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Sample records for blocks tumor growth

  1. Emodin Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth by Blocking the Tumor-Promoting Feedforward Loop between Cancer Cells and Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowycz, Stephen; Wang, Junfeng; Hodge, Johnie; Wang, Yuzhen; Yu, Fang; Fan, Daping

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage infiltration correlates with severity in many types of cancer. Tumor cells recruit macrophages and educate them to adopt an M2-like phenotype through the secretion of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP1 and CSF1. Macrophages in turn promote tumor growth through supporting angiogenesis, suppressing antitumor immunity, modulating extracellular matrix remodeling, and promoting tumor cell migration. Thus, tumor cells and macrophages interact to create a feedforward loop supporting tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, we tested the ability of emodin, a Chinese herb-derived compound, to inhibit breast cancer growth in mice and examined the underlying mechanisms. Emodin was used to treat mice bearing EO771 or 4T1 breast tumors. It was shown that emodin attenuated tumor growth by inhibiting macrophage infiltration and M2-like polarization, accompanied by increased T-cell activation and reduced angiogenesis in tumors. The tumor inhibitory effects of emodin were lost in tumor-bearing mice with macrophage depletion. Emodin inhibited IRF4, STAT6, and C/EBPβ signaling and increased inhibitory histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27m3) on the promoters of M2-related genes in tumor-associated macrophages. In addition, emodin inhibited tumor cell secretion of MCP1 and CSF1, as well as expression of surface anchoring molecule Thy-1, thus suppressing macrophage migration toward and adhesion to tumor cells. These results suggest that emodin acts on both breast cancer cells and macrophages and effectively blocks the tumor-promoting feedforward loop between the two cell types, thereby inhibiting breast cancer growth and metastasis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1931-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196773

  2. Blocking tumor growth by targeting autophagy and SQSTM1 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huijun; Guan, Jun-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved cellular process for degradation of bulk cytoplasmic materials in response to starvation and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Dysfunction of autophagy is implicated in a variety of diseases including cancer. In a recent study, we devised a system for inducible deletion of an essential autophagy gene Rb1cc1/Fip200 in established tumor cells in vivo and showed that Rb1cc1 is required for maintaining tumor growth. We further investigated the role of the accumulated SQSTM1 in Rb1cc1-null autophagy-deficient tumor cells. To our surprise, the increased SQSTM1 was not responsible for the inhibition of tumor growth, but rather supported the residual growth of tumors (i.e., partially compensated for the defective growth caused by Rb1cc1 deletion). Further analysis indicated that SQSTM1 promoted tumor growth in autophagy-deficient cells at least partially through its activation of the NFKB signaling pathway. A working model is proposed to account for our findings, which suggest that targeting both autophagy and the consequently increased SQSTM1 may be exploited for developing more effective cancer therapies.

  3. Small interfering RNA targeted to secretory clusterin blocks tumor growth, motility, and invasion in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohe Niu; Xinhui Li; Bin Hu; Rong Li; Ligang Wang; Lilin Wu; Xingang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Clusterin/apolipoprotein J (Clu) is a ubiquitously expressed secreted heterodimeric glycoprotein that is implicated in several physiological processes.It has been reported that the elevated level of secreted clusterin (sClu) protein is associated with poor survival in breast cancer patients and can induce metastasis in rodent models.In this study,we investigated the effects of sClu inhibition with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) on cell motility,invasion,and growth in vitro and in vivo.MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with pSuper-siRNA/sClu.Cell survival and proliferation were examined by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium and clonogenic survival assay.The results showed that sClu silencing significantly inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells.The invasion and migration ability were also dramatically decreased,which was detected by matrigel assays.TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activity assay demonstrated that sClu silencing also could increase the apoptosis rate of cells,resulting in the inhibition of cell growth.We also determined the effects of sClu silencing on tumor growth and metastatic progression in an orthotopic breast cancer model.The results showed that orthotopic primary tumors derived from MDA-MB-231/pSuper sClu siRNA cells grew significantly slower than tumors derived from parental MDA-MB-231 or MDA-MB-231/pSuper scramble siRNA cells,and metastasize less to the lungs.These data suggest that secretory clusterin plays a significant role in tumor growth and metastatic progression.Knocking-down sClu gene expression may provide a valuable method for breast cancer therapy.

  4. Oridonin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis through anti-angiogenesis by blocking the Notch signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Dong

    Full Text Available While significant progress has been made in understanding the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects of the natural diterpenoid component Oridonin on tumor cells, little is known about its effect on tumor angiogenesis or metastasis and on the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, Oridonin significantly suppressed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs proliferation, migration, and apillary-like structure formation in vitro. Using aortic ring assay and mouse corneal angiogenesis model, we found that Oridonin inhibited angiogenesis ex vivo and in vivo. In our animal experiments, Oridonin impeded tumor growth and metastasis. Immunohistochemistry analysis further revealed that the expression of CD31 and vWF protein in xenografts was remarkably decreased by the Oridonin. Furthermore, Oridonin reinforced endothelial cell-cell junction and impaired breast cancer cell transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, Oridonin not only down-regulated Jagged2 expression and Notch1 activity but also decreased the expression of their target genes. In conclusion, our results demonstrated an original role of Oridonin in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and propose a mechanism. This study also provides new evidence supporting the central role of Notch in tumor angiogenesis and suggests that Oridonin could be a potential drug candidate for angiogenesis related diseases.

  5. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopeptidase 2, an effector protein, which plays a role in endothelial cell growth. Overexpression of the domain in mouse endothelial MSS31 cells reduced DNA synthesis, and the corresponding synthetic peptide (named NBD) indeed interacted with S100A4 and inhibited capillary formation in vitro and new blood vessel formation in vivo. Intriguingly, a single intra-tumor administration of the NBD peptide in human prostate cancer xenografts significantly reduced vascularity, resulting in tumor regression. Mechanistically, the NBD peptide enhanced assembly of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments along with Ser1943 phosphorylation, stimulated formation of focal adhesions without phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, and provoked G1/S arrest of the cell cycle. Altogether, the NBD peptide is a potent inhibitor for tumor angiogenesis, and is the first example of an anticancer peptide drug developed on the basis of an endothelial S100A4-targeted strategy. PMID:26029719

  6. A function blocking anti-mouse integrin α5β1 antibody inhibits angiogenesis and impedes tumor growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powers David

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrins are important adhesion molecules that regulate tumor and endothelial cell survival, proliferation and migration. The integrin α5β1 has been shown to play a critical role during angiogenesis. An inhibitor of this integrin, volociximab (M200, inhibits endothelial cell growth and movement in vitro, independent of the growth factor milieu, and inhibits tumor growth in vivo in the rabbit VX2 carcinoma model. Although volociximab has already been tested in open label, pilot phase II clinical trials in melanoma, pancreatic and renal cell cancer, evaluation of the mechanism of action of volociximab has been limited because this antibody does not cross-react with murine α5β1, precluding its use in standard mouse xenograft models. Methods We generated a panel of rat-anti-mouse α5β1 antibodies, with the intent of identifying an antibody that recapitulated the properties of volociximab. Hybridoma clones were screened for analogous function to volociximab, including specificity for α5β1 heterodimer and blocking of integrin binding to fibronectin. A subset of antibodies that met these criteria were further characterized for their capacities to bind to mouse endothelial cells, inhibit cell migration and block angiogenesis in vitro. One antibody that encompassed all of these attributes, 339.1, was selected from this panel and tested in xenograft models. Results A panel of antibodies was characterized for specificity and potency. The affinity of antibody 339.1 for mouse integrin α5β1 was determined to be 0.59 nM, as measured by BIAcore. This antibody does not significantly cross-react with human integrin, however 339.1 inhibits murine endothelial cell migration and tube formation and elicits cell death in these cells (EC50 = 5.3 nM. In multiple xenograft models, 339.1 inhibited the growth of established tumors by 40–60% (p Conclusion The results herein demonstrate that 339.1, like volociximab, exhibits potent anti-α5β1

  7. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopep...

  8. Platycodin D inhibits tumor growth by antiangiogenic activity via blocking VEGFR2-mediated signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Xin; Gao, Yun-Ge; Guan, Ying-Yun; Xu, Jian-Rong; Lu, Qin [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Mei [Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Institute of Health Sciences and Health School Attached to SJTU-SM, 279 Zhouzhu Road, Shanghai 201318 (China); Liu, Ya-Rong; Liu, Hai-Jun [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Fang, Chao, E-mail: fangchao100@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Hong-Zhuan, E-mail: hongzhuan_chen@hotmail.com [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Platycodin D (PD) is an active component mainly isolated from the root of Platycodon grandiflorum. Recent studies proved that PD exhibited inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration, invasion and xenograft growth of diverse cancer cell lines. However, whether PD is suppressive for angiogenesis, an important hallmark in cancer development, remains unknown. Here, we found that PD could dose-dependently inhibit human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. PD also significantly inhibited angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Moreover, the antiangiogenic activity of PD contributed to its in vivo anticancer potency shown in the decreased microvessel density and delayed growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice with no overt toxicity. Western blot analysis indicated that PD inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream protein kinase including PLCγ1, JAK2, FAK, Src, and Akt in endothelial cells. Molecular docking simulation showed that PD formed hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions within the ATP binding pocket of VEGFR2 kinase domain. The present study firstly revealed the high antiangiogenic activity and the underlying molecular basis of PD, suggesting that PD may be a potential antiangiogenic agent for angiogenesis-related diseases. - Highlights: • Platycodin D inhibits HUVEC proliferation, motility, migration and tube formation. • Platycodin D inhibits the angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. • Platycodin D suppresses the angiogenesis and growth of HCT-15 xenograft in mice. • Platycodin D inhibits the phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and downstream kinases in HUVEC.

  9. Peripheral opioid antagonist enhances the effect of anti-tumor drug by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Suzuki

    Full Text Available The dormancy of tumor cells is a major problem in chemotherapy, since it limits the therapeutic efficacy of anti-tumor drugs that only target dividing cells. One potential way to overcome chemo-resistance is to "wake up" these dormant cells. Here we show that the opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MNTX enhances the effect of docetaxel (Doc by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway. We found that PENK, which encodes opioid growth factor (OGF and suppresses cell growth, is predominantly expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancers (GCs. The blockade of OGF signaling by MNTX releases cells from their arrest and boosts the effect of Doc. In comparison with the use of Doc alone, the combined use of Doc and MNTX significantly prolongs survival, alleviates abdominal pain, and diminishes Doc-resistant spheroids on the peritoneal membrane in model mice. These results suggest that blockade of the pathways that suppress cell growth may enhance the effects of anti-tumor drugs.

  10. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  11. Combined Inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases (Dinaciclib) and AKT (MK-2206) Blocks Pancreatic Tumor Growth and Metastases in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models.

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    Hu, Chaoxin; Dadon, Tikva; Chenna, Venugopal; Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Bannerji, Rajat; Booher, Robert; Strack, Peter; Azad, Nilofer; Nelkin, Barry D; Maitra, Anirban

    2015-07-01

    KRAS is activated by mutation in the vast majority of cases of pancreatic cancer; unfortunately, therapeutic attempts to inhibit KRAS directly have been unsuccessful. Our previous studies showed that inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) reduces pancreatic cancer growth and progression, through blockage of the centrally important RAL effector pathway, downstream of KRAS. In the current study, the therapeutic effects of combining the CDK inhibitor dinaciclib (SCH727965; MK-7965) with the pan-AKT inhibitor MK-2206 were evaluated using orthotopic and subcutaneous patient-derived human pancreatic cancer xenograft models. The combination of dinaciclib (20 mg/kg, i.p., three times a week) and MK-2206 (60 mg/kg, orally, three times a week) dramatically blocked tumor growth and metastasis in all eight pancreatic cancer models examined. Remarkably, several complete responses were induced by the combination treatment of dinaciclib and MK-2206. The striking results obtained in these models demonstrate that the combination of dinaciclib with the pan-AKT inhibitor MK-2206 is promising for therapeutic evaluation in pancreatic cancer, and strongly suggest that blocking RAL in combination with other effector pathways downstream from KRAS may provide increased efficacy in pancreatic cancer. Based on these data, an NCI-CTEP-approved multicenter phase I clinical trial for pancreatic cancer of the combination of dinaciclib and MK-2206 (NCT01783171) has now been opened. PMID:25931518

  12. Metformin selectively targets cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumor growth and prolong remission

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Heather A; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsichlis, Philip N.; Struhl, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that, unlike most cancer cells within a tumor, cancer stem cells resist chemotherapeutic drugs and can regenerate the various cell types in the tumor, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, drugs that selectively target cancer stem cells offer great promise for cancer treatment, particularly in combination with chemotherapy. Here, we show that low doses of metformin, a standard drug for diabetes, inhibits cellular transformation and selectively ...

  13. The inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor growth by denbinobin is associated with the blocking of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling.

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    Tsai, An-Chi; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Lai, Chin-Yu; Wang, Chih-Ya; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang; Teng, Che-Ming

    2011-07-01

    Denbinobin, which is a phenanthraquinone derivative present in the stems of Ephemerantha lonchophylla, has been demonstrated to display antitumor activity. Recent reports suggest that the enhanced activity of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is closely associated with tumor angiogenesis and growth. This study aims at investigating the roles of denbinobin in suppressing these effects and at further elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms. In the present study, we used an in vivo xenograft model antitumor and the Matrigel implant assays to show that denbinobin suppresses lung adenocarcinoma A549 growth and microvessel formation. Additionally, crystal violet and capillary-like tube formation assays indicated that denbinobin selectively inhibits insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)-induced proliferation (GI50=1.3×10⁻⁸ M) and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) without influencing the effect of epidermal growth factor; vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Furthermore, denbinobin inhibited the IGF-1-induced migration of HUVECs in a concentration-dependent fashion. Western blotting and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that denbinobin causes more efficient inhibition of IGF-1-induced activation of IGF-1R and its downstream signaling targets, including , extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, 4EBP and cyclin D1. All of our results provide evidences that denbinobin suppresses the activation of IGF-1R and its downstream signaling pathway, which leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Our findings suggest that denbinobin may be a novel IGF-1R kinase inhibitor and has potential therapeutic abilities for angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer. PMID:20951021

  14. Insulin/insulin like growth factors in cancer: new roles for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, tumor resistance mechanisms and new blocking strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B Salisbury

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R and the insulin receptor (IR are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs that are expressed in cancer cells. The results of different studies indicate that tumor proliferation and survival is dependent on the IGF1R and IR, and that their inhibition leads to reductions in proliferation and increases in cell death. Molecular targeting therapies that have been used in solid tumors include: anti-IGF1R antibodies, anti-IGF1/IGF2 antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that suppress IGF1R and IR kinase activity. New advances in the molecular basis of anti-IGF1R blocking antibodies reveal they are biased agonists and promote the binding of IGF1 to integrin β3 receptors in some cancer cells. Our recent reports indicate that pharmacological aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR ligands inhibit breast cancer cell responses to IGFs, suggesting that targeting AHR may have benefit in cancers whose proliferation and survival are dependent on insulin/IGF signaling. Novel aspects of IGF1R/IR in cancer, such as biased agonism, integrin β3 signaling, AHR and new therapeutic targeting strategies will be discussed.

  15. CRM-1 knockdown inhibits extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma tumor growth by blocking the nuclear export of p27Kip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Chen, Yongjun; Li, Qiang; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Yanqiong; Lan, Hongzhen

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a deadly disease which responds poorly to surgery and conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the anatomical and biological characteristics of cholangiocarcinoma. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor and in the present study, we found that p27Kip1 expression was suppressed in the nucleus and increased in the cytoplasm in 53 samples of cholangiocarcinoma from patients with highly malignant tumors (poorly-differentiated and tumor-node-metastsis (TNM) stage III-IV) compared with that in samples from 10 patients with chronic cholangitis. The expression of phosphorylated (p-)p27Kip1 (Ser10), one of the phosphorylated forms of p27Kip1, was increased in the patient samples with increasing malignancy and clinical stage. Coincidentally, chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM-1; also referred to as exportin 1 or Xpo1), a critical protein responsible for protein translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, was also overexpressed in the tumor samples which were poorly differentiated and of a higher clinical stage. Through specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRM-1 in the cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939, we identified an elevation of cytoplasmic p27Kip1 and a decrease of nuclear p27Kip1. Furthermore, the viability and colony formation ability of QBC939 cells was largely reduced with G1 arrest. Consistent with the findings of the in vitro experiments, in a xenograft mouse model, the tumors formed in the CRM-1 knockdown group were markedly smaller and weighed less than those in the control group in vivo. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that the interplay between CRM-1 and p27Kip1 may provide potentially potent biomarkers and functional targets for the development of future cholangiocarcinoma treatments. PMID:27279267

  16. CRM-1 knockdown inhibits extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma tumor growth by blocking the nuclear export of p27Kip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Chen, Yongjun; Li, Qiang; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Yanqiong; Lan, Hongzhen

    2016-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a deadly disease which responds poorly to surgery and conventional chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Early diagnosis is difficult due to the anatomical and biological characteristics of cholangiocarcinoma. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1) is a cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitor and in the present study, we found that p27Kip1 expression was suppressed in the nucleus and increased in the cytoplasm in 53 samples of cholangiocarcinoma from patients with highly malignant tumors (poorly-differentiated and tumor-node-metastsis (TNM) stage III-IV) compared with that in samples from 10 patients with chronic cholangitis. The expression of phosphorylated (p-)p27Kip1 (Ser10), one of the phosphorylated forms of p27Kip1, was increased in the patient samples with increasing malignancy and clinical stage. Coincidentally, chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM-1; also referred to as exportin 1 or Xpo1), a critical protein responsible for protein translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, was also overexpressed in the tumor samples which were poorly differentiated and of a higher clinical stage. Through specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRM-1 in the cholangiocarcinoma cell line QBC939, we identified an elevation of cytoplasmic p27Kip1 and a decrease of nuclear p27Kip1. Furthermore, the viability and colony formation ability of QBC939 cells was largely reduced with G1 arrest. Consistent with the findings of the in vitro experiments, in a xenograft mouse model, the tumors formed in the CRM-1 knockdown group were markedly smaller and weighed less than those in the control group in vivo. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that the interplay between CRM-1 and p27Kip1 may provide potentially potent biomarkers and functional targets for the development of future cholangiocarcinoma treatments.

  17. Growth factors in tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xuejing; Nie, Daotai; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in tumor initiation and progression. Components in the microenvironment can modulate the growth of tumor cells, their ability to progress and metastasize. A major venue of communication between tumor cells and their microenvironment is through polypeptide growth factors and receptors for these growth factors. This article discusses three major classes of growth-stimulatory polypeptide growth factors and receptors for these growth factors. It also d...

  18. Targeted inhibition of tumor growth and angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meel, R.

    2013-01-01

    Two main strategies have been pursued for the development of an effective and targeted anti-cancer treatment. The first strategy comprised the generation of a targeted nanomedicine for the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation by blocking growth factor receptor pathways. The epidermal growth factor

  19. Inhibition of tumor growth by targeted anti-EGFR/IGF-1R Nanobullets depends on efficient blocking of cell survival pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meel, van der Roy; Oliveira, Sabrina; Altintas, Isil; Heukers, Raimond; Pieters, Ebel H.E.; Bergen en Henegouwen, van Paul M.P.; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E.; Kok, Robbert J.; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted inhibitors is limited due to resistance mechanisms of the tumor such as activation of compensatory pathways. Crosstalk between EGFR and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1R) signaling has been frequently described to be involv

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Gene 3 (EBI3) Blocking Leads to Induce Antitumor Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response and Suppress Tumor Growth in Colorectal Cancer by Bidirectional Reciprocal-Regulation STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanfang; Chen, Qianqian; Du, Wenjing; Chen, Can; Li, Feifei; Yang, Jingying; Peng, Jianyu; Kang, Dongping; Lin, Bihua; Chai, Xingxing; Zhou, Keyuan; Zeng, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) is a member of the interleukin-12 (IL-12) family structural subunit and can form a heterodimer with IL-27p28 and IL-12p35 subunit to build IL-27 and IL-35, respectively. However, IL-27 stimulates whereas IL-35 inhibits antitumor T cell responses. To date, little is known about the role of EBI3 in tumor microenvironment. In this study, firstly we assessed EBI3, IL-27p28, IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 expression with clinicopathological parameters of colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues; then we evaluated the antitumor T cell responses and tumor growth with a EBI3 blocking peptide. We found that elevated EBI3 may be associated with IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 to promote CRC progression. EBI3 blocking peptide promoted antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response by inducing Granzyme B, IFN-γ production, and p-STAT3 expression and inhibited CRC cell proliferation and tumor growth to associate with suppressing gp130 and p-STAT3 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that EBI3 may mediate a bidirectional reciprocal-regulation STAT3 signaling pathway to assist the tumor escape immune surveillance in CRC. PMID:27247488

  1. AZD9496: An Oral Estrogen Receptor Inhibitor That Blocks the Growth of ER-Positive and ESR1-Mutant Breast Tumors in Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Hazel M; Bradbury, Robert H; Lawson, Mandy; Rabow, Alfred A; Buttar, David; Callis, Rowena J; Curwen, Jon O; de Almeida, Camila; Ballard, Peter; Hulse, Michael; Donald, Craig S; Feron, Lyman J L; Karoutchi, Galith; MacFaul, Philip; Moss, Thomas; Norman, Richard A; Pearson, Stuart E; Tonge, Michael; Davies, Gareth; Walker, Graeme E; Wilson, Zena; Rowlinson, Rachel; Powell, Steve; Sadler, Claire; Richmond, Graham; Ladd, Brendon; Pazolli, Ermira; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; De Savi, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Fulvestrant is an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist administered to breast cancer patients by monthly intramuscular injection. Given its present limitations of dosing and route of administration, a more flexible orally available compound has been sought to pursue the potential benefits of this drug in patients with advanced metastatic disease. Here we report the identification and characterization of AZD9496, a nonsteroidal small-molecule inhibitor of ERα, which is a potent and selective antagonist and downregulator of ERα in vitro and in vivo in ER-positive models of breast cancer. Significant tumor growth inhibition was observed as low as 0.5 mg/kg dose in the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 xenograft model, where this effect was accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in PR protein levels, demonstrating potent antagonist activity. Combining AZD9496 with PI3K pathway and CDK4/6 inhibitors led to further growth-inhibitory effects compared with monotherapy alone. Tumor regressions were also seen in a long-term estrogen-deprived breast model, where significant downregulation of ERα protein was observed. AZD9496 bound and downregulated clinically relevant ESR1 mutants in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in an ESR1-mutant patient-derived xenograft model that included a D538G mutation. Collectively, the pharmacologic evidence showed that AZD9496 is an oral, nonsteroidal, selective estrogen receptor antagonist and downregulator in ER(+) breast cells that could provide meaningful benefit to ER(+) breast cancer patients. AZD9496 is currently being evaluated in a phase I clinical trial. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3307-18. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020862

  2. Single-chain antibody-based gene therapy: Inhibition of tumor growth by in situ production of phage-derived antibodies blocking functionally active sites of cell-associated matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Laura; Kristensen, Peter; Blanco, Belén;

    2002-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that blocking the interactions between endothelial cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components may provide a potent and general strategy to inhibit tumor neovascularization. Based on these considerations, we have focused our efforts on laminin, component of the ...

  3. Endothelial cell-derived interleukin-6 regulates tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelial cells play a complex role in the pathobiology of cancer. This role is not limited to the making of blood vessels to allow for influx of oxygen and nutrients required for the high metabolic demands of tumor cells. Indeed, it has been recently shown that tumor-associated endothelial cells secrete molecules that enhance tumor cell survival and cancer stem cell self-renewal. The hypothesis underlying this work is that specific disruption of endothelial cell-initiated signaling inhibits tumor growth. Conditioned medium from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) stably transduced with silencing RNA for IL-6 (or controls) was used to evaluate the role of endothelial-derived IL-6 on the activation of key signaling pathways in tumor cells. In addition, these endothelial cells were co-transplanted with tumor cells into immunodefficient mice to determine the impact of endothelial cell-derived IL-6 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. We observed that tumor cells adjacent to blood vessels show strong phosphorylation of STAT3, a key mediator of tumor progression. In search for a possible mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 signaling pathway, we observed that silencing interleukin (IL)-6 in tumor-associated endothelial cells inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor cells. Notably, tumors vascularized with IL-6-silenced endothelial cells showed lower intratumoral microvessel density, lower tumor cell proliferation, and slower growth than tumors vascularized with control endothelial cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IL-6 secreted by endothelial cells enhance tumor growth, and suggest that cancer patients might benefit from targeted approaches that block signaling events initiated by endothelial cells

  4. Image based modeling of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghdadi, N; Soltani, M; Niroomand-Oscuii, H; Ghalichi, F

    2016-09-01

    Tumors are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the efforts of the clinical and research communities, little has been achieved in the past decades in terms of improving the treatment of aggressive tumors. Understanding the underlying mechanism of tumor growth and evaluating the effects of different therapies are valuable steps in predicting the survival time and improving the patients' quality of life. Several studies have been devoted to tumor growth modeling at different levels to improve the clinical outcome by predicting the results of specific treatments. Recent studies have proposed patient-specific models using clinical data usually obtained from clinical images and evaluating the effects of various therapies. The aim of this review is to highlight the imaging role in tumor growth modeling and provide a worthwhile reference for biomedical and mathematical researchers with respect to tumor modeling using the clinical data to develop personalized models of tumor growth and evaluating the effect of different therapies.

  5. Hyaluronan Promotes Tumor Lymphangiogenesis and Intralymphantic Tumor Growth in Xenografts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Xia GUO; Ke ZOU; Ji-Hang JU; Hong XIE

    2005-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix, has been implicated in the promotion of malignant phenotypes, including tumor angiogenesis. However, little is known about the effect of HA on tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis. In this study, mouse hepatocellular carcinoma Hca-F cells combined with or without HA were injected subcutaneously into C3H/Hej mice, then angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis of implanted tumors were examined by immunostaining for plateletendothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 and lymphatic vascular endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1 respectively.Interestingly, we found HA promotes tumor lymphangiogenesis and the occurrence of intratumoral lymphatic vessels, but has little effect on tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, HA also promotes intralymphatic tumor growth, although it is not sufficient to potentiate lymphatic metastasis. These results suggest that HA,which is elevated in most malignant tumor stroma, may also play a role in tumor progression by promoting lymphangiogenesis.

  6. Biochemomechanical poroelastic theory of avascular tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shi-Lei; Li, Bo; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-09-01

    Tumor growth is a complex process involving genetic mutations, biochemical regulations, and mechanical deformations. In this paper, a thermodynamics-based nonlinear poroelastic theory is established to model the coupling among the mechanical, chemical, and biological mechanisms governing avascular tumor growth. A volumetric growth law accounting for mechano-chemo-biological coupled effects is proposed to describe the development of solid tumors. The regulating roles of stresses and nutrient transport in the tumor growth are revealed under different environmental constraints. We show that the mechano-chemo-biological coupling triggers anisotropic and heterogeneous growth, leading to the formation of layered structures in a growing tumor. There exists a steady state in which tumor growth is balanced by resorption. The influence of external confinements on tumor growth is also examined. A phase diagram is constructed to illustrate how the elastic modulus and thickness of the confinements jointly dictate the steady state of tumor volume. Qualitative and quantitative agreements with experimental observations indicate the developed model is capable of capturing the essential features of avascular tumor growth in various environments.

  7. Tumor growth inhibition through targeting liposomally bound curcumin to tumor vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Goutam; Barui, Sugata; Saha, Soumen; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2013-12-28

    Increasing number of Phase I/II clinical studies have demonstrated clinical potential of curcumin for treatment of various types of human cancers. Despite significant anti-tumor efficacies and bio-safety profiles of curcumin, poor systemic bioavailability is retarding its clinical success. Efforts are now being directed toward developing stable formulations of curcumin using various drug delivery systems. To this end, herein we report on the development of a new tumor vasculature targeting liposomal formulation of curcumin containing a lipopeptide with RGDK-head group and two stearyl tails, di-oleyolphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and cholesterol. We show that essentially water insoluble curcumin can be solubilized in fairly high concentrations (~500 μg/mL) in such formulation. Findings in the Annexin V/Propidium iodide (PI) binding based flow cytometric assays showed significant apoptosis inducing properties of the present curcumin formulation in both endothelial (HUVEC) and tumor (B16F10) cells. Using syngeneic mouse tumor model, we show that growth of solid melanoma tumor can be inhibited by targeting such liposomal formulation of curcumin to tumor vasculature. Results in immunohistochemical staining of the tumor cryosections are consistent with tumor growth inhibition being mediated by apoptosis of tumor endothelial cells. Findings in both in vitro and in vivo mechanistic studies are consistent with the supposition that the presently described liposomal formulation of curcumin inhibits tumor growth by blocking VEGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor endothelium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on inhibiting tumor growth through targeting liposomal formulation of curcumin to tumor vasculatures.

  8. Strange Attractor in Immunology of Tumor Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Voitikova, M

    1997-01-01

    The time delayed cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response on the tumor growth has been developed on the basis of discrete approximation (2-dimensional map). The growth kinetic has been described by logistic law with growth rate being the bifurcation parameter. Increase in the growth rate results in instability of the tumor state and causes period-doubling bifurcations in the immune+tumor system. For larger values of tumor growth rate a strange attractor has been observed. The model proposed is able to describe the metastable-state production when time series data of the immune state and the number of tumor cells are irregular and unpredictable. This metastatic disease may be caused not by exterior (medical) factors, but interior density dependent ones.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Branching Morphogenesis and Vascular Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huaming

    Feedback regulation of cell lineages is known to play an important role in tissue size control, but the effect in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. We first use a non-spatial model to show that a combination of positive and negative feedback on stem and/or progenitor cell self-renewal leads to bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors and ultrasensitivity to external growth cues. Next, a spatiotemporal model is used to demonstrate spatial patterns such as local budding and branching arise in this setting, and are not consequences of Turing-type instabilities. We next extend the model to a three-dimensional hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth to study the effects of angiogenesis, tumor progression and cancer therapies. We account for the crosstalk between the vasculature and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and CSC transdifferentiation into vascular endothelial cells (gECs), as observed experimentally. The vasculature stabilizes tumor invasiveness but considerably enhances growth. A gEC network structure forms spontaneously within the hypoxic core, consistent with experimental findings. The model is then used to study cancer therapeutics. We demonstrate that traditional anti-angiogenic therapies decelerate tumor growth, but make the tumor highly invasive. Chemotherapies help to reduce tumor sizes, but cannot control the invasion. Anti-CSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduce tumor invasiveness. However, gECs inherit mutations present in CSCs and are resistant to traditional therapies. We show that anti-gEC treatments block the support on CSCs by gECs, and reduce both tumor size and invasiveness. Our study suggests that therapies targeting the vasculature, CSCs and gECs, when combined, are highly synergistic and are capable of controlling both tumor size and shape.

