partially recapitulated in vitro by differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Thalidomide is a developmental toxicant in vivo and acts in a species-dependent manner. Besides its therapeutic value, thalidomide also serves as a prototypical model to study teratogenecity. Although many in vivo and in vitro platforms have demonstrated its toxicity, only a few test systems accurately reflect human physiology. We used global gene expression and proteomics prof...

  15. Natural taurine promotes apoptosis of human hepatic stellate cells in proteomics analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the differential expression of proteins between natural taurine treated hepatic stellate cells and controls, and investigate the underlying regulatory mechanism of natural taurine in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis.METHODS: A proteomic strategy combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and ultraperform ance liquid chromatographyelectrospray ionizationtandem mass spectrometry (UPLCESIMS/MS) was used to study the differential expression of proteins and Western blotting was used to validate the re...

  16. Proteomic analysis of cell surface-associated proteins from probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Madsen, Søren M; Glenting, Jacob;

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to identify surface-associated proteins from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. Proteins were extracted from the cell surface using a mild wash in phosphate buffer and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel...... probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The results provide the basis for future studies on the molecular mechanisms of probiotics....

  17. Aortic wall proteomic analysis in spontaneously hypertensive rats with a blood pressure decrease induced by 6-week load-free swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Hong; Li, Haiying; ZHANG, DERONG; ZHAO, YUNGANG; Jiang, Ning; Zhao, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yu; TAN, JUNZHEN; Fang, Wen; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Decreased arterial compliance is one of the earliest detectable manifestations of adverse structural and functional changes within the vessel wall in hypertension. The proteomic approach is a powerful technique to analyze a complex mixture of proteins in various settings. Physical activity level was negatively associated with blood pressure. Sixteen 4-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and 16 Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were randomly divided into four groups: i) SHR exercise grou...

  18. Proteome profile of swine testicular cells infected with porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruili Ma

    Full Text Available The interactions occurring between a virus and a host cell during a viral infection are complex. The purpose of this paper was to analyze altered cellular protein levels in porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV-infected swine testicular (ST cells in order to determine potential virus-host interactions. A proteomic approach using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ-coupled two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identification was conducted on the TGEV-infected ST cells. The results showed that the 4-plex iTRAQ-based quantitative approach identified 4,112 proteins, 146 of which showed significant changes in expression 48 h after infection. At 64 h post infection, 219 of these proteins showed significant change, further indicating that a larger number of proteomic changes appear to occur during the later stages of infection. Gene ontology analysis of the altered proteins showed enrichment in multiple biological processes, including cell adhesion, response to stress, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, cell motility, protein complex assembly, growth, developmental maturation, immune system process, extracellular matrix organization, locomotion, cell-cell signaling, neurological system process, and cell junction organization. Changes in the expression levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, caspase-8, and heat shock protein 90 alpha (HSP90α were also verified by western blot analysis. To our knowledge, this study is the first time the response profile of ST host cells following TGEV infection has been analyzed using iTRAQ technology, and our description of the late proteomic changes that are occurring after the time of vigorous viral production are novel. Therefore, this study provides a solid foundation for further investigation, and will likely help us to better understand the mechanisms of TGEV infection and pathogenesis.

  19. Immunophenotyping of hematopoietic progenitor cells: Comparison between cord blood and adult mobilized blood grafts

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the immunophenotype of hematopoietic progenitor cells from cord blood (CB) grafts (n = 39) in comparison with adult apheresis grafts (AG, n = 229) and pre-apheresis peripheral blood (PAPB) samples (n = 908) using flow cytometry analysis.

  20. Arterial Blood, Rather Than Venous Blood, is a Better Source for Circulating Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizue Terai

    2015-11-01

    Interpretation: Our data indicate that arterial blood specimens might be a better source of circulating uveal melanoma cells. Although less conveniently processed, perhaps arterial blood should be evaluated as sample source for measurement of CTCs.

  1. Synergistic effects of retinoic acid and tamoxifen on human breast cancer cells: Proteomic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anti-estrogen tamoxifen and vitamin A-related compound, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), in combination act synergistically to inhibit the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. In the present study, we applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomic approach to globally analyze this synergistic effect of RA and tamoxifen. Proteomic study revealed that multiple clusters of proteins were involved in RA and tamoxifen-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, including post-transcriptional and splicing factors, proteins related to cellular proliferation or differentiation, and proteins related to energy production and internal degradation systems. The negative growth factor-transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) was secreted by RA and/or tamoxifen treatment and was studies as a potential mediator of the synergistic effects of RA and tamoxifen in apoptosis. By comparing protein alterations in treatments of RA and tamoxifen alone or in combination to those of TGFβ treatment, or co-treatment with TGFβ inhibitor SB 431542, proteomic results showed that a number of proteins were involved in TGFβ signaling pathway. These results provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of RA and tamoxifen-induced TGFβ signaling pathway in breast cancer cells

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganglong Yang

    Full Text Available The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia, KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC, and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer.

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Fukao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex, respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  4. Magnetophoretic separation of blood cells at the microscale

    CERN Document Server

    Furlani, E P

    2006-01-01

    We present a method and model for the direct and continuous separation of red and white blood cells in plasma. The method is implemented at the microscale using a microfluidic system that consists of an array of integrated soft-magnetic elements embedded beneath a microfluidic channel. The microsystem is passive, and is activated via application of a bias field that magnetizes the elements. Once magnetized, the elements produce a nonuniform magnetic field distribution in the microchannel, which gives rise to a force on blood cells as they pass through the microsystem. In whole blood, white blood cells behave as diamagnetic microparticles while red blood cells exhibit diamagnetic or paramagnetic behavior depending on the oxygenation of their hemoglobin. We develop a mathematical model for predicting the motion of blood cells in the microsystem that takes into account the dominant magnetic, fluidic and buoyant forces on the cells. We use the model to study red/white blood cell transport, and our analysis indica...

  5. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs

  6. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Yeon-Mi [Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bong-Wook; Byun, June-Ho [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jae-Won [Department of Microbiology, Division of Life Sciences, Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Gyu-Jin, E-mail: jinrho@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Theriogenology and Biotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs.

  7. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Heerkens, Tammy; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl;

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non......-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low....... The hypothesis of this study was that equine MSCs could be isolated from fresh whole equine cord blood. Results: Cord blood was collected from 7 foals immediately after foaling. The mononuclear cell fraction was isolated by Ficoll density centrifugation and cultured in a DMEM low glucose based media...

  8. Proteomic analysis of human blastocoel fluid and blastocyst cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille; Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen;

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst and can differentiate into any cell type in the human body. These cells hold a great potential for regenerative medicine, but to obtain enough cells needed for medical treatment, culture is required on a...... blastocoel fluid, which is in contact with all the cells in the blastocyst, including hESCs. Fifty-three surplus human blastocysts were donated after informed consent, and blastocoel fluid was isolated by micromanipulation. Using highly sensitive nano-high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass...

  9. Proteomic analysis of human skin treated with larval schistosome peptidases reveals distinct invasion strategies among species of blood flukes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ingram

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin invasion is the initial step in infection of the human host by schistosome blood flukes. Schistosome larvae have the remarkable ability to overcome the physical and biochemical barriers present in skin in the absence of any mechanical trauma. While a serine peptidase with activity against insoluble elastin appears to be essential for this process in one species of schistosomes, Schistosoma mansoni, it is unknown whether other schistosome species use the same peptidase to facilitate entry into their hosts.Recent genome sequencing projects, together with a number of biochemical studies, identified alternative peptidases that Schistosoma japonicum or Trichobilharzia regenti could use to facilitate migration through skin. In this study, we used comparative proteomic analysis of human skin treated with purified cercarial elastase, the known invasive peptidase of S. mansoni, or S. mansoni cathespin B2, a close homolog of the putative invasive peptidase of S. japonicum, to identify substrates of either peptidase. Select skin proteins were then confirmed as substrates by in vitro digestion assays.This study demonstrates that an S. mansoni ortholog of the candidate invasive peptidase of S. japonicum and T. regenti, cathepsin B2, is capable of efficiently cleaving many of the same host skin substrates as the invasive serine peptidase of S. mansoni, cercarial elastase. At the same time, identification of unique substrates and the broader species specificity of cathepsin B2 suggest that the cercarial elastase gene family amplified as an adaptation of schistosomes to human hosts.

  10. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  11. Plant cell wall proteomics: mass spectrometry data, a trove for research on protein structure/function relationships.

    OpenAIRE

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Zhang, Yu; San Clemente, Hélène; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    International audience Proteomics allows the large-scale study of protein expression either in whole organisms or in purified organelles. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of gel-separated proteins produces data not only for protein identification, but for protein structure, location, and processing as well. An in-depth analysis was performed on MS data from etiolated hypocotyl cell wall proteomics of Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses show that highly homologous members of ...

  12. Human lung epithelial cell A549 proteome data after treatment with titanium dioxide and carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Ngoc Q; Goegan, Patrick; Mohottalage, Susantha; Breznan, Dalibor; Ariganello, Marianne; Williams, Andrew; Elisma, Fred; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Vincent, Renaud; Kumarathasan, Premkumari

    2016-09-01

    Here, we have described the dataset relevant to the A549 cellular proteome changes after exposure to either titanium dioxide or carbon black particles as compared to the non-exposed controls, "Proteomic changes in human lung epithelial cells (A549) in response to carbon black and titanium dioxide exposures" (Vuong et al., 2016) [1]. Detailed methodologies on the separation of cellular proteins by 2D-GE and the subsequent mass spectrometry analyses using MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS are documented. Particle exposure-specific protein expression changes were measured via 2D-GE spot volume analysis. Protein identification was done by querying mass spectrometry data against SwissProt and RefSeq protein databases using Mascot search engine. Two-way ANOVA analysis data provided information on statistically significant A549 protein expression changes associated with particle exposures. PMID:27508218

  13. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Kenneth; Ackmann, James

    1996-03-01

    Measurements of the complex dielectric constant of suspensions of blood cells have recently been reported by Ackmann, et al.(J. J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). At frequencies below 100 kHz, the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') goes through a maximum at a blood cell volume fraction of about 70%. Effective medium approximations do not agree well with this behavior. As a more realistic model, we are studying the grain consolidation model of Roberts and Schwartz(J. N. Roberts and L. M. Schwartz, Phys. Rev. B 31), 5990 (1985). We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of this model for a cubic array of spheres. The simulations agree remarkably well with experiment. They suggest, however, that ɛ' may be showing oscillations rather than a simple maximum. Comparison of the simulated and experimental points suggests that this is not an artifact of the periodic array used in the model. Furthermore the simulations indicate that the maximum (or oscillations) disappears at low conductivities of the suspending fluid.

  14. Label-free quantitative proteomics of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Sheng-Ta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells, which are characterized by their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and their tumor initiation ability at limited dilutions, have been recognized as a critical target in liver cancer therapeutics. In the current work, we developed a label-free quantitative method to investigate the proteome of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells for the purpose of identifying unique biomarkers that can be utilized for targeting liver cancer stem cells. Label-free quantitation was performed in combination with ID-based Elution time Alignment by Linear regression Quantitation (IDEAL-Q and MaxQuant. Results Initially, IDEAL-Q analysis revealed that 151 proteins were differentially expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells when compared with CD133-negative cells. We then analyzed these 151 differentially expressed proteins by MaxQuant software and identified 10 significantly up-regulated proteins. The results were further validated by RT-PCR, western blot, flow cytometry or immunofluorescent staining which revealed that prominin-1, annexin A1, annexin A3, transgelin, creatine kinase B, vimentin, and EpCAM were indeed highly expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells. Conclusions These findings confirmed that mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics can be used to gain insights into liver cancer stem cells.

  15. Alterations in cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells in stored blood

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusion. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called CPDA-1. With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements of the 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and their progressive alterations in stored RBCs. Our results show that the stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within 2 weeks which was accompanied with significant ...

  16. Comparative membrane proteomics: a technical advancement in the search of renal cell carcinoma biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Francesca; Corbetta, Samuele; Savoia, Andrea; Chinello, Clizia; Cazzaniga, Marta; Rocco, Francesco; Bosari, Silvano; Grasso, Marco; Bovo, Giorgio; Magni, Fulvio; Pitto, Marina

    2015-06-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) is the most common kidney cancer, accounting for 3% of adult malignancies, with high metastatic potential and radio-/chemo-resistance. To investigate the protein profile of membrane microdomains (MD), plasma membrane supramolecular structures involved in cell signaling, transport, and neoplastic transformation, we set up a proteomic bottom-up approach as a starting point for the identification of potential RCC biomarkers. We purified MD from RCC and adjacent normal kidney (ANK) tissues, through their resistance to non-ionic detergents followed by ultracentrifugation in sucrose density gradient. MD from 5 RCC/ANK tissues were then pooled and analysed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. In order to identify the highest number of proteins and increase the amount of membrane and hydrophobic ones, we first optimized an enzymatic digestion protocol based on Filter Aided Sample Preparation (FASP), coupled to MD delipidation. The MS analysis led to the identification of 742 ANK MD and 721 RCC MD proteins, of which, respectively, 53.1% and 52.6% were membrane- bound. Additionally, we evaluated RCC MD differential proteome by label-free quantification; 170 and 126 proteins were found to be, respectively, up-regulated and down-regulated in RCC MD. Some differential proteins, namely CA2, CD13, and ANXA2, were subjected to validation by immunodecoration. These results show the importance of setting up different protocols for the proteomic analysis of membrane proteins, specific to the different molecular features of the samples. Furthermore, the subcellular proteomic approach provided a list of differentially expressed proteins among which RCC biomarkers may be looked for. PMID:25926002

  17. Changes in the proteomic profile of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells during passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capra Emanuele

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC have recently raised the attention because of their therapeutic potential in the novel context of regenerative medicine. However, the safety of these new and promising cellular products should be carefully defined before they can be used in the clinical setting, as. The protein expression profile of these cells might reveal potential hazards associated with senescence and tumoral transformation which may occur during culture. Proteomic is a valuable tool for hMSC characterization and identification of possible changes during expansion. Results We used Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time Of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-ToF-MS to evaluate the presence of stable molecular markers in adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSC produced under conditions of good manufacturing practices (GMP. Proteomic patterns of cells prepared were consistent, with 4 up-regulated peaks (mass-to-charge ratio (m/z 8950, 10087, 10345, and 13058 through subculture steps (P0-P7 with similar trend in three donors. Among the differentially expressed proteins found in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, a cytoplasmic 10.1 kDa protein was upregulated during culture passages and was identified as S100A6 (Calcyclin. Conclusions This study suggests for the first time that common variation could occur in AD-MSC from different donors, with the identification of S100A6, a protein prevalently related to cell proliferation and cell culture condition. These results support the hypothesis of common proteomic changes during MSCs expansion and could give important insight in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms intervening during MSC expansion.

  18. T-cell recognition is shaped by epitope sequence conservation in the host proteome and microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Paul, Sinu; Schommer, Nina;

    2016-01-01

    allergen with the conservation of its sequence in the human proteome or the healthy human microbiome. Indeed, performing such comparisons on large sets of validated T-cell epitopes, we found that epitopes that are similar with self-antigens above a certain threshold showed lower immunogenicity, presumably...... as a result of negative selection of T cells capable of recognizing such peptides. Moreover, we also found a reduced level of immune recognition for epitopes conserved in the commensal microbiome, presumably as a result of peripheral tolerance. These findings indicate that the existence (and...

  19. Biochemistry, proteomics and phosphoproteomics of plant mitochondria from non-photosynthetic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper Foged Havelund

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria fulfill some basic roles in all plant cells. They supply the cell with energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents (NAD(PH and they provide the cell with intermediates for a range of biosynthetic pathways. In addition to this, mitochondria contribute to a number of specialized functions depending on the tissue and cell type, as well as environmental conditions. We will here review the biochemistry and proteomics of mitochondria from non-green cells and organs, which differ from those of photosynthetic organs in a number of respects. We will briefly cover purification of mitochondria and general biochemical properties such as oxidative phosphorylation. We will then mention a few adaptive properties in response to water stress, seed maturation and germination and the ability to function under hypoxic conditions. The discussion will mainly focus on Arabidopsis cell cultures, etiolated germinating rice seedlings and potato tubers as model plants. It will cover the general proteome as well as the posttranslational modification protein phosphorylation. To date 64 phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins with a total of 103 phosphorylation sites have been identified.

  20. Quantitative phospho-proteomics reveals the Plasmodium merozoite triggers pre-invasion host kinase modification of the red cell cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccala, Elizabeth S; Satchwell, Timothy J; Angrisano, Fiona; Tan, Yan Hong; Wilson, Marieangela C; Heesom, Kate J; Baum, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The invasive blood-stage malaria parasite - the merozoite - induces rapid morphological changes to the target erythrocyte during entry. However, evidence for active molecular changes in the host cell that accompany merozoite invasion is lacking. Here, we use invasion inhibition assays, erythrocyte resealing and high-definition imaging to explore red cell responses during invasion. We show that although merozoite entry does not involve erythrocyte actin reorganisation, it does require ATP to complete the process. Towards dissecting the ATP requirement, we present an in depth quantitative phospho-proteomic analysis of the erythrocyte during each stage of invasion. Specifically, we demonstrate extensive increased phosphorylation of erythrocyte proteins on merozoite attachment, including modification of the cytoskeletal proteins beta-spectrin and PIEZO1. The association with merozoite contact but not active entry demonstrates that parasite-dependent phosphorylation is mediated by host-cell kinase activity. This provides the first evidence that the erythrocyte is stimulated to respond to early invasion events through molecular changes in its membrane architecture. PMID:26830761

  1. Unique proteome signature of post-chemotherapy ovarian cancer ascites-derived tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nuzhat; Greening, David; Samardzija, Chantel; Escalona, Ruth M; Chen, Maoshan; Findlay, Jock K; Kannourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Eighty % of ovarian cancer patients diagnosed at an advanced-stage have complete remission after initial surgery and chemotherapy. However, most patients die within identification of 353 proteins. There were significant differences in proteins encoding for immune surveillance, DNA repair mechanisms, cytoskeleton rearrangement, cell-cell adhesion, cell cycle pathways, cellular transport, and proteins involved with glycine/proline/arginine synthesis in tumor cells isolated from CR relative to CN patients. Pathway analyses revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways, DNA repair mechanisms and energy metabolism pathways in CR tumor cells. In conclusion, this is the first proteomics study to comprehensively analyze ascites-derived tumor cells from CN and CR ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27470985

  2. A draft map of the mouse pluripotent stem cell spatial proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforou, Andy; Mulvey, Claire M; Breckels, Lisa M; Geladaki, Aikaterini; Hurrell, Tracey; Hayward, Penelope C; Naake, Thomas; Gatto, Laurent; Viner, Rosa; Martinez Arias, Alfonso; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the subcellular distribution of proteins is vital for understanding cellular mechanisms. Capturing the subcellular proteome in a single experiment has proven challenging, with studies focusing on specific compartments or assigning proteins to subcellular niches with low resolution and/or accuracy. Here we introduce hyperLOPIT, a method that couples extensive fractionation, quantitative high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry with multivariate data analysis. We apply hyperLOPIT to a pluripotent stem cell population whose subcellular proteome has not been extensively studied. We provide localization data on over 5,000 proteins with unprecedented spatial resolution to reveal the organization of organelles, sub-organellar compartments, protein complexes, functional networks and steady-state dynamics of proteins and unexpected subcellular locations. The method paves the way for characterizing the impact of post-transcriptional and post-translational modification on protein location and studies involving proteome-level locational changes on cellular perturbation. An interactive open-source resource is presented that enables exploration of these data. PMID:26754106

  3. Proteomic changes resulting from gene copy number variations in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Geiger

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Along the transformation process, cells accumulate DNA aberrations, including mutations, translocations, amplifications, and deletions. Despite numerous studies, the overall effects of amplifications and deletions on the end point of gene expression--the level of proteins--is generally unknown. Here we use large-scale and high-resolution proteomics combined with gene copy number analysis to investigate in a global manner to what extent these genomic changes have a proteomic output and therefore the ability to affect cellular transformation. We accurately measure expression levels of 6,735 proteins and directly compare them to the gene copy number. We find that the average effect of these alterations on the protein expression is only a few percent. Nevertheless, by using a novel algorithm, we find the combined impact that many of these regional chromosomal aberrations have at the protein level. We show that proteins encoded by amplified oncogenes are often overexpressed, while adjacent amplified genes, which presumably do not promote growth and survival, are attenuated. Furthermore, regulation of biological processes and molecular complexes is independent of general copy number changes. By connecting the primary genome alteration to their proteomic consequences, this approach helps to interpret the data from large-scale cancer genomics efforts.

  4. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Rüetschi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, the most common lymphoma, is a heterogeneous disease where the outcome for patients with early relapse or refractory disease is very poor, even in the era of immunochemotherapy. In order to describe possible differences in global protein expression and network patterns, we performed a SILAC-based shotgun (LC-MS/MS quantitative proteomic analysis in fresh-frozen tumor tissue from two groups of DLBCL patients with totally different clinical outcome: (i early relapsed or refractory and (ii long-term progression-free patients. We could identify over 3,500 proteins; more than 1,300 were quantified in all patients and 87 were significantly differentially expressed. By functional annotation analysis on the 66 proteins overexpressed in the progression-free patient group, we found an enrichment of proteins involved in the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Also, five proteins from actin cytoskeleton regulation, applied in a supervised regression analysis, could discriminate the two patient groups. In conclusion, SILAC-based shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis appears to be a powerful tool to explore the proteome in DLBCL tumor tissue. Also, as progression-free patients had a higher expression of proteins involved in the actin cytoskeleton protein network, such a pattern indicates a functional role in the sustained response to immunochemotherapy.

  5. The Genomic and Proteomic Content of Cancer Cell-Derived Exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith C Henderson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are secreted membrane vesicles that have been proposed as an effective means to detect a variety of disease states, including cancer. The properties of exosomes, including stability in biological fluids, allow for their efficient isolation and make them an ideal vehicle for studies on early disease detection and evaluation. Much data has been collected over recent years regarding the mRNA, miRNA, and protein contents of exosomes. In addition, many studies have described the functional role that exosomes play in disease initiation and progression. Tumor cells have been shown to secrete exosomes, often in increased amounts compared to normal cells, and these exosomes can carry the genomic and proteomic signatures characteristic of the tumor cells from which they were derived. While these unique signatures make exosomes ideal for cancer detection, exosomes derived from cancer cells have also been shown to play a functional role in cancer progression. Here, we review the unique genomic and proteomic contents of exosomes originating from cancer cells as well as their functional effects to promote tumor progression.

  6. Proteomics study of progeny of normal human liver cells irradiated by 60Co γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To characterize the differential protein expression in the progeny of human liver cells surviving from ionizing radiation by the proteomic analysis. Methods: Two-dimensional electrophoresis gel coupled with mass spectrometry was used to explore the specific protein expression in the progeny of 7702 human liver cells surviving from ionizing radiation. Alterations in expression level of protein spots between the control and the progeny groups were statistically analyzed by ImageMaster 2D Platinum software and mass spectrometry was used to identify the protein spots with significantly altered expression-level. Results: The progeny of irradiated ceils were derived from human liver cell line exposed to 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy of 60Co γ-irradiation. A total of 42 differentially expressed proteins between the control and the progeny of the irradiated cells groups were screened, of which 17 were identified by matrix assistant laser desorption ion-top off light-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis, including 4 up-regulated and 13 down-regnlated proteins. Conclusions: The differentially expressed proteins profile could be significantly altered in the progeny of irradiated cells. The proteomics approach has the potential to detect the protein changes relevant to radiatian-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Further study of differentially expressed proteins would likely reveal the molecular mechanisms of gene expression in RIGI. (authors)

  7. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  8. Proteome data from a host-pathogen interaction study with Staphylococcus aureus and human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Surmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To simultaneously obtain proteome data of host and pathogen from an internalization experiment, human alveolar epithelial A549 cells were infected with Staphylococcus aureus HG001 which carried a plasmid (pMV158GFP encoding a continuously expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP. Samples were taken hourly between 1.5 h and 6.5 h post infection. By fluorescence activated cell sorting GFP-expressing bacteria could be enriched from host cell debris, but also infected host cells could be separated from those which did not carry bacteria after contact (exposed. Additionally, proteome data of A549 cells which were not exposed to S. aureus but underwent the same sample processing steps are provided as a control. Time-resolved changes in bacterial protein abundance were quantified in a label-free approach. Proteome adaptations of host cells were monitored by comparative analysis to a stable isotope labeled cell culture (SILAC standard. Proteins were extracted from the cells, digested proteolytically, measured by nanoLC–MS/MS, and subsequently identified by database search and then quantified. The data presented here are related to a previously published research article describing the interplay of S. aureus HG001 and human epithelial cells (Surmann et al., 2015 [1]. They have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange platform with the identifiers PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002384 for the S. aureus HG001 proteome dataset and PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002388 for the A549 proteome dataset.

  9. Evaluation of cell wall preparations for proteomics: a new procedure for purifying cell walls from Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canut Hervé

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ultimate goal of proteomic analysis of a cell compartment should be the exhaustive identification of resident proteins; excluding proteins from other cell compartments. Reaching such a goal closely depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific difficulties: (i the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP during the isolation procedure, (ii polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins. Several reported procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomic analyses led to the isolation of a high proportion (more than 50% of predicted intracellular proteins. Since isolated cell walls should hold secreted proteins, one can imagine alternative procedures to prepare cell walls containing a lower proportion of contaminant proteins. Results The rationales of several published procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomics were analyzed, with regard to the bioinformatic-predicted subcellular localization of the identified proteins. Critical steps were revealed: (i homogenization in low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP, (ii purification through increasing density cushions, (iii extensive washes with a low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP while removing as many cytosolic proteins as possible, and (iv absence of detergents. A new procedure was developed to prepare cell walls from etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana. After salt extraction, a high proportion of proteins predicted to be secreted was released (73%, belonging to the same functional classes as proteins identified using previously described protocols. Finally, removal of intracellular proteins was obtained using detergents, but their amount represented less than 3% in mass of the total protein extract, based on protein quantification. Conclusion The

  10. Red Blood Cells Estimation Using Hough Transform Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrul Humaimi Mahmood

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The number of red blood cells contributes more to clinical diagnosis with respect to blood diseases. Theaim of this research is to produce a computer vision system that can detect and estimate the number of redblood cells in the blood sample image. Morphological is a very powerful tool in image processing, and it isbeen used to segment and extract the red blood cells from the background and other cells. The algorithmused features such as shape of red blood cells for counting process, and Hough transform is introduced inthis process. The result presented here is based on images with normal blood cells. The tested data consistsof 10 samples and produced the accurate estimation rate closest to 96% from manual counting.

  11. Functional proteomics screen enables enrichment of distinct cell types from human pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revital Sharivkin

    Full Text Available The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+, glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9-/CD56+ and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9-/CD56-. This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples.

  12. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung cell response to copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola J Edelmann

    Full Text Available Copper (II oxide (CuO nanoparticles (NP are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the signaling pathways represented by BEAS-2B proteins responsive to the NP included mTOR signaling, protein ubiquitination pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling and epithelial adherens junction signaling. Follow-up experiments showed that CuO NP altered actin cytoskeleton, protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination level.

  13. Morphological and proteomic analysis of early stage of osteoblast differentiation in osteoblastic progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Dun [Population Council, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Orthopedic Department, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Linhai, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Chen, Hai-Xiao, E-mail: Hxchen-1@163.net [Orthopedic Department, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Linhai, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Yu, Hai-Qiang [Proteomics Resource Center, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Liang, Yong; Wang, Carrie [Population Council, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Lian, Qing-Quan [The 2nd Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325000 (China); Deng, Hai-Teng, E-mail: dengh@mail.rockefeller.edu [Proteomics Resource Center, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Ge, Ren-Shan, E-mail: rge@popcbr.rockefeller.edu [Population Council, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); The 2nd Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325000 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Bone remodeling relies on a dynamic balance between bone formation and resorption, mediated by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively. Under certain stimuli, osteoprogenitor cells may differentiate into premature osteoblasts and further into mature osteoblasts. This process is marked by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation. In this study, we induced osteoblast differentiation in mouse osteoprogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells and divided the process into three stages. In the first stage (day 3), the MC3T3-E1 cell under osteoblast differentiation did not express ALP or deposit a mineralized nodule. In the second stage, the MC3T3-E1 cell expressed ALP but did not form a mineralized nodule. In the third stage, the MC3T3-E1 cell had ALP activity and formed mineralized nodules. In the present study, we focused on morphological and proteomic changes of MC3T3-E1 cells in the early stage of osteoblast differentiation - a period when premature osteoblasts transform into mature osteoblasts. We found that mean cell area and mean stress fiber density were increased in this stage due to enhanced cell spreading and decreased cell proliferation. We further analyzed the proteins in the signaling pathway of regulation of the cytoskeleton using a proteomic approach and found upregulation of IQGAP1, gelsolin, moesin, radixin, and Cfl1. After analyzing the focal adhesion signaling pathway, we found the upregulation of FLNA, LAMA1, LAMA5, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL4A6, and COL5A2 as well as the downregulation of COL4A1, COL4A2, and COL4A4. In conclusion, the signaling pathway of regulation of the cytoskeleton and focal adhesion play critical roles in regulating cell spreading and actin skeleton formation in the early stage of osteoblast differentiation.

