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Sample records for blocks tumour growth

  1. Blocking CLEC14A-MMRN2 binding inhibits sprouting angiogenesis and tumour growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    PJ, Noy; P, Lodhia; K, Khan; X, Zhuang; DG, Ward; AR, Verissimo; A, Bacon; R, Bicknell

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified CLEC14A as a tumour endothelial marker. Here we show CLEC14A is a regulator of sprouting angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Using a HUVEC spheroid sprouting assay we found CLEC14A to be a regulator of sprout initiation. Analysis of endothelial sprouting in aortic ring and in vivo subcutaneous sponge assays from clec14a+/+ and clec14a−/− mice revealed defects in sprouting angiogenesis in CLEC14A deficient animals. Tumour growth was retarded and vascularity reduced in clec14a−/− mice. Pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed MMRN2 binds to the extracellular region of CLEC14A. The CLEC14A-MMRN2 interaction was interrogated using mouse monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies were screened for their ability to block this interaction. Clone C4 but not C2 blocked CLEC14A-MMRN2 binding. C4 antibody perturbed tube formation and endothelial sprouting in vitro and in vivo, with a similar phenotype to loss of CLEC14A. Significantly, tumour growth was impaired in C4 treated animals and vascular density was also reduced in the C4 treated group. We conclude that CLEC14A-MMRN2 binding has a role in inducing sprouting angiogenesis during tumour growth, that has the potential to be manipulated in future anti-angiogenic therapy design. PMID:25745997

  2. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination.

  3. Growth, Endlessness, Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Nabata, Avery Misuzu

    2014-01-01

    Growth, Endlessness, Blocks is a sculptural installation comprised of a series of wood structures of various scales. Large sections of drywall function as extensions of the gallery walls. Each structure balances a number of different physical characteristics that are tied to the act of making. Balance and presence combine in a disconcerting way giving the viewer a sense of uneasiness and a moment finely tuned by the artist. The artist seeks to embody the role of the factory fabricator as a me...

  4. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  5. Coupled modeling of tumour angiogenesis, tumour growth,and blood perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a more realistic mathematical simulation method to investigate the dynamic process of tumour angio-genesis by fully coupling the vessel growth,tumour growth and associated blood perfusion.The tumour growth and angiogenesis are coupled by the chemical microenvironment and the cell-matrix interaction.The haemodynamic calculation is carried out on the new vasculature,and an estimation of vessel collapse is made according to the wall shear stress criterion.The results are consistent with phy...

  6. 3D Multiscale Modelling of Angiogenesis and Vascular Tumour Growth

    KAUST Repository

    Perfahl, H.

    2012-11-01

    We present a three-dimensional, multiscale model of vascular tumour growth, which couples nutrient/growth factor transport, blood flow, angiogenesis, vascular remodelling, movement of and interactions between normal and tumour cells, and nutrient-dependent cell cycle dynamics within each cell. We present computational simulations which show how a vascular network may evolve and interact with tumour and healthy cells. We also demonstrate how our model may be combined with experimental data, to predict the spatio-temporal evolution of a vascular tumour.

  7. Sorafenib blocks tumour growth, angiogenesis and metastatic potential in preclinical models of osteosarcoma through a mechanism potentially involving the inhibition of ERK1/2, MCL-1 and ezrin pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Stefano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common primary bone tumour in children and young adults. Despite improved prognosis, metastatic or relapsed OS remains largely incurable and no significant improvement has been observed in the last 20 years. Therefore, the search for alternative agents in OS is mandatory. Results We investigated phospho-ERK 1/2, MCL-1, and phospho-Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (P-ERM as potential therapeutic targets in OS. Activation of these pathways was shown by immunohistochemistry in about 70% of cases and in all OS cell lines analyzed. Mutational analysis revealed no activating mutations in KRAS whereas BRAF gene was found to be mutated in 4/30 OS samples from patients. Based on these results we tested the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib (BAY 43-9006 in preclinical models of OS. Sorafenib inhibited OS cell line proliferation, induced apoptosis and downregulated P-ERK1/2, MCL-1, and P-ERM in a dose-dependent manner. The dephosphorylation of ERM was not due to ERK inhibition. The downregulation of MCL-1 led to an increase in apoptosis in OS cell lines. In chick embryo chorioallantoic membranes, OS supernatants induced angiogenesis, which was blocked by sorafenib and it was also shown that sorafenib reduced VEGF and MMP2 production. In addition, sorafenib treatment dramatically reduced tumour volume of OS xenografts and lung metastasis in SCID mice. Conclusion In conclusion, ERK1/2, MCL-1 and ERM pathways are shown to be active in OS. Sorafenib is able to inhibit their signal transduction, both in vitro and in vivo, displaying anti-tumoural activity, anti-angiogenic effects, and reducing metastatic colony formation in lungs. These data support the testing of sorafenib as a potential therapeutic option in metastatic or relapsed OS patients unresponsive to standard treatments.

  8. Variable tumour blood flow influences tumour growth and hypoxia in rodents and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are studying the causes and implications of variable tumour blood flow in clinical and xenografted tumours using immunohistochemical techniques with flow cytometry and image analysis. Both established tumour xenograft systems and biopsies of in-situ cervical cancer after pimonidazole administration have been evaluated. In the laboratory, enzymatic reduction of part of the biopsy to a single cell suspension has been followed by pulse labelling with iododeoxyuridine, then fixation for flow analysis of DNA content. The remaining material, like that from xenografts infused with Hoechst 33342 to indicate blood flow, has been analyzed by image cytometry after staining with proliferation (IUdR, PCNA or Ki-67/MIB1) or structural (cytokeratin, CD31, CD104, etc.) markers. The variability of tumour blood flow that can be easily documented in xenografts leads to discontinuities in proliferation and hypoxia that appear to be duplicated in the clinic. Interestingly, more than half of the tumours with substantial pimonidazole labelling showed hypoxic cells capable of incorporating IUdR in vitro, thus suggesting transient hypoxia in in-situ human tumours. Other evidence also suggests that tumour blood flow is non-constant in patients. Two preliminary conclusions are emerging: 1) non-constant blood flow that provides an additional restriction on tumour growth rate in the pre-treatment situation may lead to rapidly accelerated repopulation following the initiation of chemo- or radiotherapy, and 2) a significant fraction of human cervix cancers may express both 'acute' and 'chronic' hypoxia. Both observations are consistent with non-constant blood flow leading to dynamic time-dependent changes in hypoxia and proliferation patterns. With our xenograft systems, we are now undertaking 3-D assessments of tumour vasculature and its function that are expected to provide an improved understanding of the tumour-level factors that result in non-constant tumour blood flow

  9. Tumour cell–derived extracellular vesicles interact with mesenchymal stem cells to modulate the microenvironment and enhance cholangiocarcinoma growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Haga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contributions of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to tumour growth and stroma formation are poorly understood. Tumour cells can transfer genetic information and modulate cell signalling in other cells through the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs. We examined the contribution of EV-mediated inter-cellular signalling between bone marrow MSCs and tumour cells in human cholangiocarcinoma, highly desmoplastic cancers that are characterized by tumour cells closely intertwined within a dense fibrous stroma. Exposure of MSCs to tumour cell–derived EVs enhanced MSC migratory capability and expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin mRNA, in addition to mRNA expression and release of CXCL-1, CCL2 and IL-6. Conditioned media from MSCs exposed to tumour cell–derived EVs increased STAT-3 phosphorylation and proliferation in tumour cells. These effects were completely blocked by anti-IL-6R antibody. In conclusion, tumour cell–derived EVs can contribute to the generation of tumour stroma through fibroblastic differentiation of MSCs, and can also selectively modulate the cellular release of soluble factors such as IL-6 by MSCs that can, in turn, alter tumour cell proliferation. Thus, malignant cells can “educate” MSCs to induce local microenvironmental changes that enhance tumour cell growth.

  10. Plasmid-based Stat3 siRNA delivered by hydroxyapatite nanoparticles suppresses mouse prostate tumour growth in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo-Wen Liang; Ling Zhang; Bao-Xue Yang; Bao-Feng Guo; Yang Li; Xiao-Jie Li; Xin Li; Li-Ting Zhao; Ii-Fang Gao; Hao Yu; Xue-Jian Zhao

    2011-01-01

    DNA vector-based Stat3-specific RNA interference (si-Stat3) blocks Stat3 signalling and inhibits prostate tumour growth. However, the antitumour activity depends on the efficient delivery of si-Stat3. The effects on the growth of mouse prostate cancer cells of si-Stat3 delivered by hydroxyapatite were determined in this study. RM-1 tumour blocks were transplanted into C57BL/6 mice. CaCl2-modif ied hydroxyapatite carrying si-Stat3 plasmids were injected into tumours, and tumour growth and histology were determined. The expression levels of Stat3, pTyr-Stat3, Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase3, VEGF and cyclin Dl were measured by western blot analysis. Amounts of apoptosis in cancer cells were analysed with immunohistochemistry and the terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay. The results showed that hydroxyapatite-delivered si-Stat3 significantly suppressed tumour growth up to 74% (P<0.01). Stat3 expression was dramatically downregulated in the tumours. The immunohistochemistry and TUNEL results showed that si-Stet3-induced apoptosis (up to 42%, P<0.01). The Stat3 downstream genes Bcl-2, VEGFand cyclin Dl were also strongly downregulated in the tumour tissues that also displayed significant increases in Bax expression and Caspase3 activity. These results suggest that hydroxyapatite can be used for the in vivo delivery of plasmid-based siRNAs into tumours.

  11. Multiphase modelling of vascular tumour growth in two spatial dimensions

    KAUST Repository

    Hubbard, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a continuum mathematical model of vascular tumour growth which is based on a multiphase framework in which the tissue is decomposed into four distinct phases and the principles of conservation of mass and momentum are applied to the normal/healthy cells, tumour cells, blood vessels and extracellular material. The inclusion of a diffusible nutrient, supplied by the blood vessels, allows the vasculature to have a nonlocal influence on the other phases. Two-dimensional computational simulations are carried out on unstructured, triangular meshes to allow a natural treatment of irregular geometries, and the tumour boundary is captured as a diffuse interface on this mesh, thereby obviating the need to explicitly track the (potentially highly irregular and ill-defined) tumour boundary. A hybrid finite volume/finite element algorithm is used to discretise the continuum model: the application of a conservative, upwind, finite volume scheme to the hyperbolic mass balance equations and a finite element scheme with a stable element pair to the generalised Stokes equations derived from momentum balance, leads to a robust algorithm which does not use any form of artificial stabilisation. The use of a matrix-free Newton iteration with a finite element scheme for the nutrient reaction-diffusion equations allows full nonlinearity in the source terms of the mathematical model.Numerical simulations reveal that this four-phase model reproduces the characteristic pattern of tumour growth in which a necrotic core forms behind an expanding rim of well-vascularised proliferating tumour cells. The simulations consistently predict linear tumour growth rates. The dependence of both the speed with which the tumour grows and the irregularity of the invading tumour front on the model parameters is investigated. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Cytokinetic Control Mechanisms in Ehrlich Ascites Tumour Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich ascites tumour in mice was studied as a model system to elucidate the cytokinetic mechanisms controlling growth of cell populations. The basis for a retardation in growth rate during tumour development was determined with the aid of 3H-thymidine labelling and autoradiography. Three possible cytokinetic variables in growth regulation, namely, duration of the mitotic cell cycle, fraction of the cycling cells in the population (growth fraction) and rate of cell loss, were measured at different stages of growth. It was concluded that a deceleration in growth was a result of (1) a gradual prolongation of the cell cycle and its components and (2) a progressive decline in the growth fraction. Rate of cell loss did not appreciably change during most of the growth. It was also found that the total cell mass rather than the tumour age dictated the growth rate at any instant over a considerable range of growth. Non-cycling cells were found to resume cycle when a fraction of an old tumour was transplanted in new hosts, 3H-thymidine labelling combined with microspectrophotometric estimates of cellular DNA was utilized to locate the stages at which a cell cycle could be suspended or resumed. It was found that decycling or recycling could occur only after mitosis and before DNA synthesis; non-cycling (G0) state resembled G1, which was absent in the proliferating tumour cells. These findings are relevant to a further understanding of the molecular events leading to the initiation or suspension of a cell cycle. They are also pertinent to formulating a rationale for tumour therapy — for example with radiation — when coupled with the existing knowledge of the relative sensitivity of cells at different stages of cycle. (author)

  13. Multiphase modelling of vascular tumour growth in two spatial dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, M. E.; Byrne, H. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a continuum mathematical model of vascular tumour growth which is based on a multiphase framework in which the tissue is decomposed into four distinct phases and the principles of conservation of mass and momentum are applied to the normal/healthy cells, tumour cells, blood vessels and extracellular material. The inclusion of a diffusible nutrient, supplied by the blood vessels, allows the vasculature to have a nonlocal influence on the other phases. Two-dimensional c...

  14. Epidermal growth factor and imagine diagnosis and therapy of tumour with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has a direct proportion correlation between the epidermal growth factor receptor levels of tumour and tumour differentiation degree, tumour sizes, stage, mototic index or cancer recurrence. Epidermal growth factor receptor is detected in 90% of the tumours, in which, 54% of epidermal growth factor receptor of malignant tumours can link with external genous ligand. Therefore, radionuclide labelled epidermal growth factor will bring about the imaging diagnosis and therapy of malignant tumours. The research present situation and clinical significance of radionuclide labelled epidermal growth factor for receptor imaging diagnosis and therapy of tumour are emphatically elaborated

  15. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R)-dependent pathways control tumour growth and tumour response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages induces a suppressor phenotype. Previous data from our group suggested that this occurs via Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R)-mediated pathways. In the present study, we investigated the impact of apoptotic cell inoculation or induction by a chemotherapeutic agent (dacarbazine, DTIC) on tumour growth, microenvironmental parameters and survival, and the effect of treatment with a PAF-R antagonist (WEB2170). These studies were performed in murine tumours: Ehrlich Ascitis Tumour (EAT) and B16F10 melanoma. Tumour growth was assessed by direct counting of EAT cells in the ascitis or by measuring the volume of the solid tumour. Parameters of the tumour microenvironment, such as the frequency of cells expressing cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), caspase-3 and galectin-3, and microvascular density, were determined by immunohistochemistry. Levels of vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were determined by ELISA, and levels of nitric oxide (NO) by Griess reaction. PAF-R expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Inoculation of apoptotic cells before EAT implantation stimulated tumour growth. This effect was reversed by in vivo pre-treatment with WEB2170. This treatment also reduced tumour growth and modified the microenvironment by reducing PGE2, VEGF and NO production. In B16F10 melanoma, WEB2170 alone or in association with DTIC significantly reduced tumour volume. Survival of the tumour-bearing mice was not affected by WEB2170 treatment but was significantly improved by the combination of DTIC with WEB2170. Tumour microenvironment elements were among the targets of the combination therapy since the relative frequency of COX-2 and galectin-3 positive cells and the microvascular density within the tumour mass were significantly reduced by treatment with WEB2170 or DTIC alone or in combination. Antibodies to PAF-R stained the cells from inside the tumour, but not the

  16. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R-dependent pathways control tumour growth and tumour response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Ciro BS

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages induces a suppressor phenotype. Previous data from our group suggested that this occurs via Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R-mediated pathways. In the present study, we investigated the impact of apoptotic cell inoculation or induction by a chemotherapeutic agent (dacarbazine, DTIC on tumour growth, microenvironmental parameters and survival, and the effect of treatment with a PAF-R antagonist (WEB2170. These studies were performed in murine tumours: Ehrlich Ascitis Tumour (EAT and B16F10 melanoma. Methods Tumour growth was assessed by direct counting of EAT cells in the ascitis or by measuring the volume of the solid tumour. Parameters of the tumour microenvironment, such as the frequency of cells expressing cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2, caspase-3 and galectin-3, and microvascular density, were determined by immunohistochemistry. Levels of vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were determined by ELISA, and levels of nitric oxide (NO by Griess reaction. PAF-R expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results Inoculation of apoptotic cells before EAT implantation stimulated tumour growth. This effect was reversed by in vivo pre-treatment with WEB2170. This treatment also reduced tumour growth and modified the microenvironment by reducing PGE2, VEGF and NO production. In B16F10 melanoma, WEB2170 alone or in association with DTIC significantly reduced tumour volume. Survival of the tumour-bearing mice was not affected by WEB2170 treatment but was significantly improved by the combination of DTIC with WEB2170. Tumour microenvironment elements were among the targets of the combination therapy since the relative frequency of COX-2 and galectin-3 positive cells and the microvascular density within the tumour mass were significantly reduced by treatment with WEB2170 or DTIC alone or in combination. Antibodies to PAF-R stained

  17. Tumour growth delay and cell survival in rat R-1 tumours after radiation and methotrexate treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rat R-1 rhabdomyosarcoma which forms colonies in vitro has been used to investigate the effectiveness of radiochemotherapy. Tumour growth delay data were compared with those on survival of cells derived from tumours treated in situ. Methotrexate (MTX) was administered i.p. in three doses of 10 mg per kg body weight at intervals of 4 h. A dose of 10 Gy of 300 kV X rays was given at different time intervals before or after the MTX treatment. The observed tumour growth delays for the combined treatment for intervals of up to 4 d were less than the sum of those following separate treatments. An excess in growth delay was observed when MTX was given 6 to 8 days after or 5 days before a dose of 10 Gy. The radiation treatment resulted in fractions of surviving cells which remained constant for up to 6 days after treatment. The effectiveness of the MTX treatment could be assessed at 3d after administration of the drug, that of the combined treatments as at least 3 days after the MTX treatment. (Auth.)

  18. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Departement de Neurologie, CHU de Caen (France); Marteau, Lena [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Bernaudin, Jean-Francois [Service d' Histologie-Biologie Tumorale, ER2UPMC, Universite Paris 6, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Roussel, Simon [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, CHU de Caen (France); Bernaudin, Myriam [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France); Petit, Edwige, E-mail: epetit@cyceron.fr [CERVOxy team ' Hypoxia and cerebrovascular pathophysiology' , UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Universite Paris-Descartes, CNRS, CEA. G.I.P. CYCERON, Caen (France)

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  19. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  20. Growth after treatment of solid tumours in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined 90 survivors of childhood solid tumours diagnosed in our hospital between 1960 and 1976. Their ages at the time of this study ranged from 12.2 to 41.5 years. Adult standing height was usually normal. However, final standing height was less than expected in the females, and sitting height was below the normal mean in the males. The males who had received both chemotheraphy and radiation therapy to the spine had a greater decrement in sitting height, but we did not find any association between radiation therapy to the spine without chemotherapy and subsequent total growth of the spine as measured by sitting height. We conclude that these children generally do not experience any major growth disturbances. (au)

  1. Mathematical modeling of liver metastases tumour growth and control with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generating an optimized radiation treatment plan requires understanding the factors affecting tumour control. Mathematical models of tumour dynamics may help in future studies of factors predicting tumour sensitivity to radiotherapy. In this study, a time-dependent differential model, incorporating biological cancer markers, is presented to describe pre-treatment tumour growth, response to radiation, and recurrence. The model uses Gompertzian-Exponential growth to model pre-treatment tumour growth. The effect of radiotherapy is handled by a realistic cell-kill term that includes a volume-dependent change in tumour sensitivity. Post-treatment, a Gompertzian, accelerated, delayed repopulation is employed. As proof of concept, we examined the fit of the model's prediction using various liver enzyme levels as markers of metastatic liver tumour growth in a liver cancer patient. A tumour clonogen population model was formulated. Each enzyme was coupled to the same tumour population, and served as surrogates of the tumour. This dynamical model was solved numerically and compared to the measured enzyme levels. By minimizing the mean-squared error of the model enzyme predictions, we determined the following tumour model parameters: growth rate prior to treatment was 0.52% per day; the fractional radiation cell kill for the prescribed dose (60 Gy in 15 fractions) was 42% per day, and the tumour repopulation rate was 2.9% per day. These preliminary results provided the basis to test the model in a larger series of patients, to apply biological markers for improving the efficacy of radiotherapy by determining the underlying tumour dynamics.

  2. Renal space-occupying solid growth of uncertain tumour status in metastasising tumour of the testicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of a particular case of 'atypical' hypernephroma the main differential diagnosis of solid renal masses are described with reference to the basis disease: testicle tumour causing metastasis. The problems of determining the dignity of the disease by methods of sonography, pyelogram and CT are pointed out as well as the differences between those characteristics of the said tumour revealed by X-ray diagnosis and the known characteristics of substantial kidney deformations as described in medical literature. (orig.)

  3. Computer simulation of tumour growth and cellular phase distribution prior to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A study into the optimal fractionation and schedule in combined chemo-radiotherapy for head and neck cancer has imposed the development of a computer model of tumour growth. The model is based on biological parameters, and characterises tumour growth and eventual tumour regression when chemo-radiotherapy is used. Tumour growth starting from a single stem cell is modelled using the Monte Carlo method. The type of the cell function, their relative proportions on mitosis, their proliferative capacity, the duration of the four phases of the cell cycle, the mean cell cycle time, and the cell loss due to natural causes are the main parameters of the basic model. A Gaussian distribution function operates in establishing the cell cycle time, with a mean value of 26 hours, while the cell type is sampled from a uniform distribution. With the established model, the sensitivity of the developed tumour's cell population to the stem, proliferative and non proliferative ratio at mitosis was assessed. The present model accurately reflects the exponential distribution of cells along the cell cycle (70% cells in G1 phase, 15% in S, 10% in G2, 5% in M) of a developed tumour as described in the literature. The proportion of stem, finitely proliferating and resting cells during tumour growth is maintained within their biological limits (2% stem. 23% finitely proliferating, 75% nonproliferating cells). The ratio (R=3) between the time necessary to develop a clinically detectable tumour (109 cells) and the time to grow to its lethal size (1012 cells) is in accordance with the biological data when tumour volume is compared for the two periods (30 doublings and 10 doublings respectively). Computer simulation can illustrate the biological growth of a tumour and the cell distribution along the cell cycle. These distributions may than be used in the assessment of tumour response to radiotherapy and to specific chemotherapeutic agents. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of

  4. Tuberous sclerosis-A model for tumour growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Kayleigh M; Dunlop, Elaine A

    2016-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a rare genetic disorder where patients develop benign tumours in several organ systems. Central to TSC pathology is hyper-activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling pathway, which is a key controller of cell growth. As a result, TSC model systems are a valuable tool for examining mTORC1-driven cellular processes. The immunosuppressant, rapamycin, is a specific inhibitor of mTORC1 and has shown promise as a therapeutic agent in TSC as well as in malignancy. This review will focus on the cellular processes controlled by mTORC1 and how TSC-deficient cell lines and mouse models have broadened our understanding of the mTORC1 signalling network. It will also discuss how our knowledge of TSC signalling can help us understand sporadic conditions where mTORC1 activity is implicated in disease onset or progression, and the possibility of using rapamycin to treat sporadic disease. PMID:26816112

  5. N-terminus-modified Hec1 suppresses tumour growth by interfering with kinetochore-microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orticello, M; Fiore, M; Totta, P; Desideri, M; Barisic, M; Passeri, D; Lenzi, J; Rosa, A; Orlandi, A; Maiato, H; Del Bufalo, D; Degrassi, F

    2015-06-01

    Mitotic proteins are attractive targets to develop molecular cancer therapeutics due to the intimate interdependence between cell proliferation and mitosis. In this work, we have explored the therapeutic potential of the kinetochore (KT) protein Hec1 (Highly Expressed in Cancer protein 1) as a molecular target to produce massive chromosome missegregation and cell death in cancer cells. Hec1 is a constituent of the Ndc80 complex, which mediates KT-microtubule (MT) attachments at mitosis and is upregulated in various cancer types. We expressed Hec1 fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at its N-terminus MT-interaction domain in HeLa cells and showed that expression of this modified Hec1, which localized at KTs, blocked cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis in tumour cells. EGFP-Hec1 was extremely potent in tumour cell killing and more efficient than siRNA-induced Hec1 depletion. In striking contrast, normal cells showed no apparent cell proliferation defects or cell death following EGFP-Hec1 expression. Live-cell imaging demonstrated that cancer cell death was associated with massive chromosome missegregation within multipolar spindles after a prolonged mitotic arrest. Moreover, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to increase KT-MT attachment stability, providing a molecular explanation for the abnormal spindle architecture and the cytotoxic activity of this modified protein. Consistent with cell culture data, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to strongly inhibit tumour growth in a mouse xenograft model by disrupting mitosis and inducing multipolar spindles. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of massive chromosome segregation defects can be used as an anti-cancer strategy through the activation of mitotic catastrophe after a multipolar mitosis. Importantly, this study represents a clear proof of concept that targeting KT proteins required for proper KT-MT attachment dynamics constitutes a powerful approach in cancer therapy. PMID

  6. On the importance of the submicrovascular network in a computational model of tumour growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Lesart, Anne-Cécile; Van Der Sanden, Boudewijn; Hamard, Lauriane; Estève, François; Stéphanou, Angélique

    2012-01-01

    A computational model is potentially a powerful tool to apprehend complex phenomena like solid tumour growth and to predict the outcome of therapies. To that end, the confrontation of the model with experiments is essential to validate this tool. In this study, we develop a computational model specifically dedicated to the interpretation of tumour growth as observed in a mouse model with a dorsal skinfold chamber. Observation of the skin vasculature at the dorsal window scale shows a sparse n...

  7. Object-Oriented Paradigms for Modelling Vascular Tumour Growth: a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, A J; Cooper, J; Byrne, H.M.; Maini, P.K.; Mckeever, S.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by a family of related hybrid multiscale models, we have built an object-oriented framework for developing and implementing multiscale models of vascular tumour growth. The models are implemented in our framework as a case study to highlight how object-oriented programming techniques and good object-oriented design may be used effectively to develop hybrid multiscale models of vascular tumour growth. The intention is that this paper will serve as a useful reference for researchers m...

  8. Oscillatory dynamics in a model of vascular tumour growth - implications for chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maini PK

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations of solid tumours suggest that vessel occlusion may occur when increased pressure from the tumour mass is exerted on the vessel walls. Since immature vessels are frequently found in tumours and may be particularly sensitive, such occlusion may impair tumour blood flow and have a negative impact on therapeutic outcome. In order to study the effects that occlusion may have on tumour growth patterns and therapeutic response, in this paper we develop and investigate a continuum model of vascular tumour growth. Results By analysing a spatially uniform submodel, we identify regions of parameter space in which the combination of tumour cell proliferation and vessel occlusion give rise to sustained temporal oscillations in the tumour cell population and in the vessel density. Alternatively, if the vessels are assumed to be less prone to collapse, stable steady state solutions are observed. When spatial effects are considered, the pattern of tumour invasion depends on the dynamics of the spatially uniform submodel. If the submodel predicts a stable steady state, then steady travelling waves are observed in the full model, and the system evolves to the same stable steady state behind the invading front. When the submodel yields oscillatory behaviour, the full model produces periodic travelling waves. The stability of the waves (which can be predicted by approximating the system as one of λ-ω type dictates whether the waves develop into regular or irregular spatio-temporal oscillations. Simulations of chemotherapy reveal that treatment outcome depends crucially on the underlying tumour growth dynamics. In particular, if the dynamics are oscillatory, then therapeutic efficacy is difficult to assess since the fluctuations in the size of the tumour cell population are enhanced, compared to untreated controls. Conclusions We have developed a mathematical model of vascular tumour growth formulated as a system of partial

  9. A single dividing cell population with imbalanced fate drives oesophageal tumour growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frede, Julia; Greulich, Philip; Nagy, Tibor; Simons, Benjamin D; Jones, Philip H

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of tumour growth is key for designing rational anticancer treatment. Here we used genetic lineage tracing to quantify cell behaviour during neoplastic transformation in a model of oesophageal carcinogenesis. We found that cell behaviour was convergent across premalignant tumours, which contained a single proliferating cell population. The rate of cell division was not significantly different in the lesions and the surrounding epithelium. However, dividing tumour cells had a uniform, small bias in cell fate so that, on average, slightly more dividing than non-dividing daughter cells were generated at each round of cell division. In invasive cancers induced by Kras(G12D) expression, dividing cell fate became more strongly biased towards producing dividing over non-dividing cells in a subset of clones. These observations argue that agents that restore the balance of cell fate may prove effective in checking tumour growth, whereas those targeting cycling cells may show little selectivity. PMID:27548914

  10. alpha-Tocopherol enhances tumour growth inhibition by cis-dichlorodiammine platinum (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarna

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Present studies indicate that alpha-tocopherol enhances the efficacy of cisplatin as demonstrated by inoculation of Dalton's lymphoma cells incubated with either cisplatin (5 or 10 µg/ml alone or cisplatin + alpha-tocopherol (25 or 50 µg/ml into C3H/He mice. Tumour cells (3 x 10(6 cells/mouse incubated with cisplatin grow slowly in syngeneic mice as indicated by the late appearance of tumour. However, mice failed to develop tumour when inoculated with tumour cells incubated with cisplatin + alpha-tocopherol. When the animals were challenged with tumour cells (3 x 10(6 cells/mouse on the 15th day after the initial inoculation, 30-50% survived more than 60 days, with 10% tumour-free survivors being observed in some groups. Antitumour activity was higher in mice receiving lymphoma cells (3 x 10(6 cells/mouse preincubated with cisplatin + alpha-tocopherol compared to cisplatin alone. Tumour-bearing mice receiving cisplatin in combination with different concentrations of alpha-tocopherol exhibited significantly higher (P<0.001 intratumour platinum content (123-306% but without any change in the kidney platinum content as compared to those receiving cisplatin (5 or 10 µg/ml alone. Enhancement of cisplatin-induced tumour growth inhibition is probably due to the modulation of tumour cell membrane permeability by alpha-tocopherol. alpha-Tocopherol might increase the influx of cisplatin into tumour cells, causing the DNA repair machinery to be less efficient due to increased efficiency of adduct formation in the DNA molecule. This effect of alpha-tocopherol can render cisplatin more effective as an antitumour agent.

  11. Investigation of various growth mechanisms of solid tumour growth within the linear-quadratic model for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAneney, H.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.

    2007-02-01

    The standard linear-quadratic survival model for radiotherapy is used to investigate different schedules of radiation treatment planning to study how these may be affected by different tumour repopulation kinetics between treatments. The laws for tumour cell repopulation include the logistic and Gompertz models and this extends the work of Wheldon et al (1977 Br. J. Radiol. 50 681), which was concerned with the case of exponential re-growth between treatments. Here we also consider the restricted exponential model. This has been successfully used by Panetta and Adam (1995 Math. Comput. Modelling 22 67) in the case of chemotherapy treatment planning.Treatment schedules investigated include standard fractionation of daily treatments, weekday treatments, accelerated fractionation, optimized uniform schedules and variation of the dosage and α/β ratio, where α and β are radiobiological parameters for the tumour tissue concerned. Parameters for these treatment strategies are extracted from the literature on advanced head and neck cancer, prostate cancer, as well as radiosensitive parameters. Standardized treatment protocols are also considered. Calculations based on the present analysis indicate that even with growth laws scaled to mimic initial growth, such that growth mechanisms are comparable, variation in survival fraction to orders of magnitude emerged. Calculations show that the logistic and exponential models yield similar results in tumour eradication. By comparison the Gompertz model calculations indicate that tumours described by this law result in a significantly poorer prognosis for tumour eradication than either the exponential or logistic models. The present study also shows that the faster the tumour growth rate and the higher the repair capacity of the cell line, the greater the variation in outcome of the survival fraction. Gaps in treatment, planned or unplanned, also accentuate the differences of the survival fraction given alternative growth

  12. Fast growth associated with aberrant vasculature and hypoxia in fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) over-expressing PC-3 prostate tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate tumours are commonly poorly oxygenated which is associated with tumour progression and development of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and radiotherapy. Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is a mitogenic and angiogenic factor, which is expressed at an increased level in human prostate tumours and is associated with a poor prognosis. We studied the effect of FGF8b on tumour oxygenation and growth parameters in xenografts in comparison with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-expressing xenografts, representing another fast growing and angiogenic tumour model. Subcutaneous tumours of PC-3 cells transfected with FGF8b, VEGF or empty (mock) vectors were produced and studied for vascularity, cell proliferation, glucose metabolism and oxygenation. Tumours were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC), flow cytometry, use of radiolabelled markers of energy metabolism ([18F]FDG) and hypoxia ([18F]EF5), and intratumoral polarographic measurements of pO2. Both FGF8b and VEGF tumours grew rapidly in nude mice and showed highly vascularised morphology. Perfusion studies, pO2 measurements, [18F]EF5 and [18F]FDG uptake as well as IHC staining for glucose transport protein (GLUT1) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1 showed that VEGF xenografts were well-perfused and oxygenised, as expected, whereas FGF8b tumours were as hypoxic as mock tumours. These results suggest that FGF8b-induced tumour capillaries are defective. Nevertheless, the growth rate of hypoxic FGF8b tumours was highly increased, as that of well-oxygenised VEGF tumours, when compared with hypoxic mock tumour controls. FGF8b is able to induce fast growth in strongly hypoxic tumour microenvironment whereas VEGF-stimulated growth advantage is associated with improved perfusion and oxygenation of prostate tumour xenografts

  13. Fast growth associated with aberrant vasculature and hypoxia in fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b over-expressing PC-3 prostate tumour xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnunen Ilpo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate tumours are commonly poorly oxygenated which is associated with tumour progression and development of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs and radiotherapy. Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b is a mitogenic and angiogenic factor, which is expressed at an increased level in human prostate tumours and is associated with a poor prognosis. We studied the effect of FGF8b on tumour oxygenation and growth parameters in xenografts in comparison with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-expressing xenografts, representing another fast growing and angiogenic tumour model. Methods Subcutaneous tumours of PC-3 cells transfected with FGF8b, VEGF or empty (mock vectors were produced and studied for vascularity, cell proliferation, glucose metabolism and oxygenation. Tumours were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC, flow cytometry, use of radiolabelled markers of energy metabolism ([18F]FDG and hypoxia ([18F]EF5, and intratumoral polarographic measurements of pO2. Results Both FGF8b and VEGF tumours grew rapidly in nude mice and showed highly vascularised morphology. Perfusion studies, pO2 measurements, [18F]EF5 and [18F]FDG uptake as well as IHC staining for glucose transport protein (GLUT1 and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF 1 showed that VEGF xenografts were well-perfused and oxygenised, as expected, whereas FGF8b tumours were as hypoxic as mock tumours. These results suggest that FGF8b-induced tumour capillaries are defective. Nevertheless, the growth rate of hypoxic FGF8b tumours was highly increased, as that of well-oxygenised VEGF tumours, when compared with hypoxic mock tumour controls. Conclusion FGF8b is able to induce fast growth in strongly hypoxic tumour microenvironment whereas VEGF-stimulated growth advantage is associated with improved perfusion and oxygenation of prostate tumour xenografts.

  14. The Klein–Gordon equation in mixture models of tumour growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caviglia, G. [DIMA, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 35, 16146 Genoa (Italy); Morro, A. [DIBRIS, University of Genoa, Via Opera Pia 13, 16145 Genoa (Italy); Pinamonti, N., E-mail: pinamont@dima.unige.it [DIMA, University of Genoa, Via Dodecaneso 35, 16146 Genoa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genoa (Italy)

    2014-11-14

    A mixture model of tumour microenvironment is considered, which consists of a solid phase for the tumour cells, a liquid phase for the interstitial fluid, and a nutrient phase. The balance equations for the three phases take into account exchange of mass between tumour and nutrients, and exchange of drag forces between the constituents. Under rather natural assumptions, the determination of the nutrient density is reduced to the solution of a Klein–Gordon equation, with source term depending on mass injection from outside. A chain of decoupled equations for the remaining unknowns is then determined in terms of the nutrient density. Finally, the growth of tumour volume is investigated under the assumption of spherical symmetry.

  15. A Stochastic and State Space Model for Tumour Growth and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Yuan Tan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a state space model documenting Gompertz behaviour of tumour growth. The state space model consists of two sub-models: a stochastic system model that is an extension of the deterministic model proposed by Gyllenberg and Webb (1991, and an observation model that is a statistical model based on data for the total number of tumour cells over time. In the stochastic system model we derive through stochastic equations the probability distributions of the numbers of different types of tumour cells. Combining with the statistic model, we use these distribution results to develop a generalized Bayesian method and a Gibbs sampling procedure to estimate the unknown parameters and to predict the state variables (number of tumour cells. We apply these models and methods to real data and to computer simulated data to illustrate the usefulness of the models, the methods, and the procedures.

  16. Growth and growth hormone secretion in children following treatment of brain tumours with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the growth of 144 children after treatment of brain tumours distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. All had cranial irradiation and 87 spinal irradiation. In 56 patients observed without intervention for 3 years, height SDS in the cranial (CR) group (n=20) declined from 0.02 to -0.44 and in the craniospinal (CS) group (n=36) from -0.28 to -1.11. Failure of spinal growth had a marked effect in the CS group. The onset of puberty was slightly but not significantly advanced; median ages at onset of puberty were 10.3 years in girls and 12.1 years in boys. Of the total group 86.4% had clinical and biochemical evidence of growth hormone insufficiency. Fifty-two children, 33 (28 CS; 5 CR) of whome were prepubertal, received biosynthetic human growth hormone, in a dose of 15 mU/m2/week by daily injection for a period of one year. Height velocity SDS increased significantly in both groups from -2.74 to +1.90 (CS) and from -1.0 to +4.26 (CR). Spinal response to GH treatment was restricted in the craniospinal group. (authors)

  17. On the importance of the submicrovascular network in a computational model of tumour growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesart, Anne-Cécile; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Hamard, Lauriane; Estève, François; Stéphanou, Angélique

    2012-09-01

    A computational model is potentially a powerful tool to apprehend complex phenomena like solid tumour growth and to predict the outcome of therapies. To that end, the confrontation of the model with experiments is essential to validate this tool. In this study, we develop a computational model specifically dedicated to the interpretation of tumour growth as observed in a mouse model with a dorsal skinfold chamber. Observation of the skin vasculature at the dorsal window scale shows a sparse network of a few main vessels of several hundreds micrometers in diameter. However observation at a smaller scale reveals the presence of a dense and regular interconnected network of capillaries about ten times smaller. We conveniently designate this structure as the submicrovascular network (SMVN).(1) The question that we wish to answer concerns the necessity of explicitly taking into account the SMVN in the computational model to describe the tumour evolution observed in the dorsal chamber. For that, simulations of tumour growth realised with and without the SMVN are compared and lead to two distinct scenarios. Parameters that are known to strongly influence the tumour evolution are then tested in the two cases to determine to which extent those parameters can be used to compensate the observed differences between these scenarios. Explicit modelling of the smallest vessels appears mandatory although not necessarily under the form of a regular grid. A compromise between the two investigated cases can thus be reached. PMID:22705361

  18. Complement-mediated tumour growth: implications for cancer nanotechnology and nanomedicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, S. M.; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2009-01-01

    The recent unexpected observation that complement activation helps turnout growth and progression has an important bearing on the future development of cancer nanomedicines for site-specific tumour targeting as these entities are capable of triggering complement. These issues are discussed and su...

  19. Oxygen-Driven Tumour Growth Model: A Pathology-Relevant Mathematical Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Delgado-SanMartin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Xenografts--as simplified animal models of cancer-differ substantially in vasculature and stromal architecture when compared to clinical tumours. This makes mathematical model-based predictions of clinical outcome challenging. Our objective is to further understand differences in tumour progression and physiology between animal models and the clinic. To achieve that, we propose a mathematical model based upon tumour pathophysiology, where oxygen--as a surrogate for endocrine delivery--is our main focus. The Oxygen-Driven Model (ODM, using oxygen diffusion equations, describes tumour growth, hypoxia and necrosis. The ODM describes two key physiological parameters. Apparent oxygen uptake rate (k'R represents the amount of oxygen cells seem to need to proliferate. The more oxygen they appear to need, the more the oxygen transport. k'R gathers variability from the vasculature, stroma and tumour morphology. Proliferating rate (kp deals with cell line specific factors to promote growth. The KH,KN describe the switch of hypoxia and necrosis. Retrospectively, using archived data, we looked at longitudinal tumour volume datasets for 38 xenografted cell lines and 5 patient-derived xenograft-like models. Exploration of the parameter space allows us to distinguish 2 groups of parameters. Group 1 of cell lines shows a spread in values of k'R and lower kp, indicating that tumours are poorly perfused and slow growing. Group 2 share the value of the oxygen uptake rate (k'R and vary greatly in kp, which we interpret as having similar oxygen transport, but more tumour intrinsic variability in growth. However, the ODM has some limitations when tested in explant-like animal models, whose complex tumour-stromal morphology may not be captured in the current version of the model. Incorporation of stroma in the ODM will help explain these discrepancies. We have provided an example. The ODM is a very simple -and versatile- model suitable for the design of preclinical

  20. Effect of monoclonal antibodies to early pregnancy factor (EPF) on the in vivo growth of transplantable murine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, K A; Morton, H

    1992-01-01

    Neutralisation studies with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for early pregnancy factor (EPF) have shown it to be essential for the continuation of pregnancy in mice and the growth of some tumour cells in vitro. These studies report that the mAbs are also able to limit the growth of two murine tumour lines transplanted s.c. The development of MCA-2 tumours in CBA mice was unaffected by the injection of 1 mg anti-EPF IgM at the time of tumour cell inoculation. However, four doses of 500 micrograms anti-EPF, injected one dose per day for 4 days after tumour cell inoculation, significantly retarded tumour development such that no tumours were palpable on day 13. A similar dose regimen of control IgM had no effect on tumour size. Dose/response studies revealed that lower doses of anti-EPF administered after tumour cell inoculation were effective in retarding the growth of the MCA-2 tumours. The effects of anti-EPF mAb administration on the growth rate of palpable B16 tumours established s.c. in C57BL/6 mice was also determined. Tumours injected with 6 mg anti-EPF 5/341 or anti-EPF 5/333 mAbs showed significant decrease in the uptake of [3H]thymidine into tumour tissue, measured 16 h after injection. Furthermore, titration of sera for active EPF showed that a significant reduction in the EPF titre was associated with a significant inhibition of tumour DNA synthesis. Thus it appears that neutralisation of EPF retards tumour growth both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro the effects must be due to anti-EPF mAb interfering with a direct mechanism that contributes to the maintenance of cells in the active growing phase. However, in vivo host immunological mechanism that are modified to allow tumour survival may also be affected. The presence of EPF-induced suppressor factor circulating in the serum of tumour-bearing mice has been confirmed and the contribution of such factors to tumour progression must now be investigated. PMID:1537058

  1. Early growth of tumour cells in lung tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the treatment of metastases is a very important problem in human and veterinary medicine (for instance osteosarcoma is notorious for its high deathrate due to this problem), proof was sought for the hypothesis that the doubling time of early metastases is shorter than that of tumor cells of an older age. This is of fundamental importance for the therapeutic problem: is a favourable effect to be expected from a limited dose of radiation on the lungs when metastases are still very small or even invisible. If the hypothesis holds true, it would be justified to treat patients, even though a small group of patients will be treated unnecessarily; clinical experience shows that some patients have not developed metastases without adjuvant treatment. The interest was directed at the very early (1-cell, 2-cell etc.) stages. Obviously these are not detectable in patients and therefore an experimental study with tumourcells in the lungs of mice was devised. The expectation is that the theoretical approach may produce an additional basis for the radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic treatment of patients, in whom the tumourload has been diminished by treatment of the primary tumour but where metastases, although frequently not detectable must be expected. (Auth.)

  2. Successful tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy suppresses oxidative stress and hypoxia-induced mitochondrial mutagenesis in inflammatory arthritis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2011-07-25

    Abstract Introduction To examine the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy on the levels of early mitochondrial genome alterations and oxidative stress. Methods Eighteen inflammatory arthritis patients underwent synovial tissue oxygen (tpO2) measurements and clinical assessment of disease activity (DAS28-CRP) at baseline (T0) and three months (T3) after starting biologic therapy. Synovial tissue lipid peroxidation (4-HNE), T and B cell specific markers and synovial vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Synovial levels of random mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were assessed using Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay. Results 4-HNE levels pre\\/post anti TNF-α therapy were inversely correlated with in vivo tpO2 (P < 0.008; r = -0.60). Biologic therapy responders showed a significantly reduced 4-HNE expression (P < 0.05). High 4-HNE expression correlated with high DAS28-CRP (P = 0.02; r = 0.53), tender joint count for 28 joints (TJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.49), swollen joint count for 28 joints (SJC-28) (P = 0.03; r = 0.50) and visual analogue scale (VAS) (P = 0.04; r = 0.48). Strong positive association was found between the number of 4-HNE positive cells and CD4+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.60), CD8+ cells (P = 0.001; r = 0.70), CD20+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.68), CD68+ cells (P = 0.04; r = 0.47) and synovial VEGF expression (P = 0.01; r = 063). In patients whose in vivo tpO2 levels improved post treatment, significant reduction in mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP was observed (P < 0.05). In contrast in those patients whose tpO2 levels remained the same or reduced at T3, no significant changes for mtDNA mutations and DAS28-CRP were found. Conclusions High levels of synovial oxidative stress and mitochondrial mutation burden are strongly associated with low in vivo oxygen tension and synovial inflammation. Furthermore these significant mitochondrial genome alterations are rescued following successful anti TNF

  3. The effects of exogenous growth factors on matrix metalloproteinase secretion by human brain tumour cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rooprai, H K; Rucklidge, G J; Panou, C; Pilkington, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a growing family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases that are capable of degrading various components of the extracellular matrix. These enzymes have been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions including embryogenesis and tumour invasion. The synthesis of many MMPs is thought to be regulated by growth factors, cytokines and hormones. In this study, we investigated the effects of five exogenous growth factors known to be expressed...

  4. Growth of cultured human glioma tumour cells can be regulated with histamine and histamine antagonists.

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Ven, L. T.; Prinsen, I. M.; Jansen, G H; Roholl, P.J.; Defferrari, R.; Slater, R.; DEN OTTER;, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 50% survival time for low grade astrocytomas is 50 months and for high grade astrocytomas it is 13 months, underlining the need for new therapies. Several reports show that in vivo histamine antagonists cause retardation of tumour growth in some animal models and prolonged survival in cancer patients. Therefore we have tested the growth modulating effects of histamine and histamine antagonists on human glioma cultures. Twelve freshly excised human gliomas were cultured and tested for thei...

  5. Dynamic characterisation of brain tumours growth from time series of nuclear magnetic resonance scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of a high grade glioblastoma of a patient undergoing radio-therapy has been analysed by considering a mathematical model which simulates the brain tumour growth within a two-dimensional domain defined by the brain and ventricles geometry. This simulated behaviour was compared with morphological data obtained from successive nuclear magnetic resonance scans of the patient. The model parameters include the proliferation rate and the diffusion coefficient of the tumour cells as well as their sensitivity to the irradiation. They were estimated using optimisation techniques to minimise the distance between simulated tumour area and scan data from different brain sections. The relevance of this quantitative estimation for the prognosis and for the consideration of additional parameters in the pre and post therapeutic evaluation of glioma is discussed. (authors). 12 refs., 2 figs

  6. ELL targets c-Myc for proteasomal degradation and suppresses tumour growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Chi; Ji, Wei; Mei, Zhichao; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xing; Ouyang, Gang; Zhou, Jiangang; Xiao, Wuhan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports that ELL (eleven–nineteen lysine-rich leukaemia) is a key regulator of transcriptional elongation, but the physiological function of Ell in mammals remains elusive. Here we show that ELL functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targets c-Myc for proteasomal degradation. In addition, we identify that UbcH8 serves as a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme in this pathway. Cysteine 595 of ELL is an active site of the enzyme; its mutation to alanine (C595A) renders the protein unable to promote the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Myc. ELL-mediated c-Myc degradation inhibits c-Myc-dependent transcriptional activity and cell proliferation, and also suppresses c-Myc-dependent xenograft tumour growth. In contrast, the ELL(C595A) mutant not only loses the ability to inhibit cell proliferation and xenograft tumour growth, but also promotes tumour metastasis. Thus, our work reveals a previously unrecognized function for ELL as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for c-Myc and a potential tumour suppressor. PMID:27009366

  7. Cell survival and growth delay in rat R-1 tumours after radiation and vinblastine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rat R-1 rhabdomyosarcoma with a capacity for colony growth in vitro after excision of the tumour and dissociation by a trypsin method was used to investigate the effectiveness of radio-chemotherapy. Growth delay data were compared with data on survival of cells derived from tumours treated in situ. An excess in growth delay was observed when vinblastine (1.5 mg/kg) was given at intervals of 0.3 to 2 d after or 4 d before a dose of 20 Gy of X-rays. Cell survival data indicated that the maximum effectiveness of the drug treatment and the combined treatment (vinblastine and a dose of 10 Gy) can be assessed 2 to 3 d after treatment. The fractions of surviving cells determined after combined therapy at 0,1 and 2 d intervals were not significantly different from the fractions expected on the basis of simple multiplication of the fractions surviving individual treatments. The data suggested that the excess in tumour growth delay observed cannot be accounted for by co-operative interaction of the doses of radiation and drug. (author)

  8. Incompressible limit of a mechanical model of tumour growth with viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perthame, Benoît; Vauchelet, Nicolas

    2015-09-13

    Various models of tumour growth are available in the literature. The first type describe the evolution of the cell number density when considered as a continuous visco-elastic material with growth. The second type describe the tumour as a set, and rules for the free boundary are given related to the classical Hele-Shaw model of fluid dynamics. Following previous papers where the material is described by a purely elastic material, or when active cell motion is included, we make the link between the two types of description considering the 'stiff pressure law' limit. Even though viscosity is a regularizing effect, new mathematical difficulties arise in the visco-elastic case because estimates on the pressure field are weaker and do not immediately imply compactness. For instance, travelling wave solutions and numerical simulations show that the pressure is discontinuous in space, which is not the case for an elastic material. PMID:26261366

  9. Hypoxia optimises tumour growth by controlling nutrient import and acidic metabolite export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Scott K; Cormerais, Yann; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Pouyssegur, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    In their quest for survival and successful growth, cancer cells optimise their cellular processes to enable them to outcompete normal cells in their microenvironment. In essence cancer cells: (i) enhance uptake of nutrients/metabolites, (ii) utilise nutrients more efficiently via metabolic alterations and (iii) deal with the metabolic waste products in a way that furthers their progression while hampering the survival of normal tissue. Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) act as essential drivers of these adaptations via the promotion of numerous membrane proteins including glucose transporters (GLUTs), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), amino-acid transporters (LAT1, xCT), and acid-base regulating carbonic anhydrases (CAs). In addition to a competitive growth advantage for tumour cells, these HIF-regulated proteins are implicated in metastasis, cancer 'stemness' and the immune response. Current research indicates that combined targeting of these HIF-regulated membrane proteins in tumour cells will provide promising therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26724171

  10. Tumour cell growth inhibitory potential of mushroom extracts from the genus Suillus

    OpenAIRE

    Vaz, Josiana A.; Santos, Tiago; Tavares, Catarina; Almeida, Gabriela M.; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena

    2012-01-01

    Mushrooms are a source of compounds with promising antitumour activity [1]. We have been working on the identification of wild mushrooms with promising antitumour activity and a Clitocybe alexandri extract which induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a lung cancer cell line has been previously identified by part of the team [2]. The objective of this work was to continue the identification of mushrooms from the Northeast of Portugal with tumour cell growth inhibitory potential. Thirty...

  11. The Effect of Regional Thermal-Neutron Exposure Upon the Growth and Transplantability of a Malignant Tumour in the Mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of work on effects of thermal neutron: boron- 10 reactions upon transplantable tumours it was necessary to determine consequences of regional thermalneutron exposure alone. This work done at Brookhaven National Laboratory utilized both Graphite and Medical Research Reactors and the Brookhaven-Swiss white mice strain to maintain transplants of tumour, an experimental anaplastic sarcoma of high invasiveness. Only young male animals were used for study. One series used tumour transplants into the thigh muscle of each of a number of recipient m ice. Another series utilized incranial implants to contrast exposed and non-exposed tumours. In all regional exposure studies, the mouse's body was shielded with units containing lithium-6 or boron-10 to limit significant thermal-neutron exposure solely to the region of the neoplasm. That the exposure was limited to the region of interest was made certain by gold-foil activation data. Two procedures were used to measure thermal-neutron effects on the tumour. For intracranial transplants, the animal was sacrificed shortly after neutron exposure. Each tumour was dissected and transplanted intracranially into ten recipient animals to establish if the growth potentiality upon transplant was altered. No changes were observed in tumour take rate or longevity of recipient animals. For thigh transplants the exposed tumour remained in situ. The effects were established by using a growth index, the ratio of tumour diameters upon the observed post-treatment day to the diameter upon the treatment day. The growth index in neutron exposed animals was less than in unexposed animals over a two week interval. These data were also compared with data obtained from animals with thigh-implanted tumours subjected to similar regional exposures but with induction of the thermal neutron: boron-10 reaction. Animals with complete tumour regression were maintained for die remainder of their life up to two and one-half years to observe if

  12. Bifurcation analysis of a free boundary problem modelling tumour growth under the action of inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we investigate non-radial stationary solutions of a free boundary problem modelling tumour growth under the action of inhibitors. The model consists of two elliptic equations describing the concentration of nutrients and inhibitors, respectively, and a Stokes equation for the velocity of tumour cells and internal pressure. The ratio μ/γ of the proliferation rate μ and the cell-to-cell adhesiveness γ plays the role of the bifurcation parameter. We prove that in certain situations there exists a positive sequence {(μ/γ)n}n≥n* such that for each (μ/γ)n(n even ⩾n*) there exist non-radial stationary solutions bifurcating from the radial stationary solution, while in the other situations there exists at most a finite number of bifurcation points. This is a remarkable difference from the corresponding inhibitor-free model where there always exist infinitely many branches of non-radial stationary bifurcation solutions. Our analysis also indicates that inhibitor supply may lower the ability of tumour invasion, and even make the tumour unaggressive and stable. (paper)

  13. The food processing contaminant glyoxal promotes tumour growth in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Camilla; Høie, Anja Hortemo; Alexander, Jan; Murkovic, Michael; Husøy, Trine

    2016-08-01

    Glyoxal is formed endogenously and at a higher rate in the case of hyperglycemia. Glyoxal is also a food processing contaminant and has been shown to be mutagenic and genotoxic in vitro. The tumourigenic potential of glyoxal was investigated using the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model, which spontaneously develops intestinal tumours and is susceptible to intestinal carcinogens. C57BL/6J females were mated with Min males. Four days after mating and throughout gestation and lactation, the pregnant dams were exposed to glyoxal through drinking water (0.0125%, 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%) or regular tap water. Female and male offspring were housed separately from PND21 and continued with the same treatment. One group were only exposed to 0.1% glyoxal from postnatal day (PND) 21. There was no difference in the number of intestinal tumours between control and treatment groups. However, exposure to 0.1% glyoxal starting in utero and at PND21 caused a significant increase in tumour size in the small intestine for male and female mice in comparison with respective control groups. This study suggests that glyoxal has tumour growth promoting properties in the small intestine in Min mice. PMID:27288931

  14. Prognostic markers and tumour growth kinetics in melanoma patients progressing on vemurafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Heike; Fisher, Rosalie; Martin-Liberal, Juan; Edmonds, Kim; Hughes, Peta; Khabra, Komel; Gore, Martin; Larkin, James

    2016-04-01

    The BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib is an effective drug in patients with BRAF mutant metastatic melanoma, but resistance occurs after a median of 6 months. The anti-CTLA4-antibody, ipilimumab, is a standard first-line and second-line treatment option in Europe, with a median time to response of 2-3 months, but some patients show rapid clinical deterioration before that. The aim of this analysis was to identify prognostic markers for survival after failure of vemurafenib treatment to identify patients who have a sufficient life expectancy to respond to new immunotherapy treatments. We retrospectively analysed 101 consecutive unselected patients treated with vemurafenib for metastatic melanoma at a single institution. The association between clinical parameters and death within 3 months after cessation of vemurafenib (n=69) was assessed by binary logistic and Cox regression. Of the patients, 45% died within 3 months of progression on vemurafenib. Elevated baseline serum lactate dehydrogenase, absence of normalization of serum lactate dehydrogenase on vemurafenib therapy, performance status of at least 2 at progression and time from primary tumour to metastatic disease less than 5 years were identified as poor prognostic markers. In an exploratory tumour growth kinetics analysis (n=16), we found that following cessation of vemurafenib, approximately a third each showed a stable, decelerated or accelerated rate of tumour growth. Patients with these poor prognostic markers are unlikely to have sufficient life expectancy to complete ipilimumab treatment after failure with vemurafenib. Consideration needs to be given to the elective use of immunotherapy before patients become resistant to vemurafenib. This requires prospective randomized evaluation. Our tumour growth kinetics analysis requires confirmation; however, it may suggest that intermittent vemurafenib treatment should be investigated in clinical trials. PMID:26684061

  15. Investigating the role of tumour cell derived iNOS on tumour growth and vasculature in vivo using a tetracycline regulated expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaevangelou, Efthymia; Whitley, Guy S; Johnstone, Alan P; Robinson, Simon P; Howe, Franklyn A

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical signalling molecule involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Both tumouricidal and tumour promoting effects have been attributed to NO, making its role in cancer biology controversial and unclear. To investigate the specific role of tumour-derived NO in vascular development, C6 glioma cells were genetically modified to include a doxycycline regulated gene expression system that controls the expression of an antisense RNA to inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to manipulate endogenous iNOS expression. Xenografts of these cells were propagated in the presence or absence of doxycycline. Susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), initially with a carbogen (95% O2 /5% CO2 ) breathing challenge and subsequently an intravascular blood pool contrast agent, was used to assess haemodynamic vasculature (ΔR2 *) and fractional blood volume (fBV), and correlated with histopathological assessment of tumour vascular density, maturation and function. Inhibition of NO production in C6 gliomas led to significant growth delay and inhibition of vessel maturation. Parametric fBV maps were used to identify vascularised regions from which the carbogen-induced ΔR2 * was measured and found to be positively correlated with vessel maturation, quantified ex vivo using fluorescence microscopy for endothelial and perivascular cell staining. These data suggest that tumour-derived iNOS is an important mediator of tumour growth and vessel maturation, hence a promising target for anti-vascular cancer therapies. The combination of ΔR2 * response to carbogen and fBV MRI can provide a marker of tumour vessel maturation that could be applied to non-invasively monitor treatment response to iNOS inhibitors. PMID:26756734

  16. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V.; Swanson, Benjamin J.; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  17. Seminal plasma enhances cervical adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and tumour growth in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R Sutherland

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in women in sub-Saharan Africa. Extensive evidence has shown that cervical cancer and its precursor lesions are caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Although the vast majority of HPV infections are naturally resolved, failure to eradicate infected cells has been shown to promote viral persistence and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, following neoplastic transformation, exposure of cervical epithelial cells to inflammatory mediators either directly or via the systemic circulation may enhance progression of the disease. It is well recognised that seminal plasma contains an abundance of inflammatory mediators, which are identified as regulators of tumour growth. Here we investigated the role of seminal plasma in regulating neoplastic cervical epithelial cell growth and tumorigenesis. Using HeLa cervical adenocarcinoma cells, we found that seminal plasma (SP induced the expression of the inflammatory enzymes, prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PTGS1 and PTGS2, cytokines interleukin (IL -6, and -11 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A. To investigate the role of SP on tumour cell growth in vivo, we xenografted HeLa cells subcutaneously into the dorsal flank of nude mice. Intra-peritoneal administration of SP rapidly and significantly enhanced the tumour growth rate and size of HeLa cell xenografts in nude mice. As observed in vitro, we found that SP induced expression of inflammatory PTGS enzymes, cytokines and VEGF-A in vivo. Furthermore we found that SP enhances blood vessel size in HeLa cell xenografts. Finally we show that SP-induced cytokine production, VEGF-A expression and cell proliferation are mediated via the induction of the inflammatory PTGS pathway.