  10. Clinical significance of assessing Her2/neu expression in gastric cancer with dual tumor tissue paraffin blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaowen; Wang, Haixing; Zeng, Haiying; Jin, Xuejuan; Sujie, Akesu; Xu, Chen; Liu, Yalan; Huang, Jie; Ji, Yuan; Tan, Yunshan; Liu, Tianshu; Hou, Yingyong; Qin, Jing; Sun, Yihong; Qin, Xinyu

    2015-06-01

    One paraffin block is routinely used for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2/neu) immunohistochemistry (IHC) assessment. Here, we investigated if picking 2 paraffin blocks for Her2/neu evaluation on 1 slide is an economical, efficient, and practical method, which may reduce false negativity of Her2/neu IHC assessment due to intratumoral heterogeneity. A total of 251 gastric cancer (GC) patients were divided into a cohort using 1 tumor tissue paraffin block (single-block group, n = 132) and a cohort using dual tumor tissue paraffin blocks (dual-block group, n = 119) when evaluating Her2/neu expression status by IHC. In dual-block group, we combined the results from 2 different paraffin blocks and used the higher one as the final score. The number of IHC 1+, 2+, and 3+ specimens in the single-block group was 31 (23.5%), 40 (30.3%), and 19 (14.4%), respectively. The combined final IHC score in the dual-block group of 1+, 2+, and 3+ was 26 (21.8%), 34 (28.6%), and 23 (19.3%), respectively. Inconsistent Her2/neu expression between blocks was found in 36 (30.3%) cases in the dual-block group. The pooled data in the single-block group and the dual-block group indicated that, when using dual blocks, the Her2/neu-positive (3+) rate of GC was higher compared to that in the single-block group. Our results implied that using dual paraffin blocks to assess Her2/neu expression of GC may help identify more patients with Her2/neu-positive GC who could benefit from targeted therapy, by reducing false-negative rate of Her2 status assessment. This is an efficient, economical, and practical method for Her2/neu evaluation of GC.

  11. Tumor growth in a defined microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, R H; Sköldenberg, E G; Nilsson, B O

    1997-06-01

    The fate of human tumor cells deposited in rat uteri was investigated by light microscopy of histological sections, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy of microvascular corrosion casts. The human colonic tumor cell line LS 174 T was used as graft since it can be detected by CEA immunohistochemistry, and spayed nude rats (PVG rnu/rnu) were used as hosts, subjected to different hormonal regimens (no exogenous hormones, medroxyprogesterone acetate, 17-beta-estradiol, or the last two regimens in combination). Intrauterine deposition of a suspension of 2 x 10(6) tumor cells resulted in tumor take in 72% (21/29) of the nude rats. Endometrial growth was verified in only three animals (14%, 3/21). Extraendometrial growth, however, was found in all animals with tumor take. These observations suggest that the endometrium is comparatively resistant to growth of xenografted human colonic tumor cells. The tumor microcirculation consisted of new vessels, giving morphological evidence that tumor growth is dependent on angiogenesis and not on invasion of preexisting vessels. PMID:9236867

  12. Quantitation and gompertzian analysis of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    to transform the experimental data into useful growth curves. A transformed Gompertz function is used as the basis for calculating relevant parameters pertaining to tumor growth and response to therapy. The calculations are facilitated by use of a computer program which performs the necessary calculations...

  13. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in solid tumor malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Mette K; Hedegaard, Chris J; Poulsen, Hans S

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is over-expressed, as well as mutated, in many types of cancers. In particular, the EGFR variant type III mutant (EGFRvIII) has attracted much attention as it is frequently and exclusively found on many tumor cells, and hence both EGFR and EGFRvIII have...... to the extracellular part of EGFR, blocking the binding sites for the EGFR ligands, and intracellular tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that block the ATP binding site of the tyrosine kinase domain. Besides an EGFRvIII-targeted vaccine, conjugated anti-EGFR mAbs have been used in different settings to deliver lethal...... been proposed as valid targets in many cancer therapy settings. Different strategies have been developed in order to either inhibit EGFR/EGFRvIII activity or to ablate EGFR/EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells. Drugs that inhibit these receptors include monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind...

  14. Essential operating principles for tumor spheroid growth

    OpenAIRE

    Ropella Glen EP; Engelberg Jesse A; Hunt C Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Our objective was to discover in silico axioms that are plausible representations of the operating principles realized during characteristic growth of EMT6/Ro mouse mammary tumor spheroids in culture. To reach that objective we engineered and iteratively falsified an agent-based analogue of EMT6 spheroid growth. EMT6 spheroids display consistent and predictable growth characteristics, implying that individual cell behaviors are tightly controlled and regulated. An approach...

  15. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25–10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug. PMID:25136960

  16. Amygdalin blocks bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by diminishing cyclin A and cdk2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP. Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug.

  17. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Xinyu [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Lab of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China); Han, Xingpeng [Department of Pathology, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin 300051 (China); Zhang, Fang [Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Enzymology, Yangtze Delta Region Institute of Tsinghua University, Jiaxing 314006, Zhejiang (China); He, Miao [Life Sciences School, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Zhang, Yi [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhi, Xiu-Yi, E-mail: xiuyizhi@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhao, Hong, E-mail: zhaohong9@sina.com [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Lab of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100021 (China)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  18. Stochastic Modelling of Gompertzian Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, S. F. C.; Behera, A.

    2009-08-01

    We study the effect of correlated noise in the Gompertzian tumor growth model for non-zero correlation time. The steady state probability distributions and average population of tumor cells are analyzed within the Fokker-Planck formalism to investigate the importance of additive and multiplicative noise. We find that the correlation strength and correlation time have opposite effects on the steady state probability distributions. It is observed that the non-bistable Gompertzian model, driven by correlated noise exhibits a stochastic resonance and phase transition. This behaviour of the Gompertz model is unaffected with the change of correlation time and occurs as a result of multiplicative noise.

  19. Advances in the Researches on the Blocking Effect of Chinese Drugs on Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Malignant tumors are caused by multiple carcinogenic factors undergoing several stages. The occurrence and development of tumors may be prevented and blocked if some effective interference factors are brought into play.1 At present, there are two main subjects for the researches, that is, blocking the precancerous lesions and blocking the develop-ment of tumors. The former focuses on the removing of carcinogenic factors and on the chemoprophylaxis of cancer, while the latter on the inhibition of cancer cell infiltration and cancerometastasis. These are summarized as follows.

  20. Stochastic model for tumor growth with immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Thomas; Trimper, Steffen

    2009-05-01

    We analyze a stochastic model for tumor cell growth with both multiplicative and additive colored noises as well as nonzero cross correlations in between. Whereas the death rate within the logistic model is altered by a deterministic term characterizing immunization, the birth rate is assumed to be stochastically changed due to biological motivated growth processes leading to a multiplicative internal noise. Moreover, the system is subjected to an external additive noise which mimics the influence of the environment of the tumor. The stationary probability distribution Ps is derived depending on the finite correlation time, the immunization rate, and the strength of the cross correlation. Ps offers a maximum which becomes more pronounced for increasing immunization rate. The mean-first-passage time is also calculated in order to find out under which conditions the tumor can suffer extinction. Its characteristics are again controlled by the degree of immunization and the strength of the cross correlation. The behavior observed can be interpreted in terms of a biological model of tumor evolution.

  1. Essential contribution of tumor-derived perlecan to epidermal tumor growth and angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Multhaupt, Hinke; Chan, En;

    2004-01-01

    antibodies, together with immunoelectron microscopy, showed that perlecan distributed around blood vessels was of both host and tumor cell origin. Tumor-derived perlecan was also distributed throughout the tumor matrix. Blood vessels stained with rat-specific PECAM-1 antibody showed their host origin. RT101...... factor. In vivo, antisense perlecan-transfected cells generated no tumors, whereas untransfected and vector-transfected cells formed tumors with obvious neovascularization, suggesting that tumor perlecan rather than host perlecan controls tumor growth and angiogenesis....

  2. Insulin-responsiveness of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelau, Ernst

    2009-05-01

    In October 2008, the 2nd International Insulin & Cancer Workshop convened roughly 30 researchers from eight countries in Düsseldorf/Germany. At this meeting, which was industry-independent like the preceding one in 2007, the following issues were discussed a) association between certain cancers and endogenous insulin production in humans, b) growth-promoting effects of insulin in animal experiments, c) mitogenic and anti-apoptotic activity of pharmaceutic insulin and insulin analogues in in vitro experiments, d) potential mechanisms of insulin action on cell growth, mediated by IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor signaling, and e) IGF-1 receptor targeting for inhibition of tumor growth. It was concluded that further research is necessary to elucidate the clinical effects of these observations, and their potential for human neoplastic disease and treatment.

  3. Therapeutic tumor-specific cell cycle block induced by methionine starvation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Lishko, V K; Herrera, H; Groce, A; Kubota, T; Hoffman, R M

    1993-12-01

    The ability to induce a specific cell cycle block selectively in the tumor could have many uses in chemotherapy. In the present study we have achieved this goal of inducing a tumor-specific cell cycle block in vivo by depriving Yoshida sarcoma-bearing nude mice of dietary methionine. Further, we demonstrate that methionine depletion also causes the tumor to eventually regress. The antitumor effect of methionine depletion resulted in the extended survival of the tumor-bearing mice. The mice on the methionine-deprived diets maintained their body weight for the time period studied, indicating that tumor regression was not a function of body weight loss. The data reported here support future experiments utilizing methionine depletion as a target for tumor-selective cell cycle-dependent therapy.

  4. Squalamine inhibits angiogenesis and solid tumor growth in vivo and perturbs embryonic vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, A K; Williams, J I; Tyler, B M; Epstein, D S; Sipos, E P; Davis, J D; McLane, M P; Pitchford, S; Cheshire, K; Gannon, F H; Kinney, W A; Chao, T L; Donowitz, M; Laterra, J; Zasloff, M; Brem, H

    1998-07-01

    The novel aminosterol, squalamine, inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in multiple animal models. This effect is mediated, at least in part, by blocking mitogen-induced proliferation and migration of endothelial cells, thus preventing neovascularization of the tumor. Squalamine has no observable effect on unstimulated endothelial cells, is not directly cytotoxic to tumor cells, does not alter mitogen production by tumor cells, and has no obvious effects on the growth of newborn vertebrates. Squalamine was also found to have remarkable effects on the primitive vascular bed of the chick chorioallantoic membrane, which has striking similarities to tumor capillaries. Squalamine may thus be well suited for treatment of tumors and other diseases characterized by neovascularization in humans. PMID:9661892

  5. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Wen-guo; Lu, Xin-an; Shang, Bo-yang; Fu, Yan; ZHANG, SHENG-HUA; Zhou, Daifu; Liang LI; Li, Yi; Luo, Yongzhang; ZHEN, YONG-SU

    2013-01-01

    Background Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. The...

  6. Numerical simulation of avascular tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slezak, D Fernandez; Suarez, C; Soba, A; Risk, M; Marshall, G [Laboratorio de Sistemas Complejos, Departamento de Computacion, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires (C1428EGA) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    A mathematical and numerical model for the description of different aspects of microtumor development is presented. The model is based in the solution of a system of partial differential equations describing an avascular tumor growth. A detailed second-order numeric algorithm for solving this system is described. Parameters are swiped to cover a range of feasible physiological values. While previous published works used a single set of parameters values, here we present a wide range of feasible solutions for tumor growth, covering a more realistic scenario. The model is validated by experimental data obtained with a multicellular spheroid model, a specific type of in vitro biological model which is at present considered to be optimum for the study of complex aspects of avascular microtumor physiology. Moreover, a dynamical analysis and local behaviour of the system is presented, showing chaotic situations for particular sets of parameter values at some fixed points. Further biological experiments related to those specific points may give potentially interesting results.

  7. Tumor-host interactions in the gallbladder suppress distal angiogenesis and tumor growth: involvement of transforming growth factor beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohongi, T; Fukumura, D; Boucher, Y; Yun, C O; Soff, G A; Compton, C; Todoroki, T; Jain, R K

    1999-10-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors produced by a primary tumor can create a systemic anti-angiogenic environment and maintain metastatic tumor cells in a state of dormancy. We show here that the gallbladder microenvironment modulates the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, a multifunctional cytokine that functions as an endogenous anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor factor in a cranial window preparation. We found that a wide variety of human gallbladder tumors express TGF-beta1 irrespective of histologic type. We implanted a gel impregnated with basic fibroblast growth factor or Mz-ChA-2 tumor in the cranial windows of mice without tumors or mice with subcutaneous or gallbladder tumors to study angiogenesis and tumor growth at a secondary site. Angiogenesis, leukocyte-endothelial interaction in vessels and tumor growth in the cranial window were substantially inhibited in mice with gallbladder tumors. The concentration of TGF-beta1 in the plasma of mice with gallbladder tumors was 300% higher than that in the plasma of mice without tumors or with subcutaneous tumors. In contrast, there was no difference in the plasma levels of other anti- and pro-angiogenic factors. Treatment with neutralizing antibody against TGF-beta1 reversed both angiogenesis suppression and inhibition of leukocyte rolling induced by gallbladder tumors. TGF-beta1 also inhibited Mz-ChA-2 tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the production of anti-angiogenesis/proliferation factors is regulated by tumor-host interactions. PMID:10502827

  8. Anti-tumor effect of SLPI on mammary but not colon tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiano, Nicolás O; Costa, María J; Reiteri, R Macarena; Payés, Cristian; Guerrieri, Diego; Tateosian, Nancy L; Sánchez, Mercedes L; Maffia, Paulo C; Diament, Miriam; Karas, Romina; Orqueda, Andrés; Rizzo, Miguel; Alaniz, Laura; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Klein, Slobodanka; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Chuluyan, H Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a serine protease inhibitor that was related to cancer development and metastasis dissemination on several types of tumors. However, it is not known the effect of SLPI on mammary and colon tumors. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of SLPI on mammary and colon tumor growth. The effect of SLPI was tested on in vitro cell apoptosis and in vivo tumor growth experiments. SLPI over-expressing human and murine mammary and colon tumor cells were generated by gene transfection. The administration of murine mammary tumor cells over-expressing high levels of SLPI did not develop tumors in mice. On the contrary, the administration of murine colon tumor cells over-expressing SLPI, developed faster tumors than control cells. Intratumoral, but not intraperitoneal administration of SLPI, delayed the growth of tumors and increased the survival of mammary but not colon tumor bearing mice. In vitro culture of mammary tumor cell lines treated with SLPI, and SLPI producer clones were more prone to apoptosis than control cells, mainly under serum deprivation culture conditions. Herein we demonstrated that SLPI induces the apoptosis of mammary tumor cells in vitro and decreases the mammary but not colon tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, SLPI may be a new potential therapeutic tool for certain tumors, such as mammary tumors. PMID:22767220

  9. Fractal Dimension and Universality in Avascular Tumor Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, Fabiano L; Mata, Angélica S

    2016-01-01

    The comprehension of tumor growth is a intriguing subject for scientists. New researches has been constantly required to better understand the complexity of this phenomenon. In this paper, we pursue a physical description that account for some experimental facts involving avascular tumor growth. We have proposed an explanation of some phenomenological (macroscopic) aspects of tumor, as the spatial form and the way it growths, from a individual-level (microscopic) formulation. The model proposed here is based on a simple principle: competitive interaction between the cells dependent on their mutual distances. As a result, we reproduce many empirical evidences observed in real tumors, as exponential growth in their early stages followed by a power law growth. The model also reproduces the fractal space distribution of tumor cells and the universal behavior presented in animals and tumor growth, conform reported by West, Guiot {\\it et. al.}\\cite{West2001,Guiot2003}. The results suggest that the universal similar...

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor blocking agents in retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Canning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarises the current status of the use of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF blocking agents in retinal vein occlusion. There have been no randomised controlled trials comparing this treatment with the current standard treatment (largely laser so the lower grade evidence of single treatment case series and anecdotal reports are discussed. VEGF blockers are good at reducing macular oedema in the short term, do improve visual acuity in many cases, and do not seem to adversely affect the long term revascularisation that is necessary to overcome the vein occlusion. VEGF blocking agents are not used in isolation in this condition - they will remain an adjunct to systemic and other local treatments. The literature was reviewed in online searches of Embase and Ovid and the papers quoted are a representative sample of a larger body of publications.

  11. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  12. Insights from a Novel Tumor Model: Indications for a Quantitative Link between Tumor Growth and Invasion

    CERN Document Server

    Deisboeck, T S; Guiot, C; Degiorgis, P G; Delsanto, P P; Deisboeck, Thomas S.; Mansury, Yuri; Guiot, Caterina; Degiorgis, Piero Giorgio; Delsanto, Pier Paolo

    2003-01-01

    Using our previously developed model we demonstrate here, that (1) solid tumor growth and cell invasion are linked, not only qualitatively but also quantitatively, that (2) the onset of invasion marks the time point when the tumor cell density exceeds a compaction maximum, and that (3) tumor cell invasion, reduction of mechanical confinement and angiogenesis can act synergistically to increase the actual tumor mass towards the level predicted by West et al. universal growth curve.

  13. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  14. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  15. Clinical analysis of abdominal aorta block in operation of gynecologic tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Yu-lan; TANG Chun-sheng; WEN Ze-qing; YIN Fu-bo; LIU Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the clinical effects of the abdominal aorta block in controlling haemorrhage during operations of the gynecologic tumor. Methods: From July 1965 to January 2005, we collected patients (n= 49) of gynecologic tumor complicated with haemorrhage during operations, who were divided into 3 groups: preventive blocking group (PG, n= 12), treatment blocking group (TG, n= 20) used abdominal aorta block technique with sterilized cotton band and silica gel tube, and control group (CG, n=17) which were used the regular haemostatic methods, such as ligature, suture and ribbon gauze packing.During operations, the vital signs including the amount of bleeding and transfusion were measured. Results: Compared with the CG, the amount of bleeding and transfusion in the PG and TG decreased significantly (P<0.01). After using the technique, 32 cases of haemorrhage were controlled completely. All patients finished operation smoothly in the end and the vital signs were stable. The vision field of operation was clear and the operating time was shortened dramatically (3.0 h vs 5.7 h and 3.8 h vs 5.7 h, P<0.01). No complications caused by the block occurred in the post-operation. Conclusion: Lower abdominal aorta block is safe and effective in controlling haemorrhage during operations of the gynecologic tumor.

  16. P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion promotes tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cuiling; Wei, Bo; Zhou, Weijie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Li, Jialin; Ye, Jie; Li, Jiangchao; Zhang, Qianqian; Lan, Tian; He, Xiaodong; Cao, Liu; Zhou, Jia; Geng, Jianguo; Wang, Lijing

    2015-03-30

    Blood platelets foster carcinogenesis. We found that platelets are accumulated in human tumors. P-selectin deficiency and soluble P-selectin abolish platelet deposition within tumors, decreasing secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis, thereby suppressing tumor growth. Binding of the P-selectin cytoplasmic tail to talin1 triggers the talin1 N-terminal head to interact with the β3 cytoplasmic tail. This activates αIIbβ3 and recruits platelets into tumors. Platelet infiltration into solid tumors occurs through a P-selectin-dependent mechanism.

  17. Squalamine and cisplatin block angiogenesis and growth of human ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Williams, Jon I; Pietras, Richard J

    2002-04-25

    Angiogenesis is important for growth and progression of ovarian cancers. Squalamine is a natural antiangiogenic sterol, and its potential role in treatment of ovarian cancers with or without standard cisplatin chemotherapy was assessed. Since HER-2 gene overexpression is associated with cisplatin resistance in vitro and promotion of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, the response of ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 gene overexpression to squalamine and cisplatin was evaluated both in tumor xenograft models and in tissue culture. Ovarian cancer cells with or without HER-2 overexpression were grown as subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. Animals were treated by intraperitoneal injection with control vehicle, cisplatin, squalamine or cisplatin combined with squalamine. At the end of the experiment, tumors were assessed for tumor growth inhibition and for changes in microvessel density and apoptosis. Additional in vitro studies evaluated effects of squalamine on tumor and endothelial cell growth and on signaling pathways in human endothelial cells. Profound growth inhibition was elicited by squalamine alone and by combined treatment with squalamine and cisplatin for both parental and HER-2-overexpressing ovarian tumor xenografts. Immunohistochemical evaluation of tumors revealed decreased microvessel density and increased apoptosis. Although HER-2-overexpressing tumors had more angiogenic and less apoptotic activity than parental cancers, growth of both tumor types was similarly suppressed by treatment with squalamine combined with cisplatin. In in vitro studies, we found that squalamine does not directly affect proliferation of ovarian cells. However, squalamine significantly blocked VEGF-induced activation of MAP kinase and cell proliferation in human vascular endothelial cells. The results suggest that squalamine is anti-angiogenic for ovarian cancer xenografts and appears to enhance cytotoxic effects of cisplatin chemotherapy independent of HER-2 tumor status

  18. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Nuccitelli

    Full Text Available We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF. We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth.

  19. The autophagic tumor stroma model of cancer or "battery-operated tumor growth": A simple solution to the autophagy paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pavlides, Stephanos; Chiavarina, Barbara; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Casey, Trimmer; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Migneco, Gemma; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka; Balliet, Renee; Mercier, Isabelle; Wang, Chengwang; Flomenberg, Neal; Howell, Anthony; Lin, Zhao; Caro, Jaime; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-11-01

    The role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is controversial. Both autophagy inhibitors (chloroquine) and autophagy promoters (rapamycin) block tumorigenesis by unknown mechanism(s). This is called the "Autophagy Paradox". We have recently reported a simple solution to this paradox. We demonstrated that epithelial cancer cells use oxidative stress to induce autophagy in the tumor microenvironment. As a consequence, the autophagic tumor stroma generates recycled nutrients that can then be used as chemical building blocks by anabolic epithelial cancer cells. This model results in a net energy transfer from the tumor stroma to epithelial cancer cells (an energy imbalance), thereby promoting tumor growth. This net energy transfer is both unilateral and vectorial, from the tumor stroma to the epithelial cancer cells, representing a true host-parasite relationship. We have termed this new paradigm "The Autophagic Tumor Stroma Model of Cancer Cell Metabolism" or "Battery-Operated Tumor Growth". In this sense, autophagy in the tumor stroma serves as a "battery" to fuel tumor growth, progression and metastasis, independently of angiogenesis. Using this model, the systemic induction of autophagy will prevent epithelial cancer cells from using recycled nutrients, while the systemic inhibiton of autophagy will prevent stromal cells from producing recycled nutrients-both effectively "starving" cancer cells. We discuss the idea that tumor cells could become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy, by the upregulation of natural endogenous autophagy inhibitors in cancer cells. Alternatively, tumor cells could also become resistant to the systemic induction of autophagy, by the genetic silencing/deletion of pro-autophagic molecules, such as Beclin1. If autophagy resistance develops in cancer cells, then the systemic inhibition of autophagy would provide a therapeutic solution to this type of drug resistance, as it would still target autophagy in the tumor stroma. As such, an

  20. Cellular Automaton Model for Immunology of Tumor Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Voitikova, M

    1998-01-01

    The stochastic discrete space-time model of an immune response on tumor spreading in a two-dimensional square lattice has been developed. The immunity-tumor interactions are described at the cellular level and then transferred into the setting of cellular automata (CA). The multistate CA model for system, in which all statesoflattice sites, composing of both immune and tumor cells populations, are the functions of the states of the 12 nearest neighbors. The CA model incorporates the essential featuresof the immunity-tumor system. Three regimes of neoplastic evolution including metastatic tumor growth and screen effect by inactive immune cells surrounding a tumor have been predicted.

  1. Inflamed tumor-associated adipose tissue is a depot for macrophages that stimulate tumor growth and angiogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Marek; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Wiig, Helge; Melero-Martin, Juan M.; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Klagsbrun, Michael; Dudley, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-associated stroma is typified by a persistent, non-resolving inflammatory response that enhances tumor angiogenesis, growth and metastasis. Inflammation in tumors is instigated by heterotypic interactions between malignant tumor cells, vascular endothelium, fibroblasts, immune and inflammatory

  2. Effect of blocking the transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway on tumor-specific cytotoxic T lym-phocytes%靶向阻断转化生长因子-β信号通路对肿瘤特异性细胞毒性T淋巴细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田丰; 周凯; 车晓玲; 傅点; 程文; 周文泉; 张征宇; 秦卫军; 王龙信

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cytotoxic T lymphocytes ( CTLs) are final effect tumor-killer cells in the body and their immune func-tion can be suppressed by the transforming growth factor-beta ( TGF-β) secreted from the tumor .We observed the effect of blocking the TGF-βsignaling pathway on tumor-specific CTLs. Methods Tumor lysate-pulsed CTLs (TP-CTLs) were activated to be sensitive to mouse renal cancer cells with dendritic cells and transfected with a retrovirus containing dominant -negative TGF-βtype Ⅱ receptor ( TβRⅡDN) for isolation of TGF-β-insensitive tumor-specific TβRⅡDN-CTLs.Western blot was used to measure the level of phos-phorylated Smad-2 and evaluate the inhibitory effect of TGF-βon the proliferation of CTLs .The cytotoxic effect of TGF-βwas detected by 51 Cr releasing test , and the levels of serum IL-2 and INF-γin the mouse model determined by ELISA . Results TGF-βshowed a significantly lower rate of inhibition on the proliferation of the TβRⅡDN-CTLs than on that of the TP-CTLs (2.08%vs 65.96%, P [850.34 ±27.22]pg/mL, P Blocking the TGF-βsignaling pathway of tumor-specific CTLs can overcome the immunosuppressive effect of tumor cells and improve the cytotoxic efficiency of CTLs .%目的细胞毒性T淋巴细胞( cytotoxic T lymphocyte , CTL)是体内杀伤肿瘤的最终效应细胞,但其免疫功能会被肿瘤分泌的转化生长因子β( transforming growth factor β, TGF-β)所抑制,文中观察靶向阻断TGF-β信号通路对肿瘤特异性CTL的影响。方法利用包涵修饰过的TGF-βⅡ型受体( transforming growth factor βreceptor type Ⅱ, TβRⅡ)质粒的逆转录病毒载体,转染经DC激活的小鼠肾癌Renca细胞敏感的CTL(tumor pulsed CTL, TP-CTL),获得对TGF-β不敏感而肿瘤特异性的CTL( TβRⅡDN-CTL),Western blot检测Smad-2的磷酸化情况,观察TGF-β对CTL体外增殖抑制情况,将TβRⅡDN-CTL与未阻断TGF-β信号通路TP-CTL分别与相关及无关

  3. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  4. The role of tumor cell-derived connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in pancreatic tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennewith, Kevin L; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M;

    2009-01-01

    RNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted s.c. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by positron emission tomography imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia...

  5. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Yu [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakahama, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nakacell@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsuaki [Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  6. Tumor-Derived CXCL1 Promotes Lung Cancer Growth via Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils have a traditional role in inflammatory process and act as the first line of defense against infections. Although their contribution to tumorigenesis and progression is still controversial, accumulating evidence recently has demonstrated that tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs play a key role in multiple aspects of cancer biology. Here, we detected that chemokine CXCL1 was dramatically elevated in serum from 3LL tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, 3LL cells constitutively expressed and secreted higher level of CXCL1. Furthermore, knocking down CXCL1 expression in 3LL cells significantly hindered tumor growth by inhibiting recruitment of neutrophils from peripheral blood into tumor tissues. Additionally, tumor-infiltrated neutrophils expressed higher levels of MPO and Fas/FasL, which may be involved in TAN-mediated inhibition of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results demonstrate that tumor-derived CXCL1 contributes to TANs infiltration in lung cancer which promotes tumor growth.

  7. Diagnostic Value of Processing Cytologic Aspirates of Renal Tumors in Agar Cell (Tissue) Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedts, F.; Schrik, M.; Horn, T.;

    2010-01-01

    cells to formulate a diagnosis; the conventional cytologic sample in this case contained enough diagnostic cells. In all cases the AM diagnosis was confirmed in the definitive surgical specimen. Conclusion Our AM technique for processing fine needle aspirates from renal tumors results in a major......-initiated, and in 14% too few diagnostic cells were present in the conventional smears for cytologic diagnosis. It was, however, possible to correctly diagnose histologic sections from 97% of AM tissue blocks. In 11 cases this was facilitated with immunochemistry. In only 1 case did the AM tissue block contain too few...

  8. The transcription factor Ets21C drives tumor growth by cooperating with AP-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toggweiler, Janine; Willecke, Maria; Basler, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is driven by genetic alterations that perturb the signaling networks regulating proliferation or cell death. In order to block tumor growth, one has to precisely know how these signaling pathways function and interplay. Here, we identified the transcription factor Ets21C as a pivotal regulator of tumor growth and propose a new model of how Ets21C could affect this process. We demonstrate that a depletion of Ets21C strongly suppressed tumor growth while ectopic expression of Ets21C further increased tumor size. We confirm that Ets21C expression is regulated by the JNK pathway and show that Ets21C acts via a positive feed-forward mechanism to induce a specific set of target genes that is critical for tumor growth. These genes are known downstream targets of the JNK pathway and we demonstrate that their expression not only depends on the transcription factor AP-1, but also on Ets21C suggesting a cooperative transcriptional activation mechanism. Taken together we show that Ets21C is a crucial player in regulating the transcriptional program of the JNK pathway and enhances our understanding of the mechanisms that govern neoplastic growth. PMID:27713480

  9. Is grid therapy useful for all tumors and every grid block design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Somayeh; Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Longo, Francesco; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Wright, Stacey; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Grid therapy is a treatment technique that has been introduced for patients with advanced bulky tumors. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the radia-tion sensitivity of the tumors and the design of the grid blocks on the clinical response of grid therapy. The Monte Carlo simulation technique is used to determine the dose distribution through a grid block that was used for a Varian 2100C linear accelerator. From the simulated dose profiles, the therapeutic ratio (TR) and the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for different types of tumors with respect to their radiation sensitivities were calculated. These calculations were performed using the linear quadratic (LQ) and the Hug-Kellerer (H-K) models. The results of these calculations have been validated by comparison with the clinical responses of 232 patients from different publications, who were treated with grid therapy. These published results for different tumor types were used to examine the correlation between tumor radiosensitivity and the clinical response of grid therapy. Moreover, the influence of grid design on their clinical responses was investigated by using Monte Carlo simulations of grid blocks with different hole diameters and different center-to-center spacing. The results of the theoretical models and clinical data indicated higher clinical responses for the grid therapy on the patients with more radioresistant tumors. The differences between TR values for radioresistant cells and radiosensitive cells at 20 Gy and 10 Gy doses were up to 50% and 30%, respectively. Interestingly, the differences between the TR values with LQ model and H-K model were less than 4%. Moreover, the results from the Monte Carlo studies showed that grid blocks with a hole diameters of 1.0 cm and 1.25 cm may lead to about 19% higher TR relative to the grids with hole diameters smaller than 1.0 cm or larger than 1.25 cm (with 95% confidence interval). In sum-mary, the results of this study indicate that

  10. Extratumoral Macrophages Promote Tumor and Vascular Growth in an Orthotopic Rat Prostate Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Halin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages are involved in angiogenesis and tumor progression, but their role and specific site of action in prostate cancer remain unknown. To explore this, Dunning R-3327 AT-1 rat prostate tumor cells were injected into the prostate of syngenic and immunocompetent Copenhagen rats and analyzed at different time points for vascular proliferation and macrophage density. Endothelial proliferation increased with tumor size both in the tumor and importantly also in the extratumoral normal prostate tissue. Macrophages accumulated in the tumor and in the extratumoral normal prostate tissue and were most abundant in the invasive zone. Moreover, only extratumoral macrophages showed strong positive associations with tumor size and extratumoral vascular proliferation. Treatment with clodronate-encapsulated liposomes reduced the monocyte/macrophage infiltration and resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. This was accompanied by a suppressed proliferation in microvessels and in the extratumoral prostate tissue also in arterioles and venules. The AT-1 tumors produced, as examined by RT2 Profiler PCR arrays, numerous factors promoting monocyte recruitment, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. Several, namely, chemokine (C-C ligand 2, fibroblast growth factor 2, matrix metalloproteinase 9, interleukin 1β, interferon γ, and transforming growth factor β, were highly upregulated by the tumor in vivo compared with tumor cells in vitro, suggesting macrophages as a plausible source. In conclusion, we here show the importance of extratumoral monocytes/macrophages for prostate tumor growth, angiogenesis, and extratumoral arteriogenesis. Our findings identify tumor-associated macrophages and several chemotactic and angiogenic factors as potential targets for prostate cancer therapy.