  14. Proteome analysis of virus-host cell interaction: rabies virus replication in Vero cells in two different media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Sabine; Rourou, Samia; Vester, Diana; Majoul, Samy; Benndorf, Dirk; Genzel, Yvonne; Rapp, Erdmann; Kallel, Héla; Reichl, Udo

    2013-06-01

    The use of Vero cells for rabies vaccine production was recommended from the WHO in 2005. A controlled production process is necessary to reduce the risk of contaminants in the product. One step towards this is to turn away from animal-derived components (e.g. serum, trypsin, bovine serum albumin) and face a production process in animal component-free medium. In this study, a proteomic approach was applied, using 2-D differential gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to compare rabies virus propagation in Vero cells under different cultivation conditions in microcarrier culture. Protein alterations were investigated for uninfected and infected Vero cells over a time span from 1 to 8 days post-infection in two different types of media (serum-free versus serum-containing media). For mock-infected cells, proteins involved in stress response, redox status, protease activity or glycolysis, and protein components in the endoplasmic reticulum were found to be differentially expressed comparing both cultivation media at all sampling points. For virus-infected cells, additionally changes in protein expression involved in general cell regulation and in calcium homeostasis were identified under both cultivation conditions. The fact that neither of these additional proteins was identified for cells during mock infection, but similar protein expression changes were found for both systems during virus propagation, indicates for a specific response of the Vero cell proteome on rabies virus infection. PMID:23674149

  15. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2015-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize MS coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilization and denaturation methods were compared. Mechanical disruption of DC cell pellets under cryogenic conditions, coupled with the use of RIPA (radioimmunoprecipitation assay) buffer, was shown to be the method of choice based on total protein extraction and on the solubilization and identification of nuclear proteins. Precipitation by acetone was found to be more efficient than that by 10% trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone, allowing in excess of 28% more protein identifications. Although being an effective strategy to eliminate the detergent residue, the acetone wash step caused a loss of protein identifications. However, this potential drawback was overcome by adding 1% sodium deoxycholate into the dissolution buffer, which enhanced both solubility of the precipitated proteins and digestion efficiency. This in turn resulted in 6 to 11% more distinct peptides and 14 to 19% more total proteins identified than using 0.5M triethylammonium bicarbonate alone, with the greatest increase (34%) for hydrophobic proteins. PMID:25983236

  16. Optimization of human dendritic cell sample preparation for mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Bottinelli, Dario; Lisacek, Frédérique; Luban, Jeremy; De Castillia, Caterina Strambio; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes that orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Mass spectrometry based proteomic study of these cells presents technical challenges, especially when the DCs are human in origin due to the paucity of available biological material. Here, to maximize mass spectrometry coverage of the global human DC proteome, different cell disruption methods, lysis conditions, protein precipitation, and protein pellet solubilisation and denaturation methods were compared. Mechanical disruption of DC cell pellets under cryogenic conditions, coupled with the use of RIPA buffer, was shown to be the method of choice based on total protein extraction and on the solubilisation and identification of nuclear proteins. Precipitation by acetone was found to be more efficient than by 10% TCA/acetone, allowing greater than 28% more protein identifications. Although being an effective strategy to eliminate the detergent residue, the acetone-wash step caused a loss of protein identifications. However, this potential drawback was overcome by adding 1% sodium deoxycholate in the dissolution buffer, which enhanced both solubility of the precipitated proteins and digestion efficiency. This in turn resulted in 6-11% more distinct peptides and 14-19% more total proteins identified than using 0.5M triethylammonium bicarbonate alone with the greatest increase (34%) for hydrophobic proteins. PMID:25983236

  17. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianxiong He; Canhua Huang; Aiping Tong; Bin Chen; Zhi Zeng; Peng Zhang; Chunting Wang; Yuquan Wei

    2008-12-01

    Suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an orally administered histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that has shown significant antitumour activity in a variety of tumour cells. To identify proteins involved in its antitumour activity, we utilized a proteomic approach to reveal protein expression changes in the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa following SAHA treatment. Protein expression profiles were analysed by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein identification was performed on a MALDI-Q-TOF MS/MS instrument. As a result, a total of nine differentially expressed proteins were visualized by 2-DE and Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) staining. Further, all the changed proteins were positively identified via mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Of these, PGAM1 was significantly downregulated in HeLa cells after treatment with SAHA. Moreover, PGAM1 has been proven to be downregulated in another cervical cancer cell line (CaSki) by western blot analysis. Together, using proteomic tools, we identified several differentially expressed proteins that underwent SAHA-induced apoptosis. These changed proteins may provide some clues to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying SAHA-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer.

  18. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics- a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26945515

  19. Proteomic analysis of exosomes secreted by human mesothelioma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P.J.J. Hegmans (Joost); A. Hemmes (Annabrita); T.M. Luider (Theo); M.J. Kleijmeer (Monique); J-B. Prins (Jan-Bas); L. Zitvogel; S.A. Burgers (Sjaak); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart); M.P.L. Bard (Martin)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractExosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted into the extracellular compartment by exocytosis. Tumor exosomes may be involved in the sampling of antigens to antigen presenting cells or as decoys allowing the tumor to escape immune-directed destruction. The proteins pre

  20. Neural stem cells and proteomics assesment of their properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Halada, Petr; Vodička, Petr; Motlík, Jan; Kovářová, Hana

    Vídeň : FENS (The Federation of European Neuroscience Societies), 2006. s. 1. [Forum of European Neuroscience /5./. 08.07.2006-12.07.2006, Vienna] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : neural stem cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  1. Proteomics of membrane microdomains from activated human natural killer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Petr; Pompach, Petr; Vančurová, Markéta; Novák, Petr; Kavan, Daniel; Mrázek, Hynek; Bezouška, Karel

    Bremen : German Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2009. s. 128-128. [International Mass Spectrometry Conference /18./. 30.08.2009-04.09.2009, Bremen] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA AV ČR KJB500200612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : mass spectrometry * natural killer cells Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  2. A simple method for purification of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells, and application for proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Herget

    Full Text Available Mechanosensitive hair cells and supporting cells comprise the sensory epithelia of the inner ear. The paucity of both cell types has hampered molecular and cell biological studies, which often require large quantities of purified cells. Here, we report a strategy allowing the enrichment of relatively pure populations of vestibular hair cells and non-sensory cells including supporting cells. We utilized specific uptake of fluorescent styryl dyes for labeling of hair cells. Enzymatic isolation and flow cytometry was used to generate pure populations of sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells. We applied mass spectrometry to perform a qualitative high-resolution analysis of the proteomic makeup of both the hair cell and non-sensory cell populations. Our conservative analysis identified more than 600 proteins with a false discovery rate of <3% at the protein level and <1% at the peptide level. Analysis of proteins exclusively detected in either population revealed 64 proteins that were specific to hair cells and 103 proteins that were only detectable in non-sensory cells. Statistical analyses extended these groups by 53 proteins that are strongly upregulated in hair cells versus non-sensory cells and vice versa by 68 proteins. Our results demonstrate that enzymatic dissociation of styryl dye-labeled sensory hair cells and non-sensory cells is a valid method to generate pure enough cell populations for flow cytometry and subsequent molecular analyses.

  3. Phenotype and Functions of Memory Tfh cells in Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Ueno, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the origin and functions of human blood CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells found in human blood has changed dramatically in the past years. These cells are currently considered to represent a circulating memory compartment of T follicular helper (Tfh)-lineage cells. Recent studies have shown that blood memory Tfh cells are composed of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Here we review the current understanding of human blood memory Tfh cells and the subsets within this compartment. We present a strategy to define these subsets based on cell surface profiles. Finally, we discuss how increased understanding of the biology of blood memory Tfh cells may contribute insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and the mode of action of vaccines. PMID:24998903

  4. Nuclear proteome analysis of benzo(a)pyrene-treated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we employed a proteomics-based 2-D gel electrophoresis assay to show that exposure to 10 μM benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) during a 24 h frame can lead to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing. To further expand our knowledge about the DNA damage response (DDR) induced by BaP, we investigated the nuclear protein expression profiles in HeLa cells treated with different concentrations of BaP (0.1, 1, and 10 μM) using this proteomics-based 2-D gel electrophoresis assay. We found 125 differentially expressed proteins in BaP-treated cells compared to control cells. Among them, 79 (63.2%) were down-regulated, 46 (36.8%) were up-regulated; 8 showed changes in the 1 μM and 10 μM BaP-treated groups, 2 in the 0.1 μM and 10 μM BaP-treated groups, 4 in the 0.1 μM and 1 μM BaP-treated groups, and only one showed changes in all three groups. Fifty protein spots were chosen for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) identification, and of these, 39 were identified, including subunits of the 26S proteasome and Annexin A1. The functions of some identified proteins were further examined and the results showed that they might be involved in BaP-induced DDR. Taken together, these data indicate that proteomics is a valuable approach in the study of environmental chemical–host interactions, and the identified proteins could provide new leads for better understanding BaP-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  5. HUMAN PLASMA PROTEOME MAPPING IN HEALTH AND CLEAR CELL CARCINOMA OF THE KIDNEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Shevchenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasma proteome from patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC and controls underwent mass spectrometric mapping. A total of 247 proteins were identified; the expression of 12 proteins of them increased on transition from the controls to patients with Stages I–II and III–IV RCC. There was decreased expression of 14 proteins in this series. Out of the 26 proteins showing a change in their expressions, 7 proteins belong to acute-phase ones, 3 proteins are associated with the intercellular matrix. These proteins can be potential markers for RCC.

  6. Proteomic analysis of mammalian sperm cells identifies new components of the centrosome

    OpenAIRE

    Fırat, Elif Nur Karalar; Sante, Joshua; Elliott, Sarah; Stearns, Tim

    2014-01-01

    1 Proteomic analysis of mammalian sperm cells identifies new components of the centrosome Elif N. Firat-Karalar1,3, Joshua Sante1,4, Sarah Elliott1, and Tim Stearns1,2 1Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5020, USA 2Department of Genetics, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5120, USA 3Current address: Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Koç University, Istanbul, 34450, Turkey 4Current address: Division of Pulmonary and ...

  7. Cost effectiveness of cord blood versus bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bart

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Thomas BartSwiss Blood Stem Cells, Bern, SwitzerlandAbstract: Umbilical cord blood (CB has become, since its first successful use more than two decades ago, an increasingly important source of blood stem cells. In this light, an overview of current usage of CB in the field of unrelated hematopoietic blood stem cell transplantation (HSCT is given. The three main sources of hematopoietic stem cells: bone marrow (BM, peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC, and cord blood (CB are compared as regards their current quantitative usage in HSCT. A cost analysis of the named three hematopoietic blood stem cell (HSC sources, taking into account various factors, is undertaken. The health economical comparison shows significant differences between CB on the one side, and BM and PBSC on the other. The consequences for the public health side and propositions for a possible health care policy, especially regarding future resource allocation towards the different choices for HSCT products, are discussed. An outlook on the possible future usage of BM, PBSC, and CB and its implications on health systems, donor registries, and CB banks is given.Keywords: health economy, cord blood, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  8. Leucocyte filtration of salvaged blood during cardiac surgery : effect on red blood cell function in concentrated blood compared with diluted blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Y. John; de Vries, Adrianus J.; Hagenaars, J. Ans M.; van Oeveren, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Leucocyte filtration of salvaged blood has been suggested to prevent patients from receiving activated leucocytes during autotransfusion in cardiac surgery. This study examines whether leucocyte filtration of salvaged blood affects the red blood cell (RBC) function and whether there is a

  9. Proteomic analysis and identification of cell surface-associated proteins of Clostridium chauvoei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaramaiah, Usharani; Singh, Neetu; Thankappan, Sabarinath; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Chaudhuri, Pallab; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara

    2016-06-01

    Blackleg is a highly fatal disease of cattle and sheep, caused by Clostridium chauvoei, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore forming bacteria. Cell surface-associated proteins play a major role in inducing the protective immunity. However, the identity of a majority of cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei is not known. In the present investigation, we have used SDS-PAGE, 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blotting followed by mass spectrometry to identify cell surface-associated proteins of C. chauvoei. Among the identified proteins, which have shown to offer protective antigencity in other bacteria, Enolase, Chaperonin, Ribosomal protein L10, Glycosyl Hydrolase and Flavoprotein were characterized by sequencing and their overexpression in Escherichia coli. In conclusion, cell surface-associated proteins were identified using proteomic approach and the genes for the immunoreactive proteins were expressed, which may prove to be potential diagnostic or vaccine candidates. PMID:26971466

  10. SILAC Proteomics of Planarians Identifies Ncoa5 as a Conserved Component of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Böser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planarian regeneration depends on the presence of pluripotent stem cells in the adult. We developed an in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC protocol in planarians to identify proteins that are enriched in planarian stem cells. Through a comparison of SILAC proteomes of normal and stem cell-depleted planarians and of a stem cell-enriched population of sorted cells, we identified hundreds of stem cell proteins. One of these is an ortholog of nuclear receptor coactivator-5 (Ncoa5/CIA, which is known to regulate estrogen-receptor-mediated transcription in human cells. We show that Ncoa5 is essential for the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell population in planarians and that a putative mouse ortholog is expressed in pluripotent cells of the embryo. Our study thus identifies a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating that planarians, in particular, when combined with in vivo SILAC, are a powerful model in stem cell research.

  11. Effects of 5'-azacytidine and alendronate on a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line: a proteomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Amber; Hashim, Zehra; Zarina, Shamshad

    2015-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer related deaths around the world. Due to late diagnosis and development of drug resistance in patients suffering from HCC, development of more effective therapeutic strategies is inevitable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined apoptotic effect of 5'-Azacytidine (5'-AzaC) and alendronate (ALN) on Huh-7 HCC cell line and to explore differential expression at genomics and proteomics level. Incubation of HCC cell line with 5'-AzaC alone showed cell death in a time and dose dependent manner while in combination with ALN, increased cytotoxicity was observed. Up-regulation of CASP7(Caspase7) and LZTS1 (leucine zipper, putative tumor suppressor 1) and down-regulation of DNMT1(DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1) was noted in treated cells. Proteomic studies on the treated cells revealed altered expression of different proteins including peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), Annexin 5 (Anx5), Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP), Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB), tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein (TNF), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), Glutathione S transferase (GSTP1) and Heat shock protein60 (HSP60). Our study demonstrated the cytotoxic effect of 5'-AzaC and ALN drug combination on Huh-7 HCC cells suggesting such combinations may be explored as a possible therapeutic approach. Current study revealed that Huh-7 HCC cells are sensitive to 5'-AzaC and ALN drug combination and such combination approaches could lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, we also report the expression of Anx5 exclusively in untreated cancerous cell line indicating the possibility of being used as a potential therapeutic target and biomarker. PMID:25854900

  12. Proteomic profiling of a robust Wolbachia infection in an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Baldridge, Abigail S; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd W; Fallon, Ann M

    2014-11-01

    Wolbachia pipientis, a widespread vertically transmitted intracellular bacterium, provides a tool for insect control through manipulation of host-microbe interactions. We report proteomic characterization of wStr, a Wolbachia strain associated with a strong cytoplasmic incompatibility phenotype in its native host, Laodelphax striatellus. In the Aedes albopictus C/wStr1 mosquito cell line, wStr maintains a robust, persistent infection. MS/MS analyses of gel bands revealed a protein 'footprint' dominated by Wolbachia-encoded chaperones, stress response and cell membrane proteins, including the surface antigen WspA, a peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein and a 73 kDa outer membrane protein. Functional classifications and estimated abundance levels of 790 identified proteins suggested that expression, stabilization and secretion of proteins predominate over bacterial genome replication and cell division. High relative abundances of cysteine desulphurase, serine/glycine hydroxymethyl transferase, and components of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in conjunction with above average abundances of glutamate dehydrogenase and proline utilization protein A support Wolbachia genome-based predictions for amino acid metabolism as a primary energy source. wStr expresses 15 Vir proteins of a Type IV secretion system and its transcriptional regulator. Proteomic characterization of a robust insect-associated Wolbachia strain provides baseline information that will inform further development of in vitro protocols for Wolbachia manipulation. PMID:25155417

  13. Effect of irradiation on cell transcriptome and proteome of rat submandibular salivary glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Stiubea-Cohen

    Full Text Available Salivary glands (SGs are irreversibly damaged by irradiation (IR treatment in head and neck cancer patients. Here, we used an animal irradiation model to investigate and define the molecular mechanisms affecting SGs following IR, focusing on saliva proteome and global transcription profile of submandibular salivary gland (SSG tissue.We show that saliva secretion was gradually reduced to 50% of its initial level 12 weeks post-IR. Saliva protein composition was further examined by proteomic analysis following mass spectrometry (MS analysis that revealed proteins with reduced expression originating from SSGs and proteins with increased expression derived from the serum, both indicating salivary tissue damage. To examine alterations in mRNA expression levels microarray analysis was performed. We found significant alterations in 95 genes, including cell-cycle arrest genes, SG functional genes and a DNA repair gene.Tissue damage was seen by confocal immunofluorescence of α-amylase and c-Kit that showed an increase and decrease, respectively, in protein expression. This was coherent with real-time PCR results.This data indicates that IR damages the SSG cells' ability to produce and secrete saliva and proteins, and maintain the physiological barrier between serum and saliva. The damage does not heal due to cell-cycle arrest, which prevents tissue regeneration. Taken together, our results reveal a new insight into IR pathobiology.

  14. Proteomic analysis of barley cell nuclei purified by flow sorting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrovská, Beáta; Jeřábková, Hana; Chamrád, I.; Vrána, Jan; Lenobel, R.; Uřinovská, J.; Šebela, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 143, 1-3 (2014), s. 78-86. ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28443S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cell cycle * Chromatin * Flow cytometry Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.561, year: 2014 http://gateway.isiknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=MEDLINE&DestLinkType=FullRecord&UT=25059295

  15. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  16. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells.Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06368j

  17. Stem Cell Transplant (Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, and Cord Blood Transplants)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are studied in cloning and other types of research. These stem cells are blood-forming stem cells. Stem cells mostly ... Preventing and managing GVHD are major priorities for research. Chronic ... 90 to 600 days after the stem cell transplant. A rash on the palms of the ...

  18. Single Cell Proteomics with Ultra-High Sensitivity Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M

    2005-02-16

    This project was a joint LDRD project between PAT, CMS and NAI with the objective to develop an instrument that analyzes the biochemical composition of single cells in real-time using bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) combined with advanced laser desorption and ionization techniques. Applications include both biological defense, fundamental cell biology and biomedical research. BAMS analyzes the biochemical composition of single, micrometer-sized particles (such as bacterial cells or spores) that can be directly sampled from air or a suspension. BAMS is based on an earlier development of aerosol time of flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) by members of our collaboration [1,2]. Briefly, in ATOFMS and BAMS aerosol particles are sucked directly from the atmosphere into vacuum through a series of small orifices. As the particles approach the ion source region of the mass spectrometer, they cross and scatter light from two CW laser beams separated by a known distance. The timing of the two bursts of scattered light created by each ''tracked'' particle reveals the speed, location and size of the particle. This information then enables the firing of a high-intensity laser such that the resulting laser pulse desorbs and ionizes molecules from the tracked particle just as it reaches the center of the ion source region. The full spectrum of ions is then measured using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The ability to rapidly analyze individual particles is clearly applicable to the rapid detection of aerosolized biological warfare agents so long as agent particles can be made to produce mass spectra that are distinct from the spectra of harmless background particles. The pattern of ions formed is determined by the properties of the laser pulse, the particle, and, in aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), also the MALDI matrix used. As a result, it is critical that the properties of the laser pulses used for desorption and ionization

  19. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of human hepatic stellate cells treated with natural taurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Wu, Fa-Sheng; Tang, Yan-Fang

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential expression of genes and proteins between natural taurine (NTau)‑treated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and control cells as well as the underlying mechanism of NTau in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis. A microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to analyze the proliferation of NTau‑treated HSCs. Flow cytometry was performed to compare the apoptosis rate between NTau-treated and non‑treated HSCs. Proteomic analysis using a combination of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) was conducted to identify the differentially expressed proteins. Microarray analysis was performed to investigate the differential expression of genes and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to validate the results. The experimental findings obtained demonstrated that NTau decreased HSC proliferation, resulting in an increased number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a reduced number of cells in the S phase. Flow cytometric analysis showed that NTau-treated HSCs had a significantly increased rate of apoptosis when compared with the non‑treated control group. A total of 15 differentially expressed proteins and 658 differentially expressed genes were identified by 2DE and MS, and microarray analysis, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) functional analysis indicated that these genes and proteins were enriched in the function clusters and pathways related to cell proliferation, cellular apoptosis and oxidation. The transcriptome and proteome analyses of NTau-treated HSCs demonstrated that NTau is able to significantly inhibit cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis, highlighting its potential therapeutic benefits in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23525364

  20. Hormones that Stimulate the Growth of Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golde, David W.; Gasson, Judith C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the nature and action of hematopoietic proteins which regulate the production of specific sets of blood cells. Discusses the production of these hematopoietins by recombinant-DNA methods in an effort to enable physicians to treat patients by eliciting production of specific types of blood cells. (CW)

  1. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kapur

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Di

  2. Effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome in Physarum polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuijie; Sun, Yeqing

    Some researchers suggest that the changes of cell cycle under the effect of microgravity may be associated with many serious adverse physiological changes. In the search for underlying mechanisms and possible new countermeasures, we used the slime mold Physarum polycephalum in which all the nuclei traverse the cell cycle in natural synchrony to study the effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome. In parallel, the cell cycle was analyzed in Physarum incubated (1) in altered gravity for 20 h, (2) in altered gravity for 40 h, (3) in altered gravity for 80 h, and (4) in ground controls. The cell cycle, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteome in the altered gravity and ground controls were examined. The results indicated that the duration of the G2 phase was lengthened 20 min in high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) for 20 h, and prolonged 2 h in altered gravity either for 40 h or for 80 h, whereas the duration of other phases in the cell cycle was unchanged with respect to the control. The microfilaments in G2 phase had a reduced number of fibers and a unique abnormal morphology in altered gravity for 40 h, whereas the microfilaments in other phases of cell cycle were unchanged when compared to controls. Employing classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), we examined the effect of the altered gravity on P. polycephalum proteins. The increase in the duration of G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h was accompanied by changes in the 2-DE protein profiles, over controls. Out of a total of 200 protein spots investigated in G2 phase, which were reproducible in repeated experiments, 72 protein spots were visually identified as specially expressed, and 11 proteins were up-regulated by 2-fold and 28 proteins were down-regulated by 2-fold over controls. Out of a total of three low-expressed proteins in G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h, two proteins were unknown proteins, and one protein was spherulin 3b by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS

  3. Proteomic response analysis of endothelial cells of human coronary artery to stimulation with carbachol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min YU; Dong-mei CHEN; Gang HU; Hai WANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify the molecular basis of the endothelial target for acetylcholine (ETA). METHODS: Proteomic methods were used to monitor changes in protein expression in the first 10 h following the stimulation of human coronary endothelial cells with carbachol 100 μmol/L. Thirty proteins showing the largest changes were identified by mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Based on analysis with Image Master 2-D Elite software, about 623 protein spots were detected in control cells and 825 protein spots in carbachol-treated cells, the matching rate was 68.1%.Among all the detected spots, 39 were up-regulated and 29 were down-regulated, showing detectable changes varied from 1.7-3.8 folds. Forty one spots in the peptide mass fingerprints were successfully obtained. The most interesting feature was that all the four newly synthesized proteins belonged to the heat shock protein family.CONCLUSION: These identified proteins played key roles in the molecular mechanism of ETA.

  4. A proteomic study of the regulatory role for STAT-1 in cytokine-induced beta-cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondas, Dieter; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; D’Hertog, Wannes; Crèvecoeur, Inne; Waelkens, Etienne; Brunak, Søren; Mathieu, Chantal; Overbergh, Lut

    PURPOSE: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) plays a crucial role in cytokine-induced beta-cell destruction. However, its precise downstream pathways have not been completely clarified. We performed a proteome analysis of cytokine-exposed C57Bl/6 and STAT-1-/- mouse islets...... assigned to small ubiquitin-related modifier 4 (SUMO4). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These findings confirm a central role for STAT-1 in pancreatic islet inflammation induced destruction and most importantly elucidate the underlying proteomic pathways involved.......PURPOSE: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) plays a crucial role in cytokine-induced beta-cell destruction. However, its precise downstream pathways have not been completely clarified. We performed a proteome analysis of cytokine-exposed C57Bl/6 and STAT-1-/- mouse islets...

  5. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V.; Sellountos, Euripides J.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 less-than-or-equal n less-than-or-equal 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail.

  6. Novel Cell Preservation Technique to Extend Bovine In Vitro White Blood Cell Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Laurin, Emilie L.; McKenna, Shawn L. B.; Sanchez, Javier; Bach, Horacio; Rodriguez-Lecompte, Juan Carlos; Chaffer, Marcelo; Keefe, Greg P

    2015-01-01

    Although cell-mediated immunity based diagnostics can be integral assays for early detection of various diseases of dairy cows, processing of blood samples for these tests is time-sensitive, often within 24 hours of collection, to maintain white blood cell viability. Therefore, to improve utility and practicality of such assays, the objective of this study was to assess the use of a novel white blood cell preservation technology in whole bovine blood. Blood samples from ten healthy cows were ...

  7. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Preben D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low. The hypothesis of this study was that equine MSCs could be isolated from fresh whole equine cord blood. Results Cord blood was collected from 7 foals immediately after foaling. The mononuclear cell fraction was isolated by Ficoll density centrifugation and cultured in a DMEM low glucose based media at 38.5°C in humidified atmosphere containing 5% CO2. In 4 out of 7 samples colonies with MSC morphology were observed. Cellular morphology varied between monolayers of elongated spindle-shaped cells to layered cell clusters of cuboidal cells with shorter cytoplasmic extensions. Positive Alizarin Red and von Kossa staining as well as significant calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity confirmed osteogenesis. Histology and positive Safranin O staining of matrix glycosaminoglycans illustrated chondrogenesis. Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets confirmed adipogenesis. Conclusion We here report, for the first time, the isolation of mesenchymal-like stem cells from fresh equine cord blood and their differentiation into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. This novel isolation of equine cord blood MSCs and their preliminary in vitro differentiation positions the horse as the ideal pre-clinical animal model for proof-of-principle studies of cord blood derived MSCs.

  8. Blood Thixotropy in Patients with Sickle Cell Anaemia: Role of Haematocrit and Red Blood Cell Rheological Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Waltz, Xavier; Romana, Marc; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Billaud, Marie; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We compared the blood thixotropic/shear-thinning properties and the red blood cells’ (RBC) rheological properties between a group of patients with sickle cell anaemia (SS) and healthy individuals (AA). Blood thixotropy was determined by measuring blood viscosity with a capillary viscometer using a “loop” protocol: the shear rate started at 1 s−1 and increased progressively to 922 s−1 and then re-decreased to the initial shear rate. Measurements were performed at native haematocrit for the two...

  9. A Simulation of Blood Cells in Branching Capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Isfahani, Amir H G; Freund, Jonathan B

    2008-01-01

    The multi-cellular hydrodynamic interactions play a critical role in the phenomenology of blood flow in the microcirculation. A fast algorithm has been developed to simulate large numbers of cells modeled as elastic thin membranes. For red blood cells, which are the dominant component in blood, the membrane has strong resistance to surface dilatation but is flexible in bending. Our numerical method solves the boundary integral equations built upon Green's functions for Stokes flow in periodic domains. This fluid dynamics video is an example of the capabilities of this model in handling complex geometries with a multitude of different cells. The capillary branch geometries have been modeled based upon observed capillary networks. The diameter of the branches varies between 10-20 mum. A constant mean pressure gradient drives the flow. For the purpose of this fluid dynamics video, the red blood cells are initiated as biconcave discs and white blood cells and platelets are initiated as spheres and ellipsoids resp...