  18. Tumours and tumourous diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book on tumours and tumourous diseases comprises two parts: 1. Bone tumours and tumourous lesions. 2. Soft tissue tumours and tumourous lesions. Details are presented on pathology, diagnosis, conservative and perioperative therapy, surgical therapy, complications after resection, indicators for amputation, recommendations for follow-up treatment, radiotherapy, radionuclide therapy, alternative therapies, therapy concepts in case of metastases, tissue engineering and plastic surgery. (uke)

  19. The Bone Niche of Chondrosarcoma: A Sanctuary for Drug Resistance, Tumour Growth and also a Source of New Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage-forming tumours representing around 20% of malignant primary tumours of bone and affect mainly adults in the third to sixth decade of life. Unfortunately, the molecular pathways controlling the genesis and the growth of chondrosarcoma cells are still not fully defined. It is well admitted that the invasion of bone by tumour cells affects the balance between early bone resorption and formation and induces an “inflammatory-like” environment which establishes a dialogue between tumour cells and their environment. The bone tumour microenvironment is then described as a sanctuary that contributes to the drug resistance patterns and may control at least in part the tumour growth. The concept of “niche” defined as a specialized microenvironment that can promote the emergence of tumour stem cells and provide all the required factors for their development recently emerges in the literature. The present paper aims to summarize the main evidence sustaining the existence of a specific bone niche in the pathogenesis of chondrosarcomas.

  20. Prognostic implications of p53 protein, epidermal growth factor receptor, and Ki-67 labelling in brain tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaros, E.; Perry, R H; Adam, L.; Kelly, P J; Crawford, P. J.; Kalbag, R M; Mendelow, A D; Sengupta, R P; Pearson, A D

    1992-01-01

    The expression of p53 protein, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Ki-67 nuclear antigen was examined by immunohistochemistry in biopsies of 16 types of human brain tumours, including 43 astrocytomas. P53 protein, almost certainly its mutant form, was expressed in seven of the 16, and EGFR in 11 of the 16 types of tumours. In astrocytomas both the proportion of tumours which expressed p53 or EGFR increased with grade of malignancy as did the mean Ki-67 labelling index (LI): p53-0% in...

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor blocking agents in retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Canning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarises the current status of the use of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF blocking agents in retinal vein occlusion. There have been no randomised controlled trials comparing this treatment with the current standard treatment (largely laser so the lower grade evidence of single treatment case series and anecdotal reports are discussed. VEGF blockers are good at reducing macular oedema in the short term, do improve visual acuity in many cases, and do not seem to adversely affect the long term revascularisation that is necessary to overcome the vein occlusion. VEGF blocking agents are not used in isolation in this condition - they will remain an adjunct to systemic and other local treatments. The literature was reviewed in online searches of Embase and Ovid and the papers quoted are a representative sample of a larger body of publications.

  2. Combined effect of levan and cytotoxic agents on the growth of experimental tumours in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovici, J.; Stark, Y.; Wolman, M.

    1983-01-01

    The combined effect of the polysaccharide levan (previously shown to exert a host-dependent as well as direct antitumoural activity) and the cytotoxic agents cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), vincristine (VINC) and 5-fluoro-uracil (SFU) was studied in Lewis lung carcinoma and AKR lymphoma. Combined chemo- and immunotherapy was applied beginning on the day of tumour cell inoculation. Additive effects were obtained with the combined treatments, compared to single treatments, with all the combinations except MTX-levan in Lewis lung carcinoma, where the combined effect was synergistic. The additive effect was obtained with different doses and routes of chemotherapy, whether local or intraperitoneal. A 2 mg dose of CY combined with levan administered at daily doses of 10 mg, resulted in a 100% prevention of Lewis lung carcinoma growth. It is suggested that the levan may have two beneficial effects: it can exert an inhibitory effect on tumour growth and diminish the deleterious effect of cytotoxic agents on the immune system. PMID:6882675

  3. Use of GPUs to boost the performance of a lattice-free tumour growth model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently developed a computational model of tumour growth. It is a cell- based model that can simulate the growth of multicellular tumour spheroids up to more than one million cells. The simulation program is very demanding and simulation time severely limits the integration of additional biological details, and indeed, at the moment, a typical simulation run requires tens of days to be completed. A new version of the code that exploits Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) to boost performance is being developed. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of a nearest-neighbour search (NNS) algorithm suitable to run on GPU. The algorithm will be integrated in the original code to manage the geometrical calculation in the simulation of the spheroid. Initially the stand alone NNS algorithm was tested for spheroids of different size: better efficency was obtained for bigger spheroids. Eventually the code was integrated in the whole simulation code and preliminary runs gave a speed up of about 5 for spheroids of relatively small size (15000 cells)

  4. Wild mushrooms Clitocybe alexandri and Lepista inversa: in vitro antioxidant activity and growth inhibition of human tumour cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Josiana A; Heleno, Sandrina A; Martins, Anabela; Almeida, Gabriela M; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2010-10-01

    The in vitro antioxidant and growth inhibitory activity of extracts obtained from two Portuguese wild mushrooms (Clitocybe alexandri and Lepista inversa) was studied in human tumour cell lines. The extracts were phenolic (methanolic and ethanolic) and polysaccharidic (boiling water). The antioxidant activity assays included evaluation of radical-scavenging capacity, reducing power and inhibition of lipid peroxidation measured in liposome solutions. Extract-induced cell growth inhibition was measured in four different tumour cell lines (lung, breast, colon and gastric cancer) using the SRB assay. The polysaccharidic extract of L. inversa was the most potent as antioxidant (EC(50)mushrooms are promising sources of bioactive compounds. PMID:20647028

  5. Addition of vasopressin synthetic analogue [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard chemotherapy enhances tumour growth inhibition and impairs metastatic spread in aggressive breast tumour models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garona, Juan; Pifano, Marina; Pastrian, Maria B; Gomez, Daniel E; Ripoll, Giselle V; Alonso, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP is a novel 2nd generation vasopressin analogue with robust antitumour activity against metastatic breast cancer. We recently reported that, by acting on vasopressin V2r membrane receptor present in tumour cells and microvascular endothelium, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis and metastatic progression of the disease without overt toxicity. Despite chemotherapy remaining as a primary therapeutic option for aggressive breast cancer, its use is limited by low selectivity and associated adverse effects. In this regard, we evaluated potential combinational benefits by adding [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP to standard-of-care chemotherapy. In vitro, combination of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with sub-IC50 concentrations of paclitaxel or carmustine resulted in a cooperative inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in comparison to single-agent therapy. In vivo antitumour efficacy of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition to chemotherapy was first evaluated using the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model. Tumour-bearing mice were treated with i.v. injections of [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice weekly) in combination with weekly cycles of paclitaxel (10 mg/kg i.p.). After 6 weeks of treatment, combination regimen resulted in greater tumour growth inhibition compared to monotherapy. [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP addition was also associated with reduction of local aggressiveness, and impairment of tumour invasion and infiltration of the skin. Benefits of combined therapy were confirmed in the hormone-independent and metastatic F3II breast cancer model by combining [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP with carmustine (25 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP plus cytotoxic agents severely impaired colony forming ability of tumour cells and inhibited breast cancer metastasis to lung. The present study shows that [V(4)Q(5)]dDAVP may complement conventional chemotherapy by modulating metastatic progression and early stages of microtumour establishment, and thus supports further preclinical testing of

  6. Evolution of growth hormone neurosecretory disturbance after cranial irradiation for childhood brain tumours: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the aetiopathology of post-irradiation growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we performed a mixed longitudinal analysis of 56 24 h serum GH concentration profiles and 45 paired insulin-induced hypoglycaemia tests (ITT) in 35 prepubertal children, aged 1.5-11.8 years, with brain tumours in the posterior foss (n = 25) or cerebral hemispheres (n 10). Assessments were made before (n = 16), 1 year (n = 25) and 2 to 5 years (n = 15) after a cranial irradiation (DXR) dose of at least 30 Gy. Fourier transforms, occupancy percentage, first-order derivatives (FOD) and mean concentrations were determined from the GH profiles taken after neurosurgery but before radiotherapy (n = 16) and in three treatment groups: Group 1: neurosurgery only without DXR 9n 9); Group 2: ≥ 30 Gy DXR only (n = 22); Group 3: ≥ 30 Gy DXR with additional chemotherapy (n = 9). Results were compared with those from 26 short normally growing (SN) children. (author)

  7. Inhibitory effect of STAT3 gene combined with CDDP on growth of human Wilms tumour SK-NEP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junrong; Zhang, Nina; Qu, Haijiang; You, Guangxian; Yuan, Junhui; Chen, Caie; Li, Wenyi; Pan, Feng

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) combined with cisplatin (CDDP) on the growth of human Wilms tumour (WT) SK-NEP-1 cell subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice and the possible mechanisms. Human WT SK-NEP-1 cells were subcutaneously transplanted to establish the BALB/c nude mice xenograft model. Mice were randomly divided into five groups: blank control group, adenovirus control group (NC group), STAT3 group, CDDP group and STAT3 plus CDDP group (combination group). Tumour volume and tumour weight were observed during the therapeutic process. The expression levels of STAT3, glucose regulatory protein 78 (GRP78) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis. Compared with the STAT3 group or CDDP group, the tumour weight and volume was significantly reduced in the combination group (Pstatistical significance was found in NC group compared with the blank control group (P > 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that STAT3, GRP78 and BAX protein levels in the combination group were significantly higher than those in STAT3 group and CDDP group (P<0.05). Exogenous STAT3 and CDDP may synergistically inhibit the xenograft tumour growth through up-regulation of BAX protein via GRP78. PMID:27129294

  8. Effect of reconstituted basement membrane components on the growth of a panel of human tumour cell lines in nude mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Topley, P.; Jenkins, D C; Jessup, E. A.; Stables, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that reconstituted basement membrane (matrigel), when co-injected with either established or primary human tumour cells, can improve the growth of subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. The human adenocarcinoma cell lines A549, SW480, and WiDr, and the human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080scc2 exhibit varying degrees of tumourigenicity in nude mice. All these lines showed increased tumorigenicity and/or growth rate, together with a change towards a more differenti...

  9. A human tRNA methyltransferase 9-like protein prevents tumour growth by regulating LIN9 and HIF1-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Ulrike; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Patil, Ashish; Endres, Lauren; Estrada, Yeriel; Chan, Clement T Y; Su, Dan; Dedon, Peter C; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Begley, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Emerging evidence points to aberrant regulation of translation as a driver of cell transformation in cancer. Given the direct control of translation by tRNA modifications, tRNA modifying enzymes may function as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we show that a tRNA methyltransferase 9-like (hTRM9L/KIAA1456) mRNA is down-regulated in breast, bladder, colorectal, cervix and testicular carcinomas. In the aggressive SW620 and HCT116 colon carcinoma cell lines, hTRM9L is silenced and its re-expression and methyltransferase activity dramatically suppressed tumour growth in vivo. This growth inhibition was linked to decreased proliferation, senescence-like G0/G1-arrest and up-regulation of the RB interacting protein LIN9. Additionally, SW620 cells re-expressing hTRM9L did not respond to hypoxia via HIF1-α-dependent induction of GLUT1. Importantly, hTRM9L-negative tumours were highly sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics and this was associated with altered tRNA modification levels compared to antibiotic resistant hTRM9L-expressing SW620 cells. Our study links hTRM9L and tRNA modifications to inhibition of tumour growth via LIN9 and HIF1-α-dependent mechanisms. It also suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotics may be useful to treat hTRM9L-deficient tumours. PMID:23381944

  10. Oxygen-Driven Tumour Growth Model: A Pathology-Relevant Mathematical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado-SanMartin, Juan A.; Hare, Jennifer I.; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Yates, James W. T.

    2015-01-01

    Xenografts -as simplified animal models of cancer- differ substantially in vasculature and stromal architecture when compared to clinical tumours. This makes mathematical model-based predictions of clinical outcome challenging. Our objective is to further understand differences in tumour progression and physiology between animal models and the clinic. To achieve that, we propose a mathematical model based upon tumour pathophysiology, where oxygen -as a surrogate for endocrine delivery- is our...

  11. Treatment of transplanted CT26 tumour with dendritic cell vaccine in combination with blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and CTLA-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Buus, S; Claesson, M H

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the anti CT26 tumour effect of dendritic cell based vaccination with the MuLV gp70 envelope protein-derived peptides AH1 and p320-333. Vaccination lead to generation of AH1 specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL) and some decrease in tumour growth of simultaneously inoculated CT26 ce...... of mice with already established tumours was only obtained after combination of vaccination, DC101 and 9H10 treatment in which setting 80% of the mice rejected their tumours....

  12. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debajit Bhowmick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma.

  13. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  14. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K.; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  15. In vitro growth inhibitory activity of the Portuguese wild mushroom Clitocybe alexandri in human tumour cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Vaz, Josiana A.; Almeida, Gabriela M.; Martins, Anabela; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.

    2010-01-01

    Some mushrooms are a powerful source of bioactive compounds. lndeed, many pre-clinical studies have been conducted in human tumour cell lines and in some cases a number of compounds extracted from mushrooms have entered clinical trials [1]. Our previous results showed that phenolic (methanolic and ethanolic) and polissacharidic extracts from Clitocybe alexandri inhibited the growth of four human cell lines (lung, breast, colon and gastric cancer) [2]. The aim of the present wor...

  16. In vitro growth environment produces lipidomic and electron transport chain abnormalities in mitochondria from non-tumorigenic astrocytes and brain tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas N Seyfried

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial lipidome influences ETC (electron transport chain and cellular bioenergetic efficiency. Brain tumours are largely dependent on glycolysis for energy due to defects in mitochondria and oxidative phosphorylation. In the present study, we used shotgun lipidomics to compare the lipidome in highly purified mitochondria isolated from normal brain, from brain tumour tissue, from cultured tumour cells and from non-tumorigenic astrocytes. The tumours included the CT-2A astrocytoma and an EPEN (ependymoblastoma, both syngeneic with the C57BL/6J (B6 mouse strain. The mitochondrial lipidome in cultured CT-2A and EPEN tumour cells were compared with those in cultured astrocytes and in solid tumours grown in vivo. Major differences were found between normal tissue and tumour tissue and between in vivo and in vitro growth environments for the content or composition of ethanolamine glycerophospholipids, phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. The mitochondrial lipid abnormalities in solid tumours and in cultured cells were associated with reductions in multiple ETC activities, especially Complex I. The in vitro growth environment produced lipid and ETC abnormalities in cultured non-tumorigenic astrocytes that were similar to those associated with tumorigenicity. It appears that the culture environment obscures the boundaries of the Crabtree and the Warburg effects. These results indicate that in vitro growth environments can produce abnormalities in mitochondrial lipids and ETC activities, thus contributing to a dependency on glycolysis for ATP production.

  17. Anti-inflammation induced by counter-irritation or by treatment with non-steroidal agents inhibits the growth of a tumour of non-detected immunogenicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Sordelli, D O; Fontán, P. A.; Meiss, R. P.; Ruggiero, R. A.; Bustuoabad, O. D.

    1989-01-01

    Counter-irritation (CI) triggered by different non-specific irritant stimuli delayed the growth of a murine tumour of non-detected immunogenicity. The syngeneic LB tumour transplant by itself also induced CI and decreased the number of leukocytes migrating to a secondary s.c. irritant stimulus, e.g. sponge or carrageenan. On the other hand, partial inhibition of cell migration by treatment with either 0.5 mg kg-1 indomethacin or 0.3 mg kg-1 piroxicam retarded LB tumour growth, presumably by a...

  18. Aerosolised 5-azacytidine suppresses tumour growth and reprogrammes the epigenome in an orthotopic lung cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M D; Tellez, C S; Grimes, M J; Picchi, M A; Tessema, M; Cheng, Y S; March, T H; Kuehl, P J; Belinsky, S A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic silencing by promoter methylation and chromatin remodelling affects hundreds of genes and is a causal event for lung cancer. Treatment of patients with low doses of the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine in combination with the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat has yielded clinical responses. The subcutaneous dosing route for consecutive days and reduced bioavailability of 5-azacytidine because of inactivation by cytidine deaminase may limit the expansion of epigenetic therapy into Phase III trials. To mitigate these barriers, an aerosol of 5-azacytidine was generated and characterised. Methods: The effect of aerosol vs systemic delivery of 5-azacytidine on tumour burden and molecular response of engrafted lung tumours in the nude rat was compared. Results: Pharmacokinetics revealed major improvement in the half-life of 5-azacytidine in lung tissue with aerosol delivery. Aerosolised 5-azacytidine significantly reduced lung tumour burden and induced global demethylation of the epigenome at one-third of the comparable effective systemic dose. High commonality for demethylation of genes was seen in tumours sampled throughout lung lobes and across treated animals receiving the aerosolised drug. Conclusion: Collectively, these findings show that aerosolised 5-azacytidine targets the lung, effectively reprogrammes the epigenome of tumours, and is a promising approach to combine with other drugs for treating lung cancer. PMID:24045660

  19. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation. PMID:27241667

  20. Beta-adrenoceptor-blocking drugs, growth hormone and acromegaly.

    OpenAIRE

    Feely, J.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic treatment with oxprenolol or propranolol in active hypertensive patients was associated with elevation of serum growth hormone (GH). Propranolol, 80 mg orally, caused a marked rise in GH in 3 of 4 acromegalic patients.

  1. HIF1α and HIF2α: sibling rivalry in hypoxic tumour growth and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Brian; Johnson, Randall S; Simon, M Celeste

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are broadly expressed in human cancers, and HIF1α and HIF2α were previously suspected to promote tumour progression through largely overlapping functions. However, this relatively simple model has now been challenged in light of recent data from various approaches that reveal unique and sometimes opposing activities of these HIFα isoforms in both normal physiology and disease. These effects are mediated in part through the regulation of unique target genes, as well as through direct and indirect interactions with important oncoproteins and tumour suppressors, including MYC and p53. As HIF inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical evaluation as cancer therapeutics, a more thorough understanding of the unique roles performed by HIF1α and HIF2α in human neoplasia is warranted. PMID:22169972

  2. Targeting ALCAM in the cryo-treated tumour microenvironment successfully induces systemic anti-tumour immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Fuwa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Cryoablative treatment has been widely used for treating cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacies are still controversial. The molecular mechanisms of the cryo-induced immune responses, particularly underlying the ineffectiveness, remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified a new molecular mechanism involved in the cryo failure. We used cryo-ineffective metastatic tumour models that murine melanoma B16-F10 cells were subcutaneously and intravenously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. When the subcutaneous tumours were treated cryoablation on day 7 after tumour implantation, cells expressing activated leucocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) were significantly expanded not only locally in the treated tumours but also systemically in spleen and bone marrow of the mice. The cryo-induced ALCAM(+) cells including CD45(-) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells significantly suppressed interferon γ production and cytotoxicity of tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells via ALCAM expressed in these cells. This suggests that systemic expansion of the ALCAM(+) cells negatively switches host-immune directivity to the tumour-supportive mode. Intratumoural injection with anti-ALCAM blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) following the cryo treatment systemically induced tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher cytotoxic activities, resulting in suppression of tumour growth and metastasis in the cryo-resistant tumour models. These suggest that expansion of ALCAM(+) cells is a determinant of limiting the cryo efficacy. Further combination with an immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-CTLA4 mAb optimized the anti-tumour efficacy of the dual-combination therapy. Targeting ALCAM may be a promising strategy for overcoming the cryo ineffectiveness leading to the better practical use of cryoablation in clinical treatment of cancer. PMID:27208904

  3. Combined effect of levan and cytotoxic agents on the growth of experimental tumours in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Leibovici, J.; Stark, Y.; Wolman, M.

    1983-01-01

    The combined effect of the polysaccharide levan (previously shown to exert a host-dependent as well as direct antitumoural activity) and the cytotoxic agents cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), vincristine (VINC) and 5-fluoro-uracil (SFU) was studied in Lewis lung carcinoma and AKR lymphoma. Combined chemo- and immunotherapy was applied beginning on the day of tumour cell inoculation. Additive effects were obtained with the combined treatments, compared to single treatments, with all t...

  4. Multiscale modelling of tumour growth induced by circadian rhythm disruption in epithelial tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Bratsun, D. A.; Merkuriev, D. V.; Zakharov, A. P.; Pismen, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a multiscale chemo-mechanical model of cancer tumour development in an epithelial tissue. The model is based on transformation of normal cells into the cancerous state triggered by a local failure of spatial synchronisation of the circadian rhythm. The model includes mechanical interactions and chemical signal exchange between neighbouring cells, as well as division of cells and intercalation, and allows for modification of the respective parameters following transformation into th...

  5. Oral inoculation of probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM suppresses tumour growth both in segmental orthotopic colon cancer and extra-intestinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Wei-Chuan; Kong, Man-Shan; Shi, Hai Ning; Walker, W Allan; Lin, Chun-Yen; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Yung-Chang; Jung, Shih-Ming; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2012-06-01

    Modulation of the cellular response by the administration of probiotic bacteria may be an effective strategy for preventing or inhibiting tumour growth. We orally pre-inoculated mice with probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (La) for 14 d. Subcutaneous dorsal-flank tumours and segmental orthotopic colon cancers were implanted into mice using CT-26 murine colon adenocarcinoma cells. On day 28 after tumour initiation, the lamina propria of the colon, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and spleen were harvested and purified for flow cytometry and mRNA analyses. We demonstrated that La pre-inoculation reduced tumour volume growth by 50·3 %, compared with untreated mice at 28 d after tumour implants (2465·5 (SEM 1290·4) v. 4950·9 (SEM 1689·3) mm³, P<0·001). Inoculation with La reduced the severity of colonic carcinogenesis caused by CT-26 cells, such as level of colonic involvement and structural abnormality of epithelial/crypt damage. Moreover, La enhanced apoptosis of CT-26 cells both in dorsal-flank tumour and segmental orthotopic colon cancer, and the mean counts of apoptotic body were higher in mice pre-inoculated with La (P<0·05) compared with untreated mice. La pre-inoculation down-regulated the CXCR4 mRNA expressions in the colon, MLN and extra-intestinal tissue, compared with untreated mice (P<0·05). In addition, La pre-inoculation reduced the mean fluorescence index of MHC class I (H-2Dd, -Kd and -Ld) in flow cytometry analysis. Taken together, these findings suggest that probiotics La may play a role in attenuating tumour growth during CT-26 cell carcinogenesis. The down-regulated expression of CXCR4 mRNA and MHC class I, as well as increasing apoptosis in tumour tissue, indicated that La may be associated with modulating the cellular response triggered by colon carcinogenesis. PMID:21992995

  6. Effect of histamine on the growth of human gastrointestinal tumours: reversal by cimetidine.

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, S A; Wilkinson, L J; Robertson, J F; Hardcastle, J D

    1993-01-01

    The proliferative effects of histamine were examined on the human gastric tumour cell lines; MKN45, the gastrin producing subline, MKN45G, and the colorectal lines; LoVo and C170. The proliferation of MKN45 as assessed by 75[Se] selenomethionine uptake and cell counts was increased by histamine concentrations of 10(-7) and 10(-9) M. Histamine concentrations between 10(-6) and 10(-7) M maximally stimulated MKN45G proliferation which titrated out at lower histamine concentrations. The accumulat...

  7. Morphology-controlled growth of perylene derivative induced by double-hydrophilic block copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Minghua Huang; Markus Antonietti; Helmut Cölfen

    2016-01-01

    Controlled growth of technically relevant perylene derivative 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid potassium salt (PTCAPS), with tuneable morpologies, has been successfully realized by a recrystallization method using a double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly (ethylene glycol)-block poly (ethyleneimine) (PEG-b-PEI) as the structure directing agent. The {001} faces of PTCAPS are most polar and adsorb the oppositively charged polymer additive PEG-b-PEI well by electrostatic attraction. By s...

  8. The synthetic peptide P111-136 derived from the C-terminal domain of heparin affin regulatory peptide inhibits tumour growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP), also called pleiotrophin, is a heparin-binding, secreted factor that is overexpressed in several tumours and associated to tumour growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The C-terminus part of HARP composed of amino acids 111 to 136 is particularly involved in its biological activities and we previously established that a synthetic peptide composed of the same amino acids (P111-136) was capable of inhibiting the biological activities of HARP. Here we evaluate the ability of P111-136 to inhibit in vitro and in vivo the growth of a human tumour cell line PC-3 which possess an HARP autocrine loop. A total lysate of PC-3 cells was incubated with biotinylated P111-136 and pulled down for the presence of the HARP receptors in Western blot. In vitro, the P111-136 effect on HARP autocrine loop in PC-3 cells was determined by colony formation in soft agar. In vivo, PC-3 cells were inoculated in the flank of athymic nude mice. Animals were treated with P111-136 (5 mg/kg/day) for 25 days. Tumour volume was evaluated during the treatment. After the animal sacrifice, the tumour apoptosis and associated angiogenesis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In vivo anti-angiogenic effect was confirmed using a mouse Matrigel™ plug assay. Using pull down experiments, we identified the HARP receptors RPTPβ/ζ, ALK and nucleolin as P111-136 binding proteins. In vitro, P111-136 inhibits dose-dependently PC-3 cell colony formation. Treatment with P111-136 inhibits significantly the PC-3 tumour growth in the xenograft model as well as tumour angiogenesis. The angiostatic effect of P111-136 on HARP was also confirmed using an in vivo Matrigel™ plug assay in mice Our results demonstrate that P111-136 strongly inhibits the mitogenic effect of HARP on in vitro and in vivo growth of PC-3 cells. This inhibition could be linked to a direct or indirect binding of this peptide to the HARP receptors (ALK, RPTPβ/ζ, nucleolin). In vivo, the P111

  9. The synthetic peptide P111-136 derived from the C-terminal domain of heparin affin regulatory peptide inhibits tumour growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delbé Jean

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP, also called pleiotrophin, is a heparin-binding, secreted factor that is overexpressed in several tumours and associated to tumour growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The C-terminus part of HARP composed of amino acids 111 to 136 is particularly involved in its biological activities and we previously established that a synthetic peptide composed of the same amino acids (P111-136 was capable of inhibiting the biological activities of HARP. Here we evaluate the ability of P111-136 to inhibit in vitro and in vivo the growth of a human tumour cell line PC-3 which possess an HARP autocrine loop. Methods A total lysate of PC-3 cells was incubated with biotinylated P111-136 and pulled down for the presence of the HARP receptors in Western blot. In vitro, the P111-136 effect on HARP autocrine loop in PC-3 cells was determined by colony formation in soft agar. In vivo, PC-3 cells were inoculated in the flank of athymic nude mice. Animals were treated with P111-136 (5 mg/kg/day for 25 days. Tumour volume was evaluated during the treatment. After the animal sacrifice, the tumour apoptosis and associated angiogenesis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In vivo anti-angiogenic effect was confirmed using a mouse Matrigel™ plug assay. Results Using pull down experiments, we identified the HARP receptors RPTPβ/ζ, ALK and nucleolin as P111-136 binding proteins. In vitro, P111-136 inhibits dose-dependently PC-3 cell colony formation. Treatment with P111-136 inhibits significantly the PC-3 tumour growth in the xenograft model as well as tumour angiogenesis. The angiostatic effect of P111-136 on HARP was also confirmed using an in vivo Matrigel™ plug assay in mice Conclusions Our results demonstrate that P111-136 strongly inhibits the mitogenic effect of HARP on in vitro and in vivo growth of PC-3 cells. This inhibition could be linked to a direct or indirect binding of this peptide to the HARP

  10. Reduced tumour growth of the human colonic cancer cell lines COLO-320 and HT-29 in vivo by dietary n-3 lipids.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaguchi, M; Rowley, S; Kane, N; Imray, C.; Davies, A; Jones, C; Newbold, M.; Keighley, M R; Baker, P.; Neoptolemos, J P

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-five nude mice received subcutaneous inoculation with 1 X 10(7) cells of the human colonic cancer cell lines COLO-320 or HT-29. Tumour growth was assessed over 4 weeks in animals given one of three iso-caloric diets; standard diet, high saturated fat (20% coconut) diet and high n-3 fat (20% Maxepa fish oil) diet. The n-3 diet produced significant tumour growth reduction compared to the other diets for COLO-320 at 3 to 4 weeks (P less than 0.05 at least) and similarly for HT-29 at 4 we...

  11. Fibroblast growth factors, old kids on the new block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Cong; Xiao, Jian; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen

    2016-05-01

    The fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of cell intrinsic regulatory peptides that control a broad spectrum of cellular activities. The family includes canonic FGFs that elicit their activities by activating the FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase and non-canonic members that elicit their activities intracellularly and via FGFR-independent mechanisms. The FGF signaling axis is highly complex due to the existence of multiple isoforms of both ligands and receptors, as well as cofactors that include the chemically heterogeneous heparan sulfate (HS) cofactors, and in the case of endocrine FGFs, the Klotho coreceptors. Resident FGF signaling controls embryonic development, maintains tissue homeostasis, promotes wound healing and tissue regeneration, and regulates functions of multiple organs. However, ectopic or aberrant FGF signaling is a culprit for various diseases, including congenital birth defects, metabolic disorder, and cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which the specificity of FGF signaling is achieved remain incompletely understood. Since its application as a druggable target has been gradually recognized by pharmaceutical companies and translational researchers, understanding the determinants of FGF signaling specificity has become even more important in order to get into the position to selectively suppress a particular pathway without affecting others to minimize side effects. PMID:26768548

  12. The Viscum album preparation Isorel inhibits the growth of melanoma B16F10 by influencing the tumour-host relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkovic, N; Zarkovic, K; Grainca, S; Kissel, D; Jurin, M

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse whether Viscum album (mistletoe; Isorel) modulates the tumour-host relationship and whether this might be a basic mechanism of the antitumorous activity of the drug. The effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of the drug (100 mg/kg single 'planta tota' dose) were analysed for mice-bearing melanoma B16F10 growing in the hind limb. Injection of Isorel reduced the size of the tumour and caused abundant tumour necrosis with inflammatory response, oedema and destruction of the malignant tissue. Furthermore, the lymphocytes of saline-treated tumorous mice were not able to respond to the mitogenic lectin concanavalin A in vitro, while those of mistletoe extract-treated mice showed high reactivity too the mitogen, but only if cultured in the medium supplemented with the plasma of the mistletoe extract-treated mice. Moreover, melanoma cells exposed to the mistletoe extract were more sensitive to the cytotoxic activity of the lymphocytes than the control tumour cells, particularly in the presence of the plasma of mistletoe extract-treated mice. The plasma itself, however, did not show any cytotoxic activity. These results indicate that the antitumour activity of the mistletoe drug is due to a modulation of the tumour-host relationship, mediated by direct cytotoxicity of the drug to tumour cells and/or through a potentiation of immune response by certain, as yet unidentified, growth modifying humoral factors of the host. PMID:9179362

  13. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  14. Growth-Blocking Peptides As Nutrition-Sensitive Signals for Insulin Secretion and Body Size Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Koyama, Takashi; Mirth, Christen K.

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, the fat body, functionally equivalent to the mammalian liver and adipocytes, plays a central role in regulating systemic growth in response to nutrition. The fat body senses intracellular amino acids through Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling, and produces an unidentified humoral factor(s) to regulate insulin-like peptide (ILP) synthesis and/or secretion in the insulin-producing cells. Here, we find that two peptides, Growth-Blocking Peptide (GBP1) and CG11395 (GBP2), are prod...

  15. XRP44X, an Inhibitor of Ras/Erk Activation of the Transcription Factor Elk3, Inhibits Tumour Growth and Metastasis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenchenko, Kostyantyn; Wasylyk, Christine; Cheung, Henry; Tourrette, Yves; Maas, Peter; Schalken, Jack A; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors have an important role in cancer but are difficult targets for the development of tumour therapies. These factors include the Ets family, and in this study Elk3 that is activated by Ras oncogene /Erk signalling, and is involved in angiogenesis, malignant progression and epithelial-mesenchymal type processes. We previously described the identification and in-vitro characterisation of an inhibitor of Ras / Erk activation of Elk3 that also affects microtubules, XRP44X. We now report an initial characterisation of the effects of XRP44X in-vivo on tumour growth and metastasis in three preclinical models mouse models, subcutaneous xenografts, intra-cardiac injection-bone metastasis and the TRAMP transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer progression. XRP44X inhibits tumour growth and metastasis, with limited toxicity. Tumours from XRP44X-treated animals have decreased expression of genes containing Elk3-like binding motifs in their promoters, Elk3 protein and phosphorylated Elk3, suggesting that perhaps XRP44X acts in part by inhibiting the activity of Elk3. Further studies are now warranted to develop XRP44X for tumour therapy. PMID:27427904

  16. Immunization with MHC class I-negative but not -positive HPV16-associated tumour cells inhibits growth of MHC class I-negative tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan; Šímová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Přibylová, Hana; Moravcová, Simona; Jandlová, Táňa; Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2007), s. 1011-1017. ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR7807 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Grant ostatní: Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HPV16 * MHC class I-deficient tumours * immunologic crossreaction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.295, year: 2007

  17. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, ameliorates interleukin 2-induced capillary leakage and reduces tumour growth in adenocarcinoma-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orucevic, A.; Lala, P. K.

    1996-01-01

    We tested whether NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, can prevent interleukin 2 (IL-2)-induced capillary leakage in tumour-bearing mice without compromising the therapeutic benefits of IL-2. C3H/HeJ female mice transplanted s.c. with 2.5 x 10(5) C3-L5 mammary carcinoma cells were treated with: nothing, IL-2 (ten injections of 15,000 Cetus units i.p. every 8 h), L-NAME (0.1, 0.5, or 1 mg ml-1 drinking water), IL-2 + L-NAME (0.1 or 0.5 or 1 mg ml-1 drinking water). Therapies were given in one round (IL-2, days 10-13; L-NAME, days 9-13) or in two rounds (IL-2, days 10-13 and 20-23; L-NAME, days 9-13 and days 19-23) after tumour transplantation. Capillary leakage was measured from the water contents of the pleural cavities, lungs, spleen and kidneys. Effects of the therapies on the primary tumour size and the number of spontaneous lung metastases were also recorded. NO production was measured as the nitrite + nitrate levels in the serum and in the pleural effusion. After the first round of therapies, addition of L-NAME significantly reduced IL-2-induced pulmonary oedema and water retention in the spleen in a dose-dependent manner. It also significantly reduced the IL-2-induced rise in NO levels in the serum and pleural fluid, but did not affect IL-2-induced pleural effusion or water retention in the kidney. At later stages of tumour growth (day 23), tumours themselves induced significant fluid retention in the lungs and the kidney, which was not aggravated further with the second round of IL-2 therapy. At this time, L-NAME therapy alone ameliorated tumour-induced pulmonary oedema. During both rounds of therapy different doses of L-NAME alone caused a reduction of primary tumour growth as well as spontaneous lung metastases, which improved further with the addition of IL-2. The combination therapy was at least as effective as IL-2 therapy. In summary, L-NAME had anti-tumour effects in vivo, reduced the severity of IL-2

  18. The radiation response of V79 and human tumour multicellular spheroids - cell survival and growth delay studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster cells (V79 379A), cells from a human small cell carcinoma of the lung (ME/MAR) and two xenografted human melanomas (HX117 and HX118) have been grown as multicellular spheroids in vitro. The radiation response of these four cell types has been compared when grown as spheroids (200 or 400 μm in diameter) and as single cells from disaggregated spheroids. The radiation sensitivity of the three human lines irradiated as single cells in air, is similar. In comparison, the V79 cells are more radioresistant. Only the V79 and HX118 cells show a spheroid size dependent radiation response. The radiation response of spheroids has been assayed using both cell survival and growth delay. V79, ME/MAR and HX117 cells demonstrate a good correlation between the two endpoints whereas with HX118 there appears to be greater cell kill for a given level of growth delay. This may be because HX118 is efficient in the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD). The results support the view that extrinsic factors such as three dimensional contact, hypoxia and repair of PLD can be important and together with the intrinsic cell radiosensitivity will determine the radiation response of tumours. (author)

  19. A dual immunocytochemical assay for oestrogen and epidermal growth factor receptors in tumour cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K. Sharma (Anisha K.); J.H. Horgan; R.L. McClelland (Robyn); A.G. Douglas-Jones (A.); T. van Agthoven (Ton); L.C.J. Dorssers (Lambert); R.I. Nicholson (R.)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractA new dual immunocytochemical assay for oestrogen receptor (ER) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been developed. It has been tested in a variety of conditions using cell culture lines and the results correlate well with those obtained from single immunocytochemical assays.

  20. Natamycin blocks fungal growth by binding specifically to ergosterol without permeabilizing the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Welscher, Yvonne M; ten Napel, Hendrik H; Balagué, Miriam Masià; Souza, Cleiton M; Riezman, Howard; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2008-03-01

    Natamycin is a polyene antibiotic that is commonly used as an antifungal agent because of its broad spectrum of activity and the lack of development of resistance. Other polyene antibiotics, like nystatin and filipin are known to interact with sterols, with some specificity for ergosterol thereby causing leakage of essential components and cell death. The mode of action of natamycin is unknown and is investigated in this study using different in vitro and in vivo approaches. Isothermal titration calorimetry and direct binding studies revealed that natamycin binds specifically to ergosterol present in model membranes. Yeast sterol biosynthetic mutants revealed the importance of the double bonds in the B-ring of ergosterol for the natamycin-ergosterol interaction and the consecutive block of fungal growth. Surprisingly, in strong contrast to nystatin and filipin, natamycin did not change the permeability of the yeast plasma membrane under conditions that growth was blocked. Also, in ergosterol containing model membranes, natamycin did not cause a change in bilayer permeability. This demonstrates that natamycin acts via a novel mode of action and blocks fungal growth by binding specifically to ergosterol. PMID:18165687

  1. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  2. Silencing of hypoxia inducible factor-1α by RNA interference inhibits growth of SK-NEP-1 Wilms tumour cells in vitro, and suppresses tumourigenesis and angiogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bo; Li, Ying; Wang, Xiuli; Yang, Yi; Li, Dan; Liu, Xin; Yang, Xianghong

    2016-06-01

    Wilms tumour is the most common tumour of the pediatric kidney. Elevation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) has been detected in 93% to 100% of human Wilms tumour specimens, suggesting a potential value of HIF-1α as a therapeutic target for Wilms tumour. In the present study, a stable HIF-1α-silenced Wilms tumour cell strain was established by introducing HIF-1α short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) into SK-NEP-1 cells. Silencing of HIF-1α significantly reduced single-cell growth capacity, suppressed proliferation and arrested cell cycle of SK-NEP-1 cells. In addition, reduction of HIF-1α expression induced apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 cells, which was accompanied by increased levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and Bax as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 in the cells. Furthermore, when inoculated subcutaneously in nude mice, HIF-1α-silenced SK-NEP-1 cells displayed retarded tumour growth and impaired tumour angiogenesis. In summary, the findings of this study suggest that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the development of Wilms tumour, and it may serve as a candidate target of gene therapy for Wilms tumour. PMID:27015631

  3. Niche appropriation by Drosophila intestinal stem cell tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Parthive H; Dutta, Devanjali; Edgar, Bruce A

    2015-09-01

    Mutations that inhibit differentiation in stem cell lineages are a common early step in cancer development, but precisely how a loss of differentiation initiates tumorigenesis is unclear. We investigated Drosophila intestinal stem cell (ISC) tumours generated by suppressing Notch (N) signalling, which blocks differentiation. Notch-defective ISCs require stress-induced divisions for tumour initiation and an autocrine EGFR ligand, Spitz, during early tumour growth. On achieving a critical mass these tumours displace surrounding enterocytes, competing with them for basement membrane space and causing their detachment, extrusion and apoptosis. This loss of epithelial integrity induces JNK and Yki/YAP activity in enterocytes and, consequently, their expression of stress-dependent cytokines (Upd2, Upd3). These paracrine signals, normally used within the stem cell niche to trigger regeneration, propel tumour growth without the need for secondary mutations in growth signalling pathways. The appropriation of niche signalling by differentiation-defective stem cells may be a common mechanism of early tumorigenesis. PMID:26237646

  4. Morphology-controlled growth of perylene derivative induced by double-hydrophilic block copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghua Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled growth of technically relevant perylene derivative 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid potassium salt (PTCAPS, with tuneable morpologies, has been successfully realized by a recrystallization method using a double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly (ethylene glycol-block poly (ethyleneimine (PEG-b-PEI as the structure directing agent. The {001} faces of PTCAPS are most polar and adsorb the oppositively charged polymer additive PEG-b-PEI well by electrostatic attraction. By simply adjusting the PEG-b-PEI concentration, systematic morphogenesis of PTCAPS from plates to microparticles composed of various plates splaying outwards could be realized. Furthermore, the variation of pH value of the recrystallization solution could induce the change of the interaction strength between PEG-b-PEI additive and PTCAPS and thus modify the morphology of PTCAPS from microparticles composed of various plates to ultralong microbelts.

  5. Morphology-controlled growth of perylene derivative induced by double-hydrophilic block copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minghua; Antonietti, Markus; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Controlled growth of technically relevant perylene derivative 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid potassium salt (PTCAPS), with tuneable morpologies, has been successfully realized by a recrystallization method using a double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly (ethylene glycol)-block poly (ethyleneimine) (PEG-b-PEI) as the structure directing agent. The {001} faces of PTCAPS are most polar and adsorb the oppositively charged polymer additive PEG-b-PEI well by electrostatic attraction. By simply adjusting the PEG-b-PEI concentration, systematic morphogenesis of PTCAPS from plates to microparticles composed of various plates splaying outwards could be realized. Furthermore, the variation of pH value of the recrystallization solution could induce the change of the interaction strength between PEG-b-PEI additive and PTCAPS and thus modify the morphology of PTCAPS from microparticles composed of various plates to ultralong microbelts.

  6. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25–10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug. PMID:25136960

  7. Amygdalin blocks bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by diminishing cyclin A and cdk2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP. Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug.

  8. ERas protein is overexpressed and binds to the activated platelet-derived growth factor β receptor in bovine urothelial tumour cells associated with papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Valeria; Roperto, Franco; Esposito, Iolanda; Ceccarelli, Dora Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Leonardi, Leonardo; Capparelli, Rosanna; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Roperto, Sante

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic stem cell-expressed Ras (ERas) encodes a constitutively active form of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that binds to and activates phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), which in turn phosphorylates and activates downstream targets such as Akt. The current study evaluated ERas regulation and expression in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumours in cattle grazing on lands rich in bracken fern. ERas was found upregulated and overexpressed by PCR, real time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, protein overexpression was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. ERas was found to interact physically and colocalise with the activated platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) by coimmunoprecipitation and laser scanning confocal investigations. Phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream effector both of ERas and PDGFβR, appeared to be increased in urothelial tumour cells. Altogether, these data indicate that ERas/PDGFβR complex could play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine papillomavirus-associated bladder neoplasia. PMID:27256024

  9. Pituitary tumour clonality revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R N; Farrell, W E

    2004-01-01

    Allelotype analysis and X chromosome inactivation analysis in women enables the assessment of tissue clonality, and has demonstrated that the majority of sporadic human pituitary adenomas are monoclonal. This implies that these tumours arise from de novo somatic genetic change(s) in a single pituitary cell. However, clonality within any given tumour may be multiple or single, multiple tumours arising on the background of hyperplasia may be of identical or different clonality, multiple 'sporadic' tumours in a tissue may be of differing clonal origin, and finally morphology cannot predict genetic makeup. These general principles may also apply to the pituitary so it is simplistic to assume that monoclonality is inevitable and that pituitary tumours cannot be multiclonal in origin. Indeed, these observations would be entirely compatible with the initiating stimulus resulting in hyperplasia of specific cell subtypes in the pituitary giving rise to a number of different clones each with variable potential to develop into a discrete tumour depending on their rate of cell division/rate of apotosis. Stimuli might include pituitary-specific oncogenes, intrapituitary growth factors, or extrapituitary trophic factors (e.g. hypothalamic releasing hormones). PMID:15281347

  10. Growth-Blocking Peptides As Nutrition-Sensitive Signals for Insulin Secretion and Body Size Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Takashi; Mirth, Christen K

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, the fat body, functionally equivalent to the mammalian liver and adipocytes, plays a central role in regulating systemic growth in response to nutrition. The fat body senses intracellular amino acids through Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling, and produces an unidentified humoral factor(s) to regulate insulin-like peptide (ILP) synthesis and/or secretion in the insulin-producing cells. Here, we find that two peptides, Growth-Blocking Peptide (GBP1) and CG11395 (GBP2), are produced in the fat body in response to amino acids and TOR signaling. Reducing the expression of GBP1 and GBP2 (GBPs) specifically in the fat body results in smaller body size due to reduced growth rate. In addition, we found that GBPs stimulate ILP secretion from the insulin-producing cells, either directly or indirectly, thereby increasing insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling activity throughout the body. Our findings fill an important gap in our understanding of how the fat body transmits nutritional information to the insulin producing cells to control body size. PMID:26928023

  11. Override of the radiation-induced mitotic block in human tumour cells by methylxanthines and its relationship to the potentiation of cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musk, S.R.R.; Steel, G.G. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (UK). Surrey Branch)

    1990-06-01

    Caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine, were tested for ability to override mitotic block induced by ionizing radiation in the human bladder carcinoma cell line RT112. All were found to partially override the block, at a concentration of 1mM in the order caffeine > theophylline > theobromine = paraxanthine. At a concentration of 1 mM only caffeine was found to potentiate cell killing as well as causing block override; at higher concentrations all had a significant effect on survival but little or no further influence on the degree of block override. It is concluded that override of a mitotic block is not in itself sufficient to cause increased killing when irradiated cells are incubated in the presence of caffeine, and that caffeine exerts its potentiating effect by directly inhibiting repair of damage in DNA or by causing override of radiation-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis. (author).

  12. Override of the radiation-induced mitotic block in human tumour cells by methylxanthines and its relationship to the potentiation of cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and paraxanthine, were tested for ability to override mitotic block induced by ionizing radiation in the human bladder carcinoma cell line RT112. All were found to partially override the block, at a concentration of 1mM in the order caffeine > theophylline > theobromine = paraxanthine. At a concentration of 1 mM only caffeine was found to potentiate cell killing as well as causing block override; at higher concentrations all had a significant effect on survival but little or no further influence on the degree of block override. It is concluded that override of a mitotic block is not in itself sufficient to cause increased killing when irradiated cells are incubated in the presence of caffeine, and that caffeine exerts its potentiating effect by directly inhibiting repair of damage in DNA or by causing override of radiation-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis. (author)

  13. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaru, Jordana

    2001-05-12

    Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors require a high purity blocking layer (< 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) approximately 1 mm thick grown on a heavily doped active layer ({approx} 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) approximately 20 mm thick. Epilayers were grown using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of germanium out of lead solution. The effects of the crystallographic orientation of the germanium substrate on LPE growth modes were explored. Growth was studied on substrates oriented by Laue x-ray diffraction between 0.02{sup o} and 10{sup o} from the {l_brace}111{r_brace} toward the {l_brace}100{r_brace}. Terrace growth was observed, with increasing terrace height for larger misorientation angles. It was found that the purity of the blocking layer was limited by the presence of phosphorus in the lead solvent. Unintentionally doped Ge layers contained {approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} phosphorus as determined by Hall effect measurements and Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS). Lead purification by vacuum distillation and dilution reduced the phosphorus concentration in the layers to {approx} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} but further reduction was not observed with successive distillation runs. The graphite distillation and growth components as an additional phosphorus source cannot be ruled out. Antimony ({approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) was used as a dopant for the active BIB layer. A reduction in the donor binding energy due to impurity banding was observed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. A BIB detector fabricated from an Sb-doped Ge layer grown on a pure substrate showed a low energy photoconductive onset ({approx}6 meV). Spreading resistance measurements on doped layers revealed a nonuniform dopant distribution with Sb pile-up at the layer surface, which must be removed by chemomechanical polishing. Sb diffusion into the pure substrate was observed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) for epilayers grown at 650 C. The Sb concentration at the interface

  14. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors require a high purity blocking layer ( and lt; 10(sup 13) cm(sup -3)) approximately 1 mm thick grown on a heavily doped active layer ((approx) 10(sup 16) cm(sup -3)) approximately 20 mm thick. Epilayers were grown using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of germanium out of lead solution. The effects of the crystallographic orientation of the germanium substrate on LPE growth modes were explored. Growth was studied on substrates oriented by Laue x-ray diffraction between 0.02(sup o) and 10(sup o) from the(lbrace)111(rbrace) toward the(lbrace)100(rbrace). Terrace growth was observed, with increasing terrace height for larger misorientation angles. It was found that the purity of the blocking layer was limited by the presence of phosphorus in the lead solvent. Unintentionally doped Ge layers contained(approx)10(sup 15) cm(sup -3) phosphorus as determined by Hall effect measurements and Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS). Lead purification by vacuum distillation and dilution reduced the phosphorus concentration in the layers to(approx) 10(sup 14) cm(sup -3) but further reduction was not observed with successive distillation runs. The graphite distillation and growth components as an additional phosphorus source cannot be ruled out. Antimony ((approx)10(sup 16) cm(sup -3)) was used as a dopant for the active BIB layer. A reduction in the donor binding energy due to impurity banding was observed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. A BIB detector fabricated from an Sb-doped Ge layer grown on a pure substrate showed a low energy photoconductive onset ((approx)6 meV). Spreading resistance measurements on doped layers revealed a nonuniform dopant distribution with Sb pile-up at the layer surface, which must be removed by chemomechanical polishing. Sb diffusion into the pure substrate was observed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) for epilayers grown at 650 C. The Sb concentration at the interface dropped

  15. Blocking transforming growth factor- receptor signaling down-regulates transforming growth factor-β1 autoproduction in keloid fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 蔡泽浩; 王丹茹; 武小莉; 崔磊; 商庆新; 钱云良; 曹谊林

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) autoproduction in keloid fibroblasts and theregulation effect of blocking TGF-β intracellular signalingon rhTGF-β1 autoproduction.Methods: Keloid fibroblasts cultured in vitro weretreated with either rhTGF-β1 (5 ng/ml ) or recombinantadenovirus containing a truncated type II TGF-β receptorgene (50 pfu/cell ). Their effects of regulating geneexpression of TGF-β1 and its receptor I and II wereobserved with Northern blot.Results: rhTGF-β1 up-regulated the gene expressionof TGF-β1 and receptor I, but not receptor II. Over-expression of the truncated receptor II down-regulated thegene expression of TGF-β1 and its receptor I, but notreceptor II.Conclusions: TGF-β1 autoproduction was observed inkeloid fibroblasts. Over-expression of the truncated TGF-βreceptor H decreased TGF-β1 autoproduction via blockingTGF-β receptor signaling.

  16. miR-155 is up-regulated in primary and secondary glioblastoma and promotes tumour growth by inhibiting GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, Pietro I; D'Urso, Oscar F; Storelli, Carlo; Mallardo, Massimo; Gianfreda, Cosimo Damiano; Montinaro, Antonio; Cimmino, Antonia; Pietro, Caliandro; Marsigliante, Santo

    2012-07-01

    An altered expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes both to the development of cancer and to the progression of the disease. Malignant tumours and tumour cell lines have widespread deregulated expressions of miRNAs compared to normal tissues. In this study, we investigated the expression profiles of 340 mammalian miRNAs in 93 cases of multiform glioblastoma (primary and secondary glioblastoma tumours), by means of DNA microarrays. We show that the expression profiles of 10 miRNAs can distinguish primary from secondary glioblastoma types. Moreover, we found elevated miR-155 levels in primary and secondary glioblastoma tissues as well as in glioblastoma primary cultures. We hypothesised that γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor 1 (GABRA1) is a miR-155 target, and studied the correlation between miR-155 up-regulation and the GABRA1 protein in cultured glioblastoma cells by miRNA silencing. We show that a decrease in miR-155 expression to normal levels restores the expression of GABRA1, making glioblastoma cells sensitive to signals that inhibit cell proliferation mediated by GABRA1. In conclusion, the expression patterns of different miRNAs characterise primary and secondary glioblastomas. The aberrant overexpression of miR-155 contributes to the malignant phenotype of glioblastoma cells removing growth inhibition. PMID:22470130

  17. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  18. Reducing the serine availability complements the inhibition of the glutamine metabolism to block leukemia cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polet, Florence; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Rubio, Laila Illan; Martherus, Ruben; Bol, Vanesa; Drozak, Xavier; Grégoire, Vincent; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are described as a prototype of glucose-consuming cells with a high turnover rate. The role of glutamine in fueling the tricarboxylic acid cycle of leukemia cells was however recently identified confirming its status of major anaplerotic precursor in solid tumors. Here we examined whether glutamine metabolism could represent a therapeutic target in leukemia cells and whether resistance to this strategy could arise. We found that glutamine deprivation inhibited leukemia cell growth but also led to a glucose-independent adaptation maintaining cell survival. A proteomic study revealed that glutamine withdrawal induced the upregulation of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) and phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), two enzymes of the serine pathway. We further documented that both exogenous and endogenous serine were critical for leukemia cell growth and contributed to cell regrowth following glutamine deprivation. Increase in oxidative stress upon inhibition of glutamine metabolism was identified as the trigger of the upregulation of PHGDH. Finally, we showed that PHGDH silencing in vitro and the use of serine-free diet in vivo inhibited leukemia cell growth, an effect further increased when glutamine metabolism was blocked. In conclusion, this study identified serine as a key pro-survival actor that needs to be handled to sensitize leukemia cells to glutamine-targeting modalities. PMID:26625201

  19. Ultrasonic treatment of experimental animal tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Kremkau, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Studies on the effects of ultrasound on several solid tumours in experimental animals have indicated that tumour growth rates can be reduced. These data are generally consistent with a thermal mechanism of action. Application of combined ultrasound and X-irradiation have shown that with some experimental animal tumours the radiation dose required to locally control 50% of the tumours can be reduced by ultrasound. These results were also consistent with a thermal mechanism of action hypothesis...

  20. Production of immunoreactive insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-I binding proteins by human lung tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Reeve, J. G.; Payne, J. A.; Bleehen, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    The production of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-I binding proteins (BPs) by human lung tumour cell lines in vitro has been examined and the levels of these substances in the serum of lung cancer patients investigated. While small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines secreted both IGF-I and BPs, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines secreted BPs only. No evidence of increased serum IGF-I levels was obtained in a cohort of 52 lung cancer patients having SCLC and NSCLC histo...

  1. Absence of transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor is associated with poorer prognosis in HER2-negative breast tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paiva, C E; Drigo, S A; Rosa, F E;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical relevance of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)-signalling pathway in breast carcinomas (BCs) remained elusive. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of TGF-beta1 and transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor (TGF-betaRII) expression levels in.......489, P = 0.003]. TGF-betaRII positivity was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (HR = 0.439, P = 0.001) and overall survival (OS) (HR = 0.409, P = 0.003) in human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-negative patients. Absence of TGF-beta1 and TGF-betaRII proteins in breast tumour cells was...

  2. The effect of radiation and cytotoxic platinum compounds on the growth of normal and tumour bladder explant cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothersill, C.; Seymour, C.B.; Cusack, A.; O' Brien, A.; Butler, M. (Saint Luke' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland) Meath Hospital, Dublin (Ireland). Urology Dept.)

    1990-01-01

    Using an explant tissue culture model developed by this group for use with human surgical and biopsy specimens, data are presented showing the response of normal and tumor bladder urothelium to radiation in combination with cis- and carboplatin. Cellular response is measured after two weeks in culture as a reduction in the extent of outgrowth from the explant. The outgrowth has been shown to be growing and to be epithelial. Results showed that when either drug or radiation is used singly, the tumour is resistant to treatment while the normal cells are severely affected. However, appropriate combinations of either drug with radiation reverse the unfavourable therapeutic ratio and result in higher tumour cell kill. The model may be useful for investigating mechanisms of radiation/chemotherapy action at the cellular level and, if integrated into appropriate clinical trials, may serve as an easy-to-use in vitro test for optimising single agent or combination therapy regimens. (orig.).

  3. Anti-tumour activity of oncolytic Western Reserve vaccinia viruses in canine tumour cell lines, xenografts, and fresh tumour biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, K; Knuuttila, A; Kipar, A; Ahonen, M; Parviainen, S; Diaconu, I; Kanerva, A; Hakonen, T; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A

    2014-10-10

    Cancer is one of the most common reasons for death in dogs. One promising approach is oncolytic virotherapy. We assessed the oncolytic effect of genetically modified vaccinia viruses in canine cancer cells, in freshly excised tumour biopsies, and in mice harbouring canine tumour xenografts. Tumour transduction efficacy was assessed using virus expressing luciferase or fluorescent marker genes and oncolysis was quantified by a colorimetric cell viability assay. Oncolytic efficacy in vivo was evaluated in a nude mouse xenograft model. Vaccinia virus was shown to infect most tested canine cancer cell lines and primary surgical tumour tissues. Virus infection significantly reduced tumour growth in the xenograft model. Oncolytic vaccinia virus has antitumour effects against canine cancer cells and experimental tumours and is able to replicate in freshly excised patient tumour tissue. Our results suggest that oncolytic vaccinia virus may offer an effective treatment option for otherwise incurable canine tumours. PMID:25302859

  4. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  5. Growth of monolithic full-color GaN-based LED with intermediate carrier blocking layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghoroury, Hussein S.; Yeh, Milton; Chen, J. C.; Li, X.; Chuang, Chih-Li

    2016-07-01

    Specially designed intermediate carrier blocking layers (ICBLs) in multi-active regions of III-nitride LEDs were shown to be effective in controlling the carrier injection distribution across the active regions. In principle, the majority of carriers, both holes and electrons, can be guided into targeted quantum wells and recombine to generate light of specific wavelengths at controlled current-densities. Accordingly we proposed and demonstrated a novel monolithic InGaN-based LED to achieve three primary colors of light from one device at selected current densities. This LED structure, which has three different sets of quantum wells separated with ICBLs for three primary red-green-blue (RGB) colors, was grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Results show that this LED can emit light ranging from 460 to 650 nm to cover the entire visible spectrum. The emission wavelength starts at 650 nm and then decreases to 460 nm or lower as the injection current increases. In addition to three primary colors, many other colors can be obtained by color mixing techniques. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of monolithic full-color LED grown by a simple growth technique without using re-growth process.