  11. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm3), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%; p < 0.001). Left

  12. Phase transition in tumor growth: I avascular development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Rebelo, I.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular tumor growth based on a simple chemical network. This model presents a logistic behavior and shows a “second order” phase transition. We prove the fractal origin of the empirical logistics and Gompertz constant and its relation to mitosis and apoptosis rate. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed demonstrates the entropy production rate as a Lyapunov function during avascular tumor growth.

  13. Bioavailable copper modulates oxidative phosphorylation and growth of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Seiko; Andreux, Pénélope; Poitry-Yamate, Carole; Auwerx, Johan; Hanahan, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Copper is an essential trace element, the imbalances of which are associated with various pathological conditions, including cancer, albeit via largely undefined molecular and cellular mechanisms. Here we provide evidence that levels of bioavailable copper modulate tumor growth. Chronic exposure to elevated levels of copper in drinking water, corresponding to the maximum allowed in public water supplies, stimulated proliferation of cancer cells and de novo pancreatic tumor growth in mice. Conversely, reducing systemic copper levels with a chelating drug, clinically used to treat copper disorders, impaired both. Under such copper limitation, tumors displayed decreased activity of the copper-binding mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase and reduced ATP levels, despite enhanced glycolysis, which was not accompanied by increased invasiveness of tumors. The antiproliferative effect of copper chelation was enhanced when combined with inhibitors of glycolysis. Interestingly, larger tumors contained less copper than smaller tumors and exhibited comparatively lower activity of cytochrome c oxidase and increased glucose uptake. These results establish copper as a tumor promoter and reveal that varying levels of copper serves to regulate oxidative phosphorylation in rapidly proliferating cancer cells inside solid tumors. Thus, activation of glycolysis in tumors may in part reflect insufficient copper bioavailability in the tumor microenvironment.

  14. Mirtazapine inhibits tumor growth via immune response and serotonergic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Kai Fang

    Full Text Available To study the tumor inhibition effect of mirtazapine, a drug for patients with depression, CT26/luc colon carcinoma-bearing animal model was used. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into six groups: two groups without tumors, i.e. wild-type (no drug and drug (mirtazapine, and four groups with tumors, i.e. never (no drug, always (pre-drug, i.e. drug treatment before tumor inoculation and throughout the experiment, concurrent (simultaneously tumor inoculation and drug treatment throughout the experiment, and after (post-drug, i.e. drug treatment after tumor inoculation and throughout the experiment. The "psychiatric" conditions of mice were observed from the immobility time with tail suspension and spontaneous motor activity post tumor inoculation. Significant increase of serum interleukin-12 (sIL-12 and the inhibition of tumor growth were found in mirtazapine-treated mice (always, concurrent, and after as compared with that of never. In addition, interferon-γ level and immunocompetent infiltrating CD4+/CD8+ T cells in the tumors of mirtazapine-treated, tumor-bearing mice were significantly higher as compared with that of never. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α expressions, on the contrary, are decreased in the mirtazapine-treated, tumor-bearing mice as compared with that of never. Ex vivo autoradiography with [(123I]ADAM, a radiopharmaceutical for serotonin transporter, also confirms the similar results. Notably, better survival rates and intervals were also found in mirtazapine-treated mice. These findings, however, were not observed in the immunodeficient mice. Our results suggest that tumor growth inhibition by mirtazapine in CT26/luc colon carcinoma-bearing mice may be due to the alteration of the tumor microenvironment, which involves the activation of the immune response and the recovery of serotonin level.

  15. CEP-701 and CEP-751 inhibit constitutively activated RET tyrosine kinase activity and block medullary thyroid carcinoma cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Christopher J; Park, Jong-In; Rosen, Mark; Dionne, Craig; Ruggeri, Bruce; Jones-Bolin, Susan; Denmeade, Samuel R; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2003-09-01

    All of the cases of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) express the RET receptor tyrosine kinase. In essentially all of the hereditary cases and approximately 40% of the sporadic cases of MTC, the RET kinase is constitutively activated by mutation. This suggests that RET may be an effective therapeutic target for treatment of MTC. We show that the indolocarbazole derivatives, CEP-701 and CEP-751, inhibit RET in MTC cells. These compounds effectively inhibit RET phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations <100 nM in 0.5% serum and at somewhat higher concentrations in the presence of 16% serum. They also blocked the growth of these MTC cells in culture. CEP-751 and its prodrug, CEP-2563, also inhibited tumor growth in MTC cell xenografts. These results show that inhibiting RET can block the growth of MTC cells and may have a therapeutic benefit in MTC.

  16. Tie2-dependent deletion of α6 integrin subunit in mice reduces tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvard, Claire; Segaoula, Zacharie; De Arcangelis, Adèle; Galy-Fauroux, Isabelle; Mauge, Laetitia; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth; Helley, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    The α6 integrin subunit (α6) has been implicated in cancer cell migration and in the progression of several malignancies, but its role in tumor angiogenesis is unclear. In mice, anti-α6 blocking antibodies reduce tumor angiogenesis, whereas Tie1-dependent α6 gene deletion enhances neovessel formation in melanoma and lung carcinoma. To clarify the discrepancy in these results we used the cre-lox system to generate a mouse line, α6fl/fl‑Tie2Cre(+), with α6 gene deletion specifically in Tie2-lineage cells: endothelial cells, pericytes, subsets of hematopoietic stem cells, and Tie2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEMs), known for their proangiogenic properties. Loss of α6 expression in α6fl/fl‑Tie2Cre(+) mice reduced tumor growth in a murine B16F10 melanoma model. Immunohistological analysis of the tumors showed that Tie2-dependent α6 gene deletion was associated with reduced tumor vascularization and with reduced infiltration of proangiogenic Tie2-expressing macrophages. These findings demonstrate that α6 integrin subunit plays a major role in tumor angiogenesis and TEM infiltration. Targeting α6 could be used as a strategy to reduce tumor growth. PMID:25176420

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  18. CANSTATIN, A ENDOGENOUS INHIBITOR OF ANGIOGENESIS AND TUMOR GROWTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏影; 朱建思

    2004-01-01

    Canstatin is a novel inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth, derived from the C-terminal globular non-collageneous (NCl) domain of the (2 chain of type IV collagen. It inhibits endothelial cell proliferation and migration in a dose-dependent manner, and induces endothelial cell apoptosis. In vivo experiments show that canstatin significantly inhibits solid tumor growth. The canstatin mediated inhibition of tumor is related to apoptosis. Canstatin- induced apoptosis is associated with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt inhibition and is dependend upon signaling events transduced trough membrane death receptor.

  19. SHAPE PARAMETERS USED IN GROWTH ESTIMATION OF TUMORS USING MAMMOGRAPHY

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    SONALI BHADORIA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of tumor size is very important input for the doctors in deciding the stage of the cancer and surgical approach. Various parameters gives different information about the tumor. This affects treatment decisions, and hence plays a significant role. This paper proposes the effective methodology for analysis of shape and size ofthe tumors present in the breast using mammograms. It gives detail study of each tumor present in the mammogram and predicts the growth rate. It is a powerful tools to assist the doctors in the treatment related to breast cancer.

  20. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  1. Hypoxia promotes tumor growth in linking angiogenesis to immune escape

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    Salem eCHOUAIB

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the impressive progress over the past decade, in the field of tumor immunology, such as the identification of tumor antigens and antigenic peptides as potential targets, there are still many obstacles in eliciting an effective immune response to eradicate cancer. It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in the control of immune protection and contains many overlapping mechanisms to evade antigen specific immunotherapy. Obviously, tumors have evolved to utilize hypoxic stress to their own advantage by activating key biochemical and cellular pathways that are important in progression, survival and metastasis. Among the hypoxia-induced genes, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF play a determinant role in promoting tumor cell growth and survival. In this regard, hypoxia is emerging as an attractive target for cancer therapy. How the microenvironmental hypoxia poses both obstacles and opportunities for new therapeutic immune interventions will be discussed.

  2. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor C increases growth and alters the metastatic pattern of orthotopic PC-3 prostate tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Väänänen H Kalervo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant sites but the roles of lymphatic and hematogenous pathways in metastasis are not fully understood. Methods We studied the roles of VEGF-C and VEGFR3 in prostate cancer metastasis by blocking VEGFR3 using intravenous adenovirus-delivered VEGFR3-Ig fusion protein (VEGFR3-Ig and by ectopic expression of VEGF-C in PC-3 prostate tumors in nude mice. Results VEGFR3-Ig decreased the density of lymphatic capillaries in orthotopic PC-3 tumors (p p p p Conclusion The data suggest that even though VEGF-C/VEGFR3 pathway is primarily required for lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, an increased level of VEGF-C can also stimulate angiogenesis, which is associated with growth of orthotopic prostate tumors and a switch from a primary pattern of lymph node metastasis to an increased proportion of metastases at distant sites.

  3. Near-criticality underlies the behavior of early tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Guillaume; Cluzel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The controlling factors that underlie the growth of tumors have often been hard to identify because of the presence in this system of a large number of intracellular biochemical parameters. Here, we propose a simplifying framework to identify the key physical parameters that govern the early growth of tumors. We model growth by means of branching processes where cells of different types can divide and differentiate. First, using this process that has only one controlling parameter, we study a one cell type model and compute the probability for tumor survival and the time of tumor extinction. Second, we show that when cell death and cell division are perfectly balanced, stochastic effects dominate the growth dynamics and the system exhibits a near-critical behavior that resembles a second-order phase transition. We show, in this near-critical regime, that the time interval before tumor extinction is power-law distributed. Finally, we apply this branching formalism to infer, from experimental growth data, the number of different cell types present in the observed tumor. PMID:27043180

  4. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciumè, G.; Shelton, S.; Gray, W. G.; Miller, C. T.; Hussain, F.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behavior of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory. A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TCs), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HCs); and an interstitial fluid for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a finite element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTSs) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behavior: initially, the rapidly growing TCs tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable TCs whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case—mostly due to the relative adhesion of the TCs and HCs to the ECM, and the less favorable transport of nutrients. In particular, for HCs adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced as the malignant mass grows, whereas TC

  5. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

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    J. Brian Morgan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula. Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM. Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase. Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF in tumor cells.

  6. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

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    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  7. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  8. Heparanase 2 Attenuates Head and Neck Tumor Vascularity and Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross-Cohen, Miriam; Feld, Sari; Doweck, Ilana; Neufeld, Gera; Hasson, Peleg; Arvatz, Gil; Barash, Uri; Naroditsky, Inna; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2016-05-01

    The endoglycosidase heparanase specifically cleaves the heparan sulfate (HS) side chains on proteoglycans, an activity that has been implicated strongly in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Heparanase-2 (Hpa2) is a close homolog of heparanase that lacks intrinsic HS-degrading activity but retains the capacity to bind HS with high affinity. In head and neck cancer patients, Hpa2 expression was markedly elevated, correlating with prolonged time to disease recurrence and inversely correlating with tumor cell dissemination to regional lymph nodes, suggesting that Hpa2 functions as a tumor suppressor. The molecular mechanism associated with favorable prognosis following Hpa2 induction is unclear. Here we provide evidence that Hpa2 overexpression in head and neck cancer cells markedly reduces tumor growth. Restrained tumor growth was associated with a prominent decrease in tumor vascularity (blood and lymph vessels), likely due to reduced Id1 expression, a transcription factor highly implicated in VEGF-A and VEGF-C gene regulation. We also noted that tumors produced by Hpa2-overexpressing cells are abundantly decorated with stromal cells and collagen deposition, correlating with a marked increase in lysyl oxidase expression. Notably, heparanase enzymatic activity was unimpaired in cells overexpressing Hpa2, suggesting that reduced tumor growth is not caused by heparanase regulation. Moreover, growth of tumor xenografts by Hpa2-overexpressing cells was unaffected by administration of a mAb that targets the heparin-binding domain of Hpa2, implying that Hpa2 function does not rely on heparanase or heparan sulfate. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2791-801. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013193

  9. Multiscale models for the growth of avascular tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, M. L.; Ferreira, S. C.; Vilela, M. J.

    2007-06-01

    In the past 30 years we have witnessed an extraordinary progress on the research in the molecular biology of cancer, but its medical treatment, widely based on empirically established protocols, still has many limitations. One of the reasons for that is the limited quantitative understanding of the dynamics of tumor growth and drug response in the organism. In this review we shall discuss in general terms the use of mathematical modeling and computer simulations related to cancer growth and its applications to improve tumor therapy. Particular emphasis is devoted to multiscale models which permit integration of the rapidly expanding knowledge concerning the molecular basis of cancer and the complex, nonlinear interactions among tumor cells and their microenvironment that will determine the neoplastic growth at the tissue level.

  10. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and Tumor Growth: Focus on Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise a heterogeneous population that resides within the tumor microenvironment. They actively participate in tumor growth and metastasis by production of cytokines and chemokines, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors, creating a more supportive microenvironment. The aim of the current review is to summarize the origin and characteristics of CAFs, and to describe the role of CAFs in tumor progression and metastasis. Furthermore, we focus on the presence of CAFs in hypoxic conditions in relation to multiple myeloma disease

  11. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts and Tumor Growth: Focus on Multiple Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Veirman, Kim, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Rao, Luigia [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Valckenborgh, Els [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Van Riet, Ivan [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Stem Cell Laboratory, Division of Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Brussels 1090 (Belgium); Frassanito, Maria Antonia [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of General Pathology, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Di Marzo, Lucia; Vacca, Angelo [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine, University of Bari Medical School, Bari I-70124 (Italy); Vanderkerken, Karin, E-mail: kdeveirm@vub.ac.be [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Myeloma Center Brussels, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels 1090 (Belgium)

    2014-06-27

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) comprise a heterogeneous population that resides within the tumor microenvironment. They actively participate in tumor growth and metastasis by production of cytokines and chemokines, and the release of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors, creating a more supportive microenvironment. The aim of the current review is to summarize the origin and characteristics of CAFs, and to describe the role of CAFs in tumor progression and metastasis. Furthermore, we focus on the presence of CAFs in hypoxic conditions in relation to multiple myeloma disease.

  12. Histological study on side effects and tumor targeting of a block copolymer micelle on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Takanori; Honda, Takashi; Nishihara, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Yokoyama, Masayuki

    2009-06-19

    Histological examinations were performed with polymeric micelle-injected rats for evaluations of possible toxicities of polymeric micelle carriers. Weight of major organs as well as body weight of rats was measured after multiple intravenous injections of polymeric micelles forming from poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(aspartate) block copolymer. No pathological toxic side effects were observed at two different doses, followed only by activation of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) in the spleen, liver, lung, bone marrow, and lymph node. This finding confirms the absence of--or the very low level of--in vivo toxicity of the polymeric micelle carriers that were reported in previous animal experiments and clinical results. Then, immunohistochemical analyses with a biotinylated polymeric micelle confirmed specific accumulation of the micelle in the MPS. The immunohistochemical analyses also revealed, first, very rapid and specific accumulation of the micelle in the vasculatures of tumor capsule of rat ascites hepatoma AH109A, and second, the micelle's scanty infiltration into tumor parenchyma. This finding suggests a unique tumor-accumulation mechanism that is very different from simple EPR effect-based tumor targeting.

  13. Inhibition of IL-17A suppresses enhanced-tumor growth in low dose pre-irradiated tumor beds.

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    Eun-Jung Lee

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation induces modification of the tumor microenvironment such as tumor surrounding region, which is relevant to treatment outcome after radiotherapy. In this study, the effects of pre-irradiated tumor beds on the growth of subsequently implanted tumors were investigated as well as underlying mechanism. The experimental model was set up by irradiating the right thighs of C3H/HeN mice with 5 Gy, followed by the implantation of HCa-I and MIH-2. Both implanted tumors in the pre-irradiated bed showed accelerated-growth compared to the control. Tumor-infiltrated lymphocyte (TIL levels were increased, as well as pro-tumor factors such as IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1 in the pre-irradiated group. In particular, the role of pro-tumor cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A was investigated as a possible target mechanism because IL-6 and TGF-β are key factors in Th17 cells differentiation from naïve T cells. IL-17A expression was increased not only in tumors, but also in CD4+ T cells isolated from the tumor draining lymph nodes. The effect of IL-17A on tumor growth was confirmed by treating tumors with IL-17A antibody, which abolished the acceleration of tumor growth. These results indicate that the upregulation of IL-17A seems to be a key factor for enhancing tumor growth in pre-irradiated tumor beds.

  14. CD248 facilitates tumor growth via its cytoplasmic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromal fibroblasts participate in the development of a permissive environment for tumor growth, yet molecular pathways to therapeutically target fibroblasts are poorly defined. CD248, also known as endosialin or tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1), is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on activated fibroblasts. We recently showed that the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 is important in facilitating an inflammatory response in a mouse model of arthritis. Others have reported that CD248 gene inactivation in mice results in dampened tumor growth. We hypothesized that the conserved cytoplasmic domain of CD248 is important in regulating tumor growth. Mice lacking the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 (CD248CyD/CyD) were generated and evaluated in tumor models, comparing the findings with wild-type mice (CD248WT/WT). As compared to the response in CD248WT/WT mice, growth of T241 fibrosarcomas and Lewis lung carcinomas was significantly reduced in CD248CyD/CyD mice. Tumor size was similar to that seen with CD248-deficient mice. Conditioned media from CD248CyD/CyD fibroblasts were less effective at supporting T241 fibrosarcoma cell survival. In addition to our previous observation of reduced release of activated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, CD248CyD/CyD fibroblasts also had impaired PDGF-BB-induced migration and expressed higher transcripts of tumor suppressor factors, transgelin (SM22α), Hes and Hey1. The multiple pathways regulated by the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 highlight its potential as a therapeutic target to treat cancer

  15. CD248 facilitates tumor growth via its cytoplasmic domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssens Tom

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal fibroblasts participate in the development of a permissive environment for tumor growth, yet molecular pathways to therapeutically target fibroblasts are poorly defined. CD248, also known as endosialin or tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1, is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on activated fibroblasts. We recently showed that the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 is important in facilitating an inflammatory response in a mouse model of arthritis. Others have reported that CD248 gene inactivation in mice results in dampened tumor growth. We hypothesized that the conserved cytoplasmic domain of CD248 is important in regulating tumor growth. Methods Mice lacking the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 (CD248CyD/CyD were generated and evaluated in tumor models, comparing the findings with wild-type mice (CD248WT/WT. Results As compared to the response in CD248WT/WT mice, growth of T241 fibrosarcomas and Lewis lung carcinomas was significantly reduced in CD248CyD/CyD mice. Tumor size was similar to that seen with CD248-deficient mice. Conditioned media from CD248CyD/CyD fibroblasts were less effective at supporting T241 fibrosarcoma cell survival. In addition to our previous observation of reduced release of activated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, CD248CyD/CyD fibroblasts also had impaired PDGF-BB-induced migration and expressed higher transcripts of tumor suppressor factors, transgelin (SM22α, Hes and Hey1. Conclusions The multiple pathways regulated by the cytoplasmic domain of CD248 highlight its potential as a therapeutic target to treat cancer.

  16. Tumor-derived IL-35 promotes tumor growth by enhancing myeloid cell accumulation and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Liu, Jin-Qing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Shen, Rulong; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xu, Jianping; Basu, Sujit; Feng, Youmei; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2013-03-01

    IL-35 is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that is comprised of an IL-12 p35 subunit and an IL-12 p40-related protein subunit, EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3). IL-35 functions through IL-35R and has a potent immune-suppressive activity. Although IL-35 was demonstrated to be produced by regulatory T cells, gene-expression analysis revealed that it is likely to have a wider distribution, including expression in cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that IL-35 is produced in human cancer tissues, such as large B cell lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and melanoma. To determine the roles of tumor-derived IL-35 in tumorigenesis and tumor immunity, we generated IL-35-producing plasmacytoma J558 and B16 melanoma cells and observed that the expression of IL-35 in cancer cells does not affect their growth and survival in vitro, but it stimulates tumorigenesis in both immune-competent and Rag1/2-deficient mice. Tumor-derived IL-35 increases CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cell accumulation in the tumor microenvironment and, thereby, promotes tumor angiogenesis. In immune-competent mice, spontaneous CTL responses to tumors are diminished. IL-35 does not directly inhibit tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell activation, differentiation, and effector functions. However, IL-35-treated cancer cells had increased expression of gp130 and reduced sensitivity to CTL destruction. Thus, our study indicates novel functions for IL-35 in promoting tumor growth via the enhancement of myeloid cell accumulation, tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor immunity.

  17. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaylani, Samer Z. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Pressey, Joseph G. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  18. Tumor growth instability and the onset of invasion

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, M; Deisboeck, T; Castro, Mario; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Deisboeck, Thomas s.

    2005-01-01

    Motivated by experimental observations, we develop a mathematical model of chemotactically directed tumor growth. We present an analytical study of the model as well as a numerical one. The mathematical analysis shows that: (i) tumor cell proliferation by itself cannot generate the invasive branching behaviour observed experimentally, (ii) heterotype chemotaxis provides an instability mechanism that leads to the onset of tumor invasion and (iii) homotype chemotaxis does not provide such an instability mechanism but enhances the mean speed of the tumor surface. The numerical results not only support the assumptions needed to perform the mathematical analysis but they also provide evidence of (i), (ii) and (iii). Finally, both the analytical study and the numerical work agree with the experimental phenomena.

  19. Impact of macrophages on tumor growth characteristics in a murine ocular tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stei, Marta M; Loeffler, Karin U; Kurts, Christian; Hoeller, Tobias; Pfarrer, Christiane; Holz, Frank G; Herwig-Carl, Martina C

    2016-10-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAM), mean vascular density (MVD), PAS positive extravascular matrix patterns, and advanced patients' age are associated with a poor prognosis in uveal melanoma. These correlations may be influenced by M2 macrophages and their cytokine expression pattern. Thus, the effect of TAM and their characteristic cytokines on histologic tumor growth characteristics were studied under the influence of age. Ninety five CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice (young 8-12weeks, old 10-12months) received an intravitreal injection of 1 × 10(5) HCmel12 melanoma cells. Subgroups were either systemically macrophage-depleted by Clodronate liposomes (n = 23) or received melanoma cells, which were pre-incubated with the supernatant of M1- or M2-polarized macrophages (n = 26). Eyes were processed histologically/immunohistochemically (n = 75), or for flow cytometry (n = 20) to analyze tumor size, mean vascular density (MVD), extravascular matrix patterns, extracellular matrix (ECM) and the presence/polarization of TAM. Prognostically significant extravascular matrix patterns (parallels with cross-linkings, loops, networks) were found more frequently in tumors of untreated old compared to tumors of untreated young mice (p = 0.024); as well as in tumors of untreated mice compared to tumors of macrophage-depleted mice (p = 0.014). Independent from age, M2-conditioned tumors showed more TAM (p = 0.001), increased collagen IV levels (p = 0.024) and a higher MVD (p = 0.02) than M1-conditioned tumors. Flow cytometry revealed a larger proportion of M2-macrophages in old than in young mice. The results indicate that TAM and their cytokines appear to be responsible for a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Tumor favoring and pro-angiogenic effects can be directly attributed to a M2-dominated tumor microenvironment rather than to age-dependent factors alone. However, an aged immunoprofile with an increased number of M2-macrophages may provide a tumor-favoring basis

  20. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  1. The impact of stress on tumor growth: peripheral CRF mediates tumor-promoting effects of stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stathopoulos Efstathios N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Stress has been shown to be a tumor promoting factor. Both clinical and laboratory studies have shown that chronic stress is associated with tumor growth in several types of cancer. Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF is the major hypothalamic mediator of stress, but is also expressed in peripheral tissues. Earlier studies have shown that peripheral CRF affects breast cancer cell proliferation and motility. The aim of the present study was to assess the significance of peripheral CRF on tumor growth as a mediator of the response to stress in vivo. Methods For this purpose we used the 4T1 breast cancer cell line in cell culture and in vivo. Cells were treated with CRF in culture and gene specific arrays were performed to identify genes directly affected by CRF and involved in breast cancer cell growth. To assess the impact of peripheral CRF as a stress mediator in tumor growth, Balb/c mice were orthotopically injected with 4T1 cells in the mammary fat pad to induce breast tumors. Mice were subjected to repetitive immobilization stress as a model of chronic stress. To inhibit the action of CRF, the CRF antagonist antalarmin was injected intraperitoneally. Breast tissue samples were histologically analyzed and assessed for neoangiogenesis. Results Array analysis revealed among other genes that CRF induced the expression of SMAD2 and β-catenin, genes involved in breast cancer cell proliferation and cytoskeletal changes associated with metastasis. Cell transfection and luciferase assays confirmed the role of CRF in WNT- β-catenin signaling. CRF induced 4T1 cell proliferation and augmented the TGF-β action on proliferation confirming its impact on TGFβ/SMAD2 signaling. In addition, CRF promoted actin reorganization and cell migration, suggesting a direct tumor-promoting action. Chronic stress augmented tumor growth in 4T1 breast tumor bearing mice and peripheral administration of the CRF antagonist antalarmin suppressed this

  2. Effect of complex amino acid imbalance on growth of tumor in tumor-bearing rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-Cheng He; Yuan-Hong Wang; Jun Cao; Ji-Wei Chen; Ding-Yu Pan; Ya-Kui Zhou

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of complex amino acid imbalance on the growth of tumor in tumor-bearing (TB) rats.METHODS: Sprague-Dawlley (SD) rats underwent jejunostomy for nutritional support. A suspension of Walker256 carcinosarcoma cells was subcutaneously inoculated.TB rats were randomly divided into groups A, B, C and D according to the formula of amino acids in enteral nutritional solutions, respectively. TB rats received jejunal feedings supplemented with balanced amino acids (group A),methionine-depleted amino acids (group B), valine-depleted amino acids (group C) and methionine- and valine-depleted complex amino acid imbalance (group D) for 10 days. Tumor volume, inhibitory rates of tumor, cell cycle and life span of TB rats were investigated.RESULTS: The G0/G1 ratio of tumor cells in group D (80.5±9.0) % was higher than that in groups A, B and C which was 67.0±5.1 %, 78.9±8.5 %, 69.2±6.2 %, respectively (P<0.05). The ratio of S/G2M and PI in group D were lower than those in groups A, B and C. The inhibitory rate of tumor in groups B, C and D was 37.2 %, 33.3 % and 43.9 %,respectively (P<0.05). The life span of TB rats in group D was significantly longer than that in groups B, C, and A.CONCLUSION: Methionine/valine-depleted amino acid imbalance can inhibit tumor growth. Complex amino acids of methionine and valine depleted imbalance have stronger inhibitory effects on tumor growth.

  3. Inhibition of Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth by the DSL Domain of Human Delta-Like 1 Targeted to Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Cheng Zhao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth of solid tumors depends on neovascularization. Several therapies targeting tumor angiogenesis have been developed. However, poor response in some tumors and emerging resistance necessitate further investigations of newdrug targets. Notch signal pathway plays a pivotal role in vascular development and tumor angiogenesis. Either blockade or forced activation of this pathway can inhibit angiogenesis. As blocking Notch pathway results in the formation of vascular neoplasm, activation of Notch pathway to prevent tumor angiogenesis might be an alternative choice. However, an in vivo deliverable reagent with highly efficient Notch-activating capacity has not been developed. Here, we generated a polypeptide, hD1R, which consists of the Delta-Serrate-Lag-2 fragment of the human Notch ligand Delta-like 1 and an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD motif targeting endothelial cells (ECs. We showed that hD1R could bind to ECs specifically through its RGD motif and effectively triggered Notch signaling in ECs. We demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo that hD1R inhibited angiogenic sprouting and EC proliferation. In tumor-bearing mice, the injection of hD1R effectively repressed tumor growth, most likely through increasing tumor hypoxia and tissue necrosis. The amount and width of vessels reduced remarkably in tumors of mice treated with hD1R. Moreover, vessels in tumors of mice treated with hD1R recruited more NG2+ perivascular cells and were better perfused. Combined application of hD1R and chemotherapy with cisplatin and teniposide revealed that these two treatments had additive antitumor effects. Our study provided a new strategy for antiangiogenic tumor therapy.

  4. Human STEAP3 maintains tumor growth under hypoferric condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, Taichi, E-mail: tisobe@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Baba, Eishi, E-mail: e-baba@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Arita, Shuji, E-mail: arita.s@nk-cc.go.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Komoda, Masato, E-mail: komoda@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Tamura, Shingo, E-mail: tamshin@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Shirakawa, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: t-w-r@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ariyama, Hiroshi, E-mail: hariyama@kyumed.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Takaishi, Shigeo, E-mail: takaishi@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kusaba, Hitoshi, E-mail: hkusaba@intmed1.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); and others

    2011-11-01

    Iron is essential in cellular proliferation and survival based on its crucial roles in DNA and ATP synthesis. Tumor cells proliferate rapidly even in patients with low serum iron, although their actual mechanisms are not well known. To elucidate molecular mechanisms of efficient tumor progression under the hypoferric condition, we studied the roles of six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate family member 3 (STEAP3), which was reported to facilitate iron uptake. Using Raji cells with low STEAP3 mRNA expression, human STEAP3-overexpressing cells were established. The impact of STEAP3 expression was analyzed about the amount of iron storage, the survival under hypoferric conditions in vitro and the growth of tumor in vivo. STEAP3 overexpression increased ferritin, an indicator of iron storage, in STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells. STEAP3 gave Raji cells the resistance to iron deprivation-induced apoptosis. These STEAP3-overexpressing Raji cells preserved efficient growth even in hypoferric mice, while parental Raji cells grew less rapidly. In addition, iron deficiency enhanced STEAP3 mRNA expression in tumor cells. Furthermore, human colorectal cancer tissues exhibited more STEAP3 mRNA expression and iron storage compared with normal colon mucosa. These findings indicate that STEAP3 maintains iron storage in human malignant cells and tumor proliferation under the hypoferric condition. -- Highlights: {yields} STEAP3 expression results in increment of stored intracellular iron. {yields} Iron deprivation induces expression of STEAP3. {yields} Colorectal cancer expresses STEAP3 highly and stores iron much. {yields} STEAP3 expressing tumors preserves growth even in mice being hypoferremia.

  5. Sorafenib inhibits growth and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma by blocking STAT3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-Ming Gu; Quan-Lin Li; Qiang Gao; Jia-Hao Jiang; Xiao-Yong Huang; Jin-Feng Pan; Jia Fan; Jian Zhou

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory role and the underlying mechanisms of sorafenib on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: Human and rat HCC cell lines were treated with sorafenib. Proliferation and STAT3 dephosphorylation were assessed. Potential molecular mechanisms of STAT3 pathway inhibition by sorafenib were evaluated. In vivo antitumor action and STAT3 inhibition were investigated in an immunocompetent orthotopic rat HCC model. RESULTS: Sorafenib decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at the tyrosine and serine residues (Y705 and S727), but did not affect Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and phospha-tase shatterproof 2 (SHP2), which is associated with growth inhibition in HCC cells. Dephosphorylation of S727 was associated with attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, similar to the effects of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126, suggesting that sorafenib induced S727 dephosphorylation by inhibiting MEK/ERK signaling. Meanwhile, sorafenib could also inhibit Akt phosphorylation, and both the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 and Akt knockdown resulted in Y705 dephosphorylation, indicating that Y705 dephosphorylation by sorafenib was mediated by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway. Finally, in the rat HCC model, sorafenib significantly inhibited STAT3 activity, reducing tumor growth and metastasis. CONCLUSION: Sorafenib inhibits growth and metastasis of HCC in part by blocking the MEK/ERK/STAT3 and PI3K/Akt/STAT3 signaling pathways, but independent of JAK2 and SHP2 activation.