  10. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects may be better "storers" than donors of red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Kriebardis, Anastasios G; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Foudoulaki-Paparizos, Leontini E; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Papassideri, Issidora S; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Antonelou, Marianna H

    2016-07-01

    Storage of packed red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with progressive accumulation of lesions, mostly triggered by energy and oxidative stresses, which potentially compromise the effectiveness of the transfusion therapy. Concerns arise as to whether glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects (G6PD(-)), ~5% of the population in the Mediterranean area, should be accepted as routine donors in the light of the increased oxidative stress their RBCs suffer from. To address this question, we first performed morphology (scanning electron microscopy), physiology and omics (proteomics and metabolomics) analyses on stored RBCs from healthy or G6PD(-) donors. We then used an in vitro model of transfusion to simulate transfusion outcomes involving G6PD(-) donors or recipients, by reconstituting G6PD(-) stored or fresh blood with fresh or stored blood from healthy volunteers, respectively, at body temperature. We found that G6PD(-) cells store well in relation to energy, calcium and morphology related parameters, though at the expenses of a compromised anti-oxidant system. Additional stimuli, mimicking post-transfusion conditions (37°C, reconstitution with fresh healthy blood, incubation with oxidants) promoted hemolysis and oxidative lesions in stored G6PD(-) cells in comparison to controls. On the other hand, stored healthy RBC units showed better oxidative parameters and lower removal signaling when reconstituted with G6PD(-) fresh blood compared to control. Although the measured parameters of stored RBCs from the G6PD deficient donors appeared to be acceptable, the results from the in vitro model of transfusion suggest that G6PD(-) RBCs could be more susceptible to hemolysis and oxidative stresses post-transfusion. On the other hand, their chronic exposure to oxidative stress might make them good recipients, as they better tolerate exposure to oxidatively damaged long stored healthy RBCs. PMID:27094493

  11. Interpretation of automated blood cell counts

    OpenAIRE

    Zühre Kaya

    2013-01-01

    Complete blood count (CBC) tests are rapid, inexpensiveand universally available, and often aid primary clinicianswith decision making about patients with severaldisorders. Thus the rapid availability of the results of CBCcould provide considerable advantage for both patientsand clinicians. Furthermore, physicians can also avoidunnecessary peripheral blood smear examination usingCBC parameters. Many hematology analyzers, which enabledus simultaneously, measure several different CBCparameters,...

  12. Proteins upregulated by mild and severe hypoxia in squamous cell carcinomas in vitro identified by proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Solid malignant tumours are characterised by an inadequate vascular system, which can give rise to micro-regional hypoxic areas. As the negative impact of tumour hypoxia is believed largely to depend on dynamic changes in gene expression, it is important to identify the genes regulated by hypoxia to further enlighten the biology behind the cellular response to hypoxia. Previous studies have demonstrated that hypoxia has an impact not only on the gene transcription, but also on gene-specific mRNA translation. Therefore, proteomics is a suitable approach to understand the complexity of gene regulation under hypoxia at protein level. In this in vitro study we have studied the proteome of cells under intermediate hypoxia (1% O2) and anoxia and compared these to normoxic (21% O2) cells to identify proteins upregulated by mild and severe hypoxia. Materials and methods: A human cervix cancer cell line (SiHa) and a human head and neck cancer cell line (FaDuDD) were used. Total cell lysate from hypoxic and normoxic cells was separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and images were analysed using Quantity One software. Proteins from significant spots (difference in intensity by more than a factor 2) were identified by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In order to confirm the hypoxic regulation of the identified proteins, immunoblotting and qPCR were employed when possible. Results: All together 32 spots were found to be upregulated in the hypoxic gels. Of these, 11 different proteins were successfully identified and largely confirmed by Western blotting and qPCR. Amongst these proteins are protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 6 (PDIA6) and dynein light chain roadblock-type 1 (DynLRB1). Both 2D gels and Western blots revealed that PDAI6 exhibited a cell line specific pattern; in FaDuDD there was upregulation at 1% and further upregulated at 0% compared to atmospheric air, whereas there was no upregulation in SiHa cells. DynLRB1 was

  13. Microfluidics-Based Single-Cell Functional Proteomics for Fundamental and Applied Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Zhou, Jing; Sutherland, Alex; Wei, Wei; Shin, Young Shik; Xue, Min; Heath, James R.

    2014-06-01

    We review an emerging microfluidics-based toolkit for single-cell functional proteomics. Functional proteins include, but are not limited to, the secreted signaling proteins that can reflect the biological behaviors of immune cells or the intracellular phosphoproteins associated with growth factor-stimulated signaling networks. Advantages of the microfluidics platforms are multiple. First, 20 or more functional proteins may be assayed simultaneously from statistical numbers of single cells. Second, cell behaviors (e.g., motility) may be correlated with protein assays. Third, extensions to quantized cell populations can permit measurements of cell-cell interactions. Fourth, rare cells can be functionally identified and then separated for further analysis or culturing. Finally, certain assay types can provide a conduit between biology and the physicochemical laws. We discuss the history and challenges of the field then review design concepts and uses of the microchip platforms that have been reported, with an eye toward biomedical applications. We then look to the future of the field.

  14. Approaches to radiolabelling blood cells: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of cellular blood elements in health and disease can never be overemphasized. Associated with every organic illness there is an involvement of blood cells. Using radiolabelled blood cells, researchers have made fundamental contributions in the basic knowledge of cell kinetics and physiology. Further development in cell labelling techniques, in conjunction with the advancements in nuclear imaging have made it possible to use radiolabelled blood cells as a non-invasive means of diagnosing diseases. Useful as it may be, we have become increasingly aware of the current limitations in the cell labelling technique. The object of this article is to highlight the past and present approaches to the technique, emphasize the current problems and discuss future directions that might help to fetch solutions. (Auth.)

  15. NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation time of human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation times were studied as probes of water structure in human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions. Normal saline had a relaxation time of about 3000 ms while packed red blood cells had a relaxation time of about 500 ms. The relaxation time of a red blood cell suspension at 50% hematocrit was about 750 ms showing that surface charges and polar groups of the red cell membrane effectively structure extracellular water. Incubation of red cells in hypotonic saline increases relaxation time whereas hypertonic saline decreases relaxation time. Relaxation times varied independently of mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration in a sample population. Studies with lysates and resealed membrane ghosts show that hemoglobin is very effective in lowering water-proton relaxation time whereas resealed membrane ghosts in the absence of hemoglobin are less effective than intact red cells. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  16. Evaluation of preparation methods for MS-based analysis of intestinal epithelial cell proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius Cosmin; Bendixen, Emøke

    2015-01-01

    The gut epithelium formed between an organism and the environment plays an essential role in host–microbe interactions, yet remains one of the least characterized mammalian tissues. Especially the membrane proteins, which are critical to bacterial adhesion, are understudied, because these proteins...... are low in abundance, and large amounts of sample is needed for their preparation and for undertaking MS-based analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate three different methods for isolation and preparation of pig intestinal epithelial cells for MS-based analysis of the proteome. Samples were...... of ease and speed of sample preparation, as well as protein recovery. In comparison, more gentle methods where intestinal epithelial cells are harvested by shaking are more time consuming, result in lower protein yield, and are prone to increased technical variation due to multiple steps involved....

  17. Proteomic analysis of arginine methylation sites in human cells reveals dynamic regulation during transcriptional arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Horn, Heiko; Jungmichel, Stephanie;

    2014-01-01

    contain regulated functions on their own. Collectively, we present a site-specific MMA dataset in human cells and demonstrate for the first time that MMA is a dynamic post-translational modification regulated during transcriptional arrest by a hitherto uncharacterized arginine demethylase....... mono-methylation (MMA) sites. We thereby identify 1,027 site-specific MMA sites on 494 human proteins, discovering numerous novel mono-methylation targets and confirming the majority of currently known MMA substrates. Nuclear RNA-binding proteins involved in RNA processing, RNA localization......, transcription, and chromatin remodeling are predominantly found modified with MMA. Despite this, MMA sites prominently are located outside RNA-binding domains as compared to the proteome-wide distribution of arginine residues. Quantification of arginine methylation in cells treated with Actinomycin D uncovers...

  18. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Patrick; Verdier, Claude; Wagner, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) are known to form aggregates in the forms of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. Rouleaux formation can be also induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC solution. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly rely on indirect measurements like flow chamber experiments, but on the single cell level data is lacking. Here we present measurements on the d...

  19. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis of the proteomes expressed in the human hepatoma cell line BEL-7404 and normal liver cell line L-02

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Proteome analysis technology has been used extensively in conducting discovery research of biology and has become one of the most essential technologies in functional genomics. The proteomes of the human hepatoma cell line BEL-7404 and the normal human liver cell line L-02 have been separated by high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) with immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF) in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in the second dimension (IPG-DALT). The resulting images have been analyzed using 2-D analysis software. Quantitative analysis reveals that 7 protein spots are detected only in hepatoma BEL-7404 cells, 14 only in L-02 cells, and 78 protein spots show significant fluctuation in quantity in both cell lines (P<0.01).These protein spots have been displayed on a proteome differential expression map. Analysis for the reproducibility of 2-DE indicates that the positional variability in the IEF dimension is 0.73 mm, while the variability in the SDS-PAGE dimension is 0.44 mm, and the quantitative variability is 17.6%-19.2%. These results suggest that the reproducibility of 2-DE has been suitable for the study of differential expression of proteomes. Proteome differential expression maps can be useful tools for disease diagnosis, drug-target validation analysis and biological process elucidation.

  20. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas; Lyon, David; Mullari, Meeli; Madsen, Maria V; Daniel, Jeremy A; Jensen, Lars J; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins by arginine methylation is functionally important, yet the breadth of this modification is not well characterized. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 8030 arginine methylation sites within 3300 human proteins in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified by methylation. Through quantitative proteomics and RNA interference to examine arginine methylation stoichiometry, we unexpectedly found that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of arginine methyltransferases catalyzed methylation independently of arginine sequence context. In contrast to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially regulated the functions of the pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 (serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2) and the RNA transport ribonucleoprotein HNRNPUL1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1). Knocking down PRMT5 impaired the RNA binding function of SRSF2, whereas knocking down PRMT4 [also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human arginine methylome provides a missing piece in the global and integrative view of cellular physiology and protein regulation. PMID:27577262

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of plasma membrane proteins between human osteosarcoma and normal osteoblastic cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone in children and adolescents. However, the knowledge in diagnostic modalities has progressed less. To identify new biomarkers for the early diagnosis of OS as well as for potential novel therapeutic candidates, we performed a sub-cellular comparative proteomic research. An osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63) and human osteoblastic cells (hFOB1.19) were used as our comparative model. Plasma membrane (PM) was obtained by aqueous two-phase partition. Proteins were analyzed through iTRAQ-based quantitative differential LC/MS/MS. The location and function of differential proteins were analyzed through GO database. Protein-protein interaction was examined through String software. One of differentially expressed proteins was verified by immunohistochemistry. 342 non-redundant proteins were identified, 68 of which were differentially expressed with 1.5-fold difference, with 25 up-regulated and 43 down-regulated. Among those differential proteins, 69% ware plasma membrane, which are related to the biological processes of binding, cell structure, signal transduction, cell adhesion, etc., and interaction with each other. One protein--CD151 located in net nodes was verified to be over-expressed in osteosarcoma tissue by immunohistochemistry. It is the first time to use plasma membrane proteomics for studying the OS membrane proteins according to our knowledge. We generated preliminary but comprehensive data about membrane protein of osteosarcoma. Among these, CD151 was further validated in patient samples, and this small molecule membrane might be a new target for OS research. The plasma membrane proteins identified in this study may provide new insight into osteosarcoma biology and potential diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers

  2. Proteomics reveals multiple routes to the osteogenic phenotype in mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yener Bülent

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, we demonstrated that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC stimulated with dexamethazone undergo gene focusing during osteogenic differentiation (Stem Cells Dev 14(6: 1608–20, 2005. Here, we examine the protein expression profiles of three additional populations of hMSC stimulated to undergo osteogenic differentiation via either contact with pro-osteogenic extracellular matrix (ECM proteins (collagen I, vitronectin, or laminin-5 or osteogenic media supplements (OS media. Specifically, we annotate these four protein expression profiles, as well as profiles from naïve hMSC and differentiated human osteoblasts (hOST, with known gene ontologies and analyze them as a tensor with modes for the expressed proteins, gene ontologies, and stimulants. Results Direct component analysis in the gene ontology space identifies three components that account for 90% of the variance between hMSC, osteoblasts, and the four stimulated hMSC populations. The directed component maps the differentiation stages of the stimulated stem cell populations along the differentiation axis created by the difference in the expression profiles of hMSC and hOST. Surprisingly, hMSC treated with ECM proteins lie closer to osteoblasts than do hMSC treated with OS media. Additionally, the second component demonstrates that proteomic profiles of collagen I- and vitronectin-stimulated hMSC are distinct from those of OS-stimulated cells. A three-mode tensor analysis reveals additional focus proteins critical for characterizing the phenotypic variations between naïve hMSC, partially differentiated hMSC, and hOST. Conclusion The differences between the proteomic profiles of OS-stimulated hMSC and ECM-hMSC characterize different transitional phenotypes en route to becoming osteoblasts. This conclusion is arrived at via a three-mode tensor analysis validated using hMSC plated on laminin-5.

  3. Interpretation of automated blood cell counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zühre Kaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Complete blood count (CBC tests are rapid, inexpensiveand universally available, and often aid primary clinicianswith decision making about patients with severaldisorders. Thus the rapid availability of the results of CBCcould provide considerable advantage for both patientsand clinicians. Furthermore, physicians can also avoidunnecessary peripheral blood smear examination usingCBC parameters. Many hematology analyzers, which enabledus simultaneously, measure several different CBCparameters, are available for early diagnosis. Herein theimpact of both pre and post analytic variations on the interpretationof the CBC results with case reports are reviewedin the light of the latest literature.Key words: Complete blood count, interpretation

  4. Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) Applied to Quantitative Proteomics of Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soufi, Boumediene; Kumar, C.; Gnad, F.;

    2010-01-01

    We applied stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to large-scale quantitative proteomics analyses of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis in two physiological conditions: growth on succinate and growth under phosphate starvation. Using a B. subtilis strain auxotrophic for...... most comprehensive quantitative proteomics studies in bacteria, covering more than 75% of the B. subtilis genes expressed in the log phase of growth. Furthermore, we detect and quantify dynamics of 35 Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation sites under growth on succinate, and 10 phosphorylation sites under...

  5. Organellar proteome analyses of ricin toxin-treated HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Li, Yunhu; Li, Hongyang; Liu, Wensen

    2016-07-01

    Apoptosis triggered by ricin toxin (RT) has previously been associated with certain cellular organellar compartments, but the diversity in the composition of the organellar proteins remains unclear. Here, we applied a shotgun proteomics strategy to examine the differential expression of proteins in the mitochondria, nuclei, and cytoplasm of HeLa cells treated and not treated with RT. Data were combined with a global bioinformatics analysis and experimental confirmations. A total of 3107 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics predictors (Proteome Analyst, WoLF PSORT, TargetP, MitoPred, Nucleo, MultiLoc, and k-nearest neighbor) and a Bayesian model that integrated these predictors were used to predict the locations of 1349 distinct organellar proteins. Our data indicate that the Bayesian model was more efficient than the individual implementation of these predictors. Additionally, a Biomolecular Interaction Network (BIN) analysis was used to identify 149 BIN subnetworks. Our experimental confirmations indicate that certain apoptosis-related proteins (e.g. cytochrome c, enolase, lamin B, Bax, and Drp1) were found to be translocated and had variable expression levels. These results provide new insights for the systematic understanding of RT-induced apoptosis responses. PMID:25227225

  6. Differential proteome analysis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianyu Zhuang

    Full Text Available Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is a complex three-dimensional deformity of the spine. The cause and pathogenesis of scoliosis and the accompanying generalized osteopenia remain unclear despite decades of extensive research. In this study, we utilized two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE coupled with mass spectrometry (MS to analyze the differential proteome of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs from AIS patients. In total, 41 significantly altered protein spots were detected, of which 34 spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis and found to represent 25 distinct gene products. Among these proteins, five related to bone growth and development, including pyruvate kinase M2, annexin A2, heat shock 27 kDa protein, γ-actin, and β-actin, were found to be dysregulated and therefore selected for further validation by Western blot analysis. At the protein level, our results supported the previous hypothesis that decreased osteogenic differentiation ability of MSCs is one of the mechanisms leading to osteopenia in AIS. In summary, we analyzed the differential BM-MSCs proteome of AIS patients for the first time, which may help to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of bone loss in AIS and also increase understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of AIS.

  7. Proteomic analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from normal and deep carious dental pulp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Ma

    Full Text Available Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs, precursor cells of odontoblasts, are ideal seed cells for tooth tissue engineering and regeneration. Our previous study has demonstrated that stem cells exist in dental pulp with deep caries and are called carious dental pulp stem cells (CDPSCs. The results indicated that CDPSCs had a higher proliferative and stronger osteogenic differentiation potential than DPSCs. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the biological differences between DPSCs and CDPSCs are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular features of DPSCs and CDPSCs by comparing the proteomic profiles using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Our results revealed that there were 18 protein spots differentially expressed between DPSCs and CDPSCs in a narrow pH range of 4 to 7. These differently expressed proteins are mostly involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, cell cytoskeleton and motility. In addition, our results suggested that CDPSCs had a higher expression of antioxidative proteins that might protect CDPSCs from oxidative stress. This study explores some potential proteins responsible for the biological differences between DPSCs and CDPSCs and expands our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of mineralization of DPSCs in the formation of the dentin-pulp complex.

  8. Transcriptome and proteome characterization of surface ectoderm cells differentiated from human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ying; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Wei; Han, Bingchen; Yu-Rice, Yi; Gao, Bowen; Johnson, Jeffery; Svendsen, Clive N; Freeman, Michael R; Giuliano, Armando E; Sareen, Dhruv; Cui, Xiaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Surface ectoderm (SE) cells give rise to structures including the epidermis and ectodermal associated appendages such as hair, eye, and the mammary gland. In this study, we validate a protocol that utilizes BMP4 and the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT to induce SE differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). hiPSC-differentiated SE cells expressed markers suggesting their commitment to the SE lineage. Computational analyses using integrated quantitative transcriptomic and proteomic profiling reveal that TGFβ superfamily signaling pathways are preferentially activated in SE cells compared with hiPSCs. SE differentiation can be enhanced by selectively blocking TGFβ-RI signaling. We also show that SE cells and neural ectoderm cells possess distinct gene expression patterns and signaling networks as indicated by functional Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Our findings advance current understanding of early human SE cell development and pave the way for modeling of SE-derived tissue development, studying disease pathogenesis, and development of regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:27550649

  9. The Proteomic Landscape of Human Ex Vivo Regulatory and Conventional T Cells Reveals Specific Metabolic Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; Carbone, Fortunata; Di Silvestre, Dario; Brambilla, Francesca; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Faicchia, Deriggio; Marone, Gianni; Tramontano, Donatella; Corona, Marco; Alviggi, Carlo; Porcellini, Antonio; La Cava, Antonio; Mauri, Pierluigi; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+CD127− Treg and CD4+CD25−Foxp3− Tconv cell functions are governed by their metabolic requirements. Here we report a comprehensive comparative analysis between ex vivo human Treg and Tconv cells that comprises analyses of the proteomic networks in subcellular compartments. We identified a dominant proteomic signature at the metabolic level that primarily impacted the highly-tuned balance between glucose and fatty-acid oxidation in the two cell types. Ex vivo Treg cells were highly glycolytic while Tconv cells used predominantly fatty-acid oxidation (FAO). When cultured in vitro, Treg cells engaged both glycolysis and FAO to proliferate, while Tconv cell proliferation mainly relied on glucose metabolism. Our unbiased proteomic analysis provides a molecular picture of the impact of metabolism on ex vivo human Treg versus Tconv cell functions that might be relevant for therapeutic manipulations of these cells. PMID:26885861

  10. The Proteomic Landscape of Human Ex Vivo Regulatory and Conventional T Cells Reveals Specific Metabolic Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procaccini, Claudio; Carbone, Fortunata; Di Silvestre, Dario; Brambilla, Francesca; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Faicchia, Deriggio; Marone, Gianni; Tramontano, Donatella; Corona, Marco; Alviggi, Carlo; Porcellini, Antonio; La Cava, Antonio; Mauri, Pierluigi; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-02-16

    Human CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+)CD127(-) Treg and CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(-) Tconv cell functions are governed by their metabolic requirements. Here we report a comprehensive comparative analysis between ex vivo human Treg and Tconv cells that comprises analyses of the proteomic networks in subcellular compartments. We identified a dominant proteomic signature at the metabolic level that primarily impacted the highly-tuned balance between glucose and fatty-acid oxidation in the two cell types. Ex vivo Treg cells were highly glycolytic while Tconv cells used predominantly fatty-acid oxidation (FAO). When cultured in vitro, Treg cells engaged both glycolysis and FAO to proliferate, while Tconv cell proliferation mainly relied on glucose metabolism. Our unbiased proteomic analysis provides a molecular picture of the impact of metabolism on ex vivo human Treg versus Tconv cell functions that might be relevant for therapeutic manipulations of these cells. PMID:26885861

  11. Net haemoglobin increase from reinfusion of refrigerated vs. frozen red blood cells after autologous blood transfusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashenden, M; Mørkeberg, Jakob Sehested

    2011-01-01

    freezing. Nevertheless, frozen storage allowed haemoglobin to fully recover before reinfusion, while the haemoglobin was 10% lower in the refrigerated group compared with baseline. After reinfusion, the haemoglobin levels were 11·5% higher than the baseline values in the group reinfused with frozen blood......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES  Two main blood storage procedures can be used for storing red blood cells: refrigeration and freezing. Nevertheless, the efficiency of these procedures measured as the increase in haemoglobin after reinfusion compared with baseline has never been examined. The main...... objective was to examine which storage procedure yielded the largest increase in circulating haemoglobin after reinfusion compared to baseline. MATERIALS AND METHODS  Equal volumes of blood from 15 men were withdrawn and stored either frozen or refrigerated as packed red blood cells. Serial measures...

  12. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  13. Proteomics Technologies and Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics is the study of proteins and their interactions in a cell. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, the emphasis is shifting to the protein compliment of the human organism. Because proteome reflects more accurately on the dynamic state of a cell, tissue, or organism, much is expected from proteomics to yield better disease markers for diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The advent of proteomics technologies for global detection and quantitation of proteins creates new opportunities and challenges for those seeking to gain greater understanding of diseases. High-throughput proteomics technologies combining with advanced bioinformatics are extensively used to identify molecular signatures of diseases based on protein pathways and signaling cascades. Mass spectrometry plays a vital role in proteomics and has become an indispensable tool for molecular and cellular biology. While the potential is great, many challenges and issues remain to be solved, such as mining low abundant proteins and integration of proteomics with genomics and metabolomics data. Nevertheless, proteomics is the foundation for constructing and extracting useful knowledge to biomedical research. In this review, a snapshot of contemporary issues in proteomics technologies is discussed.

  14. A proteomic and genetic analysis of the Neurospora crassa conidia cell wall proteins identifies two glycosyl hydrolases involved in cell wall remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Jie; Aldabbous, Mash'el; Notaro, Marysa J; Lojacono, Mark; Free, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    A proteomic analysis of the conidial cell wall identified 35 cell wall proteins. A comparison with the proteome of the vegetative hyphae showed that 16 cell wall proteins were shared, and that these shared cell wall proteins were cell wall biosynthetic proteins or cell wall structural proteins. Deletion mutants for 34 of the genes were analyzed for phenotypes indicative of conidial cell wall defects. Mutants for two cell wall glycosyl hydrolases, the CGL-1 β-1,3-glucanase (NCU07523) and the NAG-1 exochitinase (NCU10852), were found to have a conidial separation phenotype. These two enzymes function in remodeling the cell wall between adjacent conidia to facilitate conidia formation and dissemination. Using promoter::RFP and promoter::GFP constructs, we demonstrated that the promoters for 15 of the conidia-specific cell wall genes, including cgl-1 and nag-1, provided for conidia-specific gene expression or for a significant increase in their expression during conidiation. PMID:27381444

  15. Vesicle-associated microRNAs are released from blood cells on incubation of blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köberle, Verena; Kakoschky, Bianca; Ibrahim, Ahmed Atef; Schmithals, Christian; Peveling-Oberhag, Jan; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kronenberger, Bernd; Waidmann, Oliver; Pleli, Thomas; Piiper, Albrecht

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) circulating extracellularly in the blood are currently intensively studied as novel disease markers. However, the preanalytical factors influencing the levels of the extracellular miRNAs are still incompletely explored. In particular, it is unknown, whether the incubation of blood samples as occurring in clinical routine can lead to a release of miRNAs from blood cells and thus alter the extracellular miRNA levels before the preparation of serum or plasma from the blood cells. Using a set of marker miRNAs and quantitative RT-PCR, we found that the levels of extracellular miRNA-1, miRNA-16, and miRNA-21 were increased in EDTA and serum collection tubes incubated for 1-3 hours at room temperature and declined thereafter; the levels of the liver-specific miRNA-122 declined monophasically. These events occurred in the absence of significant hemolysis. When the blood was supplemented with Ribonuclease A inhibitor, the levels of miRNA-1, miRNA-16, and miRNA-21 increased substantially during the initial 3 hours of incubation and those of miRNA-122 remained unchanged, indicating that the release of blood cell-derived miRNAs occurred during the initial 3 hours of incubation of the blood tubes, but not at later time points. Separation of 5-hour preincubated blood into vesicle and nonvesicle fractions revealed a selective increase in the portion of vesicle-associated miRNAs. Together, these data indicate that the release of vesicle-associated miRNAs from blood cells can occur in blood samples within the time elapsing in normal clinical practice until their processing without significant hemolysis. This becomes particularly visible on the inhibition of miRNA degradation by Ribonuclease A inhibitor. PMID:26608461

  16. WHITE BLOOD CELLS IN POLISH ATHLETES OF VARIOUS SPORTS DISCIPLINES

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Orysiak; Konrad Witek; Piotr Zmijewski; Jan Gajewski

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the diversity of white blood cell (WBC) counts and their subsets (neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes) among competitive athletes of different sports disciplines. The blood samples were collected from 608 healthy, medically examined athletes (181 females and 427 males) aged 20.1 ± 5.1 years, who represented five sport disciplines: canoeing, judo, rowing, swimming and volleyball. All blood samples were taken from the antecubital vein in the morning, ...

  17. Transfusion management of patients with red blood cell antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Bujandrić Nevenka B.; Grujić Jasmina N.; Krga-Milanović Mirjana M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Red blood cell antibodies may cause a positive result of pre-transfusion blood compatibility testing (crossmatch test). It can be a problem to provide suitable blood units for patients with clinically significant antibodies to high-frequency antigens as well as for those with multiple alloantibody specificities. This study was aimed at identifying transfused patients in the population of South-Backa who had developed clinically significant red...

  18. Dynamic Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Mesenchyme Reveals Novel Factors That Enhance Human Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger A. Russ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC to pancreatic beta cell differentiation have largely been based on knowledge gained from developmental studies of the epithelial pancreas, while the potential roles of other supporting tissue compartments have not been fully explored. One such tissue is the pancreatic mesenchyme that supports epithelial organogenesis throughout embryogenesis. We hypothesized that detailed characterization of the pancreatic mesenchyme might result in the identification of novel factors not used in current differentiation protocols. Supplementing existing hESC differentiation conditions with such factors might create a more comprehensive simulation of normal development in cell culture. To validate our hypothesis, we took advantage of a novel transgenic mouse model to isolate the pancreatic mesenchyme at distinct embryonic and postnatal stages for subsequent proteomic analysis. Refined sample preparation and analysis conditions across four embryonic and prenatal time points resulted in the identification of 21,498 peptides with high-confidence mapping to 1,502 proteins. Expression analysis of pancreata confirmed the presence of three potentially important factors in cell differentiation: Galectin-1 (LGALS1, Neuroplastin (NPTN, and the Laminin α-2 subunit (LAMA2. Two of the three factors (LGALS1 and LAMA2 increased expression of pancreatic progenitor transcript levels in a published hESC to beta cell differentiation protocol. In addition, LAMA2 partially blocks cell culture induced beta cell dedifferentiation. Summarily, we provide evidence that proteomic analysis of supporting tissues such as the pancreatic mesenchyme allows for the identification of potentially important factors guiding hESC to pancreas differentiation.