  6. Radiolabelled aptamers for tumour imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The growth in biotechnology has led to new techniques for the design, selection and production of ligands capable of molecular recognition. One promising approach is the production of specific receptor binding molecules based on specific nucleic acid sequences that are capable of recognising a wide array of target molecules. These oligonuclide ligands are known as aptamers. The technology that allows production of aptamer molecules is known as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). We have used combinatorial chemistry techniques coupled with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to rapidly select aptamers from degenerate libraries that bind with high affinity and specificity to the protein core of the MUC1 antigen, a tumour marker previously extensively used in tumour imaging and therapy. MUC1 is widely expressed by normal glandular epithelial cells, however this expression is dramatically increased when the cells become malignant. This has been well documented for breast and ovarian cancer, as well as some lung, pancreatic and prostate cancers. Recently it has also been shown that MUC1 is a valuable marker for bladder and has been used for the imaging and targeted therapy of bladder cancer. The aptamer selection process was performed on affinity chromatography matrices. After ten rounds of selection and amplification, aptamers were cloned and sequenced. Post SELEX amino modifications have been used to confer nuclease resistance and coupling potential. The aptamers bound to MUC1 antigen with a Kd of 5nm and high specificity, demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy on MUC1-expressing tumour cells. Using peptide coupling reactions, we have successfully attached chelators for Tc-99m radiolabelling. Two of the constructs tested were based on mono-aptamer chelator complexes, one with commercially available MAG3 and one with a novel designed cyclen-based chelator. The other two constructs were based on the use of multi-aptamer complexes

  7. ING1 and 5-Azacytidine Act Synergistically to Block Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Satbir; Feng, Xiaolan; Qiao Shi, Zhong; Ganapathy, Amudha; Kumar Mishra, Manoj; Atadja, Peter; Morris, Don; Riabowol, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins are epigenetic “readers” that recognize trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me3) and target histone acetyl transferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) complexes to chromatin. Methods and Principal Findings Here we asked whether dysregulating two epigenetic pathways with chemical inhibitors showed synergistic effects on breast cancer cell line killing. We also tested whether ING1 could synergize better with chemotherapeutics that target the same epigenetic mechanism such as the HDAC inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat) or a different epigenetic mechanism such as 5-azacytidine (5azaC), which inhibits DNA methyl transferases. Simultaneous treatment of breast cancer cell lines with LBH589 and 5azaC did not show significant synergy in killing cells. However, combination treatment of ING1 with either LBH589 or 5azaC did show synergy. The combination of ING1b with 5azaC, which targets two distinct epigenetic mechanisms, was more effective at lower doses and enhanced apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). ING1b plus 5azaC also acted synergistically to increase γH2AX staining indicating significant levels of DNA damage were induced. Adenoviral delivery of ING1b with 5azaC also inhibited cancer cell growth in a murine xenograft model and led to tumor regression when viral concentration was optimized in vivo. Conclusions These data show that targeting distinct epigenetic pathways can be more effective in blocking cancer cell line growth than targeting the same pathway with multiple agents, and that using viral delivery of epigenetic regulators can be more effective in synergizing with a chemical agent than using two chemotherapeutic agents. This study also indicates that the ING1 epigenetic regulator may have additional activities in the cell when expressed at high levels. PMID:22916295

  8. ING1 and 5-azacytidine act synergistically to block breast cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satbir Thakur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inhibitor of Growth (ING proteins are epigenetic "readers" that recognize trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me3 and target histone acetyl transferase (HAT and histone deacetylase (HDAC complexes to chromatin. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we asked whether dysregulating two epigenetic pathways with chemical inhibitors showed synergistic effects on breast cancer cell line killing. We also tested whether ING1 could synergize better with chemotherapeutics that target the same epigenetic mechanism such as the HDAC inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat or a different epigenetic mechanism such as 5-azacytidine (5azaC, which inhibits DNA methyl transferases. Simultaneous treatment of breast cancer cell lines with LBH589 and 5azaC did not show significant synergy in killing cells. However, combination treatment of ING1 with either LBH589 or 5azaC did show synergy. The combination of ING1b with 5azaC, which targets two distinct epigenetic mechanisms, was more effective at lower doses and enhanced apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. ING1b plus 5azaC also acted synergistically to increase γH2AX staining indicating significant levels of DNA damage were induced. Adenoviral delivery of ING1b with 5azaC also inhibited cancer cell growth in a murine xenograft model and led to tumor regression when viral concentration was optimized in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that targeting distinct epigenetic pathways can be more effective in blocking cancer cell line growth than targeting the same pathway with multiple agents, and that using viral delivery of epigenetic regulators can be more effective in synergizing with a chemical agent than using two chemotherapeutic agents. This study also indicates that the ING1 epigenetic regulator may have additional activities in the cell when expressed at high levels.

  9. Clofarabine, a novel adenosine analogue, reactivates DNA methylation-silenced tumour suppressor genes and inhibits cell growth in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Stefanska, Barbara; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Smolewski, Piotr; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2014-01-15

    Clofarabine (2-chloro-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyarabinosyladenine, ClF) is a second-generation 2'-deoxyadenosine analogue that is structurally related to cladribine (2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine, 2CdA) and fludarabine (9-beta-d-arabinosyl-2-fluoroadenine, F-ara-A). It demonstrates potent antitumour activity at much lower doses than parent compounds with high therapeutic efficacy in paediatric blood cancers. Our previous studies in breast cancer cells indicate that 2CdA and F-ara-A are involved in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We therefore investigated whether ClF influences methylation and expression of selected tumour suppressor genes, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), and retinoic acid receptor beta 2 (RARbeta2), as well as expression of p53, p21 and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines with different invasive potential. Promoter methylation and gene expression were estimated using methylation-sensitive restriction analysis (MSRA) and real-time PCR, respectively. ClF demonstrated potent growth inhibitory activity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells after 96h treatment with IC50 determined as equal to 640nM and 50nM, respectively. In both breast cancer cell lines, ClF led to hypomethylation and up-regulation of APC, PTEN and RARbeta2 as well as increase in p21 expression. Only in non-invasive MCF-7 cells, these changes were associated with down-regulation of DNMT1. Our results provide first evidence of ClF implications in epigenetic regulation of transcriptional activity of selected tumour suppressor genes in breast cancer. It seems to be a new important element of ClF anticancer activity and may indicate its potential efficacy in epigenetic therapy of solid tumours, especially at early stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:24296317

  10. Soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha receptor 2, a serum marker of resistance to the anabolic actions of growth hormone in subjects with HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelato, Marie C; Mynarcik, Dennis; McNurlan, Margaret A

    2002-01-01

    Therapies are still being sought for the prevention of loss of body weight and lean body mass in HIV disease. The purpose of the present study was to identify a serum marker that would help in selecting patients who may be appropriate candidates for the use of anabolic agents, such as growth hormone, to restore lean body mass. This study included 26 HIV-infected patients and nine healthy controls, assessed previously for the effectiveness of 2 weeks of growth hormone administration in the stimulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Serum levels of interleukins-1beta, -6 and -10 were not useful predictors of the anabolic response to growth hormone. Serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) were significantly elevated (P<0.05) in patients with AIDS and AIDS-related weight loss, and there was a significant correlation between the serum concentration of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and stage of disease (P=0.03). However, the serum concentration of the soluble TNFalpha receptor type 2 was most predictive of an inability of muscle protein synthesis to respond anabolically to growth hormone (r=-0.42, P=0.01). These data suggest that inflammation impacts on the responsiveness of muscle tissue to an anabolic stimulus, and that the soluble TNFalpha receptor type 2 provides a useful serum marker for metabolic dysfunction in HIV disease, which can be used to identify individuals likely to respond to growth hormone-based anabolic therapy. PMID:11749664

  11. Growth-inhibitory effects of the chemopreventive agent indole-3-carbinol are increased in combination with the polyamine putrescine in the SW480 colon tumour cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gescher Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many tumours undergo disregulation of polyamine homeostasis and upregulation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC activity, which can promote carcinogenesis. In animal models of colon carcinogenesis, inhibition of ODC activity by difluoromethylornithine (DFMO has been shown to reduce the number and size of colon adenomas and carcinomas. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C has shown promising chemopreventive activity against a range of human tumour cell types, but little is known about the effect of this agent on colon cell lines. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of ODC by I3C could contribute to a chemopreventive effect in colon cell lines. Methods Cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. Ornithine decarboxylase activity was determined by liberation of CO2 from 14C-labelled substrate, and polyamine levels were measured by HPLC. Results I3C inhibited proliferation of the human colon tumour cell lines HT29 and SW480, and of the normal tissue-derived HCEC line, and at higher concentrations induced apoptosis in SW480 cells. The agent also caused a decrease in ODC activity in a dose-dependent manner. While administration of exogenous putrescine reversed the growth-inhibitory effect of DFMO, it did not reverse the growth-inhibition following an I3C treatment, and in the case of the SW480 cell line, the effect was actually enhanced. In this cell line, combination treatment caused a slight increase in the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and increased the proportion of cells undergoing necrosis, but did not predispose cells to apoptosis. Indole-3-carbinol also caused an increase in intracellular spermine levels, which was not modulated by putrescine co-administration. Conclusion While indole-3-carbinol decreased ornithine decarboxylase activity in the colon cell lines, it appears unlikely that this constitutes a major mechanism by which the agent exerts its antiproliferative

  12. Paediatric laryngeal granular cell tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauda Ayuba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumour (GCT affecting the larynx is not common, especially in children. Most cases are apt to be confused with respiratory papilloma and may even be mistaken for a malignant neoplasia. We present a case of laryngeal GCT in a 12-year-old child to emphasize that the tumour should be regarded in the differential of growths affecting the larynx in children.

  13. Tumour T1 changes in vivo are highly predictive of response to chemotherapy and reflect the number of viable tumour cells – a preclinical MR study in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective chemotherapy rapidly reduces the spin–lattice relaxation of water protons (T1) in solid tumours and this change (ΔT1) often precedes and strongly correlates with the eventual change in tumour volume (TVol). To understand the biological nature of ΔT1, we have performed studies in vivo and ex vivo with the allosteric mTOR inhibitor, everolimus. Mice bearing RIF-1 tumours were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine TVol and T1, and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to determine levels of the proliferation marker choline and levels of lipid apoptosis markers, prior to and 5 days (endpoint) after daily treatment with vehicle or everolimus (10 mg/kg). At the endpoint, tumours were ablated and an entire section analysed for cellular and necrotic quantification and staining for the proliferation antigen Ki67 and cleaved-caspase-3 as a measure of apoptosis. The number of blood-vessels (BV) was evaluated by CD31 staining. Mice bearing B16/BL6 melanoma tumours were studied by MRI to determine T1 under similar everolimus treatment. At the endpoint, cell bioluminescence of the tumours was measured ex vivo. Everolimus blocked RIF-1 tumour growth and significantly reduced tumour T1 and total choline (Cho) levels, and increased polyunsaturated fatty-acids which are markers of apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry showed that everolimus reduced the %Ki67+ cells but did not affect caspase-3 apoptosis, necrosis, BV-number or cell density. The change in T1 (ΔT1) correlated strongly with the changes in TVol and Cho and %Ki67+. In B16/BL6 tumours, everolimus also decreased T1 and this correlated with cell bioluminescence; another marker of cell viability. Receiver-operating-characteristic curves (ROC) for everolimus on RIF-1 tumours showed that ΔT1 had very high levels of sensitivity and specificity (ROCAUC = 0.84) and this was confirmed for the cytotoxic patupilone in the same tumour model (ROCAUC = 0.97). These studies suggest that ΔT1 is not a measure of cell density

  14. Monitoring the Growth of an Orthotopic Tumour Xenograft Model: Multi-Modal Imaging Assessment with Benchtop MRI (1T), High-Field MRI (9.4T), Ultrasound and Bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Daniel J.; David, Anna L.; Pedley, R. Barbara; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Siow, Bernard; Walker-Samuel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background Research using orthotopic and transgenic models of cancer requires imaging methods to non-invasively quantify tumour burden. As the choice of appropriate imaging modality is wide-ranging, this study aimed to compare low-field (1T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a novel and relatively low-cost system, against established preclinical techniques: bioluminescence imaging (BLI), ultrasound imaging (US), and high-field (9.4T) MRI. Methods A model of colorectal metastasis to the liver was established in eight mice, which were imaged with each modality over four weeks post-implantation. Tumour burden was assessed from manually segmented regions. Results All four imaging systems provided sufficient contrast to detect tumours in all of the mice after two weeks. No significant difference was detected between tumour doubling times estimated by low-field MRI, ultrasound imaging or high-field MRI. A strong correlation was measured between high-field MRI estimates of tumour burden and all the other modalities (p < 0.001, Pearson). Conclusion These results suggest that both low-field MRI and ultrasound imaging are accurate modalities for characterising the growth of preclinical tumour models. PMID:27223614

  15. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours: pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumours of the alimentary tract. They normally involve the stomach, the small bowel, or the colon. Localisation within the oesophagus, rectum, mesentery, omentum, or retroperitoneum is less common, GISTs are immunohistochemically identified by the expression of the c-kit protein, which is not detected in other mesenchymal tumours. The role of imaging includes the detection (subjects with occult gastro-intestinal bleeding, incidental recognition, etc.), characterisation, analysis of relations between mass and gastrointestinal wall, staging, prognostic assessment (recognition of signs of malignancy and unfavourable prognosis), and follow-up during specific treatment. Owing to the frequent exophytic growth of these lesions, differentiation of these tumours from non digestive lesions of different nature is a common diagnostic problem. Imaging findings usually allow differentiation from gastrointestinal epithelial tumours but not from non-epithelial tumours, for which histological confirmation is necessary, in part to verify potential response to therapy. Smaller lesions, which are usually benign, tend to be well-defined, relatively homogeneous, and with intraluminal growth. Larger lesions normally show well-defined or ill defined margins, inhomogeneous density both on unenhanced and on contrast-enhanced scans, with combined intraluminal/extra luminal growth and a tendency to spread to surrounding structures. Internal attenuation is often necrotic or clearly fluid. Signs of high-grade GIST include liver metastasis, gastrointestinal wall infiltration, large volume, irregular surface, ill-defined margins, inhomogeneous enhancement and peritoneal spread. Recurrences usually share the appearance of the larger, primary malignant GIST

  16. Huge landslide blocks in the growth of piton de la fournaise, La réunion, and Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Stieltjes, Laurent; Varet, Jacques

    1982-01-01

    Piton de la Fournaise, on the island of La Réunion, and Kilauea volcano, on the island of Hawaii, are active, basaltic shield volcanoes growing on the flanks of much larger shield volcanoes in intraplate tectonic environments. Past studies have shown that the average rate of magma production and the chemistry of lavas are quite similar for both volcanoes. We propose a structural similarity — specifically, that periodic displacement of parts of the shields as huge landslide blocks is a common mode of growth. In each instance, the unstable blocks are within a rift-zone-bounded, unbuttressed flank of the shield. At Kilauea, well-documented landslide blocks form relatively surficial parts of a much larger rift-zone-bounded block; scarps of the Hilina fault system mark the headwalls of the active blocks. At Fournaise, Hilina-like slump blocks are also present along the unbuttressed east coast of the volcano. In addition, however, the existence of a set of faults nested around the present caldera and northeast and southeast rift zones suggests that past chapters in the history of Fournaise included the slumping of entire rift-zone-bounded blocks themselves. These nested faults become younger to the east southeast and apparently record one of the effects of a migration of the focus of volcanism in that direction. Repeated dilation along the present set of northeast and southeast rift zones, most recently exemplified by an eruption in 1977, suggests that the past history of rift-zone-bounded slumping will eventually be repeated. The record provided by the succession of slump blocks on Fournaise is apparently at a relatively detailed part of a migration of magmatic focus that has advanced at least 30 km to the east-southeast from neighboring Piton des Neiges, an extinct Pliocene to Pleistocene volcano.?? 1982.

  17. [Biotherapy of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C.P.; Knigge, U.

    2008-01-01

    Biotherapy of hormonal symptoms and tumour growth is a mainstay in the therapy of metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. Symptomatic relief can be achieved by somatostatin analogues and interferon, either alone or in combination. The effect on tumour growth is...

  18. Reversible control of oestradiol-stimulated growth of MCF-7 tumours by tamoxifen in the athymic mouse.

    OpenAIRE

    Iino, Y.; Wolf, D. M.; Langan-Fahey, S. M.; Johnson, D.A.; Ricchio, M.; Thompson, M E; Jordan, V C

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the ability of high concentrations of oestradiol to reverse the growth inhibitory action of tamoxifen on MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vivo. Tamoxifen inhibits the oestradiol stimulated growth of MCF-7 cells in athymic mice. Using a sustained release preparation of tamoxifen we consistently achieved serum concentrations of the drug in the 40 to 50 ng ml-1 range and much higher levels in tissues. These serum levels are sufficient to inhibit the oestrogen stimulated growth of MCF...

  19. Inhibition of angiogenesis, tumour growth and experimental metastasis of human fibrosarcoma cells HT1080 by a multimeric form of the laminin sequence Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg (YIGSR).

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamoto, Y; Nomizu, M; Yamada, Y.; Ito, Y.; K.Tanaka; Sugioka, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A multimeric peptide, Ac-Y16, consisting of 16 YIGSR sequences from laminin was evaluated for its effect on experimental metastasis, angiogenesis and tumour growth of HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Co-injection of 0.5 mg per mouse of Ac-Y16 i.v. with HT 1080 cells inhibited lung colonisation by 100%, whereas 0.5 mg per mouse of monomeric Ac-YIGSR-NH2(AcY1) inhibited by 94%. Ac-Y16 did not show any direct cytotoxicity in tumour cells in vivo. The effect of the peptides on angiogenesis and tu...

  20. Placental Tumour: What could it be?

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Riyami, Nihal; Al-Hadabi, Rahma; Al-Dughaishi, Tamima; Al-Riyami, Marwa

    2013-01-01

    Placental tumours include placental chorioangiomas, teratomas, haemangiomas, and haematomas. Placental chorioangiomas are benign vascular tumours and are the most common placental tumours, with a prevalence of 1%. Large placental chorioangiomas are rare and may lead to pregnancy complications and poor perinatal outcomes. These complications include fetal anaemia, hydrops fetalis, fetal growth restriction, polyhydramnios, and preterm delivery. We report a case of a large placental chorioangiom...

  1. Effect of an anti-human Co-029/tspan8/Tspan8 mouse monoclonal antibody on tumour growth in a nude mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ClaudeBoucheix

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available New therapeutic agents are needed in digestive tract tumours. Co-029/tspan8 is a tetraspanin frequently expressed on human colorectal tumours, In this work, we report the effects of the monoclonal antibody Ts29.2, targeting Co-029/tspan8, on colorectal tumor cells in vitro and after implantation in nude mice. HT29, Isreco1 and SW480 colorectal tumor cell lines were used for this study. HT29 has a strong endogenous expression of Co-029/tspan8, whereas Isreco1 cells don’t express Co-029/tspan8 and SW480 has only a weak expression. Isreco1 and SW480 were transduced to express Co-029/tspan8 at the same level as HT29. In order to check the specificity of the effect of monoclonal antibody Ts29.2, low Co029/tspan8 expressing SW480 cells were injected simultaneously with transduced cells in the back, on the left and right sides of the mice. With an early treatment, Ts29.2 mAb inhibited growth of tumors expressing Co-029/tspan8 up to 70%, whereas a delayed treatment was less efficient. No effect of the antibody on cell proliferation or apoptosis induction was detected in vitro. No increase of activated caspase 3 labeling was observed in vivo and areas occupied by vessels were not significantly different between treated mice and controls. This suggests that the action of Ts29.2 is linked neither to cellular toxicity nor to the inhibition of the previously reported angiogenic properties of Co-029/tspan8. An inhibition of cell proliferation in vivo is demonstrated by a reduction of the mitotic index in HT29 tumors of Ts29.2 treated mice. The discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo data on cell proliferation suggests that the binding of Ts29.2 to tumour cells may modify their response to signals issued from the microenvironment. Given the restricted pattern of tissue expression of the tetraspanin Co-029/tspan8, these preliminary results put forth for consideration the antibody targeting of this tetraspanin in further investigations for therapeutic

  2. The Assessment of Sagittal Changes with Twin Block Appliance in Patients with Decelerating Growth Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Dauravu, Liju Marcely; Vannala, Venkataramana; Arafath, Mohamed; Singaraju, Gowri Sankar; Cherukuri, Sreekanth A.; Mathew, Anju

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The main reason for seeking orthodontic treatment for Class II malocclusions is aesthetic improvement. Growth modification treatment procedures offer better results for a patient with significant potential growth.

  3. p53 status determines the role of autophagy in pancreatic tumour development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeldt, Mathias T.; O'Prey, Jim; Morton, Jennifer P.; Nixon, Colin; Mackay, Gillian; Mrowinska, Agata; Au, Amy; Rai, Taranjit Singh; Zheng, Liang; Ridgway, Rachel; Adams, Peter D.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Sansom, Owen J.; Ryan, Kevin M.

    2013-12-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a process in which organelles termed autophagosomes deliver cytoplasmic constituents to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy has a major role in cellular homeostasis and has been implicated in various forms of human disease. The role of autophagy in cancer seems to be complex, with reports indicating both pro-tumorigenic and tumour-suppressive roles. Here we show, in a humanized genetically-modified mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), that autophagy's role in tumour development is intrinsically connected to the status of the tumour suppressor p53. Mice with pancreases containing an activated oncogenic allele of Kras (also called Ki-Ras)--the most common mutational event in PDAC--develop a small number of pre-cancerous lesions that stochastically develop into PDAC over time. However, mice also lacking the essential autophagy genes Atg5 or Atg7 accumulate low-grade, pre-malignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, but progression to high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias and PDAC is blocked. In marked contrast, in mice containing oncogenic Kras and lacking p53, loss of autophagy no longer blocks tumour progression, but actually accelerates tumour onset, with metabolic analysis revealing enhanced glucose uptake and enrichment of anabolic pathways, which can fuel tumour growth. These findings provide considerable insight into the role of autophagy in cancer and have important implications for autophagy inhibition in cancer therapy. In this regard, we also show that treatment of mice with the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine, which is currently being used in several clinical trials, significantly accelerates tumour formation in mice containing oncogenic Kras but lacking p53.

  4. Pulmonary Scintigraphy for Tumour Diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning of the lungs with albumin aggregates is one of the most useful methods for studying variations in pulmonary circulation and diagnosing embolisms and infarcts. However, its utilization for the diagnosis of tumours is barely in the trial stage. Using scintillation scanning, the authors have centered their attention on the study of patients with primary pulmonary tumours and secondary tumours at-other sites, and have observed that the tracer distribution pattern differs fundamentally according to the type of tumour. With metastatic tumours, the repercussion of the lesions in scintillation scanning is slight and is entirely dependent on the volume of the zone of condensation. The tumorous nodules behave entirely like inactive zones within a mass of active functional parenchyma and their effect on the scanning image depends solely on the size of the tumorous region and the amount of healthy parenchyma intervening between it and the detector. With primary pulmonary tumours and more especially those located in the hilar region, relatively small lesions give rise to defects in uptake in extensive areas of the lung, and these may affect various segments, a lobe or even the entire lung. This decrease in uptake cannot be entirely explained by the image of the tumour or by the associated zones of atelectasia, but must be due to serious alteration in the haemodynamics of the lung affected. Various kinds of phenomena associated with tumorous development may cause vascular changes affecting even the periphery of the lung: changes in breathing conditions accompanied by a reduction of oxygen tension, leading to change in haemodynamic conditions; pulmonary hypertension through compression of the veins in the lungs which are less resistant than the arteries; and direct nervous stimulation due to irritation of the bronchial plexi as a result of the growth of the tumour and, associated reactive. phenomena. (author)

  5. Clinical relevance of intermittent tumour blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the goals of translational cancer research is to understand basic 'phenomena' so that tumour response to therapy can be improved. One such phenomenon is intermittent tumour blood flow. The impact of the transient hypoxia that results from decreased tumour blood flow is now beginning to be appreciated in preclinical systems, and also receiving some attention in clinical practise. Thus in this article we review the nature and frequency of microregional blood flow changes in preclinical and clinical tumours and examine the impact of those changes on response to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, the implications of non-constant blood flow for both the growth of the unperturbed tumour and the regrowth of surviving tumour clonogens during and after therapy are examined

  6. Effect of time between x-irradiation and chemotherapy on the growth of three solid mouse tumours. VI. BCNU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been carried out to determine the effect of different time intervals between the administration of x-irradiation (1200 rad) and BCNU (15 mg/kg) on the growth delay produced in three mouse tumors. The tumors used were the EMT6 tumor in BALB/c mice and the KHT and RIF-1 sarcomas in C3H mice. All tumors were grown intramuscularly in the gastrocnemius muscle and treatment was carried out at a mean tumor weight of 450 mg. Time to reach 2X (for KHT) or 4X (for EMT6 and RIF-1) treatment volume was used as the endpoint of response. The drug was administered by the intraperitoneal route either 24, 6, or 2 hr before radiation. All irradiations were carried out in unanesthetized mice. The growth delays due to the drug alone were 2,6, and 11 days for the RIF-1, EMT6, and KHT tumors, respectively. No consistent general pattern emerged from the results of combination treatments. For the RIF-1 tumor, the growth delays following combination treatments were generally less than predicted by the simple addition of the growth delays for the single modalities. For EMT6 this was true when BCNU was administered immediately before x-rays, but not for other timings. In the KHT tumor an unexpectedly high incidence of long-term tumor controls was seen in the group which received BCNU at 2 hr before x-rays. In addition to the single dose studies (above), fractionated regimens in which radiation and BCNU were combined in several different ways were tested with the RIF-1 tumor. None of the combination schedules tested showed a greater-than-additive effect

  7. Vertical and lateral fluid flow related to a large growth fault, South Eugene Island Block 330 field, offshore Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losh, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Eglinton, L. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States). Dept. of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry; Schoell, M. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Wood, J. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Data from sediments in and near a large growth fault adjacent to the giant South Eugene Island Block 330 field, offshore Louisiana, indicate that the fault has acted as a conduit for fluids whose flux has varied in space and time. Core and cuttings samples from two wells that penetrated the same fault about 300 m apart show markedly different thermal histories and evidence for mass flux. Sediments within and adjacent to the fault zone in the US Department of Energy-Pennzoil Pathfinder well at about 2200 m SSTVD (subsea true vertical depth) showed little paleothermal or geochemical evidence for through-going fluid flow. The sediments were characterized by low vitrinite reflectances (R{sub {omicron}}), averaging 0.3% R{sub {omicron}}, moderate to high {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C values, and little difference in major or trace element composition between deformed and undeformed sediments. In contrast, faulted sediments from the A6ST well, which intersects the A fault at 1993 m SSTVD, show evidence for a paleothermal anomaly (0.55% R{sub {omicron}}) and depleted {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C values. Overall, indicators of mass and heat flux indicate the main growth fault zone in South Eugene Island Block 330 has acted as a conduit for ascending fluids, although the cumulative fluxes vary along strike. This conclusion is corroborated by oil and gas distribution in downthrown sands in Blocks 330 and 331, which identify the fault system in northwestern Block 330 as a major feeder.

  8. Naturally occurring tumours in the basal metazoan Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Klimovich, Alexander; Anokhin, Boris; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Hamm, Mailin J; Lange, Christina; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2014-01-01

    The molecular nature of tumours is well studied in vertebrates, although their evolutionary origin remains unknown. In particular, there is no evidence for naturally occurring tumours in pre-bilaterian animals, such as sponges and cnidarians. This is somewhat surprising given that recent computational studies have predicted that most metazoans might be prone to develop tumours. Here we provide first evidence for naturally occurring tumours in two species of Hydra. Histological, cellular and molecular data reveal that these tumours are transplantable and might originate by differentiation arrest of female gametes. Growth of tumour cells is independent from the cellular environment. Tumour-bearing polyps have significantly reduced fitness. In addition, Hydra tumours show a greatly altered transcriptome that mimics expression shifts in vertebrate cancers. Therefore, this study shows that spontaneous tumours have deep evolutionary roots and that early branching animals may be informative in revealing the fundamental mechanisms of tumorigenesis. PMID:24957317

  9. The roles of TGFβ in the tumour microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Pickup, Michael; Novitskiy, Sergey; Harold L Moses

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the microenvironment on tumour progression is becoming clearer. In this Review we address the role of an essential signalling pathway, that of transforming growth factor-β, in the regulation of components of the tumour microenvironment and how this contributes to tumour progression.

  10. Translationally Controlled Tumour Protein (TCTP) and Growth Regulation of Cells%翻译调节肿瘤蛋白(TCTP)与细胞生长调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈科; 程汉华; 周荣家

    2012-01-01

    翻译调节肿瘤蛋白(translationally controlled tumor protein,TCTP)是一个在物种间高度保守、广谱表达和多功能的蛋白质,具有调节细胞骨架的动态变化和调节细胞的生长与增殖的作用;能够激活干细胞标记基因Oct4和Nanog的转录;调节细胞凋亡、肿瘤逆转、细胞分化、炎症反应和保护细胞免受多种应激的损伤等.本文综述了TCTP的结构、表达调控、生物学功能等研究进展.%The translationally controlled tumour protein (TCTP) is a highly conserved protein and appears to be widely expressed in all eukaryotic organisms. TCTP is a multifunctional protein, including many cellular processes, e.g. Cytoskeleton regulation, cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, tumor reversion, cell differentiation, inflammatory response and protection of cells against various stress conditions. TCTP is also a transcription factor for pluripotency genes Oct4 and Nanog. This review focuses on TCTP expression regulation and its biological functions.

  11. Digestibility and Growth in West African Dwarf Sheep Fed Gliricidia-based Multinutrient Block Supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Aye, P. A.; Adegun, M. K.

    2010-01-01

    Sixty West African Dwarf (WAD) rams aged between 7 - 10 months and mean body weight of 12.6kg were used to study the influence of Gliricidia - based multinutrient blocks (MNBs) as supplement to Panicum maximum and cassava peel feed for 12 weeks using experimental research design. Gliricidia + Poultry manure (GPMNB), Gliricidia + Urea + Poultry manure (GUPMNB) and Gliricidia + Urea (GUMNB) and Panicum - cassava peel (control) were analyzed for proximate composition, mineral content, gross en...

  12. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Michael Reiter; Igor Tsaur; Georg Bartsch; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regu...

  13. Direct astatination of a tumour-binding protein, human epidermal growth factor, using nido-carborane as a prosthetic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for direct astatine labeling of proteins has been investigated. Binding sites for astatine were created by coupling of a nido-carborane derivative to a protein, the human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), using two different conjugation methods - by glutaraldehyde cross-linking or by introduction of sulfohydryl groups by Traut's reagent with subsequent linking of ANC-1 with m-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide ester. The conjugates were astatinated using the Chloramine-T method in high yield. The best labeling was obtained by the glutaraldehyde conjugate with an average yield of 68 ± 9%. In vitro stability tests indicated that the glutaraldehyde conjugated label was as stable as hEGF labeled with astatobenzoate. (author)

  14. Tumours and tumourous diseases; Tumoren, tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, W. (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    This book on tumours and tumourous diseases comprises two parts: 1. Bone tumours and tumourous lesions. 2. Soft tissue tumours and tumourous lesions. Details are presented on pathology, diagnosis, conservative and perioperative therapy, surgical therapy, complications after resection, indicators for amputation, recommendations for follow-up treatment, radiotherapy, radionuclide therapy, alternative therapies, therapy concepts in case of metastases, tissue engineering and plastic surgery. (uke) [German] Der vorliegende Band der Reihe Orthopaedie und orthopaedische Chirurgie behandelt das Thema Tumoren und tumoraehnliche Erkrankungen. Der Band teilt sich in zwei Kapitel: 1. Knochentumoren und tumorartige Laesionen und 2. Weichteiltumoren und tumorartige Laesionen. Dargestellt werden Pathologie, Diagnostik, konservative und perioperative Therapie, chirurgische Therapie, Komplikationen nach Resektion, Indikatoren zur Amputation, Nachsorgeempfehlung, Strahlentherapie, Radionuklidtherapie, alternative Therapieverfahren, Therapiekonzepte bei Metastasen, Tissue Engineering und plastisch-chirurgische Massnahmen. (uke)

  15. Sorafenib inhibits tumor growth and vascularization of rhabdomyosarcoma cells by blocking IGF-1R-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessen Maruwge

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Wessen Maruwge1, Pádraig D’Arcy1, Annika Folin1,2, Slavica Brnjic1, Johan Wejde1, Anthony Davis1, Fredrik Erlandsson3, Jonas Bergh1,2, Bertha Brodin11Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Bayer Pharmaceutical Corporation, SwedenAbstract: The growth of many soft tissue sarcomas is dependent on aberrant growth factor signaling, which promotes their proliferation and motility. With this in mind, we evaluated the effect of sorafenib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on cell growth and apoptosis in sarcoma cell lines of various histological subtypes. We found that sorafenib effectively inhibited cell proliferation in rhabdomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma and Ewing’s sarcoma with IC50 values <5 µM. Sorafenib effectively induced growth arrest in rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which was concurrent with inhibition of Akt and Erk signaling. Studies of ligand-induced phosphorylation of Erk and Akt in rhabdomyosarcoma cells showed that insulin-like growth factor-1 is a potent activator, which can be blocked by treatment with sorafenib. In vivo sorafenib treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts had a significant inhibitory effect on tumor growth, which was associated with inhibited vascularization and enhanced necrosis in the adjacent tumor stroma. Our results demonstrate that in vitro and in vivo growth of rhabdomyosarcoma can be suppressed by treatment with sorafenib, and suggests the possibilities of using sorafenib as a potential adjuvant therapy for the treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma.Keywords: soft tissue sarcoma, kinase inhibitors, targeted therapy, vascularization

  16. Dissecting the Role of Curcumin in Tumour Growth and Angiogenesis in Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bimonte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is considered the most common cancer for women worldwide and it is now the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among females in the world. Since breast cancer is highly resistant to chemotherapy, alternative anticancer strategies have been developed. In particular, many studies have demonstrated that curcumin, a derivative of turmeric, can be used as natural agent in treatment of some types of cancer by playing antiproliferative and antioxidant effects. In our study, we assessed the antitumor activities of curcumin in ER-negative human breast cancer cell line resistant to chemotherapy, MDA.MB231 by in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro data allowed us to demonstrate that curcumin played a role in regulation of proliferation and apoptosis in MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo, by generation of mouse model of breast cancer, we showed that treatment of curcumin inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis. Specifically, we showed that curcumin is able to deregulate the expression of cyclin D1, PECAM-1, and p65, which are regulated by NF-κB. Our data demonstrated that curcumin could be used as an adjuvant agent to chemotherapy in treatment of triple negative breast cancer.

  17. Lymphangiogenesis in malignant tumours: Does it occur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarijs, R; Ruiter, D J; de Waal, R M

    2001-02-01

    The development of a vascular bed is essential for solid tumour growth and metastasis. In many tumours, mean vascular density can be related to the rate of metastasis and, therefore, to prognosis. In other tumour types, such as cutaneous melanoma and head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma, this relation is absent. Until now, the reason for this has been unclear, but since these particular tumour types are also known for their propensity to spread via the lymphatic system, it may be speculated that the presence of a pre-existing lymphatic bed and the formation of new lymphatics (lymphangiogenesis) are important factors. Growth factors involved in lymphangiogenesis during embryogenesis have been recently identified and these are also expressed in many tumour types, but the existence of tumour-induced lymphangiogenesis has not so far been reported. Partly, this could be due to the lack of reliable endothelial markers, thereby hampering a consistent evaluation of lymphatic vasculature. This editorial discusses the role of the lymphatic bed in mediating the metastasis of solid tumours, summarizes known methods to detect lymphatics, and proposes a hypothetical mechanism of tumour-induced lymphangiogenesis. PMID:11180158

  18. Growth of block copolymer stabilized metal nanoparticles probed simultaneously by in situ XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, D; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-01-01

    The growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles from their respective chloride precursors using block copolymer-based reducers has been studied by simultaneous in situ measurement of XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy at the energy-dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS at RRCAT, Indore, India. While the XANES spectra of the precursor give real-time information on the reduction process, the EXAFS spectra reveal the structure of the clusters formed at the intermediate stages of growth. The growth kinetics of both types of nanoparticles are found to be almost similar and are found to follow three stages, though the first stage of nucleation takes place earlier in the case of Au than in the case of Pt nanoparticles due to the difference in the reduction potential of the respective precursors. The first two stages of the growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles as obtained by in situ XAS measurements could be corroborated by simultaneous in situ measurement of UV-Vis spectroscopy also. PMID:26698077

  19. Emodin Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth by Blocking the Tumor-Promoting Feedforward Loop between Cancer Cells and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Hodge, Johnie; Wang, Yuzhen; Yu, Fang; Fan, Daping

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage infiltration correlates with severity in many types of cancer. Tumor cells recruit macrophages and educate them to adopt an M2-like phenotype through the secretion of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP1 and CSF1. Macrophages in turn promote tumor growth through supporting angiogenesis, suppressing antitumor immunity, modulating extracellular matrix remodeling, and promoting tumor cell migration. Thus, tumor cells and macrophages interact to create a feedforward loop supporting tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, we tested the ability of emodin, a Chinese herb-derived compound, to inhibit breast cancer growth in mice and examined the underlying mechanisms. Emodin was used to treat mice bearing EO771 or 4T1 breast tumors. It was shown that emodin attenuated tumor growth by inhibiting macrophage infiltration and M2-like polarization, accompanied by increased T-cell activation and reduced angiogenesis in tumors. The tumor inhibitory effects of emodin were lost in tumor-bearing mice with macrophage depletion. Emodin inhibited IRF4, STAT6, and C/EBPβ signaling and increased inhibitory histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27m3) on the promoters of M2-related genes in tumor-associated macrophages. In addition, emodin inhibited tumor cell secretion of MCP1 and CSF1, as well as expression of surface anchoring molecule Thy-1, thus suppressing macrophage migration toward and adhesion to tumor cells. These results suggest that emodin acts on both breast cancer cells and macrophages and effectively blocks the tumor-promoting feedforward loop between the two cell types, thereby inhibiting breast cancer growth and metastasis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1931-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196773

  20. TLR3 engagement induces IRF-3-dependent apoptosis in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells and inhibits tumour growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambara, Guido; Desideri, Marianna; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Padula, Fabrizio; De Cesaris, Paola; Starace, Donatella; Tubaro, Andrea; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Filippini, Antonio; Ziparo, Elio; Riccioli, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of highly conserved transmembrane proteins expressed in epithelial and immune cells that recognize pathogen associated molecular patterns. Besides their role in immune response against infections, numerous studies have shown an important role of different TLRs in cancer, indicating these receptors as potential targets for cancer therapy. We previously demonstrated that the activation of TLR3 by the synthetic double-stranded RNA analogue poly I:C induces apoptosis of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer (PCa) LNCaP cells and, much less efficiently, of the more aggressive PC3 cell line. Therefore, in this study we selected LNCaP cells to investigate the mechanism of TLR3-mediated apoptosis and the in vivo efficacy of poly I:C-based therapy. We show that interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3) signalling plays an essential role in TLR3-mediated apoptosis in LNCaP cells through the activation of the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Interestingly, hardly any apoptosis was induced by poly I:C in normal prostate epithelial cells RWPE-1. We also demonstrate for the first time the direct anticancer effect of poly I:C as a single therapeutic agent in a well-established human androgen-sensitive PCa xenograft model, by showing that tumour growth is highly impaired in poly I:C-treated immunodeficient mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of PCa xenografts highlights the antitumour role of poly I:C in vivo both on cancer cells and, indirectly, on endothelial cells. Notably, we show the presence of TLR3 and IRF-3 in both human normal and PCa clinical samples, potentially envisaging poly I:C-based therapy for PCa. PMID:25444175

  1. Tumour-stromal interactions: Transforming growth factor-beta isoforms and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor in mammary gland ductal morphogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mammary gland undergoes morphogenesis through the entire reproductive life of mammals. In mice, ductal outgrowth from the nipple across the fat pad results in an intricate, well spaced ductal tree that further ramifies and develops alveolar structures during pregnancy. Ductal morphogenesis is regulated by the concerted action of circulating steroid and polypeptide hormones, and local epithelial-mesenchymal inductive signals. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-3 and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/scatter factor (SF) are important components of this latter signaling pathway. TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 have roles in both promotion and inhibition of branching morphogenesis that are dependent on concentration and context. HGF/SF promotes ductal outgrowth and tubule formation in the mammary gland. These data suggest that these two growth factors have complementary roles in promoting mammary ductal morphogenesis and in maintaining ductal spacing. In addition, TGF-β3 triggers apoptosis in the alveolar epithelia, which is a necessary component of mammary gland involution and return of the ductal structure to a virgin-like state after lactation

  2. ING1 and 5-Azacytidine Act Synergistically to Block Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Satbir Thakur; Xiaolan Feng; Zhong Qiao Shi; Amudha Ganapathy; Manoj Kumar Mishra; Peter Atadja; Don Morris; Karl Riabowol

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins are epigenetic "readers" that recognize trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me3) and target histone acetyl transferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) complexes to chromatin. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we asked whether dysregulating two epigenetic pathways with chemical inhibitors showed synergistic effects on breast cancer cell line killing. We also tested whether ING1 could synergize better with chemotherapeutics that targe...

  3. Small interfering RNA targeted to secretory clusterin blocks tumor growth, motility, and invasion in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohe Niu; Xinhui Li; Bin Hu; Rong Li; Ligang Wang; Lilin Wu; Xingang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Clusterin/apolipoprotein J (Clu) is a ubiquitously expressed secreted heterodimeric glycoprotein that is implicated in several physiological processes.It has been reported that the elevated level of secreted clusterin (sClu) protein is associated with poor survival in breast cancer patients and can induce metastasis in rodent models.In this study,we investigated the effects of sClu inhibition with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) on cell motility,invasion,and growth in vitro and in vivo.MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with pSuper-siRNA/sClu.Cell survival and proliferation were examined by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium and clonogenic survival assay.The results showed that sClu silencing significantly inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells.The invasion and migration ability were also dramatically decreased,which was detected by matrigel assays.TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activity assay demonstrated that sClu silencing also could increase the apoptosis rate of cells,resulting in the inhibition of cell growth.We also determined the effects of sClu silencing on tumor growth and metastatic progression in an orthotopic breast cancer model.The results showed that orthotopic primary tumors derived from MDA-MB-231/pSuper sClu siRNA cells grew significantly slower than tumors derived from parental MDA-MB-231 or MDA-MB-231/pSuper scramble siRNA cells,and metastasize less to the lungs.These data suggest that secretory clusterin plays a significant role in tumor growth and metastatic progression.Knocking-down sClu gene expression may provide a valuable method for breast cancer therapy.

  4. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Mei [Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Institute of Health Sciences and Health School Attached to SJTU-SM, 279 Zhouzhu Road, Shanghai 201318 (China); Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Fang, Chao, E-mail: fangchao100@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Hong-Zhuan, E-mail: hongzhuan_chen@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  5. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC

  6. Ablation of lung tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Gillams, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Radiofrequency, laser, microwave and cryotherapy have all been used for the ablation of lung tumours. However, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and microwave ablation are the most widely used technologies. RFA has been successfully applied to tumour measuring from

  7. A function blocking anti-mouse integrin α5β1 antibody inhibits angiogenesis and impedes tumor growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powers David

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrins are important adhesion molecules that regulate tumor and endothelial cell survival, proliferation and migration. The integrin α5β1 has been shown to play a critical role during angiogenesis. An inhibitor of this integrin, volociximab (M200, inhibits endothelial cell growth and movement in vitro, independent of the growth factor milieu, and inhibits tumor growth in vivo in the rabbit VX2 carcinoma model. Although volociximab has already been tested in open label, pilot phase II clinical trials in melanoma, pancreatic and renal cell cancer, evaluation of the mechanism of action of volociximab has been limited because this antibody does not cross-react with murine α5β1, precluding its use in standard mouse xenograft models. Methods We generated a panel of rat-anti-mouse α5β1 antibodies, with the intent of identifying an antibody that recapitulated the properties of volociximab. Hybridoma clones were screened for analogous function to volociximab, including specificity for α5β1 heterodimer and blocking of integrin binding to fibronectin. A subset of antibodies that met these criteria were further characterized for their capacities to bind to mouse endothelial cells, inhibit cell migration and block angiogenesis in vitro. One antibody that encompassed all of these attributes, 339.1, was selected from this panel and tested in xenograft models. Results A panel of antibodies was characterized for specificity and potency. The affinity of antibody 339.1 for mouse integrin α5β1 was determined to be 0.59 nM, as measured by BIAcore. This antibody does not significantly cross-react with human integrin, however 339.1 inhibits murine endothelial cell migration and tube formation and elicits cell death in these cells (EC50 = 5.3 nM. In multiple xenograft models, 339.1 inhibited the growth of established tumors by 40–60% (p Conclusion The results herein demonstrate that 339.1, like volociximab, exhibits potent anti-α5β1

  8. Squalamine and cisplatin block angiogenesis and growth of human ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Williams, Jon I; Pietras, Richard J

    2002-04-25

    Angiogenesis is important for growth and progression of ovarian cancers. Squalamine is a natural antiangiogenic sterol, and its potential role in treatment of ovarian cancers with or without standard cisplatin chemotherapy was assessed. Since HER-2 gene overexpression is associated with cisplatin resistance in vitro and promotion of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, the response of ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 gene overexpression to squalamine and cisplatin was evaluated both in tumor xenograft models and in tissue culture. Ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 overexpression were grown as subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. Animals were treated by intraperitoneal injection with control vehicle, cisplatin, squalamine or cisplatin combined with squalamine. At the end of the experiment, tumors were assessed for tumor growth inhibition and for changes in microvessel density and apoptosis. Additional in vitro studies evaluated effects of squalamine on tumor and endothelial cell growth and on signaling pathways in human endothelial cells. Profound growth inhibition was elicited by squalamine alone and by combined treatment with squalamine and cisplatin for both parental and HER-2-overexpressing ovarian tumor xenografts. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tumors revealed decreased microvessel density and increased apoptosis. Although HER-2-overexpressing tumors had more angiogenic and less apoptotic activity than parental cancers, growth of both tumor types was similarly suppressed by treatment with squalamine combined with cisplatin. In in vitro studies, we found that squalamine does not directly affect proliferation of ovarian cells. However, squalamine significantly blocked VEGF-induced activation of MAP kinase and cell proliferation in human vascular endothelial cells. The results suggest that squalamine is anti-angiogenic for ovarian cancer xenografts and appears to enhance cytotoxic effects of cisplatin chemotherapy independent of HER-2 tumor status

  9. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  10. Why are epididymal tumours so rare?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Hei Yeung; Kai Wang; Trevor G Cooper

    2012-01-01

    Epididymal tumour incidence is at most 0.03% of all male cancers.It is an enigma why the human epididymis does not often succumb to cancer,when it expresses markers of stem and cancer cells,and constitutively expresses oncogenes,pro-proliferative and pro-angiogenic factors that allow tumour cells to escape immunosurveillance in cancer-prone tissues.The privileged position of the human epididymis in evading tumourigenicity is reflected in transgenic mouse models in which induction of tumours in other organs is not accompanied by epididymal neoplasia.The epididymis appears to:(i) prevent tumour initiation (it probably lacks stem cells and has strong anti-oxidative mechanisms,active tumour suppressors and inactive oncogene products); (ii) foster tumour monitoring and destruction (by strong immuno-surveillance and -eradication,and cellular senescence); (iii) avert proliferation and angiogenesis (with persistent tight junctions,the presence of anti-angiogenic factors and misplaced pro-angiogenic factors),which together (iv) promote dormancy and restrict dividing cells to hyperplasia.Epididymal cells may be rendered non-responsive to oncogenic stimuli by the constitutive expression of factors generally inducible in tumours,and resistant to the normal epididymal environment,which mimics that of a tumour niche promoting tumour growth.The threshold for tumour initiation may thus be higher in the epididymis than in other organs.Several anti-tumour mechanisms are those that maintain spermatozoa quiescent and immunologically silent,so the low incidence of cancer in the epididymis may be a consequence of its role in sperm maturation and storage.Understanding these mechanisms may throw light on cancer prevention and therapy in general.

  11. Blocking rpS6 Phosphorylation Exacerbates Tsc1 Deletion-Induced Kidney Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan; Chen, Jianchun; Xu, Jinxian; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying renal growth and renal growth-induced nephron damage remain poorly understood. Here, we report that in murine models, deletion of the tuberous sclerosis complex protein 1 (Tsc1) in renal proximal tubules induced strikingly enlarged kidneys, with minimal cystogenesis and occasional microscopic tumorigenesis. Signaling studies revealed hyperphosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in activated renal tubules. Notably, knockin of a nonphosphorylatable rpS6 in theseTsc1-mutant mice exacerbated cystogenesis and caused drastic nephron damage and renal fibrosis, leading to kidney failure and a premature death rate of 67% by 9 weeks of age. In contrast,Tsc1single-mutant mice were all alive and had far fewer renal cysts at this age. Mechanistic studies revealed persistent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling causing hyperphosphorylation and consequent accumulation of 4E-BP1, along with greater cell proliferation, in the renal tubules ofTsc1andrpS6double-mutant mice. Furthermore, pharmacologic treatment ofTsc1single-mutant mice with rapamycin reduced hyperphosphorylation and accumulation of 4E-BP1 but also inhibited phosphorylation of rpS6. Rapamycin also exacerbated cystic and fibrotic lesions and impaired kidney function in these mice, consequently leading to a premature death rate of 40% within 2 weeks of treatment, despite destroying tumors and decreasing kidney size. These findings indicate that Tsc1 prevents aberrant renal growth and tumorigenesis by inhibiting mTORC1 signaling, whereas phosphorylated rpS6 suppresses cystogenesis and fibrosis inTsc1-deleted kidneys. PMID:26296742

  12. Tailored nanoparticles for tumour therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Drake, Philip; Cho, Hui-Ju; Kao, Chao-Hung; Lee, Kun-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. PMID:22905580

  13. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun; Fang, Chao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2014-09-22

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:25250884

  14. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  15. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaylani, Samer Z. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Pressey, Joseph G. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  16. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of tyrosinase expressing tumours in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Jan; Jathoul, Amit; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Lythgoe, Mark; Pedley, R. Barbara; Pule, Martin; Beard, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Two human tumour cell lines (K562, 293T) were stably transfected to achieve the genetic expression of tyrosinase, which is involved in the production of the pigment eumelanin. The cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice to form tumour xenografts, which were imaged over a period of up to 26 days using an all-optical photoacoustic imaging system. 3D photoacoustic images of the tumours and the surrounding vasculature were acquired at excitation wavelengths ranging from 600nm to 770nm. The images showed tumour growth and continued tyrosinase expression over the full 26 day duration of the study. These findings were confirmed by histological analysis of excised tumour samples.

  17. Combined MET inhibition and topoisomerase I inhibition block cell growth of small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, Cleo E; Kanteti, Rajani; Surati, Mosmi; Nandi, Suvobroto; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; Yala, Soheil; Tretiakova, Maria; Arif, Qudsia; Hembrough, Todd; Brand, Toni M; Wheeler, Deric L; Husain, Aliya N; Vokes, Everett E; Bharti, Ajit; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a devastating disease, and current therapies have not greatly improved the 5-year survival rates. Topoisomerase (Top) inhibition is a treatment modality for SCLC; however, the response is short lived. Consequently, our research has focused on improving SCLC therapeutics through the identification of novel targets. Previously, we identified MNNG HOS transforming gene (MET) to be overexpressed and functional in SCLC. Herein, we investigated the therapeutic potential of combinatorial targeting of MET using SU11274 and Top1 using 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). MET and TOP1 gene copy numbers and protein expression were determined in 29 patients with limited (n = 11) and extensive (n = 18) disease. MET gene copy number was significantly increased (>6 copies) in extensive disease compared with limited disease (P = 0.015). Similar TOP1 gene copy numbers were detected in limited and extensive disease. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a significantly higher Top1 nuclear expression in extensive (0.93) versus limited (0.15) disease (P = 0.04). Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was detected between MET gene copy number and Top1 nuclear expression (r = 0.5). In vitro stimulation of H82 cells revealed hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced nuclear colocalization of p-MET and Top1. Furthermore, activation of the HGF/MET axis enhanced Top1 activity, which was abrogated by SU11274. Combination of SN-38 with SU11274 dramatically decreased SCLC growth as compared with either drug alone. Collectively, these findings suggest that the combinatorial inhibition of MET and Top1 is a potentially efficacious treatment strategy for SCLC. PMID:24327519

  18. Computerized tomography of fatty tissue tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    34 fatty tissue tumours were diagnosed in the course of 7 040 CT scans, including rare intracranial, intraspinal, intrahepatic and intrarenal localisations. The fatty tissue tumours were examined in respect of position, size, absorption coefficients, marginal structure and relation to the adjacent organs. Growths with density values below -80 HU were safely diagnosed as lipomas. Tumours with density values abow -80 HU will almost always require clarification of diagnosis by surgical means. In some patients, computerized tomography can help to avoid the risks of general narcosis for exploratory laparotomy in cases where the space-occupying growth would otherwise be of a doubtful nature. The three-dimensional extension of the tumour can be demonstrated in all body regions. Computerized tomography supplies information on the infiltration of the liposarcoma into neighbouring organs. Such information has become indispensable for proper planning of surgery and radiotherapy. (orig.)

  19. Primary malignant tumours of the duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, G A; Wilson, J H; Dees, J

    1985-04-01

    The clinical and radiological findings in 19 patients with primary duodenal malignancy are described. Weight loss, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting were the main symptoms. Diagnosis was made by endoscopy or ERCP (71%) or by barium studies (68%). In retrospect the tumour was visible in 97% of the studies. Tumour growth was longitudinal, circular or spiral, the inner curvature being involved over a greater length than the outer curvature. Exophytic tumour growth, involvement of the papilla of Vater, malignant spikes, transient, non-constant tumour image, skip lesions and ulceration were often seen. Mean survival time was 18 months from start of symptoms in 10 inoperable patients, and 24 months in 9 patients undergoing resection. PMID:2986213

  20. Effects of continuous peripheral nerve block by tetrodotoxin on growth associated protein-43 expression during neuropathic pain development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Wang; Xiaoyu Huang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral nerve injury may lead to neuropathic pain and cause a markedly increase expression of growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion, local anesthetics blocking electrical impulse propagation of nerve fibers may also affect the expression of GAP-43 in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of continuous peripheral nerve block by tetrodotoxin before and after nerve injury on GAP-43 expression in the dorsal root ganglion during the development of neuropathic pain.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTINGS: Department of Anesthesiology, the Second Hospital of Xiamen City; Department of Anesthesiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College. MATERIALS: Thirty-five Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 200 - 250 g, were randomly divided into four groups: control group (n =5), simple sciatic nerve transection group (n =10), peripheral nerve block before and after sciatic nerve transection groups (n =10). All the sciatic nerve transection groups were divided into two subgroups according to the different postoperative survival periods: 3 and 7 days (n =5) respectively. Mouse anti-GAP-43 monoclonal antibody (Sigma Co., Ltd.), supervision TM anti-mouse reagent (HRP, Changdao antibody diagnosis reagent Co., Ltd., Shanghai), and HMIAS-100 image analysis system (Qianping Image Engineering Company, Tongji Medical University) were employed in this study. METHODS: This experiment was carried out hi the Department of Surgery and Pathological Laboratory, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College from April 2005 to April 2006.①The animals were anesthetized and the right sciatic nerve was exposed and transected at 1 cm distal to sciatic notch.②Tetrodotoxin 10 μg/kg was injected percutaneously between the greater trochanter and the posterior superior iliac spine of right hind limb to block the sciatic nerve proximally

  1. Oridonin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis through anti-angiogenesis by blocking the Notch signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Dong

    Full Text Available While significant progress has been made in understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects of the natural diterpenoid component Oridonin on tumor cells, little is known about its effect on tumor angiogenesis or metastasis and on the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, Oridonin significantly suppressed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs proliferation, migration, and apillary-like structure formation in vitro. Using aortic ring assay and mouse corneal angiogenesis model, we found that Oridonin inhibited angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo. In our animal experiments, Oridonin impeded tumor growth and metastasis. Immunohistochemistry analysis further revealed that the expression of CD31 and vWF protein in xenografts was remarkably decreased by the Oridonin. Furthermore, Oridonin reinforced endothelial cell-cell junction and impaired breast cancer cell transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, Oridonin not only down-regulated Jagged2 expression and Notch1 activity but also decreased the expression of their target genes. In conclusion, our results demonstrated an original role of Oridonin in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and propose a mechanism. This study also provides new evidence supporting the central role of Notch in tumor angiogenesis and suggests that Oridonin could be a potential drug candidate for angiogenesis related diseases.

  2. Somatostatin analogue treatment of neuroendocrine tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    de Herder, W. W.; van der Lely, A.J.; Lamberts, S. W.

    1996-01-01

    The long-acting analogues of somatostatin have an established place in the medical treatment of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. They act through binding with specific, high-affinity membrane receptors. Somatostatin analogue therapy is an effective and safe treatment for most growth hormone and thyrothropin-secreting pituitary adenomas. The potential therapeutic consequences of the presence of somatostatin receptors on clinically 'nonfunctioning' pituitary tumours are still uncertain. So...

  3. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  4. Brain tumour stem cells: the undercurrents of human brain cancer and their relationship to neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dirks, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    Conceptual and technical advances in neural stem cell biology are being applied to the study of human brain tumours. These studies suggest that human brain tumours are organized as a hierarchy and are maintained by a small number of tumour cells that have stem cell properties. Most of the bulk population of human brain tumours comprise cells that have lost the ability to initiate and maintain tumour growth. Although the cell of origin for human brain tumours is uncertain, recent evidence poin...

  5. Prograde and retrograde growth of monazite in migmatites:An example from the Nagercoil Block, southern India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tim E. Johnson; Chris Clark; Richard J.M. Taylor; M. Santosh; Alan S. Collins

    2015-01-01

    Data from a migmatised metapelite raft enclosed within charnockite provide quantitative constraints on the pressureetemperatureetime (PeTet) evolution of the Nagercoil Block at the southernmost tip of peninsular India. An inferred peak metamorphic assemblage of garnet, K-feldspar, sillimanite, plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, spinel and melt is consistent with peak metamorphic pressures of 6e8 kbar and temperatures in excess of 900 ?C. Subsequent growth of cordierite and biotite record high-temperature retrograde decompression to around 5 kbar and 800 ?C. SHRIMP UePb dating of magmatic zircon cores suggests that the sedimentary protoliths were in part derived from felsic igneous rocks with Palae-oproterozoic crystallisation ages. New growth of metamorphic zircon on the rims of detrital grains con-strains the onset of melt crystallisation, and the minimum age of the metamorphic peak, to around 560 Ma. The data suggest two stages of monazite growth. The first generation of REE-enriched monazite grew during partial melting along the prograde path at around 570 Ma via the incongruent breakdown of apatite. Relatively REE-depleted rims, which have a pronounced negative europium anomaly, grew during melt crystallisation along the retrograde path at around 535 Ma. Our data show the rocks remained at suprasolidus temperatures for at least 35 million years and probably much longer, supporting a long-lived high-grade metamorphic history. The metamorphic conditions, timing and duration of the implied clockwise PeTet path are similar to that previously established for other regions in peninsular India during the Ediacaran to Cambrian assembly of that part of the Gondwanan supercontinent.