  6. ING1 and 5-Azacytidine Act Synergistically to Block Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Satbir; Feng, Xiaolan; Qiao Shi, Zhong; Ganapathy, Amudha; Kumar Mishra, Manoj; Atadja, Peter; Morris, Don; Riabowol, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins are epigenetic “readers” that recognize trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me3) and target histone acetyl transferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) complexes to chromatin. Methods and Principal Findings Here we asked whether dysregulating two epigenetic pathways with chemical inhibitors showed synergistic effects on breast cancer cell line killing. We also tested whether ING1 could synergize better with chemotherapeutics that target the same epigenetic mechanism such as the HDAC inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat) or a different epigenetic mechanism such as 5-azacytidine (5azaC), which inhibits DNA methyl transferases. Simultaneous treatment of breast cancer cell lines with LBH589 and 5azaC did not show significant synergy in killing cells. However, combination treatment of ING1 with either LBH589 or 5azaC did show synergy. The combination of ING1b with 5azaC, which targets two distinct epigenetic mechanisms, was more effective at lower doses and enhanced apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). ING1b plus 5azaC also acted synergistically to increase γH2AX staining indicating significant levels of DNA damage were induced. Adenoviral delivery of ING1b with 5azaC also inhibited cancer cell growth in a murine xenograft model and led to tumor regression when viral concentration was optimized in vivo. Conclusions These data show that targeting distinct epigenetic pathways can be more effective in blocking cancer cell line growth than targeting the same pathway with multiple agents, and that using viral delivery of epigenetic regulators can be more effective in synergizing with a chemical agent than using two chemotherapeutic agents. This study also indicates that the ING1 epigenetic regulator may have additional activities in the cell when expressed at high levels. PMID:22916295

  7. ING1 and 5-azacytidine act synergistically to block breast cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satbir Thakur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inhibitor of Growth (ING proteins are epigenetic "readers" that recognize trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me3 and target histone acetyl transferase (HAT and histone deacetylase (HDAC complexes to chromatin. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we asked whether dysregulating two epigenetic pathways with chemical inhibitors showed synergistic effects on breast cancer cell line killing. We also tested whether ING1 could synergize better with chemotherapeutics that target the same epigenetic mechanism such as the HDAC inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat or a different epigenetic mechanism such as 5-azacytidine (5azaC, which inhibits DNA methyl transferases. Simultaneous treatment of breast cancer cell lines with LBH589 and 5azaC did not show significant synergy in killing cells. However, combination treatment of ING1 with either LBH589 or 5azaC did show synergy. The combination of ING1b with 5azaC, which targets two distinct epigenetic mechanisms, was more effective at lower doses and enhanced apoptosis as determined by Annexin V staining and cleavage of caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. ING1b plus 5azaC also acted synergistically to increase γH2AX staining indicating significant levels of DNA damage were induced. Adenoviral delivery of ING1b with 5azaC also inhibited cancer cell growth in a murine xenograft model and led to tumor regression when viral concentration was optimized in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that targeting distinct epigenetic pathways can be more effective in blocking cancer cell line growth than targeting the same pathway with multiple agents, and that using viral delivery of epigenetic regulators can be more effective in synergizing with a chemical agent than using two chemotherapeutic agents. This study also indicates that the ING1 epigenetic regulator may have additional activities in the cell when expressed at high levels.

  8. Beta-adrenoceptor-blocking drugs, growth hormone and acromegaly.

    OpenAIRE

    Feely, J.

    1980-01-01

    Chronic treatment with oxprenolol or propranolol in active hypertensive patients was associated with elevation of serum growth hormone (GH). Propranolol, 80 mg orally, caused a marked rise in GH in 3 of 4 acromegalic patients.

  9. Fluctuation of Parameters in Tumor Cell Growth Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Bao-Quan; WANG Xian-Ju; LIU Guo-Tao; LIU Liang-Gang

    2003-01-01

    We study the steady state properties of a logistic growth model in the presence of Gaussian white noise.Based on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation the steady state solution of the probability distribution functionand its extrema have been investigated. It is found that the fluctuation of the tumor birth rate reduces the populationof the cells while the fluctuation of predation rate can prevent the population of tumor cells from going into extinction.Noise in the system can induce the phase transition.

  10. Fluctuation of Parameters in Tumor Cell Growth Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AIBao-Quan; WANGXian-Ju; LIUGuo-Tao; LIULiang-Gang

    2003-01-01

    We study the steady state properties of a logistic growth model in the presence of Gaussian white noise.Based on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation the steady state solution of the probability distribution function and its extrema have been investigated. It is found that the fluctuation of the tumor birth rate reduces the population of the cells while the fluctuation of predation rate can prevent the population of tumor ceils from going into extinction.Noise in the system can induce the phase transition.

  11. Inhibitors of the cytochrome P-450 enzymes block the secretagogue-induced release of corticotropin in mouse pituitary tumor cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Luini, A G; Axelrod, J

    1985-01-01

    A mouse pituitary tumor cell line (AtT-20) releases corticotropin (ACTH) in response to a number of secretagogues, including corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), beta-adrenergic agents, N6,O2'-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (Bt2 cAMP), and potassium. The stimulation of ACTH secretion induced by the secretagogues can be blocked by inhibitors of the enzymes that generate (phospholipase A2) and metabolize (lipoxygenase and epoxygenase) arachidonic acid. The phospholipase A2 block...

  12. Hypoestoxide inhibits tumor growth in the mouse CT26 colon tumor model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel A Ojo-Amaize; Howard B Cottam; Olusola A Oyemade; Joseph I Okogun; Emeka J Nchekwube

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of the natural diterpenoid,hypoestoxide (HE) on the growth of established colon cancer in mice.METHODS: The CT26.WT mouse colon carcinoma cell line was grown and expanded in vitro. Following the expansion, BALB/c mice were inoculated s.c. with viable tumor cells. After the tumors had established and developed to about 80-90 mm3, the mice were started on chemotherapy by oral administration of HE, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or combination.RESULTS: The antiangiogenic HE has previously been shown to inhibit the growth of melanoma in the B16F1tumor model in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrate that mean volume of tumors in mice treated with oral HE as a single agent or in combination with 5-FU, were significantly smaller (> 60%) than those in vehicle control mice (471.2 mm3 vs 1542.8 mm3, P < 0.01).The significant reductions in tumor burden resulted in pronounced mean survival times (MST) and increased life spans (ILS) in the treated mice.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that HE is an effective chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer in mice and that HE may be used alone or in combination with 5-FU.

  13. The role of the microenvironment in tumor growth and invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangjin; Stolarska, Magdalena A.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computational analysis are essential for understanding the dynamics of the complex gene networks that control normal development and homeostasis, and can help to understand how circumvention of that control leads to abnormal outcomes such as cancer. Our objectives here are to discuss the different mechanisms by which the local biochemical and mechanical microenvironment, which is comprised of various signaling molecules, cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM), affects the progression of potentially-cancerous cells, and to present new results on two aspects of these effects. We first deal with the major processes involved in the progression from a normal cell to a cancerous cell at a level accessible to a general scientific readership, and we then outline a number of mathematical and computational issues that arise in cancer modeling. In Section 2 we present results from a model that deals with the effects of the mechanical properties of the environment on tumor growth, and in Section 3 we report results from a model of the signaling pathways and the tumor microenvironment (TME), and how their interactions affect the development of breast cancer. The results emphasize anew the complexities of the interactions within the TME and their effect on tumor growth, and show that tumor progression is not solely determined by the presence of a clone of mutated immortal cells, but rather that it can be ‘community-controlled’. It Takes a Village – Hilary Clinton PMID:21736894

  14. Bursts of Bipolar Microsecond Pulses Inhibit Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Michael B.; Arena, Christopher B.; Bittleman, Katelyn R.; Dewitt, Matthew R.; Cho, Hyung J.; Szot, Christopher S.; Saur, Dieter; Cissell, James M.; Robertson, John; Lee, Yong W.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2015-10-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging focal therapy which is demonstrating utility in the treatment of unresectable tumors where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. IRE uses ultra-short duration, high-intensity monopolar pulsed electric fields to permanently disrupt cell membranes within a well-defined volume. Though preliminary clinical results for IRE are promising, implementing IRE can be challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of tumor tissue and the unintended induction of muscle contractions. High-frequency IRE (H-FIRE), a new treatment modality which replaces the monopolar IRE pulses with a burst of bipolar pulses, has the potential to resolve these clinical challenges. We explored the pulse-duration space between 250 ns and 100 μs and determined the lethal electric field intensity for specific H-FIRE protocols using a 3D tumor mimic. Murine tumors were exposed to 120 bursts, each energized for 100 μs, containing individual pulses 1, 2, or 5 μs in duration. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited and all protocols were able to achieve complete regressions. The H-FIRE protocol substantially reduces muscle contractions and the therapy can be delivered without the need for a neuromuscular blockade. This work shows the potential for H-FIRE to be used as a focal therapy and merits its investigation in larger pre-clinical models.

  15. Biodegradable polymeric micelles encapsulated JK184 suppress tumor growth through inhibiting Hedgehog signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nannan; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Ning; Deng, Senyi; Song, Linjiang; Wu, Qinjie; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Xie, Yongmei; Gong, Changyang

    2015-01-01

    JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in vitro release behavior and had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of HUVECs than free JK184. Furthermore, JK184 micelles had stronger tumor growth inhibiting effects in subcutaneous Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor models. Histological analysis showed that JK184 micelles improved anti-tumor activity by inducing more apoptosis, decreasing microvessel density and reducing expression of CD31, Ki67, and VEGF in tumor tissues. JK184 micelles showed a stronger inhibition of Gli expression in Hh signaling, which played an important role in pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore, circulation time of JK184 in blood was prolonged after entrapment in polymeric micelles. Our results suggested that JK184 micelles are a promising drug candidate for treating pancreatic tumors with a highly inhibitory effect on Hh activity.JK184 can specially inhibit Gli in the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, which showed great promise for cancer therapeutics. For developing aqueous formulation and improving anti-tumor activity of JK184, we prepared JK184 encapsulated MPEG-PCL micelles by the solid dispersion method without using surfactants or toxic organic solvents. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of JK184 micelles were both increased compared with the free drug. JK184 micelles induced more apoptosis and blocked proliferation of Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumor cells. In addition, JK184 micelles exerted a sustained in

  16. Interfacial properties in a discrete model for tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-03-01

    We propose and study, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations, a minimal discrete model for avascular tumor growth, which can also be applied for the description of cell cultures in vitro. The interface of the tumor is self-affine and its width can be characterized by the following exponents: (i) the growth exponent β=0.32(2) that governs the early time regime, (ii) the roughness exponent α=0.49(2) related to the fluctuations in the stationary regime, and (iii) the dynamic exponent z=α/β≃1.49(2), which measures the propagation of correlations in the direction parallel to the interface, e.g., ξ∝t1/z, where ξ is the parallel correlation length. Therefore, the interface belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, in agreement with recent experiments of cell cultures in vitro. Furthermore, density profiles of the growing cells are rationalized in terms of traveling waves that are solutions of the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. In this way, we achieved excellent agreement between the simulation results of the discrete model and the continuous description of the growth front of the culture or tumor.

  17. Over-Expression of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-D Promotes Tumor Growth and Invasion in Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The platelet-derived growth factor-D (PDGF-D was demonstrated to be able to promote tumor growth and invasion in human malignancies. However, little is known about its roles in endometrial cancer. In the present study, we investigated the expression and functions of PDGF-D in human endometrial cancer. Alterations of PDGF-D mRNA and protein were determined by real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical staining. Up-regulation of PDGF-D was achieved by stably transfecting the pcDNA3-PDGF-D plasmids into ECC-1 cells; and knockdown of PDGF-D was achieved by transient transfection with siRNA-PDGF-D into Ishikawa cells. The MTT assay, colony formation assay and Transwell assay were used to detect the effects of PDGF-D on cellular proliferation and invasion. The xenograft assay was used to investigate the functions of PDGF-D in vivo. Compared to normal endometrium, more than 50% cancer samples showed over-expression of PDGF-D (p < 0.001, and high level of PDGF-D was correlated with late stage (p = 0.003, deep myometrium invasion (p < 0.001 and lympha vascular space invasion (p = 0.006. In vitro, over-expressing PDGF-D in ECC-1 cells significantly accelerated tumor growth and promoted cellular invasion by increasing the level of MMP2 and MMP9; while silencing PDGF-D in Ishikawa cells impaired cell proliferation and inhibited the invasion, through suppressing the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-expressed PDGF-D could induce EMT and knockdown of PDGF-D blocked the EMT transition. Consistently, in xenografts assay, PDGF-D over-expression significantly promoted tumor growth and tumor weights. We demonstrated that PDGF-D was commonly over-expressed in endometrial cancer, which was associated with late stage deep myometrium invasion and lympha vascular space invasion. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments showed PDGF-D could promote tumor growth and invasion through up-regulating MMP2/9 and inducing EMT. Thus, we

  18. Serum platelet-derived growth factor and fibroblast growth factor in patients with benign and malignant ovarian tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christine Vestergaard; Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Olsen, Dorte Aalund;

    2012-01-01

    New biological markers with predictive or prognostic value are highly warranted in the treatment of ovarian cancer. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) system and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) system are important components in tumor growth and angiogenesis....

  19. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Michael Reiter; Igor Tsaur; Georg Bartsch; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regu...

  20. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Therefore, we reasoned that endostatin-lidamycin (ES-LDM) fusion proteins upon energizing with enediyne chromophore may obtain the combined capability targeting tumor vasculature and tumor cell by respective ES and LDM moiety. In this study, we designed and obtained two new endostatin-based fusion proteins, endostatin-LDP (ES-LDP) and LDP-endostatin (LDP-ES). In vitro, the antiangiogenic effect of fusion proteins was determined by the wound healing assay and tube formation assay and the cytotoxicity of their enediyne-energized analogs was evaluated by CCK-8 assay. Tissue microarray was used to analyze the binding affinity of LDP, ES or ES-LDP with specimens of human lung tissue and lung tumor. The in vivo efficacy of the fusion proteins was evaluated with human lung carcinoma PG-BE1 xenograft and the experimental metastasis model of 4T1-luc breast cancer. ES-LDP and LDP-ES disrupted the formation of endothelial tube structures and inhibited endothelial cell migration. Evidently, ES-LDP accumulated in the tumor and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. ES-LDP and ES show higher binding capability than LDP to lung carcinoma; in addition, ES-LDP and ES share similar binding capability. Furthermore, the enediyne-energized fusion protein ES-LDP-AE demonstrated significant efficacy against lung carcinoma xenograft in athymic mice. The ES-based fusion protein therapy provides some fundamental information for further drug development. Targeting both tumor vasculature and tumor cells by endostatin

  1. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen, E-mail: srrshurology@163.com

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  2. Targeting vascular NADPH oxidase 1 blocks tumor angiogenesis through a PPARα mediated mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Garrido-Urbani

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species, ROS, are regulators of endothelial cell migration, proliferation and survival, events critically involved in angiogenesis. Different isoforms of ROS-generating NOX enzymes are expressed in the vasculature and provide distinct signaling cues through differential localization and activation. We show that mice deficient in NOX1, but not NOX2 or NOX4, have impaired angiogenesis. NOX1 expression and activity is increased in primary mouse and human endothelial cells upon angiogenic stimulation. NOX1 silencing decreases endothelial cell migration and tube-like structure formation, through the inhibition of PPARα, a regulator of NF-κB. Administration of a novel NOX-specific inhibitor reduced angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo in a PPARα dependent manner. In conclusion, vascular NOX1 is a critical mediator of angiogenesis and an attractive target for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  3. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; Antonosante, Andrea; d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-12-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma. PMID:26540346

  4. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Elisabetta; Antonosante, Andrea; d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-12-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma.

  5. A multinomial model of tumor growth treated by radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Keinj, Roukaya; Bastogne, Thierry; Vallois, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    International audience A main challenge in radiotherapy is to personalize the treatment by adapting the dose fractionation scheme to the patient. One way is to model the treatment effect on the tumor growth. In this study, we propose a new multinomial model based on a discrete-time Markov chain, able to take into account both of cell repair and cell damage heterogeneity. The proposed model relies on the 'Hit' theory in Radiobiology and assumes that a cancer cell contains m targets which mu...

  6. The Ape-1/Ref-1 redox antagonist E3330 inhibits the growth of tumor endothelium and endothelial progenitor cells: therapeutic implications in tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Gang-Ming; Karikari, Collins; Kabe, Yasuaki; Handa, Hiroshi; Anders, Robert A; Maitra, Anirban

    2009-04-01

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ape-1/Ref-1) is a multi-functional protein, involved in DNA repair and the activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors. The Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain acts as a cytoprotective element in normal endothelial cells, mitigating the deleterious effects of apoptotic stimuli through induction of survival signals. We explored the role of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain in the maintenance of tumor-associated endothelium, and of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which contribute to tumor angiogenesis. We demonstrate that E3330, a small molecule inhibitor of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain, blocks the in vitro growth of pancreatic cancer-associated endothelial cells (PCECs) and EPCs, which is recapitulated by stable expression of a dominant-negative redox domain mutant. Further, E3330 blocks the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into CD31(+) endothelial progeny. Exposure of PCECs to E3330 results in a reduction of H-ras expression and intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, as well as decreased DNA-binding activity of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF-1alpha. E3330 also reduces secreted and intracellular vascular endothelial growth factor expression by pancreatic cancer cells, while concomitantly downregulating the cognate receptor Flk-1/KDR on PCECs. Inhibition of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain with E3330 or comparable angiogenesis inhibitors might be a potent therapeutic strategy in solid tumors.

  7. Emergent Behavior from A Cellular Automaton Model for Invasive Tumor Growth in Heterogeneous Microenvironments

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Understanding tumor invasion and metastasis is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical practice. In vitro experiments have established that the invasive growth of malignant tumors is characterized by the dendritic invasive branches composed of chains of tumor cells emanating from the primary tumor mass. The preponderance of previous tumor simulations focused on non-invasive (or proliferative) growth. The formation of the invasive cell chains and their interactions with the primary tumor mass and host microenvironment are not well understood. Here, we present a novel cellular automaton (CA) model that enables one to efficiently simulate invasive tumor growth in a heterogeneous host microenvironment. By taking into account a variety of microscopic-scale tumor-host interactions, including the short-range mechanical interactions between tumor cells and tumor stroma, degradation of extracellular matrix by the invasive cells and oxygen/nutrient gradient driven cell motions, our CA mo...

  8. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Chauviere

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth.

  9. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauviere, Arnaud; Hatzikirou, Haralambos; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Lowengrub, John S; Cristini, Vittorio

    2012-03-01

    Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT) extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth. PMID:22489279

  10. The hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive proteins semaphorin 4D and vascular endothelial growth factor promote tumor growth and angiogenesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hua; Yang, Ying-Hua [Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Maryland Dental School, 650W. Baltimore Street, 7-North, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Binmadi, Nada O. [Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Maryland Dental School, 650W. Baltimore Street, 7-North, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Oral Basic and Clinical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Proia, Patrizia [Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Maryland Dental School, 650W. Baltimore Street, 7-North, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Sports Science (DISMOT), University of Palermo, Via Eleonora Duse 2 90146, Palermo (Italy); Basile, John R., E-mail: jbasile@umaryland.edu [Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Maryland Dental School, 650W. Baltimore Street, 7-North, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Greenebaum Cancer Center, 22S. Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Growth and metastasis of solid tumors requires induction of angiogenesis to ensure the delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to rapidly dividing transformed cells. Through either mutations, hypoxia generated by cytoreductive therapies, or when a malignancy outgrows its blood supply, tumor cells undergo a change from an avascular to a neovascular phenotype, a transition mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcriptional regulators. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one example of a gene whose transcription is stimulated by HIF. VEGF plays a crucial role in promoting tumor growth and survival by stimulating new blood vessel growth in response to such stresses as chemotherapy or radiotherapy-induced hypoxia, and it therefore has become a tempting target for neutralizing antibodies in the treatment of advanced neoplasms. Emerging evidence has shown that the semaphorins, proteins originally associated with control of axonal growth and immunity, are regulated by changes in oxygen tension as well and may play a role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Through the use of RNA interference, in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays and tumor xenograft experiments, we demonstrate that expression of semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D), which is under the control of the HIF-family of transcription factors, cooperates with VEGF to promote tumor growth and vascularity in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We use blocking antibodies to show that targeting SEMA4D function along with VEGF could represent a novel anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategy for the treatment of OSCC and other solid tumors. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar to VEGF, SEMA4D promotes angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both VEGF and SEMA4D are produced by OSCC cells in a HIF-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These factors combine to elicit a robust pro-angiogenic phenotype in OSCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-SEMA4D

  11. Growth curves of three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spang-Thomsen, M; Nielsen, A; Visfeldt, J

    1980-01-01

    Experimental growth data for three human malignant tumors transplanted to nude mice of BALB/c origin are analyzed statistically in order to investigate whether they can be described according to the Gompertz function. The aim is to set up unequivocal standards for planned therapeutic experiments...... and to develop an essential part of the determination of proliferation parameters for the tumors. The results indicate that the course of tumor growth can be described with good approximation by the Gompertz function. A transformation of this function depicts the growth rectilinearly and appears to be suitable...... mice. For tumors whose growth is described according to the Gompertz function, recording of the growth of the tumor size in two dimensions is sufficient for calculating other relevant growth parameters, if the three linear tumor measurements are proportional throughout the growth period. The initial...

  12. Effects of Cordyceps militaris extract on angiogenesis and tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hwa-seung YOO; Jang-woo SHIN; Jung-hyo CHO; Chang-gue SON; Yeon-weol LEE; Sang-yong PARK; Chong-kwan CHO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of Cordyceps militaris extract (CME) on angiogenesis and tumor growth. METHODS:Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), HT1080, and B 16-F10 cells were used. DNA fragment, angiogenic related gene expressions (MMPs, bFGF, VEGF, etc), capillary tube formation, wound healing in vitro, rumor growth in vivo were measured. RESULTS: CME inhibited growth of HUVECs and HT1080 (P<0.01). CME 100and 200 mg/L reduced MMP-2 gene expression in HT1080 cells by 6.0 % and 22.9 % after 3-h and 14.9 % and 32.8 % after 6-h treatment. CME did not affect MMP-9 gene expression in B16-F10 melanoma cells. CME 100 and 200 mg/L also reduced bFGF gene expression in HUVECs by 22.2 % and 41.3 %. CME inhibited tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. CME repressed the growth of B 16-F10 melanoma cells in mice compared with control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: CME has antiangiogenetic properties.

  13. Alerting the immune system via stromal cells is central to the prevention of tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navikas, Shohreh

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer immunotherapies are highly desired. Conversely, unwanted inflammatory or immune responses contribute to oncogenesis, tumor progression, and cancer-related death. For non-immunogenic therapies to inhibit tumor growth, they must promote, not prevent, the activation of anticancer immune...

  14. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: Improving target volume delineation

    CERN Document Server

    Unkelbach, Jan; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma are known to infiltrate the brain parenchyma instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In clinical practice, a uniform margin is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth: Anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain...

  15. Inhibiting Vimentin or beta 1-integrin Reverts Prostate Tumor Cells in IrECM and Reduces Tumor Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xueping; Fournier, Marcia V.; Ware, Joy L.; Bissell, Mina J.; Zehner, Zendra E.

    2009-07-27

    Prostate epithelial cells grown embedded in laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) undergo morphological changes that closely resemble their architecture in vivo. In this study, growth characteristics of three human prostate epithelial sublines derived from the same cellular lineage, but displaying different tumorigenic and metastatic properties in vivo, were assessed in three-dimensional (3D) lrECM gels. M12, a highly tumorigenic and metastatic subline, was derived from the parental prostate epithelial P69 cell line by selection in nude mice and found to contain a deletion of 19p-q13.1. The stable reintroduction of an intact human chromosome 19 into M12 resulted in a poorly tumorigenic subline, designated F6. When embedded in lrECM gels, the nontumorigenic P69 line produced acini with clearly defined lumena. Immunostaining with antibodies to {beta}-catenin, E-cadherin or {alpha}6-, {beta}4- and {beta}1-integrins showed polarization typical of glandular epithelium. In contrast, the metastatic M12 subline produced highly disorganized cells with no evidence of polarization. The F6 subline reverted to acini-like structures exhibiting basal polarity marked with integrins. Reducing either vimentin levels via siRNA interference or {beta}1-integrin expression by the addition of the blocking antibody, AIIB2, reorganized the M12 subline into forming polarized acini. The loss of vimentin significantly reduced M12-Vim tumor growth when assessed by subcutaneous injection in athymic mice. Thus, tumorigenicity in vivo correlated with disorganized growth in 3D lrECM gels. These studies suggest that the levels of vimentin and {beta}1-integrin play a key role in the homeostasis of the normal acini in prostate and that their dysregulation may lead to tumorigenesis.

  16. Skeletons in the p53 tumor suppressor closet: genetic evidence that p53 blocks bone differentiation and development

    OpenAIRE

    Zambetti, Gerard P; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Schipani, Ernestina

    2006-01-01

    A series of in vitro tissue culture studies indicated that the p53 tumor suppressor promotes cellular differentiation, which could explain its role in preventing cancer. Quite surprisingly, however, two new in vivo studies (Lengner et al., 2006; Wang et al., 2006) provide genetic evidence that p53 blocks osteoblast differentiation and bone development. These interesting results and their biological and clinical implications are the focus of this comment.

  17. Impact of APE1/Ref-1 redox inhibition on pancreatic tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Melissa L; Jiang, Yanlin; Rajeshkumar, N V; Scandura, Glenda; Sinn, Anthony L; He, Ying; Shen, Changyu; Jones, David R; Pollok, Karen E; Ivan, Mircea; Maitra, Anirban; Kelley, Mark R

    2011-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is especially a deadly form of cancer with a survival rate less than 2%. Pancreatic cancers respond poorly to existing chemotherapeutic agents and radiation, and progress for the treatment of pancreatic cancer remains elusive. To address this unmet medical need, a better understanding of critical pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in pancreatic tumor development, progression, and resistance to traditional therapy is therefore critical. Reduction-oxidation (redox) signaling systems are emerging as important targets in pancreatic cancer. AP endonuclease1/Redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1) is upregulated in human pancreatic cancer cells and modulation of its redox activity blocks the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic cancer-associated endothelial cells in vitro. Modulation of APE1/Ref-1 using a specific inhibitor of APE1/Ref-1's redox function, E3330, leads to a decrease in transcription factor activity for NFκB, AP-1, and HIF1α in vitro. This study aims to further establish the redox signaling protein APE1/Ref-1 as a molecular target in pancreatic cancer. Here, we show that inhibition of APE1/Ref-1 via E3330 results in tumor growth inhibition in cell lines and pancreatic cancer xenograft models in mice. Pharmacokinetic studies also show that E3330 attains more than10 μmol/L blood concentrations and is detectable in tumor xenografts. Through inhibition of APE1/Ref-1, the activity of NFκB, AP-1, and HIF1α that are key transcriptional regulators involved in survival, invasion, and metastasis is blocked. These data indicate that E3330, inhibitor of APE1/Ref-1, has potential in pancreatic cancer and clinical investigation of APE1/Ref-1 molecular target is warranted.

  18. Role of constitutive behavior and tumor-host mechanical interactions in the state of stress and growth of solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysovalantis Voutouri

    Full Text Available Mechanical forces play a crucial role in tumor patho-physiology. Compression of cancer cells inhibits their proliferation rate, induces apoptosis and enhances their invasive and metastatic potential. Additionally, compression of intratumor blood vessels reduces the supply of oxygen, nutrients and drugs, affecting tumor progression and treatment. Despite the great importance of the mechanical microenvironment to the pathology of cancer, there are limited studies for the constitutive modeling and the mechanical properties of tumors and on how these parameters affect tumor growth. Also, the contribution of the host tissue to the growth and state of stress of the tumor remains unclear. To this end, we performed unconfined compression experiments in two tumor types and found that the experimental stress-strain response is better fitted to an exponential constitutive equation compared to the widely used neo-Hookean and Blatz-Ko models. Subsequently, we incorporated the constitutive equations along with the corresponding values of the mechanical properties - calculated by the fit - to a biomechanical model of tumor growth. Interestingly, we found that the evolution of stress and the growth rate of the tumor are independent from the selection of the constitutive equation, but depend strongly on the mechanical interactions with the surrounding host tissue. Particularly, model predictions - in agreement with experimental studies - suggest that the stiffness of solid tumors should exceed a critical value compared with that of the surrounding tissue in order to be able to displace the tissue and grow in size. With the use of the model, we estimated this critical value to be on the order of 1.5. Our results suggest that the direct effect of solid stress on tumor growth involves not only the inhibitory effect of stress on cancer cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis, but also the resistance of the surrounding tissue to tumor expansion.

  19. Reduced growth factor requirement of keloid-derived fibroblasts may account for tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, S.B.; Trupin, K.M.; Rodriguez-Eaton, S.; Russell, J.D.; Trupin, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Keloids are benign dermal tumors that form during an abnormal wound-healing process is genetically susceptible individuals. Although growth of normal and keloid cells did not differ in medium containing 10% (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum, keloid culture grew to significantly higher densities than normal cells in medium containing 5% (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum, keloid cultures grew to significantly higher densities than normal cells in medium containing 5% (vol/vol) plasma or 1% fetal bovine serum. Conditioned medium from keloid cultures did not stimulate growth of normal cells in plasma nor did it contain detectable platelet-derived growth factor or epidermal growth factor. Keloid fibroblasts responded differently than normal adult fibroblasts to transforming growth factor ..beta... Whereas transforming growth factor ..beta.. reduced growth stimulation by epidermal growth factor in cells from normal adult skin or scars, it enhanced the activity of epidermal growth factor in cells from normal adult skin or scars, it enhanced the activity of epidermal growth factor in cells from keloids. Normal and keloid fibroblasts also responded differently to hydrocortisone: growth was stimulated in normal adult cells and unaffected or inhibited in keloid cells. Fetal fibroblasts resembled keloid cells in their ability to grow in plasma and in their response to hydrocortisone. The ability of keloid fibroblasts to grow to higher cell densities in low-serum medium than cells from normal adult skin or from normal early or mature scars suggests that a reduced dependence on serum growth factors may account for their prolonged growth in vivo. Similarities between keloid and fetal cells suggest that keloids may result from the untimely expression of growth-control mechanism that is developmentally regulated.

  20. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Choksi, Swati; Liu, Zheng-Gang, E-mail: zgliu@helix.nih.gov [Cell and Cancer Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80{sup +} macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206{sup +} TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer.