  19. Dynamic Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Mesenchyme Reveals Novel Factors That Enhance Human Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Holger A; Landsman, Limor; Moss, Christopher L; Higdon, Roger; Greer, Renee L; Kaihara, Kelly; Salamon, Randy; Kolker, Eugene; Hebrok, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) to pancreatic beta cell differentiation have largely been based on knowledge gained from developmental studies of the epithelial pancreas, while the potential roles of other supporting tissue compartments have not been fully explored. One such tissue is the pancreatic mesenchyme that supports epithelial organogenesis throughout embryogenesis. We hypothesized that detailed characterization of the pancreatic mesenchyme might result in the identification of novel factors not used in current differentiation protocols. Supplementing existing hESC differentiation conditions with such factors might create a more comprehensive simulation of normal development in cell culture. To validate our hypothesis, we took advantage of a novel transgenic mouse model to isolate the pancreatic mesenchyme at distinct embryonic and postnatal stages for subsequent proteomic analysis. Refined sample preparation and analysis conditions across four embryonic and prenatal time points resulted in the identification of 21,498 peptides with high-confidence mapping to 1,502 proteins. Expression analysis of pancreata confirmed the presence of three potentially important factors in cell differentiation: Galectin-1 (LGALS1), Neuroplastin (NPTN), and the Laminin α-2 subunit (LAMA2). Two of the three factors (LGALS1 and LAMA2) increased expression of pancreatic progenitor transcript levels in a published hESC to beta cell differentiation protocol. In addition, LAMA2 partially blocks cell culture induced beta cell dedifferentiation. Summarily, we provide evidence that proteomic analysis of supporting tissues such as the pancreatic mesenchyme allows for the identification of potentially important factors guiding hESC to pancreas differentiation. PMID:26681951

  20. Proteomic analysis of apoptosis induction by lariciresinol in human HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhan-Jun; Wang, Xue-Xi; Su, Gang; Yang, Jing-Jing; Zhu, Ya-Juan; Wu, You-Wei; Li, Jing; Lu, Li; Zeng, Long; Pei, Hai-Xia

    2016-08-25

    Lariciresinol (LA) is a traditional Chinese medicine possessing anticancer activity, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. The present study explored the effects of LA on human HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism. Our data indicated that LA inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, subsequently resulting in apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Using a proteomics approach, eight differentially expressed proteins were identified. Among them, three proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, UDP-glucose 4-epimerase, and annexin A1, were upregulated, while the other five proteins, heat shock protein 27, haptoglobin, tropomodulin-2, tubulin alpha-1A chain, and brain acid soluble protein 1, were downregulated; all of these proteins are involved in cell proliferation, metabolism, cytoskeletal organization, and movement. Network analysis of these proteins suggested that the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (UBC) plays an important role in the mechanism of LA. Western blotting confirmed downregulation of heat shock protein 27 and upregulation of ubiquitin and UBC expression levels in LA-treated cells, consistent with the results of two-dimensional electrophoresis and a STRING software-based analysis. Overall, LA is a multi-target compound with anti-cancer effects potentially related to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. This study will increase our understanding of the anticancer mechanisms of LA. PMID:27417256

  1. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and quantitative comparison of the membrane proteomes of self-renewing and differentiating human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Johansen, Pia T;

    2009-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a powerful quantitative proteomics platform for comprehensive characterization of complex biological systems. However, the potential of SILAC-based approaches has not been fully utilized in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research...

  2. Non-biased enrichment does not improve quantitative proteomic delineation of reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cell protein alterations

    OpenAIRE

    KevinM.Coombs

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based methods have allowed elucidation of alterations in complex proteomes, such as eukaryotic cells. Such studies have identified and measured relative abundances of thousands of host proteins after cells are infected with a virus. One of the potential limitations in such studies is that generally only the most abundant proteins are identified, leaving the deep richness of the cellular proteome largely unexplored. We differentially labeled HeLa cells with light and heavy st...

  3. Deep diving in the blood stem cell-ome

    OpenAIRE

    Kalaitzidis, Demetrios; Scadden, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Defining the functional distinctions between cells comprising the bone marrow has yielded fundamental insights into lineage ordering and drivers of blood cell production. A novel, highly granular and multi-dimensional molecular characterization of functional subsets of hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells recently published in Cell Stem Cell (Cabezas-Wallscheid et al, 2014) will serve as a landmark and treasure trove for unanticipated insights into basic biology and the development of fut...

  4. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  5. Safety and radiation risks in the labelling of blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk in the management of radioactive material and biological exposition to infectious agents. Protocols and normative to observe GOOD RADIOPHARMACY Practices. Main infectious agents that may be transmitted during preparation of a blood cell radiopharmaceutical. Problems of contamination

  6. High-throughput quantitative proteomic analysis of dengue virus type 2 infected A549 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chen Chiu

    Full Text Available Disease caused by dengue virus is a global health concern with up to 390 million individuals infected annually worldwide. There are no vaccines or antiviral compounds available to either prevent or treat dengue disease which may be fatal. To increase our understanding of the interaction of dengue virus with the host cell, we analyzed changes in the proteome of human A549 cells in response to dengue virus type 2 infection using stable isotope labelling in cell culture (SILAC in combination with high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS. Mock and infected A549 cells were fractionated into nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts before analysis to identify proteins that redistribute between cellular compartments during infection and reduce the complexity of the analysis. We identified and quantified 3098 and 2115 proteins in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions respectively. Proteins that showed a significant alteration in amount during infection were examined using gene enrichment, pathway and network analysis tools. The analyses revealed that dengue virus infection modulated the amounts of proteins involved in the interferon and unfolded protein responses, lipid metabolism and the cell cycle. The SILAC-MS results were validated for a select number of proteins over a time course of infection by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Our study demonstrates for the first time the power of SILAC-MS for identifying and quantifying novel changes in cellular protein amounts in response to dengue virus infection.

  7. Proteomic analysis of the effect of iptakalim on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxia YANG; Zhengxia LIU; Shu ZHANG; Yu JING; Shijiang ZHANG; Weiping XIE; Lei MA; Changliang ZHU; Hong WANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the anti-proliferative effect of iptakalim (Ipt),a newly selective KATP channel opener,in endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) using proteomic analysis.Methods: Human PASMCs were incubated with ET-1 (10-8 mol/L) and ETA (10-8 mol/L) plus iptaklim (10-5 mol/L) for 24 h.Analysis via 2-DE gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS was employed to display the different protein profiles of whole-cell protein from cultures of control,ET-1 treatment alone,and treatment with ET-1 and iptaklim combined.Real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the proteomic analysis.Results: When iptakalim inhibited the proliferative effect of ET-1 in human PASMCs by opening the KATP channels,the expression of different groups of cellular proteins was changed,including cytoskeleton-associated proteins,plasma mem-brane proteins and receptors,chaperone proteins,ion transport-associated proteins,and glycolytic and metabolism-associ-ated proteins.We found that iptakalim could inhibit the proliferation of human PASMCs partly by affecting the expression of Hsp60,vimentin,nucleoporin P54 (NUP54) and Bcl-XL by opening the KATP channel.Conclusion: The data suggest that a wide range of signaling pathways may be involved in abolishing ET-1-induced prolif-eration of human PASMCs following iptakalim treatment.

  8. Proteomic analysis of hippocampal dentate granule cells in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Application of laser capture technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YairM.Gozal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is the most common cause of dementia with pre-senile onset, accounting for as many as 20% of cases. A common subset of FTLD cases is characterized by the presence of ubiquitinated inclusions in vulnerable neurons (FTLD-U. While the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in FTLD-U have not yet been elucidated, the presence of inclusions in this disease indicates enhanced aggregation of one or several proteins. Moreover, these inclusions suggest altered expression, processing, or degradation of proteins during FTLD-U pathogenesis. Thus, one approach to understanding disease mechanisms is to delineate the molecular changes in protein composition in FTLD-U brain. Using a combined approach consisting of laser capture microdissection (LCM and high resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, we identified 1252 proteins in hippocampal dentate granule cells excised from three post-mortem FTLD-U and three unaffected control cases processed in parallel. Additionally, we employed a labeling-free quantification technique to compare the abundance of the identified proteins between FTLD-U and control cases. Quantification revealed 54 proteins with selective enrichment in FTLD-U, including TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43, a recently identified component of ubiquitinated inclusions. Moreover, 19 proteins were selectively decreased in FTLD-U. Subsequent immunohistochemical analysis of TDP-43 and three additional protein candidates suggests that our proteomic profiling of FTLD-U dentate granule cells reveals both inclusion-associated proteins and non-aggregated disease-specific proteins. Application of LCM is a valuable tool in the molecular analysis of complex tissues, and its application in the proteomic characterization of neurodegenerative disorders such as FTLD-U may be used to identify proteins altered in disease.

  9. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, B.H.; Vidarsson, G.; Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Diagnostically, for HDFN laboratory tests are in place in order to predict risk for severe fetal RBC destruction and thereby initiate appropriate treatments. This test is sensitive, but has relativel...

  10. Analysis of proteome response to the mobile phone radiation in two types of human primary endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kuster Niels; Nylund Reetta; Leszczynski Dariusz

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Use of mobile phones has widely increased over the past decade. However, in spite of the extensive research, the question of potential health effects of the mobile phone radiation remains unanswered. We have earlier proposed, and applied, proteomics as a tool to study biological effects of the mobile phone radiation, using as a model human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. Exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 900 MHz GSM radiation has caused statistically significant changes in exp...

  11. Analysis of proteome response to the mobile phone radiation in two types of human primary endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nylund, Reetta; KUSTER, Niels; Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of mobile phones has widely increased over the past decade. However, in spite of the extensive research, the question of potential health effects of the mobile phone radiation remains unanswered. We have earlier proposed, and applied, proteomics as a tool to study biological effects of the mobile phone radiation, using as a model human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. Exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 900 MHz GSM radiation has caused statistically significant changes in expression o...

  12. Proteomic identification of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein as a plasma biomarker of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    TIAN, WEN-DONG; Li, Jun-Zheng; Hu, Shui-Wang; Peng, Xiao-wei; Li, Gang; LIU, Xiong; Chen, Huai-hong; Xu, Xia; Li, Xiang-ping

    2015-01-01

    Hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) has very poor prognosis compared with other head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Late-stage diagnosis of HSCC increases mortality. Therefore, more effective biomarkers for early diagnosis of HSCC are necessary. Unfortunately, appropriate biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis have not been identified yet. However, recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to identify plasma proteins as biomarkers for HSCC....

  13. Genomic and proteomic analyses of Prdm5 reveal interactions with insulator binding proteins in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Carrara, Matteo; Francavilla, Chiara;

    2013-01-01

    find that Prdm5 is highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (mES) and exploit this cellular system to characterize molecular functions of Prdm5. By combining proteomics and next generation sequencing technologies we identify Prdm5 interaction partners and genomic occupancy. We demonstrate that......-occupies genomic loci. In summary, our data indicate how Prdm5 may modulate transcription by interacting with factors involved in genome organization in mouse embryonic stem cells....

  14. Integration of genomic and proteomic data to identify candidate genes in HT-29 cells after incubation with Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Gui; Wu, Yaoping; Qiu, Liang; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng; Wei, Hua

    2016-09-01

    As the predominant group inhabiting the human gastrointestinal tract, bifidobacteria play a vital role in human nutrition, therapeutics, and health by shaping and maintaining the gut ecosystem, reducing blood cholesterol, and promoting the supply of nutrients. The interaction between bacterial cells and human intestinal epithelial cell lines has been studied for decades in an attempt to understand the mechanisms of action. These studies, however, have been limited by lack of genomic and proteomic database to aid in achieving comprehensive understanding of these mechanisms at molecular levels. Microarray data (GSE: 74119) coupled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) were performed to detect differentially expressed genes and proteins in HT-29 cells after incubation with Bifidobacterium bifidum. Real-time quantitative PCR, gene ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses were further conducted for mRNA validation, functional annotation, and pathway identification, respectively. According to the results of microarray, 1,717 differentially expressed genes, including 1,693 upregulated and 24 downregulated genes, were selected and classified by the gene ontology database. The iTRAQ analysis identified 43 differentially expressed proteins, where 29 proteins were upregulated and 14 proteins were downregulated. Eighty-two candidate genes showing consistent differences with microarray and iTRAQ were further validated in HT-29 and Caco-2 cells by real-time quantitative PCR. Nine of the top genes showing interesting results with high confidence were further investigated in vivo in mice intestine samples. Integration of genomic and proteomic data provides an approach to identify candidate genes that are more likely to function in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, positive regulation of apoptosis, membrane proteins, and transferase catalysis. These findings might contribute to our understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating the

  15. Raman spectroscopy of stored red blood cells: evaluating clinically-relevant biochemical markers in donated blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Chad G.; Buckley, Kevin; Chen, Deborah; Schulze, H. G.; Devine, Dana V.; Blades, Michael W.; Turner, Robin F. B.

    2015-07-01

    Modern transfusion medicine relies on the safe, secure, and cost-effective delivery of donated red blood cells (RBCs). Once isolated, RBCs are suspended in a defined additive solution and stored in plastic blood bags in which, over time, they undergo chemical, physiological, and morphological changes that may have a deleterious impact on some patients. Regulations limit the storage period to 42 days and the cells do not routinely undergo analytical testing before use. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy to interrogate stored RBCs and we identify metabolic and cell-breakdown products, such as haemoglobin and membrane fragments, that build-up in the blood bags as the cells age. Our work points the way to the development of an instrument which could quickly and easily assess the biochemical nature of stored RBC units before they are transfused.

  16. Extracting Biological Meaning From Global Proteomic Data on Circulating-Blood Platelets: Effects of Diabetes and Storage Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P.

    2008-11-25

    Transfusion of platelets into patients suffering from trauma and a variety of disease is a common medical practice that involves millions of units per year. Partial activation of platelets can result in the release of bioactive proteins and lipid mediators that increase the risk of adverse post-transfusion effects. Type-2 diabetes and storage are two factors known to cause partial activation of platelets. A global proteomic study was undertaken to investigate these effects. In this paper we discuss the methods used to interpret these data in terms of biological processes affected by diabetes and storage. The main emphasis is on the processing of proteomic data for gene ontology enrichment analysis by techniques originally designed for microarray data.

  17. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of dioscin on human HCT-116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2014-01-01

    Dioscin shows various pharmacological effects. However, its activity on colorectal cancer is still unknown. The present work showed that dioscin significantly inhibited cell proliferation on human HCT-116 colon cancer cells, and affected Ca(2+) release and ROS generation. The content of nitric oxide (NO) and its producer inducible NO synthase (iNOS) associated with DNA damage and aberrant cell signaling were assayed using the kits. DNA damage and cell apoptosis caused by dioscin were also analyzed through single-cell gel electrophoresis and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assays. The results showed that dioscin increased the levels of NO and inducible NO synthase. The comet length in dioscin-treated groups was much longer than that of the control group, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling positive cells (apoptotic cells) was significantly increased by the compound (p dioscin caused mitochondrial damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest through transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. To study the cytotoxic mechanism of dioscin, an iTRAQ-based proteomics approach was used. There were 288 significantly different proteins expressed in response to dioscin, which were connected with each other and were involved in different Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Then, some differentially expressed proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, Wnt, p53, and calcium signaling pathways were validated by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR assays. Our work elucidates the molecular mechanism of dioscin-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells, and the identified targets may be useful for treatment of colorectal cancer in future. PMID:24420967

  18. A Discrete-Element Approach for Blood Cell Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer; Marshall, Jeffrey

    2006-11-01

    An efficient computational model for simulation of the individual dynamics of adhering blood cells is discussed. Each cell is represented as a discrete particle so that the model can extend existing discrete-element approaches for dense particulate fluid flows to account for receptor-ligand binding of particles, elliptical particle shape, and deformation of the particles due to shear forces. Capabilities of the method in simulating large numbers of particles are illustrated through simulations of the formation of red blood cell rouleaux in shear flow. The effects of several factors, such as aspect ratio of the elliptical particle, shear rate, strength of the cell adhesion force, and hematocrit are investigated. Comparison of the discrete-element results with results of a level-set approach which computes the entire flow field about a small number of cells is used to develop an improved model of the effect of nearby red blood cells on the cell drag force expression. The method is also being applied to examine the influence of red blood cells on other components of the blood, such as platelet dispersion and activation in high shear regions.

  19. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Andrés Penuela

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods: Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one of two groups: erythropoietin (addition of 665 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin and control (isotonic buffer solution was added. The pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin were estimated and the following parameters were measured weekly, for six weeks: Immunoreactive erythropoietin, hemolysis, percentage of non-discocytes, adenosine triphosphate, glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, and annexin-V/esterase activity. The t-test or Wilcoxon's test was used for statistical analysis with significance being set for a p-value 6 weeks under blood bank conditions, with persistent supernatant concentrations of erythropoietin during the entire storage period. Adenosine triphosphate was higher in the Erythropoietin Group in Week 6 (4.19 ± 0.05 µmol/L vs. 3.53 ± 0.02 µmol/L; p-value = 0.009. The number of viable cells in the Erythropoietin Group was higher than in the Control Group (77% ± 3.8% vs. 71% ± 2.3%; p-value <0.05, while the number of apoptotic cells was lower (9.4% ± 0.3% vs. 22% ± 0.8%; p-value <0.05. Conclusions: Under standard blood bank conditions, an important proportion of red blood cells satisfy the criteria of apoptosis. Recombinant human erythropoietin beta seems to improve storage lesion parameters and mitigate apoptosis.

  20. Supernatant of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induces Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Possessing Mesenchymal Features

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Gang; Xu, Jun-jun; Deng, Zhi-Hong; Feng, Jie; Jin, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that some cells from peripheral blood fibroblast-like mononuclear cells have the capacity to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages. However, the insufficiency of these cells in the circulation challenges the cell isolation and subsequently limits the clinical application of these cells. In the present study, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pbMNCs) were isolated from wound animals and treated with the supernatant of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (bmM...

  1. Comparative Studies of the Proteome, Glycoproteome, and N-Glycome of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Plasma before and after Curative Nephrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Gbormittah, Francisca O.; Lee, Ling Y.; Taylor, KyOnese; Hancock, William S.; Iliopoulos, Othon

    2014-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma is the most prevalent of all reported kidney cancer cases, and currently there are no markers for early diagnosis. This has stimulated great research interest recently because early detection of the disease can significantly improve the low survival rate. Combining the proteome, glycoproteome, and N-glycome data from clear cell renal cell carcinoma plasma has the potential of identifying candidate markers for early diagnosis and prognosis and/or to monitor dise...

  2. Morphologic and proteomic characterization of exosomes released by cultured extravillous trophoblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exosomes represent an important intercellular communication vehicle, mediating events essential for the decidual microenvironment. While we have demonstrated exosome induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, to date, no extensive characterization of trophoblast-derived exosomes has been provided. Our objective was to provide a morphologic and proteomic characterization of these exosomes. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned media of Swan71 human trophoblast cells by ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. These were analyzed for density (sucrose density gradient centrifugation), morphology (electron microscopy), size (dynamic light scattering) and protein composition (Ion Trap mass spectrometry and western immunoblotting). Based on density gradient centrifugation, microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit a density between 1.134 and 1.173 g/ml. Electron microscopy demonstrated that microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit the characteristic cup-shaped morphology of exosomes. Dynamic light scattering showed a bell-shaped curve, indicating a homogeneous population with a mean size of 165 nm ± 0.5 nm. Ion Trap mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of exosome marker proteins (including CD81, Alix, cytoskeleton related proteins, and Rab family). The MS results were confirmed by western immunoblotting. Based on morphology, density, size and protein composition, we defined the release of exosomes from extravillous trophoblast cells and provide their first extensive characterization. This characterization is essential in furthering our understanding of 'normal' early pregnancy.

  3. Morphologic and proteomic characterization of exosomes released by cultured extravillous trophoblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, Safinur [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Gercel-Taylor, Cicek [Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Kesimer, Mehmet [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Taylor, Douglas D., E-mail: ddtaylor@louisville.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women' s Health, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Exosomes represent an important intercellular communication vehicle, mediating events essential for the decidual microenvironment. While we have demonstrated exosome induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, to date, no extensive characterization of trophoblast-derived exosomes has been provided. Our objective was to provide a morphologic and proteomic characterization of these exosomes. Exosomes were isolated from the conditioned media of Swan71 human trophoblast cells by ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation. These were analyzed for density (sucrose density gradient centrifugation), morphology (electron microscopy), size (dynamic light scattering) and protein composition (Ion Trap mass spectrometry and western immunoblotting). Based on density gradient centrifugation, microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit a density between 1.134 and 1.173 g/ml. Electron microscopy demonstrated that microvesicles from Sw71 cells exhibit the characteristic cup-shaped morphology of exosomes. Dynamic light scattering showed a bell-shaped curve, indicating a homogeneous population with a mean size of 165 nm {+-} 0.5 nm. Ion Trap mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of exosome marker proteins (including CD81, Alix, cytoskeleton related proteins, and Rab family). The MS results were confirmed by western immunoblotting. Based on morphology, density, size and protein composition, we defined the release of exosomes from extravillous trophoblast cells and provide their first extensive characterization. This characterization is essential in furthering our understanding of 'normal' early pregnancy.

  4. Comparative proteomics analysis of lanthanum citrate complex-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study,the lanthanum citrate complex([LaCit2]3-) has been found to induce apoptosis in the human HeLa cervical cancer cell line.To clarify the mechanism,we carried out comparative proteomics analysis between treated and control cells.Differentially expressed proteins were separated electrophoretically and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry.There were profound changes in 14 proteins related to mitochondrial function and oxidative stress,suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in [LaCit2]3--induced apoptosis.This was confirmed by a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential,and increases in cytochrome c release and reactive oxygen species generation in [LaCit2]3--treated cells.Western blotting analyses show that [LaCit2]3--induced apoptosis was accompanied by the activation of caspase-9 and the specific proteolytic cleavage of PARP,leading to an increase in the proapoptotic protein Bax and a decrease in the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2.These results suggest that [LaCit2]3-induced the apoptosis of HeLa cells through oxidative stress mediated pathway involving MT participation.

  5. The effects of quercetin on SW480 human colon carcinoma cells: a proteomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hargrove James L

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High fruit and vegetable intake is known to reduce the risk of colon cancer. To improve understanding of this phenomenon the action of different phytochemicals on colon cells has been examined. One such compound is quercetin that belongs to the group known as flavonoids. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of quercetin on the proteome of the SW480 human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, specifically to identify proteins that could be the molecular targets of quercetin in its amelioration of the progression of colon cancer. To this end, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify proteins that underwent a change in expression following treatment of the cells with 20 μM quercetin. This could elucidate how quercetin may reduce the progression of colon cancer. Results Quercetin treatment of the SW480 human colon cancer cells was found to result in the decreased expression of three proteins and the increased expression of one protein. The identified proteins with decreased expression were type II cytoskeletal 8 keratin and NADH dehydrogenase Fe-S protein 3. The other protein with decreased expression was not identified. The protein with increased expression belonged to the annexin family. Conclusion Several proteins were determined to have altered expression following treatment with quercetin. Such changes in the levels of these particular proteins could underlie the chemo-protective action of quercetin towards colon cancer.

  6. Comprehensive transcriptomic and proteomic characterization of human mesenchymal stem cells reveals source specific cellular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billing, Anja M; Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Dib, Shaima S; Cotton, Richard J; Bhagwat, Aditya M; Kumar, Pankaj; Hayat, Shahina; Yousri, Noha A; Goswami, Neha; Suhre, Karsten; Rafii, Arash; Graumann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are multipotent cells with great potential in therapy, reflected by more than 500 MSC-based clinical trials registered with the NIH. MSC are derived from multiple tissues but require invasive harvesting and imply donor-to-donor variability. Embryonic stem cell-derived MSC (ESC-MSC) may provide an alternative, but how similar they are to ex vivo MSC is unknown. Here we performed an in depth characterization of human ESC-MSC, comparing them to human bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) as well as human embryonic stem cells (hESC) by transcriptomics (RNA-seq) and quantitative proteomics (nanoLC-MS/MS using SILAC). Data integration highlighted and validated a central role of vesicle-mediated transport and exosomes in MSC biology and also demonstrated, through enrichment analysis, their versatility and broad application potential. Particular emphasis was placed on comparing profiles between ESC-MSC and BM-MSC and assessing their equivalency. Data presented here shows that differences between ESC-MSC and BM-MSC are similar in magnitude to those reported for MSC of different origin and the former may thus represent an alternative source for therapeutic applications. Finally, we report an unprecedented coverage of MSC CD markers, as well as membrane associated proteins which may benefit immunofluorescence-based applications and contribute to a refined molecular description of MSC. PMID:26857143

  7. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  8. A Framework for White Blood Cell Segmentation in Microscopic Blood Images Using Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Seman Zainina; Abdul Kahar Badrul; Sadeghian Farnoosh; Ramli Abdul; Saripan M-Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of blood smear is a commonly clinical test these days. Most of the time, the hematologists are interested on white blood cells (WBCs) only. Digital image processing techniques can help them in their analysis and diagnosis. For example, disease like acute leukemia is detected based on the amount and condition of the WBC. The main objective of this paper is to segment the WBC to its two dominant elements: nucleus and cytoplasm. The segmentation is conducted using a proposed ...

  9. Quantitative proteomic study of human prostate cancer cells with different metastatic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Li, Yilei; Wang, Yanying; Cui, Zheng; Gong, Lulu; Qu, Zhigang; Zhong, Yanping; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yong; Li, Yulin

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic dissemination is a feature of most cancers including prostate cancer (PCa), and is the main cause of treatment failure and mortality. The aim of the study is to explore the mechanisms of PCa metastasis and to search for potential prognostic markers using proteomics. Two-dimensional fluorescent differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was used to quantify proteins in normal prostate epithelial cells, bone metastasis-derived PC-3 cells, and visceral metastasis-derived PC-3M cells. Metastatic potential was confirmed by flow cytometry, electron microscopy, proliferating cell nuclear antigen assay, and wound healing assay. Differential protein expression was compared between PCa cells with different metastatic potentials (LNcap, DU145, PC-3 and PC-3M) and normal prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1). Selected candidate proteins in human prostate tissues were analyzed using GOA, UniProt and GeneCards analyses. Eighty-six proteins were differentially expressed between cell lines (>1.5-fold, P<0.05). Among them, twelve proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. One protein was upregulated in normal prostate epithelial cells, nine proteins were upregulated in PC-3, and two proteins were upregulated in PC-3M. Proteins were divided into five groups according to their functions. The SETDB1 protein was closely associated with the prognosis of PCa. Bioinformatics suggested that SETDB1 might promote PCa bone metastasis through the WNT pathway. In conclusion, SETDB1 might be associated with the development of bone metastases from PCa. Further study is necessary to assess its exact role in PCa. PMID:26846621

  10. Quantitative proteomic analysis for radiation-induced cell cycle suspension in 92-1 melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor with high invasive and metastatic properties. Though radiation is the major therapy for melanoma, its radio-resistance has been shown to severely influence the clinical outcome. So it is imperative to enhance the sensitivity of uveal melanoma cells to radiotherapy. Previously, we found that the cell cycle of 92-1 uveal melanoma cells was suspended and remained unchanged for up to 5 days after exposure to 10 Gy of X-rays, which might be relevant to the high radio-sensitivity of 92-1 cells. To further investigate the cell cycle suspension-associated proteins, we employed two analyses with stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture technology and two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Cells were incubated for 15 h or 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy of X-rays. We identified a total of 737 proteins at 15 h (Group A) and 530 proteins at 48 h post-irradiation (Group B). The gene ontology biological pathway was used to obtain a systems level view of proteome changes in 92-1 cells under cell cycle suspension. We further selected the significantly changed proteins for investigation of their potential contribution to cell cycle suspension, growth arrest and cell senescence. These proteins are involved in the cell cycle, stress response, glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, etc. Our study expected to reveal potential marker proteins associated with cell suspension induced by irradiation, which might contribute to understanding the mechanism beyond the cell cycle suspension. (author)

  11. Plumbagin elicits differential proteomic responses mainly involving cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qui JX

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jia-Xuan Qiu,1,2 Zhi-Wei Zhou, 3,4 Zhi-Xu He,4 Ruan Jin Zhao,5 Xueji Zhang,6 Lun Yang,7 Shu-Feng Zhou,3,4 Zong-Fu Mao11School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 4Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China; 5Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Sarasota, FL, USA; 6Research Center for Bioengineering and Sensing Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 7Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Development and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Plumbagin (PLB has exhibited a potent anticancer effect in preclinical studies, but the molecular interactome remains elusive. This study aimed to compare the quantitative proteomic responses to PLB treatment in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells using the approach of stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. The data were finally validated using Western blot assay. First, the bioinformatic analysis predicted that PLB could interact with 78 proteins that were involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis, immunity, and signal transduction. Our quantitative proteomic study using SILAC revealed that there were at least 1,225 and 267 proteins interacting with PLB and there were 341 and 107 signaling pathways and cellular functions potentially regulated by PLB in PC-3 and DU145 cells, respectively. These proteins and pathways played a

  12. [Introduction and prospect of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Y

    1995-12-01

    The number of hematopoietic stem cells circulating in peripheral blood increases remarkably during the recovery of marrow function after myelosuppressive chemotherapy. In peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, these stem cells are collected and cryopreserved, and then used to restore marrow function after myelodisruptive (high-dose) anticancer therapy, Marrow recovery is faster with this procedure than with autologous bone marrow transplantation. Recently, this procedure has been used after high-dose chemotherapy for chemosensitive solid tumors such as breast cancer. We used high-dose chemotherapy with etoposide and carboplatin, followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, to treat 5 patients with intrathoracic malignant tumors, including small cell lung cancer Neutrophils recovered (> 500 microliters) with 9 to 11 days and platelets recovered (> 5,000 microliters) within 8 to 13 days after the transplantation. No other serious complication was seen. Current topics regarding this procedure, problems to be solved, and prospects for further development are discussed. PMID:8752478

  13. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Patrick; Wagner, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) are known to form aggregates in the forms of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. Rouleaux formation can be also induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC solution. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly rely on indirect measurements like flow chamber experiments, but on the single cell level data is lacking. Here we present measurements on the dextran induced aggregation of red blood cells by use of atomic force microscopy based single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs was determined. The results are in good agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and former experimental studies.