  6. Tumours and tumour mimics in the olecranon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesions in the olecranon are rare and may be identified during the investigation of a clinically suspected abnormality or as an incidental finding. This review describes the spectrum of tumours and tumour-like lesions that can involve the olecranon and illustrates the radiographic, CT, and MRI appearances that may facilitate diagnosis. A variety of pathological processes affecting the olecranon are presented and discussed including the epidemiology and imaging features

  7. Radiolabelled somatostatin analogs for radionuclide therapy of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    first peptide evaluated was somatostatin. To date five somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst1-sst5) have been identified and cloned. The stabilized somatostatin analogue octreotide binds with high affinity to subtypes sst2 and sst5. The diagnostic accuracy of In-111-labeled octreotide to visualize tumour lesions after intravenous injection has been determined in large series of patients with sst2-positive, mostly neuroendocrine tumours. Most interesting is the recent application of somatostatin analogues in PET, after labelling with positron emitters. As soon as the success of peptide receptor scintigraphy for tumour visualization became clear, the next logical step was to try to label these peptides with therapeutic radionuclides and to treat receptor-positive tumours with peptide receptor radionuclides. So far, Y-90, emitting beta-particles with a high maximum energy (2.27 MeV), and Lu-177, emitting beta-particles with a lower maximum energy (0.5 MeV) and gamma radiation suitable for scintigraphy, are the most frequently used radionuclides in PRRT. The second generation somatostatin analogue DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide can form a stable complex with Y-90. In rats with subcutaneous CA20948 pancreatic tumours, Y-90-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide effectively controlled tumour growth. Studies to determine the therapeutic efficacy of Y-90-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide in cancer patients are ongoing at various institutions in Basel, Milan, Brussels and Rotterdam and show most promising rates of complete plus partial remissions. The new somatostatin analogue Tyr3-octreotate has an increased affinity for sst2 compared to octreotide and Tyr3-octreotide. Lu-177-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate has proved very successful in achieving tumour regression in animal models. Patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, known to be resistant to external beam radiation, were treated with 3?4 administrations of 200 mCi (7.4 GBq) Lu-177-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate in our hospital. Three months after the final

  8. Perinatal tumours: the contribution of radiology to management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoghue, Veronica; Ryan, Stephanie; Twomey, Eilish [Children' s University Hospital, Radiology Department, Dublin (Ireland)

    2008-06-15

    A formal classification does not exist and they are probably best classified by their location. Overall the most common neoplasms are - Extracranial teratoma - Neuroblastoma - Soft-tissue tumours - Brain tumours - Leukaemia - Renal tumours - Liver tumours - Retinoblastoma. The prognosis is generally poor, although there are some exceptions such as congenital neuroblastoma and hepatoblastoma. These tumours have a tendency to regress and have a benign clinical course despite a clear malignant histological picture. Other tumours, though histologically benign, may be fatal because of their size and location. Large benign masses may cause airway or cardiovascular compromise and death. Others may cause significant mass effect preventing normal organ development. As normal embryonic cells have a high mitotic rate it is not surprising that perinatal tumours may have a rapid growth rate and become enormous in size. (orig.)

  9. Transforming growth factor-β1 blocks the enhancement of tumor necrosis factor cytotoxicity by hyaluronidase Hyal-2 in L929 fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Nan-Shan

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Functional antagonism between transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and hyaluronidase has been demonstrated. For example, testicular hyaluronidase PH-20 counteracts TGF-β1-mediated growth inhibition of epithelial cells. PH-20 sensitizes various cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) cytotoxicity by upregulating proapoptotic p53 and WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WOX1). TGF-β1 blocks PH-20-increased TNF cytotoxicity. In the present study, the functional antagon...

  10. Development of a Universal Chain-Growth Polymerization Protocol of Conjugated Polymers: Toward a Variety of All-Conjugated Block-Copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Verswyvel, Michiel; VERSTAPPEN, Pieter; De Cremer, Lieven; Verbiest, Thierry; Koeckelberghs, Guy

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript reports a universal chain-growth polymerization protocol for conjugated polymers. Herein, the Pd-based catalyst moiety dissociates from the growing active center into the solution and therefore, the controlled chain-growth character is not relying on any specific, system-related complexation, as is the case in polymerization methods reported before. This makes the protocol applicable on a broad range of monomers and, furthermore, also allows an easy one-pot synthesis of block-...

  11. Radioimmunoassay for the measurement of tumour markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time, the new concept of tumour markers (TM) includes not only the ''classical'' secretion products bu also all changes (immunological, biochemical, morphological, antigenic, etc.) which the cell undergoes throughout the transformation process. With the use of isotopic methods we can determine some tumour markers in biological fluids which are useful in clinical practice (preferentially in the follow-up of cancer patients undergoing treatment). Nevertheless, with the new concept to TM, we can also determine other new substances in tumour specimens, prior to any treatment, which can help in the early characterization of the tumour (tissular markers) related to hormone dependence, aggressiveness, drug resistance, free survival interval, etc. The isotopic methods allow us to determine hormone receptors (e.g. oestrogen, androgen, progesterone receptors), growth factor receptors (e.g. epidermal, insulin-like, platelet derived), changes in oncogenes and anti-oncogenes (amplifications, mutations, deletions, overexpression, etc.) oncogene and anti-oncogene products (neu, p53, Rb protein, etc.), proteinases (cathepsins, collagenases, etc.), proteinase inhibitors, some biochemical changes of the different components of cell surface, proteins related to drug resistance and to cell proliferation, etc. In conclusion, the new concept of tumour marker includes all aspects of tumours cells and requires an intercollaborative and co-ordinated study to determine early on the behaviour (characterization) of a tumour and to provide the oncologist with ''real'' information. (author). 26 refs, 6 figs, 8 tabs

  12. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopeptidase 2, an effector protein, which plays a role in endothelial cell growth. Overexpression of the domain in mouse endothelial MSS31 cells reduced DNA synthesis, and the corresponding synthetic peptide (named NBD) indeed interacted with S100A4 and inhibited capillary formation in vitro and new blood vessel formation in vivo. Intriguingly, a single intra-tumor administration of the NBD peptide in human prostate cancer xenografts significantly reduced vascularity, resulting in tumor regression. Mechanistically, the NBD peptide enhanced assembly of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments along with Ser1943 phosphorylation, stimulated formation of focal adhesions without phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, and provoked G1/S arrest of the cell cycle. Altogether, the NBD peptide is a potent inhibitor for tumor angiogenesis, and is the first example of an anticancer peptide drug developed on the basis of an endothelial S100A4-targeted strategy. PMID:26029719

  13. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshingkar S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT is a biologically controversial entity that was originally described as non-neoplastic lesion in the lungs and designated initially as inflammatory pseudotumour. The lesion has recently been recognized to occur at various sites but rarely affects head and neck region. Controversies still exist regarding its reactive versus neoplastic nature. The lesion has a potential for recurrence, persistent local growth, progression to frank sarcoma and metastasis. Hence IMT can best be regarded as a low-grade sarcoma. A case of a 30-year-old female with swelling in the right maxilla and associated ophthalmic manifestations is discussed here. Contribution of immunohistochemistry for diagnosis of IMT is emphasized. Additional cytogenetic studies of this highly enigmatic and minimally studied tumour are warranted.

  14. Sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Elephantopus scaber L. inhibits human lymphocyte proliferation and the growth of tumour cell lines and induces apoptosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, B S; Nair, Mangalam S; Latha, P G; Remani, P

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to isolate the compounds responsible for the cytotoxic properties of South Indian Elephantopus scaber L. and further investigate their effects on quiescent and proliferating cells. Bioassay-guided isolation of the whole plant of chloroform extract of South Indian Elephantopus scaber afforded the known sesquiterpene lactone, deoxyelephantopin, and isodeoxyelephantopin whose structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. These compounds caused a dose dependent reduction in the viability of L-929 tumour cells in 72 h culture (IC(50) value of 2.7 μg/mL and 3.3 μg/mL) by the cell viability assay. Both the compounds act selectively on quiescent and PHA-stimulated proliferating human lymphocytes and inhibited tritiated thymidine incorporation into cellular DNA of DLA tumour cells. The compound deoxyelephantopin at a concentration of 3 μg/mL caused maximum apoptotic cells. It also exhibited significant in vivo antitumour efficacy against DLA tumour cells. The results, therefore, indicate that the antiproliferative property of deoxyelephantopin and isodeoxyelephantopin could be used in regimens for treating tumors with extensive proliferative potencies. PMID:22500104

  15. Sesquiterpene Lactones Isolated from Elephantopus scaber L. Inhibits Human Lymphocyte Proliferation and the Growth of Tumour Cell Lines and Induces Apoptosis In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to isolate the compounds responsible for the cytotoxic properties of South Indian Elephantopus scaber L. and further investigate their effects on quiescent and proliferating cells. Bioassay-guided isolation of the whole plant of chloroform extract of South Indian Elephantopus scaber afforded the known sesquiterpene lactone, deoxyelephantopin, and isodeoxyelephantopin whose structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. These compounds caused a dose dependent reduction in the viability of L-929 tumour cells in 72 h culture (IC50 value of 2.7 μg/mL and 3.3 μg/mL by the cell viability assay. Both the compounds act selectively on quiescent and PHA-stimulated proliferating human lymphocytes and inhibited tritiated thymidine incorporation into cellular DNA of DLA tumour cells. The compound deoxyelephantopin at a concentration of 3 μg/mL caused maximum apoptotic cells. It also exhibited significant in vivo antitumour efficacy against DLA tumour cells. The results, therefore, indicate that the antiproliferative property of deoxyelephantopin and isodeoxyelephantopin could be used in regimens for treating tumors with extensive proliferative potencies.

  16. The siRNA cocktail targeting interleukin 10 receptor and transforming growth factor-β receptor on dendritic cells potentiates tumour antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Y-H; Hong, S-O; Kim, J H; Noh, K H; Song, K-H; Lee, Y-H; Jeon, J-H; Kim, D-W; Seo, J H; Kim, T W

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are promising therapeutic agents in the field of cancer immunotherapy due to their intrinsic immune-priming capacity. The potency of DCs, however, is readily attenuated immediately after their administration in patients as tumours and various immune cells, including DCs, produce various immunosuppressive factors such as interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β that hamper the function of DCs. In this study, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to silence the expression of endogenous molecules in DCs, which can sense immunosuppressive factors. Among the siRNAs targeting various immunosuppressive molecules, we observed that DCs transfected with siRNA targeting IL-10 receptor alpha (siIL-10RA) initiated the strongest antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell immune responses. The potency of siIL-10RA was enhanced further by combining it with siRNA targeting TGF-β receptor (siTGF-βR), which was the next best option during the screening of this study, or the previously selected immunoadjuvant siRNA targeting phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) or Bcl-2-like protein 11 (BIM). In the midst of sorting out the siRNA cocktails, the cocktail of siIL-10RA and siTGF-βR generated the strongest antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell immunity. Concordantly, the knock-down of both IL-10RA and TGF-βR in DCs induced the strongest anti-tumour effects in the TC-1 P0 tumour model, a cervical cancer model expressing the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 E7 antigen, and even in the immune-resistant TC-1 (P3) tumour model that secretes more IL-10 and TGF-β than the parental tumour cells (TC-1 P0). These results provide the groundwork for future clinical development of the siRNA cocktail-mediated strategy by co-targeting immunosuppressive molecules to enhance the potency of DC-based vaccines. PMID:25753156

  17. Chronic anaemia, hyperbaric oxygen and tumour radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormack, M.; Nias, A.H.W.; Smith, Eileen (Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (UK). Richard Dimbleby Research Lab.)

    1990-10-01

    The present study examined the relationship between anaemia and tumour response to radiation given in air or HPO in C{sub 3}H mice transplanted with a mammary adenocarcinoma using a growth delay assay to assess radiation response. Radiation studies with these anaemic mice demonstrated that the tumour radiosensitivity was decreased when treatment was given in air. HPO was successful in overcoming the increased radioresistance associated with anaemia. This result suggested that tumours grown in anaemic mice have a higher hypoxic fraction than those grown in control mice. Changes in host physiology with chronic anaemia may contribute to the benefit seen with HPO but such alterations per se may be inadequate to maintain tumour oxygenation when treatment is given in air. (author).

  18. Radiation biology of human tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation response of human tumour xenografts can be measured with sufficient accuracy using cell survival in vitro and tumour growth delay in vivo as endpoints. There is evidence that radiation response of xenografts mirrors clinical radioresponsiveness of corresponding tumours in patients. Thus xenografts may have a significant potential in experimental radiotherapeutic research, e.g. in development of in vitro and in vivo predictive assays of clinical radioresponsiveness. There are at least three main disadvantages with xenografts as models for human cancer. Firstly, volume doubling time is usually shorter for xenografts than for tumours in patients. Secondly, the haematological system and vascular network of xenografts originate from the host. Thirdly, host defence mechanisms may be active against xenografts. These disadvantages may limit the usefulness of xenografts as models for human cancer in some types of radiobiological studies. (author)

  19. The role of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the treatment of cancer Cachexia and tumour growth in patients with malignant diseases: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Symington

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show that ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have the capacity to modulate cancer outcomes. The body responds to cancer in the same way that it responds to inflammation and wound healing. Nutrients with anti-inflammatory effects could therefore be expected to play a role in cancer treatment. This review focuses on the role of ω-3 PUFAs in tumourigenesis and cancer cachexia. Studies indicate that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA supplementation may promote arrest of tumour growth and reduce cell proliferation. Patients need to consume at least 2 g of EPA per day for it to have a therapeutic effect. Positive outcomes related to cachexia include diminished weight loss, increased appetite, improved quality of life and prolonged survival, although there is controversy regarding these clinical outcomes. The effects of ω-3 PUFAs on tumourigenesis and cachexia are viewed in the context of altered lipid and protein metabolism. This altered metabolism usually experienced by cancer patients results in increased formation of proinflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines. Cytokines play an indirect role by stimulating the production of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids, which support inflammation, cell proliferation and angiogenesis, and inhibit apoptosis. It can be concluded that ω-3 PUFA supplementation offers a means of augmenting cancer therapy, inhibiting tumourigenesis and possibly contributing to cachexia alleviation. Opsomming Onlangse studies toon dat ω-3-poli-onversadigde vetsure (POVSe oor die vermoë beskik om kankeruitkomste te moduleer. Die liggaam reageer op kanker op dieselfde wyse as wat dit op inflammasie en wondgenesing reageer. Daar kan dus verwag word dat voedingstowwe met ‘n anti-inflammatoriese uitwerking ‘n rol in die behandeling van kanker kan speel. In hierdie oorsig word daar op die rol van ω-3-POVSe in tumorigenese en kankerkageksie gefokus. Studies dui daarop dat eikosapentanoënsuur- (EPS

  20. Oxidative stress, polarization of macrophages and tumour angiogenesis: Efficacy of caffeic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oršolić, Nada; Kunštić, Martina; Kukolj, Marina; Gračan, Romana; Nemrava, Johann

    2016-08-25

    Macrophage polarization is a process when macrophage expresses different functional programs in response to microenvironmental signals and two extreme forms exist; M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 macrophages are highly microbicidal and anticancer with enhanced ability to kill and phagocytose pathogens, upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive molecular species, and present antigens; M2 macrophages and the related tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) regulate tissue remodelling and promote tissue repair and angiogenesis and can amplification of metabolic pathways that can suppress adaptive immune responses. It is demonstrated that ROS production, critical for the activation and functions of M1 macrophages, is necessary for the differentiation of M2 macrophages and TAMs, and that antioxidant therapy blocks TAMs differentiation and tumorigenesis in mouse models of cancer. In order to study how caffeic acid (CA), a natural antioxidant, affects macrophage function, polarization, angiogenesis and tumour growth we injected mice with Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells and treated them for 10 days with CA in a dose of 40 and/or 80 mg kg(-1.) Macrophage polarization was further characterized by quantifying secreted pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide and arginase 1 activity. CA may increase the cytotoxic actions of M1 macrophages and inhibit tumour growth; inhibitory activity on TAMs may be mediated through its antioxidative activity. Taken together, we conclude that the antitumour activity of CA was the result of the synergistic activities of different mechanisms by which CA acts on proliferation, angiogenesis, immunomodulation and survival. The continuous administration of CA efficiently blocked the occurrence of TAMs and markedly suppressed tumorigenesis in mouse cancer models. Targeting TAMs by antioxidants can be a potentially effective method for cancer treatment. PMID:27378625

  1. Interaction between three subpopulations of Ehrlich carcinoma in mixed solid tumours in nude mice: evidence of contact domination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, K; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1994-01-01

    Clonal interaction between three subpopulations of Ehrlich carcinoma were studied during growth as mixed solid tumours and as ascites tumours in immune-incompetent nude NMRI mice. The tumour cell lines differed in DNA content as determined by DNA flow cytometry (FCM). Tumour growth was evaluated ...... line had no dominating effect on the E1.15 or E1.95. It is concluded that non-immunologically mediated cellular dominance in heterogeneous tumours may contribute to the evolution of these tumours and may be involved in fundamental tumour biological phenomena....

  2. Therapy for minimal residual tumour disease: beta-galactosylceramide inhibits growth of recurrent HPV16-associated neoplasms after surgery and chemotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šímová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Mikyšková, Romana; Bubeník, Jan; Reiniš, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 12 (2010), s. 2997-3004. ISSN 0020-7136 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/06/0774; GA AV ČR IAA500520807; GA ČR GA301/07/1410; GA ČR GA301/09/1024 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : beta-galactosylceramide * tumour immunotherapy * NKT cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.926, year: 2010

  3. Blocking the NOTCH pathway can inhibit the growth of CD133-positive A549 cells and sensitize to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juntao; Mao, Zhangfan; Huang, Jie; Xie, Songping; Liu, Tianshu; Mao, Zhifu, E-mail: 48151660@qq.com

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Notch signaling pathway members are expressed lower levels in CD133+ cells. • CD133+ cells are not as sensitive as CD133− cells to chemotherapy. • GSI could inhibit the growth of both CD133+ and CD133− cells. • Blockade of Notch signaling pathway enhanced the effect of chemotherapy with CDDP. • DAPT/CDDP co-therapy caused G2/M arrest and elimination in CD133+ cells. - Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to play an important role in tumor growth and recurrence. These cells exhibit self-renewal and proliferation properties. CSCs also exhibit significant drug resistance compared with normal tumor cells. Finding new treatments that target CSCs could significantly enhance the effect of chemotherapy and improve patient survival. Notch signaling is known to regulate the development of the lungs by controlling the cell-fate determination of normal stem cells. In this study, we isolated CSCs from the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. CD133 was used as a stem cell marker for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We compared the expression of Notch signaling in both CD133+ and CD133− cells and blocked Notch signaling using the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT (GSI-IX). The effect of combining GSI and cisplatin (CDDP) was also examined in these two types of cells. We observed that both CD133+ and CD133− cells proliferated at similar rates, but the cells exhibited distinctive differences in cell cycle progression. Few CD133+ cells were observed in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and there were half as many cells in S phase compared with the CD133− cells. Furthermore, CD133+ cells exhibited significant resistance to chemotherapy when treated with CDDP. The expression of Notch signaling pathway members, such as Notch1, Notch2 and Hes1, was lower in CD133+ cells. GSI slightly inhibited the proliferation of both cell types and exhibited little effect on the cell cycle. The inhibitory effects of DPP on these two types of cells were

  4. Blocking the NOTCH pathway can inhibit the growth of CD133-positive A549 cells and sensitize to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Notch signaling pathway members are expressed lower levels in CD133+ cells. • CD133+ cells are not as sensitive as CD133− cells to chemotherapy. • GSI could inhibit the growth of both CD133+ and CD133− cells. • Blockade of Notch signaling pathway enhanced the effect of chemotherapy with CDDP. • DAPT/CDDP co-therapy caused G2/M arrest and elimination in CD133+ cells. - Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to play an important role in tumor growth and recurrence. These cells exhibit self-renewal and proliferation properties. CSCs also exhibit significant drug resistance compared with normal tumor cells. Finding new treatments that target CSCs could significantly enhance the effect of chemotherapy and improve patient survival. Notch signaling is known to regulate the development of the lungs by controlling the cell-fate determination of normal stem cells. In this study, we isolated CSCs from the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. CD133 was used as a stem cell marker for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We compared the expression of Notch signaling in both CD133+ and CD133− cells and blocked Notch signaling using the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT (GSI-IX). The effect of combining GSI and cisplatin (CDDP) was also examined in these two types of cells. We observed that both CD133+ and CD133− cells proliferated at similar rates, but the cells exhibited distinctive differences in cell cycle progression. Few CD133+ cells were observed in the G2/M phase, and there were half as many cells in S phase compared with the CD133− cells. Furthermore, CD133+ cells exhibited significant resistance to chemotherapy when treated with CDDP. The expression of Notch signaling pathway members, such as Notch1, Notch2 and Hes1, was lower in CD133+ cells. GSI slightly inhibited the proliferation of both cell types and exhibited little effect on the cell cycle. The inhibitory effects of DPP on these two types of cells were enhanced

  5. Hypoxia-mediated tumour targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binley, K; Askham, Z; Martin, L; Spearman, H; Day, D; Kingsman, S; Naylor, S

    2003-04-01

    Hypoxia is a common physiological feature of tumours. It activates a signalling cascade that culminates in the stabilization of the HIF-1 transcription factor and activation of genes that possess a hypoxia response element (HRE). We have used an optimized hypoxia responsive promoter (OBHRE) to investigate hypoxia-targeted gene expression in vivo in the context of an adenovirus vector. The OBHRE promoter showed limited activity in the liver or spleen such that expression was 1000-fold lower than that driven by the strong CMV/IE promoter. However, in the context of the tumour microenvironment, the OBHRE promoter achieved expression levels comparable to that of the CMV/IE promoter. Next, we showed that an adenovirus expressing the human cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6) regulated by the OBHRE promoter delays tumour growth in response to the prodrug cyclophosphamide (CPA). Finally, we exploited the hepatotropism of adenovirus to investigate whether the OBHRE promoter could mitigate the hepatotoxicity of a recombinant adenovirus expressing thymidine kinase (TK) in the context of the prodrug ganciclovir (GCV). High-dose Ad.CMVTK/GCV treatment caused significant liver necrosis whereas the same dose of Ad.HRETK was well tolerated. These in vivo data demonstrate that hypoxia-targeted gene expression via the OBHRE promoter can be used to increase the therapeutic window of cytotoxic cancer gene therapy. PMID:12646859

  6. Dexamethasone and radiation response in the Lewis lung tumour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of dexamethasone on the radiation response of Lewis lung tumour growth in the gastronemius muscle of mice was studied. The log average tumour volume/time curve did not show any significant difference in radiation response between the mice given dexamethasone and the mice not given the drug. (UK)

  7. Electrochemotherapy of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemotherapy consists of chemotherapy followed by local application of electric pulses to the tumour to increase drug delivery into cells. Drug uptake can be increased by electroporation for only those drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, only bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical trials. In vitro studies demonstrated several fold increase of their cytotoxicity after electroporation of cells. In vivo, electroporation of tumours after local or systemic administration of either of the drugs, i.e. electrochemotherapy, proved to be an effective antitumour treatment. In preclinical studies on several tumour models, electrochemotherapy either with bleomycin or cisplatin was elaborated and parameters for effective local tumour control were determined. In veterinary medicine, electrochemotherapy also proved to be effective in the treatment of primary tumours in cats, dogs and horses. In human clinical studies, electrochemotherapy was performed on the patients with progressive disease and accessible tumour nodules of different malignancies. All clinical studies demonstrated that electrochemotherapy is an effective treatment for local tumour control in cancer patients. (author)

  8. [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551}, a new Affibody conjugate for visualization of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor expression in malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, Anna; Varasteh, Zohreh [Uppsala University, Preclinical PET Platform, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Uppsala (Sweden); Hofstroem, Camilla; Graeslund, Torbjoern [Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Molecular Biotechnology, School of Biotechnology, Stockholm (Sweden); Strand, Joanna [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Sandstrom, Mattias [Uppsala University Hospital, Medical Physics, Department of Oncology, Uppsala (Sweden); Andersson, Karl [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Ridgeview Instruments AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tolmachev, Vladimir [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-03-15

    Radionuclide imaging of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) expression in tumours might be used for selection of patients who would benefit from IGF-1R-targeted therapy. We have previously shown the feasibility of IGF-1R imaging using the Affibody molecule {sup 111}In-DOTA-His{sub 6}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551}. The use of {sup 99m}Tc instead of {sup 111}In should improve sensitivity and resolution of imaging, and reduce the dose burden to patients. We hypothesized that inclusion of a HEHEHE tag instead of a His{sub 6} tag in Z{sub IGF1R:4551} would permit its convenient purification using IMAC, enable labelling with [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}, and improve its biodistribution. Z{sub IGF1R:4551} was expressed with a HEHEHE tag in the N terminus. The resulting (HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} construct was labelled with [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}. Targeting of IGF-1R-expressing cells using [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. (HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} was stably labelled with {sup 99m}Tc with preserved specific binding to IGF-1R-expressing DU-145 prostate cancer cells in vitro. In mice, [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} accumulated in IGF-1R-expressing organs (pancreas, stomach, lung and salivary gland). [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} demonstrated 3.6-fold lower accumulation in the liver and spleen than {sup 111}In-DOTA-Z{sub IGF1R:4551}. In NMRI nu/nu mice with DU-145 prostate cancer xenografts, the tumour uptake was 1.32 {+-} 0.11 %ID/g and the tumour-to-blood ratio was 4.4 {+-} 0.3 at 8 h after injection. The xenografts were visualized using a gamma camera 6 h after injection. [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +}-(HE){sub 3}-Z{sub IGF1R:4551} is a promising candidate for visualization of IGF-1R expression in malignant tumours. (orig.)

  9. Characterization of Inhibitory Anti-insulin-like Growth Factor Receptor Antibodies with Different Epitope Specificity and Ligand-blocking Properties: IMPLICATIONS FOR MECHANISM OF ACTION IN VIVOS⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Doern, Adam; Cao, Xianjun; Sereno, Arlene; Reyes, Christopher L.; Altshuler, Angelina; Huang, Flora; Hession, Cathy; Flavier, Albert; Favis, Michael; Tran, Hon; Ailor, Eric; Levesque, Melissa; MURPHY, TRACEY; Berquist, Lisa; Tamraz, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies directed against the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have recently gained significant momentum in the clinic because of preliminary data generated in human patients with cancer. These antibodies inhibit ligand-mediated activation of IGF-1R and the resulting down-stream signaling cascade. Here we generated a panel of antibodies against IGF-1R and screened them for their ability to block the binding of both IGF-1 and IGF-2 at es...

  10. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The c...

  11. Effect of urea-molasses-mineral block lick on the growth performance of caracows kept on themeda pasture of central Luzon during the wet season

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unimproved Themeda pastures of Central Luzon can only sustain the normal growth of caracows during the wet season. They are only sufficient to maintain body weight. Supplementation of carabaos grazing on native pasture with rice bran/damaged palay at the rate of 0.5% of body weight gave a better response in growth and weight gain, which was attributed to increased dry-matter intake, but the response appears inadequate. Further supplementation with urea-molasses-mineral block lick induces maximum responses in terms of liveweight gain. (author)

  12. Cranial irradiation for cerebral and nasopharyngeal tumours in children: evidence for the production of a hypothalmic defect in growth hormone release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A synthetic 29-amino acid analogue of human pancreatic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH(1-29)NH2) has recently been shown to stimulate the release of GH in normal subjects. The authors have studied the GH reponse to GHRH(1-29)NH2 in nine children irradiated for brain and nasopharyngeal tumours, who were not growing and were deficient in GH as assessed by insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. Serum GH rose in response to GHRH(1-29)NH2 in all the children, and in five the peak serum GH response was > 20 mu./1. The data suggest that when hypothalamo-pituitary irradiation results in GH deficiency, this is due to a failure of the synthesis or delivery of endogenous GHRH from the hypothalamus to the pituitary cells. It also suggests that it may be possible to treat such children using synthetic GHRH in place of exogenous GH. (author)

  13. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, ameliorates interleukin 2-induced capillary leakage and reduces tumour growth in adenocarcinoma-bearing mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Orucevic, A.; P. K. Lala

    1996-01-01

    We tested whether NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, can prevent interleukin 2 (IL-2)-induced capillary leakage in tumour-bearing mice without compromising the therapeutic benefits of IL-2. C3H/HeJ female mice transplanted s.c. with 2.5 x 10(5) C3-L5 mammary carcinoma cells were treated with: nothing, IL-2 (ten injections of 15,000 Cetus units i.p. every 8 h), L-NAME (0.1, 0.5, or 1 mg ml-1 drinking water), IL-2 + L-NAME (0.1 or 0.5 or 1 mg...

  14. Cardiac tumours in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tumours in infancy are rare and are mostly benign with rhabdomyomas, fibromas and teratomas accounting for the majority. The presentation depends on size and location of the mass as they tend to cause cavity obstruction or arrhythmias. Most rhabdomyomas tend to regress spontaneously but fibromas and teratomas generally require surgical intervention for severe haemodynamic or arrhythmic complications. Other relatively rare cardiac tumours too are discussed along with an Indian perspect...

  15. The natural history of disappearing bone tumours and tumour-like conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe 27 cases of bone tumours or tumour-like lesions where there was spontaneous regression. The follow-up period was 2.8-16.7 years (average, 7.0 years). Fourteen of these cases were no longer visible on plain radiographs. Histological diagnosis included exostosis, eosinophilic granuloma, fibrous dysplasia, fibrous cortical defect, non-ossifying fibroma, osteoid osteoma and bone island. Most cases began to reduce in adolescence or earlier, although sclerotic type lesions showed their regression in older patients. All lesions thought to be eosinophilic granuloma began to regress after periods of less than 3 months, while the duration of the other lesions showed wide variation (1-74 months). As resolution of the lesions took between 2 and 79 months (mean, 25.0 ± 20.3 months) we consider that the most likely mechanism was recovery of normal skeletal growth control. In exostosis with fracture, alteration of vascular supply may contribute to growth arrest, but not to subsequent remodelling stage. In inflammatory-related lesions such as eosinophilic granuloma, cessation of inflammation may be the mechanism of growth arrest, whilst temporary inflammation may stimulate osteogenic cells engaged in remodeling. In the sclerotic type, growth arrest is a less probable mechanism. Necrosis within the tumour and/or local changes in hormonal control, plus remodelling of the sclerotic area takes longer. Knowledge of the potential for spontaneous resolution may help in management of these tumour and tumour-like lesions of bone. Yanagawa, T. et al. (2001)

  16. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonise a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, Canine Transmissible Venereal Tumour (CTVT) that spreads among dogs and Devil Facial Tumour Disease (D...

  17. An imaging-based computational model for simulating angiogenesis and tumour oxygenation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-05-21

    Tumour growth, angiogenesis and oxygenation vary substantially among tumours and significantly impact their treatment outcome. Imaging provides a unique means of investigating these tumour-specific characteristics. Here we propose a computational model to simulate tumour-specific oxygenation changes based on the molecular imaging data. Tumour oxygenation in the model is reflected by the perfused vessel density. Tumour growth depends on its doubling time (T d) and the imaged proliferation. Perfused vessel density recruitment rate depends on the perfused vessel density around the tumour (sMVDtissue) and the maximum VEGF concentration for complete vessel dysfunctionality (VEGFmax). The model parameters were benchmarked to reproduce the dynamics of tumour oxygenation over its entire lifecycle, which is the most challenging test. Tumour oxygenation dynamics were quantified using the peak pO2 (pO2peak) and the time to peak pO2 (t peak). Sensitivity of tumour oxygenation to model parameters was assessed by changing each parameter by 20%. t peak was found to be more sensitive to tumour cell line related doubling time (~30%) as compared to tissue vasculature density (~10%). On the other hand, pO2peak was found to be similarly influenced by the above tumour- and vasculature-associated parameters (~30-40%). Interestingly, both pO2peak and t peak were only marginally affected by VEGFmax (~5%). The development of a poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) core with tumour growth increased VEGF accumulation, thus disrupting the vessel perfusion as well as further increasing hypoxia with time. The model with its benchmarked parameters, is applied to hypoxia imaging data obtained using a [(64)Cu]Cu-ATSM PET scan of a mouse tumour and the temporal development of the vasculature and hypoxia maps are shown. The work underscores the importance of using tumour-specific input for analysing tumour evolution. An extended model incorporating therapeutic effects can serve as a powerful tool for

  18. An imaging-based computational model for simulating angiogenesis and tumour oxygenation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Tumour growth, angiogenesis and oxygenation vary substantially among tumours and significantly impact their treatment outcome. Imaging provides a unique means of investigating these tumour-specific characteristics. Here we propose a computational model to simulate tumour-specific oxygenation changes based on the molecular imaging data. Tumour oxygenation in the model is reflected by the perfused vessel density. Tumour growth depends on its doubling time (T d) and the imaged proliferation. Perfused vessel density recruitment rate depends on the perfused vessel density around the tumour (sMVDtissue) and the maximum VEGF concentration for complete vessel dysfunctionality (VEGFmax). The model parameters were benchmarked to reproduce the dynamics of tumour oxygenation over its entire lifecycle, which is the most challenging test. Tumour oxygenation dynamics were quantified using the peak pO2 (pO2peak) and the time to peak pO2 (t peak). Sensitivity of tumour oxygenation to model parameters was assessed by changing each parameter by 20%. t peak was found to be more sensitive to tumour cell line related doubling time (~30%) as compared to tissue vasculature density (~10%). On the other hand, pO2peak was found to be similarly influenced by the above tumour- and vasculature-associated parameters (~30–40%). Interestingly, both pO2peak and t peak were only marginally affected by VEGFmax (~5%). The development of a poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) core with tumour growth increased VEGF accumulation, thus disrupting the vessel perfusion as well as further increasing hypoxia with time. The model with its benchmarked parameters, is applied to hypoxia imaging data obtained using a [64Cu]Cu-ATSM PET scan of a mouse tumour and the temporal development of the vasculature and hypoxia maps are shown. The work underscores the importance of using tumour-specific input for analysing tumour evolution. An extended model incorporating therapeutic effects can serve as a powerful tool for

  19. Fabrication of honeycomb-structured poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) porous films and biomedical applications for cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA porous films were fabricated. • The organization of pores depends on molecular weight ratio of PEG-to-PLA block. • The pores in the film were internally decorated with a layer of PEG. • The honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA film was suitable as a substrate for cell growth. - Abstract: A series of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-PLA) copolymers with a hydrophobic PLA block of different molecular weights and a fixed length hydrophilic PEG were synthesized successfully and characterized. These amphiphilic block copolymers were used to fabricate honeycomb-structured porous films using the breath figure (BF) templating technique. The surface topology and composition of the highly ordered pattern film were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fluorescence microscopy. The results indicated that the PEG-to-PLA block molecular weight ratio influenced the BF film surface topology. The film with the best ordered pores was obtained with a PEG-to-PLA ratio of 2.0 × 103:3.0 × 104. The self-organization of the hydrophilic PEG chains within the pores was confirmed by XPS and fluorescence labeled PEG. A model is proposed to elucidate the stabilization process of the amphiphilic PEG-PLA aggregated architecture on the water droplet-based templates. In addition, GFP-U87 cell viability has been investigated by MTS test and the cell morphology on the honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA porous film has been evaluated using phase-contrast microscope. This porous film is shown to be suitable as a matrix for cell growth

  20. Fabrication of honeycomb-structured poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) porous films and biomedical applications for cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Bingjian [Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250199 (China); College of chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Collaborative Innovation Center of Functionalized Probes for Chemical Imaging, Key Laboratory of Molecular and Nano Probes, Ministry of Education, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Zhu, Qingzeng, E-mail: qzzhu@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250199 (China); Yao, Linli [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Experimental Teratology, Department of Histology and Embryology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 250012 Jinan (China); Hao, Jingcheng [Key Laboratory of Special Functional Aggregated Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250199 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA porous films were fabricated. • The organization of pores depends on molecular weight ratio of PEG-to-PLA block. • The pores in the film were internally decorated with a layer of PEG. • The honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA film was suitable as a substrate for cell growth. - Abstract: A series of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-PLA) copolymers with a hydrophobic PLA block of different molecular weights and a fixed length hydrophilic PEG were synthesized successfully and characterized. These amphiphilic block copolymers were used to fabricate honeycomb-structured porous films using the breath figure (BF) templating technique. The surface topology and composition of the highly ordered pattern film were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fluorescence microscopy. The results indicated that the PEG-to-PLA block molecular weight ratio influenced the BF film surface topology. The film with the best ordered pores was obtained with a PEG-to-PLA ratio of 2.0 × 10{sup 3}:3.0 × 10{sup 4}. The self-organization of the hydrophilic PEG chains within the pores was confirmed by XPS and fluorescence labeled PEG. A model is proposed to elucidate the stabilization process of the amphiphilic PEG-PLA aggregated architecture on the water droplet-based templates. In addition, GFP-U87 cell viability has been investigated by MTS test and the cell morphology on the honeycomb-structured PEG-PLA porous film has been evaluated using phase-contrast microscope. This porous film is shown to be suitable as a matrix for cell growth.

  1. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of maxilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a very rare entity in head and neck with high rate of recurrences and local invasiveness. This tumour is usually found in lower extremities and only 10-12% occur in head and neck region. The diagnosis is considered as the most elusive and difficult among soft tissue sarcomas because of its non specific presentation, both clinically as well as pathologically. This difficulty has now been overcome by immunohistochemistry. We report here a case of MPNST in a 50 years old male with a localized right maxillary growth. (author)

  2. [Surgical treatment of children with hepatic tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, A.; Kvist, N.; Kirkegaard, P.;

    2008-01-01

    difference in survival dependent on the type of resection, and there was no impact of the extension of tumour growth at the time of diagnosis. CONCLUSION: The combination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by liver resection or liver transplantation is the treatment of choice in all children with......INTRODUCTION: In this paper we review the results of surgical treatment of children with hepatic tumours. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study comprises 33 children who have undergone lever resection or liver transplantation since 1990. 26 patients had hepatoblastoma, 3 had hepatocellular carcinoma, 2...

  3. Selective assessment of in vitro radiosensitivity of tumour cells and fibroblasts from single tumour biopsies using immunocytochemical identification of colonies in the soft agar clonogenic assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assumed selective growth of tumour cells has formed the basis for the use of the soft agar clonogenic assay to test in vitro radio- and chemosensitivity of tumours. However, recent studies have demonstrated that fibroblasts proliferate in soft agar in addition to tumour cells. The present study was initiated to quantify the contaminating growth of non-malignant cells in the modified form of the Courtenay-Mills soft agar assay, in order to establish a reliable assay for estimating tumour cell radiosensitivity in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. DNA flow cytometry analysis confirmed that 'tumour fibroblasts' (fibroblasts obtained from tumour biopsies) grow in soft agar. In contrast, white blood cells did not form colonies. Different media were tested with soft agar, but a selective medium for tumour cells was not found. Therefore, a colony filter-technique combined with an immunocytochemical analysis was developed to quantify the number of tumour cell and fibroblast colonies. In 12 tumour biopsies, 2-33% of the colonies were Cytokeratin AE1-3 positive, whereas 83-100% of the colonies were 5B5 fibroblast antibody positive. The parameter normally reported, the overall SF2 (surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy) based on colonies in agar, was found to be statistically significantly correlated to the fibroblast SF2, but not to the tumour cell SF2. The overall SF2 was significantly different from the tumour cell SF2 in half of the tumours. Furthermore, the tumour cell SF2 was not correlated to fibroblast SF2. In consequence of our findings, correcting for fibroblast contamination is a necessity, when studying in vitro sensitivity of tumour cells. Combining the soft agar clonogenic assay with the new colony filter-technique and the immunocytochemical analysis appear to be useful for making this routine correction and for measuring the in vitro radiosensitivity of both tumour cells and fibroblasts from single tumour biopsies, which is of interest in future

  4. Prostacyclin Inhibits Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Growth by a Frizzled 9-Dependent Pathway That Is Blocked by Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith A. Tennis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess the ability of iloprost, an orally active prostacyclin analog, to inhibit transformed growth of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to define the mechanism of iloprost's tumor suppressive effects. In a panel of NSCLC cell lines, the ability of iloprost to inhibit transformed cell growth was not correlated with the expression of the cell surface receptor for prostacyclin, but instead was correlated with the presence of Frizzled 9 (Fzd 9 and the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ. Silencing of Fzd 9 blocked PPARγ activation by iloprost, and expression of Fzd 9 in cells lacking the protein resulted in iloprost's activation of PPARγ and inhibition of transformed growth. Interestingly, soluble Frizzled-related protein-1, a well-known inhibitor of Wnt/Fzd signaling, also blocked the effects of iloprost and Fzd 9. Moreover, mice treated with iloprost had reduced lung tumors and increased Fzd 9 expression. These studies define a novel paradigm, linking the eicosanoid pathway and Wnt signaling. In addition, these data also suggest that prostacyclin analogs may represent a new class of therapeutic agents in the treatment of NSCLC where the restoration of noncanonical Wnt signaling maybe important for the inhibition of transformed cell growth.

  5. Phosphoglycerate kinase acts in tumour angiogenesis as a disulphide reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Angelina J.; Jiang, Xing-Mai; Kisker, Oliver; Flynn, Evelyn; Underwood, Anne; Condron, Rosemary; Hogg, Philip J.

    2000-12-01

    Disulphide bonds in secreted proteins are considered to be inert because of the oxidizing nature of the extracellular milieu. An exception to this rule is a reductase secreted by tumour cells that reduces disulphide bonds in the serine proteinase plasmin. Reduction of plasmin initiates proteolytic cleavage in the kringle 5 domain and release of the tumour blood vessel inhibitor angiostatin. New blood vessel formation or angiogenesis is critical for tumour expansion and metastasis. Here we show that the plasmin reductase isolated from conditioned medium of fibrosarcoma cells is the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase. Recombinant phosphoglycerate kinase had the same specific activity as the fibrosarcoma-derived protein. Plasma of mice bearing fibrosarcoma tumours contained several-fold more phosphoglycerate kinase, as compared with mice without tumours. Administration of phosphoglycerate kinase to tumour-bearing mice caused an increase in plasma levels of angiostatin, and a decrease in tumour vascularity and rate of tumour growth. Our findings indicate that phosphoglycerate kinase not only functions in glycolysis but is secreted by tumour cells and participates in the angiogenic process as a disulphide reductase.

  6. Multidisciplinary treatment of Wilms' tumour. 13 years' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe the results obtained by them personally in their multidisciplinary treatment of Wilms' tumour. In the National Paediatric Institute, Mexico City, 116 cases of Wilms' tumour in children were studied between January 1971 and December 1983. Of these, only 57 were evaluated as only they had completed their multidisciplinary treatment and had been followed up for over two years. Wilms' tumour is the solid abdominal tumour most frequently found in Mexican children. It is the fifth most frequent malign tumour after leukaemia, tumours of the central nervous system, Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and retinoblastoma. The multidisciplinary treatment included: radical surgery; radiotherapy (site and dosage by group and by age of the child) and chemotherapy (drugs according to the group and histology of the tumour). In 82% of cases, the tumours occurred before the age of five, predominantly in girls. The average growth time was three months. Where tumour histology was favourable, 78% survived; 45% survived when the histology was adverse. For the various groups, survival was 100% in group I, 83.5% in group II, and 71.5% in group III and 25% in group IV. The survival of all groups was 67% and the actuarial survival was 83%. (author)

  7. Parathyroid hormone blocks the stimulatory effect of insulin-like growth factor-I on collagen synthesis in cultured 21-day fetal rat calvariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the interaction of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on collagen synthesis in 21-day fetal rat calvariae as assessed by measuring the incorporation of [3H]proline into collagenase-digestible protein. After 96 hours of culture, 10 nM PTH antagonized the stimulation of collagen synthesis and partially blocked the increase in dry weight produced by 10 nM IGF-I. The effect of PTH to block IGF-I stimulated collagen synthesis was observed in the central bone of calvariae and was mimicked by forskolin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but not by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, transforming growth factor-alpha or dexamethasone. Our data are consistent with the concept that the direct effect of PTH is to inhibit basal CDP labeling and fully oppose IGF-I stimulated CDP labeling. The finding that this effect of PTH is mimicked by forskolin and PMA suggests that this block in IGF-I stimulation of CDP labeling involves both cAMP and protein kinase C mediated pathways

  8. Experimental tumour treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report of 1984 is the seventh in a series and presents that year's results of continuous studies in the domain of experimental tumour radiotherapy. In the year under review, more personnel has been available for the studies, and the scientific programmes for the assessment of acute and chronic side effects of radiotherapies have been extended. New models have been developed, among them a first system based on animal experiments, for quantifying the mucositis of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa, a limiting condition in the radiotherapy of head and throat tumours. Another significant advancement is a model for quantification of chronical damage to the ureter, which still is a serious problem in the radiotherapy of gynaecological tumours. The 1984 experimental tumour studies have been mainly devoted to the repopulation and split-dose recovery in various tumours, concentrating on dose fractionation as one of the major problems studies. Particular interest has been attached to the processes involved in treatments over several weeks with a daily effective dose of 2 Gy. (orig./MG)

  9. Small peripheral lung carcinomas with five-year post-surgical follow-up: assessment by semi-automated volumetric measurement of tumour size, CT value and growth rate on TSCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively assess the utility of semi-automated measurements by stratification of CT values of tumour size, CT value and doubling time (DT) using thin-section computed tomography (CT) images. The post-surgical outcomes of favourable and problematic tumours (more advanced p stage than IA, post-surgical recurrence or mortality from lung cancer) were compared using the measured values. The computed DTs were compared with manually measured values. The study subjects comprised 85 patients (aged 33-80 years, 48 women, 37 men), followed-up for more than 5 years postoperatively, with 89 lung lesions, including 17 atypical adenomatous hyperplasias and 72 lung cancers. DTs were determined in 45 lesions. For problematic lesions, whole tumour diameter and density were >18 mm and >-400 HU, respectively. The respective values for the tumour core (with CT values of -350 to 150 HU) were >15 mm and >-70 HU. Analysis of tumour core DTs showed interval tumour progression even if little progress was seen by standard tumour volume DT (TVDT). Software-based volumetric measurements by stratification of CT values provide valuable information on tumour core and help estimate tumour aggressiveness and interval tumour progression better than standard manually measured 2D-VDTs. (orig.)

  10. Small peripheral lung carcinomas with five-year post-surgical follow-up: assessment by semi-automated volumetric measurement of tumour size, CT value and growth rate on TSCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sone, Shusuke [JA Nagano Azumi General Hospital, Ikeda, Nagano (Japan); Nagano Health Promotion Corporation, Inasato, Nagano (Japan); Hanaoka, Takaomi [JA Nagano Azumi General Hospital, Department of Chest Surgery, Ikeda, Nagano (Japan); Ogata, Hiroyuki [JA Nagano Azumi General Hospital, Division of Clinical Laboratory and Pathology, Ikeda, Nagano (Japan); Takayama, Fumiyoshi [JA Nagano Azumi General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ikeda, Nagano (Japan); Ichinose Neurosurgery Hospital, Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan); Watanabe, Tomofumi [Iida Municipal Hospital, Iida, Nagano (Japan); Haniuda, Masayuki [Aichi Medical University, Division of Chest Surgery, Aichi (Japan); Kaneko, Kazuhiko [Shinshu University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Matsumoto (Japan); Okaya-Enrei Hospital, Okaya, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, Ryoichi [National Chushin Matsumoto Hospital, Matsumoto (Japan); Yoshida, Kazuo [Shinshu University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Matsumoto (Japan); Honda, Takayuki [Shinshu University School of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    To retrospectively assess the utility of semi-automated measurements by stratification of CT values of tumour size, CT value and doubling time (DT) using thin-section computed tomography (CT) images. The post-surgical outcomes of favourable and problematic tumours (more advanced p stage than IA, post-surgical recurrence or mortality from lung cancer) were compared using the measured values. The computed DTs were compared with manually measured values. The study subjects comprised 85 patients (aged 33-80 years, 48 women, 37 men), followed-up for more than 5 years postoperatively, with 89 lung lesions, including 17 atypical adenomatous hyperplasias and 72 lung cancers. DTs were determined in 45 lesions. For problematic lesions, whole tumour diameter and density were >18 mm and >-400 HU, respectively. The respective values for the tumour core (with CT values of -350 to 150 HU) were >15 mm and >-70 HU. Analysis of tumour core DTs showed interval tumour progression even if little progress was seen by standard tumour volume DT (TVDT). Software-based volumetric measurements by stratification of CT values provide valuable information on tumour core and help estimate tumour aggressiveness and interval tumour progression better than standard manually measured 2D-VDTs. (orig.)

  11. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  12. Quantification of tumour vasculature and hypoxia by immunohistochemical staining and HbO2 saturation measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, B. M.; Paoni, S F; Lee, J.; Koch, C.J. (Christian); Lord, E M

    1999-01-01

    Despite the possibility that tumour hypoxia may limit radiotherapeutic response, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. A new methodology has been developed in which information from several sophisticated techniques is combined and analysed at a microregional level. First, tumour oxygen availability is spatially defined by measuring intravascular blood oxygen saturations (HbO2) cryospectrophotometrically in frozen tumour blocks. Second, hypoxic development is quantified in adjace...

  13. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckwell, W.; Bezak, E.; Yeoh, E.; Marcu, L.

    2008-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (109 cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy.

  14. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (109 cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy

  15. Anti-tumour immune effect of oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum to CT26 tumour-bearing mice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jingtao Hu; Chunfeng Wang; Liping Ye; Wentao Yang; Haibin Huang; Fei Meng; Shaohua Shi; Zhuang Ding

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent forms of cancer that shows a high mortality and increasing incidence. There are numerous successful treatment options for CRC, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immunotherapy; however, their side effects and limitations are considerable. Probiotics may be an effective strategy for preventing and inhibiting tumour growth through stimulation of host innate and adaptive immunity. We investigated and compared potential anti-tumour immune responses induced by two isolated Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus plantarum A and Lactobacillus rhamnosus b, by pre-inoculating mice with lactobacilli for 14 days. Subsequently, subcutaneous and orthotopic intestinal tumours were generated in the pre-inoculated mice using CT26 murine adenocarcinoma cells and were assessed for response against the tumour. Our results indicated that oral administration with L. plantarum inhibited CT26 cell growth in BALB/c mice and prolonged the survival time of tumour-bearing mice compared with mice administered L. rhamnosus. L. plantarum produced protective immunity against the challenge with CT26 cells by increasing the effector functions of CD8+ and natural killer (NK) cell infiltration into tumour tissue, up-regulation of IFN- (but not IL-4 or IL-17) production, and promotion of Th1-type CD4+ T differentiation. Consequently, our results suggest that L. plantarum can enhance the anti-tumour immune response and delay tumour formation.

  16. Chronic stress in mice remodels lymph vasculature to promote tumour cell dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Caroline P; Nowell, Cameron J; Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Botteri, Edoardo; Hiller, Jonathan G; Ismail, Hilmy; Pimentel, Matthew A; Chai, Ming G; Karnezis, Tara; Rotmensz, Nicole; Renne, Giuseppe; Gandini, Sara; Pouton, Colin W; Ferrari, Davide; Möller, Andreas; Stacker, Steven A; Sloan, Erica K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces signalling from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and drives cancer progression, although the pathways of tumour cell dissemination are unclear. Here we show that chronic stress restructures lymphatic networks within and around tumours to provide pathways for tumour cell escape. We show that VEGFC derived from tumour cells is required for stress to induce lymphatic remodelling and that this depends on COX2 inflammatory signalling from macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of SNS signalling blocks the effect of chronic stress on lymphatic remodelling in vivo and reduces lymphatic metastasis in preclinical cancer models and in patients with breast cancer. These findings reveal unanticipated communication between stress-induced neural signalling and inflammation, which regulates tumour lymphatic architecture and lymphogenous tumour cell dissemination. These findings suggest that limiting the effects of SNS signalling to prevent tumour cell dissemination through lymphatic routes may provide a strategy to improve cancer outcomes. PMID:26925549

  17. Sorafenib inhibits tumor growth and vascularization of rhabdomyosarcoma cells by blocking IGF-1R-mediated signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Maruwge, Wessen; D’Arcy, Pádraig; Folin, Annika; Brnjic, Slavica; Wejde, Johan; Davis, Anthony; Erlandsson, Fredrik; Bergh, Jonas; Brodin, Bertha

    2008-01-01

    The growth of many soft tissue sarcomas is dependent on aberrant growth factor signaling, which promotes their proliferation and motility. With this in mind, we evaluated the effect of sorafenib, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on cell growth and apoptosis in sarcoma cell lines of various histological subtypes. We found that sorafenib effectively inhibited cell proliferation in rhabdomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma and Ewing’s sarcoma with IC50 values

  18. Inverse relationship between tumour proliferation markers and connexin expression in a malignant cardiac tumour originating from mesenchymal stem cell engineered tissue in a rat in-vivo model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StefanDhein

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions and hypothesis: These observations strongly suggest the hypothesis, that invasive tumour growth is accompanied by reduction in connexins. This implicates that gap junction communication between tumour and normal tissue is reduced or absent, which could mean that growth and differentiation signals can not be exchanged.

  19. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopep...

  20. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome. PMID:23716380

  1. Clinical utility of KRAS status in circulating plasma DNA compared to archival tumour tissue from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Appelt, Ane Lindegaard;

    2015-01-01

    -house qPCR method. Results are presented according to REMARK. RESULTS: One-hundred-and-forty patients were included. Thirty-four percent had detectable KRAS mutations in the tumour, compared to 23% in plasma. KRAS detection in archival tumour tissue showed no correlation to survival, whereas plasma KRAS...... an additional prognostic effect. CONCLUSION: The value of clinically relevant mutations could be improved by performing the analysis on circulation plasma DNA rather than archival tumour tissue....

  2. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Franzese, Ciro; Navarria, Pierina; Scorsetti, Marta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Grimaldi, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Simonelli, Matteo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Medical Oncology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Bello, Lorenzo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  3. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  4. Where is the Lesion? Glomus Tumours of the Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Fung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Glomus tumours are vascular hamartomas that are commonly found in the hand, particularlythe subungual region. They appear as solitary or multiple tumours, and often present as abluish discoloration of the nail plate. Different diagnostic tests are outlined, as well as imagingstudies such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. Misdiagnosis and delayeddiagnosis of these tumours are common, while a familial tendency is a potential risk factor butnot yet proven. Complete surgical excision often results in complete symptomatic relief, whilerecurrences are largely due to incomplete excision or the growth of a new glomus tumour. Thisarticle aims to review the key aspects of glomus tumours and provide a diagnostic algorithmso that the lesion can be recognized and treated earlier.

  5. Computed tomography in primary and secondary adrenal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to find out how reliably benign and malignant adrenal tumours can be differentiated on the basis of CT characteristics. The material included 86 adrenal tumours with the following confirmed diagnoses: 48 primary adrenal tumours (8 carcinomas, 1 neuroblastoma, 4 pheochromocytomas, 31 adenomas, 3 cysts, 1 haemangioma) and 38 metastases. The size, density, homogeneity, enhancement and growth of the tumours were evaluated. No specific CT findings could separate benign from malignant tumours. Coexistence of cancer and bilateral non-homogenous adrenal masses is probably sufficient for the diagnosis of adrenal metastases. In cases of coincidental small (< 3 cm), homogeneous and relatively hypodense masses with no signs of hormonal activity, a follow-up examination of the lesion within three months is recommended. Other masses may indicate further diagnostic procedures. (orig.)

  6. Lymphatic vessels assessment in feline mammary tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diracca Laura

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lymphatic vessels play a crucial role in a variety of human cancers since tumour cell lymphatic invasion significantly influences prognosis. It is not known if pre-existing lymphatics are enough for tumour dissemination or de novo development is necessary. VEGFR-3 is an angiogenetic mediator for both lymphatic and blood vessels during embryonic development, and only for lymphatics after birth. VEGF is a mediator of both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, regulates the growth of lymphatics in various experimental models, and is produced in many solid tumours. CD44 mediates hyaluronic acid (HA-dependent cell adhesion: besides promoting invasion, this interaction also supports neoangiogenesis that indirectly stimulates tumour cell proliferation. The expression of VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor – C, its receptor VEGFR-3 and CD44, were studied on feline mammary samples to assess the importance of lymphangiogenesis and lymphangiotrophism in neoplasia. Methods Samples were taken from six normal mammary glands (NMG, ten benign (BT and 32 malignant (MT tumours. Immunohistochemical laminin/VEGFR-3 double stain, VEGF-C and CD44 stains were applied to 4 μm-thick sections, and their expression evaluated in intratumoral/extratumoral and intramammary/extramammary fields. Results All groups revealed a higher number of lymphatics in the extratumoral/extramammary areas. VEGF-C expression in the epithelium paralleled the number of positive vessels in the NMG, BT and MT, whereas VEGF-C higher expression was noted in the intratumoral fields only in infiltrating MT. CD44 score was lower in extratumoral than intratumoral fields in tumours and showed a significant increase in extramammary/extratumoral fields from NMG to MT. Pearson test showed a significant and inversely proportional correlation between CD44 expression and the number of lymphatic vessels with VEGFR-3 in malignant infiltrating tumours. Conclusion The number of both

  7. Effect of Irradiation on the Kinetics of Cellular Proliferation in Animal and Human Tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of cellular proliferation in tumours is governed by three main factors, the average duration of the cell cycle, the 'growth fraction' and cell losses. The effect of the last-mentioned factors is the main reason for the variations in rate of growth among solid tumours and for the slackening in the rate of growth observed in a solid tumour as its volume increases. In ascitic tumours the duration of the cell cycle has been found to increase considerably during tumour growth. When a cell is transplanted in the form of an ascitic tumour the mechanisms which explain the gradual slackening of the rate of tumour growth are different from those which obtain when it is grafted in the form of a solid tumour; this shows that these mechanisms depend on extrinsic factors relating to the metabolic conditions,- the cellular micro environment and intercellular contact phenomena. The phenomena which occur in an irradiated tumour are quantitatively similar to those found in normal tissue, but they may differ from the qualitative point of, view and in respect of temporal behaviour. These differences, which doubtless depend on the type of tumour, will have to be analysed before radiotherapy can be used to the maximum advantage. (author)

  8. Genetically modified tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, Suppl. 1 (2005), S7. ISSN 1214-021X. [Cells VI - Biological Days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumour vaccines * HPV16 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  9. Anthropogenic selection enhances cancer evolution in Tasmanian devil tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujvari, Beata; Pearse, Anne-Maree; Swift, Kate; Hodson, Pamela; Hua, Bobby; Pyecroft, Stephen; Taylor, Robyn; Hamede, Rodrigo; Jones, Menna; Belov, Katherine; Madsen, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    The Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) provides a unique opportunity to elucidate the long-term effects of natural and anthropogenic selection on cancer evolution. Since first observed in 1996, this transmissible cancer has caused local population declines by >90%. So far, four chromosomal DFTD variants (strains) have been described and karyotypic analyses of 253 tumours showed higher levels of tetraploidy in the oldest strain. We propose that increased ploidy in the oldest strain may have evolved in response to effects of genomic decay observed in asexually reproducing organisms. In this study, we focus on the evolutionary response of DFTD to a disease suppression trial. Tumours collected from devils subjected to the removal programme showed accelerated temporal evolution of tetraploidy compared with tumours from other populations where no increase in tetraploid tumours were observed. As ploidy significantly reduces tumour growth rate, we suggest that the disease suppression trial resulted in selection favouring slower growing tumours mediated by an increased level of tetraploidy. Our study reveals that DFTD has the capacity to rapidly respond to novel selective regimes and that disease eradication may result in novel tumour adaptations, which may further imperil the long-term survival of the world's largest carnivorous marsupial. PMID:24567746

  10. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Okazumi, Shinichi; Hayano, Kohichi; Satoh, Asami; Saitoh, Hiroshige; Shimada, Hideaki; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Hisahiro [Chiba University, Department of Frontier Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Kazama, Toshiki [Chiba University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. circle Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen circle There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor circle ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. (orig.)