  1. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Qingwen [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jiang, Songmin [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Han, Baohui [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Tongwen [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China); Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang [College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Sun, Jialin, E-mail: jialin_sun@126.com [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  2. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of a VEGFR2-blocking antibody using sodium-iodide symporter molecular imaging in a tumor xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Su-Jin; Lee, Chang-Moon; Kim, Eun-Mi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Cyclotron Research Center, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Tai-Boong [Faculty of Biological Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju-si, jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hwan-Jeong, E-mail: jayjeong@chonbuk.ac.k [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Cyclotron Research Center, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Cyclotron Research Center, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju-si, Jeonbuk 561-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-blocking antibody (DC101) has inhibitory effects on tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene has been shown to be a useful molecular imaging reporter gene. Here, we investigated the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy by molecular imaging in reporter gene transfected tumor xenografts using a gamma imaging system. Methods: The hNIS gene was transfected into MDA-MB-231 cells using Lipofectamine. The correlation between the number of MDA-MB-231-hNIS cells and the uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate or {sup 125}I was investigated in vitro by gamma imaging and counting. MDA-MB-231-hNIS cells were injected subcutaneously into mice. When the tumor volume reached 180-200 mm{sup 3}, we randomly assigned five animals to each of three groups representing different tumor therapies; no DC101 (control), 100 {mu}g, or 150 {mu}g DC101/mouse. One week and 2 weeks after the first injection of DC101, gamma imaging was performed. Mice were sacrificed 2 weeks after the first injection of DC101. The tumor tissues were used for reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and CD31 staining. Results: Uptake of {sup 125}I and {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate into MDA-MB-231-hNIS cells in vitro showed correlation with the number of cells. In DC101 treatment groups, the mean tumor volume was smaller than that of the control mice. Furthermore, tumor uptake of {sup 125}I was lower than in the controls. The CD31 staining and RT-PCR assay results showed that vessel formation and expression of the hNIS gene were significantly reduced in the tumor tissues of treatment groups. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the power of molecular imaging using a gamma imaging system for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy of an antitumor treatment. Molecular imaging systems may be useful in evaluation and development of effective diagnostic and/or therapeutic antibodies for specific target molecules.

  3. EXPRESSION OF GROWTH-FACTORS AND GROWTH-FACTOR RECEPTORS IN NORMAL AND TUMOROUS HUMAN THYROID TISSUES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, B.F.A.M.; FREEMAN, JL; ASA, SL

    1995-01-01

    A number of growth factors have been implicated as stimuli of thyroid cell proliferation; overexpression of these growth factors and/or their receptors may play a role in the growth of thyroid tumors. To determine if immunohistochemical detection of growth factors and/or their receptors correlates w

  4. Berberine suppresses tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by inhibiting STAT3 activation induced by tumor associated fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortidis rhizoma (Huanglian) and its major therapeutic component, berberine, have drawn extensive attention in recent years for their anti-cancer properties. Growth inhibitory effects of berberine on multiple types of human cancer cells have been reported. Berberine inhibits invasion, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human cancer cells. The anti-inflammatory property of berberine, involving inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) activation, has also been documented. In this study, we have examined the effects of berberine on tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells and their relationship to STAT3 signaling using both in vivo and in vitro models. Berberine effectively inhibited the tumorigenicity and growth of an EBV-positive NPC cell line (C666-1) in athymic nude mice. Inhibition of tumorigenic growth of NPC cells in vivo was correlated with effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells inside the tumor xenografts grown in nude mice. In vitro, berberine inhibited both constitutive and IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Inhibition of STAT3 activation by berberine induced growth inhibition and apoptotic response in NPC cells. Tumor-associated fibroblasts were found to secret IL-6 and the conditioned medium harvested from the fibroblasts also induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Furthermore, STAT3 activation by conditioned medium of tumor-associated fibroblasts could be blocked by berberine or antibodies against IL-6 and IL-6R. Our observation that berberine effectively inhibited activation of STAT3 induced by tumor-associated fibroblasts suggests a role of berberine in modulating the effects of tumor stroma on the growth of NPC cells. The effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells by berberine supports its potential use in the treatment of NPC

  5. CSR1 suppresses tumor growth and metastasis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoying; Tseng, George C; Yu, Yan Ping; Gavel, Tim; Nelson, Joel; Wells, Alan; Michalopoulos, George; Kokkinakis, Demetrius; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2006-02-01

    Prostate cancer is frequent among men over 45 years of age, but it generally only becomes lethal with metastasis. In this study, we identified a gene called cellular stress response 1 (CSR1) that was frequently down-regulated and methylated in prostate cancer samples. Survival analysis indicated that methylation of the CSR1 promoter, and to a lesser extent down-regulation of CSR1 protein expression, was associated with a high rate of prostate cancer metastasis. Forced expression of CSR1 in prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 resulted in a two- to threefold decrease in colony formation and a 10-fold reduction in anchorage-independent growth. PC3 cells stably expressing CSR1 had an average threefold decrease in their ability to invade in vitro. Expression of CSR1 in PC3 cell xenografts produced a dramatic reduction (>8-fold) in tumor size, rate of invasion (0 versus 31%), and mortality (13 versus 100%). The present findings suggest that CSR1 is a potent tumor sup-pressor gene. PMID:16436673

  6. Growth hormone and risk for cardiac tumors in Carney complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandettini, W Patricia; Karageorgiadis, Alexander S; Sinaii, Ninet; Rosing, Douglas R; Sachdev, Vandana; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Gourgari, Evgenia; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Keil, Meg F; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Carney, J Aidan; Arai, Andrew E; Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-09-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is a multiple neoplasia syndrome that is caused mostly by PRKAR1A mutations. Cardiac myxomas are the leading cause of mortality in CNC patients who, in addition, often develop growth hormone (GH) excess. We studied patients with CNC, who were observed for over a period of 20 years (1995-2015) for the development of both GH excess and cardiac myxomas. GH secretion was evaluated by standard testing; dedicated cardiovascular imaging was used to detect cardiac abnormalities. Four excised cardiac myxomas were tested for the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). A total of 99 CNC patients (97 with a PRKAR1A mutation) were included in the study with a mean age of 25.8 ± 16.6 years at presentation. Over an observed mean follow-up of 25.8 years, 60% of patients with GH excess (n = 46) developed a cardiac myxoma compared with only 36% of those without GH excess (n = 54) (P = 0.016). Overall, patients with GH excess were also more likely to have a tumor vs those with normal GH secretion (OR: 2.78, 95% CI: 1.23-6.29; P = 0.014). IGF-1 mRNA and protein were higher in CNC myxomas than in normal heart tissue. We conclude that the development of cardiac myxomas in CNC may be associated with increased GH secretion, in a manner analogous to the association between fibrous dysplasia and GH excess in McCune-Albright syndrome, a condition similar to CNC. We speculate that treatment of GH excess in patients with CNC may reduce the likelihood of cardiac myxoma formation and/or recurrence of this tumor.

  7. Growth hormone and risk for cardiac tumors in Carney complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandettini, W Patricia; Karageorgiadis, Alexander S; Sinaii, Ninet; Rosing, Douglas R; Sachdev, Vandana; Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Gourgari, Evgenia; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Keil, Meg F; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Carney, J Aidan; Arai, Andrew E; Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-09-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is a multiple neoplasia syndrome that is caused mostly by PRKAR1A mutations. Cardiac myxomas are the leading cause of mortality in CNC patients who, in addition, often develop growth hormone (GH) excess. We studied patients with CNC, who were observed for over a period of 20 years (1995-2015) for the development of both GH excess and cardiac myxomas. GH secretion was evaluated by standard testing; dedicated cardiovascular imaging was used to detect cardiac abnormalities. Four excised cardiac myxomas were tested for the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). A total of 99 CNC patients (97 with a PRKAR1A mutation) were included in the study with a mean age of 25.8 ± 16.6 years at presentation. Over an observed mean follow-up of 25.8 years, 60% of patients with GH excess (n = 46) developed a cardiac myxoma compared with only 36% of those without GH excess (n = 54) (P = 0.016). Overall, patients with GH excess were also more likely to have a tumor vs those with normal GH secretion (OR: 2.78, 95% CI: 1.23-6.29; P = 0.014). IGF-1 mRNA and protein were higher in CNC myxomas than in normal heart tissue. We conclude that the development of cardiac myxomas in CNC may be associated with increased GH secretion, in a manner analogous to the association between fibrous dysplasia and GH excess in McCune-Albright syndrome, a condition similar to CNC. We speculate that treatment of GH excess in patients with CNC may reduce the likelihood of cardiac myxoma formation and/or recurrence of this tumor. PMID:27535175

  8. Stochastic resonance in the growth of a tumor induced by correlated noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Weirong; SHAO Yuanzhi; HE Zhenhui

    2005-01-01

    Multiplicative noise is found to divide the growth law of tumors into two parts in a logistic model, which is driven by additive and multiplicative noises simultaneously. The Fokker-Planck equation was also derived to explain the fact that the influence of the intensity of multiplicative noise on the growth of tumor cells has a stochastic resonance-like characteristic. An appropriate intensity of multiplicative noise is benefit to the growth of the tumor cells. The correlation between two sorts of noises weakens the stochastic resonance-like characteristic. Homologous noises promote the growth of the tumor cells.

  9. Modulation of cell cycle regulatory protein expression and suppression of tumor growth by mimosine in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H C; Weng, C F; Yen, M H; Chuang, L Y; Hung, W C

    2000-10-01

    Our previous results demonstrated that the plant amino acid mimosine blocked cell cycle progression and suppressed proliferation of human lung cancer cells in vitro by multiple mechanisms. Inhibition of cyclin D1 expression or induction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1 expression was found in mimosine-treated lung cancer cells. However, whether mimosine may modulate the expression of these cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppress tumor growth in vivo is unknown. In this study, we examined the anti-cancer effect of mimosine on human H226 lung cancer cells grown in nude mice. Our results demonstrated that mimosine inhibits cyclin D1 and induces p21WAF1 expression in vivo. Furthermore, results of TUNEL analysis indicated that mimosine may induce apoptosis to suppress tumor growth in nude mice. Collectively, these results suggest that mimosine exerts anti-cancer effect in vivo and might be useful in the therapy of lung cancer. PMID:10995875

  10. Anti-tumor activity of the TGF-β receptor kinase inhibitor galunisertib (LY2157299 monohydrate) in patient-derived tumor xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Armin; Peille, Anne-Lise; Vuaroqueaux, Vincent; Lahn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway is known to play a critical role in promoting tumor growth. Consequently, blocking this pathway has been found to inhibit tumor growth. In order to achieve an optimal anti-tumor effect, however, it remains to be established whether blocking the TGF-β signaling pathway alone is sufficient, or whether the tumor microenvironment plays an additional, possibly synergistic, role. Methods To investigate the relevance of blocking T...

  11. Curdlan blocks the immune suppression by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduces tumor burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Ke; Tian, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Ma, Jie; Xu, Ping; Tian, Xinyu; Wang, Yungang; Xu, Huaxi; Lu, Liwei; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-08-01

    Tumor-elicited immunosuppression is one of the essential mechanisms for tumor evasion of immune surveillance. It is widely thought to be one of the main reasons for the failure of tumor immunotherapy. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of cells that play an important role in tumor-induced immunosuppression. These cells expand in tumor-bearing individuals and suppress T cell responses via various mechanisms. Curdlan, the linear (1 → 3)-β-glucan from Agrobacterium, has been applied in the food industry and other sectors. The anti-tumor property of curdlan has been recognized for a long time although the underlying mechanism still needs to be explored. In this study, we investigated the effect of curdlan on MDSCs and found that curdlan could promote MDSCs to differentiate into a more mature state and then significantly reduce the suppressive function of MDSCs, decrease the MDSCs in vivo and down-regulate the suppression in tumor-bearing mice, thus leading to enhanced anti-tumor immune responses. We, therefore, increase the understanding of further mechanisms by which curdlan achieves anti-tumor effects. PMID:26832917

  12. A New Cell Block Method for Multiple Immunohistochemical Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells in Patients with Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soo Jeong; Yeo, Hyun Yang; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Bo Hyun; Hong, Eun Kyung; Park, Joong-Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We developed a new method of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in liver cancer patients by constructing cell blocks from peripheral blood cells, including CTCs, followed by multiple immunohistochemical analysis. Materials and Methods Cell blockswere constructed from the nucleated cell pellets of peripheral blood afterremoval of red blood cells. The blood cell blocks were obtained from 29 patients with liver cancer, and from healthy donor blood spikedwith seven cell lines. The cell blocks and corresponding tumor tissues were immunostained with antibodies to seven markers: cytokeratin (CK), epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), CK18, α-fetoprotein (AFP), Glypican 3, and HepPar1. Results The average recovery rate of spiked SW620 cells from blood cell blocks was 91%. CTCs were detected in 14 out of 29 patients (48.3%); 11/23 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), 1/2 cholangiocarcinomas (CC), 1/1 combined HCC-CC, and 1/3 metastatic cancers. CTCs from 14 patients were positive for EpCAM (57.1%), EMA (42.9%), AFP (21.4%), CK18 (14.3%), Gypican3 and CK (7.1%, each), and HepPar1 (0%). Patients with HCC expressed EpCAM, EMA, CK18, and AFP in tissue and/or CTCs, whereas CK, HepPar1, and Glypican3 were expressed only in tissue. Only EMA was significantly associated with the expressions in CTC and tissue. CTC detection was associated with higher T stage and portal vein invasion in HCC patients. Conclusion This cell block method allows cytologic detection and multiple immunohistochemical analysis of CTCs. Our results show that tissue biomarkers of HCC may not be useful for the detection of CTC. EpCAM could be a candidate marker for CTCs in patients with HCC. PMID:27034142

  13. HIF-1α inhibition blocks the cross talk between multiple myeloma plasma cells and tumor microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant disorder of post-germinal center B cells, characterized by the clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells (PCs) within the bone marrow (BM). The reciprocal and complex interactions that take place between the different compartments of BM and the MM cells result in tumor growth, angiogenesis, bone disease, and drug resistance. Given the importance of the BM microenvironment in MM pathogenesis, we investigated the possible involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible transcription Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in the PCs-bone marrow stromal cells interplay. To test this hypothesis, we used EZN-2968, a 3rd generation antisense oligonucleotide against HIF-1α, to inhibit HIF-1α functions. Herein, we provide evidence that the interaction between MM cells and BM stromal cells is drastically reduced upon HIF-1α down-modulation. Notably, we showed that upon exposure to HIF-1α inhibitor, neither the incubation with IL-6 nor the co-culture with BM stromal cells were able to revert the anti-proliferative effect induced by EZN-2968. Moreover, we observed a down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades and a reduction of MM cells adhesion capability to the extracellular matrix proteins in EZN-2968-treated samples. Taken together, these results strongly support the concept that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the interactions between bone BM cells and PCs in Multiple Myeloma. - Highlights: • HIF-1α inhibition induces a mild apoptotic cell death. • Down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades upon HIF-1α inhibition. • Reduced interaction between MM cells and BMSCs upon HIF-1α down-modulation. • Reduced PCs adhesion to the extracellular matrix protein induced by EZN-2968. • HIF-1α inhibition may be an attractive therapeutic strategy for Multiple Myeloma

  14. HIF-1α inhibition blocks the cross talk between multiple myeloma plasma cells and tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsi, Enrica, E-mail: enrica.borsi2@unibo.it [Department of Experimental Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES), “L. and A. Seràgnoli”, Bologna University School of Medicine, S. Orsola' s University Hospital (Italy); Perrone, Giulia [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Hematology Department, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Terragna, Carolina; Martello, Marina; Zamagni, Elena; Tacchetti, Paola; Pantani, Lucia; Brioli, Annamaria; Dico, Angela Flores; Zannetti, Beatrice Anna; Rocchi, Serena; Cavo, Michele [Department of Experimental Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES), “L. and A. Seràgnoli”, Bologna University School of Medicine, S. Orsola' s University Hospital (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant disorder of post-germinal center B cells, characterized by the clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells (PCs) within the bone marrow (BM). The reciprocal and complex interactions that take place between the different compartments of BM and the MM cells result in tumor growth, angiogenesis, bone disease, and drug resistance. Given the importance of the BM microenvironment in MM pathogenesis, we investigated the possible involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible transcription Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in the PCs-bone marrow stromal cells interplay. To test this hypothesis, we used EZN-2968, a 3rd generation antisense oligonucleotide against HIF-1α, to inhibit HIF-1α functions. Herein, we provide evidence that the interaction between MM cells and BM stromal cells is drastically reduced upon HIF-1α down-modulation. Notably, we showed that upon exposure to HIF-1α inhibitor, neither the incubation with IL-6 nor the co-culture with BM stromal cells were able to revert the anti-proliferative effect induced by EZN-2968. Moreover, we observed a down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades and a reduction of MM cells adhesion capability to the extracellular matrix proteins in EZN-2968-treated samples. Taken together, these results strongly support the concept that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the interactions between bone BM cells and PCs in Multiple Myeloma. - Highlights: • HIF-1α inhibition induces a mild apoptotic cell death. • Down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades upon HIF-1α inhibition. • Reduced interaction between MM cells and BMSCs upon HIF-1α down-modulation. • Reduced PCs adhesion to the extracellular matrix protein induced by EZN-2968. • HIF-1α inhibition may be an attractive therapeutic strategy for Multiple Myeloma.

  15. Natamycin blocks fungal growth by binding specifically to ergosterol without permeabilizing the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Welscher, Yvonne M; ten Napel, Hendrik H; Balagué, Miriam Masià; Souza, Cleiton M; Riezman, Howard; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2008-03-01

    Natamycin is a polyene antibiotic that is commonly used as an antifungal agent because of its broad spectrum of activity and the lack of development of resistance. Other polyene antibiotics, like nystatin and filipin are known to interact with sterols, with some specificity for ergosterol thereby causing leakage of essential components and cell death. The mode of action of natamycin is unknown and is investigated in this study using different in vitro and in vivo approaches. Isothermal titration calorimetry and direct binding studies revealed that natamycin binds specifically to ergosterol present in model membranes. Yeast sterol biosynthetic mutants revealed the importance of the double bonds in the B-ring of ergosterol for the natamycin-ergosterol interaction and the consecutive block of fungal growth. Surprisingly, in strong contrast to nystatin and filipin, natamycin did not change the permeability of the yeast plasma membrane under conditions that growth was blocked. Also, in ergosterol containing model membranes, natamycin did not cause a change in bilayer permeability. This demonstrates that natamycin acts via a novel mode of action and blocks fungal growth by binding specifically to ergosterol. PMID:18165687

  16. Prostacyclin Inhibits Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Growth by a Frizzled 9-Dependent Pathway That Is Blocked by Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith A. Tennis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess the ability of iloprost, an orally active prostacyclin analog, to inhibit transformed growth of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and to define the mechanism of iloprost's tumor suppressive effects. In a panel of NSCLC cell lines, the ability of iloprost to inhibit transformed cell growth was not correlated with the expression of the cell surface receptor for prostacyclin, but instead was correlated with the presence of Frizzled 9 (Fzd 9 and the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ. Silencing of Fzd 9 blocked PPARγ activation by iloprost, and expression of Fzd 9 in cells lacking the protein resulted in iloprost's activation of PPARγ and inhibition of transformed growth. Interestingly, soluble Frizzled-related protein-1, a well-known inhibitor of Wnt/Fzd signaling, also blocked the effects of iloprost and Fzd 9. Moreover, mice treated with iloprost had reduced lung tumors and increased Fzd 9 expression. These studies define a novel paradigm, linking the eicosanoid pathway and Wnt signaling. In addition, these data also suggest that prostacyclin analogs may represent a new class of therapeutic agents in the treatment of NSCLC where the restoration of noncanonical Wnt signaling maybe important for the inhibition of transformed cell growth.

  17. Hazard plotting and estimates for the tumor rate and the tumor growth time for radiogenic osteosarcomas in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tumor rate (hazard rate) and the tumor growth time were estimated from a multiply censored sample of observed tumor appearance times in persons with an initial intake of 226Ra and 228Ra larger than about 230 μCi/kg bone. The tumor appearance times in these individuals appear to be exponentially distributed and follow, therefore, a straight line if plotted against the cumulative hazard on linear paper, the hazard paper for an exponential failure time distribution. This implies a constant dose independent tumor rate for osteosarcoma induction in the limit of large radiation doses. An expression for tumor rate from a stochastic model, described earlier in detail showing this behavior, is discussed briefly

  18. Aspirin inhibits colon cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates specificity protein (Sp transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Pathi

    Full Text Available Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin is highly effective for treating colon cancer patients postdiagnosis; however, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in colon cancer are not well defined. Aspirin and its major metabolite sodium salicylate induced apoptosis and decreased colon cancer cell growth and the sodium salt of aspirin also inhibited tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. Colon cancer cell growth inhibition was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and decreased expression of Sp-regulated gene products including bcl-2, survivin, VEGF, VEGFR1, cyclin D1, c-MET and p65 (NFκB. Moreover, we also showed by RNA interference that β-catenin, an important target of aspirin in some studies, is an Sp-regulated gene. Aspirin induced nuclear caspase-dependent cleavage of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and this response was related to sequestration of zinc ions since addition of zinc sulfate blocked aspirin-mediated apoptosis and repression of Sp proteins. The results demonstrate an important underlying mechanism of action of aspirin as an anticancer agent and, based on the rapid metabolism of aspirin to salicylate in humans and the high salicylate/aspirin ratios in serum, it is likely that the anticancer activity of aspirin is also due to the salicylate metabolite.

  19. O-GlcNAcylation of G6PD promotes the pentose phosphate pathway and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiongjian; Duan, Xiaotao; Mao, Weimin; Li, Xuexia; Li, Zhonghua; Li, Qian; Zheng, Zhiguo; Xu, Haimiao; Chen, Min; Wang, Peng G; Wang, Yingjie; Shen, Binghui; Yi, Wen

    2015-09-24

    The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) plays a critical role in macromolecule biosynthesis and maintaining cellular redox homoeostasis in rapidly proliferating cells. Upregulation of the PPP has been shown in several types of cancer. However, how the PPP is regulated to confer a selective growth advantage on cancer cells is not well understood. Here we show that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme of the PPP, is dynamically modified with an O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine sugar in response to hypoxia. Glycosylation activates G6PD activity and increases glucose flux through the PPP, thereby providing precursors for nucleotide and lipid biosynthesis, and reducing equivalents for antioxidant defense. Blocking glycosylation of G6PD reduces cancer cell proliferation in vitro and impairs tumor growth in vivo. Importantly, G6PD glycosylation is increased in human lung cancers. Our findings reveal a mechanistic understanding of how O-glycosylation directly regulates the PPP to confer a selective growth advantage to tumours.

  20. Volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng-Feng; Pan, Shi-Shi; Ou, Rong-Ying; Zheng, Zhen-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Xiu; Jian, Meng-Ting; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Yang, Yang; Li, Wen-Feng; Shi, Zhi; Yan, Xiao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Volasertib (BI 6727), a highly selective and potent inhibitor of PLK1, has shown broad antitumor activities in the preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of several types of cancers. However, the anticancer effect of volasertib on cervical cancer cells is still unknown. In the present study, we show that volasertib can markedly induce cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and apoptosis with the decreased protein expressions of PLK1 substrates survivin and wee1 in human cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, volasertib also enhances the intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) levels, and pretreated with ROS scavenger N-acety-L-cysteine totally blocks ROS generation but partly reverses volasertib-induced apoptosis. In addition, volasertib significantly potentiates the activity of cisplatin to inhibit the growth of cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. In brief, volasertib suppresses tumor growth and potentiates the activity of cisplatin in cervical cancer, suggesting the combination of volasertib and cisplatin may be a promising strategy for the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. PMID:26885445

  1. M-HIFU inhibits tumor growth, suppresses STAT3 activity and enhances tumor specific immunity in a transplant tumor model of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In this study, we explored the use of mechanical high intensity focused ultrasound (M-HIFU as a neo-adjuvant therapy prior to surgical resection of the primary tumor. We also investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 in M-HIFU elicited anti-tumor immune response using a transplant tumor model of prostate cancer. METHODS: RM-9, a mouse prostate cancer cell line with constitutively activated STAT3, was inoculated subcutaneously in C57BL/6J mice. The tumor-bearing mice (with a maximum tumor diameter of 5∼6 mm were treated by M-HIFU or sham exposure two days before surgical resection of the primary tumor. Following recovery, if no tumor recurrence was observed in 30 days, tumor rechallenge was performed. The growth of the rechallenged tumor, survival rate and anti-tumor immune response of the animal were evaluated. RESULTS: No tumor recurrence and distant metastasis were observed in both treatment groups employing M-HIFU + surgery and surgery alone. However, compared to surgery alone, M-HIFU combined with surgery were found to significantly inhibit the growth of rechallenged tumors, down-regulate intra-tumoral STAT3 activities, increase cytotoxic T cells in spleens and tumor draining lymph nodes (TDLNs, and improve the host survival. Furthermore, M-HIFU combined with surgery was found to significantly decrease the level of immunosuppression with concomitantly increased number and activities of dendritic cells, compared to surgery alone. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that M-HIFU can inhibit STAT3 activities, and when combined synergistically with surgery, may provide a novel and promising strategy for the treatment of prostate cancers.

  2. Impact of Stroma on the Growth, Microcirculation, Metabolism of Experimental Prostate Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M. Zechmann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In prostate cancers (PCa, the formation of malignant stroma may substantially influence tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. Thus, the impact of the orthotopic and subcutaneous implantations of hormone-sensitive (H, hormone-insensitive (HI, anaplastic (AT1 Dunning PCa in rats on growth, microcirculation, metabolism was investigated. For this purpose, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([1H]MRS were applied in combination with histology. Consistent observations revealed that orthotopic H tumors grew significantly slower compared to subcutaneous ones, whereas the growth of HI and AT1 tumors was comparable at both locations. Histologic analysis indicated that glandular differentiation and a close interaction of tumor cells and smooth muscle cells (SMC were associated with slow tumor growth. Furthermore, there was a significantly lower SMC density in subcutaneous H tumors than in orthotopic H tumors. Perfusion was observed to be significantly lower in orthotopic H tumors than in subcutaneous H tumors. Regional blood volume and permeability-surface area product showed no significant differences between tumor models and their implantation sites. Differences in growth between subcutaneous and orthotopic H tumors can be attributed to tumor-stroma interaction and perfusion. Here, SMC, may stabilize glandular structures and contribute to the maintenance of differentiated phenotype.

  3. Impact of Stroma on the Growth, Microcirculation, and Metabolism of Experimental Prostate Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmann, Christian M; Woenne, Eva C; Brix, Gunnar; Radzwill, Nicole; Ilg, Martin; Bachert, Peter; Peschke, Peter; Kirsch, Stefan; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Delorme, Stefan; Semmler, Wolfhard; Kiessling, Fabian

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In prostate cancers (PCa), the formation of malignant stroma may substantially influence tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. Thus, the impact of the orthotopic and subcutaneous implantations of hormone-sensitive (H), hormone-insensitive (HI), and anaplastic (AT1) Dunning PCa in rats on growth, microcirculation, and metabolism was investigated. For this purpose, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([1H]MRS) were applied in combination with histology. Consistent observations revealed that orthotopic H tumors grew significantly slower compared to subcutaneous ones, whereas the growth of HI and AT1 tumors was comparable at both locations. Histologic analysis indicated that glandular differentiation and a close interaction of tumor cells and smooth muscle cells (SMC) were associated with slow tumor growth. Furthermore, there was a significantly lower SMC density in subcutaneous H tumors than in orthotopic H tumors. Perfusion was observed to be significantly lower in orthotopic H tumors than in subcutaneous H tumors. Regional blood volume and permeability-surface area product showed no significant differences between tumor models and their implantation sites. Differences in growth between subcutaneous and orthotopic H tumors can be attributed to tumor-stroma interaction and perfusion. Here, SMC, may stabilize glandular structures and contribute to the maintenance of differentiated phenotype. PMID:17325744

  4. Pathology of growth hormone-producing tumors of the human pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, K; Horvath, E

    1986-02-01

    This paper reviews the morphologic features of growth hormone-producing tumors of the human pituitary. These tumors are associated with elevated blood growth hormone levels and acromegaly or gigantism and can be classified into the following morphologically distinct entities by the combined application of histology, immunocytology, and electron microscopy: densely granulated growth hormone cell adenoma; sparsely granulated growth hormone cell adenoma; mixed growth hormone cell- prolactin cell-adenoma; acidophil stem cell adenoma; mammosomatotroph cell adenoma; growth hormone cell carcinoma; plurihormonal adenoma with growth hormone production. PMID:3303228

  5. Preliminary investigation of the inhibitory effects of mechanical stress in tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ishita; Miga, Michael I.

    2008-03-01

    In the past years different models have been formulated to explain the growth of gliomas in the brain. The most accepted model is based on a reaction-diffusion equation that describes the growth of the tumor as two separate components- a proliferative component and an invasive component. While many improvements have been made to this basic model, the work exploring the factors that naturally inhibit growth is insufficient. It is known that stress fields affect the growth of normal tissue. Due to the rigid skull surrounding the brain, mechanical stress might be an important factor in inhibiting the growth of gliomas. A realistic model of glioma growth would have to take that inhibitory effect into account. In this work a mathematical model based on the reaction-diffusion equation was used to describe tumor growth, and the affect of mechanical stresses caused by the mass effect of tumor cells was studied. An initial tumor cell concentration with a Gaussian distribution was assumed and tumor growth was simulated for two cases- one where growth was solely governed by the reaction-diffusion equation and second where mechanical stress inhibits growth by affecting the diffusivity. All the simulations were performed using the finite difference method. The results of simulations show that the proposed mechanism of inhibition could have a significant affect on tumor growth predictions. This could have implications for varied applications in the imaging field that use growth models, such as registration and model updated surgery.

  6. EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR, TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-a AND THEIR RECEPTOR IN HUMAN PITUITARY TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of growth factor autocrine stimulation in the pathogenesis of human pituitary tumors. Methods: The expression of EGF, TGF-a and EGFR were studied by immunohisto-chemical method on paraffin-embedded sections of 30 cases pituitary tumor. Results: EGFR and its ligands EGF, TGF-a expressed in majority of pituitary tumors. The expression of EGFR and its ligands varied with cells' intensity, density and type. Conclusion: The EGF autocrine stimulating exerted in the pituitary tumor development process, that tyrosine kinases inhibitors may be useful for pituitary tumors treatment.

  7. Hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth considering capillary points

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕杰; 许世雄; 姚伟; 周瑜; 龙泉

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth in the avascular phase considering capillary points is established. The influence of the position of capillary points on tumor growth is also studied by simulation. The results of the dynamic tumor growth and the distribution of oxygen, matrix-degrading enzymes, and extracellular matrix-concentration in the microenvironment with respect to time are shown by graphs. The relationships between different oxygenated environments and the numbers of surviving, dead, proliferative, and quiescent tumor cells are also investigated.