  14. Effect of red blood cell aggregation and sedimentation on optical coherence tomography signals from blood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, Monte Carlo simulation is used to obtain model optical coherence tomography (OCT) signals from a horizontally orientated blood layer at different stages of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and sedimentation processes. The parameters for aggregating and sedimenting blood cells were chosen based on the data available from the literature and our earlier experimental studies. We consider two different cases: a suspension of washed RBCs in physiological solution (where aggregation does not take place) and RBCs in blood plasma (which provides necessary conditions for aggregation). Good agreement of the simulation results with the available experimental data shows that the chosen optical parameters are reasonable. The dependence of the numbers of photons contributing to the OCT signal on the number of experienced scattering events was analysed for each simulated signal. It was shown that the maxima of these dependences correspond to the peaks in the OCT signals related to the interfaces between the layers of blood plasma and blood cells. Their positions can be calculated from the optical thicknesses of the layers, and the absorption and scattering coefficients of the media

  15. Following red blood cells in a pulmonary capillary

    CERN Document Server

    Mauroy, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The red blood cells or erythrocytes are biconcave shaped cells and consist mostly in a membrane delimiting a cytosol with a high concentration in hemoglobin. This membrane is highly deformable and allows the cells to go through narrow passages like the capillaries which diameters can be much smaller than red blood cells one. They carry oxygen thanks to hemoglobin, a complex molecule that have very high affinity for oxygen. The capacity of erythrocytes to load and unload oxygen is thus a determinant factor in their efficacy. In this paper, we will focus on the pulmonary capillary where red blood cells capture oxygen. We propose a camera method in order to numerically study the behavior of the red blood cell along a whole capillary. Our goal is to understand how erythrocytes geometrical changes along the capillary can affect its capacity to capture oxygen. The first part of this document presents the model chosen for the red blood cells along with the numerical method used to determine and follow their shapes a...

  16. Analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic profiles demonstrates improved Madin-Darby canine kidney cell function in a renal microfluidic biochip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snouber, Leila Choucha; Letourneur, Franck; Chafey, Philippe; Broussard, Cedric; Monge, Matthieu; Legallais, Cécile; Leclerc, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We have evaluated the influence of the microfluidic environment on renal cell functionality. For that purpose, we performed a time lapse transcriptomic and proteomic analysis in which we compared gene and protein expressions of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells after 24 h and 96 h of culture in both microfluidic biochips and plates. The transcriptomic and proteomic integration revealed that the ion transporters involved in calcium, phosphate, and sodium homoeostasis and several genes involved in H(+) transporters and pH regulation were up-regulated in microfluidic biochips. Concerning drug metabolism, we found Phase I (CYP P450), Phase II enzymes (GST), various multidrug resistance genes (MRP), and Phase III transporters (SLC) were also up-regulated in the biochips. Furthermore, the study shows that those inductions were correlated with the induction of the Ahr and Nrf-2 dependent pathways, which results in a global cytoprotective response induced by the microenvironment. However, there was no apoptosis situation or cell death in the biochips. Microfluidic biochips may thus provide an important insight into exploring xenobiotic injury and transport modifications in this type of bioartificial microfluidic kidney. Finally, the investigation demonstrated that combining the transcriptomic and proteomic analyses obtained from a cell "on chip" culture would provide a pertinent new tool in the mechanistic interpretation of cellular mechanisms for predicting kidney cell toxicity and renal clearance in vitro. PMID:22095740

  17. Blood thixotropy in patients with sickle cell anaemia: role of haematocrit and red blood cell rheological properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Vent-Schmidt

    Full Text Available We compared the blood thixotropic/shear-thinning properties and the red blood cells' (RBC rheological properties between a group of patients with sickle cell anaemia (SS and healthy individuals (AA. Blood thixotropy was determined by measuring blood viscosity with a capillary viscometer using a "loop" protocol: the shear rate started at 1 s-1 and increased progressively to 922 s-1 and then re-decreased to the initial shear rate. Measurements were performed at native haematocrit for the two groups and at 25% and 40% haematocrit for the AA and SS individuals, respectively. RBC deformability was determined by ektacytometry and RBC aggregation properties by laser backscatter versus time. AA at native haematocrit had higher blood thixotropic index than SS at native haematocrit and AA at 25% haematocrit. At 40% haematocrit, SS had higher blood thixotropic index than AA. While RBC deformability and aggregation were lower in SS than in AA, the strength of RBC aggregates was higher in the former population. Our results showed that 1 anaemia is the main modulator of blood thixtropy and 2 the low RBC deformability and high RBC aggregates strength cause higher blood thixotropy in SS patients than in AA individuals at 40% haematocrit, which could impact blood flow in certain vascular compartments.

  18. IMAGING RED BLOOD CELL DYNAMICS BY QUANTITATIVE PHASE MICROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, YoungKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Michael S. Feld; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a crucial role in health and disease, and structural and mechanical abnormalities of these cells have been associated with important disorders such as Sickle cell disease and hereditary cytoskeletal abnormalities. Although several experimental methods exist for analysis of RBC mechanical properties, optical methods stand out as they enable collecting mechanical and dynamic data from live cells without physical contact and without the need for exogenous contrast age...

  19. Hypoxia/hypercapnia-induced adaptation maintains functional capacity of cord blood stem and progenitor cells at 4°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaski, Marija; Negroni, Luc; Kovacevic-Filipovic, Milica; Guibert, Christelle; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Chevaleyre, Jean; Duchez, Pascale; Lafarge, Xavier; Praloran, Vincent; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Ivanovic, Zoran

    2014-12-01

    We analyzed the effect of exposure to hypoxic/hypercapnic (HH) gas mixture (5% O2 /9% CO2 ) on the maintenance of functional cord blood CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in severe hypothermia (4°C) employing the physiological and proteomic approaches. Ten-day exposure to HH maintained the Day 0 (D-0) level of hematopoietic stem cells as detected in vivo on the basis of hematopoietic repopulation of immunodeficient mice-short-term scid repopulating cells (SRC). Conversely, in the atmospheric air (20% O2 /0.05% CO2 ), usual condition used for cell storage at 4°C, stem cell activity was significantly decreased. Also, HH doubled the survival of CD34(+) cells and committed progenitors (CFCs) with respect to the atmospheric air (60% vs. 30%, respectively). Improved cell maintenance in HH was associated with higher proportion of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive cells. Cell-protective effects are associated with an improved maintenance of the plasma and mitochondrial membrane potential and with a conversion to the glycolytic energetic state. We also showed that HH decreased apoptosis, despite a sustained ROS production and a drop of ATP amount per viable cell. The proteomic study revealed that the global protein content was better preserved in HH. This analysis identified: (i) proteins sensitive or insensitive to hypothermia irrespective of the gas phase, and (ii) proteins related to the HH cell-protective effect. Among them are some protein families known to be implicated in the prolonged survival of hibernating animals in hypothermia. These findings suggest a way to optimize short-term cell conservation without freezing. PMID:24912010

  20. The homeostasis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob M A Mauritz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The asexual reproduction cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for severe malaria, occurs within red blood cells. A merozoite invades a red cell in the circulation, develops and multiplies, and after about 48 hours ruptures the host cell, releasing 15-32 merozoites ready to invade new red blood cells. During this cycle, the parasite increases the host cell permeability so much that when similar permeabilization was simulated on uninfected red cells, lysis occurred before approximately 48 h. So how could infected cells, with a growing parasite inside, prevent lysis before the parasite has completed its developmental cycle? A mathematical model of the homeostasis of infected red cells suggested that it is the wasteful consumption of host cell hemoglobin that prevents early lysis by the progressive reduction in the colloid-osmotic pressure within the host (the colloid-osmotic hypothesis. However, two critical model predictions, that infected cells would swell to near prelytic sphericity and that the hemoglobin concentration would become progressively reduced, remained controversial. In this paper, we are able for the first time to correlate model predictions with recent experimental data in the literature and explore the fine details of the homeostasis of infected red blood cells during five model-defined periods of parasite development. The conclusions suggest that infected red cells do reach proximity to lytic rupture regardless of their actual volume, thus requiring a progressive reduction in their hemoglobin concentration to prevent premature lysis.

  1. Comparative Proteomics Study on Human High-metastatic Large Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Before and After Transfecting with nm23-H1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei GAO

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective As a tumor metastasis suppressor gene, the functions of nm23-H1 gene are still unclear. The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanism of lung cancer metastasis and to find new biomarkers for early diagnosis and new target for therapy by conducting comparative proteomics between the human high-metastatic large cell lung cancer cell lines (L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 (constructed with transfecting nm23-H1 gene into the L9981 cell line. Methods The total proteins of L9981 and L9981-nm23-H1 were separated by immobilized pH gradient (IPG-based 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE; the significantly differently expressed proteins were examined by mass spectrometry and analyzed by bioinformatics. Results It was observed that nm23-H1 gene transfection caused remarkable changes of the proteome of L9981 compared with L9981-nm23-H1 cells: 5 proteins were deleted, 9 proteins appeared, 16 proteins downregulated, and 12 proteins up-regulated. These proteins are involved in cell framework, signal transduction, metabolism, proliferation and metastasis. Conclusion After nm23-H1 gene is transfected into L9981, proteome in L9981 is remarkably changed. These changes of the proteome could serve as a basis for reversing the invasive and metastatic phenotype in lung cancer and elucidating the machanisms of the metastasis of lung cancer.

  2. Systematic analysis of asymmetric partitioning of yeast proteome between mother and daughter cells reveals “aging factors” and mechanism of lifespan asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jing; McCormick, Mark A.; Zheng, Jiashun; Xie, Zhengwei; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Tsuchiyama, Scott; El-Samad, Hana; Ouyang, Qi; Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian K.; Li, Hao

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we took a proteome-centric view to analyze the cell division and lifespan asymmetry between mother and daughter cells in budding yeast. Using a flow cytometry-based, high-throughput approach, we quantified the partitioning of the proteome and identified 74 mother-enriched and 60 daughter-enriched proteins. Functional analysis of these proteins suggests mechanisms of asymmetric partitioning at an organelle/suborganelle level. We found that mother-enriched proteins are much more l...

  3. In situ Proteomic Profiling of Curcumin Targets in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Wong, Yin Kwan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the exact targets and mechanism of action of curcumin, a natural product with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, remain elusive. Here we synthesized a cell permeable curcumin probe (Cur-P) with an alkyne moiety, which can be tagged with biotin for affinity enrichment, or with a fluorescent dye for visualization of the direct-binding protein targets of curcumin in situ. iTRAQ(TM) quantitative proteomics approach was applied to distinguish the specific binding targets from the non-specific ones. In total, 197 proteins were confidently identified as curcumin binding targets from HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the targets are broadly distributed and enriched in the nucleus, mitochondria and plasma membrane, and they are involved in various biological functions including metabolic process, regulation, response to stimulus and cellular process. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis(TM) (IPA) suggested that curcumin may exert its anticancer effects over multiple critical biological pathways including the EIF2, eIF4/p70S6K, mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways. Functional validations confirmed that curcumin downregulates cellular protein synthesis, and induces autophagy, lysosomal activation and increased ROS production, thus leading to cell death. PMID:26915414

  4. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from

  5. Sex hormone drives blood stem cell reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Lee, Lydia K.; Mikkola, Hanna K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells ensure the maintenance of tissue homeostasis throughout life by tightly regulating their self-renewal and differentiation. In a recent study published in Nature, Nakada et al, 2014 unveil an unexpected endocrine mechanism that regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal.

  6. Spatial distributions of red blood cells significantly alter local haemodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Sherwood

    Full Text Available Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics.

  7. Proteomic Identification of LASP-1 Down-regulation After RNAi Urokinase Silencing in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Salvi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the high expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA is an unfavorable prognostic factor and a therapeutic target. To identify the downstream effects of uPA silencing by RNA interference, we studied proteome modifications of uPA-inhibited SKHep1C3 cells, an HCC-derived cell line. The study with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry showed Lim and SH3 protein 1 (LASP-1, cytokeratin 1 (CK-1, cytokeratin 10 (CK-10, and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 down-modulation after uPA inhibition. LASP-1, CK-1, and CK-10 are involved in cytoskeleton dynamics as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 takes part in the mRNA processing and stability. We first confirmed the proteomic data by Western blot and immunoflorescence and then explored the link between uPA and LASP-1. The ectopic expression of uPA and LASP-1 supported the proteomic results and showed that uPA up-regulation increased LASP-1 expression and that both were implicated in SKHep1C3 motility. siRNA LASP-1 inhibition showed that LASP-1 was involved in actin microfilaments organization of SKHep1C3 cells. The disruption of the actin microfilaments after LASP-1 depletion increased uPA secretion and SKHep1C3 motility. Our results would suggest the hypothesis that uPA and LASP-1 expression may be coordinated in HCC-derived cells. In summary, the proteomic identification of a set of uPA downstream proteins provides new insight into the function of uPA in HCC cells.

  8. Hyaluronic Acid-Human Blood Hydrogels for Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Connie Y. Chang; Chan, Angel; Armstrong, Patrick; Luo, Hong-Chang; Higuchi, Takahiro; Strehin, Iossif; Vakrou, Styliani; Lin, Xiaoping; Brown, Sophia; O’Rourke, Brian; Abraham, Theodore P.; Wahl, Richard; Steenbergen, Charles; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering-based approaches have the potential to improve stem cell engraftment by increasing cell delivery to the myocardium. Our objective was to develop and characterize a naturally-derived, autologous, biodegradable hydrogel in order to improve acute stem cell retention in the myocardium. HA-blood hydrogels(HA-Bl) were synthesized by mixing in a 1:1(v/v) ratio, lysed whole blood and hyaluronic acid(HA), whose carboxyl groups were functionalized with N-hydroxysuccinimide(NHS) to yi...

  9. On-chip Extraction of Intracellular Molecules in White Blood Cells from Whole Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongchan; Hyun, Ji-Chul; Yang, Sung

    2015-10-01

    The extraction of virological markers in white blood cells (WBCs) from whole blood—without reagents, electricity, or instruments—is the most important first step for diagnostic testing of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. Here we develop an integrated microfluidic chip that continuously separates WBCs from whole blood and mechanically ruptures them to extract intracellular proteins and nucleic acids for diagnostic purposes. The integrated chip is assembled with a device that separates WBCs by using differences in blood cell size and a mechanical cell lysis chip with ultra-sharp nanoblade arrays. We demonstrate the performance of the integrated device by quantitatively analyzing the levels of extracted intracellular proteins and genomic DNAs. Our results show that compared with a conventional method, the device yields 120% higher level of total protein amount and similar levels of gDNA (90.3%). To demonstrate its clinical application to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnostics, the developed chip was used to process blood samples containing HIV-infected cells. Based on PCR results, we demonstrate that the chip can extract HIV proviral DNAs from infected cells with a population as low as 102/μl. These findings suggest that the developed device has potential application in point-of-care testing for infectious diseases in developing countries.

  10. Data from proteomic characterization of the role of Snail1 in murine mesenchymal stem cells and 3T3-L1 fibroblasts differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Peláez-García

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor (TF Snail1 is a major inducer of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT during embryonic development and cancer progression. Ectopic expression of Snail in murine mesenchymal stem cells (mMSC abrogated their differentiation to osteoblasts or adipocytes. We used either stable isotopic metabolic labeling (SILAC for 3T3-L1 cells or isobaric labeling with tandem mass tags (TMT for mMSC stably transfected cells with Snail1 or control. We carried out a proteomic analysis on the nuclear fraction since Snail is a nuclear TF that mediates its effects mainly through the regulation of other TFs. Proteomics data have been deposited in ProteomeXchange via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001529 and PXD002157 (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [1]. Data are associated with a research article published in Molecular and Cellular Proteomics (Pelaez-Garcia et al., 2015 [2].

  11. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje;

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells gener...

  12. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are most commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells ... use of BMT and PBSCT, see http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/fa... If you are interested in ...

  13. Transfusion management of patients with red blood cell antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujandrić Nevenka B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Red blood cell antibodies may cause a positive result of pre-transfusion blood compatibility testing (crossmatch test. It can be a problem to provide suitable blood units for patients with clinically significant antibodies to high-frequency antigens as well as for those with multiple alloantibody specificities. This study was aimed at identifying transfused patients in the population of South-Backa who had developed clinically significant red blood cell alloantibodies. Material and methods. We analyzed the records of crossmatch results and antibody screening performed at the Blood Transfusion Institute of Vojvodina during 2012. Results. Antibodies were found in 103 patients: A 63 patients with single antibodies: 1 16 with antibodies of unknown specificity (3 autoantibodies, 13 alloantibodies; 2 39 with clinically significant antibodies (23 from Rh system (2 anti-C, 2 anti-D, 12 anti-E, 7 anti-c, 4 anti-K, 3 anti-Fya, 7 anti-Jka, 2 anti-S; 3 8 with usually not significant antibodies (6 anti-M, 1 anti-A1, 1 anti- Cw; B 40 patients developed multiple antibodies: 1 all patients had at least one clinically significant antibody from various blood group system (44 Rh, 13 Kell, 7 Kidd, 7 MNSs (S, s; 2 3 patients had usually not significant antibodies (1 Lewis, 2 Lutheran; 3 3 patients occasionally had clinically significant antibody (3 anti- Yta; 4 3 patients had antibodies of unknown specificity (2 autoantibodies, 1alloantibody. Antibodies detected in the majority of patients (65-63.1% had a specificity of Rh and/or the Kell system. Conclusions. The main goal of pre-transfusion blood compatibility testing is to detect clinically significant antibodies. The provision of antigen negative blood units for those patients is a special challenge for blood establishments. Database with a sufficient number of typed blood donors can help to resolve this problem.

  14. Filtration parameters influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A W Coumans

    Full Text Available Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·10(4∶10(2∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm(2 track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC.

  15. CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Pafumi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the relation between umbilical cord clamping time and two different enrichment system of CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood with the proliferative ability and bone marrow reconstitution of the stem cells obtained. After an obstetrician performed the cord blood collection, the purification of stem cells was performed either with a combination of monoclonal antibodies (negative selections using the Stem Sep method, or with a positive cells selection based on their surface CD34 antigens using the Mini Macs system. An excellent recovery of haematopoietic progenitors [Burst Forming Unit Erythroids (BFUE; Colony Forming Unit Granulocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GM; and Colony Forming Unit Granulocytes, Erythroids, Monocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GME], inversely related to the increase in clamping time, was performed with the Mini Macs system (54% of colonies, with 90% purity. With Stem Sep method, haematopoietic progenitor’s recovery was 35% (with 80% purity. By applying early clamping of umbilical cord blood we obtained a greater number of CD34+ cells and their clonogenic activity was increased with enrichment. This is a useful technique considering that the number of CD34+ stem cells usually contained from a unit of placental blood is enough for the transplant to a child, but not for an adult. Thus, using these methods, we can get a larger number of CD34+ stem cells which reduces the risk of Graft versus Host Disease also in adult patients, producing survival rates similar to those obtained with transplantation of bone marrow from unrelated donors.

  16. CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfio D’Agati

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the relation between umbilical cord clamping time and two different enrichment system of CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood with the proliferative ability and bone marrow reconstitution of the stem cells obtained. After an obstetrician performed the cord blood collection, the purification of stem cells was performed either with a combination of monoclonal antibodies (negative selections using the Stem Sep method, or with a positive cells selection based on their surface CD34 antigens using the Mini Macs system. An excellent recovery of haematopoietic progenitors [Burst Forming Unit Erythroids (BFUE; Colony Forming Unit Granulocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GM; and Colony Forming Unit Granulocytes, Erythroids, Monocytes and Macrophages (CFU-GME], inversely related to the increase in clamping time, was performed with the Mini Macs system (54% of colonies, with 90% purity. With Stem Sep method, haematopoietic progenitor’s recovery was 35% (with 80% purity. By applying early clamping of umbilical cord blood we obtained a greater number of CD34+ cells and their clonogenic activity was increased with enrichment. This is a useful technique considering that the number of CD34+ stem cells usually contained from a unit of placental blood is enough for the transplant to a child, but not for an adult. Thus, using these methods, we can get a larger number of CD34+ stem cells which reduces the risk of Graft versus Host Disease also in adult patients, producing survival rates similar to those obtained with transplantation of bone marrow from unrelated donors.

  17. Peripheral blood derived cells and angiogenesis in cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Post, S

    2009-01-01

    Patients suffering from myocardial infarction (MI), atherosclerosis and Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia type 1 (HHT-1) all have diseased and dysfunctional blood vessels. Cardiovascular repair in these diseases occurs not only locally, but also peripheral blood (progenitor) cells and cytokines/growth factors positively contribute to repair of malfunctioning tissue. In this thesis several aspects of cardiovascular repair have been explored. First, we show that in MI patients relatively la...

  18. In-vitro red blood cell partitioning of doxycycline

    OpenAIRE

    Deshmukh, P.V.; Badgujar, P.C.; Gatne, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In-vitro red blood cell (RBC) partitioning of doxycycline was studied to determine whether doxycycline penetrates RBC and its concentration was assayed keeping in view its high lipophilicity. Materials and Methods: Standardization of doxycycline was performed in whole blood and plasma of cattle by microbiological assay using Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633 as indicator organizm. Actual concentration of the drug was obtained by comparing zone inhibition with standard graph and the exte...

  19. Bacterial glycosidases for the production of universal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qiyong P; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Yuan, Huaiping;

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic removal of blood group ABO antigens to develop universal red blood cells (RBCs) was a pioneering vision originally proposed more than 25 years ago. Although the feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in clinical trials for group B RBCs, a major obstacle in translating this...... alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase family reveals an unusual catalytic mechanism involving NAD+. The enzymatic conversion processes we describe hold promise for achieving the goal of producing universal RBCs, which would improve the blood supply while enhancing the safety of clinical transfusions....

  20. Proteomic Profiling of Recombinant Escherichia coli in High-Cell- Density Fermentations for Improved Production of an Antibody Fragment Biopharmaceutical

    OpenAIRE

    Aldor, Ilana S.; Krawitz, Denise C.; Forrest, William; Chen, Christina; Nishihara, Julie C.; Joly, John C.; Champion, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    By using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, a proteomic analysis over time was conducted with high-cell-density, industrial, phosphate-limited Escherichia coli fermentations at the 10-liter scale. During production, a recombinant, humanized antibody fragment was secreted and assembled in a soluble form in the periplasm. E. coli protein changes associated with culture conditions were distinguished from protein changes associated with heterologous protein expression. Protein sp...

  1. Proteomic analysis of the action of the Mycobacterium ulcerans toxin mycolactone: targeting host cells cytoskeleton and collagen.

    OpenAIRE

    Gama, José B.; Steffen Ohlmeier; Martins, Teresa G.; Fraga, Alexandra G.; Belém Sampaio-Marques; Carvalho, Maria A.; Fernanda Proença; Silva, Manuel T.; Jorge Pedrosa; Paula Ludovico

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The tissue damage characteristic of BU lesions is known to be driven by the secretion of the potent lipidic exotoxin mycolactone. However, the molecular action of mycolactone on host cell biology mediating cytopathogenesis is not fully understood. Here we applied two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) to identify the mechanisms of mycolactone's cellular action in the L929 mouse fibroblast proteome. This reveal...

  2. Proteomic Analysis of the Action of the Mycobacterium ulcerans Toxin Mycolactone: Targeting Host Cells Cytoskeleton and Collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Gama, José B.; Ohlmeier, S.; Martins, Teresa G.; Fraga, Alexandra G.; Marques, Belém Sampaio; Carvalho, M. Alice; Proença, M. Fernanda R. P.; Silva, Manuel T.; Pedrosa, Jorge; Ludovico, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The tissue damage characteristic of BU lesions is known to be driven by the secretion of the potent lipidic exotoxin mycolactone. However, the molecular action of mycolactone on host cell biology mediating cytopathogenesis is not fully understood. Here we applied two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) to identify the mechanisms of mycolactone's cellular action in the L929 mouse fibroblast proteome. This reveal...

  3. Proteome analysis of functionally differentiated bovine (Bos indicus) mammary epithelial cells isolated from milk

    KAUST Repository

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh

    2013-10-01

    Mammary gland is made up of a branching network of ducts that end in alveoli. Terminally differentiated mammary epithelial cells (MECs) constitute the innermost layer of aveoli. They are milk-secreting cuboidal cells that secrete milk proteins during lactation. Little is known about the expression profile of proteins in the metabolically active MECs during lactation or their functional role in the lactation process. In the present investigation, we have reported the proteome map of MECs in lactating cows using 2DE MALDI-TOF/TOF MS and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS. MECs were isolated from milk using immunomagnetic beads and confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS and 2DE-MS/MS based approaches led to identification of 431 and 134 proteins, respectively, with a total of 497 unique proteins. Proteins identified in this study were clustered into functional groups using bioinformatics tools. Pathway analysis of the identified proteins revealed 28 pathways (p < 0.05) providing evidence for involvement of various proteins in lactation function. This study further provides experimental evidence for the presence of many proteins that have been predicted in annotated bovine genome. The data generated further provide a set of bovine MEC-specific proteins that will help the researchers to understand the molecular events taking place during lactation. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufeng Liu

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP, UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1 and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection.

  5. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; Zhao, Ting; Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  6. Comparison of Chloroflexus aurantiacus strain J-10-fl proteomes of cells grown chemoheterotrophically and photoheterotrophically

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Li; Bryant, Donald A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Vogl, Kajetan; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Callister, Stephen J.

    2012-01-17

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl is a thermophilic green bacterium, a filamentous anoxygenic phototroph, and the model organism of the phylum Chloroflexi. We applied high-throughput, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in a global quantitative proteomics investigation of C. aurantiacus cells grown under oxic (chemoorganoheterotrophically) and anoxic (photoorganoheterotrophically) redox states. Our global analysis identified 13,524 high-confidence peptides that matched to 1,286 annotated proteins, 242 of which were either uniquely identified or significantly increased in abundance under anoxic culture conditions. Fifty-three of the 242 proteins are previously characterized photosynthesis-related proteins, including chlorosome proteins, proteins involved in the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis, 3-hydroxypropionate (3-OHP) CO2 fixation pathway, and components of electron transport chains. The remaining 190 proteins have not previously been reported. Of these, five proteins were found to be encoded by genes from a novel operon and observed only in photoheterotrophically grown cells. These proteins candidates may prove useful in further deciphering the phototrophic physiology of C. aurantiacus and other filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs.

  7. SMIM1 underlies the Vel blood group and influences red blood cell traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvejic, Ana; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Stephens, Jonathan C;

    2013-01-01

    The blood group Vel was discovered 60 years ago, but the underlying gene is unknown. Individuals negative for the Vel antigen are rare and are required for the safe transfusion of patients with antibodies to Vel. To identify the responsible gene, we sequenced the exomes of five individuals negative...... and expression of the Vel antigen on SMIM1-transfected cells confirm SMIM1 as the gene underlying the Vel blood group. An expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL), the common SNP rs1175550 contributes to variable expression of the Vel antigen (P = 0.003) and influences the mean hemoglobin concentration of red...... blood cells (RBCs; P = 8.6 × 10(-15)). In vivo, zebrafish with smim1 knockdown showed a mild reduction in the number of RBCs, identifying SMIM1 as a new regulator of RBC formation. Our findings are of immediate relevance, as the homozygous presence of the deletion allows the unequivocal identification...

  8. Separation of cancer cells from white blood cells by pinched flow fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant; Ashley, Neil; Koprowska, Kamila; Mir, Kalim U.; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Bilenberg, Brian; Bodmer, Walter; Kristensen, Anders; Marie, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the microfluidic size-separation technique pinched flow fractionation (PFF) is used to separate cancer cells from white blood cells (WBCs). The cells are separated at efficiencies above 90% for both cell types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are found in the blood of cancer patients...... challenged by the size overlap between cancer cells and the 106 times more abundant WBCs. The size overlap prevents high efficiency separation, however we demonstrate that cell deformability can be exploited in PFF devices to gain higher efficiencies than expected from the size distribution of the cells....... and can form new tumors. CTCs are rare cells in blood, but they are important for the understanding of metastasis. There is therefore a high interest in developing a method for the enrichment of CTCs from blood samples, which also enables further analysis of the separated cells. The separation is...