  11. Apparent diffusion coefficient correlation with oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict the prognosis of patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we hypothesised that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values might be correlated with the collagen content and tumour angiogenesis. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between ADC values of ESCC before treatment and oesophageal tumour stroma and angiogenesis. Seventeen patients with ESCC were enrolled. The ADC values were calculated from the DWI score. Seventeen patients who had undergone oesophagectomy were analysed for tumour stroma, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD34. Tissue collagen was stained with azocarmine and aniline blue to quantitatively analyse the extracellular matrix in cancer stroma. Tissues were stained with VEGF and CD34 to analyse the angiogenesis. The ADC values decreased with stromal collagen growth. We found a negative correlation between the tumour ADC and the amount of stromal collagen (r = -0.729, P = 0.001), i.e. the ADC values decreased with growth of VEGF. We also found a negative correlation between the ADC of the tumours and the amount of VEGF (r = 0.538, P = 0.026). Our results indicated that the ADC value may be a novel prognostic factor and contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. circle Magnetic resonance apparent diffusion coefficient values inversely indicate tumour stromal collagen circle There is also negative correlation between ADCs and vascular endothelial growth factor circle ADC values may contribute to the treatment of oesophageal cancer. (orig.)

  12. Anti-tumour effects of antibodies targeting the extracellular cysteine-rich region of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Sally-Anne; Douglas, Evelyn L; Mertens-Walker, Inga; Lisle, Jessica E; Maharaj, Mohanan S N; Herington, Adrian C

    2015-04-10

    EphB4 is a membrane-bound receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) commonly over-produced by many epithelial cancers but with low to no expression in most normal adult tissues. EphB4 over-production promotes ligand-independent signaling pathways that increase cancer cell viability and stimulate migration and invasion. Several studies have shown that normal ligand-dependent signaling is tumour suppressive and therefore novel therapeutics which block the tumour promoting ligand-independent signaling and/or stimulate tumour suppressive ligand-dependent signaling will find application in the treatment of cancer. An EphB4-specific polyclonal antibody, targeting a region of 200 amino acids in the extracellular portion of EphB4, showed potent in vitro anti-cancer effects measured by an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in anchorage independent growth. Peptide exclusion was used to identify the epitope targeted by this antibody within the cysteine-rich region of the EphB4 protein, a sequence defined as a potential ligand interacting interface. Addition of antibody to cancer cells resulted in phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of the EphB4 protein, suggesting a mechanism that is ligand mimetic and tumour suppressive. A monoclonal antibody which specifically targets this identified extracellular epitope of EphB4 significantly reduced breast cancer xenograft growth in vivo confirming that EphB4 is a useful target for ligand-mimicking antibody-based anti-cancer therapies. PMID:25831049

  13. Characterization of inhibitory anti-insulin-like growth factor receptor antibodies with different epitope specificity and ligand-blocking properties: implications for mechanism of action in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doern, Adam; Cao, Xianjun; Sereno, Arlene; Reyes, Christopher L; Altshuler, Angelina; Huang, Flora; Hession, Cathy; Flavier, Albert; Favis, Michael; Tran, Hon; Ailor, Eric; Levesque, Melissa; Murphy, Tracey; Berquist, Lisa; Tamraz, Susan; Snipas, Tracey; Garber, Ellen; Shestowsky, William S; Rennard, Rachel; Graff, Christilyn P; Wu, Xiufeng; Snyder, William; Cole, Lindsay; Gregson, David; Shields, Michael; Ho, Steffan N; Reff, Mitchell E; Glaser, Scott M; Dong, Jianying; Demarest, Stephen J; Hariharan, Kandasamy

    2009-04-10

    Therapeutic antibodies directed against the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have recently gained significant momentum in the clinic because of preliminary data generated in human patients with cancer. These antibodies inhibit ligand-mediated activation of IGF-1R and the resulting down-stream signaling cascade. Here we generated a panel of antibodies against IGF-1R and screened them for their ability to block the binding of both IGF-1 and IGF-2 at escalating ligand concentrations (>1 microm) to investigate allosteric versus competitive blocking mechanisms. Four distinct inhibitory classes were found as follows: 1) allosteric IGF-1 blockers, 2) allosteric IGF-2 blockers, 3) allosteric IGF-1 and IGF-2 blockers, and 4) competitive IGF-1 and IGF-2 blockers. The epitopes of representative antibodies from each of these classes were mapped using a purified IGF-1R library containing 64 mutations. Most of these antibodies bound overlapping surfaces on the cysteine-rich repeat and L2 domains. One class of allosteric IGF-1 and IGF-2 blocker was identified that bound a separate epitope on the outer surface of the FnIII-1 domain. Using various biophysical techniques, we show that the dual IGF blockers inhibit ligand binding using a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from highly allosteric to purely competitive. Binding of IGF-1 or the inhibitory antibodies was associated with conformational changes in IGF-1R, linked to the ordering of dynamic or unstructured regions of the receptor. These results suggest IGF-1R uses disorder/order within its polypeptide sequence to regulate its activity. Interestingly, the activity of representative allosteric and competitive inhibitors on H322M tumor cell growth in vitro was reflective of their individual ligand-blocking properties. Many of the antibodies in the clinic likely adopt one of the inhibitory mechanisms described here, and the outcome of future clinical studies may reveal whether a particular inhibitory mechanism

  14. Blood vessel hyperpermeability and pathophysiology in human tumour xenograft models of breast cancer: a comparison of ectopic and orthotopic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , as many fluid-filled and collagen IV-lined spaces were observed, which likely contain excess interstitial fluid. Dextran accumulation and immunostaining results suggest that small MFP tumours best replicate the vascular permeability required to observe the EPR effect in vivo. A more predictable growth profile and the absence of ulcerated skin lesions further point to the MFP model as a strong choice for long term treatment studies that initiate after a target tumour size has been reached

  15. Peripheral Opioid Antagonist Enhances the Effect of Anti-Tumor Drug by Blocking a Cell Growth-Suppressive Pathway In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Yumi; Ashikawa, Maho; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Takeshi; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Komatsu, Masayuki; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagase, Hiroshi; Kushima, Ryoji; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Takeo; Katai, Hitoshi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Sasaki, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The dormancy of tumor cells is a major problem in chemotherapy, since it limits the therapeutic efficacy of anti-tumor drugs that only target dividing cells. One potential way to overcome chemo-resistance is to “wake up” these dormant cells. Here we show that the opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MNTX) enhances the effect of docetaxel (Doc) by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway. We found that PENK, which encodes opioid growth factor (OGF) and suppresses cell growth, is predominantly expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancers (GCs). The blockade of OGF signaling by MNTX releases cells from their arrest and boosts the effect of Doc. In comparison with the use of Doc alone, the combined use of Doc and MNTX significantly prolongs survival, alleviates abdominal pain, and diminishes Doc-resistant spheroids on the peritoneal membrane in model mice. These results suggest that blockade of the pathways that suppress cell growth may enhance the effects of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:25853862

  16. The inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor growth by denbinobin is associated with the blocking of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, An-Chi; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Lai, Chin-Yu; Wang, Chih-Ya; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang; Teng, Che-Ming

    2011-07-01

    Denbinobin, which is a phenanthraquinone derivative present in the stems of Ephemerantha lonchophylla, has been demonstrated to display antitumor activity. Recent reports suggest that the enhanced activity of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is closely associated with tumor angiogenesis and growth. This study aims at investigating the roles of denbinobin in suppressing these effects and at further elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms. In the present study, we used an in vivo xenograft model antitumor and the Matrigel implant assays to show that denbinobin suppresses lung adenocarcinoma A549 growth and microvessel formation. Additionally, crystal violet and capillary-like tube formation assays indicated that denbinobin selectively inhibits insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-induced proliferation (GI50=1.3×10⁻⁸ M) and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) without influencing the effect of epidermal growth factor; vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Furthermore, denbinobin inhibited the IGF-1-induced migration of HUVECs in a concentration-dependent fashion. Western blotting and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that denbinobin causes more efficient inhibition of IGF-1-induced activation of IGF-1R and its downstream signaling targets, including , extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, 4EBP and cyclin D1. All of our results provide evidences that denbinobin suppresses the activation of IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathway, which leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Our findings suggest that denbinobin may be a novel IGF-1R kinase inhibitor and has potential therapeutic abilities for angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer. PMID:20951021

  17. Innate Lymphoid Cells: Roles In Tumour Genesis And Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanovic Ivan; Gajovic Nevena; Radosavljevic Gordana; Pantic Jelena; Pejnovic Nada; Arsenijevic Nebojsa; Lukic Miodrag L.

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) represent the most recently identified members of the innate immune system. These cells play important roles in inflammation, tissue remodelling and metabolic disease. ILCs can be subdivided into three major groups according to their cytokine production. The role of ILCs in tumourigenesis and tumour progression is not completely clarified. In this review, we discuss whether and how ILCs are involved in tumour genesis, growth and metastasis.

  18. Innate Lymphoid Cells: Roles In Tumour Genesis And Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanovic Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs represent the most recently identified members of the innate immune system. These cells play important roles in inflammation, tissue remodelling and metabolic disease. ILCs can be subdivided into three major groups according to their cytokine production. The role of ILCs in tumourigenesis and tumour progression is not completely clarified. In this review, we discuss whether and how ILCs are involved in tumour genesis, growth and metastasis.

  19. Role of tumour angiogenesis in haematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medinger, Michael; Passweg, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Tumour angiogenesis plays a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of haematological malignancies. Thereby, pro- and anti-angiogenic growth factors and cytokines regulate the angiogenic process. The most important growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its signaling through its receptors 1 and 2, is not only involved in solid tumours, but there is also emerging evidence that tumour progression in haematological malignancies also depends on the induction of new blood vessel formation. The evidence supporting this theory includes the finding of increased bone marrow microvessel density and increased levels of plasma pro-angiogenic cytokines. Leukaemia cells interact with surrounding host cells and extracellular matrix, this crosstalk affecting the most important aspects of the malignant phenotype. The pathophysiology of leukaemia induced angiogenesis involves both direct production of angiogenic cytokines by leukaemia cells and their interaction with bone marrow microenvironment. The inhibition of VEGF signalling by monoclonal antibodies or small molecules (kinase inhibitors) has already been successfully used for the treatment of different cancer entities, and multiple new drugs are being tested. This review summarises recent advances in the basic understanding of the role of angiogenesis in haematological malignancies and the translation of such basic findings into clinical studies. PMID:25375891

  20. Triple angiokinase inhibition, tumour hypoxia and radiation response of FaDu human squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To test the effect of BIBF 1120, a novel small molecule inhibitor of multiple angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinases, on the hypoxia and radiation response of tumours. Materials and methods: Poorly differentiated human squamous cell carcinoma FaDu growing in nude mice was treated with BIBF 1120 and investigated by functional histology. To test the effect of BIBF 1120 on the radiobiological hypoxic fraction (rHF), the number and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of tumour stem cells and the outcome after fractionated irradiation, a series of local tumour control assays were performed. Results: BIBF 1120 significantly reduced the vessel area, vessel area with a perfusion signal and tumour growth rate but did not affect tumour hypoxia or the number and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of tumour stem cells. Concurrent BIBF 1120 had no effect on local tumour control after fractionated irradiation. Conclusion: Triple angiokinase inhibition resulted in a clear-cut decrease of angiogenesis, vessel area with a perfusion signal and tumour growth but did not change tumour hypoxia or radiation response of tumour stem cells. Further experiments into mechanisms of interaction between anti-angiogenic strategies and irradiation appear to be necessary to better define and exploit the potential of this strategy to improve local tumour control after fractionated radiotherapy.

  1. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.H. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Oral Pathology)

    1982-08-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy.

  2. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy

  3. Tumours following retinoblastoma radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioinduced tumours in young patients irradiated in childhood for retinoblastoma take on a particularly deadly aspect. The onset of this true clinical entity characterized by a long post-irradiation latency period induced by a dose above 6000 rads is a real tragedy. The vast majority of patients then enter into a long martyrdom ending in death. The only cure is surgical, but seldom possible. Treatment is limited to palliative radiotherapy, effective for a while, and chemiotherapy as a last resort but often difficult to prescribe. Prevention alone is the answer. The quality and reliability of the radiotherapeutic treatment depend not only on the personal talent of the radiotherapist but above all on the standard of the equipment. A strong reduction in the doses employed as well as recent technological progress improving the material, its precision and reproducibility appear already to have lowered the frequency curve of these fatal radioinduced tumours

  4. Haemorrhagic pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a group of 69 patients with pituitary tumours, 12 were found to have evidence of intratumoral haemorrhage on MRI, characterized by high signal intensity on short TR/TE sequences. This was verified in all but 1 patient. The majority of the bleedings occurred in macroadenomas. Five (42%) were prolactinomas and 4 (33%) were non-functioning adenomas. There were 2 GH- and 1 ACTH-secreting tumours. All 5 patients with prolactinomas were on bromocriptine medication. Two of the patients had a clinical picture of pituitary apoplexy. The haemorrhage was not large enough to prompt surgery in any of the patients. However, surgical verification of the diagnosis was obtained in 5 cases, while 6 patients were examined with follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  5. Neonatal soft tissue tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Spicer, R D

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-five different soft tissue tumours occurring in the first month of life are described and classified into five Clinical Groups. A. Excellent prognosis with no treatment or simple surgical excision. B. Good prognosis. Treatment depends upon anatomical site. C. Good prognosis. Treatment usually surgical but chemotherapy may be indicated in certain situations. D. Intermediate prognosis. Treatment as for older child, usually surgery or chemotherapy. E. Poor prognosis. Treatment palliative ...

  6. Soft tissue tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, A J; Thomas, J M

    1997-01-01

    Any soft tissue swelling beneath the deep fascia should be considered a sarcoma until proven otherwise. As the most important factor in the primary treatment of these cancers is the adequacy of the primary surgical resection, it is vital to diagnose these malignant tumours pre-operatively. The modern treatment of soft tissue sarcomas may involve all modalities, but the most important aspect of treatment of a primary localised sarcoma is wide excisional surgery preserving limb function. Radiot...

  7. Endobronchial tumours in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endobronchial tumours are rare in childhood and are not often considered in the differential diagnosis of persistent pneumonitis and atelectasis. We present the clinical and radiological features of seven cases of childhood bronchial 'adenoma' seen at our hospital over a 16-year period. Because they are relatively slow growing, prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment offer the best chance of cure in these patients. A review of the literature is given

  8. Endobronchial tumours in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endobronchial tumours are rare in childhood and are not often considered in the differential diagnosis of persistent pneumonitis and atelectasis. We present the clinical and radiological features of seven cases of childhood bronchial 'adenoma' seen at our hospital over a 16-year period. Because they are relatively slow growing, prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment offer the best chance of cure in these patients. A review of the literature is given. (Copyright (c) Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Induction of IL-25 secretion from tumour-associated fibroblasts suppresses mammary tumour metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shu-Yi; Jian, Feng-Yin; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), as a functionally supportive microenvironment, play an essential role in tumour progression. Here we investigate the role of IL-25, an endogenous anticancer factor secreted from TAFs, in suppression of mouse 4T1 mammary tumour metastasis. We show that a synthetic dihydrobenzofuran lignan (Q2-3), the dimerization product of plant caffeic acid methyl ester, suppresses 4T1 metastasis by increasing fibroblastic IL-25 activity. The secretion of IL-25 from treated human or mouse fibroblasts is enhanced in vitro, and this activity confers a strong suppressive effect on growth activity of test carcinoma cells. Subsequent in vivo experiments showed that the anti-metastatic effects of Q2-3 on 4T1 and human MDA-MD-231 tumour cells are additive when employed in combination with the clinically used drug, docetaxel. Altogether, our findings reveal that the release of IL-25 from TAFs may serve as a check point for control of mammary tumour metastasis and that phytochemical Q2-3 can efficiently promote such anticancer activities. PMID:27089063

  10. A RARE PANCREATIC TUMOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Panda

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insulinomas are extremely rare. Patients present with hypoglycaemic symptoms which are due to neuroglycopenia and catecholamine release. Many patients are wrongly treated for neurological symptoms for some time before proper diagnosis is made. We present a case of insulinoma and include a review of literature. Case Report: A 35 year old male presented with 4 years history of symptoms suggesting, tremor, convulsion, palpitation and swelling often relieved by eating sugar lumps . He had considerable weight gains and was under antiepileptic medication for frequent seizure. Investigation reveled low blood sugar with high insulin level. CT identified a nodular tumour of pancreas. Further tests ruled out MEN 1 but confirmed insulinoma. He was operated with successful enucleation of tumour. Results: Postoperative his blood sugar normalised and was completely symptom free. Conclusions: Though insulinoma is a rare tumour, the classical presentation with symptoms of hypoglycemia, low blood glucose (40-50 mg/dL and relief of symptoms after administration of glucose (Whipple triad makes it easy to suspect. Biochemical tests with 72 hour fasting test, blood glucose and insulin ratios etc are highly confirmatory. It is associated with MEN 1 in 5% cases . Preoperative localization and introperative localization is essential for successful outcome.

  11. Multimodal therapy for synergic inhibition of tumour cell invasion and tumour-induced angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) are highly invasive tumours with frequent local and distant recurrence. Metastasis formation requires degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is fulfilled by membrane-associated proteases such as the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). WX-UK1 is a competitive active site inhibitor of the protease function of uPA that impairs on the capacity of tumour cells to invade in vitro. In the present study, effects of combinations of WX-UK1 with matrix metalloprotease inhibitors (MMP, galardin®) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, celecoxib®) inhibitors on tumour cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis induction were evaluated. Matrigel invasion chambers and a spheroid co-cultivation model with human fibroblast served to determine the invasive potential of both FaDu (SCCHN) and HeLa (cervical carcinoma) cells, each treated with combinations of Celecoxib®, Galardin®, and WX-UK1. Blocking of single protease systems resulted in a significant 50% reduction of tumour cell invasion using WX-UK1, while the triple combination was even more effective with 80% reduction of invasion. Additionally, a sprouting assay with HUVEC was used to test the anti-angiogenetic potential of the triple combination, resulting in a 40% decrease in the sprouting rate. A combined approach targeting different families of proteases and cyclooxygenases represents a promising adjuvant therapy

  12. mTOR ATP-competitive inhibitor INK128 inhibits neuroblastoma growth via blocking mTORC signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Huiyuan; Dou, Jun; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Yanling; Fan, Yihui; Cheng, Jin; Xu, Xin; Liu, Wei; Guan, Shan; Chen, Zhenghu; Shi, Yan; Patel, Roma; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A.; Zage, Peter E; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma often develops resistance to high-dose chemotherapy. The mTOR signaling cascade is frequently deregulated in human cancers and targeting mTOR signaling sensitizes many cancer types to chemotherapy. Here, using a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines, we found that the mTOR inhibitor INK128 showed inhibitory effects on both anchorage-dependent and independent growth of neuroblastoma cells and significantly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin (Dox) on these cell li...

  13. Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the signal causes the heart to contract and pump blood. Heart block occurs if the electrical signal is ... degree heart block limits the heart's ability to pump blood to the rest of the body. This type ...

  14. PAN-811 Blocks Chemotherapy Drug-Induced In Vitro Neurotoxicity, While Not Affecting Suppression of Cancer Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Gang Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy often results in cognitive impairment, and no neuroprotective drug is now available. This study aimed to understand underlying neurotoxicological mechanisms of anticancer drugs and to evaluate neuroprotective effects of PAN-811. Primary neurons in different concentrations of antioxidants (AOs were insulted for 3 days with methotrexate (MTX, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, or cisplatin (CDDP in the absence or presence of PAN-811·Cl·H2O. The effect of PAN-811 on the anticancer activity of tested drugs was also examined using mouse and human cancer cells (BNLT3 and H460 to assess any negative interference. Cell membrane integrity, survival, and death and intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured. All tested anticancer drugs elicited neurotoxicity only under low levels of AO and elicited a ROS increase. These results suggested that ROS mediates neurotoxicity of tested anticancer drugs. PAN-811 dose-dependently suppressed increased ROS and blocked the neurotoxicity when neurons were insulted with a tested anticancer drug. PAN-811 did not interfere with anticancer activity of anticancer drugs against BNLT3 cells. PAN-811 did not inhibit MTX-induced death of H460 cells but, interestingly, demonstrated a synergistic effect with 5-FU or CDDP in reducing cancer cell viability. Thus, PAN-811 can be a potent drug candidate for chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment.

  15. Gemfibrozil Inhibits Legionella pneumophila and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Enoyl Coenzyme A Reductases and Blocks Intracellular Growth of These Bacteria in Macrophages▿

    OpenAIRE

    Reich-Slotky, Ronit; Kabbash, Christina A.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Blanchard, John S.; Feinmark, Steven J.; Freeman, Sherry; Kaplan, Gilla; Shuman, Howard A.; Silverstein, Samuel C.

    2009-01-01

    We report here that gemfibrozil (GFZ) inhibits axenic and intracellular growth of Legionella pneumophila and of 27 strains of wild-type and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bacteriological medium and in human and mouse macrophages, respectively. At a concentration of 0.4 mM, GFZ completely inhibited L. pneumophila fatty acid synthesis, while at 0.12 mM it promoted cytoplasmic accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate. To assess the mechanism(s) of these effects, we cloned an L. pne...

  16. Antimicrobial Activity, Growth Inhibition of Human Tumour Cell Lines, and Phytochemical Characterization of the Hydromethanolic Extract Obtained from Sapindus saponaria L. Aerial Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled N. Rashed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydromethanolic extract of Sapindus saponaria L. aerial parts was investigated for antimicrobial activity (against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi and capacity to inhibit the growth of different human tumor cell lines as also nontumor liver cells. The evaluated extract was further characterized in terms of phytochemicals using UV, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MS spectroscopic tools. The extract has shown a significant antimicrobial activity on all tested bacterial and fungal species. The best activity was achieved against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus among bacteria and against all three Penicillium species tested. It also revealed cytotoxicity against human colon (HCT-15, cervical (HeLa, breast (MCF-7, and lung (NCI-H460 carcinoma cell lines, with HeLa being the most susceptible tumor cell line. The extract was not toxic for nontumor liver cells. Chromatographic separation of the extract resulted in the isolation and identification of stigmasterol, oleanolic acid, luteolin, luteolin 8-C-β-glucoside (orientin, luteolin 6-C-β-glucoside (isoorientin, luteolin 7-O-β-glucuronide, and rutin. The results of the present findings may be useful for the discovery of novel antitumor and antimicrobial agents from plant origin.

  17. Vaginal haemangioendothelioma: an unusual tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Vaginal tumours are uncommon and this is a particularly rare case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma in a 38-year-old woman. Initial presentation consisted of symptoms similar to uterovaginal prolapse with "something coming down". Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated a necrotic anterior vaginal wall tumour. Histology of the lesion revealed a haemangioendothelioma which had some features of haemangiopericytoma. While the natural history of vaginal haemangioendothelioma is uncertain, as a group, they have a propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma. Management of this tumour is challenging given the paucity of literature on this tumour. There is a need to add rare tumours to our "knowledge bank" to guide management of these unusual tumours.

  18. Radiological diagnosis of liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty patients treated with an intra-arterial cytostatic drug for metastases from colo-rectal carcinoma were evaluated with angiography to determine prognostic parameters. The extent of tumour in the liver and an unchanged or diminished tumour volume following treatment, as demonstrated with angiography, were associated with significant prolongation of survival. Patients who developed occlusion of the hepatic artery or of branches of the portal vein, also survived longer. 189 patients examined with angiography, 161 with computed tomography (CT), 95 with computed tomographic arteriography (CTA) and 71 with ultrasound (US) were subjected to liver evaluation at laparotomy consisting of inspection and palpation. The result of this surgical liver evaluation was for the purpose of the study regarded as completely accurate and was used to assess the accuracy of the different radiological methods. The location of tumour in the liver lobes or segments was analysed, with a separate evaluation of the right and left liver lobes. The rate of detection of individual tumour nodules was also determined. Angiography detected 55% of liver areas affected by tumour and 47% of individual tumour nodules. CT detected 83% of liver lobes or segments containing tumour, and 70% of the tumour nodules. US detected 69% of the portions of liver holding tumour, and also 69% of the tumour nodules. CTA detected 85% of tumours areas and 74% of separate tumour nodules. Some lesions detected with CT were not seen with CTA and vice versa. More false-positive results were recorded with CTA than with CT using intravenous contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  19. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 1H magnetic resonance imaging of human bladder carcinoma on nude mice: effects of tumour growth and treatment with cis-dichloro-diamine platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Certaines, J D; Albrectsen, J; Larsen, V A;

    1992-01-01

    phosphate and phosphomonoesters and a decrease of phosphocreatine. Fast growing tumours and early stage of regrowth after treatment presented a higher phosphocreatine/beta NTP ratio. Following CDDP treatment, 31P metabolite ratios and pH were significantly altered compared with age-matched controls, as...... early as 6 hours after treatment. Although necrotic area was clearly visible in MRI, no treatment effect could be detected on the images of treated tumours....

  20. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 1H magnetic resonance imaging of human bladder carcinoma on nude mice: effects of tumour growth and treatment with cis-dichloro-diamine platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Certaines, J D; Albrectsen, J; Larsen, V A;

    1993-01-01

    phosphate and phosphomonoesters and a decrease of phosphocreatine. Fast growing tumours and early stage of regrowth after treatment presented a higher phosphocreatine/beta NTP ratio. Following CDDP treatment, 31P metabolite ratios and pH were significantly altered compared with age-matched controls, as...... early as 6 hours after treatment. Although necrotic area was clearly visible in MRI, no treatment effect could be detected on the images of treated tumours....

  1. Neurohypophysis granular cell tumours. Upon neurohypophysis rare tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granular cell tumours of neurohypophysis are rare. These tumours are more often encountered as incidental autopsy findings seen in up to 17 % of unselected adult autopsy cases. There are few reports of para-sellar granular cell tumours large enough to cause symptoms. We present three cases of neurohypophysis granular cell tumour and a review of the literature. In one patient, the asymptomatic granular cell tumour was incidentally discovered at surgical removal of a corticotrophic micro-adenoma. The remaining 2 patients had a symptomatic tumour which caused neurological symptoms such as visual disturbance and headaches and endocrine disorders such as hypopituitarism or hyper-prolactinaemia. In these 2 cases, computerized tomography showed a well-circumscribed, contrast-enhanced, intra-sellar and supra-sellar mass. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an isointense gadolinium-enhanced mass in T1-weighted-images. Trans-sphenoidal partial resection was performed and histology was interpreted as a granular cell tumour. The immunohistochemical study was positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GEAP) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 1 of the 2 tumours and positive for S100 protein and vimentin in both tumours but negative for CD68. The histogenesis of neurohypophysis granular cell tumours is still controversial but ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies support the theory that may arise from pituicytes, the glial cells of neurohypophysis. Management of these benign, slow growing, tumours is based mainly on neurosurgical resection. Data from the literature do not support a beneficial effect of post operative radiation therapy on postoperative recurrences. (authors). 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. MRI EVALUATION OF SUPRATENTORIAL TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumours represents 1.7% of all cancers and contributes 1.8% of all cancer deaths. Of all the brain tumours 80% are supratentorial.1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging is an important modality, having higher sensitivity for detecting intracranial pathology. Multiplanar imaging is possible with MRI which helps in detection, localization and characterization of the lesion. The MRI examination has helped in early diagnosis, accurate localization of the tumour with prompt initiation of appropriate medical or surgical therapy. Recent advances like Magnetic Resonance (MR spectroscopy, MR fluoroscopy with stereotactic guided biopsy have revolutionized the role of MRI in study of intracranial tumours.

  3. Prognosticating and pharmacological prophylaxis of radiogenic malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancerogenic effect risks due to ionizing radiation, that impacted on large population groups because of Chernobyl and other accidents, cause the actuality of early diagnosis problems and of radiogenic tumour prevention. Since canceroembryonic antigen and α-fetoprotein had been found, the tumour markers began to be frequently used by oncologists. However, attempt to use onco-markers, as test for earlier pre-clinic determination, have been unsuccessful. The secondary messengers of hormonal signal, cyclic nucleotides, that take the leading place in system of organism self-regulation, had attracted our attention. As known, the increase of cell division number and suppression of morphological and biochemical developments of differentiation are the fundamental characteristics of tumour growth and are proceeding together with participating of cyclic nucleotide system. The including of both nucleotides in neoplastic transformation and at the same time their constant presence in extracellular fluid (blood serum, urine) makes the perspective use of these compounds as indicators of tumour growth before the appearance of clinic signs of diseases. This coincides with the modern viewpoints on the developments of optimum programs for pre-clinic diagnosing of tumours, that needs to base on the change in homeostasis preceded the malignant tumour development. (author)

  4. EGFR and microvessel density in canine malignant mammary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Guimarães, Maria João; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Silva-Carvalho, Ricardo; Lopes, Carlos; Queiroga, Felisbina L

    2013-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor which has been shown to have an important role in human breast cancer. Its role appears to be associated with increased angiogenesis and metastasis. In order to clarify its role in canine mammary tumours (CMT), 61 malignant neoplasms were studied by using immunohistochemistry, comparing expression of EGFR, microvessel density (MVD) by CD31 immunolabelling and characteristics of tumour aggressiveness. High EGFR immunoexpression was statistically significantly associated with tumour size, tumour necrosis, mitotic grade, histological grade of malignancy and clinical stage. High CD31 immunoreactivity was statistically significantly associated with tubule formation, histological grade of malignancy and clinical stage. A positive correlation between EGFR and CD31 immunoexpression (r = 0.843; P aggression in malignant CMT, presenting the possibility of using EGFR inhibitors in the context of metastatic disease treatment. PMID:24091029

  5. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. → These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. → The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  6. Attenuating Tumour Angiogenesis: A Preventive Role of Metformin against Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is one of the most widely prescribed antidiabetics for type 2 diabetes. A critical role of metformin against tumorigenesis has recently been implicated, although several studies also reported the lack of anticancer property of the antidiabetics. Given the controversies regarding the potential role of metformin against tumour progression, the effect of metformin against breast, cervical, and ovarian tumour cell lines was examined followed by in vivo assessment of metformin on tumour growth using xenograft breast cancer models. Significant inhibitory impact of metformin was observed in MCF-7, HeLa, and SKOV-3 cells, suggesting an antiproliferative property of metformin against breast, cervical, and ovarian tumour cells, respectively, with the breast tumour cells, MCF-7, being the most responsive. In vivo assessment was subsequently carried out, where mice with breast tumours were treated with metformin (20 mg/kg body weight or sterile PBS solution for 15 consecutive days. No inhibition of breast tumour progression was detected. However, tumour necrosis was significantly increased in the metformin-treated group, accompanied by decreased capillary formation within the tumours. Thus, despite the lack of short-term benefit of metformin against tumour progression, a preventive role of metformin against breast cancer was implicated, which is at partially attributable to the attenuation of tumour angiogenesis.

  7. Attenuating tumour angiogenesis: a preventive role of metformin against breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Jiang, Jingcheng; Li, Pan; Song, Huijuan; Wang, Weiwei; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is one of the most widely prescribed antidiabetics for type 2 diabetes. A critical role of metformin against tumorigenesis has recently been implicated, although several studies also reported the lack of anticancer property of the antidiabetics. Given the controversies regarding the potential role of metformin against tumour progression, the effect of metformin against breast, cervical, and ovarian tumour cell lines was examined followed by in vivo assessment of metformin on tumour growth using xenograft breast cancer models. Significant inhibitory impact of metformin was observed in MCF-7, HeLa, and SKOV-3 cells, suggesting an antiproliferative property of metformin against breast, cervical, and ovarian tumour cells, respectively, with the breast tumour cells, MCF-7, being the most responsive. In vivo assessment was subsequently carried out, where mice with breast tumours were treated with metformin (20 mg/kg body weight) or sterile PBS solution for 15 consecutive days. No inhibition of breast tumour progression was detected. However, tumour necrosis was significantly increased in the metformin-treated group, accompanied by decreased capillary formation within the tumours. Thus, despite the lack of short-term benefit of metformin against tumour progression, a preventive role of metformin against breast cancer was implicated, which is at partially attributable to the attenuation of tumour angiogenesis. PMID:25883966

  8. Blood vessel hyperpermeability and pathophysiology in human tumour xenograft models of breast cancer: a comparison of ectopic and orthotopic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Karyn S

    2012-12-01

    in vivo. A more predictable growth profile and the absence of ulcerated skin lesions further point to the MFP model as a strong choice for long term treatment studies that initiate after a target tumour size has been reached.

  9. Anatomical and biochemical investigation of primary brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancerous transformation entails major biochemical changes including modifications of the energy metabolism of the cell, e.g. utilisation of glucose and other substrates, protein synthesis, and expression of receptors and antigens. Tumour growth also leads to heterogeneity in blood flow owing to focal necrosis, angiogenesis and metabolic demands, as well as disruption of transport mechanisms of substrates across cell membranes and other physiological boundaries such as the blood-brain barrier. All these biochemical, histological and anatomical changes can be assessed with emission tomography, X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Whereas anatomical imaging is aimed at the diagnosis of brain tumours, biochemical imaging is better suited for tissue characterisation. The identification of a tumoural mass and the assessment of its size and vascularisation are best achieved with X-ray CT and MRI, while biochemical imaging can provide additional information that is crucial for tumour classification, differential diagnosis and follow-up. As the assessment of variables such as water content, appearance of cystic lesions and location of the tumour are largely irrelevant for tissue characterisation, a number of probes have been employed for the assessment of the biochemical features of tumours. Since biochemical changes may be related to the growth rate of cancer cells, they can be thought of as markers of tumour cell proliferation. Biochemical imaging with radionuclides of processes that occur at a cellular level provides information that complements findings obtained by anatomical imaging aimed at depicting structural, vascular and histological changes. This review focusses on the clinical application of anatomical brain imaging and biochemical assessment with positron emission tomography, single-photon emission tomography and MRS in the diagnosis of primary brain tumours, as well as in follow-up. (orig.)

  10. Neutrophil-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium is facilitated by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of different cytokines that are present in tumour-conditioned medium on human neutrophil (PMN)-induced tumour cell transmigration. DESIGN: Laboratory study. SETTING: University hospital, Ireland. MATERIAL: Isolated human PMN and cultured human breast tumour cell line, MDA-MB-231. Interventions: Human PMN treated with either tumour-conditioned medium or different media neutralised with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), and MDA-MB-231 cells were plated on macrovascular and microvascular endothelial monolayers in collagen-coated transwells to assess migration of tumour cells. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cytokines present in tumour-conditioned medium, PMN cytocidal function and receptor expression, and tumour cell transmigration. RESULTS: tumour-conditioned medium contained high concentrations of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin 8 (IL-8), but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin 3 (IL-3). Anti-GM-CSF MoAb significantly reduced PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells treated with tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05), whereas anti-VEGF and anti-IL-8 MoAbs did not affect their migration. In addition, anti-GM-CSF MoAb, but not anti-VEGF or anti-IL-8 MoAb, reduced PMN CD11b and CD18 overexpression induced by tumour-conditioned medium (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the GM-CSF that is present in tumour-conditioned medium may be involved, at least in part, in alterations in PMN function mediated by the medium and subsequently PMN-induced transmigration of tumour cells.

  11. Isolation and characterization of hormone-autonomous tumours of Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the molecular genetics of factors controlling plant cell growth, we have isolated and begun to characterize a set of tumours on the small crucifer Arabidopsis thaliana. Seeds or seedlings were exposed to 60Co gamma radiation and, 30–60 d after germination, tumours developed either on the hypocotyl or in the region of the apical meristem of about 1% of the plants. When excised and placed in culture, some of these tumours were found to be capable of hormone-independent growth. The tumours exhibit a number of different phenotypes, varying in colour, texture, and degree of differentiation. Some tumours appear to be completely undifferentiated, one consistently produces roots, and others show the sporadic appearance of shoots or leaflets. Doubling times of the tumours on hormone-free medium range from approximately 2 d to 9 d. We propose that these tumours arose due to heritable changes in the genome which result in altered expression of important growth-regulatory genes. Preliminary investigations of gene expression in the tumours have led to the identification of an mRNA that is abundant in all of the tumours, differentially expressed in plant organs and hormone-dependent callus grown on different auxins, and which encodes a putative glycine-rich protein. (author)

  12. Medical treatment for gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Rossana; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Savini, Agnese; Partelli, Stefano; Rinaldi, Silvia; Caramanti, Miriam; Ferrini, Consuelo; Falconi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) represents a various family of rare tumours. Surgery is the first choice in GEP-NENs patients with localized disease whilst in the metastatic setting many other treatment options are available. Somatostatin analogues are indicated for symptoms control in functioning tumours. Furthermore they may be effective to inhibit tumour progression. GEP-NENs pathogenesis has been extensively studied in the last years therefore several driver mutations pathway genes have been identified as crucial factors in their tumourigenesis. GEP-NENs can over-express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic-fibroblastic growth factor, transforming growth factor (TGF-α and -β), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors PDGF receptor, IGF-1 receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, VEGF receptor, and c-kit (stem cell factor receptor) that can be considered as potential targets. The availability of new targeted agents, such as everolimus and sunitinib that are effective in advanced and metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, has provided new treatment opportunities. Many trials combing new drugs are ongoing. PMID:27096034

  13. Benign tumours of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To present clinicopathological analysis of benign tumours of the vulva. Patients and Methods: Thirty cases of benign tumours of vulva were studied during 2 years research period. Detailed history along with complete local and general physical examination followed by all necessary pre-operative investigations were carried out. Excision surgery was the treatment of choice in majority of cases while marsupialization was done for Bartholin's cyst. Histopathology of tumours specimen was also collected. Results: A total of 30 cases were studied. Twenty-two were cystic and 8 were solid tumours. Aggressive angiomyxoma was 10% of solid tumours and Bartholin's cyst was 46.6% of cystic tumours. Most of the patients were multipara and between 21-30 years of age. The main site of tumour was labium majus. Excision surgery for all cases and marsupialization for Bartholin's cyst was treatment of choice. Conclusion: Aggressive angiomyxoma is the commonest solid benign vulval tumour. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vulval mass in women of reproductive age. (author)

  14. Growth of continental crust and its episodic reworking over >800 Ma: evidence from Hf-Nd isotope data on the Pietersburg block (South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Oscar; Zeh, Armin; Moyen, Jean-François; Doucelance, Régis; Martin, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    The formation and evolution of the continental crust during the Precambrian, and in particular during the Archaean eon (4.0-2.5 Ga), is still a matter of debate. In particular, it is not yet clear in which tectonic environment the genesis of crust took place and how the large volume of granitoid rocks that form ~70% of the Archaean crust were extracted from the mantle. Many studies highlighted that radiogenic isotope systems, especially Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd, are powerful tools to unravel the respective extent of crustal growth and recycling in Archaean terranes. This work presents coupled Hf and Nd isotope data (analyzed both in situ in accessory minerals and in whole rock samples) of Meso- to Neoarchaean granitoids, applied to unravel the processes of crust formation and evolution of the Pietersburg crustal block in South Africa. This crustal segment, the northermost one of the Archaean Kaapvaal Craton, is separated from older crust (3.65-3.10 Ga) by a large-scale suture zone, and the processes related to amalgamation of both blocks and their subsequent evolution are still unclear. The Pietersburg block is made up of a wide range of Archaean granitoid rocks, including tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) series, high-K monzogranites as well as (grano)diorites belonging to the so-called "sanukitoid" group [1], all intruded by late Paleoproterozoic alkaline complexes. Age determinations highlighted two stages of granitoid formation: (1) TTG magmatism took place episodically over >400 Ma between 3.34 and 2.89 Ga, with a major pulse at 2.97-2.90 Ga; while (2) all the other (high-K) granitoid types emplaced subsequently between 2.84 and 2.69 Ga before a long magmatic shutdown until the intrusion of alkaline complexes at ~2.00 Ga [2-3]. Isotope systematics reveal that these two stages are related to juvenile crust formation and crust reworking, respectively. Indeed, all Hf-Nd isotope data from TTG gneisses are suprachondritic, pointing to a juvenile origin and precluding

  15. Improving tumour response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation oncology is in the middle of the most exciting developments in its 100-year history. Progress in treatment planning and delivery, in medical imaging and in basic cancer and normal tissue biology is likely to change the indication for radiotherapy as well as the way it is prescribed and delivered. Technological and conceptual advances, in particular the development of the multi-leaf collimator and the concept of inverse treatment planning, have led to the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with its capability to plan and deliver non-uniform dose distributions in the clinic. This has forced us to re-think radiation oncology: refining the indication for radiotherapy, optimizing the prescription of dose distributions and considering how, based on clinical evidence, radiation can best be combined with other treatment modalities, surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy and biologically targeted therapies. The attraction of radiation therapy as an element of multi-modality cancer therapy is that it induces DNA damage that can be modulated in space and time. Progress in basic cancer biology, genomics and proteomics, as well as biological imaging provides novel avenues for individualization of cancer therapy and for biological optimization of radiotherapy. In improving cancer care, it is the therapeutic ratio, rather than tumour control per se, that must be optimised. Interestingly, the two main avenues for improving the effectiveness of radiotherapy currently being actively pursued in the clinic generally aim at different sides of the therapeutic ratio: 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT predominantly aim to reduce normal-tissue side effects - and by doing this, open the way for dose escalation that may lead to increased tumour control rates - whereas combined radio-chemotherapy aims to improve tumour response - while keeping the fingers crossed that this will not increase normal-tissue complications to the same extent. In parallel with these

  16. Cancer and tumour markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer has been a major cause of death world wide and in Nigeria there are six commonest forms of manifestation of cancer known. Of these prostrate cancer is the highest with 16% occurrence of all known cancers according to a study by the Histopathology Department of the UCH. Many factors, amongst them dietary, environmental, lifestyle, age and sedentary work are possible causes. With the global rise in incidents, the IAEA initiated the Tumour Marker Project as a means of screening cancers in 15 African countries including Nigeria. In Nigeria, 4 groups of the commonest cancers have been chosen for screening. These are prostrate cancer, primary liver cancer, cancer of the GI tract and trophoblastic cancer

  17. Recurrent hyperphosphatemic tumoural calcinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Sonal; Agarwal, Asha; Nigam, Anand; Rao, Yashwant Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Tumoural calcinosis (TC) is a benign gradually developing disorder that can occur in a variety of clinical settings, characterised by subcutaneous deposition of calcium phosphate with or without giant cell reaction. We describe a case of 11-year-old girl presenting with recurrent hard swellings in the vicinity of shoulder and hip joints associated with elevated serum phosphate and normal serum calcium levels. TC has been mainly reported from Africa, with very few cases reported from India. After the diagnosis of hyperphosphatemic TC was established, the patient was treated with oral sevelamer and is under constant follow-up to detect recurrence, if any. The present case highlights the fact that although an uncommon lesion, TC must be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous hard lump in the vicinity of a joint. PMID:23010461

  18. Inhibition of multiple vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) blocks lymph node metastases but inhibition of VEGFR-2 is sufficient to sensitize tumor cells to platinum-based chemotherapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Sini, Patrizia; Samarzija, Ivana; Baffert, Fabienne; Littlewood-Evans, Amanda; Schnell, Christian; Theuer, Andreas; Christian, Sven; Boos, Anja; Hess-Stumpp, Holger; Foekens, John; Setyono-Han, Buddy; Wood, Jeanette; Hynes, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    textabstractVascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) have important roles in cancer, affecting blood and lymphatic vessel functionality as well as tumor cells themselves. We compared the efficacy of a VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PTK787/ZK222584 (PTK/ZK), which targets the three VEGFRs, with blocking antibodies directed against VEGFR-2 (DC101) or VEGF-A (Pab85618) in a metastatic melanoma model. Although all inhibitors exerted comparable effects on primary tumor growth, only P...

  19. Insulin-like growth factors and insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins in relation to disease status and incidence of hypoglycaemia in patients with a gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikhof, B.; van Doorn, J.; Suurmeijer, A. J. H.; Rautenberg, M. W.; Groenen, P. J. T. A.; Verdijk, M. A. J.; Jager, P. L.; de Jong, S.; Gietema, J. A.; van der Graaf, W. T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients and methods: Twenty-four patients were included. Plasma samples were collected before 1 week and median 5 months after start of treatment with imatinib, and levels of IGF-I, total IGF-II, pro-IGF-IIE[68-88], insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-2, -3 and -6 were determined. GI

  20. Determination of sarcosine as possible tumour marker of prostate tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Cernei; Michal Masarik; Jaromir Gumulec; Ondrej Zitka; Petr Babula; Rene Kizek

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid sarcosine, known also as N-methylglycine, may beestablished as new very important marker in prostate malignant tumours and may be determined by very simple test. Cancer of prostate is one of the most incident types of malignant tumours in men. More than one thousand men in Czech Republic die due to this disease. As well as in the case of other malignant tumours, for initiation of treatment well timed diagnosis of disease is necessary. For determination of sarcosine we employed the ...

  1. MET is required for the recruitment of anti-tumoural neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finisguerra, Veronica; Di Conza, Giusy; Di Matteo, Mario; Serneels, Jens; Costa, Sandra; Thompson, A A Roger; Wauters, Els; Walmsley, Sarah; Prenen, Hans; Granot, Zvi; Casazza, Andrea; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2015-06-18

    Mutations or amplification of the MET proto-oncogene are involved in the pathogenesis of several tumours, which rely on the constitutive engagement of this pathway for their growth and survival. However, MET is expressed not only by cancer cells but also by tumour-associated stromal cells, although its precise role in this compartment is not well characterized. Here we show that MET is required for neutrophil chemoattraction and cytotoxicity in response to its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Met deletion in mouse neutrophils enhances tumour growth and metastasis. This phenotype correlates with reduced neutrophil infiltration to both the primary tumour and metastatic sites. Similarly, Met is necessary for neutrophil transudation during colitis, skin rash or peritonitis. Mechanistically, Met is induced by tumour-derived tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α or other inflammatory stimuli in both mouse and human neutrophils. This induction is instrumental for neutrophil transmigration across an activated endothelium and for inducible nitric oxide synthase production upon HGF stimulation. Consequently, HGF/MET-dependent nitric oxide release by neutrophils promotes cancer cell killing, which abates tumour growth and metastasis. After systemic administration of a MET kinase inhibitor, we prove that the therapeutic benefit of MET targeting in cancer cells is partly countered by the pro-tumoural effect arising from MET blockade in neutrophils. Our work identifies an unprecedented role of MET in neutrophils, suggests a potential 'Achilles' heel' of MET-targeted therapies in cancer, and supports the rationale for evaluating anti-MET drugs in certain inflammatory diseases. PMID:25985180

  2. Tumour control by whole brain irradiation of anti-VEGF-treated mice bearing intracerebral glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.C. Verhoeff; L.J.A. Stalpers; A. Claes; K.E. Hovinga; G.D. Musters; W. Vandertop; D.J. Richel; W.P.J. Leenders; W.R. van Furth

    2009-01-01

    Aim of the study: Tumour angiogenesis and invasion are key features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Angiogenesis inhibitors increase progression-free survival (PFS) of recurrent GBM patients. VEGF inhibition controls the bulk tumour growth by inhibition of angiogenesis, but does not inhibit the in

  3. Tumour control by whole brain irradiation of anti-VEGF-treated mice bearing intracerebral glioma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, J.J.; Stalpers, L.J.; Claes, A.; Hovinga, K.E.; Musters, G.D.; Top, W.P. van der; Richel, D.J.; Leenders, W.P.J.; Furth, W.R. van

    2009-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: Tumour angiogenesis and invasion are key features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Angiogenesis inhibitors increase progression-free survival (PFS) of recurrent GBM patients. VEGF inhibition controls the bulk tumour growth by inhibition of angiogenesis, but does not inhibit the in

  4. Altered oxidant-antioxidant profile in canine mammary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaraguruparan, R; Balachandran, C; Manohar, B Murali; Nagini, S

    2005-05-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms in female dogs. Oxidative stress arising due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species, coupled with altered antioxidant capacities has been implicated in the pathogenesis of all types of cancers. However, the extent of lipid peroxidation and the status of antioxidants in canine mammary tumours have not been investigated. The present study was designed to evaluate the oxidant-antioxidant profile in canine mammary tumours. Lipid peroxidation as evidenced by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, and conjugated dienes, as well as the status of the antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and vitamin C, in tumour tissues of 25 bitches was estimated. Lipid peroxidation in tumour tissues was enhanced compared to the corresponding adjacent uninvolved tissues. This was accompanied by significant elevation in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. This study suggests that upregulation of antioxidants induced by lipid peroxidation confers a selective growth advantage to tumour cells over their adjacent normal counterparts. PMID:15751580

  5. Mononuclear phagocyte system depletion blocks interstitial tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C expression and induces salt-sensitive hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnik, Agnes; Dahlmann, Anke; Kopp, Christoph; Goss, Jennifer; Wagner, Hubertus; van Rooijen, Nico; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Müller, Dominik N; Park, Joon-Keun; Luft, Friedrich C; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Titze, Jens

    2010-03-01

    We showed recently that mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) cells provide a buffering mechanism for salt-sensitive hypertension by driving interstitial lymphangiogenesis, modulating interstitial Na(+) clearance, and increasing endothelial NO synthase protein expression in response to very high dietary salt via a tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C regulatory mechanism. We now tested whether isotonic saline and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt treatment leads to a similar regulatory response in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male rats were fed a low-salt diet and received tap water (low-salt diet LSD), 1.0% saline (high-salt diet HSD), or DOCA+1.0% saline (DOCA-HSD). To test the regulatory role of interstitial MPS cells, we further depleted MPS cells with clodronate liposomes. HSD and DOCA-HSD led to Na(+) accumulation in the skin, MPS-driven tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C-mediated hyperplasia of interstitial lymph capillaries, and increased endothelial NO synthase protein expression in skin interstitium. Clodronate liposome MPS cell depletion blocked MPS infiltration in the skin interstitium, resulting in unchanged tonicity-responsive enhance binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C levels and absent hyperplasia of the lymph capillary network. Moreover, no increased skin endothelial NO synthase protein expression occurred in either clodronate liposome-treated HSD or DOCA-salt rats. Thus, absence of the MPS-cell regulatory response converted a salt-resistant blood-pressure state to a salt-sensitive state in HSD rats. Furthermore, salt-sensitive hypertension in DOCA-salt rats was aggravated. We conclude that MPS cells act as onsite controllers of interstitial volume and blood pressure homeostasis, providing a local regulatory salt-sensitive tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/vascular endothelial growth factor C-mediated mechanism in the skin to maintain

  6. Anaesthetic management for caesarean section in a case of previously operated with residual pituitary tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerana N Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful anaesthetic management for caesarean section in a case with previous pituitary tumour resection, with residual tumour, is reported. The pituitary gland undergoes global hyperplasia during pregnancy. Functional pituitary tumours may exhibit symptomatic enlargement during pregnancy. Growth hormone secreting tumour is associated with acromegaly which has associated anaesthetic implications of difficult airway, systemic hypertension, and diabetes and electrolyte imbalance. Intracranial space occupying lesions can increase intra cranial pressure and compromise cerebral perfusion or cause herniation. We report management of this case.

  7. Molecular imaging of tumour hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By allowing an earlier diagnosis and a more exhaustive assessment of extension of the disease, the tomography by emission of positrons (PET) transforms the care of numerous cancers. At present, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]-F.D.G.) imaging appears as the only one available but new molecular markers are being developed. In the next future they would modify the approach of cancers. In this context, the molecular imaging of the hypoxia and especially the 18Fluoromisonidazole PET ([18F]-MISO PET) can give supplementary information allowing the mapping of hypoxic regions within the tumour. Because of the links, which exist between tumour hypoxia and treatment resistance of very numerous cancers, this information can have an interest, for determination of prognosis as well as for the delineation, volumes to be irradiated. Head and neck tumours are doubtless those for which the literature gives the most elements on the therapeutic impact of tumour hypoxia. Targeted therapies, based on hypoxia, already exist and the contribution of the molecular imaging could be decisive in the evaluation of the impact of such treatment. Molecular imaging of brain tumours remains to be developed. The potential contributions of the [18F]-MISO PET for the care of these patients need to be confirmed. In this context, we propose a review of hypoxia molecular imaging taking as examples head and neck tumours and glioblastomas (GB), two tumours for which hypoxia is one of the key factors to overcome in order to increase therapeutics results

  8. Metformin blocks the stimulative effect of a high-energy diet on colon carcinoma growth in vivo and is associated with reduced expression of fatty acid synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algire, Carolyn; Amrein, Lilian; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Panasci, Lawrence; Pollak, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the association of obesity with adverse colon cancer outcomes are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of a high-energy diet on growth of an in vivo colon cancer model. Seventeen days following the injection of 5x10(5) MC38 colon carcinoma cells, tumors from mice on the high-energy diet were approximately twice the volume of those of mice on the control diet. These findings were correlated with the observation that the high-energy diet led to elevated insulin levels, phosphorylated AKT, and increased expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) by the tumor cells. Metformin, an antidiabetic drug, leads to the activation of AMPK and is currently under investigation for its antineoplastic activity. We observed that metformin blocked the effect of the high-energy diet on tumor growth, reduced insulin levels, and attenuated the effect of diet on phosphorylation of AKT and expression of FASN. Furthermore, the administration of metformin led to the activation of AMPK, the inhibitory phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the upregulation of BNIP3 and increased apoptosis as estimated by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Prior work showed that activating mutations of PI3K are associated with increased AKT activation and adverse outcome in colon cancer; our results demonstrate that the aggressive tumor behavior associated with a high-energy diet has similar effects on this signaling pathway. Furthermore, metformin is demonstrated to reverse the effects of the high-energy diet, thus suggesting a potential role for this agent in the management of a metabolically defined subset of colon cancers. PMID:20228137

  9. Competition for cytotoxic immune capacity against a 'syngeneic' mouse tumour distributed at two sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassoux, D; MacLennan, I C; Munro, T R

    1977-06-15

    Normal C3H mice will develop fatal ascites after the intraperitoneal injection of as few as 100 BP8 cells. However, mice can be immunized so that they can specifically reject an intraperitoneal challenge of 10(7) of these C3H-derived tumour cells. This paper investigates a phenomenon in which the capacity of immunized mice to reject an intraperitoneal challenge of tumour cells is lost between two to seven days after tumour cells have been given subcutaneously. Investigation of this temporary loss of capacity to reject the intraperitoneal challenge of tumour suggests that this might be due to the attraction of cytotoxic immunity to the site of subcutaneous injection. The possibility that this phenomenon is due to blocking factors, tumour overload, suppressor cells or enhancing antibody has been investigated but experimental results are given which do not favour these explanations. PMID:873644

  10. Tumour cell proliferation after failed ruthenium plaque radiotherapy for posterior uveal melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enucleation following ruthenium plaque radiotherapy for posterior uveal melanoma indicates failure of treatment. This study focused on the histopathological findings and remaining tumour cell growth fraction in 42 of 46 patients with failed ruthenium plaque treatment (of 266 patients treated) for melanoma of the choroid or ciliary body. The cause for enucleation was clinically detected tumour regrowth in 27 (64%) patients, treatment-related ocular side effects in 12 (29%) cases and the patient's personal preference in three (7%) cases. The median time elapsing from plaque radiotherapy to enucleation was not significantly different for patients with recurrent tumour growth (23 months) compared to those enucleated without clinical signs of regrowth (19 months). While all tumours showed some regressive features by histopathological examination, only five melanomas were completely necrotic and viable-appearing tumours cells were present in all of the remaining 37 (88%) irradiated tumours. Microwave processed PC-10 immunostaining increased the sensitivity to detect cycling cells compared to the sole use of mitotic cell counts. By the former technique, proliferating tumour cells were detected in 17 or 23 (74%) studied melanomas of eyes enucleated for tumour regrowth following brachytherapy. Also, the number of cycling melanoma cells was similar to that of non-irradiated controls managed solely by enucleation. In contrast, the proliferative compartment of irradiated, but non-recurrent, posterior uveal melanomas were significantly reduced compared to those of matched controls. Still, cycling tumour cells were present in four of 13 (31%) irradiated melanomas, clinically assumed to be successfully treated. (au) 43 refs

  11. Imaging methods for ovarian tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper compares the results of MRT with sonography in 64 patients with tumours of the adnexa in 35 patients examined by CT. There was no difference between these three imaging methods as regards lateralisation of the lesion. MRT provided better differentiation because of the excellent demonstration of the uterus and of tumours of the adnexa. Detailed tissue characterisation, particularly as regards cystic lesions, provides improved diagnostic information. MRT has problems, however, because of its low spatial resolution and the difficulty in differentiation from bowel loops. At present sonography and CT is better at establishing a differential diagnosis. CT remains the method of choice for tumour staging. (orig.)

  12. CT appearances of pleural tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahudeen, H.M. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom)], E-mail: hmdsal@gmail.com; Hoey, E.T.D. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Robertson, R.J.; Darby, M.J. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is the imaging technique of choice for characterizing pleural masses with respect to their location, composition, and extent. CT also provides important information regarding invasion of the chest wall and surrounding structures. A spectrum of tumours can affect the pleura of which metastatic adenocarcinoma is the commonest cause of malignant pleural disease, while malignant mesothelioma is the most common primary pleural tumour. Certain CT features help differentiate benign from malignant processes. This pictorial review highlights the salient CT appearances of a range of tumours that may affect the pleura.