  8. Elevated VEGF-D Modulates Tumor Inflammation and Reduces the Growth of Carcinogen-Induced Skin Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkanen, Hanne-Kaisa; Izzi, Valerio; Petäistö, Tiina; Holopainen, Tanja; Harjunen, Vanessa; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Alitalo, Kari; Heljasvaara, Ritva

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor D (VEGF-D) promotes the lymph node metastasis of cancer by inducing the growth of lymphatic vasculature, but its specific roles in tumorigenesis have not been elucidated. We monitored the effects of VEGF-D in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) by subjecting transgenic mice overexpressing VEGF-D in the skin (K14-mVEGF-D) and VEGF-D knockout mice to a chemical skin carcinogenesis protocol involving 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatments. In K14-mVEGF-D mice, tumor lymphangiogenesis was significantly increased and the frequency of lymph node metastasis was elevated in comparison with controls. Most notably, the papillomas regressed more often in K14-mVEGF-D mice than in littermate controls, resulting in a delay in tumor incidence and a remarkable reduction in the total tumor number. Skin tumor growth and metastasis were not obviously affected in the absence of VEGF-D; however, the knockout mice showed a trend for reduced lymphangiogenesis in skin tumors and in the untreated skin. Interestingly, K14-mVEGF-D mice showed an altered immune response in skin tumors. This consisted of the reduced accumulation of macrophages, mast cells, and CD4(+) T-cells and an increase of cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cells. Cytokine profiling by flow cytometry and quantitative real time PCR revealed that elevated VEGF-D expression results in an attenuated Th2 response and promotes M1/Th1 and Th17 polarization in the early stage of skin carcinogenesis, leading to an anti-tumoral immune environment and the regression of primary tumors. Our data suggest that VEGF-D may be beneficial in early-stage tumors since it suppresses the pro-tumorigenic inflammation, while at later stages VEGF-D-induced tumor lymphatics provide a route for metastasis. PMID:27435926

  9. Plasmin-driven fibrinolysis facilitates skin tumor growth in a gender-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Andreas; Eickhardt, Hanne; Maerkedahl, Rasmus Baadsgaard;

    2012-01-01

    the development of skin cancer. To test this, we set up a chemically induced skin tumor model in a cohort of mice and found that skin tumor growth in Plg(-)(/)(-) male mice was reduced by 52% compared with wild-type controls. Histological analyses suggested that the growth-restricting effect of plasminogen...

  10. Angiostatin and endostatin: endothelial cell-specific endogenous inhibitors of angiogenesis and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, B K

    1998-01-01

    Angiostatin and Endostatin are potent inhibitors of angiogenesis. These proteins are endogenously produced and specifically target endothelial cells resulting in angiogenesis inhibition. Recombinant preparations of these proteins inhibit the growth of metastases and regress primary tumors to dormant microscopic lesions. A variety of murine tumors as well as human breast, prostate and colon tumors in human xenograft models regress when treated with Angiostatin or Endostatin. Regression of tumors upon systemic treatment with these proteins is in part due to increased tumor cell apoptosis. Repeated cycles of Endostatin therapy lead to prolonged tumor dormancy without further treatment and are not associated with any apparent toxicity or acquired drug resistance. PMID:14517374

  11. A Mathematical Model of Chaotic Attractor in Tumor Growth and Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancevic, Tijana T.; Bottema, Murk J.; Jain, Lakhmi C.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a strange-attractor model of tumor growth and metastasis. It is a 4-dimensional spatio-temporal cancer model with strong nonlinear couplings. Even the same type of tumor is different in every patient both in size and appearance, as well as in temporal behavior. This is clearly a characteristic of dynamical systems sensitive to initial conditions. The new chaotic model of tumor growth and decay is biologically motivated. It has been developed as a live Mathematica demonstration, see...

  12. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M S; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu; Pandey, B N

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  13. Blockade of Wnt signaling inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    J. Hu; Dong, A.; Fernandez-Ruiz, V. (Verónica); Shan, J.; Kawa, M. (Milosz); Martinez-Anso, E. (Eduardo); J. Prieto; Qian, C

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling plays an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis. In addition to direct effects on tumor cells, Wnt signaling might be involved in the organization of tumor microenvironment. In this study, we have explored whether Wnt signaling blockade by exogenous expression of Wnt antagonists could inhibit tumor angiogenesis and control tumor growth. Human Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) and secreted frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP1) were each fused with Fc fragment of ...

  14. Consistent fluctuations in quantities of circulating immune complexes during progressive and regressive phases of tumor growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Jennette, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Circulating immune complexes (CIC) were quantitated by a Raji cell radioimmunoassay in sera from Brown Norway rats bearing progressing or regressing methylcholanthrene-induced sarcomas. Quantitative profiles of CIC over time were related to tumor dose, tumor mass, and the regressive or progressive course of tumor growth. Animals bearing progressing tumors demonstrated an initial peak of CIC levels by 7 weeks but thereafter displayed a persistent decline in quantities of CIC despite continued ...

  15. Suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis by a specific antagonist of the cell-surface expressed nucleolin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Destouches

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidences suggest that nucleolin expressed on the cell surface is implicated in growth of tumor cells and angiogenesis. Nucleolin is one of the major proteins of the nucleolus, but it is also expressed on the cell surface where is serves as a binding protein for variety of ligands implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, mitogenesis and angiogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a specific antagonist that binds the C-terminal tail of nucleolin, the HB-19 pseudopeptide, here we show that the growth of tumor cells and angiogenesis are suppressed in various in vitro and in vivo experimental models. HB-19 inhibited colony formation in soft agar of tumor cell lines, impaired migration of endothelial cells and formation of capillary-like structures in collagen gel, and reduced blood vessel branching in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. In athymic nude mice, HB-19 treatment markedly suppressed the progression of established human breast tumor cell xenografts in nude mice, and in some cases eliminated measurable tumors while displaying no toxicity to normal tissue. This potent antitumoral effect is attributed to the direct inhibitory action of HB-19 on both tumor and endothelial cells by blocking and down regulating surface nucleolin, but without any apparent effect on nucleolar nucleolin. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results illustrate the dual inhibitory action of HB-19 on the tumor development and the neovascularization process, thus validating the cell-surface expressed nucleolin as a strategic target for an effective cancer drug. Consequently, the HB-19 pseudopeptide provides a unique candidate to consider for innovative cancer therapy.

  16. A novel thermal treatment modality for controlling breast tumor growth and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yifan; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X

    2012-01-01

    The new concept of keeping primary tumor under control in situ to suppress distant foci sheds light on the novel treatment of metastatic tumor. Hyperthermia is considered as one of the means for controlling tumor growth. In this study, a novel thermal modality was built to introduce hyperthermia effect on tumor to suppress its growth and progression using 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma, a common animal model of metastatic breast cancer. A mildly raised temperature (i.e.39°C) was imposed on the skin surface of the implanted tumor using a thermal heating pad. Periodic heating (12 hours per day) was carried out for 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days, respectively. The tumor growth rate was found significantly decreased in comparison to the control without hyperthermia. Biological evidences associated with tumor angiogenesis and metastasis were examined using histological analyses. Accordingly, the effect of mild hyperthermia on immune cell infiltration into tumors was also investigated. It was demonstrated that a delayed tumor growth and malignancy progression was achieved by mediating tumor cell apoptosis, vascular injury, degrading metastasis potential and as well as inhibiting the immunosuppressive cell myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) recruitment. Further mechanistic studies will be performed to explore the quantitative relationship between tumor progression and thermal dose in the near future. PMID:23367225

  17. Study of thermal effect on breast tumor metabolism and growth using metabonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guangchen; Jia, Wei; Hu, Xiaofang; Xu, Lisa X

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the biological effects of long-term mild hyperthermia treatment on tumor metabolism and growth were investigated using 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma, a common animal model of metastatic breast cancer. Periodic thermal treatment (12 hours per day) was applied to tumors and carried out for 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 21 days, respectively. The metabolites of tumor tissues were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that the growth rate of thermally treated tumors was inversely related to the abundance of long chain fatty acids and acyl glycerols identified in tumor tissues. In the first two weeks, the growth of thermally treated tumors was significantly inhibited, while there was an obvious accumulation of long chain fatty acids and acyl glycerols in tumor tissues. In the third week, the thermally treated tumors adapted to the thermal environment and started to regrow, while the abundance of long chain fatty acids and acyl glycerols decreased in the tumor tissues. These observations suggested that the blockade of long chain fatty acid synthesis during mild hyperthermia treatment of tumors could improve the long-term treatment effect by limiting the supply of substance and energy for tumor re-growth. PMID:24110083

  18. FAK regulates platelet extravasation and tumor growth after antiangiogenic therapy withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerle, Monika; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Pradeep, Sunila; Taylor, Morgan L; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Hansen, Jean M; Dalton, Heather J; Stone, Rebecca L; Cho, Min Soon; Nick, Alpa M; Nagaraja, Archana S; Gutschner, Tony; Gharpure, Kshipra M; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Han, Hee Dong; Zand, Behrouz; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Wu, Sherry Y; Pecot, Chad V; Burns, Alan R; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies in patients with ovarian cancer suggest that tumor growth may be accelerated following cessation of antiangiogenesis therapy; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of therapy withdrawal to those of continuous treatment with various antiangiogenic agents. Cessation of therapy with pazopanib, bevacizumab, and the human and murine anti-VEGF antibody B20 was associated with substantial tumor growth in mouse models of ovarian cancer. Increased tumor growth was accompanied by tumor hypoxia, increased tumor angiogenesis, and vascular leakage. Moreover, we found hypoxia-induced ADP production and platelet infiltration into tumors after withdrawal of antiangiogenic therapy, and lowering platelet counts markedly inhibited tumor rebound after withdrawal of antiangiogenic therapy. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelets regulated their migration into the tumor microenvironment, and FAK-deficient platelets completely prevented the rebound tumor growth. Additionally, combined therapy with a FAK inhibitor and the antiangiogenic agents pazopanib and bevacizumab reduced tumor growth and inhibited negative effects following withdrawal of antiangiogenic therapy. In summary, these results suggest that FAK may be a unique target in situations in which antiangiogenic agents are withdrawn, and dual targeting of FAK and VEGF could have therapeutic implications for ovarian cancer management. PMID:27064283

  19. Cytochalasin D, a tropical fungal metabolite, inhibits CT26 tumor growth and angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-Ying Huang; Yue-Nan Li; Wen-Li Mei; Hao-Fu Dai; Peng Zhou; Guang-Hong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate whether cytochalasin D can induce antitumor activities in a tumor model.Methods: Murine CT26 colorectal carcinoma cells were culturedin vitro and cytochalasin D was used as a cytotoxic agent to detect its capabilities of inhibitingCT26 cell proliferation and inducing cell apoptosis by MTT and aTUNEL-based apoptosis assay. MurineCT26 tumor model was established to observe the tumor growth and survival time. Tumor tissues were used to detect the microvessel density by immunohistochemistry. In addition, alginate encapsulated tumor cell assay was used to quantify the tumor angiogenesis in vivo.Results: Cytochalasin D inhibited CT26 tumor cell proliferation in time and dose dependent manner and induced significantCT26 cell apoptosis, which almost reached the level induced by the positive control nuclease. The optimum effective dose of cytochalasinD for in vivo therapy was about50 mg/kg. CytochalasinD in vivotreatment significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival times inCT26 tumor-bearing mice. The results of immunohistochemistry analysis and alginate encapsulation assay indicated that the cytochalasinD could effectively inhibited tumor angiogenesis. Conclusions:Cytochalasin D inhibitsCT26 tumor growth potentially through inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell apoptosis and suppression of tumor angiogenesis.

  20. Morphology-controlled growth of perylene derivative induced by double-hydrophilic block copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghua Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled growth of technically relevant perylene derivative 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid potassium salt (PTCAPS, with tuneable morpologies, has been successfully realized by a recrystallization method using a double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly (ethylene glycol-block poly (ethyleneimine (PEG-b-PEI as the structure directing agent. The {001} faces of PTCAPS are most polar and adsorb the oppositively charged polymer additive PEG-b-PEI well by electrostatic attraction. By simply adjusting the PEG-b-PEI concentration, systematic morphogenesis of PTCAPS from plates to microparticles composed of various plates splaying outwards could be realized. Furthermore, the variation of pH value of the recrystallization solution could induce the change of the interaction strength between PEG-b-PEI additive and PTCAPS and thus modify the morphology of PTCAPS from microparticles composed of various plates to ultralong microbelts.

  1. Morphology-controlled growth of perylene derivative induced by double-hydrophilic block copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minghua; Antonietti, Markus; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Controlled growth of technically relevant perylene derivative 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid potassium salt (PTCAPS), with tuneable morpologies, has been successfully realized by a recrystallization method using a double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly (ethylene glycol)-block poly (ethyleneimine) (PEG-b-PEI) as the structure directing agent. The {001} faces of PTCAPS are most polar and adsorb the oppositively charged polymer additive PEG-b-PEI well by electrostatic attraction. By simply adjusting the PEG-b-PEI concentration, systematic morphogenesis of PTCAPS from plates to microparticles composed of various plates splaying outwards could be realized. Furthermore, the variation of pH value of the recrystallization solution could induce the change of the interaction strength between PEG-b-PEI additive and PTCAPS and thus modify the morphology of PTCAPS from microparticles composed of various plates to ultralong microbelts.

  2. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  3. FORMATION OF NECROTIC CORES IN THE GROWTH OF TUMORS: ANALYTIC RESULTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author studies the mechanism of formation of necrotic cores in the growth of tumors by using rigorous analysis of a mathematical model. The model modifies a corresponding tumor growth model proposed by Byrne and Chaplain in 1996, in the case where no inhibitors exist. The modification is made such that both necrotic tumors and nonnecrotic tumors can be considered in a joint way. It is proved that if the nutrient supply is below a threshold value, then there is not dormant tumor,and all evolutionary tumors will finally vanish. If instead the nutrient supply is above this threshold value then there is a unique dormant tumor which can either be necrotic or nonnecrotic, depending on the level of the nutrient supply and the level of dead-cell dissolution rate, and all evolutionary tumors will converge to this dormant tumor. It is also proved that, in the second case, if the dormant tumor is necrotic then an evolutionary tumor will form a necrotic core at a finite time, and if the dormant tumor is nonnecrotic then an evolutionary tumor will also be nonnecrotic from a finite time.

  4. Decreased Warburg effect induced by ATP citrate lyase suppression inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Haifeng; Zhang, Yang; You, Yong; Cai, Tiantian; Wang, Yehuang

    2015-03-01

    ATP citrate lyase (ACLY) is responsible for the conversion of cytosolic citrate into acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate, and the first rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo lipogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that inhibition of elevated ACLY results in growth arrest and apoptosis in a subset of cancers; however, the expression pattern and underlying biological function of ACLY in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains unclear. In the current study, overexpressed ACLY was more commonly observed in PDAC compared to normal pancreatic tissues. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high expression level of ACLY resulted in a poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Silencing of endogenous ACLY expression by siRNA in PANC-1 cells led to reduced cell viability and increased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, significant decrease in glucose uptake and lactate production was observed after ACLY was knocked down, and this effect was blocked by 2-deoxy-D-glucose, indicating that ACLY functions in the Warburg effect affect PDAC cell growth. Collectively, this study reveals that suppression of ACLY plays an anti-tumor role through decreased Warburg effect, and ACLY-related inhibitors might be potential therapeutic approaches for PDAC. PMID:25701462

  5. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway

  6. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Qing [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Key Lab in Healthy Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Tou, Fangfang [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong [First Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Chen, Xinyi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029 (China); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zheng_sheva@hotmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China)

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  7. Diagnostic Value of Processing Cytologic Aspirates of Renal Tumors in Agar Cell (Tissue) Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedts, F.; Schrik, M.; Horn, T.;

    2010-01-01

    Objective To adapt a method enabling utilization of most of the harvest from a fine needle aspirate in an effort to improve diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of a renal tumor in a single histologic slide. Study Design In a series of 43 renal tumors, 2 fine needle aspirations were performed, 4...... smears were prepared after each aspiration for conventional cytology and the remaining aspirate was processed for the improved agar microbiopsy (AM) method. Conventional cytology slides, AM slides and surgical specimens were diagnosed separately, after which the diagnoses were compared...

  8. Mathematical models of tumor growth using Voronoi tessellations in pathology slides of kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saribudak, Aydin; Yiyu Dong; Gundry, Stephen; Hsieh, James; Uyar, M Umit

    2015-08-01

    The impact of patient-specific spatial distribution features of cell nuclei on tumor growth characteristics was analyzed. Tumor tissues from kidney cancer patients were allowed to grow in mice to apply H&E staining and to measure tumor volume during preclinical phase of our study. Imaging the H&E stained slides under a digital light microscope, the morphological characteristics of nuclei positions were determined. Using artificial intelligence based techniques, Voronoi features were derived from diagrams, where cell nuclei were considered as distinct nodes. By identifying the effect of each Voronoi feature, tumor growth was expressed mathematically. Consistency between the computed growth curves and preclinical measurements indicates that the information obtained from the H&E slides can be used as biomarkers to build personalized mathematical models for tumor growth. PMID:26737283

  9. Evaluation of radiolabeled ML04, a putative irreversible inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor, as a bioprobe for PET imaging of EGFR-overexpressing tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abourbeh, Galith [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Unit of Cellular Signaling, Department of Biological Chemistry, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Dissoki, Samar [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Jacobson, Orit [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Litchi, Amir [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Daniel, Revital Ben [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Laki, Desirediu [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Levitzki, Alexander [Unit of Cellular Signaling, Department of Biological Chemistry, Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Mishani, Eyal [Department of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Hadassah Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel)]. E-mail: mishani@md.huji.ac.il

    2007-01-15

    Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been implicated in tumor development and malignancy. Evaluating the degree of EGFR expression in tumors could aid in identifying patients for EGFR-targeted therapies and in monitoring treatment. Nevertheless, no currently available assay can reliably quantify receptor content in tumors. Radiolabeled inhibitors of EGFR-TK could be developed as bioprobes for positron emission tomography imaging. Such imaging agents would not only provide a noninvasive quantitative measurement of EGFR content in tumors but also serve as radionuclide carriers for targeted radiotherapy. The potency, reversibility, selectivity and specific binding characteristics of ML04, an alleged irreversible inhibitor of EGFR, were established in vitro. The distribution of the F-18-labeled compound and the extent of EGFR-specific tumor uptake were evaluated in tumor-bearing mice. ML04 demonstrated potent, irreversible and selective inhibition of EGFR, combined with specific binding to the receptor in intact cells. In vivo distribution of the radiolabeled compound revealed tumor/blood and tumor/muscle activity uptake ratios of about 7 and 5, respectively, 3 h following administration of a radiotracer. Nevertheless, only minor EGFR-specific uptake of the compound was detected in these studies, using either EGFR-negative tumors or blocking studies as controls. To improve the in vivo performance of ML04, administration via prolonged intravenous infusion is proposed. Detailed pharmacokinetic characterization of this bioprobe could assist in the development of a kinetic model that would afford accurate measurement of EGFR content in tumors.

  10. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  11. Co-option of pre-existing vascular beds in adipose tissue controls tumor growth rates and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sharon; Hosaka, Kayoko; Nakamura, Masaki; Cao, Yihai

    2016-06-21

    Many types of cancer develop in close association with highly vascularized adipose tissues. However, the role of adipose pre-existing vascular beds on tumor growth and angiogenesis is unknown. Here we report that pre-existing microvascular density in tissues where tumors originate is a crucial determinant for tumor growth and neovascularization. In three independent tumor types including breast cancer, melanoma, and fibrosarcoma, inoculation of tumor cells in the subcutaneous tissue, white adipose tissue (WAT), and brown adipose tissue (BAT) resulted in markedly differential tumor growth rates and angiogenesis, which were in concordance with the degree of pre-existing vascularization in these tissues. Relative to subcutaneous tumors, WAT and BAT tumors grew at accelerated rates along with improved neovascularization, blood perfusion, and decreased hypoxia. Tumor cells implanted in adipose tissues contained leaky microvessel with poor perivascular cell coverage. Thus, adipose vasculature predetermines the tumor microenvironment that eventually supports tumor growth.

  12. VAMP-associated protein B (VAPB) promotes breast tumor growth by modulation of Akt activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Meghana; Song, Wenqiang; Jiang, Aixiang; Shyr, Yu; Lev, Sima; Greenstein, David; Brantley-Sieders, Dana; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B) is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer.

  13. VAMP-associated protein B (VAPB promotes breast tumor growth by modulation of Akt activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghana Rao

    Full Text Available VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer.

  14. Inhibition of melanocortin 1 receptor slows melanoma growth, reduces tumor heterogeneity and increases survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Rita G; McCravy, Matthew S; Basham, Jacob H; Earl, Joshua A; McMurray, Stacy L; Starner, Chelsey J; Whitt, Michael A; Albritton, Lorraine M

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma risk is increased in patients with mutations of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) yet the basis for the increased risk remains unknown. Here we report in vivo evidence supporting a critical role for MC1R in regulating melanoma tumor growth and determining overall survival time. Inhibition of MC1R by its physiologically relevant competitive inhibitor, agouti signaling protein (ASIP), reduced melanin synthesis and morphological heterogeneity in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells. In the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, mCherry-marked, ASIP-secreting lung tumors inhibited MC1R on neighboring tumors lacking ASIP in a dose dependent manner as evidenced by a proportional loss of pigment in tumors from mice injected with 1:1, 3:1 and 4:1 mixtures of parental B16-F10 to ASIP-expressing tumor cells. ASIP-expressing B16-F10 cells formed poorly pigmented tumors in vivo that correlated with a 20% longer median survival than those bearing parental B16-F10 tumors (p=0.0005). Mice injected with 1:1 mixtures also showed survival benefit (p=0.0054), whereas injection of a 4:1 mixture showed no significant difference in survival. The longer survival time of mice bearing ASIP-expressing tumors correlated with a significantly slower growth rate than parental B16-F10 tumors as judged by quantification of numbers of tumors and total tumor load (p=0.0325), as well as a more homogeneous size and morphology of ASIP-expressing lung tumors. We conclude that MC1R plays an important role in regulating melanoma growth and morphology. Persistent inhibition of MC1R provided a significant survival advantage resulting in part from slower tumor growth, establishing MC1R as a compelling new molecular target for metastatic melanoma. PMID:27028866

  15. Tumor growth and angiogenesis is impaired in CIB1 knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayed Mohamed A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathological angiogenesis contributes to various ocular, malignant, and inflammatory disorders, emphasizing the need to understand this process more precisely on a molecular level. Previously we found that CIB1, a 22 kDa regulatory protein, plays a critical role in endothelial cell function, angiogenic growth factor-mediated cellular functions, PAK1 activation, MMP-2 expression, and in vivo ischemia-induced angiogenesis. Since pathological angiogenesis is highly dependent on many of these same processes, we hypothesized that CIB1 may also regulate tumor-induced angiogenesis. Methods To test this hypothesis, we allografted either murine B16 melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma cells into WT and CIB1-KO mice, and monitored tumor growth, morphology, histology, and intra-tumoral microvessel density. Results Allografted melanoma tumors that developed in CIB1-KO mice were smaller in volume, had a distinct necrotic appearance, and had significantly less intra-tumoral microvessel density. Similarly, allografted Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in CIB1-KO mice were smaller in volume and mass, and appeared to have decreased perfusion. Intra-tumoral hemorrhage, necrosis, and perivascular fibrosis were also increased in tumors that developed in CIB1-KO mice. Conclusions These findings suggest that, in addition to its other functions, CIB1 plays a critical role in facilitating tumor growth and tumor-induced angiogenesis.

  16. Loss of stromal JUNB does not affect tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jennifer; Strittmatter, Karin; Nübel, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Sator-Schmitt, Melanie; Bäuerle, Tobias; Angel, Peter; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina

    2014-03-15

    The transcription factor AP-1 subunit JUNB has been shown to play a pivotal role in angiogenesis. It positively controls angiogenesis by regulating Vegfa as well as the transcriptional regulator Cbfb and its target Mmp13. In line with these findings, it has been demonstrated that tumor cell-derived JUNB promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis. In contrast to JUNB's function in tumor cells, the role of host-derived stromal JUNB has not been elucidated so far. Here, we show that ablation of Junb in stromal cells including endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and fibroblasts does not affect tumor growth in two different syngeneic mouse models, the B16-F1 melanoma and the Lewis lung carcinoma model. In-depth analyses of the tumors revealed that tumor angiogenesis remains unaffected as assessed by measurements of the microvascular density and relative blood volume in the tumor. Furthermore, we could show that the maturation status of the tumor vasculature, analyzed by the SMC marker expression, α-smooth muscle actin and Desmin, as well as the attachment of pericytes to the endothelium, is not changed upon ablation of Junb. Taken together, these results indicate that the pro-angiogenic functions of stromal JUNB are well compensated with regard to tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:24027048

  17. The Influence of Different Single Radiation Dose on Delayed Growth of Transplanted Tumor in Athymic Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-zhen WANG; Zhi-yong YUAN; Ping WANG

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To reveal the biological effects and effective dosage in radiotherapy model which applies high single-dose irradiation by animal experiment. METHODS We inoculated subcutaneouly human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (MIA PaCa-2) in the lateral of the right lower extremity of the athymic mouse to grow transplantation tumor. While the median diameter of transplantation tumor reached 10 mm approximately, the animals were randomly divided into 7 groups (6 animals per group) and fixed with consciousness for irradiation by different dose in one fraction (0, 2, 5, 10, 17, 25, 35 Gy). All were kept on to be bred for observation of the change in gross tumor volume, calculation of delayed growth time and delayed growth curve. RESULTS With increased dose per fraction, cutaneous reaction on the neoplasma surface of the animal, which was mainly moist yellow effusion was more and more severe. When dosage is less than 10 Gy, all animals showed similar effects, that's the delayed tumor growth was not obvious. Tumors receiving more than 10 Gy in one fraction showed very good biological effect and the delayed tumor growth was obviously related to dosage. The difference in delayed tumor growth between the 2 groups was statistically signifi cant. The delayed tumor growth time in 10, 17, 25 Gy group was respectively 3 weeks, 6 weeks and more. CONCLUSION The biological effect of the model which applies high single-dose irradiation (more than 10 Gy in one fraction) was very good. The effect of delayed tumor growth was obviously related to the dosage after transplantation tumor was radiated. Because of its higher dose per fraction and biological effects, the model of high single-dose irradiation can get be er clinical effects.

  18. Effects of Thoracic Paravertebral Block on Postoperative Analgesia and Serum Level of Tumor Marker in Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Jiheng CHEN; Zhang, Yunxiao; Huang, Chuan; Chen, Keneng; Fan, Mengying; Zhiyi FAN

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Perioperative management of pain associated with the prognosis of cancer patients. Optimization of perio-perative analgesia method, then reduce perioperative stress response, reduce opioiddosage, to reduce or even avoid systemic adverse reactions and elevated levels of tumor markers. Serum levels of tumor markers in patients with lung cancer are closely related to tumor growth. Clinical research reports on regional anesthesia effect on tumor markers for lung cancer ar...

  19. Syrbactin Structural Analog TIR-199 Blocks Proteasome Activity and Induces Tumor Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, André S; Opoku-Ansah, John; Ibarra-Rivera, Tannya R; Yco, Lisette P; Ambadi, Sudhakar; Roberts, Christopher C; Chang, Chia-En A; Pirrung, Michael C

    2016-04-15

    Multiple myeloma is an aggressive hematopoietic cancer of plasma cells. The recent emergence of three effective FDA-approved proteasome-inhibiting drugs, bortezomib (Velcade®), carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), and ixazomib (Ninlaro®), confirms that proteasome inhibitors are therapeutically useful against neoplastic disease, in particular refractory multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. This study describes the synthesis, computational affinity assessment, and preclinical evaluation of TIR-199, a natural product-derived syrbactin structural analog. Molecular modeling and simulation suggested that TIR-199 covalently binds each of the three catalytic subunits (β1, β2, and β5) and revealed key interaction sites. In vitro and cell culture-based proteasome activity measurements confirmed that TIR-199 inhibits the proteasome in a dose-dependent manner and induces tumor cell death in multiple myeloma and neuroblastoma cells as well as other cancer types in the NCI-60 cell panel. It is particularly effective against kidney tumor cell lines, with >250-fold higher anti-tumor activities than observed with the natural product syringolin A. In vivo studies in mice revealed a maximum tolerated dose of TIR-199 at 25 mg/kg. The anti-tumor activity of TIR-199 was confirmed in hollow fiber assays in mice. Adverse drug reaction screens in a kidney panel revealed no off-targets of concern. This is the first study to examine the efficacy of a syrbactin in animals. Taken together, the results suggest that TIR-199 is a potent new proteasome inhibitor with promise for further development into a clinical drug for the treatment of multiple myeloma and other forms of cancer.

  20. Pharmacological inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 suppresses epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Finetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blockade of Prostaglandin (PG E(2 production via deletion of microsomal Prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1 gene reduces tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo on xenograft tumors. So far the therapeutic potential of the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 has not been elucidated. PGE(2 promotes epithelial tumor progression via multiple signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we evaluated the antitumor activity of AF3485, a compound of a novel family of human mPGES-1 inhibitors, in vitro and in vivo, in mice bearing human A431 xenografts overexpressing EGFR. Treatment of the human cell line A431 with interleukin-1beta (IL-1β increased mPGES-1 expression, PGE(2 production and induced EGFR phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 expression. AF3485 reduced PGE(2 production, both in quiescent and in cells stimulated by IL-1β. AF3485 abolished IL-1β-induced activation of the EGFR, decreasing VEGF and FGF-2 expression, and tumor-mediated endothelial tube formation. In vivo, in A431 xenograft, AF3485, administered sub-chronically, decreased tumor growth, an effect related to inhibition of EGFR signalling, and to tumor microvessel rarefaction. In fact, we observed a decrease of EGFR phosphorylation, and VEGF and FGF-2 expression in tumours explanted from treated mice. CONCLUSION: Our work demonstrates that the pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 reduces squamous carcinoma growth by suppressing PGE(2 mediated-EGFR signalling and by impairing tumor associated angiogenesis. These results underscore the potential of mPGES-1 inhibitors as agents capable of controlling tumor growth.

  1. Endothelial cell tumor growth is Ape/ref-1 dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Roy, Sashwati; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K; Gordillo, Gayle M

    2015-09-01

    Tumor-forming endothelial cells have highly elevated levels of Nox-4 that release H2O2 into the nucleus, which is generally not compatible with cell survival. We sought to identify compensatory mechanisms that enable tumor-forming endothelial cells to survive and proliferate under these conditions. Ape-1/ref-1 (Apex-1) is a multifunctional protein that promotes DNA binding of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as AP-1, and repairs oxidative DNA damage. A validated mouse endothelial cell (EOMA) tumor model was used to demonstrate that Nox-4-derived H2O2 causes DNA oxidation that induces Apex-1 expression. Apex-1 functions as a chaperone to keep transcription factors in a reduced state. In EOMA cells Apex-1 enables AP-1 binding to the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (mcp-1) promoter and expression of that protein is required for endothelial cell tumor formation. Intraperitoneal injection of the small molecule inhibitor E3330, which specifically targets Apex-1 redox-sensitive functions, resulted in a 50% decrease in tumor volume compared with mice injected with vehicle control (n = 6 per group), indicating that endothelial cell tumor proliferation is dependent on Apex-1 expression. These are the first reported results to establish Nox-4 induction of Apex-1 as a mechanism promoting endothelial cell tumor formation.