  9. Aggregation of Red Blood Cells: From Rouleaux to Clot Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, C.; Steffen, P.; Svetina, S

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the binding mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the binding strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caus...

  10. Counting White Blood Cells from a Blood Smear Using Fourier Ptychographic Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jaebum; Ou, Xiaoze; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    White blood cell (WBC) count is a valuable metric for assisting with diagnosis or prognosis of various diseases such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, or infection. Counting WBCs can be done either manually or automatically. Automatic methods are capable of counting a large number of cells to give a statistically more accurate reading of the WBC count of a sample, but the specialized equipment tends to be expensive. Manual methods are inexpensive since they only involve a convention...

  11. Identification of malaria parasite-infected red blood cell surface aptamers by inertial microfluidic SELEX (I-SELEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Christina M.; Hou, Han Wei; Han, Jongyoon; Niles, Jacquin C.

    2015-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites invade and remodel human red blood cells (RBCs) by trafficking parasite-synthesized proteins to the RBC surface. While these proteins mediate interactions with host cells that contribute to disease pathogenesis, the infected RBC surface proteome remains poorly characterized. Here we use a novel strategy (I-SELEX) to discover high affinity aptamers that selectively recognize distinct epitopes uniquely present on parasite-infected RBCs. Based on inertial focusing in spiral microfluidic channels, I-SELEX enables stringent partitioning of cells (efficiency ≥ 106) from unbound oligonucleotides at high volume throughput (~2 × 106 cells min-1). Using an RBC model displaying a single, non-native antigen and live malaria parasite-infected RBCs as targets, we establish suitability of this strategy for de novo aptamer selections. We demonstrate recovery of a diverse set of aptamers that recognize distinct, surface-displayed epitopes on parasite-infected RBCs with nanomolar affinity, including an aptamer against the protein responsible for placental sequestration, var2CSA. These findings validate I-SELEX as a broadly applicable aptamer discovery platform that enables identification of new reagents for mapping the parasite-infected RBC surface proteome at higher molecular resolution to potentially contribute to malaria diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccine efforts.

  12. Depletion induced clustering of red blood cells in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    The flow properties of blood are determined by the physical properties of its main constituents, the red blood cells (RBC's). At low shear rates RBC's form aggregates, so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates can break them up and the viscosity of blood shows a shear thinning behavior. The physical origin of the rouleaux formation is not yet fully resolved and there are two competing models available. One predicts that the adhesion is induced by bridging of the plasma (macromolecular) proteins in-between two RBC's. The other is based on the depletion effect and thus predicts the absence of macromolecules in-between the cells of a rouleaux. Recent single cell force measurements by use of an AFM support strongly the depletion model. By varying the concentration of Dextran at different molecular weights we can control the adhesions strength. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the depletion induced adhesion strength.

  13. Assessing CMT cell line stability by two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry based proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kelan; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Fey, Stephen J;

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) followed by mass spectrometric identification of the proteins in the protein spots has become a central tool in proteomics. CMT167(H), CMT64(M) and CMT170(L) cell lines, selected from a spontaneous mouse lung adenocarcinoma, with high...... useful tool for assessing differences in cell line stability. This approach provided a tool to select the best cell line and optimal subculture period for studies of cancer related phenomena and for testing the effect of potential anticancer drugs....

  14. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Patient-Centered Approach - Duration: 4:12. NCIcancertopics 3,087 views 4:12 The Truth About Cord ... 19 Stem cell donation: Step by step - Duration: 3:35. hemaquebec1998 1,127 views 3:35 Two ...

  15. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 13:41. BOOKparty! 1,367 views 13:41 Bone marrow transplantation, donation procedure (HD, ENG subtitles) - Duration: 8:21. Marcin Ostajewski 155,257 views 8:21 Pain Control: Support for People with Cancer - Duration: 11:58. ... Bone Marrow/Stem Cell Transplant - Duration: 7:24. tannermom80 99,818 views 7: ...

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... 41. Annabelle Monks 3,487 views 4:41 Science Friction: Stem Cell Research - Duration: 54:44. Irishstemcell ...

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... views 4:25 Susan Solomon: The promise of research with stem cells - Duration: 14:59. TED 55, ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... playlist. Sign in Share More Report Need to report the video? Sign in to report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript 6,983 views ... Stem Cell Therapy Injections - Duration: 6:18. Caring Medical Regenerative Medicine Clinics 234,106 views 6:18 ...

  19. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:25 Susan Solomon: The promise of research with stem cells - Duration: 14:59. TED 54, ... 1:04 Pain Control: Support for People with Cancer - Duration: 11:58. NCIcancertopics 1,987 views 11: ...

  20. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). PMID:27282583

  1. Comparison of functional proteomic analyses of human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Adjo Aka

    Full Text Available T47D and MCF7 are two human hormone-dependent breast cancer cell lines which are widely used as experimental models for in vitro and in vivo (tumor xenografts breast cancer studies. Several proteins involved in cancer development were identified in these cell lines by proteomic analyses. Although these studies reported the proteomic profiles of each cell line, until now, their differential protein expression profiles have not been established. Here, we used two-dimensional gel and mass spectrometry analyses to compare the proteomic profiles of the two cell lines, T47D and MCF7. Our data revealed that more than 164 proteins are differentially expressed between them. According to their biological functions, the results showed that proteins involved in cell growth stimulation, anti-apoptosis mechanisms and cancerogenesis are more strongly expressed in T47D than in MCF7. These proteins include G1/S-specific cyclin-D3 and prohibitin. Proteins implicated in transcription repression and apoptosis regulation, including transcriptional repressor NF-X1, nitrilase homolog 2 and interleukin-10, are, on the contrary, more strongly expressed in MCF7 as compared to T47D. Five proteins that were previously described as breast cancer biomarkers, namely cathepsin D, cathepsin B, protein S100-A14, heat shock protein beta-1 (HSP27 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, are found to be differentially expressed in the two cell lines. A list of differentially expressed proteins between T47D and MCF7 was generated, providing useful information for further studies of breast cancer mechanisms with these cell lines as models.

  2. Nanoparticle encapsulation in red blood cells enables blood-pool magnetic particle imaging hours after injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging approach that is based on the nonlinear magnetization response of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) injected into the blood stream. To date, real-time MPI of the bolus passage of an approved MRI SPIO contrast agent injected into the tail vein of living mice has been demonstrated. However, nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood stream by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Therefore, imaging applications for long-term monitoring require the repeated administration of bolus injections, which complicates quantitative comparisons due to the temporal variations in concentration. Encapsulation of SPIOs into red blood cells (RBCs) has been suggested to increase the blood circulation time of nanoparticles. This work presents first evidence that SPIO-loaded RBCs can be imaged in the blood pool of mice several hours after injection using MPI. This finding is supported by magnetic particle spectroscopy performed to quantify the iron concentration in blood samples extracted from the mice 3 and 24 h after injection of SPIO-loaded RBCs. Based on these results, new MPI applications can be envisioned, such as permanent 3D real-time visualization of the vessel tree during interventional procedures, bleeding monitoring after stroke, or long-term monitoring and treatment control of cardiovascular diseases. (paper)

  3. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    CD163 and CD91 are scavenging receptors with highly increased expression during the differentiation of monocytes into the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. In addition, CD91 is expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), where the receptor is suggested to be important for...... internalization of CD91-targeted antigens to be presented on the dendritic cell surface for T-cell stimulation. Despite their overlap in functionality, the expression of CD91 and CD163 has never been compared and the expression of CD163 in the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage is not yet characterized. CD163...... expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...

  4. State of the science of blood cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood cell labeling can be considered a science in as far as it is based on precise knowledge and can be readily reproduced. This benchmark criterion is applied to all current cell labeling modalities and their relative merits and deficiencies are discussed. Mechanisms are given where they are known as well as labeling yields, label stability, and cell functionality. The focus is on the methodology and its suitability to the clinical setting rather than on clinical applications per se. Clinical results are cited only as proof of efficacy of the various methods. The emphasis is on technetium as the cell label, although comparisons are made between technetium and indium, and all blood cells are covered. 52 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Labelling of red blood cells with 99m pertechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a method for labelling red blood cells with 99mTc in vitro, using electrolytically generated stannous ions as the reducing agent for 99mTc-pertechnetate. A labelling of 95% was found. A method for the in vivo labelling of red blood cells is also reported. This involves an injection of a stanno-DTPA-complex followed 20 minutes later by a 99mTc-pertechnetate solution scintillation camera images show more background activity when the in vivo method of labelling is used

  6. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zhu, Jingde; Tian, Geng;

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome) analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per...... strand), we report a comprehensive (92.62%) methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found...

  7. Detection of hepatitis B virus DNA in mononuclear blood cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Pontisso, P; Poon, M C; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C

    1984-01-01

    The Southern transfer hybridisation technique was used to test mononuclear blood cells for hepatitis B virus DNA. Viral DNA sequences were detected in mononuclear cells of 10 out of 16 patients with hepatitis B virus infection and in none of 21 normal controls. Blood contamination was excluded by the absence of hepatitis B virus DNA in the corresponding serum samples in all cases. Free monomeric hepatitis B virus DNA was found in three patients positive for hepatitis Be antigen (HBeAg) and on...

  8. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Stephen F.; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of solub...

  9. Nanostructured Substrates for Capturing Circulating Tumor Cells in Whole Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-03-01

    Over the past decade, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has become an emerging ``biomarker'' for detecting early-stage cancer metastasis, predicting patient prognosis, as well as monitoring disease progression and therapeutic outcomes. However, isolation of CTCs has been technically challenging due to the extremely low abundance (a few to hundreds per ml) of CTCs among a high number of hematologic cells (109 per mL) in the blood. Our joint research team at UCLA has developed a new cell capture technology for quantification of CTCs in whole blood samples. Similar to most of the existing approaches, epithelial cell adhesion molecule antibody (anti-EpCAM) was grafted onto the surfaces to distinguish CTCs from the surrounding hematologic cells. The uniqueness of our technology is the use of nanostructured surfaces, which facilitates local topographical interactions between CTCs and substrates at the very first cell/substrate contacting time point. We demonstrated the ability of these nanostructured substrates to capture CTCs in whole blood samples with significantly improved efficiency and selectivity. The successful demonstration of this cell capture technology using brain, breast and prostate cancer cell lines encouraged us to test this approach in clinical setting. We have been able to bond our first validation study with a commercialized technology based on the use of immunomagnetic nanoparticles. A group of clinically well-characterized prostate cancer patients at UCLA hospital have been recruited and tested in parallel by these two technologies.

  10. Proteomic analysis of prolactinoma cells by immuno-laser capture microdissection combined with online two-dimensional nano-scale liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Luping

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pituitary adenomas, the third most common intracranial tumor, comprise nearly 16.7% of intracranial neoplasm and 25%-44% of pituitary adenomas are prolactinomas. Prolactinoma represents a complex heterogeneous mixture of cells including prolactin (PRL, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and other stromal cells, making it difficult to dissect the molecular and cellular mechanisms of prolactin cells in pituitary tumorigenesis through high-throughout-omics analysis. Our newly developed immuno-laser capture microdissection (LCM method would permit rapid and reliable procurement of prolactin cells from this heterogeneous tissue. Thus, prolactin cell specific molecular events involved in pituitary tumorigenesis and cell signaling can be approached by proteomic analysis. Results Proteins from immuno-LCM captured prolactin cells were digested; resulting peptides were separated by two dimensional-nanoscale liquid chromatography (2D-nanoLC/MS and characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. All MS/MS spectrums were analyzed by SEQUEST against the human International Protein Index database and a specific prolactinoma proteome consisting of 2243 proteins was identified. This collection of identified proteins by far represents the largest and the most comprehensive database of proteome for prolactinoma. Category analysis of the proteome revealed a widely unbiased access to various proteins with diverse functional characteristics. Conclusions This manuscript described a more comprehensive proteomic profile of prolactinomas compared to other previous published reports. Thanks to the application of immuno-LCM combined with online two-dimensional nano-scale liquid chromatography here permitted identification of more proteins and, to our best knowledge, generated the largest prolactinoma proteome. This enlarged proteome would contribute significantly to further understanding of prolactinoma tumorigenesis which is crucial to the management of

  11. Cytochemical characteristics of blood cells from Brazilian tortoises (Testudines: Testudinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, G S; Alevi, K C C; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V; Bonini-Domingos, C R

    2016-01-01

    The hematology of wild and captive animals is essential for obtaining details about species and represents a simple method of diagnosing disease and determining prognosis. Few studies have described the morphology of chelonian blood cells, which are more common in sea and freshwater turtle species. Thus, in order to further our understanding and recognition of different chelonian cells types, the present study aimed to describe blood cells from the two species of Brazilian tortoises, Chelonoidis carbonarius and C. denticulatus. Cytochemical analysis of tortoise blood tissue with Panótico®, made it possible to describe all the of the chelonian cell types (with the exception of thrombocytes): erythrocytes, agranular leukocytes (monocytes and lymphocytes), and granular leukocytes (eosinophils, heterophils, basophils, and azurophils). These data are of high importance for establishing hematological profiles of Brazilian tortoises and reptiles. Therefore, based on our results and on comparative analyses with data from the literature for other reptile species, we can conclude that the blood cells described for Brazilian tortoises are found in all species of reptiles that have been analyzed thus far, and may be characterized and used as a comparative parameter between different groups to evaluate the health status of these animals. PMID:27050968

  12. Thrombin regulates the function of human blood dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrombin is the key enzyme in the coagulation cascade and activates endothelial cells, neutrophils and monocytes via protease-activated receptors (PARs). At the inflammatory site, immune cells have an opportunity to encounter thrombin. However little is known about the effect of thrombin for dendritic cells (DC), which are efficient antigen-presenting cells and play important roles in initiating and regulating immune responses. The present study revealed that thrombin has the ability to stimulate blood DC. Plasmacytoid DC (PDC) and myeloid DC (MDC) isolated from PBMC expressed PAR-1 and released MCP-1, IL-10, and IL-12 after thrombin stimulation. Unlike blood DC, monocyte-derived DC (MoDC), differentiated in vitro did not express PAR-1 and were unresponsive to thrombin. Effects of thrombin on blood DC were significantly diminished by the addition of anti-PAR-1 Ab or hirudin, serine protease inhibitor. Moreover, thrombin induced HLA-DR and CD86 expression on DC and the thrombin-treated DC induced allogenic T cell proliferation. These findings indicate that thrombin plays a role in the regulation of blood DC functions

  13. Proteomic response to 5,6-dimethylxanthenone 4-acetic acid (DMXAA, vadimezan in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells determined by the stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan ST

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shu-Ting Pan,1,* Zhi-Wei Zhou,2,3,* Zhi-Xu He,3 Xueji Zhang,4 Tianxin Yang,5 Yin-Xue Yang,6 Dong Wang,7 Jia-Xuan Qiu,1 Shu-Feng Zhou2 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino-US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, 4Research Center for Bioengineering and Sensing Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah and Salt Lake Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 6Department of Colorectal Surgery, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan, 7Cancer Center, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These two authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone 4-acetic acid (DMXAA, also known as ASA404 and vadimezan, is a potent tumor blood vessel-disrupting agent and cytokine inducer used alone or in combination with other cytotoxic agents for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and other cancers. However, the latest Phase III clinical trial has shown frustrating outcomes in the treatment of NSCLC, since the therapeutic targets and underlying mechanism for the anticancer effect of DMXAA are not yet fully understood. This study aimed to examine the proteomic response to DMXAA and unveil the global molecular targets and possible mechanisms for the anticancer effect of DMXAA in NSCLC A549 cells using a stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC approach. The proteomic data showed that treatment with DMXAA

  14. Deep Proteomics of Breast Cancer Cells Reveals that Metformin Rewires Signaling Networks Away from a Pro-growth State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Francesca; Silvestri, Alessandra; Posca, Daniela; Pirrò, Stefano; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Castagnoli, Luisa; Mann, Matthias; Cesareni, Gianni

    2016-03-23

    Metformin is the most frequently prescribed drug for type 2 diabetes. In addition to its hypoglycemic effects, metformin also lowers cancer incidence. This anti-cancer activity is incompletely understood. Here, we profiled the metformin-dependent changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of breast cancer cells using high-resolution mass spectrometry. In total, we quantified changes of 7,875 proteins and 15,813 phosphosites after metformin changes. To interpret these datasets, we developed a generally applicable strategy that overlays metformin-dependent changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome onto a literature-derived network. This approach suggested that metformin treatment makes cancer cells more sensitive to apoptotic stimuli and less sensitive to pro-growth stimuli. These hypotheses were tested in vivo; as a proof-of-principle, we demonstrated that metformin inhibits the p70S6K-rpS6 axis in a PP2A-phosphatase dependent manner. In conclusion, analysis of deep proteomics reveals both detailed and global mechanisms that contribute to the anti-cancer activity of metformin. PMID:27135362

  15. Time-course proteomics dataset monitoring HeLa cells subjected to DTT induced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhe; Rendleman, Justin; Vogel, Christine

    2016-09-01

    The data described here provide an analysis of the dynamic response of HeLa cell proteome to dithiothreitol (DTT) inducing stress of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). During ER stress, accumulation of misfolded and unfolded proteins in the lumen of the ER initiates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), resulting in a large-scale redistribution of proteins. We used label-free mass spectrometry to monitor the proteomic changes of HeLa cells during a 30-h time course, monitoring eight time points (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 8, 16, 24, and 30 h). The data are associated with the research article "Differential dynamics of the mammalian mRNA and protein expression response to misfolding stress" [1], which discusses a core dataset of 1237 proteins. Here, we present the extended dataset of 2131 proteins. The raw mass spectrometry data and the analysis results have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002039. PMID:27547793

  16. Data from a comparative proteomic analysis of tumor-derived lung-cancer CD105(+) endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hongwei; Cheng, Xiao; Pei, Yihua; Fu, Jianguo; Lyu, Zhi; Peng, Huifang; Yao, Qin; Jiang, Yu; Luo, Lianzhong; Zhuo, Huiqin

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that tumor-derived endothelial cells (TECs) are more relevant for the study of tumor angiogenesis and for screening antiangiogenic drugs than normal ECs (NECs). In this data article, high-purity (>98%) primary CD105(+) NECs and TECs purified from a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma model bearing 0.5 cm tumors were identified using 2D-PAGE and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS/MS). All the identified proteins were categorized functionally by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, and gene-pathway annotated by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Finally, protein-protein interaction networks were also built. The proteomics and bioinformatics data presented here provide novel insights into the molecular characteristics and the early modulation of the TEC proteome in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27081670

  17. Effects of stem cell therapy on protein profile of parkinsonian rats using an(18) O-labeling quantitative proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yahui; Liu, Kefu; Qin, Wei; Liu, Chenghao; Zheng, Xiaowei; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The application of neural stem cell (NSC) research to neurodegenerative diseases has led to promising clinical trials. Currently, NSC therapy is most promising for Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted behavioral tests and immunoassays for the profiling of a PD model in rats to assess the therapeutic effects of NSC treatments. Further, using a multiple sample comparison workflow, combined with (18) O-labeled proteome mixtures, we compared the differentially expressed proteins from control, PD, and NSC-treated PD rats. The results were analyzed bioinformatically and verified by Western blot. Based on our initial findings, we believe that the proteomic approach is a valuable tool in evaluating the therapeutic effects of NSC transplantation on neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26791447

  18. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Yuk-kit

    2015-04-01

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient, and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1, and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma proteome analysis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mee Lee Looi; Saiful Anuar Karsani; Mariati Abdul Rahman; Ahmad Zailani Hatta Mohd Dali; Siti Aishah Md Ali; Wan Zurinah Wan Ngah; Yasmin Anum Mohd Yusof

    2009-12-01

    Although cervical cancer is preventable with early detection, it remains the second most common malignancy among women. An understanding of how proteins change in their expression during a particular diseased state such as cervical cancer will contribute to an understanding of how the disease develops and progresses. Potentially, it may also lead to the ability to predict the occurrence of the disease. With this in mind, we aimed to identify differentially expressed proteins in the plasma of cervical cancer patients. Plasma from control, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) stage IV subjects was resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the resulting proteome profiles compared. Differentially expressed protein spots were then identified by mass spectrometry. Eighteen proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the plasma of CIN 3 and SCC stage IV samples when compared with that of controls. Competitive ELISA further validated the expression of cytokeratin 19 and tetranectin. Functional analyses of these differentially expressed proteins will provide further insight into their potential role(s) in cervical cancer-specific monitoring and therapeutics.

  20. Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    Stem Cell Transplantation; Bone Marrow Transplantation; Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Allogeneic Transplantation,; Genetic Diseases; Thalassemia; Pediatrics; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Combined Immune Deficiency; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Metabolic Diseases

  1. Membranotropic photobiomodulation on red blood cell deformability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang-Yue; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Liu, Song-Hao

    2007-05-01

    To assess modulation of laser on erythrocyte permeability and deformability via cell morphology changes, healthy human echinocytes with shrinking size and high plasmic viscosity due to cellular dehydration were treated with 1 mW, 2 mW, 3 mW, and 5 mW laser power exposure respectively. Image analyzing system on single intact erythrocyte was applied for measuring comprehensive cell morphological parameters (surface area, external membrane perimeter, circle index and elongation index) that were determined by the modulation of erythrocyte water permeability and deformability to detect relationship between erythrocyte water permeability alteration and deformability. Our preliminary experiment showed that exposure under light dose of 5 mW for 5 min could induce more active erythrocyte swelling and deformation. water channel aquaporin-1(AQP-1) was inhibited by the incubation of HgCl II in the presence and absence of 5 mW laser irradiation. The result suggested that osmotic water permeability is a primary factor in the procedure of erythrocyte deformability. In addition, no modulation of laser(5mW) on erythrocyte deformability had been found when the echinocytes were cultured with GDP-β-S (G protein inhibitor).

  2. Proteomic Analyses of the Effects of Drugs of Abuse on Monocyte-Derived Mature Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica L. Reynolds; Supriya D Mahajan; Aalinkeel, Ravikunar; Nair, B.; Sykes, Donald E; Schwartz, Stanley A.

    2009-01-01

    Drug abuse has become a global health concern. Understanding how drug abuse modulates the immune system and how the immune system responds to pathogens associated with drug abuse, such hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), can be assessed by an integrated approach comparing proteomic analyses and quantitation of gene expression. Two-dimensional (2D) difference gel electrophoresis was used to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying the proteomic changes that a...

  3. Combining proteomics and transcriptome sequencing to identify active plant-cell-wall-degrading enzymes in a leaf beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsch Roy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary plant cell wall is a complex mixture of polysaccharides and proteins encasing living plant cells. Among these polysaccharides, cellulose is the most abundant and useful biopolymer present on earth. These polysaccharides also represent a rich source of energy for organisms which have evolved the ability to degrade them. A growing body of evidence suggests that phytophagous beetles, mainly species from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea, possess endogenous genes encoding complex and diverse families of so-called plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs. The presence of these genes in phytophagous beetles may have been a key element in their success as herbivores. Here, we combined a proteomics approach and transcriptome sequencing to identify PCWDEs present in larval gut contents of the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae. Results Using a two-dimensional proteomics approach, we recovered 11 protein bands, isolated using activity assays targeting cellulose-, pectin- and xylan-degrading enzymes. After mass spectrometry analyses, a total of 13 proteins putatively responsible for degrading plant cell wall polysaccharides were identified; these proteins belong to three glycoside hydrolase (GH families: GH11 (xylanases, GH28 (polygalacturonases or pectinases, and GH45 (β-1,4-glucanases or cellulases. Additionally, highly stable and proteolysis-resistant host plant-derived proteins from various pathogenesis-related protein (PRs families as well as polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs were also identified from the gut contents proteome. In parallel, transcriptome sequencing revealed the presence of at least 19 putative PCWDE transcripts encoded by the P. cochleariae genome. All of these were specifically expressed in the insect gut rather than the rest of the body, and in adults as well as larvae. The discrepancy observed in the number of putative PCWDEs between transcriptome and proteome

  4. Macromolecular Dynamics in Red Blood Cells Investigated Using Neutron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadler, Andreas Maximilian; Demmel, Franz; Artmann, Gerhard; 10.1098/rsif.2010.0306

    2011-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of hemoglobin (Hb) in human red blood cells in vivo. Global and internal Hb dynamics were measured in the ps to ns time- and {\\AA} length-scale using quasielastic neutron backscattering spectroscopy. We observed the cross-over from global Hb short-time to long-time self-diffusion. Both short- and long-time diffusion coefficients agree quantitatively with predicted values from hydrodynamic theory of non-charged hard-sphere suspensions when a bound water fraction of around 0.23g H2O/ g Hb is taken into account. The higher amount of water in the cells facilitates internal protein fluctuations in the ps time-scale when compared to fully hydrated Hb powder. Slower internal dynamics of Hb in red blood cells in the ns time-range were found to be rather similar to results obtained with fully hydrated protein powders, solutions and E. coli cells.

  5. Aggregation of Red Blood Cells: From Rouleaux to Clot Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, C; Svetina, S

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the binding mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the binding strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life saving in the case of wound healing but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  6. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  7. RBCs and Parasites Segmentation from Thin Smear Blood Cell Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal V. Panchbhai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Manually examine the blood smear for the detection of malaria parasite consumes lot of time for trend pathologists. As the computational power increases, the role of automatic visual inspection becomes more important. An automated system is therefore needed to complete as much work as possible for the identification of malaria parasites. The given scheme based on used of RGB color space, G layer processing, and segmentation of Red Blood Cells (RBC as well as cell parasites by auto-thresholding with offset value and use of morphological processing. The work compare with the manual results obtained from the pathology lab, based on total RBC count and cells parasite count. The designed system successfully detects malaria parasites and RBC cells in thin smear image.

  8. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future. PMID:26996518

  9. Mechanopathology of red blood cell diseases—Why mechanics matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    During the onset of a disease a cell may experience alterations in both the composition and organization of its cellular and molecular structures.These alterations may eventually lead to changes in its geometrical and mechanical properties such as cell size and shape,deformability and adhesion.As such,knowing how diseased cells respond to mechanical forces can reveal ways by which they differ from healthy ones.Here,we will present biomechanistic insights into red blood cell related diseases that manifest...

  10. Multiscale modeling of red blood cell mechanics and blood flow in malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A Fedosov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cells (RBCs infected by a Plasmodium parasite in malaria may lose their membrane deformability with a relative membrane stiffening more than ten-fold in comparison with healthy RBCs leading to potential capillary occlusions. Moreover, infected RBCs are able to adhere to other healthy and parasitized cells and to the vascular endothelium resulting in a substantial disruption of normal blood circulation. In the present work, we simulate infected RBCs in malaria using a multiscale RBC model based on the dissipative particle dynamics method, coupling scales at the sub-cellular level with scales at the vessel size. Our objective is to conduct a full validation of the RBC model with a diverse set of experimental data, including temperature dependence, and to identify the limitations of this purely mechanistic model. The simulated elastic deformations of parasitized RBCs match those obtained in optical-tweezers experiments for different stages of intra-erythrocytic parasite development. The rheological properties of RBCs in malaria are compared with those obtained by optical magnetic twisting cytometry and by monitoring membrane fluctuations at room, physiological, and febrile temperatures. We also study the dynamics of infected RBCs in Poiseuille flow in comparison with healthy cells and present validated bulk viscosity predictions of malaria-infected blood for a wide range of parasitemia levels (percentage of infected RBCs with respect to the total number of cells in a unit volume.

  11. Natural Antioxidants Improve Red Blood Cell “Survival” in Non-Leukoreduced Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V Kucherenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood collected in an anticoagulant can be kept refrigerated in an unmodified state within 5 - 6 weeks. Oxidative damage is considered to be a one of the major factors contributing to the development of storage lesions. Lipid and membrane proteins oxidation results in changes in cation gradients that affect the cell survival. Aim: In the present study we used the natural antioxidants and ion channels blockers (L-carnosine, spermine, phloretin and their mixtures to prolong “survival” of red blood cells (RBCs, measured as the lack of PS exposure and cell hemolysis, in the Alsever's preservative solution upon hypothermic storage. Results: We show that the mixture of carnosine (20 mM, spermine (20 µM and phloretin (100 µM effectively blunted phosphatidylserine (PS exposure, Ca2+ accumulation and RBCs hemolysis in non-leukoreduced low (∼2% hematocrit samples after 36 days of storage as well as after 1 day of post-storage incubation of the stored cells in physiological saline solution. In addition, a slight but significant decrease in PS exposure was observed in non-leukoreduced high (∼20% hematocrit samples after 36 days of storage with the mixture of substances. Conclusion: We conclude that the use of the mixture of natural antioxidants (carnosine, spermine, and phloretin as an additive to blood preservative solution provides better RBCs storage and “survival”.

  12. 78 FR 23571 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... amended), the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT) advises the Secretary of the... Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Hemoglobinopathies. The Council will also hear presentations...