  13. Sodium hyaluronate enhances colorectal tumour cell metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Sodium hyaluronate has been used intraperitoneally to prevent postoperative adhesions. However, the effect of sodium hyaluronate on tumour growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. METHODS: Human colorectal tumour cell lines SW480, SW620 and SW707 were treated with sodium hyaluronate (10-500 microg\\/ml) and carboxymethylcellulose (0.125-1 per cent), and tumour cell proliferation and motility were determined in vitro. For the in vivo experiments male BD IX rats were randomized to a sodium hyaluronate group (n = 11; intraperitoneal administration of 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml 0.4 per cent sodium hyaluronate) or a phosphate-buffered saline group (n = 11; 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally). Four weeks later the intraperitoneal tumour load was visualized directly. RESULTS: In vitro sodium hyaluronate increased tumour cell proliferation and motility significantly. Sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell motility appeared to be CD44 receptor dependent, whereas sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell proliferation was CD44 receptor independent. In vivo there was a significantly higher total tumour nodule count in the peritoneal cavity of the sodium hyaluronate-treated group compared with the control (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Sodium hyaluronate enhances tumour metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that use of sodium hyaluronate to prevent adhesions in colorectal cancer surgery may also potentiate intraperitoneal tumour growth. Presented to the Patey Prize Session of the Surgical Research Society and the annual scientific meeting of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, Brighton, UK, 4-7 May 1999

  14. [Efficacy of somatostatin analogues in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours based on the results of recent clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igaz, Péter

    2014-11-30

    Due to their inhibitory effects on hormone secretion, somatostatin analogues are of pivotal importance in the symptomatic treatment of hormone-secreting neuroendocrine tumours. Although several earlier clinical observations supported the view that these biological agents are capable of inhibiting the growth of neuroendocrine tumours, the PROMID study published in 2009 was the first to confirm the inhibitory effect of octreotide on tumour growth and demonstrated the prolongation of progression free survival. These findings have been confirmed and extended by the most recent CLARINET trial with lanreotide published in 2014. Somatostatin analogues are capable of inhibiting tumour growth and stabilizing disease irrespective of the hormonal activity of the tumour and, therefore, their applicability is expected to be extended to the treatment of hormonally inactive neuroendocrine tumours, as well. PMID:25417137

  15. Reproductive tract tumours: the scourge of woman reproduction ails Indian rhinoceroses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Robert; Göritz, Frank; Saragusty, Joseph; Stoops, Monica A; Hildebrandt, Thomas B

    2014-01-01

    In Indian rhinoceros, extensive leiomyoma, a benign smooth muscle tumour, was sporadically diagnosed post mortem and commonly thought of as contributing factor for reduced fecundity of this species in captivity. However, to date, the prevalence of reproductive tract tumours and their relevance for fecundity are unknown. Our analysis of the international studbook now reveals that females cease reproducing at the age of 18.1±1.2 years; equivalent to a reproductive lifespan of just 9.5±1.3 years. This short reproductive life is in sharp contrast to their longevity in captivity of over 40 years. Here we show, after examining 42% of the captive female population, that age-related genital tract tumours are highly prevalent in this endangered species. Growth and development of these tumours was found to be age-related, starting from the age of 10 years. All females older than 12 years had developed genital tumours, just 7-9 years past maturity. Tumour sizes ranged from 1.5-10 cm. With age, tumours became more numerous, sometimes merging into one large diffuse tumour mass. These tumours, primarily vaginal and cervical, presumably cause widespread young-age infertility by the age of 18 years. In few cases, tumour necrosis suggested possible malignancy of tumours. Possible consequences of such genital tract tumour infestation are hindered intromission, pain during mating, hampered sperm passage, risk of ascending infection during pregnancy, dystocia, or chronic vaginal bleeding. In humans, leiomyoma affect up to 80% of pre-menopause women. While a leading cause for infertility, pregnancy is known to reduce the risk of tumour development. However, different from human, surgical intervention is not a viable treatment option in rhinoceroses. Thus, in analogy to humans, we suggest early onset and seamless consecutive pregnancies to help reduce prevalence of this disease, better maintain a self-sustained captive population and improve animal welfare. PMID:24671211

  16. Reproductive tract tumours: the scourge of woman reproduction ails Indian rhinoceroses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hermes

    Full Text Available In Indian rhinoceros, extensive leiomyoma, a benign smooth muscle tumour, was sporadically diagnosed post mortem and commonly thought of as contributing factor for reduced fecundity of this species in captivity. However, to date, the prevalence of reproductive tract tumours and their relevance for fecundity are unknown. Our analysis of the international studbook now reveals that females cease reproducing at the age of 18.1±1.2 years; equivalent to a reproductive lifespan of just 9.5±1.3 years. This short reproductive life is in sharp contrast to their longevity in captivity of over 40 years. Here we show, after examining 42% of the captive female population, that age-related genital tract tumours are highly prevalent in this endangered species. Growth and development of these tumours was found to be age-related, starting from the age of 10 years. All females older than 12 years had developed genital tumours, just 7-9 years past maturity. Tumour sizes ranged from 1.5-10 cm. With age, tumours became more numerous, sometimes merging into one large diffuse tumour mass. These tumours, primarily vaginal and cervical, presumably cause widespread young-age infertility by the age of 18 years. In few cases, tumour necrosis suggested possible malignancy of tumours. Possible consequences of such genital tract tumour infestation are hindered intromission, pain during mating, hampered sperm passage, risk of ascending infection during pregnancy, dystocia, or chronic vaginal bleeding. In humans, leiomyoma affect up to 80% of pre-menopause women. While a leading cause for infertility, pregnancy is known to reduce the risk of tumour development. However, different from human, surgical intervention is not a viable treatment option in rhinoceroses. Thus, in analogy to humans, we suggest early onset and seamless consecutive pregnancies to help reduce prevalence of this disease, better maintain a self-sustained captive population and improve animal welfare.

  17. Tumour angiogenesis as a chemo-mechanical surface instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giverso, Chiara; Ciarletta, Pasquale

    2016-03-01

    The hypoxic conditions within avascular solid tumours may trigger the secretion of chemical factors, which diffuse to the nearby vasculature and promote the formation of new vessels eventually joining the tumour. Mathematical models of this process, known as tumour angiogenesis, have mainly investigated the formation of the new capillary networks using reaction-diffusion equations. Since angiogenesis involves the growth dynamics of the endothelial cells sprouting, we propose in this work an alternative mechanistic approach, developing a surface growth model for studying capillary formation and network dynamics. The model takes into account the proliferation of endothelial cells on the pre-existing capillary surface, coupled with the bulk diffusion of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The thermo-dynamical consistency is imposed by means of interfacial and bulk balance laws. Finite element simulations show that both the morphology and the dynamics of the sprouting vessels are controlled by the bulk diffusion of VEGF and the chemo-mechanical and geometric properties at the capillary interface. Similarly to dendritic growth processes, we suggest that the emergence of tree-like vessel structures during tumour angiogenesis may result from the free boundary instability driven by competition between chemical and mechanical phenomena occurring at different length-scales.

  18. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  19. Sclerosing stromal tumour of ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitrawati B. Gargade

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing stromal tumor is rare benign ovarian sex cord stromal tumour which occurs predominantly in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with irregular menstruation and pelvic pain. She underwent panhysterectomy as USG revealed a solid and cystic 15 cm right ovarian tumour with increased vascularity with raised CA125. Hysterectomy specimen revealed a benign sclerosing stromal tumour of right ovary. We present this rare case to emphasis the awareness of benign sclerosing stromal tumour of ovary in young female to avoid unnecessary extensive surgery. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 2037-2040

  20. Ablative therapy for liver tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Dick, E A; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Thomas, H C; Gedroyc, W M W

    2002-01-01

    Established ablative therapies for the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours, including percutaneous ethanol injection, cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation, are discussed. Newer techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging guided laser interstitial thermal therapy of liver tumours has produced a median survival rate of 40.8 months after treatment. The merits of this newly emerging technique are discussed, together with future developments, such as focused ultrasound therapy, ...

  1. Canine mammary tumours, an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeckx, N; de Rooster, H; Veldhuis Kroeze, E J B; Van Ginneken, C; Van Brantegem, L

    2011-12-01

    Canine mammary tumours (CMTs) are the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs. Although the prevalence of these tumours decreases in regions where preventive ovari(ohyster)ectomy is performed, it remains an important disease entity in veterinary medicine. Moreover, treatment options are limited in comparison with human breast cancer. Nevertheless, recent human treatment protocols might have potential in bitches suffering from CMTs. PMID:21645126

  2. Tumour markers in urology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The same applies essentially also for the bladder carcinomas: There is no reliable marker for these cancers which would be useful for clinical purposes. TPA has proven to be too non-specific in malignoma-detection and therefore hardly facilitates clinical decision-making in individual cases. The CEA is not sensitive enough to be recommendable for routine application. However, in advanced stages a CEA examination may be useful if applied within the scope of therapeutic efforts made to evaluate efficacy. In cases of carcinomas of the prostate the sour prostate-specific phosphatase (SPP) and, more recently, especially the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have proven in follow-up and therapy monitoring, whereby the PSA is superior to the SPP. Nevertheless, both these markers should be employed in therapy monitoring because differences in behaviour will be observed when the desired treatment effect is only achieved in one of the two markers producing tumour cell clonuses. Both markers, but especially the PSA, are quite reliably in agreement with the result of the introduced chemo-/hormone therapy, whereby an increase may be a sure indicator of relapse several months previous to clinical symptoms, imaging procedures, so-called routine laboratory results and subjective complaints. However, none of the 2 markers is appropriate for the purposes of screening or early diagnosis of carcinomas of the prostate. (orig.)

  3. Radiotherapy of testicular tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, M.

    1980-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, the general pathological, diagnostical and therapeutical measures against seminomas and teratomas are dealt with. In the second part, the results obtained by the radiotherapeutical division of the University Clinics of Freiburg 1964-1977 in the treatment of seminomas and teratomas are described. The average age of the 59 seminoma patients was 36 years, the average age of the 28 teratoma patients was 26. The 5-years-total survival rate of the seminoma patients was 80.8%, for teratoma patients it was 30.5%. In the individual phases, of all seminoma patients in stage I, 93.1% were still alive after 5 years, in stage II 95.9%, in stage III 12.5%. The 5-years survival rate of the teratoma patients in stage I was around 100%, in stage II around 36.8% and in stage III around 20.5%. In the discussion, the problems of the histological and pathological classification for testicular tumours are talked about and the treatment methods used at the Freiburg university clinics are described. The results obtained in the Freiburg university clinics are compared with those of other authors.

  4. Significance of tumour mass on T-lymphocyte levels in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, H S; Whitehead, R H; Hughes, L E

    1979-08-01

    The relationship between tumour load and immunity in gastrointestinal cancer has been studied by sequential comparison in patients whose tumour has been removed and those whose tumour was found to be inoperable. Total lymphocyte count, absolute and percentage T- and B-lymphocyte counts, effect of papain on E-rosetting cell levels, and inhibitory effect of cancer sera on E-rosette formation by normal lymphocytes have been studied in 30 patients with stomach or colorectal cancer, and 10 control patients with benign gastrointestinal disease. The examination was done on each patient before and at regular intervals after operation up to 24 weeks. Operable cases, with removal of tumour load, showed a temporary fall in total lymphocyte count and T cell counts, which returned to normal by four weeks postoperatively. Inoperable cases (15 patients) showed a progressive fall in total lymphocyte count and a relatively greater depression of T cell counts, in parallel with increasing tumour mass. E-receptor blocking factor was demonstrated in the sera of cancer patients. This factor was related to tumour mass and presumably was of tumour origin, as it persisted in the inoperable group but disappeared by 12 weeks after tumour removal. The factor explained the excess depresion of T cells over total lymphocytes, but does not explain the continuing depression of total lymphocyte count in the cancer patients. PMID:314923

  5. Nonlinear modelling of cancer: bridging the gap between cells and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite major scientific, medical and technological advances over the last few decades, a cure for cancer remains elusive. The disease initiation is complex, and including initiation and avascular growth, onset of hypoxia and acidosis due to accumulation of cells beyond normal physiological conditions, inducement of angiogenesis from the surrounding vasculature, tumour vascularization and further growth, and invasion of surrounding tissue and metastasis. Although the focus historically has been to study these events through experimental and clinical observations, mathematical modelling and simulation that enable analysis at multiple time and spatial scales have also complemented these efforts. Here, we provide an overview of this multiscale modelling focusing on the growth phase of tumours and bypassing the initial stage of tumourigenesis. While we briefly review discrete modelling, our focus is on the continuum approach. We limit the scope further by considering models of tumour progression that do not distinguish tumour cells by their age. We also do not consider immune system interactions nor do we describe models of therapy. We do discuss hybrid-modelling frameworks, where the tumour tissue is modelled using both discrete (cell-scale) and continuum (tumour-scale) elements, thus connecting the micrometre to the centimetre tumour scale. We review recent examples that incorporate experimental data into model parameters. We show that recent mathematical modelling predicts that transport limitations of cell nutrients, oxygen and growth factors may result in cell death that leads to morphological instability, providing a mechanism for invasion via tumour fingering and fragmentation. These conditions induce selection pressure for cell survivability, and may lead to additional genetic mutations. Mathematical modelling further shows that parameters that control the tumour mass shape also control its ability to invade. Thus, tumour morphology may serve as a predictor of

  6. C/EBPalpha: a tumour suppressor in multiple tissues?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuster, Mikkel Bruhn; Porse, Bo Torben

    2006-01-01

    The CCATT/enhancer binding protein alpha, C/EBPalpha, is a key transcription factor involved in late differentiation events of several cell types. Besides acting as a classical transcription factor, C/EBPalpha is also a well-characterized inhibitor of mitotic growth in most cell lines tested. In...... that C/EBPalpha acts as a tumour suppressor in the hematopoietic system and that mutation within C/EBPalpha is sufficient to induce tumourigenesis. Here, we will review these data and probe the possibility that C/EBPalpha also act as a tumour suppressor in other C/EBPalpha-expressing tissues....

  7. Osteopenia in children surviving brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitton, A.C.; Eves, M. [Children' s Hospital at Chedoke-McMaster, Room 3N27B, Health Sciences Centre, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Hay, J. [Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada); Gill, G.J.; Webber, C.E. [Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University (Canada); Simpson, T. [Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Barr, R.D. [Children' s Hospital at Chedoke-McMaster, Room 3N27B, Health Sciences Centre, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    Osteopenia has been reported in children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, apparently as a consequence of therapy. It has been suggested that cranial irradiation may play a crucial role in this disorder. To explore that possibility, survivors of brain tumours in childhood, all of whom had received radiotherapy, were examined for evidence of bone mineral loss. 19 children were assessed, on average at 7 years after treatment. Measurements of growth velocities, plain radiography of the skeleton, bone densitometry, health-related quality of life and physical activity were undertaken. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency had been detected in 6 children and 5 had received GH replacement, for a minimum of more than 3 years. 9 children were radiographically osteopenic (including the 5 who had received GH). Z scores for bone mineral density (BMD) were negative in the majority of children. Health-related quality of life was less and pain more frequent in those with low BMD scores. Pain was correlated negatively with both free-time activity and seasonal activity (P<0.01). Osteopenia is a common sequel of therapy in children with brain tumours. Those with osteopenia have more pain and more compromised, health-related quality of life than those who are not osteopenic, and pain significantly limits physical activity. The pathogenesis of osteopenia in these children is still uncertain, but is likely to be multifactorial. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. Osteopenia in children surviving brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteopenia has been reported in children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, apparently as a consequence of therapy. It has been suggested that cranial irradiation may play a crucial role in this disorder. To explore that possibility, survivors of brain tumours in childhood, all of whom had received radiotherapy, were examined for evidence of bone mineral loss. 19 children were assessed, on average at 7 years after treatment. Measurements of growth velocities, plain radiography of the skeleton, bone densitometry, health-related quality of life and physical activity were undertaken. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency had been detected in 6 children and 5 had received GH replacement, for a minimum of more than 3 years. 9 children were radiographically osteopenic (including the 5 who had received GH). Z scores for bone mineral density (BMD) were negative in the majority of children. Health-related quality of life was less and pain more frequent in those with low BMD scores. Pain was correlated negatively with both free-time activity and seasonal activity (P<0.01). Osteopenia is a common sequel of therapy in children with brain tumours. Those with osteopenia have more pain and more compromised, health-related quality of life than those who are not osteopenic, and pain significantly limits physical activity. The pathogenesis of osteopenia in these children is still uncertain, but is likely to be multifactorial. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Inhibition of transforming growth factor-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 blocks and reverses epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Strippoli

    Full Text Available Peritoneal fibrosis is a frequent complication of peritoneal dialysis following repeated low grade inflammatory and pro-fibrotic insults. This pathological process may lead to ultrafiltration failure and eventually to the discontinuing of the therapy. Fibrosis is linked to epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT of the peritoneal mesothelial cells, which acquire invasive and fibrogenic abilities. Here, we analyzed the role of the transforming growth factor-activated kinase-1 (TAK1 in the EMT of primary mesothelial cells from human peritoneum. The inhibition of TAK1 in mesenchymal-like mesothelial cells from the effluents of patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis led to the reacquisition of the apical to basolateral polarity, to increased expression of epithelial and to down-regulation of mesenchymal markers. TAK1 inhibition also resulted in decreased migratory/invasive abilities of effluent-derived mesothelial cells. Simultaneous inhibition of ERK1/2 and TAK1 pathways did not lead to an additive effect in the reacquisition of the epithelial phenotype. Inhibition of TAK1 also blocked EMT in vitro and reduced the levels of PAI-1, which is involved in fibrosis and invasion. Analysis of signalling pathways downstream of TAK1 involved in EMT induction, showed that TAK1 inhibition reduced the transcriptional activity of NF-κB and Smad3, as well as the phosphorylation of c-jun, while enhancing Smad1-5-8 activity. These results demonstrate that TAK1 is a cross-point in a network including different pro-EMT transcription factors, such as NF-κB, Snail, AP-1 and Smads. The identification of TAK1 as a main biochemical mediator of EMT and fibrosis in mesothelial cells from human peritoneum and the study of signalling pathways induced by its activity may be relevant in the design of new therapies aimed to counteract peritoneal fibrosis.

  10. Insulin-like growth factors require phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to signal myogenesis: dominant negative p85 expression blocks differentiation of L6E9 muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, P; Canicio, J; Shepherd, P R; Beeton, C A; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI 3)-kinases are potently inhibited by two structurally unrelated membrane-permeant reagents: wortmannin and LY294002. By using these two inhibitors we first suggested the involvement of a PI 3-kinase activity in muscle cell differentiation. However, several reports have described that these compounds are not as selective for PI 3-kinase activity as assumed. Here we show that LY294002 blocks the myogenic pathway elicited by insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), and we confirm the specific involvement of PI 3-kinase in IGF-induced myogenesis by overexpressing in L6E9 myoblasts a dominant negative p85 PI 3-kinase-regulatory subunit (L6E9-delta p85). IGF-I, des(1-3)IGF-I, or IGF-II induced L6E9 skeletal muscle cell differentiation as measured by myotube formation, myogenin gene expression, and GLUT4 glucose carrier induction. The addition of LY294002 to the differentiation medium totally inhibited these IGF-induced myogenic events without altering the expression of a non-muscle-specific protein, beta1-integrin. Independent clones of L6E9 myoblasts expressing a dominant negative mutant of the p85-regulatory subunit (delta p85) showed markedly impaired glucose transport activity and formation of p85/p110 complexes in response to insulin, consistent with the inhibition of PI 3-kinase activity. IGF-induced myogenic parameters in L6E9-delta p85 cells, ie. cell fusion and myogenin gene and GLUT4 expression, were severely impaired compared with parental cells or L6E9 cells expressing wild-type p85. In all, data presented here indicate that PI 3-kinase is essential for IGF-induced muscle differentiation and that the specific PI 3-kinase subclass involved in myogenesis is the heterodimeric p85-p110 enzyme. PMID:9440811

  11. Analysis of Regional Trade Block and Agricultural Productivity: Impact of SAFTA (South Asian Free Trade Agreement on Economic Growth of Pakistan by Using CGE Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shahzad Iqbal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The current research highlights the trade among under the regime of South Asian Free Trade Agreements specially focus on trade with India. The Regional Block trade has given importance to the host as well receiving countries. Data were collected from various secondary sources and analysis by using Computable General Equilibrium model by using GEM pack. The regional trade among the Block countries are given absolutely and comparative advantage among various countries in the Blocks. The recent trade development shows positive results among the member countries specially in the context of free trade among South Asian Countries. ASEAN, NAFTA, MESUER trade gaining importance in the world and regional block trade has effect on the economies of the country. It was revealed that block trade has positive impact not only the countries economy but also welfare of the importing and host countries among the regional bloack.

  12. Radiolabelled somatostatin analogues for radionuclide therapy of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the most frequently used radionuclides in PRRT. The second generation somatostatin analogue DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide can form a stable complex with 90Y. In rats with subcutaneous, CA20948 pancreatic tumours, 90Y-DOTA-Tyr3- octreotide, effectively controlled tumour growth. Studies to determine the therapeutic efficacy of 90Y-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotide in cancer patients are ongoing at various institutions and show most promising rates of complete plus partial remission. With the development of new somatostatin analogues that bind with high affinity receptors on (author)

  13. The Askin tumour. Neuroactodermic tumour of the thoracic wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Askin tumours is an extremely rare and malignant process in the thoracic pulmonary region during infancy and youth. The differential diagnosis has to be considered with other thoracic wall tumours that are more common in pediatrics like the undifferentiated neuroblastoma, the embionic rabdomiosarcoma, the Ewing sarcoma and the linfoma. A retrospective examination was carried out on 473 thoracic wall tumours from 1994 to 1997 at our centre, resulting in 4 patients with an anatomopathologically tested Askin tumour (ages from 13-21). All the cases were studied using simple radiography and CT. In two cases MRI was also used. The most common clinical manifestation was a palpable painful mass in the thoracic wall. In the simple radiograph the main finding was a large mass of extrapleural soft material, with costal destruction ( n=3) and a pleural effusion (n=2). In the CT study the mass was heterogeneous, with internal calcifications in one case. CT and MRI showed invasion in the mediastinum (n=1), medular channel (n=1) and phrenic and sulphrenic extension (n=1). The Askin tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic wall masses in infant-youth ages. There are no specific morphological characteristics. Both CT and MRI are useful for the diagnosis, staging and follow up. (Author) 11 refs

  14. Ghost Block

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Filmed on the English south coast 'Ghost Block' depicts the uncanny and eerie atmosphere at the site of a WW2 coastal defence line. The concrete cubes were used as an anti-invasion blockade against potential landing forces. This protection line now slowly decaying and becoming enmeshed into the environment still acts as a defence to repel unwanted visitors. The area is a natural reserve to nesting birds that often lay eggs directly onto the beach surface. The blocks act as a final barrier ...

  15. Gene expression profiling of tumours derived from rasV12/E1A-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts to identify genes required for tumour development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagorn Jean

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cancer, cellular transformation is followed by tumour development. Knowledge on the mechanisms of transformation, involving activation of proto-oncogenes and inactivation of tumour-suppressor genes has considerably improved whereas tumour development remains poorly understood. An interesting way of gaining information on tumour progression mechanisms would be to identify genes whose expression is altered during tumour formation. We used the Affymetrix-based DNA microarray technology to analyze gene expression profiles of tumours derived from rasV12/E1A-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts in order to identify the genes that could be involved in tumour development. Results Among the 12,000 genes analyzed in this study, only 489 showed altered expression during tumour development, 213 being up-regulated and 276 down-regulated. The genes differentially expressed are involved in a variety of cellular functions, including control of transcription, regulation of mRNA maturation and processing, regulation of protein translation, activation of interferon-induced genes, intracellular signalling, apoptosis, cell growth, angiogenesis, cytoskeleton, cell-to-cell interaction, extracellular matrix formation, metabolism and production of secretory factors. Conclusions Some of the genes identified in this work, whose expression is altered upon rasV12/E1A transformation of MEFs, could be new cancer therapeutic targets.

  16. Desmoid tumour in familial adenomatous polyposis. A review of literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Anne Louise; Bülow, Steffen

    2001-01-01

    Desmoid tumours (DT) are rare benign tumours that do not metastasise, but tend to invade locally. DT are frequently seen in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and diagnosis and treatment are often difficult. Surgical trauma, genetic predisposition and hormonal factors are...... considered to be correlated with the development and growth of DT. In patients with FAP, 50% of the tumours are localised intra-abdominally, and 85-100% of these are mesenteric. DT frequently present as non- tender, slowly growing masses. The symptoms are abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhoea or haematochezia....... Mesenteric DT can cause small bowel obstruction or ischaemia, hydronephrosis or form fistulas. Diagnosis is obtained through biopsy and the extension is determined by a CT-scan. Surgical excision is recommended in patients with DT in the abdominal wall. First line treatment of mesenteric DT is a NSAID in...

  17. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future. (paper)

  18. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  19. Determination of sarcosine as possible tumour marker of prostate tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Cernei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid sarcosine, known also as N-methylglycine, may beestablished as new very important marker in prostate malignant tumours and may be determined by very simple test. Cancer of prostate is one of the most incident types of malignant tumours in men. More than one thousand men in Czech Republic die due to this disease. As well as in the case of other malignant tumours, for initiation of treatment well timed diagnosis of disease is necessary. For determination of sarcosine we employed the ionex chromatography with postcolumn derivatization by ninhydrin. We achieved the calibration curve linearity R2=0.9984 with limit of detection 500nM. Moreover we confirmed that the calibration was not affected by presence of another aminoacids and ensure thatselectivity of separation is near to 99% efficiency.

  20. Epidural block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home ... It numbs or causes a loss of feeling in the lower half your body. This lessens the pain of contractions during childbirth. An epidural block may also be used to ...

  1. M2 tumour-associated macrophages contribute to tumour progression via legumain remodelling the extracellular matrix in diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Long; Li, Honghao; Shi, Yuzhi; Wang, Dekun; Gong, Junbo; Xun, Jing; Zhou, Sifan; Xiang, Rong; Tan, Xiaoyue

    2016-01-01

    Effects of M2 tumour-associated macrophages on the pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are still controversial. Our data showed that the number of CD163-positive M2 macrophages correlated negatively with DLBCL prognosis. Macrophage depletion by clodronate liposomes significantly suppressed tumour growth in a xenograft mouse model of DLBCL using OCI-Ly3 cells. Moreover, M2 polarization of macrophages induced legumain expression in U937 cells. Exogenous legumain promoted degradation of fibronectin and collagen I, which was abolished by administration of a legumain inhibitor RR-11a. Overexpression of legumain in Raw 264.7 cells also induced tube formation of endothelial cells in matrigel. In the xenograft mouse model of DLBCL, decreased fibronectin and collagen I, as well as increased legumain expression and angiogenesis were found at the late stage tumours compared with early stage tumours. Co-localization of legumain and fibronectin was observed in the extracellular matrix of tumour tissues. Administration of the legumain inhibitor to the xenograft DLBCL model suppressed tumour growth, angiogenesis and collagen deposition compared with the control. Taken together, our results suggest that M2 tumour-associated macrophages affect degradation of the extracellular matrix and angiogenesis via overexpression of legumain, and therefore play an active role in the progression of DLBCL. PMID:27464733

  2. The deletion mutant EGFRvIII significantly contributes to stress resistance typical for the tumour microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed or mutated in many tumour types. The truncated, constitutively active EGFRvIII variant has not been detected in normal tissues but is found in many malignancies. In the current study, we have investigated the hypothesis that EGFRvIII contributes to a growth and survival advantage under tumour microenvironment-related stress conditions. Materials and methods: U373MG doxycycline-regulated isogenic cells expressing EGFRwt or EGFRvIII were created and validated using Western blot, FACS and qRT-PCR. In vitro proliferation was evaluated with standard growth assays. Cell survival was assayed using clonogenic survival. Animal experiments were performed using NMRI-nu-xenografted mice. Results: Inducible isogenic cell lines were created and showed high induction of EGFRwt and EGFRvIII upon doxycycline addition. Overexpression of EGFRvIII but not of EGFRwt in this model resulted in a growth and survival advantage upon different tumour microenvironment-related stress conditions in vitro. Induction of EGFRvIII increased tumour growth in vivo, which was reversible upon loss of expression. Conclusions: Under conditions where nutrients are limited and stress is apparent, as in the tumour microenvironment, expression of EGFRvIII leads to a growth and survival advantage. These data indicate a potential selection of EGFRvIII-expressing tumour cells under such stress conditions.

  3. Differential effects of garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modifications in tumour cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Hilary M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-translational modifications (PTMs of histones and other proteins are perturbed in tumours. For example, reduced levels of acetylated H4K16 and trimethylated H4K20 are associated with high tumour grade and poor survival in breast cancer. Drug-like molecules that can reprogram selected histone PTMs in tumour cells are therefore of interest as potential cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study we assessed the effects of the phytocompounds garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modification in cancer cells, focussing on the breast tumour cell line MCF7. Methods Cell viability/proliferation assays, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry, immunodetection of specific histone and p53 acetylation marks, western blotting, siRNA and RT-qPCR. Results Although treatment with curcumin, garcinol or the garcinol derivative LTK-14 hampered MCF7 cell proliferation, differential effects of these compounds on histone modifications were observed. Garcinol treatment resulted in a strong reduction in H3K18 acetylation, which is required for S phase progression. Similar effects of garcinol on H3K18 acetylation were observed in the osteosarcoma cells lines U2OS and SaOS2. In contrast, global levels of acetylated H4K16 and trimethylated H4K20 in MCF7 cells were elevated after garcinol treatment. This was accompanied by upregulation of DNA damage signalling markers such as γH2A.X, H3K56Ac, p53 and TIP60. In contrast, exposure of MCF7 cells to curcumin resulted in increased global levels of acetylated H3K18 and H4K16, and was less effective in inducing DNA damage markers. In addition to its effects on histone modifications, garcinol was found to block CBP/p300-mediated acetylation of the C-terminal activation domain of p53, but resulted in enhanced acetylation of p53K120, and accumulation of p53 in the cytoplasmic compartment. Finally, we show that the elevation of H4K20Me3 levels by garcinol correlated with increased expression of SUV420H2

  4. Differential effects of garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modifications in tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones and other proteins are perturbed in tumours. For example, reduced levels of acetylated H4K16 and trimethylated H4K20 are associated with high tumour grade and poor survival in breast cancer. Drug-like molecules that can reprogram selected histone PTMs in tumour cells are therefore of interest as potential cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study we assessed the effects of the phytocompounds garcinol and curcumin on histone and p53 modification in cancer cells, focussing on the breast tumour cell line MCF7. Cell viability/proliferation assays, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry, immunodetection of specific histone and p53 acetylation marks, western blotting, siRNA and RT-qPCR. Although treatment with curcumin, garcinol or the garcinol derivative LTK-14 hampered MCF7 cell proliferation, differential effects of these compounds on histone modifications were observed. Garcinol treatment resulted in a strong reduction in H3K18 acetylation, which is required for S phase progression. Similar effects of garcinol on H3K18 acetylation were observed in the osteosarcoma cells lines U2OS and SaOS2. In contrast, global levels of acetylated H4K16 and trimethylated H4K20 in MCF7 cells were elevated after garcinol treatment. This was accompanied by upregulation of DNA damage signalling markers such as γH2A.X, H3K56Ac, p53 and TIP60. In contrast, exposure of MCF7 cells to curcumin resulted in increased global levels of acetylated H3K18 and H4K16, and was less effective in inducing DNA damage markers. In addition to its effects on histone modifications, garcinol was found to block CBP/p300-mediated acetylation of the C-terminal activation domain of p53, but resulted in enhanced acetylation of p53K120, and accumulation of p53 in the cytoplasmic compartment. Finally, we show that the elevation of H4K20Me3 levels by garcinol correlated with increased expression of SUV420H2, and was prevented by siRNA targeting of SUV420H2. In

  5. Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) Blocks the Effects of Asthma by Negatively Regulating NF-κB Signaling through IGFBP-3R-mediated Activation of Caspases*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong-Chul; Jogie-Brahim, Sherryline; Lee, Dae-Yeol; Han, Jinfeng; Harada, Aki; Murphy, Liam J.; Oh, Youngman

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a multifunctional protein known for modulating mitogenic and metabolic actions of IGFs as well as exerting a variety of biological actions not involving IGFs. Here, we show that IGFBP-3 blocks specific physiological consequences of asthma in an IGF-independent manner in vitro and in vivo. IGFBP-3 treatment effectively reduced all physiological manifestations of asthma examined in vivo (airway hyper-responsiveness, cellular and patholog...

  6. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  7. Preoperative shunts in thalamic tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel A

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one patients with thalamic glioma underwent a pre-tumour resection shunt surgery. The procedure was uneventful in 23 patients with relief from symptoms of increased intracranial pressure. Eight patients worsened after the procedure. The level of sensorium worsened from excessively drowsy state to unconsciousness in seven patients. Three patients developed hemiparesis, 4 developed paresis of extra-ocular muscles and altered pupillary reflexes, and 1 developed incontinence of urine and persistent vomiting. Alteration in the delicately balanced intracranial pressure and movements in the tumour and vital adjacent brain areas could be the probable cause of the worsening in the neurological state in these 8 patients. On the basis of these observations and on review of literature, it is postulated that the ventricular dilatation following an obstruction in the path of the cerebrospinal fluid flow by a tumour could be a natural defense phenomenon of the brain.

  8. A THREE YEAR RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF OVARIAN NEOPLASMS WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON SURFACE EPITHELIAL TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Bharathi Yarlagadda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Ovarian tumours being second most common gynaecological cancer in India account for 30% of all cancers of female genital tract. Study conducted to determine relative frequencies of various histological types based on WHO classification and their age distribution with particular emphasis on surface epithelial tumours. This study is undertaken to find out the frequency of incidence of different histopathological subtypes with particular emphasis on surface epithelial tumours and age distribution of ovarian tumours in our institute located in coastal Andhra Pradesh. METHODS This is a retrospective study of 100 cases of ovarian neoplasms collected during a period of 3 years from June 2013 to May 2016 from the Department of Pathology, Katuri Medical College and Hospital, Chinakondrupadu, Guntur, A. P, India. The patients attending our hospital are mostly from rural areas around. Paraffin blocks of all 100 ovarian neoplasms retrieved. Complete clinical and radiological findings analysed from our records. RESULTS The tumours are grouped according to the nature of tumour whether benign or borderline or malignant according to cell of origin, histological subtyping, and age group. Surface epithelial tumours are the most common. Benign tumours outnumber the malignant tumours. Benign ovarian tumours showed a peak in 21-40 Yrs. age group and malignant in the age group of 41- 60 Yrs. Results of our study compared with other studies. CONCLUSION Because of the geographic location, poverty, and illiteracy, patients seek medical advice late. So, awareness among public by health education, passive surveillance, and community screening facility will be helpful in early detection of ovarian neoplasms.

  9. AAV2-mediated in vivo immune gene therapy of solid tumours

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Sara A

    2010-12-20

    Abstract Background Many strategies have been adopted to unleash the potential of gene therapy for cancer, involving a wide range of therapeutic genes delivered by various methods. Immune therapy has become one of the major strategies adopted for cancer gene therapy and seeks to stimulate the immune system to target tumour antigens. In this study, the feasibility of AAV2 mediated immunotherapy of growing tumours was examined, in isolation and combined with anti-angiogenic therapy. Methods Immune-competent Balb\\/C or C57 mice bearing subcutaneous JBS fibrosarcoma or Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumour xenografts respectively were treated by intra-tumoural administration of AAV2 vector encoding the immune up-regulating cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the co-stimulatory molecule B7-1 to subcutaneous tumours, either alone or in combination with intra-muscular (IM) delivery of AAV2 vector encoding Nk4 14 days prior to tumour induction. Tumour growth and survival was monitored for all animals. Cured animals were re-challenged with tumourigenic doses of the original tumour type. In vivo cytotoxicity assays were used to investigate establishment of cell-mediated responses in treated animals. Results AAV2-mediated GM-CSF, B7-1 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth and an increase in survival in both tumour models. Cured animals were resistant to re-challenge, and induction of T cell mediated anti-tumour responses were demonstrated. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes to naïve animals prevented tumour establishment. Systemic production of Nk4 induced by intra-muscular (IM) delivery of Nk4 significantly reduced subcutaneous tumour growth. However, combination of Nk4 treatment with GM-CSF, B7-1 therapy reduced the efficacy of the immune therapy. Conclusions Overall, this study demonstrates the potential for in vivo AAV2 mediated immune gene therapy, and provides data on the inter-relationship between tumour

  10. Dasatinib, a multi-kinase inhibitor increased radiation sensitivity by interfering with nuclear localization of epidermal growth factor receptor and by blocking DNA repair pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Although inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling during radiation led to improvement of tumor control and survival, novel strategies are needed to further improve the outcome of patients with locally advanced head and neck carcinoma. Because EGFR is known to interact with c-Src kinases, the present study investigated dasatinib (BMS-354825), an inhibitor of c-Src kinases, for its efficacy in enhancing radiosensitivity of human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) in vitro and examined the underlying mechanisms for this effect. Materials and methods: Six HNSCC lines were exposed to dasatinib, radiation, or both, and assessed for c-Src and EGFR expression, cell survival and colony forming ability. Among these cell lines, HN-5 and FaDu lines were analyzed for induction of apoptosis, cell cycle re-distribution and for nuclear localization of EGFR, γ-H2AX and 53BP1 proteins. Immuno-precipitation and Western blots were performed to analyze the levels and binding of proteins involved in cell survival, apoptosis and DNA repair pathways. Suppression of c-Src by siRNA and subsequent clonogenic assay was performed in HN-5 cells. Results: All six HNSCC lines that were examined expressed high levels of c-Src. Two (HN-5 and MDA-183) expressed higher levels of EGFR than other lines. Dasatinib suppressed cell survival of all cell lines tested independent of c-Src or EGFR levels but enhanced the radiosensitivity of HN-5 and MDA-183. HN-5 and FaDu were analyzed further. Dasatinib suppressed phosphorylation of c-Src in both cell lines, but decreased repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in HN-5 cells only as evidenced by suppression of c-Abl and Nbs-1 activity, inhibition of the association between c-Src and EGFR or Her-2, prolongation of nuclear γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci and inhibition of EGFR nuclear localization and its association with DNA-PKcs. Finally, partial suppression of c-Src resulted in a small increase in HN-5 cell

  11. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-05-27

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  12. Differentiation of tumour-promoting stromal myofibroblasts by cancer exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, J P; Spary, L K; Sanders, A J; Chowdhury, R; Jiang, W G; Steadman, R; Wymant, J; Jones, A T; Kynaston, H; Mason, M D; Tabi, Z; Clayton, A

    2015-01-15

    Activation of myofibroblast rich stroma is a rate-limiting step essential for cancer progression. The responsible factors are not fully understood, but TGFβ1 is probably critical. A proportion of TGFβ1 is associated with extracellular nano-vesicles termed exosomes, secreted by carcinoma cells, and the relative importance of soluble and vesicular TGFβ in stromal activation is presented. Prostate cancer exosomes triggered TGFβ1-dependent fibroblast differentiation, to a distinctive myofibroblast phenotype resembling stromal cells isolated from cancerous prostate tissue; supporting angiogenesis in vitro and accelerating tumour growth in vivo. Myofibroblasts generated using soluble TGFβ1 were not pro-angiogenic or tumour-promoting. Cleaving heparan sulphate side chains from the exosome surface had no impact on TGFβ levels yet attenuated SMAD-dependent signalling and myofibroblastic differentiation. Eliminating exosomes from the cancer cell secretome, targeting Rab27a, abolished differentiation and lead to failure in stroma-assisted tumour growth in vivo. Exosomal TGFβ1 is therefore required for the formation of tumour-promoting stroma. PMID:24441045

  13. Tumour angiogenesis pathways: related clinical issues and implications for nuclear medicine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour angiogenesis is essential for growth, invasion and metastasis. Retrospective studies suggest that it is an independent prognostic factor that merits prospective validation. Furthermore, as tumour blood vessels show many differences from normal vessels and are not genetically unstable, they form a key area for therapy development. However, as anti-angiogenic therapy is primarily cytostatic and not cytotoxic, novel tailor-made specific end-points for treatment monitoring are required. In this regard, suitable molecular parameters for imaging tumour angiogenesis by means of nuclear medicine are being explored. Here we review current knowledge on the multiple pathways controlling tumour angiogenesis and try to assess which are the most clinically relevant for nuclear medicine imaging. Parameters that may influence the imaging potential of radiopharmaceuticals for angiogenesis imaging such as molecular weight and structure, their targeted location within the tumour and their usefulness in terms of specificity and constancy of the targeted molecular pathway are discussed. (orig.)

  14. VEGF concentrations in tumour arteries and veins from patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werther, Kim; Bülow, Steffen; Hesselfeldt, Peter;

    2002-01-01

    , automated complete white cell and platelet counts were performed. In serum and EDTA plasma, no significant differences in VEGF concentrations were observed (p = 0.1 and p = 0.5), respectively) between tumour arteries and tumour veins. However, in supernatants from lysed blood, VEGF concentrations were......This pilot study investigated the hypothesis that the tumour itself is the source of the elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations which are often observed in peripheral blood from patients with rectal cancer. Twenty-four consecutive patients with primary rectal cancer were...... included. Blood samples were drawn preoperatively from peripheral veins (I) and intraoperatively from peripheral veins (II), tumour arteries (III), and tumour veins (IV). In the four compartments, VEGF concentrations were measured in serum, EDTA plasma, and supernatants from lysed whole blood. Additionally...

  15. Cardiac tumours simulating collagen vascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, A. P.; Lanham, J. G.; Doyle, D V

    1986-01-01

    Cardiac tumours can mimic collagen vascular disease and they are often accompanied by profound systemic upset. Both benign and malignant tumours may present in this way. Three cases of cardiac tumour, two malignant and one benign, are reported with just such a presentation. A review of fifteen similar case reports showed that a spectrum of different collagen vascular diseases was diagnosed and treated before the true diagnosis emerged. In half of these cases the cardiac tumour was only diagno...

  16. Computer-aided hepatic tumour ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Voirin, D; Amavizca, M; Leroy, A; Letoublon, C; Troccaz, J; Voirin, David; Payan, Yohan; Amavizca, Miriam; Leroy, Antoine; Letoublon, Christian; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2001-01-01

    Surgical resection of hepatic tumours is not always possible. Alternative techniques consist in locally using chemical or physical agents to destroy the tumour and this may be performed percutaneously. It requires a precise localisation of the tumour placement during ablation. Computer-assisted surgery tools may be used in conjunction to these new ablation techniques to improve the therapeutic efficiency whilst benefiting from minimal invasiveness. This communication introduces the principles of a system for computer-assisted hepatic tumour ablation.

  17. Tumour markers in gynaecological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gynaecological cancers are fairly common in developing countries and represent about 26 % f all cancers. Application of cervical cytology screening nationally has made cervical cancer one of the most preventable malignant diseases thus eliminating the challenges of advanced cancer management. Tumour markers has played a most crucial role in this respect

  18. Intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schortinghuis, J; Hille, JJ; Singh, S

    2001-01-01

    A case of an intraoral myxoid nerve sheath tumour of the dorsum of the tongue in a 73-year-old Caucasian male is reported. This case describes the oldest patient with this pathology to date. Immunoperoxidase staining for neuronspecific enolase (NSE) and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) expression d

  19. Interventions in 131I-MIBG treatment of neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    xenografts the therapeutic efficacy of 131I-labelled anti-L1-CAM antibody chCE7 in comparison with 131I-MIBG and in patients the complementarity of these agents in targeting neuroblastoma was demonstrated, combined or alternating MIBG- and radioimmunotherapy may be a future approach. 9. Induction of tumour cell differentiation, e.g. using retinoic acid or interferon, may increase the specific uptake and retention of 131I-MIBG in tumours. The successful transfection of the noradrenalin transporter gene (NAT) into NAT negative neuroblastoma cell lines offers another possibility to improve the efficacy of MIBG therapy. 10. Blocking extratumoural specific uptake by unlabelled ('cold') MIBG. In nude mice with PC-12 pheochromocytoma xenografts excess unlabelled MIBG leads to significant reduction of tumour uptake of 125I-MIBG, but in patients with carcinoid tumors treated with unlabelled MIBG favourable changes in the biodistribution of 131I-MIBG were observed, increasing the tumour/non-tumour ratio by a factor 1.1-2.1 in 70% of the patients. Combined therapy of high dose unlabelled MIBG followed by 7.4 GBq 131I-MIBG may result in a greater biochemical response and palliative effect than each of the treatments alone. I conclude that 131I-MIBG therapy is effective in several neural crest tumours, attaining 50% objective response in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and neuroblastoma and providing excellent palliation to most patients. The tumour targeting and therapy effectiveness may be enhanced by pharmacological interventions and by combination with other treatment modalities. (author)

  20. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of the pineal region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorhan, C.; Soto-Ares, G.; Pruvo, J.P. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille, Lille (France); Ruchoux, M.M. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France); Blond, S. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hopital Roger Salengro, CHRU Lille (France)

    2001-11-01

    We describe CT and MR findings in a 23-month-old infant with a melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of the pineal gland. The tumour has been stereotactically biopsied and surgically resected. The pathological diagnosis was made on the resected piece. Embryology of the pineal gland and the histology of melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Solitary fibrous tumour of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mordani, J.P. [City General Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Haq, I.U. [North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Singh, J. [North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2000-09-01

    We report an intramedullary primary solitary fibrous tumour of the cervical spinal cord in a 33-year-old man. The tumour predominantly consisted of monomorphic spindle cells with a storiform pattern. MRI demonstrated an inhomogeneously enhancing cervical intramedullary tumour. The patient was well without recurrence 18 months after surgery. (orig.)

  2. YOLK SAC TUMOUR IN A PREMENARCHAL GIRL : A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Sourav; Avishek; Pallab Kumar; Bandana; Mrinmoyee

    2015-01-01

    Yolk sac tumour, otherwise known as endodermal sinus tumour, is a rare and highly malignant germ cell tumour accounting for approximately 10% of malignant germ cell tumours. The tumour usually presents as a rapidly growing mass in young women. Here we present a case of a young premenarchal girl with a huge ovarian tumour which pro...

  3. TNFR1 mediates TNF-α-induced tumour lymphangiogenesis and metastasis by modulating VEGF-C-VEGFR3 signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hong; Cao, Renhai; Yang, Yunlong; Zhang, Yin; Iwamoto, Hideki; Lim, Sharon; Nakamura, Masaki; Andersson, Patrik; Wang, Jian; Sun, Yuping; Dissing, Steen; He, Xia; Yang, Xiaojuan; Cao, Yihai

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation and lymphangiogenesis are two cohesively coupled processes that promote tumour growth and invasion. Here we report that TNF-α markedly promotes tumour lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis. The TNF-α-TNFR1 signalling pathway directly stimulates lymphatic endothelial cell activit...

  4. Custom shielding blocks - a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In delivering radiation to the cancer patients, we need to shield the critical organs which come in the way of the radiation treatment portal. To avoid critical organs getting more than the tolerable dose, we use shielding blocks, which restrict the radiation to the tumour volume. Various metals are being used as shielding materials. The transmission through the shielding block should be less than 5% and the thickness of the material needed to achieve this transmission is 5 HVL. Lead is commonly used for shielding. Another material called Cerrobend (Low Melting Alloy) is used to prepare custom shielding blocks. The standard lead blocks supplied is of 5 cm thickness and for Cerrobend (LMA), the equivalent thickness required is 7.5 cm. In this paper, a comparison between the standard lead and LMA is described

  5. The value of serum alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase measurement for the assessment of tumour response to radio- and photodynamic therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Korbelik, M.; Naraparaju, V. R.; Yamamoto, N.

    1998-01-01

    Serum activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (NaGalase), the extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme that appears to be produced exclusively by cancer cells, was measured in mice bearing SCCVII tumours (squamous cell carcinoma). The NaGalase levels in these mice increased with time of tumour growth and were directly proportional to tumour burden. After exposure of SCCVII tumours to a single X-ray dose of 20 Gy, the serum NaGalase levels gradually decreased during the first 10 days after tr...

  6. Blocked strainers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal insulation was the cause of the blockages that shut down five BWRs in Sweden. The main culprit was mineral wool installed when the plants started up. Physical degradation of the wool over the lifetime of the plant meant it could easily be washed out of place during a loss of coolant accident and could quickly block strainers in the emergency core cooling systems. The five BWRs are almost all back on line, equipped with larger strainers and faster backwashing capability. But the incident prompted more detailed investigation into how materials in the containment would behave during an accident. One material that caused particular concern is Caposil, a material often used to insulate the reactor vessel. Composed of natural calcium, aluminium silicates and cellulose fibres, in the event of a LOCA Caposil becomes particularly hazardous. Under high pressure, or when brought into contact with high pressure water and steam, Caposil fragments into 1 cm clumps, free fibres, and ''fines''. It is these fines which cause major problems and can block a strainer extremely quickly. The successful testing of a high performance water filter which can handle Caposil is described. (4 figures) (Author)

  7. Human cytomegalovirus tegument protein pp65 is detected in all intra- and extra-axial brain tumours independent of the tumour type or grade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Libard

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV has been indicated being a significant oncomodulator. Recent reports have suggested that an antiviral treatment alters the outcome of a glioblastoma. We analysed the performance of commercial HCMV-antibodies applying the immunohistochemical (IHC methods on brain sample obtained from a subject with a verified HCMV infection, on samples obtained from 14 control subjects, and on a tissue microarray block containing cores of various brain tumours. Based on these trials, we selected the best performing antibody and analysed a cohort of 417 extra- and intra-axial brain tumours such as gliomas, medulloblastomas, primary diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and meningiomas. HCMV protein pp65 immunoreactivity was observed in all types of tumours analysed, and the IHC expression did not depend on the patient's age, gender, tumour type, or grade. The labelling pattern observed in the tumours differed from the labelling pattern observed in the tissue with an active HCMV infection. The HCMV protein was expressed in up to 90% of all the tumours investigated. Our results are in accordance with previous reports regarding the HCMV protein expression in glioblastomas and medulloblastomas. In addition, the HCMV protein expression was seen in primary brain lymphomas, low-grade gliomas, and in meningiomas. Our results indicate that the HCMV protein pp65 expression is common in intra- and extra-axial brain tumours. Thus, the assessment of the HCMV expression in tumours of various origins and pathologically altered tissue in conditions such as inflammation, infection, and even degeneration should certainly be facilitated.

  8. GaInN light-emitting diodes using separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region to attain polarization-inverted electron-blocking layer, reduced electron leakage, and improved hole injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A GaInN light-emitting diode (LED) structure is analyzed that employs a separate epitaxial growth for the p-type region, i.e., the AlGaN electron-blocking layer (EBL) and p-type GaN cladding layer, followed by wafer or chip bonding. Such LED structure has a polarization-inverted EBL and allows for uncompromised epitaxial-growth optimization of the p-type region, i.e., without the need to consider degradation of the quantum-well active region during p-type region growth. Simulations show that such an LED structure reduces electron leakage, reduces the efficiency droop, improves hole injection, and has the potential to extend high efficiencies into the green spectral region

  9. Pathohistological and immunohistochemical parameters significant for prognosis and therapy of tumours in cats and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić-Kovačević Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of tumours implies a disproportion between proliferation, growth and differentiation, which is accompanied by significant genotypic and phenotypic variations in the diseased. The scenario of multiple oncogenic effects on the inhibition of cell growth, apoptosis and maturation, on the stimulation of proliferation, on cell migration and tissue invasion, is responsible for the occurrence of tumours both in humans and in animals. The qualitative and quantitative determination of biological prognostic factors in the tissue of affected cats and dogs directly indicates a possible tumour metastasizing, and consequently also the prognosis of neoplastic disease. Monitoring of clinical and biological prognostic factors is important for therapy and prediction of tumours in humans and animals. The determination of the proliferative potential of tumour cells by immunohistochemical detection of Ki-67 and PCNA is used in grading certain tumours in cats and dogs. It is also possible immunohistochemically to prove factors of angiogenesis and numerous activating and inhibiting proteins in the tumour tissue. In addition to other histological, clinical and biological parameters, they are significant for the further prognosis and therapy of neoplastic diseases.

  10. Constitutive SOCS-3 expression protects T-cell lymphoma against growth inhibition by IFNalpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brender, C; Lovato, P; Sommer, V H;

    2005-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)3 is constitutively activated in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), where it protects tumour cells against apoptosis. The constitutive activation of Stat3 leads to a constitutive expression of suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3. In...... healthy cells, SOCS-3 is transiently expressed following cytokine stimulation and functions as a negative feedback inhibitor of the Stat3-activating kinases. Here, we attempt to resolve the apparent paradox of a simultaneous SOCS-3 expression and Stat3 activation in the same cells. We show that (i) SOCS-3...... expression in tumour cells is equal to or higher than in cytokine-stimulated nonmalignant T cells, (ii) SOCS-3 is not mutated in CTCL, (iii) overexpression of SOCS-3 blocks IFNalpha-mediated growth inhibition without affecting Stat3 activation, growth, and apoptosis, and (iv) inhibition of SOCS-3 by a...

  11. Malignant tumours of childhood in Zaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaila Modupeola

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increased prevalence of hitherto uncommon tumours in children in our geographic setting formed the basis for this study. This study aimed to determine the current histopathologic distribution pattern of paediatric malignancies in Zaria. Materials and Methods : An eight year (2000-2007 consecutive analysis of malignant tumours in children ages 0 to 15 years in a referral University laboratory. All tissue biopsies were fixed in 10% formalin and processed in wax. Tumours were characterised histologically into tissues of origin and categorised into three age groups; < 1 year, 1-5 years and 6-15 years. Result : 189 children with malignant tumours were analysed. They showed a male preponderance (M: F; 1.2: 1.0 and their ages ranged from 5 days to 15 years. Tumours of mesenchymal origin were the commonest (115: 60.8% while epithelial tumours including germ cell tumours accounted for 74 (39.2% cases. The age group 1-5 years had the highest epithelial tumours while age group 6-15 years had the most tumours with 102 (54% cases overall. The five commonest tumours over-all were rhabdomyosarcoma, Burkitt lymphoma, retinoblastoma, non-Hodgkin′s lymphoma and nephroblastoma. Germ cell tumours affected the ovary predominantly and two of the endodermal sinus tumour cases were seen in the testis of an eighteen month child and sacrococcygeum of a 5 year old girl, respectively. Of the six immature teratoma cases, four were cutaneous in distribution. The vascular tumours included epithelioid haemangioendothelioma, haemangioblastoma and Dabska tumour and they accounted for (5.8% of all tumours seen. The commonest sites of occurrence of these tumours were the oculo-orbital, jaw, head and neck regions with 82 cases (43.4% while lymph nodes were involved in 31 (16.4% cases. Conclusion : The distribution and occurrence of malignant tumours in children is age related. Lymphomas were the commonest tumours overall while retinoblastoma and Burkitt lymphoma

  12. Discovery of a Metastatic Immune Escape Mechanism Initiated by the Loss of Expression of the Tumour Biomarker Interleukin-33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranchova, Iryna; Han, Jeffrey; Huang, Hui; Fenninger, Franz; Choi, Kyung Bok; Munro, Lonna; Pfeifer, Cheryl; Welch, Ian; Wyatt, Alexander W; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin E; Jefferies, Wilfred A

    2016-01-01

    A new paradigm for understanding immune-surveillance and immune escape in cancer is described here. Metastatic carcinomas express reduced levels of IL-33 and diminished levels of antigen processing machinery (APM), compared to syngeneic primary tumours. Complementation of IL-33 expression in metastatic tumours upregulates APM expression and functionality of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules, resulting in reduced tumour growth rates and a lower frequency of circulating tumour cells. Parallel studies in humans demonstrate that low tumour expression of IL-33 is an immune biomarker associated with recurrent prostate and kidney renal clear cell carcinomas. Thus, IL-33 has a significant role in cancer immune-surveillance against primary tumours, which is lost during the metastatic transition that actuates immune escape in cancer. PMID:27619158

  13. Search for polynuclear pentavalent technetium complex of dimercaptosuccinic acid [Tc(V)-DMS] tumour localization mechanism. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To search for the tumour localization mechanism of Tc(V)-DMS, a polynuclear pentavalent technetium complex of dimercaptosuccinic acid [Tc(V)-DMS], the development of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) bearing mouse model was considered. Subcutaneously transplanted tumour was allowed to grow for 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and the influence of the tumour stage on the biodistribution of Tc(V)-DMS was screened. High radioactivity uptake in the tumour tissue was observed, and this accumulation showed a direct correlation with tumour growth and calcitonin secretion, the MTC marker detectable in the blood serum. The gathered data implicated some calcitonin-related factors as the mediator in the Tc(V)-DMS localization; participation of a phosphate-like oxoanion, TcO43-, is strongly suggested not only by the high radioactivity accumulation in the calcitonin-producing tumour but also by the accumulation in the bones of this model animal. (orig.)

  14. Host microenvironment in breast cancer development: Inflammatory and immune cells in tumour angiogenesis and arteriogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer progression is associated with and dependent upon robust neovascularization. It is becoming clear that tumour-associated 'normal' cells, such as immune/inflammatory cells, endothelial cells and stromal cells, conspire with cancer cells in promoting this process. In particular, infiltrating immune/inflammatory cells secrete a diverse repertoire of growth factors and proteases that enable them to enhance tumour growth by stimulating angiogenesis and, as we suggest here, by promoting 'tumour arteriogenesis' – enlargement of feeding vessels supplying the expanding tumour capillary bed. Macrophages and their chemoattractants (e.g. macrophage chemoattractant protein-1) are critical for the arteriogenic process in ischaemia, and probably also in breast neoplasia. A better understanding of these various cellular and molecular constituents of breast cancer neovascularization may be useful in designing more effective therapies

  15. Targeting hypoxic tumour cells to overcome metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microenvironment within solid tumours can influence the metastatic dissemination of tumour cells, and recent evidence suggests that poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) cells in primary tumours can also affect the survival and proliferation of metastatic tumour cells in distant organs. Hypoxic tumour cells have been historically targeted during radiation therapy in attempts to improve loco-regional control rates of primary tumours since hypoxic cells are known to be resistant to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. There are, therefore, a number of therapeutic strategies to directly target hypoxic cells in primary (and metastatic) tumours, and several compounds are becoming available to functionally inhibit hypoxia-induced proteins that are known to promote metastasis. This mini-review summarizes several established and emerging experimental strategies to target hypoxic cells in primary tumours with potential clinical application to the treatment of patients with tumour metastases or patients at high risk of developing metastatic disease. Targeting hypoxic tumour cells to reduce metastatic disease represents an important advance in the way scientists and clinicians view the influence of tumour hypoxia on therapeutic outcome

  16. Molecular characterization of c-Abl/c-Src kinase inhibitors targeted against murine tumour progenitor cells that express stem cell markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kruewel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The non-receptor tyrosine kinases c-Abl and c-Src are overexpressed in various solid human tumours. Inhibition of their hyperactivity represents a molecular rationale in the combat of cancerous diseases. Here we examined the effects of a new family of pyrazolo [3,4-d] pyrimidines on a panel of 11 different murine lung tumour progenitor cell lines, that express stem cell markers, as well as on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549, the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and the human colon cancer cell line CaCo2 to obtain insight into the mode of action of these experimental drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Treatment with the dual kinase inhibitors blocked c-Abl and c-Src kinase activity efficiently in the nanomolar range, induced apoptosis, reduced cell viability and caused cell cycle arrest predominantly at G0/G1 phase while western blot analysis confirmed repressed protein expression of c-Abl and c-Src as well as the interacting partners p38 mitogen activated protein kinase, heterogenous ribonucleoprotein K, cyclin dependent kinase 1 and further proteins that are crucial for tumour progression. Importantly, a significant repression of the epidermal growth factor receptor was observed while whole genome gene expression analysis evidenced regulation of many cell cycle regulated genes as well integrin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK signalling to impact cytoskeleton dynamics, migration, invasion and metastasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our experiments and recently published in vivo engraftment studies with various tumour cell lines revealed the dual kinase inhibitors to be efficient in their antitumour activity.

  17. Primary bone tumours of the hand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-one primary bone tumours of the hand in children from 8 paediatric hospitals are reported. Osteochondromas and enchondromas were not included. Our material consisted of 16 patients with common tumours (3 Ewing's sarcoma, 5 aneurysmal bone cyst, 6 osteoid osteoma and 2 epithelioma) and 5 patients with uncommon tumours (osteoma, simple bone cyst, haemangiopericytoma, capillary angiomatous tumour and benign ossifying fibroma or osteoblastoma). The X-ray diagnosis of the common tumours should have high concordance with histology, whereas that of uncommon tumours in much more difficult and uncertain. The characteristic features of Ewing's sarcoma are stressed as all our children with this tumour had a delayed diagnosis and a fatal outcome. Differential diagnosis with other short tubular bone lesions of the hand - specifically osteomyelitis - is discussed and the posibilities of microscopic diagnosis are stressed. (orig.)

  18. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours: Etiology, Pathology and Clinical Management

    OpenAIRE

    Blackstein, Martin E.; Dubé, Pierre; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Keller, Oliver R; Knowling, Margaret; Létourneau, Richard; Morris, Donald; Riddell, Robert; Rorke, Stewart; Swallow, Carol J.; Canadian Advisory Committee on GIST

    2004-01-01

    Investigation of the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and death by signalling pathways has led to a greater understanding of how alterations in these pathways play a critical role in the development of some cancers, and has opened new opportunities for their treatment. In the present review, results with the prototype drug of this class, imatinib (Gleevec, Glivec [formerly STI571]; Novartis, Switzerland), in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumours are presented. The present revi...