  2. The Influence of Liver Resection on Intrahepatic Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Hannes H; Nißler, Valérie; Croner, Roland S

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of tumor recurrence after resection of metastatic liver lesions remains an unsolved problem. Small tumor cell deposits, which are not detectable by routine clinical imaging, may be stimulated by hepatic regeneration factors after liver resection. It is not entirely clear, however, which factors are crucial for tumor recurrence. The presented mouse model may be useful to explore the mechanisms that play a role in the development of recurrent malignant lesions after liver resection. The model combines the easy-to-perform and reproducible techniques of defined amounts of liver tissue removal and tumor induction (by injection) in mice. The animals were treated with either a single laparotomy, a 30% liver resection, or a 70% liver resection. All animals subsequently received a tumor cell injection into the remaining liver tissue. After two weeks of observation, the livers and tumors were evaluated for size and weight and examined by immunohistochemistry. After a 70% liver resection, the tumor volume and weight were significantly increased compared to a laparotomy alone (p number of variables like the length of postoperative observation, the cell line used for injection or the timing of injection and liver resection offer multiple angles when exploring a specific question in the context of post-hepatectomy metastases. The limitations of this procedure are the authorization to perform the procedure on animals, access to an appropriate animal testing facility and acquisition of certain equipment. PMID:27166736

  3. Dichloroacetate induces tumor-specific radiosensitivity in vitro but attenuates radiation-induced tumor growth delay in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicker, F.; Roeder, F.; Debus, J.; Huber, P.E. [University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiation Oncology; Kirsner, A.; Weber, K.J. [University Hospital Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Peschke, P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Background: Inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) by dichloroacetate (DCA) can shift tumor cell metabolism from anaerobic glycolysis to glucose oxidation, with activation of mitochondrial activity and chemotherapy-dependent apoptosis. In radiotherapy, DCA could thus potentially enhance the frequently moderate apoptotic response of cancer cells that results from their mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro and in a human tumor xenograft mouse model in vivo. Materials and methods: The interaction of DCA with photon beam radiation was investigated in the human tumor cell lines WIDR (colorectal) and LN18 (glioma), as well as in the human normal tissue cell lines HUVEC (endothelial), MRC5 (lung fibroblasts) and TK6 (lymphoblastoid). Apoptosis induction in vitro was assessed by DAPI staining and sub-G1 flow cytometry; cell survival was quantified by clonogenic assay. The effect of DCA in vivo was investigated in WIDR xenograft tumors growing subcutaneously on BALB/c-nu/nu mice, with and without fractionated irradiation. Histological examination included TUNEL and Ki67 staining for apoptosis and proliferation, respectively, as well as pinomidazole labeling for hypoxia. Results: DCA treatment led to decreased clonogenic survival and increased specific apoptosis rates in tumor cell lines (LN18, WIDR) but not in normal tissue cells (HUVEC, MRC5, TK6). However, this significant tumor-specific radiosensitization by DCA in vitro was not reflected by the situation in vivo: The growth suppression of WIDR xenograft tumors after irradiation was reduced upon additional DCA treatment (reflected by Ki67 expression levels), although early tumor cell apoptosis rates were significantly increased by DCA. This apparently paradoxical effect was accompanied by a marked DCA-dependent induction of hypoxia in tumor-tissue. Conclusion: DCA induced tumor-specific radiosensitization in vitro but not in vivo

  4. Growth-Blocking Peptides As Nutrition-Sensitive Signals for Insulin Secretion and Body Size Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Takashi; Mirth, Christen K

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, the fat body, functionally equivalent to the mammalian liver and adipocytes, plays a central role in regulating systemic growth in response to nutrition. The fat body senses intracellular amino acids through Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling, and produces an unidentified humoral factor(s) to regulate insulin-like peptide (ILP) synthesis and/or secretion in the insulin-producing cells. Here, we find that two peptides, Growth-Blocking Peptide (GBP1) and CG11395 (GBP2), are produced in the fat body in response to amino acids and TOR signaling. Reducing the expression of GBP1 and GBP2 (GBPs) specifically in the fat body results in smaller body size due to reduced growth rate. In addition, we found that GBPs stimulate ILP secretion from the insulin-producing cells, either directly or indirectly, thereby increasing insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling activity throughout the body. Our findings fill an important gap in our understanding of how the fat body transmits nutritional information to the insulin producing cells to control body size. PMID:26928023

  5. Vascular network remodeling via vessel cooption, regression and growth in tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Bartha, K

    2016-01-01

    The transformation of the regular vasculature in normal tissue into a highly inhomogeneous tumor specific capillary network is described by a theoretical model incorporating tumor growth, vessel cooption, neo-vascularization, vessel collapse and cell death. Compartmentalization of the tumor into several regions differing in vessel density, diameter and in necrosis is observed for a wide range of parameters in agreement with the vessel morphology found in human melanoma. In accord with data for human melanoma the model predicts, that microvascular density (MVD, regarded as an important diagnostic tool in cancer treatment, does not necessarily determine the tempo of tumor progression. Instead it is suggested, that the MVD of the original tissue as well as the metabolic demand of the individual tumor cell plays the major role in the initial stages of tumor growth.

  6. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors require a high purity blocking layer ( and lt; 10(sup 13) cm(sup -3)) approximately 1 mm thick grown on a heavily doped active layer ((approx) 10(sup 16) cm(sup -3)) approximately 20 mm thick. Epilayers were grown using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of germanium out of lead solution. The effects of the crystallographic orientation of the germanium substrate on LPE growth modes were explored. Growth was studied on substrates oriented by Laue x-ray diffraction between 0.02(sup o) and 10(sup o) from the(lbrace)111(rbrace) toward the(lbrace)100(rbrace). Terrace growth was observed, with increasing terrace height for larger misorientation angles. It was found that the purity of the blocking layer was limited by the presence of phosphorus in the lead solvent. Unintentionally doped Ge layers contained(approx)10(sup 15) cm(sup -3) phosphorus as determined by Hall effect measurements and Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS). Lead purification by vacuum distillation and dilution reduced the phosphorus concentration in the layers to(approx) 10(sup 14) cm(sup -3) but further reduction was not observed with successive distillation runs. The graphite distillation and growth components as an additional phosphorus source cannot be ruled out. Antimony ((approx)10(sup 16) cm(sup -3)) was used as a dopant for the active BIB layer. A reduction in the donor binding energy due to impurity banding was observed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. A BIB detector fabricated from an Sb-doped Ge layer grown on a pure substrate showed a low energy photoconductive onset ((approx)6 meV). Spreading resistance measurements on doped layers revealed a nonuniform dopant distribution with Sb pile-up at the layer surface, which must be removed by chemomechanical polishing. Sb diffusion into the pure substrate was observed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) for epilayers grown at 650 C. The Sb concentration at the interface dropped

  7. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandaru, Jordana

    2001-05-12

    Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors require a high purity blocking layer (< 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) approximately 1 mm thick grown on a heavily doped active layer ({approx} 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) approximately 20 mm thick. Epilayers were grown using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of germanium out of lead solution. The effects of the crystallographic orientation of the germanium substrate on LPE growth modes were explored. Growth was studied on substrates oriented by Laue x-ray diffraction between 0.02{sup o} and 10{sup o} from the {l_brace}111{r_brace} toward the {l_brace}100{r_brace}. Terrace growth was observed, with increasing terrace height for larger misorientation angles. It was found that the purity of the blocking layer was limited by the presence of phosphorus in the lead solvent. Unintentionally doped Ge layers contained {approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} phosphorus as determined by Hall effect measurements and Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS). Lead purification by vacuum distillation and dilution reduced the phosphorus concentration in the layers to {approx} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} but further reduction was not observed with successive distillation runs. The graphite distillation and growth components as an additional phosphorus source cannot be ruled out. Antimony ({approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) was used as a dopant for the active BIB layer. A reduction in the donor binding energy due to impurity banding was observed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. A BIB detector fabricated from an Sb-doped Ge layer grown on a pure substrate showed a low energy photoconductive onset ({approx}6 meV). Spreading resistance measurements on doped layers revealed a nonuniform dopant distribution with Sb pile-up at the layer surface, which must be removed by chemomechanical polishing. Sb diffusion into the pure substrate was observed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) for epilayers grown at 650 C. The Sb concentration at the interface

  8. EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR, TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-a AND THEIR RECEPTOR IN HUMAN PITUITARY TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Long

    2001-01-01

    [1]LIU Xu-wen, FU Pei-yu, GAO Zhi-xian. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptors in human glioma [J]. Chin J Neurosurgery 1998; 14:71.[2]Wong AJ, Ruppert JM, Bigner SH, et al. Structural alterations of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene in human gliomas [J]. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1992; 89:4309.[3]Webster J, Ham J, Bevan JS. Preliminary characterization of growth factors secreted by human pituitary tumors [J]. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1991; 72:687.[4]Klibanski A. Nonsecreting pituitary tumors [J]. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am 1987; 16:793.[5]LeRiche VK, Asa SL, Ezzat S. Epidermal growth factor and its receptor (EGF-R) in human pituitary adenomas: EGF-R correlates with tumor aggressiveness [J]. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1996; 81:656.

  9. Blocking transforming growth factor- receptor signaling down-regulates transforming growth factor-β1 autoproduction in keloid fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 蔡泽浩; 王丹茹; 武小莉; 崔磊; 商庆新; 钱云良; 曹谊林

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) autoproduction in keloid fibroblasts and theregulation effect of blocking TGF-β intracellular signalingon rhTGF-β1 autoproduction.Methods: Keloid fibroblasts cultured in vitro weretreated with either rhTGF-β1 (5 ng/ml ) or recombinantadenovirus containing a truncated type II TGF-β receptorgene (50 pfu/cell ). Their effects of regulating geneexpression of TGF-β1 and its receptor I and II wereobserved with Northern blot.Results: rhTGF-β1 up-regulated the gene expressionof TGF-β1 and receptor I, but not receptor II. Over-expression of the truncated receptor II down-regulated thegene expression of TGF-β1 and its receptor I, but notreceptor II.Conclusions: TGF-β1 autoproduction was observed inkeloid fibroblasts. Over-expression of the truncated TGF-βreceptor H decreased TGF-β1 autoproduction via blockingTGF-β receptor signaling.

  10. Novel epigenetic markers of early epithelial tumor growth and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gordiyuk V. V.; Kondratov A. G.; Gerashchenko G. V.; Kashuba V. I.

    2013-01-01

    The present work is aimed at clarifying genetic and epigenetic alterations that occur during carcinogenesis and designing perspective sets of newly identified biomarkers. The tumors of kidney, cervix, colon, ovary, and lung were analyzed in our work, using the chromosome 3 specific NotI microarrays (NMA). We have found loci/genes with essential changes in gene methylation of tumor samples. Changes in expression for these genes were confirmed. The Not-I microarray results have been used to dev...

  11. Sensitivity of fibroblast growth factor 23 measurements in tumor-induced osteomalacia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imel, Erik A; Peacock, Munro; Pitukcheewanont, Pisit;

    2006-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome of hypophosphatemia, decreased renal phosphate reabsorption, normal or low serum 1,25-dihydryxyvitamin-D concentration, myopathy, and osteomalacia. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic protein overexpressed in tumors...

  12. Comparing immune-tumor growth models with drug therapy using optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marisa C.; Rocha, Ana Maria A. C.; Costa, M. Fernanda P.; Fernandes, Edite M. G. P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we compare the dynamics of three tumor growth models that include an immune system and a drug administration therapy using optimal control. The objective is to minimize a combined function of the total of tumor cells over time and a chemotherapeutic drug administration.

  13. Adiponectin deficiency promotes tumor growth in mice by reducing macrophage infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yutong; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-08-05

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived plasma protein that has been implicated in regulating angiogenesis, but the role of adiponectin in regulating this process is still controversial. In this study, in order to determine whether adiponectin affects tumor growth and tumor induced vascularization, we implanted B16F10 melanoma and Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells subcutaneously into adiponectin knockout and wild-type control mice, and found that adiponectin deficiency markedly promoted the growth of both tumors. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that adiponectin deficiency reduced macrophage recruitment to the tumor, but did not affect cancer cell mitosis, apoptosis, or tumor-associated angiogenesis. In addition, treatment with recombinant adiponectin did not affect the proliferation of cultured B16F10 tumor cells. Importantly, the restoration of microphage infiltration at an early stage of tumorigenesis by means of co-injection of B16F10 cells and macrophages reversed the increased tumor growth in adiponectin knockout mice. Thus, we conclude that the enhanced tumor growth observed in adiponectin deficient mice is likely due to the reduction of macrophage infiltration rather than enhanced angiogenesis.

  14. Adiponectin deficiency promotes tumor growth in mice by reducing macrophage infiltration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutong Sun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived plasma protein that has been implicated in regulating angiogenesis, but the role of adiponectin in regulating this process is still controversial. In this study, in order to determine whether adiponectin affects tumor growth and tumor induced vascularization, we implanted B16F10 melanoma and Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells subcutaneously into adiponectin knockout and wild-type control mice, and found that adiponectin deficiency markedly promoted the growth of both tumors. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that adiponectin deficiency reduced macrophage recruitment to the tumor, but did not affect cancer cell mitosis, apoptosis, or tumor-associated angiogenesis. In addition, treatment with recombinant adiponectin did not affect the proliferation of cultured B16F10 tumor cells. Importantly, the restoration of microphage infiltration at an early stage of tumorigenesis by means of co-injection of B16F10 cells and macrophages reversed the increased tumor growth in adiponectin knockout mice. Thus, we conclude that the enhanced tumor growth observed in adiponectin deficient mice is likely due to the reduction of macrophage infiltration rather than enhanced angiogenesis.

  15. Functional analysis of tumor cell growth and clearance in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Thomas J.; Mailaender, V.; Tucker, Amanda A.; Olomu, A. B.; Zhang, Weisheng; Negrin, Robert S.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    Evaluation of antineoplastic therapies would be enhanced by sensitive methods that noninvasively asses both tumor location and neoplastic growth kinetics in living animals. Since light is transmitted through mammalian tissues, it was possible to externally monitor growth and regression of luciferase labeled murine tumor cells engrafted into immunodeficient mice. External quantification of tumor burden revealed the biological impact of the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide on the kinetics of tumor growth in living animals. Therapeutic activity was apparent but this drug did not eliminate the NIH 3T3 cell signal over the 28 d time course. This novel, noninvasive system allowed sensitive, real time spatiotemporal analyses of neoplastic cell growth and may facilitate rapid optimization of effective therapeutic treatment regimes.

  16. Platelets promote tumor growth and metastasis via direct interaction between Aggrus/podoplanin and CLEC-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takagi

    Full Text Available The platelet aggregation-inducing factor Aggrus, also known as podoplanin, is frequently upregulated in several types of tumors and enhances hematogenous metastasis by interacting with and activating the platelet receptor CLEC-2. Thus, Aggrus-CLEC-2 binding could be a therapeutic molecular mechanism for cancer therapy. We generated a new anti-human Aggrus monoclonal antibody, MS-1, that suppressed Aggrus-CLEC-2 binding, Aggrus-induced platelet aggregation, and Aggrus-mediated tumor metastasis. Interestingly, the MS-1 monoclonal antibody attenuated the growth of Aggrus-positive tumors in vivo. Moreover, the humanized chimeric MS-1 antibody, ChMS-1, also exhibited strong antitumor activity against Aggrus-positive lung squamous cell carcinoma xenografted into NOD-SCID mice compromising antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic and complement-dependent cytotoxic activities. Because Aggrus knockdown suppressed platelet-induced proliferation in vitro and tumor growth of the lung squamous cell carcinoma in vivo, Aggrus may be involved in not only tumor metastasis but also tumor growth by promoting platelet-tumor interaction, platelet activation, and secretion of platelet-derived factors in vivo. Our results indicate that molecular target drugs inhibiting specific platelet-tumor interactions can be developed as antitumor drugs that suppress both metastasis and proliferation of tumors such as lung squamous cell carcinoma.

  17. Data on combination effect of PEG-coated gold nanoparticles and non-thermal plasma inhibit growth of solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Yoo, Ki Chun; Uddin, Nizam; Kim, Ju Sung; Lee, Su Jae; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-12-01

    Highly resistant tumor cells are hard to treat at low doses of plasma. Therefore, researchers have gained more attention to development of enhancers for plasma therapy. Some enhancers could improve the efficacy of plasma towards selectivity of cancer cells damage. In this dataset, we report the application of low doses of PEG-coated gold nanoparticles with addition of plasma treatment. This data consists of the effect of PEG-coated GNP and cold plasma on two solid tumor cell lines T98G glioblastoma and A549 lung adenocarcinoma. Cell proliferation, frequency of cancer stem cell population studies by this co-treatment was reported. Finally, we included in this dataset the effect of co-treatment in vivo, using tumor xenograft nude mice models. The data supplied in this article supports the accompanying publication "Low doses of PEG-coated gold nanoparticles sensitize solid tumors to cold plasma by blocking the PI3K/AKT-driven signaling axis to suppress cellular transformation by inhibiting growth and EMT" (N. K. Kaushik, N. Kaushik, K. C. Yoo, N Uddin, J. S. Kim, S. J. Lee et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27668278

  18. A kinetic model of tumor growth and its radiation response with an application to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Leder, Kevin Z; Hui, Susanta K

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to simulate the growth of tumor volume and its response to a single fraction of high dose irradiation. We made several key assumptions of the model. Tumor volume is composed of proliferating (or dividing) cancer cells and non-dividing (or dead) cells. Tumor growth rate (or tumor volume doubling time, Td) is proportional to the ratio of the volumes of tumor vasculature and the tumor. The vascular volume grows slower than the tumor by introducing the vascular growth retardation factor, theta. Upon irradiation the proliferating cells gradually die over a fixed time period after irradiation. Dead cells are cleared away with cell clearance time, Tcl. The model was applied to simulate pre-treatment growth and post-treatment radiation response of rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor and metastatic brain tumors of five patients who were treated by Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). By selecting appropriate model parameters, we showed the temporal variation of the tumors for both th...

  19. A quantitative theory of solid tumor growth, metabolic rate and vascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B Herman

    Full Text Available The relationships between cellular, structural and dynamical properties of tumors have traditionally been studied separately. Here, we construct a quantitative, predictive theory of solid tumor growth, metabolic rate, vascularization and necrosis that integrates the relationships between these properties. To accomplish this, we develop a comprehensive theory that describes the interface and integration of the tumor vascular network and resource supply with the cardiovascular system of the host. Our theory enables a quantitative understanding of how cells, tissues, and vascular networks act together across multiple scales by building on recent theoretical advances in modeling both healthy vasculature and the detailed processes of angiogenesis and tumor growth. The theory explicitly relates tumor vascularization and growth to metabolic rate, and yields extensive predictions for tumor properties, including growth rates, metabolic rates, degree of necrosis, blood flow rates and vessel sizes. Besides these quantitative predictions, we explain how growth rates depend on capillary density and metabolic rate, and why similar tumors grow slower and occur less frequently in larger animals, shedding light on Peto's paradox. Various implications for potential therapeutic strategies and further research are discussed.

  20. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Juan F. Martín-Rodríguez; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L.; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M.; Justo P Castaño; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; David A Cano

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human ...

  1. Adiponectin Deficiency Promotes Tumor Growth in Mice by Reducing Macrophage Infiltration

    OpenAIRE

    Yutong Sun; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived plasma protein that has been implicated in regulating angiogenesis, but the role of adiponectin in regulating this process is still controversial. In this study, in order to determine whether adiponectin affects tumor growth and tumor induced vascularization, we implanted B16F10 melanoma and Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells subcutaneously into adiponectin knockout and wild-type control mice, and found that adiponectin deficiency markedly promoted the growth of bo...

  2. Subcutaneous administration of ketoprofen delays Ehrlich solid tumor growth in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Souza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ketoprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID has proven to exert anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic activities in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions. We investigated the effects of this compound on tumor development in Swiss mice previously inoculated with Ehrlich tumor cells. To carry out this study the solid tumor was obtained from cells of the ascites fluid of Ehrlich tumor re-suspended in physiological saline to give 2.5x106 cells in 0.05mL. After tumor inoculation, the animals were separated into two groups (n = 10. The animals treated with ketoprofen 0.1µg/100µL/animal were injected intraperitoneally at intervals of 24h for 10 consecutive days. Animals from the control group received saline. At the end of the experiment the mice were killed and the tumor removed. We analyzed tumor growth, histomorphological and immunohistochemical characteristics for CDC47 (cellular proliferation marker and for CD31 (blood vessel marker. Animals treated with the ketoprofen 0.1µg/100µL/animal showed lower tumor growth. The treatment did not significantly influence the size of the areas of cancer, inflammation, necrosis and hemorrhage. Moreover, lower rates of tumor cell proliferation were observed in animals treated with ketoprofen compared with the untreated control group. The participation of ketoprofen in controlling tumor malignant cell proliferation would open prospects for its use in clinical and antineoplasic therapy.

  3. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-06-01

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  4. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice

  5. Ultrasound-guided direct delivery of 3-bromopyruvate blocks tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shinichi; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Buijs, Manon; Wijlemans, Joost W; Kwak, Byung Kook; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-06-01

    Studies in animal models of cancer have demonstrated that targeting tumor metabolism can be an effective anticancer strategy. Previously, we showed that inhibition of glucose metabolism by the pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), induces anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo. We have also documented that intratumoral delivery of 3-BrPA affects tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor model of human liver cancer. However, the efficacy of such an approach in a clinically relevant orthotopic tumor model has not been reported. Here, we investigated the feasibility of ultrasound (US) image-guided delivery of 3-BrPA in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy. In vitro, treatment of Panc-1 cells with 3-BrPA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. The loss of viability correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in the intracellular ATP level and lactate production confirming that disruption of energy metabolism underlies these 3-BrPA-mediated effects. In vivo, US-guided delivery of 3-BrPA was feasible and effective as demonstrated by a marked decrease in tumor size on imaging. Further, the antitumor effect was confirmed by (1) a decrease in the proliferative potential by Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and (2) the induction of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphospate nick end labeling staining. We therefore demonstrate the technical feasibility of US-guided intratumoral injection of 3-BrPA in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer as well as its therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that this new therapeutic approach consisting of a direct intratumoral injection of antiglycolytic agents may represent an exciting opportunity to treat patients with pancreas cancer. PMID:23529644

  6. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Maximizes the Effects of Radiation in Sarcoma Mouse Models Through Destruction of Tumor Vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm3 within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm3 for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature

  7. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Maximizes the Effects of Radiation in Sarcoma Mouse Models Through Destruction of Tumor Vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae-June [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Changhwan [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Park, Do Joong [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeo-Jung [Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Schmidt, Benjamin [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lee, Yoon-Jin [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Division of Radiation Effects, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tap, William D. [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Eisinger-Mathason, T.S. Karin [Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Choy, Edwin [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Simon, M. Celeste [Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); and others

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm{sup 3} within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm{sup 3} for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature.

  8. Gamma knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: identification of predictors for continued tumor growth and the influence of documented tumor growth preceding radiation treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, F.C.A.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Hanssens, P.E.; Overbeeke, J.J. van; Donders, R.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Graamans, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has become an important treatment modality for vestibular schwannomas. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether tumor growth at the moment of GKRS has any correlation with the outcome. The secondary aim was to identify clinical p

  9. Finite-Time Normal Mode Disturbances and Error Growth During Southern Hemisphere Blocking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mozheng WEI; Jorgen S. FREDERIKSEN

    2005-01-01

    The structural organization of initially random errors evolving in a barotropic tangent linear model, with time-dependent basic states taken from analyses, is examined for cases of block development, maturation and decay in the Southern Hemisphere atmosphere during April, November, and December 1989. The statistics of 100 evolved errors are studied for six-day periods and compared with the growth and structures of fast growing normal modes and finite-time normal modes (FTNMs). The amplification factors of most initially random errors are slightly less than those of the fastest growing FTNM for the same time interval.During their evolution, the standard deviations of the error fields become concentrated in the regions of rapid dynamical development, particularly associated with developing and decaying blocks. We have calculated probability distributions and the mean and standard deviations of pattern correlations between each of the 100 evolved error fields and the five fastest growing FTNMs for the same time interval. The mean of the largest pattern correlation, taken over the five fastest growing FTNMs, increases with increasing time interval to a value close to 0.6 or larger after six days. FTNM 1 generally, but not always, gives the largest mean pattern correlation with error fields. Corresponding pattern correlations with the fast growing normal modes of the instantaneous basic state flow are significant but lower than with FTNMs.Mean pattern correlations with fast growing FTNMs increase further when the time interval is increased beyond six days.

  10. B16 melanoma tumor growth is delayed in mice in an age-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Pettan-Brewer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A major risk factor for cancer is increasing age, which suggests that syngeneic tumor implants in old mice would grow more rapidly. However, various reports have suggested that old mice are not as permissive to implanted tumor cells as young mice. In order to determine and characterize the age-related response to B16 melanoma, we implanted 5×105 tumor cells into 8, 16, 24, and 32-month-old male C57BL/6 (B6 and C57BL/6×BALB/c F1 (CB6 F1 mice subcutaneously in the inguinal and axillary spaces, or intradermally in the lateral flank. Results showed decreased tumor volume with increasing age, which varied according to mouse genetic background and the implanted site. The B6 strain showed robust tumor growth at 8 months of age at the inguinal implantation site, with an average tumor volume of 1341.25 mm3. The 16, 24, and 32-month age groups showed a decrease in tumor growth with tumor volumes of 563.69, 481.02, and 264.55 mm3, respectively (p≤0.001. The axillary implantation site was less permissive in 8-month-old B6 mice with an average tumor volume of 761.52 mm3. The 24- and 32-month age groups showed a similar decrease in tumor growth with tumor volumes of 440 and 178.19 mm3, respectively (p≤0.01. The CB6F1 strain was not as tumor permissive at 8 months of age as B6 mice with average tumor volumes of 446.96 and 426.91 mm3 for the inguinal and axillary sites, respectively. There was a decrease in tumor growth at 24 months of age at both inguinal and axillary sites with an average tumor volume of 271.02 and 249.12 mm3, respectively (p≤0.05. The strain dependence was not apparent in 8-month-old mice injected intradermally with B16 melanoma cells, with average tumor volumes of 736.82 and 842.85 mm3 for B6 and CB6 F1, respectively. However, a strain difference was seen in 32-month-old B6 mice with an average decrease in tumor volume of 250.83 mm3 (p≤0.01. In contrast, tumor growth significantly decreased earlier in CB6 F1 mice with average

  11. Blocking the NOTCH pathway can inhibit the growth of CD133-positive A549 cells and sensitize to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juntao; Mao, Zhangfan; Huang, Jie; Xie, Songping; Liu, Tianshu; Mao, Zhifu, E-mail: 48151660@qq.com

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Notch signaling pathway members are expressed lower levels in CD133+ cells. • CD133+ cells are not as sensitive as CD133− cells to chemotherapy. • GSI could inhibit the growth of both CD133+ and CD133− cells. • Blockade of Notch signaling pathway enhanced the effect of chemotherapy with CDDP. • DAPT/CDDP co-therapy caused G2/M arrest and elimination in CD133+ cells. - Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to play an important role in tumor growth and recurrence. These cells exhibit self-renewal and proliferation properties. CSCs also exhibit significant drug resistance compared with normal tumor cells. Finding new treatments that target CSCs could significantly enhance the effect of chemotherapy and improve patient survival. Notch signaling is known to regulate the development of the lungs by controlling the cell-fate determination of normal stem cells. In this study, we isolated CSCs from the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. CD133 was used as a stem cell marker for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We compared the expression of Notch signaling in both CD133+ and CD133− cells and blocked Notch signaling using the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT (GSI-IX). The effect of combining GSI and cisplatin (CDDP) was also examined in these two types of cells. We observed that both CD133+ and CD133− cells proliferated at similar rates, but the cells exhibited distinctive differences in cell cycle progression. Few CD133+ cells were observed in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and there were half as many cells in S phase compared with the CD133− cells. Furthermore, CD133+ cells exhibited significant resistance to chemotherapy when treated with CDDP. The expression of Notch signaling pathway members, such as Notch1, Notch2 and Hes1, was lower in CD133+ cells. GSI slightly inhibited the proliferation of both cell types and exhibited little effect on the cell cycle. The inhibitory effects of DPP on these two types of cells were

  12. Blocking the NOTCH pathway can inhibit the growth of CD133-positive A549 cells and sensitize to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Notch signaling pathway members are expressed lower levels in CD133+ cells. • CD133+ cells are not as sensitive as CD133− cells to chemotherapy. • GSI could inhibit the growth of both CD133+ and CD133− cells. • Blockade of Notch signaling pathway enhanced the effect of chemotherapy with CDDP. • DAPT/CDDP co-therapy caused G2/M arrest and elimination in CD133+ cells. - Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to play an important role in tumor growth and recurrence. These cells exhibit self-renewal and proliferation properties. CSCs also exhibit significant drug resistance compared with normal tumor cells. Finding new treatments that target CSCs could significantly enhance the effect of chemotherapy and improve patient survival. Notch signaling is known to regulate the development of the lungs by controlling the cell-fate determination of normal stem cells. In this study, we isolated CSCs from the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. CD133 was used as a stem cell marker for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We compared the expression of Notch signaling in both CD133+ and CD133− cells and blocked Notch signaling using the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT (GSI-IX). The effect of combining GSI and cisplatin (CDDP) was also examined in these two types of cells. We observed that both CD133+ and CD133− cells proliferated at similar rates, but the cells exhibited distinctive differences in cell cycle progression. Few CD133+ cells were observed in the G2/M phase, and there were half as many cells in S phase compared with the CD133− cells. Furthermore, CD133+ cells exhibited significant resistance to chemotherapy when treated with CDDP. The expression of Notch signaling pathway members, such as Notch1, Notch2 and Hes1, was lower in CD133+ cells. GSI slightly inhibited the proliferation of both cell types and exhibited little effect on the cell cycle. The inhibitory effects of DPP on these two types of cells were enhanced

  13. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibits human gastric cancer tumor growth in nude mice via the inhibition of glycolysis

    OpenAIRE

    XIAN, SHU-LIN; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells primarily depend upon glycolysis in order to gain energy. Therefore, the inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. Our previous study demonstrated that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation in vitro. However, the ability of 3-BrPA to suppress tumor growth in vivo, and its underlying mechanism, have yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of 3-BrPA in an animal model of gastric cancer. It wa...

  14. Effect of portal vein ligation on tumor growth and liver regeneration in rat cirrhotic liver lobes

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Rui; YUAN, YU-FENG; Ayav, Ahmet; JIANG, CHONG-QING; BRESLER, LAURENT; Liu, Zhi-Su; Tran, Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of portal vein ligation (PVL) on the tumor growth rate and liver regeneration in rat cirrhotic liver lobes. A total of 45 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into PVL, hepatic tumor (HT) and HT + PVL groups (n=15 per group). Liver regeneration and tumor growth in ligated and non-ligated lobes were evaluated prior to and following PVL. In addition, serum alanine transaminase, total bilirubin levels and liver tissue samples were eval...

  15. Gene expression of fibroblast growth factors in human gliomas and meningiomas: demonstration of cellular source of basic fibroblast growth factor mRNA and peptide in tumor tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    J.A. Takahashi; Mori, H.; Fukumoto, M; Igarashi, K; Jaye, M; Oda, Y.; Kikuchi, H; Hatanaka, M

    1990-01-01

    The growth autonomy of human tumor cells is considered due to the endogenous production of growth factors. Transcriptional expression of candidates for autocrine stimulatory factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), acidic FGF, and transforming growth factor type beta were determined in human brain tumors. Basic FGF was expressed abundantly in 17 of 18 gliomas, 20 of 22 meninglomas, and 0 of 5 metastatic brain tumors. The level of mRNA expression of acidic FGF in gliomas was signi...