  13. The role of red blood cells in inflammation and remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Besides being carriers of oxygen and carbon dioxide, red blood cells (RBCs) also have a scavenger function, binding inflammatory mediators to surface receptors. Animal and experimental models have suggested a role for RBCs in inflammatory and fibrotic responses and patients with idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, a disease characterized by lung hemorrhage, frequently develop fibrosis. Fibroblasts, the resident cell in the connective tissue, play an active role in tissue rem...

  14. Shear stress-induced improvement of red blood cell deformability

    OpenAIRE

    Meram, Ece; Yılmaz, Bahar D.; Bas, Ceren; Atac, Nazlı; Yalçın, Ö.; Başkurt, Oguz K.; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2013-01-01

    Classically, it is known that red blood cell (RBC) deformability is determined by the geometric and material properties of these cells. Experimental evidence accumulated during the last decade has introduced the concept of active regulation of RBC deformability. This regulation is mainly related to altered associations between membrane skeletal proteins and integral proteins, with the latter serving to anchor the skeleton to the lipid matrix. It has been hypothesized that shear stress induces...

  15. Automated counting of white blood cells in synovial fluid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Jonge (Robert); R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud); M. Smit (Marij); M. de Frankrijker-Merkestijn; R.J. Dolhain; J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); J. Lindemans (Jan)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the performance of automated leucocyte (white blood cell; WBC) counting by comparison with manual counting. METHODS: The number of WBC was determined in heparinized synovial fluid samples by the use of (i) a standard urine cytometer (Kova) and a

  16. Red blood cell antibodies in pregnancy and their clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvall, Maria; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine;

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine clinical consequences of various specificities for the infant/fetus. The population was patients referred between 1998 and 2005 to the tertiary center because of detected red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Altogether 455 infants were delivered by 390 alloimmunized...

  17. Red Blood Cell Spectrin Skeleton in the Spotlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Breton, Catherine; Abkarian, Manouk

    2016-02-01

    Das et al. recently reported a role for the major merozoite surface protein MSP1 in malarial parasite egress from the red blood cell (RBC). On the basis of these new data and physical considerations, we propose an updated model for the main steps of this essential process for parasite proliferation. PMID:26652974

  18. Quantitative Membrane Proteomics in a Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Line Undergoing Osteogenic Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Helle

    . Mesenchymal stem cells are generally isolated based on physical-chemical characteristics such as adherence to plastic, isolating the monocyte fraction. The resultant cultures are often heterogeneous and can contain other cell types, providing a currently poorly defined basis for future clinical use. The...... associated or GPI anchored proteins. A considerable number of CD antigens and GPI anchored proteins were identified and quantified, illustrating a high degree of sub-fractional proteome resolution. We identified and quantified known markers of hMSC (e.g. CD71, CD166, CD105, CD44, CD29, CD90 and CD63) as well...

  19. Measurement of limb blood flow using technetium-labelled red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, A; Robinson, P.J.; Wiggins, P.A.; Leveson, S.H.; Salter, M.C.P.; Matthews, I.F.; Ware, F.M.

    1986-05-01

    A method for measuring blood flow below the knee during reactive hyperaemia induced by 3 min of arterial occlusion has been developed. Subjects are positioned with lower limbs within the field of view of a gamma camera and pneumatic cuffs are placed below the knees to isolate the blood and induce a hyperaemic response. The remaining blood pool is labelled with /sup 99/Tcsup(m)-labelled red cells. Blood flows have been derived from the initial gradients of time-activity curves and from equilibrium blood sampling. The technique has been validated using a tissue-equivalent leg phantom and peristaltic pump. The method has been applied to a small group of patients with peripheral vascular disease and to normal controls. The mean value (+-SD) of limb perfusion for normal controls was found to be 16.4 +- 3.0 ml/100 ml/min and for patients with intermittent claudication was 5.1 +- 2.6 ml/100 ml/min. Flow measurements are found to correlate with clinical findings and with symptoms. Reproducibility (established by repeated measurements) is high. The method is well tolerated even by patients suffering from rest pain.

  20. The measurement of limb blood flow using technetium-labelled red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring blood flow below the knee during reactive hyperaemia induced by 3 min of arterial occlusion has been developed. Subjects are positioned with lower limbs within the field of view of a gamma camera and pneumatic cuffs are placed below the knees to isolate the blood and induce a hyperaemic response. The remaining blood pool is labelled with 99Tcsup(m)-labelled red cells. Blood flows have been derived from the initial gradients of time-activity curves and from equilibrium blood sampling. The technique has been validated using a tissue-equivalent leg phantom and peristaltic pump. The method has been applied to a small group of patients with peripheral vascular disease and to normal controls. The mean value (+-SD) of limb perfusion for normal controls was found to be 16.4+-3.0 ml/100 ml/min and for patients with intermittent claudication was 5.1+-2.6 ml/100 ml/min. Flow measurements are found to correlate with clinical findings and with symptoms. Reproducibility (established by repeated measurements) is high. The method is well tolerated even by patients suffering from rest pain. (author)

  1. Viscoelastic properties of whole blood. Influence of fast sedimenting red blood cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneditz, D; Rainer, F; Kenner, T

    1987-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is known to be of deciding influence on erythrocyte sedimentation-rate (ESR) and on whole blood viscoelastic properties. The rheological behaviour of blood collected from a control-group with normal ESR is compared to the viscoelastic behaviour of blood collected from two groups with high to very high ESR, whose individuals are suffering from chronical polyarthritis and Morbus Bechterew, respectively. The rheological properties are evaluated by means of an oscillating-flow capillary-rheometer where the viscous (eta') and elastic (eta") component of the complex viscosity (eta) is measured at a constant frequency of 2 Hz. Correcting for the varying hematocrit of the different blood samples according to an exponential equation, the viscoelastic data are found to be elevated in the groups with high ESR. For the viscous properties this is only due to the increase of the plasma viscosity. A correction for the plasma viscosity, however, shows that the viscous properties at low shear- rates (2s-1) are significantly reduced, whereas elastic properties in a range of medium shear-rates (10s-1 to 50s-1) are significantly increased (P less than 0.001, t-test of Student). This result is discussed to be due to the high packing density of the RBC in fast sedimenting aggregates. High packing density reduces the effective volume of the RBC but increases the stiffness of the aggregates. PMID:3651579

  2. The white blood cell scan in orthopedics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propst-Proctor, S.L.; Dillingham, M.F.; McDougall, I.R.; Goodwin, D.

    1982-08-01

    A new nuclear scanning technique was found more specific for bone, joint, and soft tissue infections than any previously described scanning technique. The leukocyte scan, whereby a patient's own cells are labeled with a radioactive tagging agent (/sup 111/In oxine), can distinguish an active infectious process from other pain-inducing conditions. Ninety-seven /sup 111/In labeled autologous leukocyte scans were performed in 88 patients. The findings in 17 of 40 patients scanned for possible acute osteomyelitis, six of nine for suspected septic arthritis, and six for possible soft tissue infections, were positive. Subsequent clinical courses verified the infectious nature of these processes in all patients. Patients who had chronic osteomyelitis (14), bony metastases (four patients), heterotopic ossification (three), and degenerative arthritis (two) demonstrated negative findings. Of the seven patients scanned for acute long-bone fractures, one demonstrated positive findings. Nine scans demonstrated positive findings without determined causes. The leukocyte scan is a useful addition to the diagnostic tools of the orthopedic surgeon.

  3. The white blood cell scan in orthopedics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new nuclear scanning technique was found more specific for bone, joint, and soft tissue infections than any previously described scanning technique. The leukocyte scan, whereby a patient's own cells are labeled with a radioactive tagging agent (111In oxine), can distinguish an active infectious process from other pain-inducing conditions. Ninety-seven 111In labeled autologous leukocyte scans were performed in 88 patients. The findings in 17 of 40 patients scanned for possible acute osteomyelitis, six of nine for suspected septic arthritis, and six for possible soft tissue infections, were positive. Subsequent clinical courses verified the infectious nature of these processes in all patients. Patients who had chronic osteomyelitis (14), bony metastases (four patients), heterotopic ossification (three), and degenerative arthritis (two) demonstrated negative findings. Of the seven patients scanned for acute long-bone fractures, one demonstrated positive findings. Nine scans demonstrated positive findings without determined causes. The leukocyte scan is a useful addition to the diagnostic tools of the orthopedic surgeon

  4. The Redox Proteome*

    OpenAIRE

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    The redox proteome consists of reversible and irreversible covalent modifications that link redox metabolism to biologic structure and function. These modifications, especially of Cys, function at the molecular level in protein folding and maturation, catalytic activity, signaling, and macromolecular interactions and at the macroscopic level in control of secretion and cell shape. Interaction of the redox proteome with redox-active chemicals is central to macromolecular structure, regulation,...

  5. Proteomic signatures of human oral epithelial cells in HIV-infected subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Yohannes

    Full Text Available The oral epithelium, the most abundant structural tissue lining the oral mucosa, is an important line of defense against infectious microorganisms. HIV infected subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART are susceptible to comorbid viral, bacterial and fungal infections in the oral cavity. To provide an assessment of the molecular alterations of oral epithelia potentially associated with susceptibility to comorbid infections in such subjects, we performed various proteomic studies on over twenty HIV infected and healthy subjects. In a discovery phase two Dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE analyses of human oral gingival epithelial cell (HOEC lysates were carried out; this identified 61 differentially expressed proteins between HIV-infected on HAART subjects and healthy controls. Down regulated proteins in HIV-infected subjects include proteins associated with maintenance of protein folding and pro- and anti-inflammatory responses (e.g., heat-shock proteins, Cryab, Calr, IL-1RA, and Galectin-3-binding protein as well as proteins involved in redox homeostasis and detoxification (e.g., Gstp1, Prdx1, and Ero1. Up regulated proteins include: protein disulfide isomerases, proteins whose expression is negatively regulated by Hsp90 (e.g., Ndrg1, and proteins that maintain cellular integrity (e.g., Vimentin. In a verification phase, proteins identified in the protein profiling experiments and those inferred from Ingenuity Pathway Analysis were analyzed using Western blotting analysis on separate HOEC lysate samples, confirming many of the discovery findings. Additionally in HIV-infected patient samples Heat Shock Factor 1 is down regulated, which explains the reduced heat shock responses, while activation of the MAPK signal transduction cascade is observed. Overall, HAART therapy provides an incomplete immune recovery of the oral epithelial cells of the oral cavity for HIV-infected subjects, and the toxic side effects of

  6. Proteomic Profiling of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Responses to Mechanical Strain and TGF-B1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurpinski, Kyle; Chu, Julia; Wang, Daojing; Li, Song

    2009-10-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a potential source of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for constructing tissue-engineered vascular grafts. However, the details of how specific combinations of vascular microenvironmental factors regulate MSCs are not well understood. Previous studies have suggested that both mechanical stimulation with uniaxial cyclic strain and chemical stimulation with transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) can induce smooth muscle markers in MSCs. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of uniaxial cyclic strain and TGF-{beta}1 stimulation on MSCs. By using a proteomic analysis, we found differential regulation of several proteins and genes, such as the up-regulation of TGF-{beta}1-induced protein ig-h3 (BGH3) protein levels by TGF-{beta}1 and up-regulation of calponin 3 protein level by cyclic strain. At the gene expression level, BGH3 was induced by TGF-{beta}1, but calponin 3 was not significantly regulated by mechanical strain or TGF-{beta}1, which was in contrast to the synergistic up-regulation of calponin 1 gene expression by cyclic strain and TGF-{beta}1. Further experiments with cycloheximide treatment suggested that the up-regulation of calponin 3 by cyclic strain was at post-transcriptional level. The results in this study suggest that both mechanical stimulation and TGF-{beta}1 signaling play unique and important roles in the regulation of MSCs at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and that a precise combination of microenvironmental cues may promote MSC differentiation.

  7. Are clear cell carcinomas of the ovary and endometrium phenotypically identical? A proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fata, Cynthia R; Seeley, Erin H; Desouki, Mohamed M; Du, Liping; Gwin, Katja; Hanley, Krisztina Z; Hecht, Jonathan L; Jarboe, Elke A; Liang, Sharon X; Parkash, Vinita; Quick, Charles M; Zheng, Wenxin; Shyr, Yu; Caprioli, Richard M; Fadare, Oluwole

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypic differences between otherwise similar tumors arising from different gynecologic locations may be highly significant in understanding the underlying driver molecular events at each site and may potentially offer insights into differential responses to treatment. In this study, the authors sought to identify and quantify phenotypic differences between ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) and endometrial clear cell carcinoma (ECCC) using a proteomic approach. Tissue microarrays were constructed from tumor samples of 108 patients (54 ECCCs and 54 OCCCs). Formalin-fixed samples on microarray slides were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, and 730 spectral peaks were generated from the combined data set. A linear mixed-effect model with random intercept was used to generate 93 (12.7%) peaks that were significantly different between OCCCs and ECCCs at the fold cutoffs of 1.5 and 0.667 and an adjusted P value cutoff of 1.0 × 10(-10). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed on selected cores from each group, and peptides identified therefrom were compared with lists of statistically significant peaks from the aforementioned linear mixed-effects model to find matches within 0.2 Da. A total of 53 candidate proteins were thus identified as being differentially expressed in OCCCs and ECCCs, 45 (85%) of which were expressed at higher levels in ECCCs than OCCCs. These proteins were functionally diverse and did not highlight a clearly dominant cellular theme or molecular pathway. Although ECCCs and OCCCs are very similar, some phenotypic differences are demonstrable. Additional studies of these differentially expressed proteins may ultimately clarify the significance of these differences. PMID:26243671

  8. A proteomic perspective on the changes in milk proteins due to high somatic cell count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Boeren, S; van Hooijdonk, A C M; Vervoort, J M; Hettinga, K A

    2015-08-01

    Although cows with subclinical mastitis have no difference in the appearance of their milk, milk composition and milk quality are altered because of the inflammation. To know the changes in milk quality with different somatic cell count (SCC) levels, 5 pooled bovine milk samples with SCC from 10(5) to 10(6) cells/mL were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using both one-dimension sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE and filter-aided sample preparation coupled with dimethyl labeling, both followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Minor differences were found on the qualitative level in the proteome from milk with different SCC levels, whereas the concentration of milk proteins showed remarkable changes. Not only immune-related proteins (cathelicidins, IGK protein, CD59 molecule, complement regulatory protein, lactadherin), but also proteins with other biological functions (e.g., lipid metabolism: platelet glycoprotein 4, butyrophilin subfamily 1 member A1, perilipin-2) were significantly different in milk from cows with high SCC level compared with low SCC level. The increased concentration of protease inhibitors in the milk with higher SCC levels may suggest a protective role in the mammary gland against protease activity. Prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase showed a linear relation with SCC, which was confirmed with an ELISA. However, the correlation coefficient was lower in individual cows compared with bulk milk. These results indicate that prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase may be used as an indicator to evaluate bulk milk quality and thereby reduce the economic loss in the dairy industry. The results from this study reflect the biological phenomena occurring during subclinical mastitis and in addition provide a potential indicator for the detection of bulk milk with high SCC. PMID:26094216

  9. Red blood cell aggregation, aggregate strength and oxygen transport potential of blood are abnormal in both homozygous sickle cell anemia and sickle-hemoglobin C disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tripette, Julien; Alexy, Tamas; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Mougenel, Daniele; Beltan, Eric; Chalabi, Tawfik; Chout, Roger; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hue, Olivier; Meiselman, Herbert J.; Connes, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that red cell aggregation and the ratio of hematocrit to blood viscosity, an index of the oxygen transport potential of blood, might considerably modulate blood flow dynamics in the microcirculation. The findings of this study indicate that patients with sickle cell disease and those with sickle cell hemoglobin C disease have low ratios of hematocrit to blood viscosity as compared to normal controls. This may play a role in tissue hypoxia and clinical status of these ...

  10. Measuring density and compressibility of white blood cells and prostate cancer cells by microchannel acoustophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas; Bruus, Henrik

    determine the density and compressibility of individual cells enables the prediction and alteration of the separation outcome for a given cell mixture. We apply the method on white blood cells (WBCs) and DU145 prostate cancer cells (DUCs) aiming to improve isolation of circulating tumor cells from blood, an......We present a novel method for the determination of density and compressibility of individual particles and cells undergoing microchannel acoustophoresis in an arbitrary 2D acoustic field. Our method is a critical advancement within acoustophoretic separation of biological cells, as the ability to...... emerging tool in the monitoring and characterizing of metastatic cancer....

  11. Identification of Progenitor Cell Survival in Peripheral Blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The myeloid progenitors can not survive properly under the usual conditions of blood banking.The aim of work is to assay the survival of myeloid progenitors during varying periods of blood storage, under the usual condition of blood banking. It is an attempt to detect whether or not ,these circulating myeloid progenitors could be stored under the blood banking condition to be used in clinical transplantation protocols to treat a wide variety of refractory diseases.Individual blood samples from forty healthy adults were examined clinically, laboratory and ultrasonography. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated using Ficoll-Paque gradients . Serial dilutions of human placental conditioned medium were made, and tested for optimal activity by In vitro cultured technique.This study estimated that the mean levels of absolute number of myeloid progenitors per c.mm. at zero time was 137.7±68.3 (Range 54-297),at day 3 was 71.0±40.2 (Range 54-297), at day 7 was 94.8±45.7 (Range 30 -232) and at day 14 was 45.5±22.7). There was statistically significant decrease in the number of colonies from zero time to day 14. There was statistically significant decrease in the number of myeloid progenitors from zero time to day 14

  12. Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid-based proteomic analysis of cell wall and secreted proteins of the ascomycetous fungi Neurospora crassa and Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Maddi, Abhiram; Bowman, Shaun M.; Free, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Cell wall proteins from purified Candida albicans and Neurospora crassa cell walls were released using trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) which cleaves the cell wall glucan/chitin matrix and deglycosylates the proteins. The cell wall proteins were then characterized by SDS PAGE and identified by proteomic analysis. The analyses for C. albicans identified 15 cell wall proteins and 6 secreted proteins. For N. crassa, the analyses identified 26 cell wall proteins and 9 secreted proteins. Most ...

  13. Studies on sequestration of neuraminidase-treated red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of reduction in the surface charge of red blood cells (RBCs) on regional blood flow and RBC distribution were studied in rats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. RBCs were treated with neuraminidase to reduce their electrophoretic mobility by 56%. Normal and neuraminidase-treated RBCs labeled with 51Cr or 111In were injected into a femoral vein while an equal volume of blood was simultaneously withdrawn from a femoral artery. More than 70% of the neuraminidase-treated RBCs injected disappeared from the circulating blood in 30 min compared with less than 2% of normal RBCs. The relative distributions of neuraminidase-treated RBCs to normal RBCs, as determined from radioactivity counting, were significantly greater than 1 in the spleen (5.65 +/- 0.97, mean +/- SD), the liver (2.84 +/- 0.21), the lung (1.48 +/- 0.31), and the kidney (1.49 +/- 0.27), indicating a preferential trapping of neuraminidase-treated RBCs in these regions. This ratio was approximately 1 in all other organs. Regional blood flows in tissues were determined with 15-micron microspheres in the control period and after the infusion of neuraminidase-treated RBCs (experimental). Experimental-to-control blood flow ratios were 0.40 +/- 0.05 in the spleen, 0.66 +/- 0.06 in the liver, 0.78 +/- 0.03 in the lung, and 0.78 +/- 0.09 in the kidneys; this ratio was approximately 1 in all other organs. An experimental-to-control blood flow ratio less than 1 indicates a reduction in blood flow; this occurred in the same organs as those with trapping of neuraminidase-treated RBCs

  14. The Effect of Pulsatile Versus Nonpulsatile Blood Flow on Viscoelasticity and Red Blood Cell Aggregation in Extracorporeal Circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Chi Bum; Kang, Yang Jun; Kim, Myoung Gon; Yang, Sung; Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, So Young; Son, Kuk Hui; Sun, Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) can induce alterations in blood viscoelasticity and cause red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. In this study, the authors evaluated the effects of pump flow pulsatility on blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation. Methods Mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: a nonpulsatile pump group (n=6) or a pulsatile pump group (n=6). After ECC was started at a pump flow rate of 80 mL/kg/min, cardiac fibrillation was induced. Blood sampling was perfo...

  15. The use of a blood conservation device to reduce red blood cell transfusion requirements: a before and after study

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Yip, Hwee S; Prabhuswamy, Dimple; Chan, Yiong H; Phua, Jason; Lim, Tow K; Leong, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Anaemia and the associated need for packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions are common in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Among many causes, blood losses from repeated diagnostic tests are contributory. Methods This is a before and after study in a medical ICU of a university hospital. We used a closed blood conservation device (Venous Arterial blood Management Protection, VAMP, Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) to decrease PRBC transfusion requirements...

  16. Proteomic Profiling of Iron Overload-Induced Human Hepatic Cells Reveals Activation of TLR2-Mediated Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatic iron overload is common in patients who have undergone hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT and may predispose to peri- and post-HCT toxicity. To better reveal more molecules that might be involved in iron overload-induced liver injury, we utilized proteomics to investigate differentially expressed proteins in iron overload-induced hepatocytes vs. untreated hepatocytes. Methods and Results: HH4 hepatocytes were exposed to ferric ammonium citrate (FAC to establish an in vitro iron overload model. Differentially expressed proteins initiated by the iron overload were studied by two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS analysis. We identified 93 proteins whose quantity statistically significantly changes under excess hepatocyte iron conditions. Gene Ontology (GO analysis showed that these differentially expressed proteins in HH4 cells are involved in various biological process including endocytosis, response to wounding, di-, trivalent inorganic cation homeostasis, inflammatory response, positive regulation of cytokine production, and etc. Meanwhile, proteomics data revealed protein level of TLR2 and IL6ST significantly increased 7 times and 2.9 times, respectively, in iron overloaded HH4 cells. Our subsequent experiments detected that FAC-treated HH4 cells can activate IL6 expression through TLR2-mediated inflammatory responses via the NF-κB pathway. Conclusions: In this study, we demonstrated that iron overload induced hepatocytes triggering TLR2-mediated inflammatory response via NF-κB signaling pathway in HH4 cells.

  17. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  18. Comparative proteomic data of M13SV1 human breast epithelial cells and their tumorigenic variants under treatment with estrogenic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuning, Albert; Schmidt, Claudia; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    Data from a comparative proteomic analysis of three human breast epithelial cell lines are presented. M13SV1 cells and their tumorigenic derivatives M13SV1-R2-2 and M13SV1-R2-N1 were used. Proteomic data were obtained using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent identification of proteins by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. In a second experiment, the three cell lines were treated with different concentrations of the estrogenic compounds β-estradiol or genistein and alterations in protein expression were monitored by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Presented data provide a comprehensive overview of proteomic differences between the three cell lines and their response to estrogenic stimulation. PMID:27331110

  19. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  20. Proteomic analysis of imatinib-resistant CML-T1 cells reveals calcium homeostasis as a potential therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, O.; Kabickova, T.; Vit, O.; Fiser, R.; Polakova, K. Machova; Zach, J.; Linhartova, J.; Vyoral, D.; Petrak, J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) therapy has markedly improved patient prognosis after introduction of imatinib mesylate for clinical use. However, a subset of patients develops resistance to imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), mainly due to point mutations in the region encoding the kinase domain of the fused BCR-ABL oncogene. To identify potential therapeutic targets in imatinib-resistant CML cells, we derived imatinib-resistant CML-T1 human cell line clone (CML-T1/IR) by prolonged exposure to imatinib in growth media. Mutational analysis revealed that the Y235H mutation in BCR-ABL is probably the main cause of CML-T1/IR resistance to imatinib. To identify alternative therapeutic targets for selective elimination of imatinib-resistant cells, we compared the proteome profiles of CML-T1 and CML-T1/IR cells using 2-DE-MS. We identified eight differentially expressed proteins, with strongly upregulated Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) in the resistant cells, suggesting that this protein may influence cytosolic pH, Ca2+ concentration or signaling pathways such as Wnt in CML-T1/IR cells. We tested several compounds including drugs in clinical use that interfere with the aforementioned processes and tested their relative toxicity to CML-T1 and CML-T1/IR cells. Calcium channel blockers, calcium signaling antagonists and modulators of calcium homeostasis, namely thapsigargin, ionomycin, verapamil, carboxyamidotriazole and immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporine A and tacrolimus (FK-506) were selectively toxic to CML-T1/IR cells. The putative cellular targets of these compounds in CML-T1/IR cells are postulated in this study. We propose that Ca2+ homeostasis can be a potential therapeutic target in CML cells resistant to TKIs. We demonstrate that a proteomic approach may be used to characterize a TKI-resistant population of CML cells enabling future individualized treatment options for patients. PMID:27430982

  1. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cabernet sauvignon grape cells exposed to thermal stresses reveals alterations in sugar and phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Iniga S; Pascovici, Dana; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Haynes, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Grapes (Vitis vinifera) are a valuable fruit crop and wine production is a major industry. Global warming and expanded range of cultivation will expose grapes to more temperature stresses in future. Our study investigated protein level responses to abiotic stresses, with particular reference to proteomic changes induced by the impact of four different temperature stress regimes, including both hot and cold temperatures, on cultured grape cells. Cabernet Sauvignon cell suspension cultures grown at 26°C were subjected to 14 h of exposure to 34 and 42°C for heat stress, and 18 and 10°C for cold stress. Cells from the five temperatures were harvested in biological triplicates and label-free quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis was performed. A total of 2042 non-redundant proteins were identified from the five temperature points. Fifty-five proteins were only detected in extreme heat stress conditions (42°C) and 53 proteins were only detected at extreme cold stress conditions (10°C). Gene Ontology (GO) annotations of differentially expressed proteins provided insights into the metabolic pathways that are involved in temperature stress in grape cells. Sugar metabolism displayed switching between alternative and classical pathways during temperature stresses. Additionally, nine proteins involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway were greatly increased in abundance at extreme cold stress, and were thus found to be cold-responsive proteins. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000977 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000977). PMID:25959233

  2. Current state of the art of blood cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An update on some recent developments in the area of blood cell labeling is provided. Specific topics covered include red cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc, platelet labeling using an antiplatelet monoclonal antibody, and the labeling of leukocytes with /sup 99m/Tc. Mechanistic information, where available, is discussed. A critical evaluation of current techniques, their pitfalls as well as advantages, and the problems that remain to be resolved, is presented. The promise shown by recent results using the antibody approach for cell labeling is emphasized. An assessment of the progress made in these areas is presented. 38 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  3. A statistical model for red blood cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korell, Julia; Coulter, Carolyn V; Duffull, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    A statistical model for the survival time of red blood cells (RBCs) with a continuous distribution of cell lifespans is presented. The underlying distribution of RBC lifespans is derived from a probability density function with a bathtub-shaped hazard curve, and accounts for death of RBCs due to senescence (age-dependent increasing hazard rate) and random destruction (constant hazard), as well as for death due to initial or delayed failures and neocytolysis (equivalent to early red cell mortality). The model yields survival times similar to those of previously published studies of RBC survival and is easily amenable to inclusion of drug effects and haemolytic disorders. PMID:20950630

  4. Saving the leftovers: models for banking cord blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Kimberly J

    2009-01-01

    Each year there are over four million live births in the United States. Each birth produces umbilical cord blood stem cells, which are usually discarded. The author argues that rather than discarding the umbilical cord, this valuable resource of cord blood should be banked and used for research and therapeutic purposes. Umbilical cord blood could provide a solution to the critical need to find matching donors for hematopoietic transplants in patients who have no matching bone marrow donors. Creating a system of universal donation to a public bank will greatlyincrease the number of donors and therefore, the number of matches for patients. Such a system will facilitate the development and use of new technologies and transplant procedures, while providing an opportunity for treatment to individuals who would otherwise not be able to find suitable donors. PMID:20101907

  5. Image-based red cell counting for wild animals blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio, Claudio R M; Schneider, Fabio K; Dos Santos, Leonilda Correia

    2010-01-01

    An image-based red blood cell (RBC) automatic counting system is presented for wild animals blood analysis. Images with 2048×1536-pixel resolution acquired on an optical microscope using Neubauer chambers are used to evaluate RBC counting for three animal species (Leopardus pardalis, Cebus apella and Nasua nasua) and the error found using the proposed method is similar to that obtained for inter observer visual counting method, i.e., around 10%. Smaller errors (e.g., 3%) can be obtained in regions with less grid artifacts. These promising results allow the use of the proposed method either as a complete automatic counting tool in laboratories for wild animal's blood analysis or as a first counting stage in a semi-automatic counting tool. PMID:21096766

  6. Bacterial glycosidases for the production of universal red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiyong P; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Yuan, Huaiping; Bennett, Eric P; Pietz, Greg; Saunders, Kristen; Spence, Jean; Nudelman, Edward; Levery, Steven B; White, Thayer; Neveu, John M; Lane, William S; Bourne, Yves; Olsson, Martin L; Henrissat, Bernard; Clausen, Henrik

    2007-04-01

    Enzymatic removal of blood group ABO antigens to develop universal red blood cells (RBCs) was a pioneering vision originally proposed more than 25 years ago. Although the feasibility of this approach was demonstrated in clinical trials for group B RBCs, a major obstacle in translating this technology to clinical practice has been the lack of efficient glycosidase enzymes. Here we report two bacterial glycosidase gene families that provide enzymes capable of efficient removal of A and B antigens at neutral pH with low consumption of recombinant enzymes. The crystal structure of a member of the alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase family reveals an unusual catalytic mechanism involving NAD+. The enzymatic conversion processes we describe hold promise for achieving the goal of producing universal RBCs, which would improve the blood supply while enhancing the safety of clinical transfusions. PMID:17401360

  7. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  8. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P.; Mañú-Pereira, María del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca2+ handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na+, K+, Ca2+) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca2+ cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca2+-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the patients to

  9. Blood loss estimation in Schistosoma incognitum by the use of 51Cr labelled red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C42 Red blood cells labelled with 51Cr were used to study the pathophysiology of S. incognitum infection. Blood volume, cell volume, faecal blood excretion and the half life of the red cells were determined. It was shown that in rabbits infected with the blood fluke, there was loss of blood, which may result in the development of anaemia in the infected animals. (author)

  10. Reduction of prion infectivity in packed red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The link between a new variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the consumption of prion contaminated cattle meat as well as recent findings showing that vCJD can be transmitted by blood transfusion have raised public health concerns. Currently, a reliable test to identify prions in blood samples is not available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to remove scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) and infectivity from red blood cell (RBC) suspensions by a simple washing procedure using a cell separation and washing device. The extent of prion removal was assessed by Western blot, PMCA and infectivity bioassays. Our results revealed a substantial removal of infectious prions (≥3 logs of infectivity) by all techniques used. These data suggest that a significant amount of infectivity present in RBC preparations can be removed by a simple washing procedure. This technology may lead to increased safety of blood products and reduce the risk of further propagation of prion diseases.