  19. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  20. The antitumour activity of maltose tetrapalmitate compared with other immunoadjuvants, and its effectiveness after tumour surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    El Kappany, H.; Chopra, C.; Nigam, V. N.; Brailovsky, C. A.; Elhilali, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effectivenss of maltose tetrapalmitate (MTP) as an antitumour immune adjuvant was verified by its comparison with other known immunopotentiators, namely BCG, Corynebacterium parvum, levamisole and pyran copolymer. Copenhagen x Fisher 344/CRBL F1 hybrid male rats inoculated s.c. with the Dunning R3327A prostatic adenocarcinoma were used as the test system. All animals treated with immunoadjuvants showed a delay in tumour appearance and inhibition of early tumour growth. MTP was found to be...

  1. Late-onset spinal deformities in children treated by laminectomy and radiation therapy for malignant tumours

    OpenAIRE

    de Jonge, Tamás; Slullitel, Hernan; Dubousset, Jean; MILADI, Lotfi; Wicart, Philip; Illés, Tamás

    2005-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 76 children who had had malignant tumours treated with laminectomy or laminoplasty and/or radiation therapy affecting the spine. Spinal tumours in children are extremely rare. However, their treatment can result in progressive spinal deformity. Radiation therapy affecting the growing spine can lead to asymmetric vertebral growth, causing kyphosis and/or scoliosis. These spinal deformities pose one of the most challenging problems for the spine surgeon. The aim...

  2. Complementation of two related tumour cell classes during experimental metastasis tagged with different histochemical marker genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, W.C.; O'Connor, K. L.; Culp, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    Intercellular complementation during tumour development and metastasis was analysed for two different oncogene (ras or sis) transformants of Balb/c 3T3 cells, tagged with different histochemical marker genes (lacZ or ALP to generate LZEJ or APSI cells, respectively), by localising them after their co-injection with specific double-staining protocols. This model evaluates whether limited progression of each tumour class can be facilitated reciprocally during co-localisation and co-growth in nu...

  3. Aspects of Tumour Targeting : Preclinical Studies on Human Malignant Cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström Wester, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Exclusive eradication of tumour cells causing minimal damage to healthy tissue, a concept referred to as targeting, is an interesting approach to improve the outcome for patients afflicted with cancer. The general aim of this thesis was to highlighten aspects that could be of importance in developing novel treatment regimens based on specific targeting of tumour cells. Two variants of targeting strategies, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR...

  4. In Silico Modelling of Treatment-Induced Tumour Cell Kill: Developments and Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Harriss-Phillips, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical and stochastic computer (in silico) models of tumour growth and treatment response of the past and current eras are presented, outlining the aims of the models, model methodology, the key parameters used to describe the tumour system, and treatment modality applied, as well as reported outcomes from simulations. Fractionated radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and combined therapies are reviewed, providing a comprehensive overview of the modelling literature for current modellers and rad...

  5. Association of primary tumour FDG uptake with clinical, histopathological and molecular characteristics in breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koolen, B.B.; Aukema, T.S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrancken Peeters, M.J.T.F.D.; Rutgers, E.J.T. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wesseling, J.; Lips, E.H. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Pathology and Experimental Therapy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vogel, W.V.; Valdes Olmos, R.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werkhoven, E. van [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biometrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, K.G.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rodenhuis, S. [Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of primary tumour {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake with clinical, histopathological and molecular characteristics of breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Second, we wished to establish for which patients pretreatment positron emission tomography (PET)/CT could safely be omitted because of low FDG uptake. PET/CT was performed in 214 primary stage II or III breast cancer patients in the prone position with hanging breasts. Tumour FDG uptake was qualitatively evaluated to determine the possibility of response monitoring with PET/CT and was quantitatively assessed using maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}). FDG uptake was compared with age, TNM stage, histology, hormone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, grade, Ki-67 and molecular subtype in univariable and multivariable analyses. In 203 tumours (95 %) FDG uptake was considered sufficient for response monitoring. No subgroup of patients with consistently low tumour FDG uptake could be identified. In a univariable analysis, SUV{sub max} was significantly higher in patients with distant metastases at staging examination, non-lobular carcinomas, tumours with negative hormone receptors, triple negative tumours, grade 3 tumours, and in tumours with a high proliferation index (Ki-67 expression). After multiple linear regression analysis, triple negative and grade 3 tumours were significantly associated with a higher SUV{sub max}. Primary tumour FDG uptake in breast cancer patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy is significantly higher in tumours with prognostically unfavourable characteristics. Based on tumour characteristics associated with low tumour FDG uptake, this study was unable to identify a subgroup of patients unlikely to benefit from pretreatment PET/CT. (orig.)

  6. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  7. Explorative laparotomy of solid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We can state that the diagnostical advantages of exploratory laparotomy must be compared to the risk of surgery. It requires a critical determination of indications and should not be primarily planned in a clinical-exploratory form but always also as therapeutic laparotomy. In addition, the general state of the patient must be so good that the anaesthesia and operative trauma can be tolerated. The patient must be prepared bearing in mind that the possible tumour resection or at least tumour reduction or other surgical palliative measures can be carried out. The wide spectrum of precise pre-examinations which are possible nowadays has caused the exploratory laparotomy to lose some of its importance. (orig.)

  8. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana J Michielsen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  9. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Michielsen, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5) could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  10. Interferon regulatory factor-8 modulates the development of tumour-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Trina J; Greeneltch, Kristy M; Reid, Julia E; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Liu, Kebin; Abrams, Scott I

    2009-09-01

    Tumour-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote immune suppression and mediate tumour progression. However, the molecular basis for the generation of MDSC, which in mice co-express the CD11b(+) and Gr-1(+) cell surface markers remains unclear. Because CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells expand during progressive tumour growth, this suggests that tumour-induced events alter signalling pathways that affect normal myeloid cell development. Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8), a member of the IFN-gamma regulatory factor family, is essential for normal myelopoiesis. We therefore examined whether IRF-8 modulated tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cell development or accumulation using both implantable (4T1) and transgenic (MMTV-PyMT) mouse models of mammary tumour growth. In the 4T1 model, both splenic and bone marrow-derived CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells of tumour-bearing mice displayed a marked reduction in IRF-8 expression compared to control populations. A causal link between IRF-8 expression and the emergence of tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells was explored in vivo using a double transgenic (dTg) mouse model designed to express transgenes for both IRF-8 and mammary carcinoma development. Despite the fact that tumour growth was unaffected, splenomegaly, as well as the frequencies and absolute numbers of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells were significantly lower in dTg mice when compared with single transgenic tumour-bearing mice. Overall, these data reveal that IRF-8 plays an important role in tumour-induced development and/or accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells, and establishes a molecular basis for the potential manipulation of these myeloid populations for cancer therapy. PMID:20196788

  11. Putting tumours in context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek

    2001-10-01

    The interactions between cancer cells and their micro- and macroenvironment create a context that promotes tumor growth and protects it from immune attack. The functional association of cancer cells with their surrounding tissues forms a new 'organ' that changes as malignancy progresses. Investigation of this process might provide new insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and could also lead to new therapeutic targets. Under normal conditions, ORGANS are made up of TISSUES that exchange information with other cell types via cell-cell contact, cytokines and the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM). The ECM, which is produced by collaboration between STROMAL fibroblasts and EPITHELIAL cells, provides structural scaffolding for cells, as well as contextual information. The endothelial vasculature provides nutrients and oxygen, and cells of the immune system combat pathogens and remove apoptotic cells. Epithelial cells associate into intact, polarized sheets. These tissues communicate through a complex network of interactions: physically, through direct contact or through the intervening ECM, and biochemically, through both soluble and insoluble signalling molecules. In combination, these interactions provide the information that is necessary to maintain cellular differentiation and to create complex tissue structures. Occasionally, the intercellular signals that define the normal context become disrupted. Alterations in epithelial tissues can lead to movement of epithelial sheets and proliferation - for example, after activation of mesenchymal fibroblasts due to wounding.Normally, these conditions are temporary and reversible, but when inflammation is sustained, an escalating feedback loop ensues.Under persistent inflammatory conditions, continual upregulation of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by stromal fibroblasts can disrupt the ECM, and invading immune cells can overproduce factors that promote abnormal proliferation. As this process

  12. An analysis of T lymphocyte subsets in tumour-transplanted mice on the basis of Lyt antigenic markers and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, P. K.; McKenzie, I. F. C.

    1982-01-01

    Small lymphocyte subsets were characterized radioautographically on the basis of several surface markers, viz. surface Ig (S-Ig), Thy-1 and Lyt (Ly-1, Ly-2 and 3) antigens in host lymphoid organs (thymus, spleen and blood) as well as at the tumour site at various stages of subcutaneous growth of two different syngeneic tumours—MPC-11 plasmacytoma and WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma in BALB/c mice. In both tumour-host combinations there was a rise in the levels of null (S-Ig-, Thy-1-) small lymphocytes as well as the Ly-23+ subset of T small lymphocytes at all the sites examined. The absolute number of these two subsets also increased excepting the case of null cell rise in the thymus which was relative. The functional potentials of Lyt subsets were explored by employing in vitro and in vivo assays. While no appreciable levels of anti-tumour cytotoxic T cells (Tc) were detectable by a 51Cr release assay in the host spleen or the tumour-draining lymph nodes at any stage of growth of MPC-11 tumour, such Tc was generated in vitro by a co-cultivation of unprimed spleen cells with irradiated MPC-11 cells. These Tc were Thy-1+ and Ly-12+, as noted from antibody+C′ mediated abrogation of cytotoxicity. These results suggested that the generation of anti-tumour Tc in vivo was suppressed in tumour-bearing hosts. The possibility of a cell-mediated suppression was tested by an adoptive transfer of thymocytes or splenocytes from tumour-bearing mice into naive or pre-immunized recipients which then received fresh tumour transplants. This procedure caused a specific enhancement of tumour growth in three tumour-host combinations: MPC-11 or WEHI-164 tumour in BALB/c mice and W-1 fibrosarcoma in CBA mice. The suppressor lineage lymphocytes appearing in vivo were found to be Thy-1+ and Ly-1-, 2+, as noted from antibody +C′ mediated abrogation of their tumour-growth promoting ability. They appeared earlier (7 days) in the thymus and later (>2 weeks) in the spleen and then persisted during

  13. TCR/CD3 ligation of a TCR-transgenic T lymphoma blocks its proliferation in vitro but does not affect its growth in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, J; Rudolphi, A; Tcherepnev, G;

    1994-01-01

    of TL1 cells resembled that of small-to-medium lymphoblasts. The cells had the following phenotype: CD3 + TCR alpha T+TCR beta T+CD4-CD8- CD44-CD45RB+LECAM-1 + IL-2R- and low H-2 expression. Exposure of TL1 cells to TCR-binding monoclonal antibodies or lectins blocked in their in vitro proliferation...

  14. Allograft in bone tumour surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last twenty years, there has been a vast improvement in the prognosis of primary malignant tumours of bone. This is due to many factors including early detection, staging and classification of tumours as a result of better staining and imaging techniques, better surgical technology, e.g. endoprosthesis and most importantly adjuvant treatment with cytotoxic drugs. As a result of long term survival, amputation of limb has more or less been replaced by limb salvage surgery. This procedure consists of two parts. Primary objective is of course complete removal of the tumour by adequate soft tissue cover and secondarily by reconstruction of the locomotor system, If possible with retention of the function of the limb. These procedures include endo-prosthetic replacement or arthroplasty and arthrodesis using autologus grafts, allograft or combination. With the development of bone banks and assured safety of preserved bones, reconstructive limb salvage surgery using massive allograft is gradually replacing prosthetic implants. The advantages include replacement of articular surfaces, incorporation of the graft to the host bone, attachment of bone tissue and increased probably permanent survival. Allograft can be used for intercalary replacement, osteo-articular arthroplasty arthrodesis or filling large cavities. Inherent complication of massive allograft are disease transmission, infection, delayed and non-union, pathological fractures, mechanical failure and joint destruction. Several limb salvage procedures using allografts have been carried out in our institution with one failure due to infection. Paucity of available allograft has restricted more such procedures to be carried out

  15. Apigenin inhibits HGF-promoted invasive growth and metastasis involving blocking PI3K/Akt pathway and β4 integrin function in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, Met, known to control invasive growth program have recently been shown to play crucial roles in the survival of breast cancer patients. The diet-derived flavonoids have been reported to possess anti-invasion properties; however, knowledge on the pharmacological and molecular mechanisms in suppressing HGF/Met-mediated tumor invasion and metastasis is poorly understood. In our preliminary study, we use HGF as an invasive inducer to investigate the effect of flavonoids including apigenin, naringenin, genistein and kaempferol on HGF-dependent invasive growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Results show that apigenin presents the most potent anti-migration and anti-invasion properties by Boyden chamber assay. Furthermore, apigenin represses the HGF-induced cell motility and scattering and inhibits the HGF-promoted cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of apigenin on HGF-induced signaling activation involving invasive growth was evaluated by immunoblotting analysis, it shows that apigenin blocks the HGF-induced Akt phosphorylation but not Met, ERK, and JNK phosphorylation. In addition to MDA-MB-231 cells, apigenin exhibits inhibitory effect on HGF-induced Akt phosphorylation in hepatoma SK-Hep1 cells and lung carcinoma A549 cells. By indirect immunofluorescence microscopy assay, apigenin inhibits the HGF-induced clustering of β4 integrin at actin-rich adhesive site and lamellipodia through PI3K-dependent manner. Treatment of apigenin inhibited HGF-stimulated integrin β4 function including cell-matrix adhesion and cell-endothelial cells adhesion in MDA-MB-231 cells. By Akt-siRNA transfection analysis, it confirmed that apigenin inhibited HGF-promoted invasive growth involving blocking PI3K/Akt pathway. Finally, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on HGF-promoted metastasis by lung colonization of tumor cells in nude mice and organ metastasis of tumor cells in chick embryo. By

  16. YOLK SAC TUMOUR IN A PREMENARCHAL GIRL : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yolk sac tumour, otherwise known as endodermal sinus tumour, is a rare and highly malignant germ cell tumour accounting for approximately 10% of malignant germ cell tumours. The tumour usually presents as a rapidly growing mass in young women. Here we present a case of a young premenarchal girl with a huge ovarian tumour which proved to be a yolk sac tumour and was successfully managed.

  17. Pathobiological features of breast tumours in the State of Kuwait: a comprehensive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Farid

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer accounts for 30.3% of all cancer types in Kuwaiti women. Death occurs in approximately 43% of these patients. Our goal was to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the pathobiological characteristics of the tumours in an attempt to determine any particular trend that could be present. Methods One hundred and sixty-six cases were included in this study. All the pathology reports and paraffin blocks pertaining to these cases were collected. Four micrometer sections were taken from each block, and immunostaining against Her-2, ER, and PgR was performed. Both the proportion and intensity of immunostaining were scored according to the Allred's method, and typing of the tumour was done according the WHO criteria regarding tumour classification. Grading of invasive carcinomas was done according to the modified Bloom-Richardson-Elston's method, and tumour stage was determined according to the criteria set by the American Joint Committee on Cancer. Results The mean age of the patients below 55 years was 40, as compared to 68 for those above 55 (p 20 with a marked to moderate nuclear pleomorphism. They were mostly grade II or III, sized 2–5 or > 5 cm, had absent or scanty tumour lymphocytes, and were stage II or III. The in situ tumours were mainly ductal carcinoma (DCIS of which comedo and cribriform were the major histological subtypes. The major histological subtypes of the invasive tumours were ductal-not otherwise specified, lobular, and tubular/cribriform. In this study, we also found a significant (p Conclusion Breast cancer in Kuwait seems to be more aggressive than what is currently seen in Europe, North America, Australia, and parts of Asia. Further investigations regarding the features observed in this study need to be performed.

  18. Radiobiological hypoxia of a transplanted rat tumour and the effect of treatment with cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isologous tumours, 8-10 mm in diameter, of the 37th-40th generation spontaneous adenocarcinoma LMC1 have been grown subcutaneously in 150-200 g female Wistar rats and irradiated with 60Co γ-rays before or 1, 4, 7, or 10 days after introperitoneal injection of 150 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide (CP). Dose-response curves for delay in growth of the tumour given aerobic or hyperbaric (HBO) irradiation alone were biphasic and, above 15 Gy (AIR) and 20GY (HBO), their response was governed by a component of hypoxic cells. One day after CP the response of the tumour to aerobic irradiation was the same as when rendered hypoxic by clamping 15 min prior to treatment indicating that only hypoxic tumour cells survive in animals treated with drugs. Three days later hypoxia is reduced by reoxygenation, but the hypoxic fraction is still significantly higher than before treatment with CP. Only by 7 and 10 days had the hypoxic fraction of clonogenic cells been reduced to a level characteristic of the untreated tumour. Even though at 4 days after giving drug the hypoxic component of cells was significantly larger than normal for rats breathing air, no resistant component was found in the tumour response for HBO irradiation. This suggests that processes leading to the reoxygenation of a tumour after an initial treatment with drug may themselves permit an enhanced effect of subsequent HBO irradiation. (author)

  19. Recurrence and mortality according to Estrogen Receptor status for breast cancer patients undergoing conservative surgery. Ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence dynamics provides clues for tumour biology within the residual breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the study was designed to determine how tumour hormone receptor status affects the subsequent pattern over time (dynamics) of breast cancer recurrence and death following conservative primary breast cancer resection. Time span from primary resection until both first recurrence and death were considered among 2825 patients undergoing conservative surgery with or without breast radiotherapy. The hazard rates for ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence (IBTR), distant metastasis (DM) and mortality throughout 10 years of follow-up were assessed. DM dynamics displays the same bimodal pattern (first early peak at about 24 months, second late peak at the sixth-seventh year) for both estrogen receptor (ER) positive (P) and negative (N) tumours and for all local treatments and metastatic sites. The hazard rates for IBTR maintain the bimodal pattern for ERP and ERN tumours; however, each IBTR recurrence peak for ERP tumours is delayed in comparison to the corresponding timing of recurrence peaks for ERN tumours. Mortality dynamics is markedly different for ERP and ERN tumours with more early deaths among patients with ERN than among patients with ERP primary tumours. DM dynamics is not influenced by the extent of conservative primary tumour resection and is similar for both ER phenotypes across different metastatic sites, suggesting similar mechanisms for tumour development at distant sites despite apparently different microenvironments. The IBTR risk peak delay observed in ERP tumours is an exception to the common recurrence risk rhythm. This suggests that the microenvironment within the residual breast tissue may enforce more stringent constraints upon ERP breast tumour cell growth than other tissues, prolonging the latency of IBTR. This local environment is, however, apparently less constraining to ERN cells, as IBTR dynamics is similar to the corresponding recurrence dynamics among other distant tissues

  20. Movement disorders caused by brain tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatoe H

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are uncommon presenting features of brain tumours. Early recognition of such lesions is important to arrest further deficit. We treated seven patients with movement disorders secondary to brain tumours over a period of seven years. Only two of these were intrinsic thalamic tumours (astrocytomas while the rest were extrinsic tumours. The intrinsic tumours were accompanied by hemichorea. Among the extrinsic tumours, there was one pituitary macroadenoma with hemiballismus and four meningiomas with parkinsonism. Symptoms were unilateral in all patients except one with anterior third falcine meningioma who had bilateral rest tremors. There was relief in movement disorders observed after surgery. Imaging by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is mandatory in the evaluation of movement disorders, especially if the presentation is atypical, unilateral and/or accompanied by long tract signs.

  1. Imaging of solid kidney tumours in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighteen children aged 6 months to 12 years with 20 solid renal tumours; 13 Wilms' tumours (WT), 2 clear cell sarcomas of the kidney, 1 malignant rhabdoid tumour of the kidney and 2 cases of bilateral nephroblastomatosis with Wilms' tumour underwent evaluation with US, CT and MR imaging. Contrast-enhanced CT and non-enhanced MR were equally accurate in determining the size and origin of the tumour but were unreliable in separation of stages I, II and III. US could only accurately assess the size of the tumours. MR characteristics varied somewhat between WTs and non-WTs but contrast-enhanced MR imaging might be useful for separation of WTs from nephroblastomatosis. (orig.)

  2. Paediatric solid tumours in Nigerian children: A changing pattern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanko Na′anlep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood cancer is fast becoming an important paediatric problem in Nigeria and several parts of Africa, with the progressive decline of infectious and nutritional diseases. The following study was a 5-year retrospective review of paediatric solid tumours as seen at the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Objective: To determine the relative frequencies of childhood solid malignant tumours in Jos, Central Nigeria and compare with reports of previous studies both locally and abroad. Materials and Methods: Cancer registers and medical records of patients were used to extract demographic data, specimen number and/or codes. Archival materials were retrieved from the histopathology laboratory and sections were made from paraffin embedded blocks of these specimens. Slides of these histological sections were reviewed and reclassified where necessary. The relative frequencies were then determined. Results: One hundred and eighty one solid tumours of children were diagnosed within the study period. Ninety-four (51% were benign and 87 (49% malignant. Male: Female ratio was 1.3:1. The commonest malignant tumour diagnosed was rhabdomyosarcoma which accounted for 27 (31%, comprising of 15 (55.6%, 11 (40.7% and 1 (3.7% embryonal, alveolar and pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcomas, respectively. Non Hodgkin lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma accounted for 17 (19.5% and 12 (13.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the result of our study, we conclude that the commonest solid malignancy of childhood in Jos, Nigeria is rhabdomyosarcoma. This has implications for diagnosis, management and prognosis of theses soft tissue sarcomas in our paediatric population.

  3. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, M C; Casey, G; MacConmara, M; Lederer, J A; Soden, D; Collins, J K; Tangney, M; O'Sullivan, G C

    2010-07-01

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development. PMID:20186173

  4. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, M C

    2012-01-31

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development.

  5. Bilateral ovarian tumour in a young girl

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral ovarian tumour in a girl presents the dilemma of conservative versus aggressive approach towards these tumours. When faced with suspicious tumour and complete replacement of the ovaries bilaterally, bilateral oophorectomy is a viable option, though the certain possibility of infertility and lifelong hormonal supplementation is unavoidable. We report a case of bilateral ovarian masses in a young girl, which on histopathological examination showed mature teratoma with aggregates of pr...

  6. Computer aided diagnosis of bone tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four radiologists, three of whom having no special expertise in bone tumour radiology, analysed 177 bone tumours. One of the radiologists, using a computer aided bone tumour program, performed significantly better than the other two at a comparable level of training and was able to compete successfully with the fourth radiologist experienced in bone diagnosis. The results validate the assumption that computer aided diagnostic programs may improve the diagnostic accuracy of radiologists having limited experience with the problem at hand. (Auth.)

  7. Surgical management of epithelial parotid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the clinicopathological presentation and treatment options in epithelial parotid tumours with emphasis on surgery. Subjects and Methods: Epithelial parotid tumours diagnosed and operated by an ENT surgeon and a general surgeon in 10 years during their posting in different teaching hospitals were included in the study. Clinical presentation, preoperative investigations, operative procedure, histopathology report, postoperative complications and further management were recorded. The data was collected and reviewed from the records of all the patients maintained by the authors. Results: Fifty-two patients presented with parotid tumour. Average age was 38 years. Commonest presentation was painless lump over the parotid region (85%), pain (15%), facial palsy, and enlarged neck nodes. Majority of tumours were benign, only two were recurrent. Parotid pleomorphic Adenoma (PPA) was the commonest benign tumour, others being Warthin's tumour and monomorphic adenoma. Adenoid cystic carcinoma was the commonest malignant tumour 29% followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Others were carcinoma in PPA squamous cell carcinoma, malignant mixed tumour, malignant Iymphoepithelioma and undifferentiated carcinoma. Superficial parotidectomy (SP) was the commonest operation performed in 69%. Other procedures were total conservative parotidectomy in 11%, total radical surgery in 9% and enucleation in only one patient earliest in the series. Neck node dissection was done in 2 patients. Except for one child, rest of the 13 patients received postoperative radiotherapy and one patient of Iymphoepithelioma received chemotherapy in addition. Commonest postoperative complication was temporary facial weakness in 35% (18/52). Permanent facial palsy occurred in 08 patients. Of these 07 had a malignant process and only one patient had excision biopsy. Conclusion: Benign and malignant epithelial parotid tumours can be diagnosed by there clinical presentation . supplemented with

  8. An unusual presentation of a glomus tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, N

    2011-02-01

    Glomus tumours are benign, soft tissue tumours, usually of fingertips. Classically they present with severe pain, temperature sensitivity and localised tenderness. The diagnosis is often delayed due to sometimes non-specific symptoms and rarity of the disorder. While usually a clinical diagnosis, imaging may be necessary for diagnosis and localisation. We present a case of glomus tumour of the fingertip with an unusual history.

  9. Malignant tumours of childhood in Zaria

    OpenAIRE

    Samaila Modupeola

    2009-01-01

    Background: The increased prevalence of hitherto uncommon tumours in children in our geographic setting formed the basis for this study. This study aimed to determine the current histopathologic distribution pattern of paediatric malignancies in Zaria. Materials and Methods : An eight year (2000-2007) consecutive analysis of malignant tumours in children ages 0 to 15 years in a referral University laboratory. All tissue biopsies were fixed in 10% formalin and processed in wax. Tumour...

  10. Ex-vivo HRMAS of adult brain tumours: metabolite quantification and assignment of tumour biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, A.J.; Fellows, G.A.; Griffiths, J.R.; Wilson, M.; Bell, B.A.; Howe, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy allows detailed metabolic analysis of whole biopsy samples for investigating tumour biology and tumour classification. Accurate biochemical assignment of small molecule metabolites that are "NMR visible" will improve our inter

  11. Inhibition of multiple vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) blocks lymph node metastases but inhibition of VEGFR-2 is sufficient to sensitize tumor cells to platinum-based chemotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sini, Patrizia; Samarzija, Ivana; Baffert, Fabienne; Littlewood-Evans, Amanda; Schnell, Christian; Theuer, Andreas; Christian, Sven; Boos, Anja; Hess-Stumpp, Holger; Foekens, John A; Setyono-Han, Buddy; Wood, Jeanette; Hynes, Nancy E

    2008-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) have important roles in cancer, affecting blood and lymphatic vessel functionality as well as tumor cells themselves. We compared the efficacy of a VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PTK787/ZK222584 (PTK/ZK), which targets the three VEGFRs, with blocking antibodies directed against VEGFR-2 (DC101) or VEGF-A (Pab85618) in a metastatic melanoma model. Although all inhibitors exerted comparable effects on primary tumor growth, only PTK/ZK significantly reduced lymph node metastasis formation. A comparable decrease in lymphatic vessel density following blockade of VEGFR-2 (DC101) or the three VEGFRs (PTK/ZK) was observed in the metastases. However, the functionality of lymphatics surrounding the primary tumor was more significantly disrupted by PTK/ZK, indicating the importance of multiple VEGFRs in the metastatic process. The antimetastatic properties of PTK/ZK were confirmed in a breast carcinoma model. B16/BL6 tumor cells express VEGF ligands and their receptors. Blockade of a VEGFR-1 autocrine loop with PTK/ZK inhibited tumor cell migration. Furthermore, the tumor cells also showed enhanced sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy in combination with PTK/ZK, indicating that autocrine VEGFRs are promoting tumor cell migration and survival. In summary, our results suggest that, in addition to blocking angiogenesis, combined inhibition of the three VEGFRs may more efficiently target other aspects of tumor pathophysiology, including lymphatic vessel functionality, tumor cell dissemination, survival pathways, and response to chemotherapeutic compounds. PMID:18316624

  12. Combined micro-PET/micro-CT imaging of lung tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rodt

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice develop disseminated and circumscribed lung adenocarcinoma respectively, allowing for assessment of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the technical feasibility, the correlation of initial findings to histology and the administered radiation dose of combined micro-PET/micro-CT in these animal models. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 14 C57BL/6 mice (4 nontransgenic, 4 SPC-raf transgenic, 6 SPC-myc transgenic were examined using micro-CT and (18F-Fluoro-deoxyglucose micro-PET in-vivo. Micro-PET data was corrected for random events and scatter prior to reconstruction with a 3D-FORE/2D-OSEM iterative algorithm. Rigid micro-PET/micro-CT registration was performed. Tumour-to-non-tumour ratios were calculated for different lung regions and focal lesions. Diffuse tumour growth was quantified using a semiautomated micro-CT segmentation routine reported earlier. Regional histologic tumour load was assessed using a 4-point rating scale. Gamma radiation dose was determined using thermoluminescence dosimeters. RESULTS: Micro-CT allowed visualisation of diffuse and circumscribed tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic animals along with morphology, while micro-PET provided information on metabolism, but lacked morphologic detail. Mean tumour-to-non-tumour ratio was 2.47 for circumscribed lesions. No significant correlation could be shown between histological tumour load and tumour-to-nontumour ratio for diffuse tumours in SPC-raf transgenic animals. Calculation of the expected dose based on gamma dosimetry yielded approximately 140 mGy/micro-PET examination additional to approximately 200 mGy due to micro-CT. CONCLUSIONS: Combined micro-PET/micro-CT imaging allows for in-vivo assessment of lung tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice. The technique has potential for the evaluation of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies in circumscribed lung tumours.

  13. Combined Micro-PET/Micro-CT Imaging of Lung Tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodt, Thomas; Luepke, Matthias; Boehm, Claudia; Hueper, Katja; Halter, Roman; Glage, Silke; Hoy, Ludwig; Wacker, Frank; Borlak, Juergen; von Falck, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Introduction SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice develop disseminated and circumscribed lung adenocarcinoma respectively, allowing for assessment of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the technical feasibility, the correlation of initial findings to histology and the administered radiation dose of combined micro-PET/micro-CT in these animal models. Material and Methods 14 C57BL/6 mice (4 nontransgenic, 4 SPC-raf transgenic, 6 SPC-myc transgenic) were examined using micro-CT and 18F-Fluoro-deoxyglucose micro-PET in-vivo. Micro-PET data was corrected for random events and scatter prior to reconstruction with a 3D-FORE/2D-OSEM iterative algorithm. Rigid micro-PET/micro-CT registration was performed. Tumour-to-non-tumour ratios were calculated for different lung regions and focal lesions. Diffuse tumour growth was quantified using a semiautomated micro-CT segmentation routine reported earlier. Regional histologic tumour load was assessed using a 4-point rating scale. Gamma radiation dose was determined using thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results Micro-CT allowed visualisation of diffuse and circumscribed tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic animals along with morphology, while micro-PET provided information on metabolism, but lacked morphologic detail. Mean tumour-to-non-tumour ratio was 2.47 for circumscribed lesions. No significant correlation could be shown between histological tumour load and tumour-to-nontumour ratio for diffuse tumours in SPC-raf transgenic animals. Calculation of the expected dose based on gamma dosimetry yielded approximately 140 mGy/micro-PET examination additional to approximately 200 mGy due to micro-CT. Conclusions Combined micro-PET/micro-CT imaging allows for in-vivo assessment of lung tumours in SPC-raf and SPC-myc transgenic mice. The technique has potential for the evaluation of carcinogenesis and treatment strategies in circumscribed lung tumours. PMID:23028537

  14. Anti-metastatic effects of viral and non-viral mediated Nk4 delivery to tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhles, Alexandra; Collins, Sara A; van Pijkeren, Jan P; Rajendran, Simon; Miles, Michelle; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; O'Hanlon, Deirdre M; Tangney, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The most common cause of death of cancer sufferers is through the occurrence of metastases. The metastatic behaviour of tumour cells is regulated by extracellular growth factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a ligand for the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant expression/activation of the c-Met receptor is closely associated with metastatic progression. Nk4 (also known as Interleukin (IL)32b) is a competitive antagonist of the HGF c-Met system and inhibits c-Met signalling and tumour metastasis. Nk4 has an additional anti-angiogenic activity independent of its HGF-antagonist function. Angiogenesis-inhibitory as well as cancer-specific apoptosis inducing effects make the Nk4 sequence an attractive candidate for gene therapy of cancer. This study investigates the inhibition of tumour metastasis by gene therapy mediated production of Nk4 by the primary tumour. Optimal delivery of anti-cancer genes is vital in order to achieve the highest therapeutic responses. Non-viral plasmid delivery methods have the advantage of safety and ease of production, providing immediate transgene expression, albeit short-lived in most tumours. Sustained presence of anti-angiogenic molecules is preferable with anti-angiogenic therapies, and the long-term expression mediated by Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) might represent a more appropriate delivery in this respect. However, the incubation time required by AAV vectors to reach appropriate gene expression levels hampers efficacy in many fast-growing murine tumour models. Here, we describe murine trials assessing the effects of Nk4 on the spontaneously metastatic Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) model when delivered to primary tumour via plasmid lipofection or AAV2 vector. Intratumoural AAV-Nk4 administration produced the highest therapeutic response with significant reduction in both primary tumour growth and incidence of lung metastases. Plasmid-mediated therapy also significantly reduced metastatic growth, but with moderate

  15. Bilateral ovarian tumour in a young girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kumar Govindarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral ovarian tumour in a girl presents the dilemma of conservative versus aggressive approach towards these tumours. When faced with suspicious tumour and complete replacement of the ovaries bilaterally, bilateral oophorectomy is a viable option, though the certain possibility of infertility and lifelong hormonal supplementation is unavoidable. We report a case of bilateral ovarian masses in a young girl, which on histopathological examination showed mature teratoma with aggregates of proliferating capillary and cavernous sized vessels in the tumour wall. Such associations are rare and must be differentiated from a vascular neoplasm.

  16. Tumour angiogenesis-Origin of blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Priya, S; Nagare, R P; Sneha, V S; Sidhanth, C; Bindhya, S; Manasa, P; Ganesan, T S

    2016-08-15

    The conventional view of tumour vascularization is that tumours acquire their blood supply from neighbouring normal stroma. Additional methods of tumour vascularization such as intussusceptive angiogenesis, vasculogenic mimicry, vessel co-option and vasculogenesis have been demonstrated to occur. However, the origin of the endothelial cells and pericytes in the tumour vasculature is not fully understood. Their origin from malignant cells has been shown indirectly in lymphoma and neuroblastoma by immuno-FISH experiments. It is now evident that tumours arise from a small population of cells called cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumour initiating cells. Recent data suggest that a proportion of tumour endothelial cells arise from cancer stem cells in glioblastoma. This was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells showed identical genetic changes to those identified in tumour cells. However, another report contradicted these results from the earlier studies in glioblastoma and had shown that CSCs give rise to pericytes and not endothelial cells. The main thrust of this review is the critical analysis of the conflicting data from different studies and the remaining questions in this field of research. The mechanism by which this phenomenon occurs is also discussed in detail. The transdifferentiation of CSCs to endothelial cells/pericytes has many implications in the progression and metastasis of the tumours and hence it would be a novel target for antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26934471

  17. Elevated tumour marker: an indication for imaging?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMahon, Colm J

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of imaging examinations in patients with elevated tumour markers when (a) the tumour marker is not validated for as a primary diagnostic test; (b) the patient had no personal history of cancer and (c) the patient had no other imaging indication. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients without known cancer who had abnormal carcinoembryonic antigen, CA19-9, CA125 and\\/or CA15-3 serology over a one-year period were included. A retrospective medical record review was performed to assess the number of these cases who underwent imaging because of \\'elevated tumour marker\\' in the absence of a clinical indication for imaging. The number and result of these imaging studies were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight hundred and nineteen patients were included. Of those, 25 patients (mean age: 67.8 [range 41-91] y), were imaged to evaluate: \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. They underwent 29 imaging studies (mean [+\\/-standard deviation (SD)] per patient = 1.2 [+\\/-0.4]), and had 42 elevated tumour marker serology tests (mean [+\\/-SD] per patient = 1.7 [+\\/-0.7]). Four patients had >1 imaging test. No patient had an imaging study which diagnosed a malignancy or explained the elevated tumour marker. CONCLUSION: The non-judicious use of tumour markers can prompt further unnecessary investigations including imaging. In this study, there was no positive diagnostic yield for imaging performed for investigation of \\'elevated tumour marker\\'. \\'Elevated tumour marker\\

  18. Computed tomography in malignant primary bone tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of computed tomography is examined in malignant primary bone tumours using a strongly defined examination group of 13 Patients (six Ewing's-sarcomas, five osteosarcomas, one chondrosarcoma and one spindle-shaped cell sarcoma). Computed tomography is judged superior compared to plain radiographs in recognition of bone marrow infiltration and presentation of parosteal tumour parts as well as in analysis of tissue components of tumours, CT is especially suitable for therapy planning and evaluating response to therapy. CT does not provide sufficient diagnostic information to determine dignity and exact diagnosis of bone tumours. (orig.)

  19. Modulation of Acid Sphingomyelinase in Melanoma Reprogrammes the Tumour Immune Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Assi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory microenvironment induces tumours to acquire an aggressive and immunosuppressive behaviour. Since acid sphingomyelinase (A-SMase downregulation in melanoma was shown to determine a malignant phenotype, we aimed here to elucidate the role of A-SMase in the regulation of tumour immunogenic microenvironment using in vivo melanoma models in which A-SMase was either downregulated or maintained at constitutively high levels. We found high levels of inflammatory factors in low A-SMase expressing tumours, which also displayed an immunosuppressive/protumoural microenvironment: high levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs, as well as low levels of dendritic cells (DCs. In contrast, the restoration of A-SMase in melanoma cells not only reduced tumour growth and immunosuppression, but also induced a high recruitment at tumour site of effector immune cells with an antitumoural function. Indeed, we observed a poor homing of MDSCs and Tregs and the increased recruitment of CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes as well as the infiltration of DCs and CD8+/CD44high T lymphocytes. This study demonstrates that change of A-SMase expression in cancer cells is sufficient per se to tune in vivo melanoma growth and that A-SMase levels modulate immune cells at tumour site. This may be taken into consideration in the setting of therapeutic strategies.

  20. Tumour Therapy with Particle Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Grupen, C.

    2000-01-01

    Photons are exponentially attenuated in matter producing high doses close to the surface. Therefore they are not well suited for the treatment of deep seated tumours. Charged particles, in contrast, exhibit a sharp increase of ionisation density close to the end of their range, the so-called Bragg-peak. The depth of the Bragg-peak can be adjusted by varying the particle's energy. In parallel with the large energy deposit the increase in biological effectiveness for cell killing at the end of ...

  1. Compensatory proliferation in normal tissues and tumours after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prolonged fractionation in radiotherapy has become standard because it has been shown to work empirically. It can now be shown that one of the rationales for this is wrong: normal tissues do not always show faster compensatory proliferation during treatment than tumours. The time of onset of compensatory proliferation depends upon the time at which cell depletion is recognised. Cell loss occurs early in rapid turnover tissues e.g. small intestine, but somewhat later in skin, and much later in slow turnover tissues such as bladder. This paper demonstrates that compensatory, rapid cell proliferation follows cell depletion and is therefore delayed for many months in some tissues. Conversely changes in the proliferation rate of experimental tumours after irradiation have been observed, resulting either from shortened cell cycle times or increased growth fractions. (Auth.)

  2. Granular cell tumour of the neurohypophysis: a rare sellar tumour with specific radiological and operative features.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aquilina, K

    2012-02-03

    Symptomatic granular cell tumours of the neurohypophysis are rare sellar lesions. Preoperative prediction of the diagnosis on the basis of radiological appearance is useful as these tumours carry specific surgical difficulties. This is possible when the tumour arises from the pituitary stalk, rostral to a normal pituitary gland. This has not been emphasized previously.

  3. Differential diagnosis of parotid gland tumours: which magnetic resonance findings should be taken in account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglione, T; Botto, A; Sciandra, M; Gaudino, S; Danieli, L; Parrilla, C; Paludetti, G; Colosimo, C

    2015-10-01

    Our aim was to define typical magnetic resonance (MRI) findings in malignant and benign parotid tumours. This study is based on retrospective evaluation of pre-surgical MRI of 94 patients with parotid gland tumours. Histology results were available for all tumours. There were 69 cases of benign (73%) and 25 cases of malignant (27%) tumours, including 44 pleomorphic adenomas, 18 Warthin's tumours, 7 various benign tumours, 6 squamous cell carcinomas, 3 carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenomas, 2 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 1 adenoid cystic carcinoma and 13 various malignant tumours. The following MRI parameters were evaluated: shape, site, size, margins, signal intensity (SI) on T1w and T2w images, contrast enhancement, signal of cystic content, presence or absence of a capsule, perineural spread, extraglandular growth pattern and cervical adenopathy. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the MRI findings most suggestive of malignancy, and to define the most typical MRI pattern of the most common histologies. Ill-defined margins (p < 0.001), adenopathies (p < 0.001) and infiltrative grown pattern (p < 0.001) were significantly predictive of malignancy. Typical findings of pleomorphic adenoma included hyperintensity on T2w images (p = 0.02), strong contrast enhancement (p < 0.001) and lobulated shape (p = 0.04). Typical findings of Warthin's tumour included hyperintense components on T1w images (p < 0.001), location in the parotid inferior process (p < 0.001) and mild or incomplete contrast enhancement (p = 0.01). SI on T1w and T2w images and contrast enhancement enables differential diagnosis between pleomorphic adenoma and Warthin's tumour. PMID:26824912

  4. Size Matters: Developing Design Rules to Engineer Nanoparticles for Solid Tumour Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Edward Alexander

    Nanotechnology enables the design of highly customizable platforms for producing minimally invasive and programmable strategies for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Advances in this field have demonstrated that nanoparticles can enhance specificity of anti-cancer agents, respond to tumour-specific cues, and direct the visualization of biological targets in vivo. . Nanoparticles can be synthesized within the 1 to 100 nm range to achieve different electromagnetic properties and specifically interact with biological tissues by tuning their size, shape, and surface chemistry. However, it remains unclear which physicochemical parameters are critical for delivering nanomaterials to the tumour site. With less than 5% of administered nanoparticles reaching the tumour, engineering of nanoparticles for effective delivery to solid tumours remains a critical challenge to cancer nanomedicine. A more comprehensive understanding of the interplay between the nanomaterial physicochemical properties and biological systems is necessary to enhance the efficacy of nanoparticle tumour targeting. This thesis explores how nanoparticle size and functionalization with cancer cell specific agents impact nanoparticle delivery to tumours. Furthermore, this doctoral work (i) discusses how tumour structure evolves with growth, (ii) elucidates how such changes modulate nanoparticle accumulation, and (iii) identifies how the skin serves as a significant off-target site for nanoparticle uptake. This thesis also demonstrates the utility of empirically-derived parametric models, Monte Carlo simulations, and decision matrices for mechanistically understanding and predicting the impact of nanomaterial features and tumour biology on nanoparticle fate in vivo. These topics establish key design considerations to tailor nanoparticles for enhanced tumour targeting. Collectively, the concepts presented herein form a fundamental framework for the development of personalized nanomedicine and nano

  5. Malignant tumours of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis analyses 317 patients with vulvar malignancies treated at the University Hospital, Lund, during 1960-1979. The three most common histological types of malignancy have been analysed. The oncological clinic in Lund has since the 1960's used a surgical technique where the primary tumour and the regional lymph nodes are operated on in two separate surgical seances. The vulvectomy is performed with tarm knife technique, and the wound is left open. The 5-year crude survival rate for the entire patient material treated with curative intention was over 60 %, which agrees well with reports from other centres. Our surgical approach using two separate seances has, however, much lower rates of postoperative complications and mortality than the rates in other reports. The overall most important prognostic factors for the patients with invasive vulvar malignancies are the presence of lymphatic metastases at the time of surgery, and the surgical radicality of the primary surgery. The treatment at most stages of tumour development and most histological types should include total vulvectomy preoperative irradiation of the inguinal lymph nodes, and inguinal lymphadenectomy. Only local extirpation and hemivulvectomy are, however, indicated for small microinvasively growing squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. Samll invasive onesided squamous cell carcinoma is best treated with ipsilateral surgery combined with preoperative irradiation of the inguinal lymph nodes. Patients with metastases in the inguinal lymph nodes should receive additional irradiation of the inguinal and pelvic lymph node stations. (Author)

  6. Wilms' tumour and renal dysplasia: an hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, HB; Lawler, W

    1982-01-01

    The incidence of renal dysplasia in a series of Wilms' tumours is presented. The distribution of such lesions is discussed, together with their course of development and regression. The kidney is regarded as a particularly suitable organ for studying the relation between dysplasia and neoplasia. A schema is suggested for this association with regard to Wilms' tumour.

  7. Epithelial tumours of the lacrimal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Holstein, Sarah Linéa; Coupland, Sarah E; Briscoe, Daniel; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Heegaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial tumours of the lacrimal gland represent a large spectrum of lesions with similarities in clinical signs and symptoms but with different biological behaviour and prognosis. They are rare, but with aggressive malignant potential. Tumours of the lacrimal gland may present with swelling of...

  8. Tumour screening by means of tomography methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomography methods such as computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), and sonography/ultrasound examinations make it possible to detect small asymptomatic tumours, thus potentially preventing their manifestation at an advanced stage and improving survival prospects for the patients concerned. There are data available on various common tumours which show that modern tomography methods are capable of detecting not only small asymptomatic tumours but also their benign precursors (e.g. polyps of the large intestine). This has been demonstrated for lung cancer, colon cancer and breast cancer. However, it has not been possible to date to show for any tomography method or any type of tumour that the systematic use of such diagnostic procedures does anything to lower the mortality rate for that tumour. For other types of tumour (pancreatic cancer, kidney cancer, ovary cancer) the above named methods are either not sufficiently sensitive or the body of data that has accumulated on their respective use is too small to judge the benefit of tomography screenings. Current technical developments make it appear probable that for many types of cancer the reliability with which small tumours can be detected will improve in future. Studies aimed at clarifying the potential of screenings for reducing mortality rates are already underway for lung cancer and would be worthwhile performing for other tumour types

  9. Percutaneously implanted markers in peripheral lung tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, G.F.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund;

    2013-01-01

    A letter to the editor is presented which is concerned with research which investigated percutaneously implanted markers in peripheral lung tumours and their complications.......A letter to the editor is presented which is concerned with research which investigated percutaneously implanted markers in peripheral lung tumours and their complications....

  10. Antenatally detected solid tumour of kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, Shasanka Shekhar; Mandelia, Ankur; Gupta, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Congenital renal tumours are rare and usually benign. Polyhydramnios is the most common mode of presentation. Although most cases have been diagnosed postnatally, with advances in imaging technology, an increasing number of cases are being detected on antenatal scans. We describe a case of solid tumour of kidney detected in the second trimester of pregnancy and managed by surgery in the postnatal period.

  11. Expressing Tumour Staging Using the Read Thesaurus

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Philip J. B.; Read, Graham; Price, Colin

    1996-01-01

    The expression of tumour staging is an important component of clinical care and the electronic capture of this data offers great potential. Version 3 of the Read Thesaurus includes a template table which offers a robust mechanism for applying specific staging detail to tumours within the clinical record.

  12. TGF-beta receptor 2 downregulation in tumour-associated stroma worsens prognosis and high-grade tumours show more tumour-associated macrophages and lower TGF-beta1 expression in colon carcinoma: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadopoulos Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histological phenotype and clinical behaviour of malignant tumours are not only dependent on alterations in the epithelial cell compartment, but are affected by their interaction with inflammatory cells and tumour-associated stroma. Studies in animal models have shown influence of tumour-associated macrophages (TAM on histological grade of differentiation in colon carcinoma. Disruption of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta signalling in tumour cells is related to more aggressive clinical behaviour. Expression data of components of this pathway in tumour-associated stroma is limited. Methods Tissue micro arrays of 310 colon carcinomas from curatively resected patients in UICC stage II and III were established. In a first step we quantified amount of CD68 positive TAMs and expression of components of TGF-beta signalling (TGF-beta1, TGF-beta receptors type 1 and 2, Smad 3 and 4 in tumour and associated stroma. Further we analyzed correlation to histological and clinical parameters (histological grade of differentiation (low-grade (i.e. grade 1 and 2 vs. high-grade (i.e. grade 3 and 4, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, 5 year cancer related survival using Chi-square or Fisher's exact test, when appropriate, to compare frequencies, Kaplan-Meier method to calculate 5-year rates of distant metastases and cancer-related survival and log rank test to compare the rates of distant metastases and survival. To identify independent prognostic factors Cox regression analysis including lymph node status and grading was performed. Results High-grade tumours and those with lymph node metastases showed higher rates of TAMs and lower expression of TGF-beta1. Loss of nuclear Smad4 expression in tumor was associated with presence of lymph node metastasis, but no influence on prognosis could be demonstrated. Decrease of both TGF-beta receptors in tumour-associated stroma was associated with increased lymph node metastasis and

  13. Process Evaluation of Routine Immunization (RI) and Growth Monitoring Services During Mamta Day (Village Health and Nutrition Day) in Sinor Block of Vadodara District, Gujarat, India.

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Parmar, Niyati Parmar, Chandresh Pandya, V S Mazumdar

    2014-01-01

    "Background: Immunization plays a very important role in decreasing under-five mortality. Universal Immunization Program performed quite well in the first decade of its introduction. However, surveys carried out during NFHS and UNICEF revealed that there has been a decline in the coverage levels of different vaccines by as much as 15-40%. Objectives: To monitor routine immunization and growth monitoring services and to provide necessary feedback to district and state authorities and ...

  14. Limitations in localising and killing tumours using radiolabelled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabelled antibodies against tumours are being studied intensely for their use in tumour detection and tumour destruction. Although a host of different tumour types can be localised, results at present are no better than other scanning techniques. In addition no tumour has been eradicated using labelled antibodies. Dramatic improvements will depend upon a fuller understanding of tumour cell biology and optimising all the parameters involved. (orig.)

  15. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  16. Optimization of tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours by radiation dose redistribution: a modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour hypoxia is a known cause of clinical resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to model the effects on tumour control probability (TCP) of selectively boosting the dose to hypoxic regions in a tumour, while keeping the mean tumour dose constant. A tumour model with a continuous oxygen distribution, incorporating pO2 histograms published for head and neck patients, was developed. Temporal and spatial variations in the oxygen distribution, non-uniform cell density and cell proliferation during treatment were included in the tumour modelling. Non-uniform dose prescriptions were made based on a segmentation of the tumours into four compartments. The main findings were: (1) Dose redistribution considerably improved TCP for all tumours. (2) The effect on TCP depended on the degree of reoxygenation during treatment, with a maximum relative increase in TCP for tumours with poor or no reoxygenation. (3) Acute hypoxia reduced TCP moderately, while underdosing chronic hypoxic cells gave large reductions in TCP. (4) Restricted dose redistribution still gave a substantial increase in TCP as compared to uniform dose boosts. In conclusion, redistributing dose according to tumour oxygenation status might increase TCP when the tumour response to radiotherapy is limited by chronic hypoxia. This could potentially improve treatment outcome in a subpopulation of patients who respond poorly to conventional radiotherapy

  17. Parotid gland tumours: a six years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find out the different types of Parotid tumours in out setup and their prevalence in different age groups. All patients admitted with Parotid swellings, irrespective of age and sex. The detailed data of the patients was collected and analyzed. A total of 27 patients, 15 males and 12 females, with ages ranging from 15 to 65 years were included in the study. Most of the patients were in the 31-50 years of age group. Pleomorphic adenoma was the commonest benign tumour with an incidence of 66.6%, while Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma with an incidence of 11.11% was the most common malignant tumour. Parotid gland is the principal site of salivary gland tumours. Males are affected more and Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common benign and Mucoepidermoid carcinoma the most common malignant tumour. (author)

  18. Imaging tumours of the brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumours of the brachial plexus are rare lesions and may be classified as benign or malignant. Within each of these groups, they are further subdivided into those that are neurogenic in origin (schwannoma, neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour) and those that are non-neurogenic. Careful pre-operative diagnosis and staging is essential to the successful management of these lesions. Benign neurogenic tumours are well characterized with pre-operative MRI, appearing as well-defined, oval soft-tissue masses, which are typically isointense on T1-weighted images and show the ''target sign'' on T2-weighted images. Differentiation between schwannoma and neurofibroma can often be made by assessing the relationship of the lesion to the nerve of origin. Many benign non-neurogenic tumours, such as lipoma and fibromatosis, are also well characterized by MRI. This article reviews the imaging features of brachial plexus tumours, with particular emphasis on the value of MRI in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Myoepithelial cells in canine mammary tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Céspedes, Raquel; Millán, Yolanda; Guil-Luna, Silvia; Reymundo, Carlos; Espinosa de Los Monteros, Antonio; Martín de Las Mulas, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms of female dogs. Compared to mammary tumours of humans and cats, myoepithelial (ME) cell involvement is common in canine mammary tumours (CMT) of any subtype. Since ME cell involvement in CMT influences both histogenetic tumour classification and prognosis, correct identification of ME cells is important. This review describes immunohistochemical methods for identification of canine mammary ME cells used in vivo. In addition, phenotypic and genotypic methods to isolate ME cells for in vitro studies to analyse tumour-suppressor protein production and gene expression are discussed. The contribution of ME cells to both histogenetic classifications and the prognosis of CMT is compared with other species and the potential use of ME cells as a method to identify carcinoma in situ is discussed. PMID:26639832

  20. The two aspects of tumour hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia is a therapeutic problem as it renders solid tumours resistant to sparsely ionizing radiation and some forms of chemotherapy. At present it is postulated that tumour hypoxia induces two types of reactions. On the one hand tissue O2 concentration 2 2 0.5-20 mm Hg), not severely, hypoxic cells may be of the greatest importance in determining biological resistance. The methods of assessing hypoxia currently applied in clinical practice are not satisfactory. However, recent advances in imaging technologies suggest that in the near future it might be possible to track temporal changes in O2 level and acute and chronic hypoxic tumour sub fractions. The ultimate goal is understanding tumour biology basing on the clinical bio markers that reflect hypoxia-associated genetic or proteomic signatures in tumour cells, in order to individualize therapy. (authors)

  1. Recurrence and Progression in Meningiomas: The Clonal Cytogenetic Evolution of a Benign Human Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketter R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are mostly benign tumours that originate from the coverings of brain and spinal cord. Only a minority of cases show progression to an anaplastic tumour (WHO grades II and III. Multiple and familial cases are rare and mostly associated with (hereditary neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2. Meningiomas show an unexpectedly high recurrence rate. Also, completely removed low-grade tumours can recur. On a cytogenetic level, meningiomas are the best-studied tumours in humans. The majority of high-grade but only a minority of low-grade meningiomas show loss of merlin, a cytoskeleton-cytoplasm-linker protein. Merlin is the product of the NF2 gene located on chromosome 22. A second tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 22 on 22q12.3 is the gene for the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3, which appears to be involved in meningioma progression and a high-grade meningioma phenotype. In contrast to other solid tumours, progression of meningiomas is correlated with increasing hypodiploidy, showing characteristic clonal evolutions that mostly include chromosomes 14, 18, and 19 and, more rarely, 6 and 10. Structural aberrations are rare, except for the loss of the short arm of one chromosome 1, which appears to be the decisive step for anaplastic growth. A biostatistical approach has been proposed, using an oncogenetic tree model that estimates the most likely cytogenetic pathways of meningioma patients in terms of accumulation of chromosome changes in tumour cells. The genetic progression score (GPS estimates the genetic status of a tumour as progression in the corresponding tumour cells along this model. High GPS values are highly correlated with early recurrence of meningiomas (p 10–4. This correlation holds true even when patients are stratified by WHO grade. Tumour location also has an impact on genetic progression. Clinical relevance of the GPS is demonstrated with respect to origin, WHO grade, and recurrence of the tumour. As a quantitative

  2. Geographical mapping of a multifocal thyroid tumour using genetic alteration analysis & miRNA profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC frequently presents as multiple tumour-foci within a single thyroid gland or pluriform, with synchronous tumours comprising different histological variants, raising questions regarding its clonality. Among the genetic aberrations described in PTC, the BRAF V600E mutation and ret/PTC activation occur most commonly. Several studies have investigated the genetic alteration status of multifocal thyroid tumours, with discordant results. To address the question of clonality this study examined disparate geographical and morphological areas from a single PTC (classic PTC, insular and anaplastic foci, and tumour cells adjacent to vascular invasion and lymphocytic infiltrate for the presence of ret/PTC 1 or BRAF mutations. Moreover, we wanted to investigate the consistency of miRNA signatures within disparate areas of a tumour, and geographical data was further correlated with expression profiles of 330 different miRNAs. Putative miRNA gene targets were predicted for differentially regulated miRNAs and immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue sections in an effort to investigate phenotypic variations in microvascular density (MVD, and cytokeratin and p53 protein expression levels. Results All of the morphological areas proved negative for ret/PTC 1 rearrangement. Two distinct foci with classic morphology harboured the BRAF mutation. All other regions, including the insular and anaplastic areas were negative for the mutation. MiRNA profiles were found to distinguish tumours containing the BRAF mutation from the other tumour types, and to differentiate between the more aggressive insular & anaplastic tumours, and the classic variant. Our data corroborated miRNAs previously discovered in this carcinoma, and additional miRNAs linked to various processes involved in tumour growth and proliferation. Conclusion The initial genetic alteration analysis indicated that pluriform PTC did not necessarily evolve

  3. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjavaara, S.

    2011-07-01

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  4. Occurrence studies of intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracranial tumours are a histopathologically heterogeneous group of tumours. This thesis focused on three types of intracranial tumours; gliomas, meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas (VS). The main objectives of the dissertation were to estimate the occurrence of intracranial tumours by different subtypes, and to assess the validity and completeness of the cancer registry data. The specific aims of the publications were to evaluate the validity of reported incidence rates of meningioma cases, to describe the trends of VS incidence in four Nordic countries, and to define the anatomic distribution of gliomas and to investigate their location in relation to mobile phone use. Completeness of meningioma registration was examined by comparing five separate sources of information, and by defining the frequencies of cases reported to the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR). Incidence trends of VS were assessed in the four Nordic countries over a twenty-one-year period (1987 - 2007) using cancer registry data. The anatomic site of gliomas was evaluated using both crude locations in the cerebral lobes and, in more detail, a three-dimensional (3D) distribution in the brain. In addition, a study on specific locations of gliomas in relation to the typical position of mobile phones was conducted using two separate approaches: a case-case and a case-specular analysis. The thesis was based on four sets of materials. Data from the international Interphone study were used for the studies on gliomas, while the two other studies were register-based. The dataset for meningiomas included meningioma cases from the FCR and four clinical data sources in Tampere University Hospital (neurosurgical clinic, pathology database, hospital discharge register and autopsy register). The data on VS were obtained from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The coverage of meningiomas was not comprehensive in any of the data sources. The completeness of FCR was

  5. AZD9496: An Oral Estrogen Receptor Inhibitor That Blocks the Growth of ER-Positive and ESR1-Mutant Breast Tumors in Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Hazel M; Bradbury, Robert H; Lawson, Mandy; Rabow, Alfred A; Buttar, David; Callis, Rowena J; Curwen, Jon O; de Almeida, Camila; Ballard, Peter; Hulse, Michael; Donald, Craig S; Feron, Lyman J L; Karoutchi, Galith; MacFaul, Philip; Moss, Thomas; Norman, Richard A; Pearson, Stuart E; Tonge, Michael; Davies, Gareth; Walker, Graeme E; Wilson, Zena; Rowlinson, Rachel; Powell, Steve; Sadler, Claire; Richmond, Graham; Ladd, Brendon; Pazolli, Ermira; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; De Savi, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Fulvestrant is an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist administered to breast cancer patients by monthly intramuscular injection. Given its present limitations of dosing and route of administration, a more flexible orally available compound has been sought to pursue the potential benefits of this drug in patients with advanced metastatic disease. Here we report the identification and characterization of AZD9496, a nonsteroidal small-molecule inhibitor of ERα, which is a potent and selective antagonist and downregulator of ERα in vitro and in vivo in ER-positive models of breast cancer. Significant tumor growth inhibition was observed as low as 0.5 mg/kg dose in the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 xenograft model, where this effect was accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in PR protein levels, demonstrating potent antagonist activity. Combining AZD9496 with PI3K pathway and CDK4/6 inhibitors led to further growth-inhibitory effects compared with monotherapy alone. Tumor regressions were also seen in a long-term estrogen-deprived breast model, where significant downregulation of ERα protein was observed. AZD9496 bound and downregulated clinically relevant ESR1 mutants in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in an ESR1-mutant patient-derived xenograft model that included a D538G mutation. Collectively, the pharmacologic evidence showed that AZD9496 is an oral, nonsteroidal, selective estrogen receptor antagonist and downregulator in ER(+) breast cells that could provide meaningful benefit to ER(+) breast cancer patients. AZD9496 is currently being evaluated in a phase I clinical trial. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3307-18. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020862

  6. EGFR antisense RNA blocks expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and partially reverse the malignant phenotype of human breast cancer MDA—MB—231 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANWENHONG; YINGLINLU; 等

    1998-01-01

    The effects of human EGFR to the malignant phenotype of human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 were investigated experimentally.A retroviral vector containing a 5'1350bp fragment of the human EGFR cDNA in the antisense orientation was transfected into targeted cells by lipofectamine.The effects on cell proliferation,cell cycle and adherent ability to extracellular matrix(ECM) components were studied after the expression of antisense transcripts to EGFR5'1350bp fragment in target cells,In vitro studies showed that the growth ability of the transfected cells was partialy inhibited in comparison to parental cells and to cells transfected with the plasmid containing the neomycin resistance gene only.It was found that EGF(10ng/ml) had an augmenation effect on the growth of transfected MDA-AS10 cells but not MDA-MB-231 cells.Flow cytometric analysis showed that the cell cycle of the transfected cells was abnormal with a decrease of cells in G2/M and S phases and an increase of cells in G1 phase,indicating a blockage in phase G1.Immunofluorescence of EGFR expression in transfectants stained with an antiEGFR antibody was decreased and their growth in soft agarose was also severely imparired.The transfected cells showed less adherence to laminin(LN) and fibronectin (FN).In short,EGFR antisense RNA decreases the expression of EGFR on MDA-MB-231 cells and partially reverses their malignant phenotype as well.