  11. Blood based cell biopsy for early detection of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cha-Mei; Adams, Daniel; Adams, Diane; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Martin, Stuart; Chumsri, Saranya; Marks, Jeffrey

    Early detection (ED) of cancer holds the promise for less aggressive treatments and better outcome. However, there are few accepted methods for ED. We report on a previously unknown blood cell found specifically in the peripheral blood of many solid tumors. They are defined as Cancer Associated Macrophage-Like cells (CAMLs) and are characterized by large size (25-300 μm) and expression of cancer markers. CAMLs were isolated on precision filters during blood filtration. We conducted prospective studies in breast cancer (BC) to ascertain CAML prevalence, specificity and sensitivity in relation to disease status at clinical presentation. We report on two related but separate studies: 1) the isolation of CAMLs from patients with known invasive BC, compared to healthy volunteers and, 2) a double blind study conducted on women undergoing core needle biopsy to evaluate suspicious breast masses. The studies show that CAMLs are found in all stages of BC and suggest that detection of CAMLs can differentiate patients with BC from those with benign breast conditions and healthy individuals. This non-invasive blood test can be potentially used for ED of BC and other malignancies after validation studies with the advantage of a minimally invasive procedure and longitudinal monitoring. This work was supported by Grants from Maryland TEDCO MTTCF, R01-CA154624 from NIH, KG100240 from Susan G. Komen Foundation, Era of Hope Scholar award from DoD (BC100675), and U01-CA084955 from NCI EDRN.

  12. Enhancement of red blood cell aggregation by plasma triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicha, I; Suzuki, Y; Tateishi, N; Maeda, N

    2001-01-01

    The effects of plasma triglycerides level on human red blood cells (RBCs) indices, hematological parameters, RBCs aggregation velocity and whole blood viscosity were studied at 2 hours after high-fat or low-fat meal. Proteins, triglycerides and cholesterol levels of plasma were analysed. The RBCs rouleaux formation rate was measured in 70% autologous plasma (with 30% phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) or 1 g/dl dextran T70 solution (with 4 g/dl bovine serum albumin) in PBS, using a low-shear rheoscope. The results were grouped according to triglycerides content in plasma. No significant difference in whole blood viscosity, hematological parameters, RBC indices, protein and cholesterol content was observed between high-fat and low-fat blood samples. There was a significant increase in rouleaux formation rate of samples with high triglyceride levels, when measured in 70% autologous plasma, but it was not significant in dextran T70 containing medium. In conclusion, the results obtained suggest that alteration of plasma lipid levels as well as possible changes in the cell membrane lipid composition lead to enhanced RBC aggregation. PMID:11564913

  13. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: In vitro assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarroz, M.O. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010-180 Natal, RN (Brazil); Fonseca, A.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: adenilso@uerj.br; Rocha, G.S. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Frydman, J.N.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Avenida General Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias, s/n, 59010-180 Natal, RN (Brazil); Rocha, V.C.; Pereira, M.O. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida 28 de Setembro, 87, 4o Andar, Vila Isabel, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99 m({sup 99m}Tc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI on BC, IF-P and IF-BC. No modifications were verified on shape of red blood cells. Cinnamon extracts could alter the labelling of blood constituents with {sup 99m}Tc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon.

  14. Atypical carcinoid and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung: a proteomic dataset from formalin-fixed archival samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanca, Alessandro; Addis, Maria Filippa; Pisanu, Salvatore; Abbondio, Marcello; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Eccher, Albino; Rindi, Guido; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Uzzau, Sergio; Fanciulli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Here we present a dataset generated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples from two rare lung neuroendocrine tumor subtypes (namely, two atypical carcinoids, ACs, and two large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, LCNECs). Samples were subjected to a shotgun proteomics pipeline, comprising full-length protein extraction, SDS removal through spin columns, in solution trypsin digestion, long gradient liquid chromatography peptide separation and LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 1260 and 2436 proteins were identified in the AC and LCNEC samples, respectively, with FDR http://www.peptideatlas.org/PASS/PASS00375. PMID:27054153

  15. Proteomic and meatbolomic analysis of smooth muscle cells derived from the arterial media and adventitial progenitors of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayr, M; Zampetaki, A.; Sidibe, A.; Mayr, U.; Yin, X.; Souza, A.I. de; Chung, Y.L.; Madhu, B.; Quax, P.H.; Hu, Y.; Griffiths, J.R.; Xu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that stem cell antigen 1-positive (Sca-1(+)) progenitors exist in the vascular adventitia of apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice and contribute to smooth muscle cell (SMC) accumulation in vein graft atherosclerosis. Using a combined proteomic and metabolomic app

  16. Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from peripheral blood B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinghe; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Longo, Nancy S; Laub, Leo; Lin, Chien-Li; Turk, Ellen; Kang, Byong H; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Connors, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies is an important technique for understanding the specificities and characteristics of antibodies that underlie the humoral immune response to a given antigen. Here we describe a technique for isolating monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The protocol includes strategies for the isolation of switch-memory B cells from peripheral blood, the culture of B cells, the removal of the supernatant for screening and the lysis of B cells in preparation for immunoglobulin heavy-chain and light-chain amplification and cloning. We have observed that the addition of cytokines IL-2, IL-21 and irradiated 3T3-msCD40L feeder cells can successfully stimulate switch-memory B cells to produce high concentrations of IgG in the supernatant. The supernatant may then be screened by appropriate assays for binding or for other functions. This protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. It is adaptable to use in other species and enables the efficient isolation of antibodies with a desired functional characteristic without prior knowledge of specificity. PMID:24030440

  17. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, SILAC, as a simple and accurate approach to expression proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ong, S.E.; Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.;

    2002-01-01

    . Here we describe a method, termed SILAC, for stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, for the in vivo incorporation of specific amino acids into all mammalian proteins. Mammalian cell lines are grown in media lacking a standard essential amino acid but supplemented with a non......Quantitative proteomics has traditionally been performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, but recently, mass spectrometric methods based on stable isotope quantitation have shown great promise for the simultaneous and automated identification and quantitation of complex protein mixtures......-radioactive, isotopically labeled form of that amino acid, in this case deuterated leucine (Leu-d3). We find that growth of cells maintained in these media is no different from growth in normal media as evidenced by cell morphology, doubling time, and ability to differentiate. Complete incorporation of Leu-d3 occurred...

  18. Harvesting, processing and inventory management of peripheral blood stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijovic Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available By 2003, 97% autologous transplants and 65% of allogeneic transplants in Europe used mobilised peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC. Soon after their introduction in the early 1990′s, PBSC were associated with faster haemopoietic recovery, fewer transfusions and antibiotic usage, and a shorter hospital stay. Furthermore, ease and convenience of PBSC collection made them more appealing than BM harvests. Improved survival has hitherto been demonstrated in patients with high risk AML and CML. However, the advantages of PBSC come at a price of a higher incidence of extensive chronic GVHD. In order to be present in the blood, stem cells undergo the process of "mobilisation" from their bone marrow habitat. Mobilisation, and its reciprocal process - homing - are regulated by a complex network of molecules on the surface of stem cells and stromal cells, and enzymes and cytokines released from granulocytes and osteoclasts. Knowledge of these mechanisms is beginning to be exploited for clinical purposes. In current practice, stem cell are mobilised by use of chemotherapy in conjunction with haemopoietic growth factors (HGF, or with HGF alone. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor has emerged as the single most important mobilising agent, due to its efficacy and a relative paucity of serious side effects. Over a decade of use in healthy donors has resulted in vast experience of optimal dosing and administration, and safety matters. PBSC harvesting can be performed on a variety of cell separators. Apheresis procedures are nowadays routine, but it is important to be well versed in the possible complications in order to avoid harm to the patient or donor. To ensure efficient collection, harvesting must begin when sufficient stem cells have been mobilised. A rapid, reliable, standardized blood test is essential to decide when to begin harvesting; currently, blood CD34+ cell counting by flow cytometry fulfils these criteria. Blood CD34+ cell counts strongly

  19. Secretome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhances Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Mildner, Michael; Hacker, Stefan; Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SECPBMC). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on ...

  20. Dynamic Modes of Red Blood Cells in Oscillatory Shear Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle $\\theta$, and phase angle $\\phi$ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. i) tank-treading (TT): $\\phi$ rotates while the shape and $\\theta$ oscillate. ii) tumbling (TB): $\\theta$ rotates while the shape and $\\phi$ oscillate. iii) intermediate ...

  1. Effect of Irradiation on Microparticles in Red Blood Cell Concentrates

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Chi Hyun; Yun, Seung Gyu; Koh, Young Eun; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-01-01

    Changes in microparticles (MP) from red blood cell (RBC) concentrates in the context of irradiation have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate how irradiation affects the number of MPs within transfusion components. Twenty RBC concentrates, within 14 days after donation, were exposed to gamma rays (dose rate: 25 cGy) from a cesium-137 irradiator. Flow cytometry was used to determine the numbers of MPs derived from RBC concentrates before and 24 hr after irradiation. The...

  2. Flow of red blood cells in capillary networks

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Ana; Teixeira, Lúcia; Leble, Vladimir; Lima, R.; Ribeiro, António E.; Dias, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we have studied the flow of red blood cells through a column packed with soda lime glass spheres with diameter of 337.5 micron (pore diameter 150 micron). The ratio between the average velocity of the RBCs and the average velocity of the carrying fluid (physiological saline) was close to 0.9. The RBCs migrated faster through the column than the carrying fluid mainly due to a hydrodynamic chromatographic effect.

  3. Effects of Dextran Molecular Weight on Red Blood Cell Aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Neu, Björn; Wenby, Rosalinda; Meiselman, Herbert J.

    2008-01-01

    The reversible aggregation of human red blood cells (RBC) by proteins or polymers continues to be of biologic and biophysical interest, yet the mechanistic details governing the process are still being explored. Although a depletion model with osmotic attractive forces due to polymer depletion near the RBC surface has been proposed for aggregation by the neutral polyglucose dextran, its applicability at high molecular mass has not been established. In this study, RBC aggregation was measured ...

  4. Proteome-wide analysis of neural stem cell differentiation to facilitate transition to cell replacement therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižková, Martina; Suchá, Rita; Tylečková, Jiřina; Jarkovská, Karla; Mairychová, Kateřina; Kotrčová, Eva; Marsala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2015), s. 83-95. ISSN 1478-9450 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cell therapy * immunomodulation * neural stem cell differentiation * neural subpopulation * neurodegenerative disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.896, year: 2014

  5. Transplantation proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Traum, Avram Z.; Schachter, Asher D.

    2005-01-01

    The field of proteomics is developing at a rapid pace in the post-genome era. Translational proteomics investigations aim to apply a combination of established methods and new technologies to learn about protein expression profiles predictive of clinical events, therapeutic response, and underlying mechanisms. However, in contrast to genetic studies and in parallel with gene expression studies, the dynamic nature of the proteome in conjunction with the challenges of accounting for post-transl...

  6. Quantitative proteomics analysis reveals glutamine deprivation activates fatty acid β-oxidation pathway in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Baisheng; Muhamad, Rodiallah; Yan, Guokai; Yu, Jie; Fan, Qiwen; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xiuzhi; Purnomoadi, Agung; Achmadi, Joelal; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine, a multifunctional amino acid, functions in nutrient metabolism, energy balance, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. Lipid is an important nutrient and controls a broad range of physiological processes. Previous studies have demonstrated that glutamine can affect lipolysis and lipogenesis, but the effect of glutamine on the detailed lipid metabolism remains incompletely understood. Here, we applied the quantitative proteomics approach to estimate the relative abundance of proteins in HepG2 cells treated by glutamine deprivation. The results showed that there were 212 differentially abundant proteins in response to glutamine deprivation, including 150 significantly increased proteins and 62 significantly decreased proteins. Interestingly, functional classification showed that 43 differentially abundant proteins were related to lipid metabolism. Further bioinformatics analysis and western blotting validation revealed that lipid accumulation may be affected by β-oxidation of fatty acid induced by glutamine deprivation in HepG2 cells. Together, our results may provide the potential for regulating lipid metabolism by glutamine in animal production and human nutrition. The MS data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with identifier PXD003387. PMID:26837383

  7. Apoptosis of Candida albicans during the Interaction with Murine Macrophages: Proteomics and Cell-Death Marker Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón, Virginia; Vialás, Vital; Gil-Bona, Ana; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Martínez-Gomariz, Montserrat; Gutiérrez-Blázquez, Dolores; Monteoliva, Lucía; Molero, Gloria; Ramsdale, Mark; Gil, Concha

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages may induce fungal apoptosis to fight against C. albicans, as previously hypothesized by our group. To confirm this hypothesis, we analyzed proteins from C. albicans cells after 3 h of interaction with macrophages using two quantitative proteomic approaches. A total of 51 and 97 proteins were identified as differentially expressed by DIGE and iTRAQ, respectively. The proteins identified and quantified were different, with only seven in common, but classified in the same functional categories. The analyses of their functions indicated that an increase in the metabolism of amino acids and purine nucleotides were taking place, while the glycolysis and translation levels dropped after 3 h of interaction. Also, the response to oxidative stress and protein translation were reduced. In addition, seven substrates of metacaspase (Mca1) were identified (Cdc48, Fba1, Gpm1, Pmm1, Rct1, Ssb1, and Tal1) as decreased in abundance, plus 12 proteins previously described as related to apoptosis. Besides, the monitoring of apoptotic markers along 24 h of interaction (caspase-like activity, TUNEL assay, and the measurement of ROS and cell examination by transmission electron microscopy) revealed that apoptotic processes took place for 30% of the fungal cells, thus supporting the proteomic results and the hypothesis of macrophages killing C. albicans by apoptosis. PMID:27048922

  8. Protein translation machinery holds a key for transition of planktonic cells to biofilm state in Enterococcus faecalis: A proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Shariq; Sharma, Divakar; Bisht, Deepa; Khan, Asad U

    2016-06-10

    Enterococcus faecalis is a member of human gut microflora causing nosocomial infection involving biofilm formation. Ethyl methyl sulfonate induced mutants were analysed using crystal violet assay, SEM and CLSM microscopy which confirmed AK-E12 as biofilm efficient and AK-F6 as biofilm deficient mutants. Growth curve pattern revealed AK-E12 was fast growing whereas, AK-F6 was found slow growing mutant. 2D-Electrophorosis and MALDI-TOF analysis revealed over and underexpression of many translation-elongation associated proteins in mutants compared to wild type. Protein translation elongation factor G, translation elongation factor Tu and ribosomal subunit interface proteins were underexpressed and UTP-glucose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase and cell division protein divIVA were overexpressed in AK-E12 as compared to wild type. In AK-F6, except 10 kDa chaperonin which was over-expressed other selected proteins were found to be suppressed. RT-PCR confirmed proteomic data except for the translation elongation factor G which showed contradictory data of proteome expression in AK-E12. Protein-protein interaction networks were constructed using STRING 10.0 which demonstrated strong connection of translation-elongation proteins with other proteins. Hence, it concludes from the data that translation elongation factors are important in transition of planktonic cells to biofilm cells in Enterococcus faecalis. PMID:27144316

  9. Clinical applications of indium-111-acetylacetone-labelled blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method permitting red-cell labelling with 111In-acetylacetone was reported in 1974 for evaluating intestinal blood loss, the liver-spleen ratio and the red-cell volume. White blood cells can be tagged similarly. In white-cell labelling, simultaneous red-cell or platelet tagging is avoided. Several procedures (dextran separation and gradient centrifugations) have been combined, to develop a highly selective cell separation. In osteomyelitis it may not be as advantageous to use 67Ga-citrate, as in inflammatory soft tissue processes. The detection of inflammatory processes with labelled leukocytes could be of great importance for the scintigraphic diagnosis of osteomyelitidies. A group of 97 patients with suspected osteomyelitis have been examined using 111In-acetylacetone-labelled leukocytes (111In-AAL) immediately following positive routine skeletal scintigraphy. Images obtained 24 h post injection usually were the most satisfactory. In the followup group of 70 patients 21 true positives, 43 true negatives, 21 false negatives and 3 false positives were observed. These findings result in a specificity of 92%, sensitivity of 50% and accuracy of 70% with 111In-AAL for osteomyelitis. Preliminary investigations using 111In-acetylacetone-labelled thrombocytes (111In-AAT) were carried out to detect rejection of transplanted kidneys. The platelets were separated by means of additional special density gradient centrifugations but no dextran from 15-20 ml of autologous whole blood. Scans have been obtained 15 min, 2.5 h and 24 h post injection in an initial group of 10 patients. In acute rejection, a high transplant uptake has been detected, whereas patients without acute rejection showed no or only a minimum activity accumulation. Patients with chronic rejection have intermediate uptakes

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Calcium- and Phosphorylation-dependentCalmodulin Complexes in Mammalian Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Wang, Daojing

    2006-05-26

    Protein conformational changes due to cofactor binding (e.g. metal ions, heme) and/or posttranslational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation) modulate dynamic protein complexes. Calmodulin (CaM) plays an essential role in regulating calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) signaling and homeostasis. No systematic approach on the identification of phosphorylation-dependent Ca{sup 2+}/CaM binding proteins has been published. Herein, we report a proteome-wide study of phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins from mammalian cells. This method, termed 'Dynamic Phosphoprotein Complex Trapping', 'DPPC Trapping' for short, utilizes a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays. The basic strategy is to drastically shift the equilibrium towards endogenous phosphorylation of Ser, Thr, and Tyr at the global scale by inhibiting corresponding phosphatases in vivo. The phosphorylation-dependent calmodulin-binding proteins are then trapped in vitro in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner by CaM-Sepharose chromatography. Finally, the isolated calmodulin-binding proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by LC/MS/MS. In parallel, the phosphorylation-dependent binding is visualized by silver staining and/or Western blotting. Using this method, we selectively identified over 120 CaM-associated proteins including many previously uncharacterized. We verified ubiquitin-protein ligase EDD1, inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (IP{sub 3}R1), and ATP-dependent RNA helicase DEAD box protein 3 (DDX3), as phosphorylation-dependent CaM binding proteins. To demonstrate the utilities of our method in understanding biological pathways, we showed that pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 in vivo by staurosporine-sensitive kinase(s), but not by PKA/PKG/PKC, significantly reduced the affinity of its Ca{sup 2+}-dependent CaM binding. However, pSer/Thr of IP{sub 3}R1 did not substantially affect its Ca{sup 2+}-independent CaM binding. We further showed that phosphatase PP1, but not PP2A or PP2B

  11. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  12. Donor cell leukemia after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Makoto; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Terakura, Seitaro; Ozeki, Kazutaka; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2008-07-01

    A 49-year-old male developed recurrent acute myeloid leukemia 27 months after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) from an HLA-identical brother. The immunophenotype of the blastic cell population was incompatible with that of the pre-transplant blast cells; a mutation in C/EBPA gene was found in the pre-transplant blast cells that was not present in the post-transplant blast cells, and short tandem repeat analysis of marrow cells, which included 71% blasts, showed complete donor chimera. Thus, this recipient developed donor cell leukemia (DCL). The donor was healthy when DCL developed in the recipient as well as before donation of the peripheral blood stem cells. Only five cases of DCL after PBSCT have been reported in the literature. As a mechanism for the development of DCL, a vigorous proliferative demand on the donor cells, which often correlates with a higher likelihood of replication error or mutation, has been proposed. Peripheral blood stem cells might have an advantage in that they are associated with a low incidence of DCL development because PBSCT recipients receive a higher total cell dose than recipients of bone marrow or cord blood cells. PMID:18470599

  13. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bonomi

    Full Text Available Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH, and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF and 42 poor responders (PR to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001 in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in single human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2015-09-01

    Determination mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from extremely small amounts of DNA extracted from tissue of limited amounts and/or degraded samples is frequently employed in medical, forensic, and anthropologic studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA cloning is a routine method, especially to examine heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations. In this review, we compare the mtDNA mutation patterns detected by three different sequencing strategies. Cloning and sequencing methods that are based on PCR amplification of DNA extracted from either single cells or pooled cells yield a high frequency of mutations, partly due to the artifacts introduced by PCR and/or the DNA cloning process. Direct sequencing of PCR product which has been amplified from DNA in individual cells is able to detect the low levels of mtDNA mutations present within a cell. We further summarize the findings in our recent studies that utilized this single cell method to assay mtDNA mutation patterns in different human blood cells. Our data show that many somatic mutations observed in the end-stage differentiated cells are found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors within the CD34(+) cell compartment. Accumulation of mtDNA variations in the individual CD34+ cells is affected by both aging and family genetic background. Granulocytes harbor higher numbers of mutations compared with the other cells, such as CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes. Serial assessment of mtDNA mutations in a population of single CD34(+) cells obtained from the same donor over time suggests stability of some somatic mutations. CD34(+) cell clones from a donor marked by specific mtDNA somatic mutations can be found in the recipient after transplantation. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the lineage tracing of HSCs, aging effect on accumulation of mtDNA mutations and the usage of mtDNA sequence in forensic identification. PMID:26149767

  15. Cost-effective and Rapid Blood Analysis on a Cell-phone

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Hongying; Sencan, Ikbal; Wong, Justin; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Tseng, Derek; Nagashima, Keita; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact and cost-effective imaging cytometry platform installed on a cell-phone for the measurement of the density of red and white blood cells as well as hemoglobin concentration in human blood samples. Fluorescent and bright-field images of blood samples are captured using separate optical attachments to the cell-phone and are rapidly processed through a custom-developed smart application running on the phone for counting of blood cells and determining hemoglobin density. W...

  16. Quantitative proteomics of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae cell envelope and membrane vesicles for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Weber, Jacob V; Gafken, Philip R; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2014-05-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) is a human-specific pathogen, and the agent of a sexually transmitted disease, gonorrhea. There is a critical need for new approaches to study and treat GC infections because of the growing threat of multidrug-resistant isolates and the lack of a vaccine. Despite the implied role of the GC cell envelope and membrane vesicles in colonization and infection of human tissues and cell lines, comprehensive studies have not been undertaken to elucidate their constituents. Accordingly, in pursuit of novel molecular therapeutic targets, we have applied isobaric tagging for absolute quantification coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for proteome quantitative analyses. Mining the proteome of cell envelopes and native membrane vesicles revealed 533 and 168 common proteins, respectively, in analyzed GC strains FA1090, F62, MS11, and 1291. A total of 22 differentially abundant proteins were discovered including previously unknown proteins. Among those proteins that displayed similar abundance in four GC strains, 34 were found in both cell envelopes and membrane vesicles fractions. Focusing on one of them, a homolog of an outer membrane protein LptD, we demonstrated that its depletion caused loss of GC viability. In addition, we selected for initial characterization six predicted outer membrane proteins with unknown function, which were identified as ubiquitous in the cell envelopes derived from examined GC isolates. These studies entitled a construction of deletion mutants and analyses of their resistance to different chemical probes. Loss of NGO1985, in particular, resulted in dramatically decreased GC viability upon treatment with detergents, polymyxin B, and chloramphenicol, suggesting that this protein functions in the maintenance of the cell envelope permeability barrier. Together, these findings underscore the concept that the cell envelope and membrane vesicles contain crucial, yet under-explored determinants of GC

  17. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Healthy and Defective Red Blood Cell Settling in Blood Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Z; Rahnama, M; Jafari, S

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to study sedimentation of a red blood cell (RBC) in a plasma-filled tube numerically. Such behaviors are studied for a healthy and a defective cell which might be created due to human diseases, such as diabetes, sickle-cell anemia, and hereditary spherocytosis. Flow-induced deformation of RBC is obtained using finite-element method (FEM), while flow and fluid-membrane interaction are handled using lattice Boltzmann (LB) and immersed boundary methods (IBMs), respectively. The effects of RBC properties as well as its geometry and orientation on its sedimentation rate are investigated and discussed. The results show that decreasing frontal area of an RBC and/or increasing tube diameter results in a faster settling. Comparison of healthy and diabetic cells reveals that less cell deformability leads to slower settling. The simulation results show that the sicklelike and spherelike RBCs have lower settling velocity as compared with a biconcave discoid cell. PMID:26926169

  18. Stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture for human embryonic stem cell proteomic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Kassem, Moustapha;

    2012-01-01

    The identification and quantitative measurements of proteins in human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is a fast growing interdisciplinary area with an enormous impact on understanding the biology of hESC and the mechanism controlling self-renewal and differentiation. Using a quantitative mass...... spectroscopic method of stable isotope labelling with amino acids during cell culture (SILAC), we are able to analyse differential expression of proteins from different cellular compartments and to identify intracellular signalling pathways involved in self-renewal and differentiation. In this chapter, we...

  19. Integrated Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Analyses of Prostate Cancer Cells Reveal Glycoprotein Alteration in Protein Abundance and Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Punit; Wang, Xiangchun; Yang, Weiming; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Sun, Shisheng; Hoti, Naseruddin; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Shuang; Pasay, Jered; Rubin, Abby; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. and worldwide, and androgen-deprivation therapy remains the principal treatment for patients. Although a majority of patients initially respond to androgen-deprivation therapy, most will eventually develop castration resistance. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of castration resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics. LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines are models for androgen-dependence and androgen-independence, respectively. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of these two prostate cancer cell lines using integrated global proteomics and glycoproteomics. Global proteome profiling of the cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and two- dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) led to the quantification of 8063 proteins. To analyze the glycoproteins, glycosite-containing peptides were isolated from the same iTRAQ-labeled peptides from the cell lines using solid phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Among the 1810 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 653 identified N-glycoproteins, 176 glycoproteins were observed to be different between the two cell lines. A majority of the altered glycoproteins were also observed with changes in their global protein expression levels. However, alterations in 21 differentially expressed glycoproteins showed no change at the protein abundance level, indicating that the glycosylation site occupancy was different between the two cell lines. To determine the glycosylation heterogeneity at specific glycosylation sites, we further identified and quantified 1145 N-linked glycopeptides with attached glycans in the same iTRAQ-labeled samples. These intact glycopeptides contained 67 glycan compositions and showed increased fucosylation in PC3 cells in several of the examined glycosylation sites. The increase in

  20. Deletion of the Scl +19 enhancer increases the blood stem cell compartment without affecting the formation of mature blood lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Spensberger, Dominik; Kotsopoulou, Ekaterini; Ferreira, Rita; Broccardo, Cyril; Scott, Linda M.; Fourouclas, Nasios; Ottersbach, Katrin; Green, Anthony R.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2012-01-01

    The stem cell leukemia (Scl)/Tal1 gene is essential for normal blood and endothelial development, and is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), progenitors, erythroid, megakaryocytic, and mast cells. The Scl +19 enhancer is active in HSCs and progenitor cells, megakaryocytes, and mast cells, but not mature erythroid cells. Here we demonstrate that in vivo deletion of the Scl +19 enhancer (Scl Δ19/Δ19 ) results in viable mice with normal Scl expression in mature hematopoietic lineages. ...