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance the Apoptotic Activity of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 by Blocking PKC-Induced IGFBP-3 Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Seung Hyun; Whang, Young Mi; Min, Hye-Young; Han, Seung Ho; Kang, Ju-Hee; Song, Ki-Hoon; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Kim, Yeul Hong; Lee, Ho-Young

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 induces apoptosis of cancer cells. However, preexisting resistance to IGFBP-3 could limit its antitumor activities. This study characterizes the efficacy and mechanism of the combination of recombinant IGFBP-3 (rIGFBP-3) and HDAC inhibitors to overcome IGFBP-3 resistance in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The effects of the combination of rIGFBP-3 and ...

  8. Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Cancer: Novel Targeted Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha P. Brahmkhatri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs are essential for growth and survival that suppress apoptosis and promote cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, and metastatic activities in various cancers. The IGFs actions are mediated through the IGF-1 receptor that is involved in cell transformation induced by tumour. These effects depend on the bioavailability of IGFs, which is regulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs. We describe here the role of the IGF system in cancer, proposing new strategies targeting this system. We have attempted to expand the general viewpoint on IGF-1R, its inhibitors, potential limitations of IGF-1R, antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and IGFBP actions. This review discusses the emerging view that blocking IGF via IGFBP is a better option than blocking IGF receptors. This can lead to the development of novel cancer therapies.

  9. Computer simulation of tumour control probabilities after irradiation for varying intrinsic radio-sensitivity using a single cell based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Currently, optimisation of the dose distribution and clinical acceptance are almost entirely based on the physical dose distribution and tumour control probability modelling is far from being routinely used as objective in treatment planning. For future individualised radiotherapeutic strategies, a reliable patient specific simulation model, taking into account customised tumour features, is needed to predict and improve treatment outcome. Materials and methods. To approach these demands, a single cell and Monte-Carlo based model was developed, which enables three-dimensional tumour growth and radiation response simulation. Tumour cells were characterised by cell-associated features such as age, intrinsic radio-sensitivity, proliferation ability, and oxygenation status, while capillary cells were considered as sources of a radial-dependent oxygen profile. Response to radiation was simulated by the linear-quadratic model, taking into account the lower radio-sensitivity of poorly oxygenated tumour cells. Results. The present study shows the influence of the model components and demonstrates the impact of the intra- and inter-tumoural radio-sensitivity heterogeneity on the treatment response. Conclusion. The simulation model adequately delineates the importance of the above described selected parameters on tumour control probability, providing an insight into the interplay of different physical and biological parameters, and its relevance for an individual tumour response

  10. Loss of bcbrn1 and bcpks13 in Botrytis cinerea Not Only Blocks Melanization But Also Increases Vegetative Growth and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenghua; He, Yifan; Zhu, Pinkuan; Chen, Lu; Wang, Yiwen; Ni, Bing; Xu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic pathogen that causes gray mold disease in a broad range of plants. Dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin is a major component of the extracellular matrix of B. cinerea, but knowledge of the exact role of melanin biosynthesis in this pathogen is unclear. In this study, we characterize two genes in B. cinerea, bcpks13 and bcbrn1, encoding polyketide synthase and tetrahydroxynaphthalene (THN) reductases, respectively, and both have predicted roles in DHN melanin biosynthesis. The ∆bcpks13 and ∆bcbrn1 mutants show white and orange pigmentation, respectively, and the mutants are also deficient in conidiation in vitro but show enhanced growth rates and virulence on hosts. Moreover, the mutants display elevated acidification of the complete medium (CM), probably due to oxalic acid secretion and secretion of cell wall-degrading enzymes, and preferably utilize plant cell-wall components as carbon sources for mycelium growth in vitro. In contrast, overexpression of bcbrn1 (OE::bcbrn1 strain) results in attenuated hydrolytic enzyme secretion, acidification ability, and virulence. Taken together, these results indicate that bcpks13 and bcbrn1 participate in diverse cellular and developmental processes, such as melanization and conidiation in B. cinerea in vitro, but they negatively regulate the virulence of this pathogen. PMID:26035129

  11. Synthesis and Morphological Characterization of Block Copolymers for Improved Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Schricker, Scott; Palacio, Manuel; Thirumamagal, B.T.S.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2010-01-01

    Biocompatible polymers are known to act as scaffolds for the regeneration and growth of bone. Block copolymers are of interest as scaffold materials because a number of the blocks are biocompatible, and their nanostructure is easily tunable with synthetic techniques. In this paper, we report the synthesis of a novel class of biomaterials from block copolymers containing a hydrophobic block of methyl methacrylate and a hydrophilic block of either acrylic acid, dimethyl acrylamide, or 2-hydroxy...

  12. Combined treatment of the immunoconjugate bivatuzumab mertansine and fractionated irradiation improves local tumour control in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To test whether BIWI 1 (bivatuzumab mertansine), an immunoconjugate of the humanized anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 and the maytansinoid DM1, given simultaneously to fractionated irradiation improves local tumour control in vivo compared with irradiation alone. Material and methods: For growth delay, FaDu tumours were treated with 5 intravenous injections (daily) of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control), BIWA 4 (monoclonal antibody against CD44v6) or BIWI 1 (bivatuzumab mertansine) at two different dose levels (50 μg/kg DM1 and 100 μg/kg DM1). For local tumour control, FaDu tumours received fractionated irradiation (5f/5d) with simultaneous PBS, BIWA 4 or BIWI 1 (two dose levels). Results: BIWI 1 significantly improved local tumour control after irradiation with 5 fractions already in the lower concentration. The dose modifying factor of 1.9 is substantial compared to the majority of other modifiers of radiation response. Conclusion: Because of the magnitude of the curative effect, this approach is highly promising and should be further evaluated using similar combinations with improved tumour-specificity.

  13. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-06-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  14. 18F-FDG PET and biomarkers for tumour angiogenesis in early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumour angiogenesis is an independent and strong prognostic factor in early breast carcinoma. We performed this study to investigate the ability of 18F-FDG to detect angiogenesis in early breast carcinoma using PET/CT. Twenty consecutive patients with early (T1-T2) breast carcinoma were recruited prospectively for 18F-FDG PET/CT. The PET/CT data were used to calculate whole tumour maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean). All patients underwent subsequent surgery without prior chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The excised tumour underwent immunohistochemistry for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD105 and glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT1). The SUVmax showed the following correlation with tumour histology: CD105: r = 0.60, p = 0.005; GLUT1: r = 0.21, p = 0.373; VEGF: r = -0.16, p = 0.496. The SUVmean showed the following correlation with tumour histology: CD105: r = 0.65, p = 0.002; GLUT1: r = 0.34, p = 0.144; VEGF: r = -0.18, p = 0.443 18F-FDG uptake is highly significantly associated with angiogenesis as measured by the immunohistochemistry with CD105 for new vessel formation. Given that tumour angiogenesis is an important prognostic indicator and a predictor of treatment response, 18F-FDG PET may have a role in the management of primary breast cancer patients even in early-stage disease. (orig.)

  15. The use of thermographic imaging to evaluate therapeutic response in human tumour xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nosheen; Connah, David; Ugail, Hassan; Cooper, Patricia A; Falconer, Robert A; Patterson, Laurence H; Shnyder, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive methods to monitor tumour growth are an important goal in cancer drug development. Thermographic imaging systems offer potential in this area, since a change in temperature is known to be induced due to changes within the tumour microenvironment. This study demonstrates that this imaging modality can be applied to a broad range of tumour xenografts and also, for the first time, the methodology's suitability to assess anti-cancer agent efficacy. Mice bearing subcutaneously implanted H460 lung cancer xenografts were treated with a novel vascular disrupting agent, ICT-2552, and the cytotoxin doxorubicin. The effects on tumour temperature were assessed using thermographic imaging over the first 6 hours post-administration and subsequently a further 7 days. For ICT-2552 a significant initial temperature drop was observed, whilst for both agents a significant temperature drop was seen compared to controls over the longer time period. Thus thermographic imaging can detect functional differences (manifesting as temperature reductions) in the tumour response to these anti-cancer agents compared to controls. Importantly, these effects can be detected in the first few hours following treatment and therefore the tumour is observable non-invasively. As discussed, this technique will have considerable 3Rs benefits in terms of reduction and refinement of animal use. PMID:27491535

  16. Quercetin mediated reduction of angiogenic markers and chaperones in DLA-induced solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Kushi; Asthana, Pallavi; Kumar, Anup; Ambasta, Rashmi K; Kumar, Pravir

    2011-01-01

    Diet-derived flavonoids, in particular quercetin, may play advantageous roles by preventing or/and inhibiting oncogenesis. Evidence suggests that quercetin can elicit various properties depending on the cell type. The aim of this study was to evaluate its effects on Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA) induced solid tumours and to identify the target(s) of action. We addressed this question by inducing subcutaneous solid tumours in Swiss albino mice and investigated whether the quercetin affects essential biological processes that are responsible for tumour growth, morphology, angiogenesis and apoptosis. We also studied influence on several heat shock proteins (HSPs). Our findings demonstrate that intra-tumour administration of quercetin results in decreased volume/weight. Furthermore, we demonstrate that quercetin promotes apoptosis of cancer cells by down-regulating the levels of Hsp90 and Hsp70. Depletion of these two chaperones by quercetin might result in triggering of caspase-3 in treated tumours. Moreover, it also down-regulated the expression of major key angiogenic or pro-angiogenic factors, like HIF-1α and VEGF In addition, H and E staining together with immunofluorescence of fixed tumour tissue provided evidence in support of increased cell death in quercetin-treated mice. PMID:22393949

  17. Methylation of tumour suppressor genes APAF-1 and DAPK-1 and in vitro effects of demethylating agents in bladder and kidney cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christoph, F.; Kempkensteffen, C.; Weikert, S; Köllermann, J.; Krause, H.; Miller, K; Schostak, M; Schrader, M

    2006-01-01

    To examine the significance of the methylation level of the p53 target and tumour suppressor genes apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (APAF-1) and death-associated protein kinase-1 (DAPK-1) in 80 microdissected tumour samples from transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder and 80 tumour samples from clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as well as from non-tumourous bladder and kidney tissue. Growth-inhibitory effects of the demethylating agents 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR) an...

  18. MRI of pineal region tumours: relationship between tumours and adjacent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, H. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Uozumi, T. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kiya, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Kurisu, K. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Arita, K. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Sumida, M. [Hiroshima University, School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Ikawa, F. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    A variety of tumours may arise in the pineal region; accurate diagnosis is important in the selection of treatment and prognosis. A retrospective analysis of the MRI studies of 25 patients with pathologically proven pineal region tumours was performed, focused on the relationship between the tumour and neighbouring structures. Compression of the tectal plate was classified as expansive or invasive, and compression of the corpus callosum as inferior, anterior or posterior. In 10 of the 14 patients (71 %) with germ cell tumours tectal compression was of the invasive type; 8 patients (57 %) had multiple tumours and in 13 (93 %) the tumour margins were irregular. Teratomas were readily diagnosed because of characteristic heterogeneous signal intensity. Pineal cell tumours were differentiated from germ cell tumours by their rounded shape, solid nature, sharp margins, and expansive type of tectal compression. Meningiomas were characterised by their falcotentorial attachments, posterior callosal compression, and a low-intensity rim on T2-weighted images. Gd-DTPA injection enabled clear demonstration of the site and extent of tumour spread and was useful in differentiating cystic and solid components. The appearances described, while not pathognomonic, are helpful in the differential diagnosis of pineal region tumours, and valuable in planning appropriate treatment. (orig.). With 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Thallium uptake and biological behaviour in childhood brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, E.J.; Howman-Giles, R.; Kellie, S.; Uren, R.F. [Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: The histopathological grade and radiological appearance of the diverse cerebral neoplasms in childhood frequently poorly reflect their biological behaviour. We examined thallium accumulation prior to treatment (and in several cases, at intervals there after) in 13 children to determine its usefulness as a tumour marker. 23 SPECT studies were acquired 20 minutes after the injection of 1-3 mCi of {sup 201}TI. Thallium index (TI), the ratio of counts in tumour/normal brain, was calculated. No uptake was seen in two patients (pts) with a Grade 1 cerebellar astrocytomas (disease free at 4/12 f/u). Three pts with medulloblastomas were studied. One pt showed intense uptake (Tl =12). His tumour (proliferative antigen stain Ki67 = 50%) recurred early after debulking surgery (Tl +ve prior to CT or MRI changes). The second pt was imaged at relapse (Ki67 = 60%) and showed intense uptake, Tl = 17. The third pt showed lower level uptake (Tl = 2), Ki67 = 5%, and is disease-free at 5/12 (as per {sup 201}TI and MRI). One pt with a Grade 1 brainstem glioma showed Tl = 5 and has progressed rapidly despite low grade histology. Four pts with chiasmatic-hypothalamic gliomas have been studied. Although these neoplasms are usually low grade histologically, their growth properties vary greatly. Two pts with Tl<2.5 have been conservatively managed because of slow tumour growth. The other two pts have Tl>3.5 and have required aggressive treatment for rapid disease progression. One pt with a large pilocytic astrocytoma of the optic chiasm showed Tl = 9.5. Active treatment was not undertaken. One pt with a pineal germ cell tumour showed avid {sup 201}TI uptake (Tl not performed) and has had two normal studies, and is clinically well, since BMT. Avid {sup 201}TI uptake also seen in one pt with cerebral neuroblastoma. (Died at 8/12 after Dx.) Thus, {sup 201}TI accumulates in histologically diverse paediatric neoplasms. The Tl appears to reflect biological behaviour in the limited

  20. Phase congruency map driven brain tumour segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilágyi, Tünde; Brady, Michael; Berényi, Ervin

    2015-03-01

    Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) systems are already of proven value in healthcare, especially for surgical planning, nevertheless much remains to be done. Gliomas are the most common brain tumours (70%) in adults, with a survival time of just 2-3 months if detected at WHO grades III or higher. Such tumours are extremely variable, necessitating multi-modal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). The use of Gadolinium-based contrast agents is only relevant at later stages of the disease where it highlights the enhancing rim of the tumour. Currently, there is no single accepted method that can be used as a reference. There are three main challenges with such images: to decide whether there is tumour present and is so localize it; to construct a mask that separates healthy and diseased tissue; and to differentiate between the tumour core and the surrounding oedema. This paper presents two contributions. First, we develop tumour seed selection based on multiscale multi-modal texture feature vectors. Second, we develop a method based on a local phase congruency based feature map to drive level-set segmentation. The segmentations achieved with our method are more accurate than previously presented methods, particularly for challenging low grade tumours.

  1. [34 epibulbar malignant tumours (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzenberg, T; Vancea, P P; Dobrescu, G

    1979-02-01

    Based on a study of 34 cases, the authors make therapeutical and diagnostical references concerning the epibulbar malignant tumours. These were met with a frequency of 10% of the total amount of the malignant tumours of the visual apparatus. The most frequent setting were at the level of the bulbar conjunctiva and of the sclero-corneal limb, especially in front of the opening of the palpebral slit and in the temporal area. The histological examination of the tumours pointed out the following morphological types; epitheliomas (61%), especially spino-cellular, malignant melanomas (32%) and sarcomas (6%). The therapeutical attitude was the surgical one -- the accurate extirpation -- in the limited tumours, followed by radiotherapy when neoplasic lesions were found at the limit of section. In the invaded tumours, the exenteration of the orbit was performed followed by radiotherapy. On the terms of such a therapeutical conduct, the distant prognosis proved to be dependent on two factors: a. The early diagnosis, that is the stage of the therapeutical action. It is insisted upon the importance of the signs of malignization of some benign tumors: papillomas or naevi. b. The nature and origin of the tumour: the secondary tumours are more severe from the beginning. PMID:444115

  2. Melatonin blocks inhibitory effects of prolactin on photoperiodic induction of gain in body mass, testicular growth and feather regeneration in the migratory male redheaded bunting (Emberiza bruniceps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Sangeeta

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Little is known about how hormones interact in the photoperiodic induction of seasonal responses in birds. In this study, two experiments determined if the treatment with melatonin altered inhibitory effects of prolactin on photoperiodic induction of seasonal responses in the Palearctic-Indian migratory male redheaded bunting Emberiza bruniceps. Each experiment employed three groups (N = 6–7 each of photosensitive birds that were held under 8 hours light: 16 hours darkness (8L:16D since early March. In the experiment 1, beginning in mid June 2001, birds were exposed to natural day lengths (NDL at 27 degree North (day length = ca.13.8 h, sunrise to sunset for 23 days. In the experiment 2, beginning in early April 2002, birds were exposed to 14L:10D for 22 days. Beginning on day 4 of NDL or day 1 of 14L:10D, they received 10 (experiment 1 or 13 (experiment 2 daily injections of both melatonin and prolactin (group 1 or prolactin alone (group 2 at a dose of 20 microgram per bird per day in 200 microliter of vehicle. Controls (group 3 received similar volume of vehicle. Thereafter, birds were left uninjected for the next 10 (experiment 1 or 9 days (experiment 2. All injections except those of melatonin were made at the zeitgeber time 10 (ZT 0 = time of sunrise, experiment 1; time of lights on, experiment 2; melatonin was injected at ZT 9.5 and thus 0.5 h before prolactin. Observations were recorded on changes in body mass, testicular growth and feather regeneration. Under NDL (experiment 1, testis growth in birds that received melatonin 0.5 h prior to prolactin (group 1 was significantly greater (P

  3. Blocking Wnt signaling by SFRP-like molecules inhibits in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in cells carrying active β-catenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, E; Hendaoui, I; Coulouarn, C; Ribault, C; Leseur, J; Eliat, P-A; Mebarki, S; Corlu, A; Clément, B; Musso, O

    2011-01-27

    Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer results from mutations in pathway components, which frequently coexist with autocrine Wnt signaling or epigenetic silencing of extracellular Wnt antagonists. Among the extracellular Wnt inhibitors, the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are decoy receptors that contain soluble Wnt-binding frizzled domains. In addition to SFRPs, other endogenous molecules harboring frizzled motifs bind to and inhibit Wnt signaling. One of such molecules is V3Nter, a soluble SFRP-like frizzled polypeptide that binds to Wnt3a and inhibits Wnt signaling and expression of the β-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc. V3Nter is derived from the cell surface extracellular matrix component collagen XVIII. Here, we used HCT116 human colon cancer cells carrying the ΔS45 activating mutation in one of the alleles of β-catenin to show that V3Nter and SFRP-1 decrease baseline and Wnt3a-induced β-catenin stabilization. Consequently, V3Nter reduces the growth of human colorectal cancer xenografts by specifically controlling cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, without affecting angiogenesis or apoptosis, as shown by decreased [(3)H]-thymidine (in vitro) or BrdU (in vivo) incorporation, clonogenesis assays, cell cycle analysis and magnetic resonance imaging in living mice. Additionally, V3Nter switches off the β-catenin target gene expression signature in vivo. Moreover, experiments with β-catenin allele-targeted cells showed that the ΔS45 β-catenin allele hampers, but does not abrogate, inhibition of Wnt signaling by SFRP-1 or by the SFRP-like frizzled domain. Finally, neither SFRP-1 nor V3Nter affect β-catenin signaling in SW480 cells carrying nonfunctional Adenomatous polyposis coli. Thus, SFRP-1 and the SFRP-like molecule V3Nter can inhibit tumor growth of β-catenin-activated tumor cells in vivo. PMID:20856206

  4. MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review was performed to describe the range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of borderline ovarian tumours. The MRI findings in 26 patients with 31 borderline ovarian tumours (mean age: 40.1 years, range: 14-85 years) were retrospectively reviewed. For each tumour, site, size, MRI characteristics, and enhancement following gadolinium administration were recorded. There were 20 serous and 11 mucinous borderline ovarian subtypes. Nine of 26 patients demonstrated bilateral disease on MRI; synchronous contralateral ovarian disease included three benign, five serous borderline, and one serous invasive tumour. A history of a metachronous mucinous borderline tumour was identified in one patient. MRI appearances were classified into four morphological categories: group 1 (6/31, 19%), unilocular cysts; group 2 (6/31, 19%), minimally septate cysts with papillary projections; group 3 (14/31, 45%), markedly septate lesions with plaque-like excrescences; and group 4 (5/31, 16%), predominantly solid with exophytic papillary projections, all of serous subtype. There was a significant difference in mean volume between serous (841.5 cm3) and mucinous (6358.2 cm3) subtypes (p = 0.009). All tumours demonstrated at least one MRI feature suggestive of malignancy. The present review demonstrates the variable MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours along with imaging features suggestive of tumour subtype. In patients in whom the clinical features are suggestive of a borderline ovarian tumour (young age and normal or minimally elevated CA125), the ability to predict a borderline disease using morphological features observed on MRI would be extremely helpful in surgical planning, with the potential to offer fertility or ovary-preserving surgery. Future studies are required to further this aim

  5. Integrative biological studies of anti-tumour agents

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, L. A.

    2009-01-01

    3, 11-difluoro-6, 8, 13-trimethyl-8H- quino [4, 3, 2-kl] acridinium methosulfate (RHPS4) is a member of a series of pentacyclic acridines developed at the University of Nottingham, which bind to, and stabilise the structure of G-quadruplex DNA and inhibit the action of telomerase at sub-micromolar concentrations in the cell free TRAP assay and limit cancer cell growth therefore leading to the conclusion that RHPS4 has potential anti-tumour activity. Previous biological studies, however, have...

  6. Carcinoid tumour of the middle ear

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baig, Salman

    2012-09-01

    A case of middle ear mass in a young female from Ireland is described, who presented with left ear hearing loss and intermittent bloody discharge from the same ear. Examination under microscope revealed occlusive polyp in the left ear and a biopsy had been taken under general anaesthesia. Histopathology report described an adenoma \\/ carcinoid tumour of the middle ear confirmed by positive immunohistochemical staining. CT temporal bones revealed the extension of the disease. The patient underwent left tympanotomy and excision of the tumour. In general, these tumours are regarded as benign but may be mistaken for adenocarcinomas because of their histological heterogenecity.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals as probes to characterize tumour tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Israt S.; Arshad, Mubarik A.; Nguyen, Quang-De; Aboagye, Eric O. [Imperial College London, Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Tumour cells exhibit several properties that allow them to grow and divide. A number of these properties are detectable by nuclear imaging methods. We discuss crucial tumour properties that can be described by current radioprobe technologies, further discuss areas of emerging radioprobe development, and finally articulate need areas that our field should aspire to develop. The review focuses largely on positron emission tomography and draws upon the seminal 'Hallmarks of Cancer' review article by Hanahan and Weinberg in 2011 placing into context the present and future roles of radiotracer imaging in characterizing tumours. (orig.)

  8. Block clustering with collapsed latent block models

    OpenAIRE

    Wyse, Jason; Friel, Nial

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a Bayesian extension of the latent block model for model-based block clustering of data matrices. Our approach considers a block model where block parameters may be integrated out. The result is a posterior defined over the number of clusters in rows and columns and cluster memberships. The number of row and column clusters need not be known in advance as these are sampled along with cluster memberhips using Markov chain Monte Carlo. This differs from existing work on latent bloc...

  9. HIFU and Chemotherapy Synergistic Inhibitory Effect on Dunning AT2 Tumour-Bearing Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, Laura; Paparel, Philipe; Chesnais, Sabrina; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2005-03-01

    Since there is no 100% satisfactory treatment for localized prostate cancer in patients presenting symptoms representing a poor prognosis (stage T3, high Gleason score, PSA level greater than 15 ng/ml, etc.), this study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic and synergistic inhibition effects of using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in combination with chemotherapy (Taxane + Estramustine). Forty-one Dunning AT2 tumour-bearing Copenhagen rats receiving HIFU and/or chemotherapy were divided into four groups: control group; chemotherapy group; HIFU group; and HIFU-chemotherapy combined group. Increase in the tumour volume was observed over 3 weeks and the tumour volume doubling time was evaluated. Growth curves for each group were then plotted and statistically evaluated. HIFU treatment combined with Taxane + Estramusine was found to have a significant synergistic effect; on day 30, the distribution of tumour volume relative to the treatment group was significantly different (p = 0.0007). The control group volumes were significantly greater than those of the chemotherapy-only (p = 0.006) or HIFU-only group (p = 0.006). The greatest difference was observed between the chemotherapy plus HIFU combined group and the control group. Additionally, tumour-doubling times were 7.7 days for the control group, 13.2 days for the HIFU-only group, and 31.2 days for the chemotherapy plus HIFU group. The differences in tumour growth rates between the chemotherapy plus HIFU combined group and a chemotherapy-only + HIFU-only grouping was 3.8% (p = 0.0020). Thus, the combined chemotherapy plus HIFU treatment was clearly more effective in reducing the tumour size than HIFU only or chemotherapy only, which indicates a synergy between the two types of treatment. Our results suggest that this combined therapy could be useful for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

  10. Polysaccharide Agaricus blazei Murill stimulates myeloid derived suppressor cell differentiation from M2 to M1 type, which mediates inhibition of tumour immune-evasion via the Toll-like receptor 2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Lingyun; Zhu, Xiangxiang; Wang, Yuehua; Liu, WenWei; Gong, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in tumor-bearing animals and play a critical negative role during tumor immunotherapy. Strategies for inhibition of MDSCs are expected to improve cancer immunotherapy. Polysaccharide Agaricus blazei Murill (pAbM) has been found to have anti-cancer activity, but the underlying mechanism of this is poorly understood. Here, pAbM directly activated the purified MDSCs through inducing the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-12, tumour necrosis factor and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), CD86, MHC II, and pSTAT1 of it, and only affected natural killer and T cells in the presence of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) monocytic MDSCs. On further analysis, we demonstrated that pAbM could selectively block the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) signal of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs and increased their M1-type macrophage characteristics, such as producing IL-12, lowering expression of Arginase 1 and increasing expression of iNOS. Extensive study showed that Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs by pAbM treatment had less ability to convert the CD4(+) CD25(-) cells into CD4(+) CD25(+) phenotype. Moreover, result from selective depletion of specific cell populations in xenograft mice model suggested that the anti-tumour effect of pAbM was dependent on Gr-1(+ ) CD11b(+) monocytes, nether CD8(+) T cells nor CD4(+) T cells. In addition to, pAbM did not inhibit tumour growth in TLR2(-/-) mice. All together, these results suggested that pAbM, a natural product commonly used for cancer treatment, was a specific TLR2 agonist and had potent anti-tumour effects through the opposite of the suppressive function of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs. PMID:26194418

  11. Vaccination with a mutated variant of human Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) blocks VEGF-induced retinal neovascularization in a rabbit experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Yanelys; González, Rafael; Lamdan, Humberto; Pérez, Lincidio; González, Yorlandis; Agüero, Judith; Castro, Jorge; Romero, Juan C; Etchegoyen, Ana Yansy; Ayala, Marta; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2014-05-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is a key driver of the neovascularization and vascular permeability that leads to the loss of visual acuity of eye diseases like wet age-related macular degeneration, diabetic macular edema, and retinopathy of premature. Among the several anti-VEGF therapies under investigation for the treatment of neovascular eye diseases, our group has developed the vaccine candidate CIGB-247-V that uses a mutated form of human VEGF as antigen. In this work we evaluated if the vaccine could prevent or attenuate VEGF-induced retinal neovascularization in the course of a rabbit eye neovascularization model, based on direct intravitreal injection of human VEGF. Our experimental findings have shown that anti-VEGF IgG antibodies induced by the vaccine were available in the retina blood circulation, and could neutralize in situ the neovascularization effect of VEGF. CIGB-247-V vaccination proved to effectively reduce retinal neovascularization caused by intravitreal VEGF injection. Altogether, these results open the way for human studies of the vaccine in neovascular eye syndromes, and inform on the potential mechanisms involved in its effect. PMID:24675387

  12. The somatostatin receptor-targeted radiotherapeutic [90Y-DOTA-dPhe1,Tyr3]octreotide (90Y-SMT 487) eradicates experimental rat pancreatic CA 20948 tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours are potential targets for therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. We have synthesized a number of such analogues in the past and identified [DOTA-dPhe1, Tyr3]octreotide (SMT 487) as the most promising candidate molecule because of its advantageous properties in cellular and in vivo tumour models. In the current paper we describe the radiotherapeutic effect of yttrium-90 labelled SMT 487 in Lewis rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic tumour CA 20948. SMT 487 binds with nanomolar affinity to both the human and the rat somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) (human sst2 IC50=0.9 nM, rat sst2 IC50=0.5 nM). In vivo, 90Y-SMT 487 distributed rapidly to the sst2 expressing CA 20948 rat pancreatic tumour, with a tumour-to-blood ratio of 49.15 at 24 h post injection. A single intravenous administration of 10 mCi/kg 90Y-SMT 487 resulted in a complete remission of the tumours in five out of seven CA 20948 tumour-bearing Lewis rats. No regrowth of the tumours occurred 8 months post injection. Control animals that were treated with 30 μg/kg of unlabelled SMT 487 had to be sacrificed 10 days post injection due to excessive growth or necrotic areas on the tumour surface. Upon re-inoculation of tumour cells into those rats that had shown complete remission, the tumours disappeared after 3-4 weeks of moderate growth without any further treatment. The present study shows for the first time the curative potential of 90Y-SMT 487-based radiotherapy for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. Clinical phase I studies with yttrium-labelled SMT 487 have started in September 1997. (orig.)

  13. Clinic histological pattern of ovarian tumours in peshawar region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovarian tumours are one of the major health problems confronting the general practitioners in general and gynaecologists in particular. Ovarian tumours may either be asymptomatic, found on the routine ultrasound examination or symptoms may be vague till the patient has an acute emergency like torsion or rupture of a benign cyst. The worst is late presentation of a malignant ovarian tumour. There is marked variation in the presentation of the tumour as well as in histological types. This study was undertaken to analyse modes of presentation and various histopathological patterns of ovarian tumours. This study was conducted from 1st January, 2002 to 31st December, 2002, in Gynaecology 'A' Unit, Lady Reading Hospital (LRH) Peshawar. After admitting patients with ovarian tumours a detailed case history was taken followed by thorough clinical examination. All the relevant details were recorded using the questionnaire. Patients were investigated after performing various surgical procedures; the specimens of ovarian tumours were subjected to Histopathological examination in the histopathology section, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar. Amongst the total numbers of 5732 gynaecological admissions during study period the total numbers of ovarian tumours were sixty-eight. Out of which benign ovarian tumours were 61 (89.71%) and malignant ovarian tumours were 7 (10.29%) There were no tumours with borderline malignancy. The commonest histological pattern observed in the study was epithelial tumours (76.5%) including both benign and malignant tumours. The commonest benign tumour was serous cyst adenoma (24%) followed by mature cystic teratoma (18%). Common malignant ovarian tumours were granulosa cell tumours and Endometriod carcinoma (each 28.5%). Epithelial tumours are the commonest variety of ovarian tumours followed by Germ cell tumours. The histological type of ovarian tumour correlates with the prognosis of the tumour. (author)

  14. EGFR-TK inhibition before radiotherapy reduces tumour volume but does not improve local control: Differential response of cancer stem cells and nontumourigenic cells?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Waiting times before radiotherapy may reduce tumour control probability due to proliferation of tumour cells. The aim of the experiment was to test whether the growth inhibiting effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-inhibitors after surgery or tumour transplantation results in a lower tumour mass at time of irradiation and can thereby improve local tumour control. Materials and methods: The EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor BIBX1382BS was applied over 14 days starting from microscopically non-in-sano-resection of FaDu tumours or from tumour transplantation, followed by irradiation (5f/5d). Endpoint was local tumour control. In addition, vital tumour areas, pimonidazole hypoxic fraction, BrdU labelling index, and colony forming ability in vitro were tested in control tumours and after BIBX1382BS treatment (starting from transplantation). Results: The tumour volume at start of irradiation was significantly lower in the BIBX1382BS treated tumours as compared to the control groups by factors of 11 (post-surgery setting) and 2.7 (transplantation setting). However, the reduced volume did not translate into improved local control after irradiation. The TCD50 values after surgery were 25.4 Gy [95% CI 18; 33 Gy] in the control group and 30.5 Gy [24; 37] in the BIBX1382BS group (p = 0.25). Treatment after transplantation resulted in TCD50 values of 41.1 Gy [35; 47] in the control group and 41.1 Gy [33; 49] in the BIBX1382BS group (p = 1). While the proportion of S-phase cells decreased after BIBX1382BS treatment, no differences were observed between the pimonidazole hypoxic fractions and in vitro colony forming ability. Conclusions: EGFR-TK inhibition with BIBX1382BS over 14 days between macroscopically complete tumour resection or tumour transplantation and start of radiotherapy significantly reduced tumour volume but did not improve local tumour control. One possible explanation is that the EGFR-TK inhibitor has a higher activity in

  15. Establishment of a small animal tumour model for in vivo studies with low energy laser accelerated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term aim of developing a laser based acceleration of protons and ions towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short pulsed particle beams. Recent in vitro data showed similar effects of laser-accelerated versus 'conventional' protons on clonogenic cell survival. As the proton energies currently achieved by laser driven acceleration are too low to penetrate standard tumour models on mouse legs, the aim of the present work was to establish a tumour model allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~ 20 MeV) to further verify their effects in vivo. KHT mouse sarcoma cells were injected subcutaneously in the right ear of NMRI (nu/nu) mice and the growing tumours were characterized with respect to growth parameters, histology and radiation response. In parallel, the laser system JETI was prepared for animal experimentation, i.e. a new irradiation setup was implemented and the laser parameters were carefully adjusted. Finally, a proof-of-principle experiment with laser accelerated electrons was performed to validate the tumour model under realistic conditions, i.e. altered environment and horizontal beam delivery. KHT sarcoma on mice ears showed a high take rate and continuous tumour growth after reaching a volume of ~ 5 mm3. The first irradiation experiment using laser accelerated electrons versus 200 kV X-rays was successfully performed and tumour growth delay was evaluated. Comparable tumour growth delay was found between X-ray and laser accelerated electron irradiation. Moreover, experimental influences, like anaesthesia and positioning at JETI, were found to be negligible. A small animal tumour model suitable for the irradiation with low energy particles was established and validated at a laser based particle accelerator. Thus, the translation from in vitro to in vivo experimentation was for the first time realized allowing a

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone tumours and mimics: pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays several roles in the evaluation of bone tumours and tumour-like conditions. Basic MRI technique for evaluation of bone tumours is discussed in this article, and the local staging of bone tumours and the MRI appearance of common and characteristic osseous lesions are reviewed. (author)

  17. Solitary perirenal metastasis from a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour mimicking a primary renal tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An uncommon case of a large solitary perirenal metastasis from a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) mimicking a primary renal tumour, is presented. A metastatic MPNST to the perirenal space is unusual and, in this rare location, is difficult to differentially diagnose from a primary renal tumour. It is shown that in differentiating between a solitary metastasis and a primary neoplasm, surgical or pre cutaneous biopsy will be necessary for a final diagnosis. Copyright (2003) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Disruption of focal adhesion kinase and p53 interaction with small molecule compound R2 reactivated p53 and blocked tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a 125 kDa non-receptor kinase that plays a major role in cancer cell survival and metastasis. We performed computer modeling of the p53 peptide containing the site of interaction with FAK, predicted the peptide structure and docked it into the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain of FAK involved in the complex with p53. We screened small molecule compounds that targeted the site of the FAK-p53 interaction and identified compounds (called Roslins, or R compounds) docked in silico to this site. By different assays in isogenic HCT116p53+/+ and HCT116 p53-/- cells we identified a small molecule compound called Roslin 2 (R2) that bound FAK, disrupted the binding of FAK and p53 and decreased cancer cell viability and clonogenicity in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, dual-luciferase assays demonstrated that the R2 compound increased p53 transcriptional activity that was inhibited by FAK using p21, Mdm-2, and Bax-promoter targets. R2 also caused increased expression of p53 targets: p21, Mdm-2 and Bax proteins. Furthermore, R2 significantly decreased tumor growth, disrupted the complex of FAK and p53, and up-regulated p21 in HCT116 p53+/+ but not in HCT116 p53-/- xenografts in vivo. In addition, R2 sensitized HCT116p53+/+ cells to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. Thus, disruption of the FAK and p53 interaction with a novel small molecule reactivated p53 in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and can be effectively used for development of FAK-p53 targeted cancer therapy approaches

  19. VEGF concentrations in tumour arteries and veins from patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werther, Kim; Bülow, Steffen; Hesselfeldt, Peter; Jespersen, Niels Frode Kragh; Svendsen, Mads Nordahl; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the hypothesis that the tumour itself is the source of the elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations which are often observed in peripheral blood from patients with rectal cancer. Twenty-four consecutive patients with primary rectal cancer wer...

  20. TSH receptors in human thyroid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the binding of human TSH (h-TSH) to various human thyroid tumour s using radio receptor assay technique, 26 thyroid tumour specimens were examined. Five specimens did not show displacement by stable h-TSH. A wide variation was observed in B0, non specific binding, affinity and capacity of TSH in all the tumours examined. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of h-TSH to thyroid membranes suggested the presence of the receptors in 57.7 per cent (15 of 26, Ka≥ 109) and more than one component in 46 per cent (12 of 26) of the tumours studied. There was no consistent pattern of the binding of TSH for thyroid tissue with respect to its pathology. However, with 35 pairs of observations log affinity appeared to be linearly related to log capacity with a slope -0.95, intercept 9.96 and r value -0.93. (author). 14 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Angiographic diagnosis and differentiation of pancreatic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an 8-year period (1971-1978) 92 patients were examined because of suspected pancreatic tumour and the following symptoms were found: in 13 cases (14.1%) inoperable pancreatic carcinoma, in 2 cases insuloma, in 5 patients pancreatic cyst, in 5 cases pancreatitis, in one patient pancreatic abscess and in 12 cases alterations in the environing organs. The observed angiographic symptoms are described in detail. Except the richly vascularized tumour grown together with the stomach all pancreatic carcinomas were poor in vessels and they caused tumourous invasions in the greater arteries. The obliteration of the lienal vein, as well as the development of mesenteric venous collateral circulation signify an inoperable stage. The signs of the differential diagnosis of the pancreatitis and the carcinoma are dealt with in detail. In case of secondary pancreatic tumours - not even detectable by post-mortem examination - the angiographic signs are to be taken into consideration. (author)

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Intracranial Tumours Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Danny Barrueta Reyes; Juan Guillermo Trigo Naranjo

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Intracranial Tumours Treatment. We review the physiopathology, diagnosis (stressing screening studies) and treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  3. Ovarian down Regulation by GnRF Vaccination Decreases Reproductive Tract Tumour Size in Female White and Greater One-Horned Rhinoceroses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Robert; Schwarzenberger, Franz; Göritz, Frank; Oh, Serena; Fernandes, Teresa; Bernardino, Rui; Leclerc, Antoine; Greunz, Eva; Mathew, Abraham; Forsyth, Sarah; Saragusty, Joseph; Hildebrandt, Thomas Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive tract tumours, specifically leiomyoma, are commonly found in female rhinoceroses. Similar to humans, tumour growth in rhinoceroses is thought to be sex hormone dependent. Tumours can form and expand from the onset of ovarian activity at puberty until the cessation of sex-steroid influences at senescence. Extensive tumour growth results in infertility. The aim of this study was to down regulate reproductive function of tumour-diseased and infertile females to stop further tumour growth using a Gonadotropin releasing factor (GnRF) vaccine. Four infertile southern white (Ceratotherium simum simum) and three Greater one-horned rhinoceroses (rhinoceros unicornis) with active ovaries and 2.7 ± 0.9 and 14.0 ± 1.5 reproductive tract tumours respectively were vaccinated against GnRF (Improvac®, Zoetis, Germany) at 0, 4 and 16 weeks and re-boostered every 6–8 months thereafter. After GnRF vaccination ovarian and luteal activity was suppressed in all treated females. Three months after vaccination the size of the ovaries, the number of follicles and the size of the largest follicle were significantly reduced (P<0.03). Reproductive tract tumours decreased significantly in diameter (Greater-one horned rhino: P<0.0001; white rhino: P<0.01), presumably as a result of reduced sex-steroid influence. The calculated tumour volumes were reduced by 50.8 ± 10.9% in Greater one-horned and 48.6 ± 12.9% in white rhinoceroses. In conclusion, GnRF vaccine effectively down regulated reproductive function and decreased the size of reproductive tract tumours in female rhinoceros. Our work is the first to use down regulation of reproductive function as a symptomatic treatment against benign reproductive tumour disease in a wildlife species. Nonetheless, full reversibility and rhinoceros fertility following GnRF vaccination warrants further evaluation. PMID:27403662

  4. Desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma: a questionably benign tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma is a rare intracranial tumour of childhood that involves the cerebral cortex and the leptomeninges. We report two patients with desmoplastic infantile gangliogliomas and multiple cerebrospinal metastases. To our knowledge, only two similar cases have been reported in the published literature. Pathologically, this rare intracranial tumour shows glial and ganglionic differentiation, accompanied by an extreme desmoplastic reaction. These are low-grade neoplasms that are questionably benign. Copyright (2005) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  5. Putrescine accumulation in human pulmonary tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoet, P H; Dinsdale, D.; Verbeken, E.K.; Demedts, M.; Nemery, B

    1996-01-01

    Type II pneumocytes and Clara cells, both epithelial cells that possess an active uptake system for polyamines, have been identified as possible precursor cells of at least some types of lung tumours. In this study we have investigated whether human pulmonary tumours exhibit putrescine uptake. Lung slices from both tumoral tissue and non-tumoral tissue, obtained from patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer, were incubated with radiolabelled putrescine at both 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C....

  6. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach. PMID:19776004

  7. Simulating tumour removal in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetzky, A; Rudolph, M

    2001-12-01

    In this article the software system ROBO-SIM is described. ROBO-SIM is a planning and simulation tool for minimally invasive neurosurgery. Different to the most other simulation tools, ROBO-SIM is able to use actual patient's datasets for simulation. Same as in real neurosurgery a planning step, which provides more functionality as up-to-date planning systems on the market, is performed before undergoing the simulated operation. The planning steps include the definition of the trepanation point for entry into the skull and the target point within the depth of the brain, checking the surgical track and doing virtual trepanations (virtual craniotomy). For use with an intra-operative active manipulator, which is guided by the surgeon during real surgery (robotic surgery), go- and non-go-areas can be defined. During operation, the robot restricts the surgeon from leaving these go-areas. After planning, an additional simulation system, which is understood as an extension to the planning step, is used to simulate whole surgical interventions directly on the patient's anatomy basing on the planning data and by using the same instruments as for the real intervention. First tests with ROBO-SIM are performed on a phantom developed for this purpose and on actual patient's datasets with ventricular tumours. PMID:11734406

  8. Perfusion imaging of parotid gland tumours: usefulness of arterial spin labeling for differentiating Warthin's tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Haruo [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro [Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke; Aoki, Mitsuhiro [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu (Japan); Okuaki, Tomoyuki [Philips Healthcare, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    To assess prospectively the efficacy of arterial spin labelling (ASL) against conventional and diffusion-weighted (DW) MR imaging for differentiating parotid gland tumours. We included 10 pleomorphic adenomas, 12 Warthin's tumours, and nine malignant tumours of the parotid glands. Only tumours larger than 10 mm were included in this study. All parotid gland tumours underwent T1-weighted, T2-weighted, DW, and ASL imaging. Tumour-to-parotid gland signal intensity ratios (SIRs) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of solid components were correlated with these pathologies. SIRs on T2-weighted images and ADCs were higher in pleomorphic adenomas than in Warthin's tumours (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.01). SIRs on ASL were higher in Warthin's tumours than in pleomorphic adenomas (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.05). Az value of SIRs on ASL for differentiating Warthin's tumours from the other pathologies was 0.982. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of SIRs on ASL for the diagnosis of Warthin's tumours at an optimal SIR threshold of over 8.70 were 91.7 %, 94.7 %, and 93.5 %, respectively. ASL with SIR measurements could non-invasively evaluate tumour blood flow of parotid gland tumours and differentiate Warthin's tumours from pleomorphic adenomas and malignant tumours. (orig.)

  9. Tumour size in cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a randomized trial comprising 204 patients with operable cervical carcinomas stages I and II, two low-dose rates in gynaecological brachytherapy were compared. Treatment consisted of Cs-137 uterovaginal application followed by surgery (either immedidate or delayed). The results for the two dose rates have been published previously. The present paper concerns the correlation between outcome and tumour size. Tumour size was carefully estimated in two ways: by clinical examination under general anaesthesia and by measurements on the customized vaginal mould used for the brachytherapy. Ninety-one patients (45%) were classified as stage I, and 113 were classified as stage II proximal. The mean tumour size was 39 mm (range 15-64 mm). Cox's multivariate analysis indicated that the factors with a poor prognostic value were for survival: node involvement (N+) (p<0.001), large tumour size (T+) (p<0.001); for local control; N+ (p=0.0001); for metastasis and regional relapse: N+ (p<0.001) and T+ (p<0.001). Stage was not a prognostic factor over the present range in either univariate or multivariate analysis. In this series tumour size is a powerful independent prognostic factor. It is therefore suggested that for the classification of cervical cancer and the indications for surgical staging and adjuvant treatment, tumour size should be taken into account. (orig.)

  10. Ovarian stimulation and granulosa-cell tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, W; Kruitwagen, R; Bastiaans, B; Hanselaar, T; Rolland, R

    1993-04-17

    Ovarian stimulation in the treatment of infertility is far from physiological because patients and their ovaries are exposed to high concentrations of gonadotropins. Many studies have focused on the two most common side-effects of ovarian stimulation--ie, hyperstimulation and multiple pregnancy. We describe 12 patients in whom granulosa-cell tumour was discovered after ovarian stimulation treatment with clomiphene citrate and/or gonadotropins. Although we cannot prove a causal link between the tumour and the medication, investigations in animals have shown a relation between gonadotropin exposition and the development of granulosa-cell tumours. The possible relation of ovarian stimulation and granulosa-cell tumours in human beings has not been published before. We postulate three explanations for this finding; first, the granulosa-cell tumour is present in the ovary, waiting for a hormonal trigger; second, increased follicle stimulating hormone concentrations are oncogenic to granulosa cell; and third, the onset of the granulosa-cell tumour during ovarian stimulation is coincidental. We recommend that ovarian stimulation is done only if there is a valid indication after proper assessment of the ovaries, and that women who have had ovarian stimulation are followed for longer than at present. PMID:8096944

  11. Incomplete block designs

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Aloke

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a systematic, rigorous and comprehensive account of the theory and applications of incomplete block designs. All major aspects of incomplete block designs are considered by consolidating vast amounts of material from the literature - the classical incomplete block designs, like the balanced incomplete block (BIB) and partially balanced incomplete block (PBIB) designs. Other developments like efficiency-balanced designs, nested designs, robust designs, C-designs and alpha designs are also discussed, along with more recent developments in incomplete block designs for special t

  12. Experimental studies on ultralow frequency pulsed gradient magnetic field inducing apoptosis of cancer cell and inhibiting growth of cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾繁清; 郑从义; 张新晨; 李宗山; 李朝阳; 王川婴; 张新松; 黄晓玲; 张沪生

    2002-01-01

    The morphology characteristics of cell apoptosis of the malignant tumour cells in magnetic field-treated mouse was observed for the first time. The apoptotic cancer cell contracted, became rounder and divorced from adjacent cells; the heterochromatin condensed and coagulated together along the inner side of the nuclear membrane; the endoplasmic reticulums(ER) expanded and fused with the cellular membrane; many apoptotic bodies which were packed by the cellular membrane appeared and were devoured by some lymphocytes and plasma. Apoptosis of cancer cells was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated in situ nick end labeling(TUNEL). It was found that the number of apoptosis cancer cells of the sample treated by the magnetic field is more than that of the control sample. The growth of malignant tumour in mice was inhibited and the ability of immune cell to dissolve cancer cells was improved by ultralow frequency(ULF) pulsed gradient magnetic field; the nuclei DNA contents decreased, indicating that magnetic field can block DNA replication and inhibit mitosis of cancer cells. It was suggested that magnetic field could inhibit the metabolism of cancer cell, lower its malignancy, and restrain its rapid and heteromorphic growth. Since ULF pulsed gradient magnetic field can induce apoptosis of cancer cells and inhibit the growth of malignant tumour, it could be used as a new method to treat cancer.

  13. Exophytic benign mixed epithelial stromal tumour of the kidney: case report of a rare tumour entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Küster Jens

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mixed epithelial and stromal tumour (MEST represents a recently described benign composite neoplasm of the kidney, which predominantly affects perimenopausal females. Most tumours are benign, although rare malignant cases have been observed. Case report A 47-year-old postmenopausal female presented to the urologist with flank pain. A CT scan of the abdomen showed a 30-mm-in-diameter uniform mass adjacent to the pelvis of the left kidney. Surgical exploration showed a tumour arising from the lower anterior hilus of the left kidney. The tumour could be excised by preserving the kidney. By intraoperative frozen section the tumour showed characteristic features of MEST with epithelial-covered cysts embedded in an "ovarian-like" stroma. Additional immunohistochemistry investigations showed expression for hormone receptors by the stromal component of the tumour. Discussion MEST typically presents in perimenopausal women as a primarily cystic mass. Commonly, the tumour arises from the renal parenchyma or pelvis. The tumour is composed of an admixture of cystic and sometimes more solid areas. The stromal cells typically demonstrate an ovarian-type stroma showing expression for the estrogen and progesterone receptors. Conclusion MEST represents a distinctive benign tumour entity of the kidney, which affects perimenopausal woman. The tumour should be distinguished from other cystic renal neoplasms. By imaging studies it is difficult to distinguish between a benign or malignant nature of the tumour. Thus, intraoperative frozen section is necessary for conservative surgery, since the overall prognosis is favourable and renal function can be preserved in most cases.

  14. Why some tumours trigger neovascularisation andothers don’t:the story thus far

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omanma Adighibe; Russell DLeek; Marta FernandezMercado; JiangtingHu; Cameron Snell; Kevin CGatter; AdrianLHarris; Francesco Pezzella

    2016-01-01

    Background:Angiogenesis is not essential for tumours to develop and expand, as cancer can also grow in a non‑angiogenic fashion, but why this type of growth occurs is unknown. Surprisingly, our data from mRNA transcription proifling did not show any differences in the classical angiogenic pathways, but differences were observed in mito‑chondrial metabolic pathways, suggesting a key role for metabolic reprogramming. We then validated these results with mRNA proifling by investigating differential protein expression via immunohistochemistry in angiogenic and non‑angiogenic non‑small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Methods:Immunohistochemical staining for 35 angiogenesis‑ and hypoxia‑related biomarkers were performed on a collection of 194 angiogenic and 73 non‑angiogenic NSCLCs arranged on tissue microarrays. Sequencing of P53 was performed with frozen tissue samples of NSCLC. Results:The non‑angiogenic tumours were distinguished from the angiogenic ones by having higher levels of proteins associated with ephrin pathways, mitochondria, cell biogenesis, and hypoxia‑inducible factor 1 (HIF1) regula‑tion by oxygen and transcription of HIF‑controlled genes but lower levels of proteins involved in the stroma, cell–cell signaling and adhesion, integrins, and Delta‑Notch and epidermal growth factor (EGF)‑related signaling. However, proteins classically associated with angiogenesis were present in both types of tumours at very comparable levels. Cytoplasmic expression of P53 was strongly associated with non‑angiogenic tumours. A pilot investigation showed that P53 mutations were observed in 32.0% of angiogenic cases but in 71.4% of non‑angiogenic tumours. Conclusions:Our observations thus far indicate that both angiogenic and non‑angiogenic tumours experience hypoxia/HIF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway protein expression in a comparable fashion. How‑ever, angiogenesis does not ensue in the non‑angiogenic tumours

  15. The response of tumour vasculature to angiotensin II revealed by its systemic and local administration to 'tissue-isolated' tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Tozer, G M; Shaffi, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    A tissue-isolated preparation of the P22 rat carcinosarcoma was used to investigate the tumour vascular response to angiotensin II (ATII). In particular, the relative importance of systemic and local tumour factors was assessed by comparing tumour vascular resistance during systemic administration of ATII and during administration directly into the tumour-supplying artery. The effect of hypervolaemia on tumour vascular resistance was determined as well as the effect of ATII on oxygen metaboli...

  16. The effect of bevacizumab on vestibular schwannoma tumour size and hearing in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Klausen, Camilla; Caye-Thomasen, Per;

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) and severe hearing loss is common in NF2 patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression level in NF2 correlates with tumour growth rate and bevacizumab, a VEGF-binding antibody, has previously...

  17. Tumour dose uniformity in radiotherapy: experimental evidence for cell response to non-uniform irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common goal of radiotherapy is the application of uniform radiation dose to the tumour volume. Such a goal has been formalized by the ICRU (ICRU 50, 1993), based on the assumption that cells respond independently and any under-dosed region represents an area with a higher probability to act as a recurrence site. However, dose distributions provided by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and other techniques offer opportunities to escalate tumour doses and greatly reduce normal tissue doses, with these effects enhanced further if dose non-uniformity is allowed in the tumour. A study of the response of several tumour cell lines has suggested an averaging effect if those cells are exposed to a gradient rather then a uniform dose. A study was performed with cell cultures exposed in a 6 MV X-ray beam in full equilibrium conditions with the beam modulated by a wedge filter. With cell communication channels open, cells exposed at the lower or higher dose ends of the wedge responded as if irradiated to mean dose levels, with the severity of this effect dependent on cell type. A possible explanation for this effect is cellular communication. When cells are irradiated with communication channels physically blocked, the normal dose response experienced under uniform irradiation conditions results. There are significant implications of this result for radiotherapy treatment and prescription, dependent primarily on translation of the results to the clinical setting. The ability to deliver largely non-uniform doses to tumours would greatly facilitate normal tissue avoidance and enhance our ability to escalate doses to tumours. This result can also be used to explain some recent observations regarding dose-response extracted from clinical trial data

  18. Non-islet Cell Tumour Hypoglycaemia (NICTH) in Malignant Mesothelioma: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Wai Keat

    2015-01-01

    Non-islet cell tumour hypoglycaemia (NICTH) is an uncommon but important clinical condition. It can occur in a setting of known malignancy. Here, we report the case of a 56-year-old, non-diabetic, female patient with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma who presented with unexplained recurrent hypoglycaemia. Surreptitious use of insulin or other hypoglycaemic agents were ruled out. Investigations revealed markedly suppressed insulin-like growth factor-I, normal insulin-like growth fact...

  19. The effect of BW12C on radiosensitivity and necrosis of murine tissues and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BW12C is a drug that has the potential to induce normal tissue and tumour hypoxia by binding to haemoglobin, increasing its affinity for oxygen and thereby reducing oxygen availability to tissues. Initial results suggested that BW12C administration caused significant radioprotection of normal tissues and induced tumour necrosis, but variable results have been reported subsequently. This work was carried to extend the range of observations concerning the ability of BW12C to radioprotect normal tissues and tumours and to induce necrosis of tumours of the mouse. BW12C was administered as 70 mg/kg intravenous 15 min before irradiation of jejunum in CBA mice and of foot skin in WHT mice with single doses of 240 kVp X-rays while mice breathed gases of varying oxygen tensions. The radiosensitivities of these tissues were assessed by the crypt survival assay and the acute skin reaction, respectively. The radiosensitivity of CaNT tumours to single fraction irradiation was assessed by the regrowth delay assay following administration of single or multiple does of BW12C at varying times to air-breathing CBA mice. The radiation response was compared to the radiosensitivity of clamped tumours. The effect of BW12C alone on tumours was assessed by regrowth delay and histological examination for necrosis. Single or multiple doses of BW12C did not influence the radiosensitivity of CaNT tumours, although marked radioprotection could be induced by clamping the tumours during irradiation. Multiple doses of BW12C alone led to a slight increase in necrosis of the CaNT tumour but did not alter its growth rate. BW12C alone did not induce necrosis of the murine JT lymphoma. The results shown that BW12C did not have a significant effect as a radioprotective or necrotizing agent in these experimental systems. The reported differences in the radiomodifying effects of BW12C are probably tissue-specific and relate to complex biochemical and physiological interactions. 18 refs., 4 figs

  20. Synchronous and Metachronous Malignant Tumours expect the un-expected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate occurrence of synchronous and metachronous malignant tumours, to find tumour types, age group, and relationship to treatment received. Methods: Previously diagnosed first primary tumour cases experiencing a synchronous or metachronous tumour, seen at AOI from February 2003 to August 2009 (78 months) were included. The cases were analyzed for morphology/histology of first primary tumour, age and gender of patient, treatment received for first tumour, time interval between the first and second primary tumour, morphology/histology of second tumour, and the treatment conferred for second tumour. Results: The second synchronous and metachronous tumours were 46/4025 (1.14%), in 18 males and 28 females (M:F 1:1.6). The age range was 16-75 years (median 43 years). The follow up time was 24-150 months. The time to second primary tumour was 2-132 months. The first primary tumours were breast, ovary, GIT and urinary bladder. The patients received surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy alone or as multi-modality treatment for the first tumours. The frequent second tumours were breast, ovary and Gastro Intestinal tumours. Conclusion: It is imperative that patients with a primary malignant tumour should be thoroughly, closely, and regularly followed. Genetic counseling, risk estimation, cancer screening and hemo prevention must be emphasized. Every subsequent occurring tumour should be biopsied. The effect of first tumour on the second or vice versa are still not fully understood and need exploration. The second primary tumour is usually more aggressive, treatment resistant, and metastasizes early requiring a more aggressive treatment strategy. (author)