  16. The Bone Microenvironment: a Fertile Soil for Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenrostro, Denise; Mulcrone, Patrick L; Owens, Philip; Sterling, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastatic disease remains a significant and frequent problem for cancer patients that can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, despite decades of research, bone metastases remain incurable. Current studies have demonstrated that many properties and cell types within the bone and bone marrow microenvironment contribute to tumor-induced bone disease. Furthermore, they have pointed to the importance of understanding how tumor cells interact with their microenvironment in order to help improve both the development of new therapeutics and the prediction of response to therapy. PMID:27255469

  17. The effect of housing temperature on the growth of CT26 tumor expressing fluorescent protein EGFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzhakova, Diana V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Lapkina, Irina V.; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2016-04-01

    To date, the effect of housing temperature on tumor development in the immunocompetent mice has been studied on poorly immunogenic cancer models. Standard housing temperature 20-26°C was shown to cause chronic metabolic cold stress and promote tumor progression via suppression of the antitumor immune response, whereas a thermoneutral temperature 30-31°C was more preferable for normal metabolism of mice and inhibited tumor growth. Our work represents the first attempt to discover the potential effect of housing temperature on the development of highly immunogenic tumor. EGFP-expressing murine colon carcinoma CT26 generated in Balb/c mice was used as a tumor model. No statistically significant differences were shown in tumor incidences and growth rates at 20°C, 25°C and 30°C for non-modified CT26. Maintaining mice challenged with CT26-EGFP cells at 30°C led to complete inhibition of tumor development. In summary, we demonstrated that the housing temperature is important for the regulation of growth of highly immunogenic tumors in mice through antitumor immunity.

  18. Simulation of avascular tumor growth by agent-based game model involving phenotype-phenotype interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Wang, Hengtong; Zhang, Jiangang; Chen, Ke; Li, Yumin

    2015-01-01

    All tumors, both benign and metastatic, undergo an avascular growth stage with nutrients supplied by the surrounding tissue. This avascular growth process is much easier to carry out in more qualitative and quantitative experiments starting from tumor spheroids in vitro with reliable reproducibility. Essentially, this tumor progression would be described as a sequence of phenotypes. Using agent-based simulation in a two-dimensional spatial lattice, we constructed a composite growth model in which the phenotypic behavior of tumor cells depends on not only the local nutrient concentration and cell count but also the game among cells. Our simulation results demonstrated that in silico tumors are qualitatively similar to those observed in tumor spheroid experiments. We also found that the payoffs in the game between two living cell phenotypes can influence the growth velocity and surface roughness of tumors at the same time. Finally, this current model is flexible and can be easily extended to discuss other situations, such as environmental heterogeneity and mutation. PMID:26648395

  19. Physical activity counteracts tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26-injected muscles: an interim report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Hiroux

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle tissue is a rare site of tumor metastasis but is the main target of the degenerative processes occurring in cancer-associated cachexia syndrome. Beneficial effects of physical activity in counteracting cancer-related muscle wasting have been described in the last decades. Recently it has been shown that, in tumor xeno-transplanted mouse models, physical activity is able to directly affect tumor growth by modulating inflammatory responses in the tumor mass microenvironment. Here, we investigated the effect of physical activity on tumor cell growth in colon carcinoma C26 cells injected tibialis anterior muscles of BALB/c mice. Histological analyses revealed that 4 days of voluntary wheel running significantly counteracts tumor cell growth in C26-injected muscles compared to the non-injected sedentary controls. Since striated skeletal muscle tissue is the site of voluntary contraction, our results confirm that physical activity can also directly counteract tumor cell growth in a metabolically active tissue that is usually not a target for metastasis.

  20. Decreased autocrine EGFR signaling in metastatic breast cancer cells inhibits tumor growth in bone and mammary fat pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Nicole K; Mohammad, Khalid S; Gilmore, Jennifer L; Crismore, Erin; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Guise, Theresa A; Foley, John

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231), and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and osteoblast-like cells. Both paracrine and autocrine EGFR signaling were inhibited with a neutralizing amphiregulin antibody, PAR34, whereas shRNA to the EGFR was used to specifically block autocrine signaling in MDA-231 cells. The impact of these was evaluated with proliferation, migration and gene expression assays. Breast cancer metastasis to bone was modeled in female athymic nude mice with intratibial inoculation of MDA-231 cells, and cancer cell-bone marrow co-cultures. EGFR knockdown, but not PAR34 treatment, decreased osteoclasts formed in vitro (p<0.01), reduced osteolytic lesion tumor volume (p<0.01), increased survivorship in vivo (p<0.001), and resulted in decreased MDA-231 growth in the fat pad (p<0.01). Fat pad shEGFR-MDA-231 tumors produced in nude mice had increased necrotic areas and decreased CD31-positive vasculature. shEGFR-MDA-231 cells also produced decreased levels of the proangiogenic molecules macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 (MCSF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), both of which were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in a panel of EGFR-positive breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibiting autocrine EGFR signaling in breast cancer cells may provide a means for reducing paracrine factor production that facilitates microenvironment support in the bone and mammary gland. PMID:22276166

  1. Decreased autocrine EGFR signaling in metastatic breast cancer cells inhibits tumor growth in bone and mammary fat pad.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole K Nickerson

    Full Text Available Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231, and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and osteoblast-like cells. Both paracrine and autocrine EGFR signaling were inhibited with a neutralizing amphiregulin antibody, PAR34, whereas shRNA to the EGFR was used to specifically block autocrine signaling in MDA-231 cells. The impact of these was evaluated with proliferation, migration and gene expression assays. Breast cancer metastasis to bone was modeled in female athymic nude mice with intratibial inoculation of MDA-231 cells, and cancer cell-bone marrow co-cultures. EGFR knockdown, but not PAR34 treatment, decreased osteoclasts formed in vitro (p<0.01, reduced osteolytic lesion tumor volume (p<0.01, increased survivorship in vivo (p<0.001, and resulted in decreased MDA-231 growth in the fat pad (p<0.01. Fat pad shEGFR-MDA-231 tumors produced in nude mice had increased necrotic areas and decreased CD31-positive vasculature. shEGFR-MDA-231 cells also produced decreased levels of the proangiogenic molecules macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 (MCSF-1 and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, both of which were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in a panel of EGFR-positive breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibiting autocrine EGFR signaling in breast cancer cells may provide a means for reducing paracrine factor production that facilitates microenvironment support in the bone and mammary gland.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A

    2015-11-09

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors. PMID:26549306

  4. Cryptotanshinone induces inhibition of breast tumor growth by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells through the JAK2/STAT4/ perforin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Xiao-Zhen; Hu, Yao-Ren; Hu, Ai-Rong; Zhu, Cheng-Liang; Gao, Guo-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Cryptotanshinone (CPT), is a quinoid diterpene isolated from the root of the Asian medicinal plant, Salvia miotiorrhiza bunge. Numerous researchers have found that it could work as a potent antitumor agent to inhibit tumor growth in vitro, buith there has been much less emphasis on its in vivo role against breast tumors. Using a mouse tumor model of MCF7 cells, we showed that CPT strongly inhibited MCF7 cell growth in vivo with polarization of immune reactions toward Th1-type responses, stimulation of naive CD4+ T cell proliferation, and also increased IFN-γ and perforin production of CD4+ T cells in response to tumor-activated splenocytes. Furthermore, data revealed that the cytotoxic activity of CD4+ T cells induced by CPT was markedly abrogated by concanamycin A(CMA), a perforin inhibitor, but not IFN-γ Ab. On the other hand, after depletion of CD4+ T cells or blocked perforin with CMA in a tumor-bearing model, CPT could not effectively suppress tumor growth, but this phenomenon could be reversed by injecting naive CD4+ T cells. Thus, our results suggested that CPT mainly inhibited breast tumor growth through inducing cytotoxic CD4+ T cells to secrete perforin. We further found that CPT enhanced perforin production of CD4+ T cells by up-regulating JAK2 and STAT4 phosphorylation. These findings suggest a novel potential therapeutic role for CPT in tumor therapy, and demonstrate that CPT performs its antitumor functions through cytotoxic CD4+ T cells.

  5. Sunitinib Does Not Accelerate Tumor Growth in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krastan B. Blagoev

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies have suggested that sunitinib accelerates metastases in animals, ascribing this to inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor or the tumor’s adaptation. To address whether sunitinib accelerates tumors in humans, we analyzed data from the pivotal randomized phase III trial comparing sunitinib and interferon alfa in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. The evidence clearly shows that sunitinib was not harmful, did not accelerate tumor growth, and did not shorten survival. Specifically, neither longer sunitinib treatment nor a greater effect of sunitinib on tumors reduced survival. Sunitinib did reduce the tumor’s growth rate while administered, thereby improving survival, without appearing to alter tumor biology after discontinuation. Concerns arising from animal models do not apply to patients receiving sunitinib and likely will not apply to similar agents.

  6. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  7. Macrophage inflammatory protein-2 contributes to liver resection-induced acceleration of hepatic metastatic tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Otto Kollmar; Michael D Menger; Martin K Schilling

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 in liver resection-induced acceleration of tumor growth in a mouse model of hepatic metastasis.METHODS: After a 50% hepatectomy, 1×105 CT26.WT cells were implanted into the left liver lobe of syngeneic balb/c mice (PHx). Additional animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody (MAB452) neutralizing MIP-2(PHx+mAB). Non-resected and non-mAB-treated mice (Con) served as controls. After 7 d, tumor angiogenesis and microcirculation as well as cell proliferation, tumor growth, and CXCR-2 expression were analyzed using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry.RESULTS: Partial hepatectomy increased (P<0.05) the expression of the MIP-2 receptor CXCR-2 on tumor cells when compared with non-resected controls, and markedly accelerated (P<0.05) angiogenesis and metastatic tumor growth. Neutralization of MIP-2 by MAB452 treatment significantly (P<0.05) depressed CXCR-2 expression. Further, the blockade of MIP-2 reduced the angiogenic response (P<0.05) and inhibited tumor growth (P< 0.05). Of interest, liver resection-induced hepatocyte proliferation was not effected by anti-MIP-2 treatment.CONCLUSION: MIP-2 significantly contributes to liver resection-induced acceleration of colorectal CT26.WT hepatic metastasis growth.

  8. The NF2 tumor suppressor gene product, merlin, mediates contact inhibition of growth through interactions with CD44

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H.L.

    2002-03-01

    The neurofibromatosis-2 (NF2) gene encodes merlin, an ezrin-radixin-moesin-(ERM)-related protein, that functions as a tumor suppressor. I found that merlin plays a critical role in the establishment and maintenance of contact inhibition of growth. At high cell density, merlin is activated and blocks profileration with corresponding changes in cell cycle parameters. Merlin interfered with growth factor receptor or Ras-dependent signal transduction of MAP kinase and the step of interference was located downstream of Ras and Raf and upstream of MEK. Merlins growth inhibiting function depended on interaction with a specific domain of the cytoplasmic tail of CD44. In addition merlin activity and phosphorylation status depended on the extracellular ligand associated with the N-terminus of CD44. At high cell densities, in the presence of the extracellular ligand HA, merlin was dephosphorylated and bound directly to a basic amino acid motif in the cytoplasmic tail of CD44. Ezrin and moesin, which are also known to bind to the same basic amino acid motif in CD44 were absent within this growth inhibitory complex. Alternatively in logarithmically growing cells, merlin was inactive, phosphorylated and in a complex with ezrin and moesin. This growth permissive complex was also associated with the cytoplasmic tail of CD44. My data provide not only significant clues about how merlin functions as a tumor suppressor but revealed the existence of a novel molecular switch that, under the influence of ligands in the microenvironment, controls a cell decision to proliferate or growth arrest. (orig.)

  9. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  10. The response to epidermal growth factor of human maxillary tumor cells in terms of tumor growth, invasion and expression of proteinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, H; Komiyama, S; Matsui, K; Hamanaka, R; Ono, M; Kiue, A; Kobayashi, M; Shimizu, N; Welgus, H G; Kuwano, M

    1991-11-11

    Three cancer cell lines, IMC-2, IMC-3 and IMC-4, were established from a single tumor of a patient with maxillary cancer. We examined responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF) of these 3 cell lines with regard to cell growth and tumor invasion. The growth rate of IMC-2 in nude mice was markedly faster than that of the IMC-3 and IMC-4 cell lines. Assay for invasion through fibrin gels showed significantly enhanced invasive capacity of IMC-2 cells in response to EGF, but no change for IMC-3 and IMC-4 cells. We examined response to EGF of IMC-2 cells with regard to expression of a growth-related oncogene (c-fos), proteinases and their inhibitors. Expression of c-fos was transiently increased in IMC-2 cells at rates comparable to those seen in the 2 other lines in the presence of EGF. There was no apparent effect of EGF on the expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and 72-kDa type-IV collagenase in IMC-2 cells. In contrast, EGF specifically enhanced the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-I (PAI-I) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-I (TIMP-I) in IMC-2 cells. Our data suggest that proteinase inhibitors or other related factors may play an important role in tumor growth and invasion in response to EGF.

  11. TetraMabs: simultaneous targeting of four oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases for tumor growth inhibition in heterogeneous tumor cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoldi, Raffaella; Schanzer, Jürgen; Panke, Christian; Jucknischke, Ute; Neubert, Natalie J.; Croasdale, Rebecca; Scheuer, Werner; Auer, Johannes; Klein, Christian; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Kobold, Sebastian; Sustmann, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody-based targeted tumor therapy has greatly improved treatment options for patients. Antibodies against oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), especially the ErbB receptor family, are prominent examples. However, long-term efficacy of such antibodies is limited by resistance mechanisms. Tumor evasion by a priori or acquired activation of other kinases is often causative for this phenomenon. These findings led to an increasing number of combination approaches either within a protein family, e.g. the ErbB family or by targeting RTKs of different phylogenetic origin like HER1 and cMet or HER1 and IGF1R. Progress in antibody engineering technology enabled generation of clinical grade bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) to design drugs inherently addressing such resistance mechanisms. Limited data are available on multi-specific antibodies targeting three or more RTKs. In the present study, we have evaluated the cloning, eukaryotic expression and purification of tetraspecific, tetravalent Fc-containing antibodies targeting HER3, cMet, HER1 and IGF1R. The antibodies are based on the combination of single-chain Fab and Fv fragments in an IgG1 antibody format enhanced by the knob-into-hole technology. They are non-agonistic and inhibit tumor cell growth comparable to the combination of four parental antibodies. Importantly, TetraMabs show improved apoptosis induction and tumor growth inhibition over individual monospecific or BsAbs in cellular assays. In addition, a mimicry assay to reflect heterogeneous expression of antigens in a tumor mass was established. With this novel in vitro assay, we can demonstrate the superiority of a tetraspecific antibody to bispecific tumor antigen-binding antibodies in early pre-clinical development. PMID:27578890

  12. Golimumab and certolizumab: The two new anti-tumor necrosis factor kids on the block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal Mohit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF agents have revolutionized treatment of psoriasis and many other inflammatory diseases of autoimmune origin. They have considerable advantages over the existing immunomodulators. Anti-TNF agents are designed to target a very specific component of the immune-mediated inflammatory cascades. Thus, they have lower risks of systemic side-effects. In a brief period of 10 years, a growing number of biological therapies are entering the clinical arena while many more biologicals remain on the horizon. With time, the long-term side-effects and efficacies of these individual agents will become clearer and help to determine which ones are the most suitable for long-term care. Golimumab (a human monoclonal anti-TNF-α antibody and Certolizumab (a PEGylated Fab fragment of humanized monoclonal TNF-α antibody are the two latest additions to the anti-TNF regimen. Here, we are providing a brief description about these two drugs and their uses.

  13. Malignant nonfunctioning islet cell tumor of the pancreas with intrasplenic growth:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Jiang Wang; Zuo-Wei Zhao; Hai-Feng Luo; Zhong-Yu Wang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We reported a case of malignant nonfunction islet cell tumor (10.0 cm in diameter) of the pancreas, with malignant histological features and splenic inifltration. The case is rare, and few reports have been published. METHODS: A 46-year-old woman with a vague pain in the left upper quadrant for 3 months was found to have a tumor in the spleen. Ultrasonography and computed tomography demonstrated a well-deifned pancreatic tumor of 8.2×10.0 cm in size, her serum levels of pancreatic hormones were within normal limits. RESULTS: Splenectomy combined with pancreatectomy was performed for the tail of the pancreas. Resected specimens showed a malignant nonfunctioning islet cell tumor invading the spleen. CONCLUSIONS:The growth pattern of the tumor causes malignant features. Resection of the tumor should be performed by enucleation, pancreaticoduodenectomy or distal pancreatectomy.

  14. A nonlinear competitive model of the prostate tumor growth under intermittent androgen suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Tong-Jun; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Xie, Jing-Hui; Hao, Fang-Fang

    2016-09-01

    Hormone suppression has been the primary modality of treatment for prostate cancer. However long-term androgen deprivation may induce androgen-independent (AI) recurrence. Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) is a potential way to delay or avoid the AI relapse. Mathematical models of tumor growth and treatment are simple while they are capable of capturing the essence of complicated interactions. Game theory models have analyzed that tumor cells can enhance their fitness by adopting genetically determined survival strategies. In this paper, we consider the survival strategies as the competitive advantage of tumor cells and propose a new model to mimic the prostate tumor growth in IAS therapy. Then we investigate the competition effect in tumor development by numerical simulations. The results indicate that successfully IAS-controlled states can be achieved even though the net growth rate of AI cells is positive for any androgen level. There is crucial difference between the previous models and the new one in the phase diagram of successful and unsuccessful tumor control by IAS administration, which means that the suggestions from the models for medication can be different. Furthermore we introduce quadratic logistic terms to the competition model to simulate the tumor growth in the environment with a finite carrying capacity considering the nutrients or inhibitors. The simulations show that the tumor growth can reach an equilibrium state or an oscillatory state with the net growth rate of AI cells being androgen independent. Our results suggest that the competition and the restraint of a limited environment can enhance the possibility of relapse prevention.

  15. A nonlinear competitive model of the prostate tumor growth under intermittent androgen suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Tong-Jun; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Xie, Jing-Hui; Hao, Fang-Fang

    2016-09-01

    Hormone suppression has been the primary modality of treatment for prostate cancer. However long-term androgen deprivation may induce androgen-independent (AI) recurrence. Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) is a potential way to delay or avoid the AI relapse. Mathematical models of tumor growth and treatment are simple while they are capable of capturing the essence of complicated interactions. Game theory models have analyzed that tumor cells can enhance their fitness by adopting genetically determined survival strategies. In this paper, we consider the survival strategies as the competitive advantage of tumor cells and propose a new model to mimic the prostate tumor growth in IAS therapy. Then we investigate the competition effect in tumor development by numerical simulations. The results indicate that successfully IAS-controlled states can be achieved even though the net growth rate of AI cells is positive for any androgen level. There is crucial difference between the previous models and the new one in the phase diagram of successful and unsuccessful tumor control by IAS administration, which means that the suggestions from the models for medication can be different. Furthermore we introduce quadratic logistic terms to the competition model to simulate the tumor growth in the environment with a finite carrying capacity considering the nutrients or inhibitors. The simulations show that the tumor growth can reach an equilibrium state or an oscillatory state with the net growth rate of AI cells being androgen independent. Our results suggest that the competition and the restraint of a limited environment can enhance the possibility of relapse prevention. PMID:27259386

  16. Growth of monolithic full-color GaN-based LED with intermediate carrier blocking layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghoroury, Hussein S.; Yeh, Milton; Chen, J. C.; Li, X.; Chuang, Chih-Li

    2016-07-01

    Specially designed intermediate carrier blocking layers (ICBLs) in multi-active regions of III-nitride LEDs were shown to be effective in controlling the carrier injection distribution across the active regions. In principle, the majority of carriers, both holes and electrons, can be guided into targeted quantum wells and recombine to generate light of specific wavelengths at controlled current-densities. Accordingly we proposed and demonstrated a novel monolithic InGaN-based LED to achieve three primary colors of light from one device at selected current densities. This LED structure, which has three different sets of quantum wells separated with ICBLs for three primary red-green-blue (RGB) colors, was grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Results show that this LED can emit light ranging from 460 to 650 nm to cover the entire visible spectrum. The emission wavelength starts at 650 nm and then decreases to 460 nm or lower as the injection current increases. In addition to three primary colors, many other colors can be obtained by color mixing techniques. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of monolithic full-color LED grown by a simple growth technique without using re-growth process.

  17. The importance of actual tumor growth rate on disease free survival and overall survival in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Evaluation of the variation in tumor growth rate and the influence of tumor growth rate on disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Material and methods: We delineated tumor volume on a diagnostic and planning CT scan in 131 patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and calculated the tumor growth rate. Primary endpoint was DFS. Follow up data were collected retrospectively. Results: A large variation in tumor growth rate was seen. When dichotomized with a cut-off point of −0.3 ln(cc/day), we found a significant association between high growth rate and worse DFS (p = 0.008) and OS (p = 0.013). After stepwise adjustment for potential confounders (age, differentiation and tumor volume) this significant association persisted. However, after adjustment of N-stage association disappeared. Exploratory analyses suggested a strong association between N-stage and tumor growth rate. Conclusions: In laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, there is a large variation in tumor growth rate. This tumor growth rate seems to be an important factor in disease free survival and OS. This tumor growth rate is independent of age, differentiation and tumor volume associated with DFS, but N-stage seems to be a more important risk factor

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells directly interact with breast cancer cells and promote tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Katharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Schambach, Axel; Glage, Silke; Otte, Anna; Hass, Ralf

    2013-12-01

    Cellular interactions were investigated between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human breast cancer cells. Co-culture of the two cell populations was associated with an MSC-mediated growth stimulation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A continuous expansion of tumor cell colonies was progressively surrounded by MSC(GFP) displaying elongated cell bodies. Moreover, some MSC(GFP) and MDA-MB-231(cherry) cells spontaneously generated hybrid/chimeric cell populations, demonstrating a dual (green fluorescent protein+cherry) fluorescence. During a co-culture of 5-6 days, MSC also induced expression of the GPI-anchored CD90 molecule in breast cancer cells, which could not be observed in a transwell assay, suggesting the requirement of direct cellular interactions. Indeed, MSC-mediated CD90 induction in the breast cancer cells could be partially blocked by a gap junction inhibitor and by inhibition of the notch signaling pathway, respectively. Similar findings were observed in vivo by which a subcutaneous injection of a co-culture of primary MSC with MDA-MB-231(GFP) cells into NOD/scid mice exhibited an about 10-fold increased tumor size and enhanced metastatic capacity as compared with the MDA-MB-231(GFP) mono-culture. Flow cytometric evaluation of the co-culture tumors revealed more than 90% of breast cancer cells with about 3% of CD90-positive cells, also suggesting an MSC-mediated in vivo induction of CD90 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an elevated neovascularization and viability in the MSC/MDA-MB-231(GFP)-derived tumors. Together, these data suggested an MSC-mediated growth stimulation of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by which the altered MSC morphology and the appearance of hybrid/chimeric cells and breast cancer-expressing CD90(+) cells indicate mutual cellular alterations.

  19. Antitumor effect of Ganoderma lucidum : Cytotoxicity and Tumor Growth Delay(1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Seong [Chonju Woosuck Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Won [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    1994-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum(G.I.) on the survival of tumor cells in vitro and on the growth of tumors in vivo. Materials and Methods: Dried G.I. was made into powder, extracted with distilled water, filtered and diluted from a maximum concentration of 100 mg/ml in sequence. The cytotoxicity of G.O. in vitro was evaluated from its ability to reduce the clonogenicity of SCK tumor cells. For the tumor growth delay study, about 2x10{sup 5} of SCK tumor cells were subcutaneously inoculated in the legs of A/J mice. The first experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G/I. From the first day after tumor inoculation for 10 days. The second experimental group of mice were injected i.p. with 0.2ml of 250 mg/kg of G.I. either once a day for 10 days or twice a day for 5 days beginning from the 7th day after tumor inoculation. Results: 1. Cytotoxicity in vitro; survival fraction, as judged from the curve, at G.I. concentration of 0.5, 1,5,10,25,50 and 100 mg/ml were 1.0, 0.74{+-}0.03, 0.18{+-}0.03, 0.15{+-}0.02, 0.006{+-}0.002, 0.015 and 0.0015, respectively. 2. Tumor growth delay in vivo; a) the time required for the mean tumor volume to grow to 1,000mm{sup 3} was 11 days in the control group and 14 days in the experimental group. b) the time required for tumor volume to increase 4 times was 11 days in the control group while it was 10.5 and 12 days in the groups injected with G.I. once a day and twice a day from the 7th day after tumor inoculation respectively. Conclusion: Aqueous extracts of G.I. showed a marked cytotoxicity on the SCK mammary cells in vitro. Tumor growth delay was statistically significant when G.I. injection was started soon after tumor inoculation, but it was not significant when injection was started after the tumors were firmly established.

  20. A fusion protein containing murine vascular endothelial growth factor and tissue factor induces thrombogenesis and suppression of tumor growth in a colon carcinoma model*

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Feng-Ying; Li, Yue-nan; WANG Hua; Huang, Yong-hao; Lin, Ying-Ying; Tan, Guang-Hong

    2008-01-01

    Induction of tumor vasculature occlusion by targeting a thrombogen to newly formed blood vessels in tumor tissues represents an intriguing approach to the eradication of primary solid tumors. In the current study, we construct and express a fusion protein containing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tissue factor (TF) to explore whether this fusion protein has the capability of inhibiting tumor growth in a colon carcinoma model. The murine cDNA of VEGF A and TF were amplified by r...

  1. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in tumor growth and progression: Lessons learned from pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilan, Jason; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a sympathetic neurotransmitter with pleiotropic actions, many of which are highly relevant to tumor biology. Consequently, the peptide has been implicated as a factor regulating the growth of a variety of tumors. Among them, two pediatric malignancies with high endogenous NPY synthesis and release - neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma - became excellent models to investigate the role of NPY in tumor growth and progression. The stimulatory effect on tumor cell proliferation, survival, and migration, as well as angiogenesis in these tumors, is mediated by two NPY receptors, Y2R and Y5R, which are expressed in either a constitutive or inducible manner. Of particular importance are interactions of the NPY system with the tumor microenvironment, as hypoxic conditions commonly occurring in solid tumors strongly activate the NPY/Y2R/Y5R axis. This activation is triggered by hypoxia-induced up-regulation of Y2R/Y5R expression and stimulation of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), which converts NPY to a selective Y2R/Y5R agonist, NPY(3-36). While previous studies focused mainly on the effects of NPY on tumor growth and vascularization, they also provided insight into the potential role of the peptide in tumor progression into a metastatic and chemoresistant phenotype. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the role of NPY in neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma and its interactions with the tumor microenvironment in the context of findings in other malignancies, as well as discusses future directions and potential clinical implications of these discoveries.

  2. Non-invasive optical imaging of tumor growth in intact animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinling; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2003-12-01

    We describe here a system for rapidly visualizing tumor growth in intact rodent mice that is simple, rapid, and eminently accessible and repeatable. We have established new rodent tumor cell line -- SP2/0-GFP cells that stably express high level of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by transfected with a plasmid that encoded GFP using electroporation and selected with G418 for 3 weeks. 1 x 104 - 1x107 SP2/0-GFP mouse melanoma cells were injected s.c. in the ears and legs of 6- to 7-week-old syngeneic male BALB/c mice, and optical images visualized real-time the engrafted tumor growth. The tumor burden was monitored over time by cryogenically cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera focused through a stereo microscope. The results show that the fluorescence intensity of GFP-expressing tumor is comparably with the tumor growth and/or depress. This in vivo optical imaging based on GFP is sensitive, external, and noninvasive. It affords continuous visual monitoring of malignant growth within intact animals, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies.

  3. Effect of melatonin on tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Arbab, Ali S; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Varma, Nadimpalli R S; Iskander, A S M; Shankar, Adarsh; Ali, Meser M; de Campos Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires

    2014-01-01

    As neovascularization is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, controlling angiogenesis is a promising tactic in limiting cancer progression. Melatonin has been studied for their inhibitory properties on angiogenesis in cancer. We performed an in vivo study to evaluate the effects of melatonin treatment on angiogenesis in breast cancer. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay after melatonin treatment in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). After, cells were implanted in athymic nude mice and treated with melatonin or vehicle daily, administered intraperitoneally 1 hour before turning the room light off. Volume of the tumors was measured weekly with a digital caliper and at the end of treatments animals underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Technetium-99m tagged vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) C to detect in vivo angiogenesis. In addition, expression of pro-angiogenic/growth factors in the tumor extracts was evaluated by membrane antibody array and collected tumor tissues were analyzed with histochemical staining. Melatonin in vitro treatment (1 mM) decreased cell viability (pbreast cancer xenografts nude mice treated with melatonin showed reduced tumor size and cell proliferation (Ki-67) compared to control animals after 21 days of treatment (p0.05) images. In addition, there was a decrease of micro-vessel density (Von Willebrand Factor) in melatonin treated mice (pmelatonin treatment showed effectiveness in reducing tumor growth and cell proliferation, as well as in the inhibition of angiogenesis. PMID:24416386

  4. Nicotine promotes tumor growth and metastasis in mouse models of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nicotine is the major addictive component of tobacco smoke. Although nicotine is generally thought to have limited ability to initiate cancer, it can induce cell proliferation and angiogenesis in a variety of systems. These properties might enable nicotine to facilitate the growth of tumors already initiated. Here we show that nicotine significantly promotes the progression and metastasis of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer. This effect was observed when nicotine was administered through intraperitoneal injections, or through over-the-counter transdermal patches. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study, Line1 mouse adenocarcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into syngenic BALB/c mice. Nicotine administration either by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection or transdermal patches caused a remarkable increase in the size of implanted Line1 tumors. Once the tumors were surgically removed, nicotine treated mice had a markedly higher tumor recurrence (59.7% as compared to the vehicle treated mice (19.5%. Nicotine also increased metastasis of dorsally implanted Line1 tumors to the lungs by 9 folds. These studies on transplanted tumors were extended to a mouse model where the tumors were induced by the tobacco carcinogen, NNK. Lung tumors were initiated in A/J mice by i.p. injection of NNK; administration of 1 mg/kg nicotine three times a week led to an increase in the size and the number of tumors formed in the lungs. In addition, nicotine significantly reduced the expression of epithelial markers, E-Cadherin and beta-Catenin as well as the tight junction protein ZO-1; these tumors also showed an increased expression of the alpha(7 nAChR subunit. We believe that exposure to nicotine either by tobacco smoke or nicotine supplements might facilitate increased tumor growth and metastasis. CONCLUSIONS: Our earlier results indicated that nicotine could induce invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in cultured lung, breast

  5. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jie; Cozzi, Paul; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA) imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8). Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r(2) = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively) and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  6. In vivo Cytokine Gene Transfer by Gene Gun Reduces Tumor Growth in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenn H.; Burkholder, Joseph K.; Sun, Jian; Culp, Jerilyn; Turner, Joel; Lu, Xing G.; Pugh, Thomas D.; Ershler, William B.; Yang, Ning-Sun

    1995-03-01

    Implantation of tumor cells modified by in vitro cytokine gene transfer has been shown by many investigators to result in potent in vivo antitumor activities in mice. Here we describe an approach to tumor immunotherapy utilizing direct transfection of cytokine genes into tumorbearing animals by particle-mediated gene transfer. In vivo transfection of the human interleukin 6 gene into the tumor site reduced methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma growth, and a combination of murine tumor necrosis factor α and interferon γ genes inhibited growth of a renal carcinoma tumor model (Renca). In addition, treatment with murine interleukin 2 and interferon γ genes prolonged the survival of Renca tumor-bearing mice and resulted in tumor eradication in 25% of the test animals. Transgene expression was demonstrated in treated tissues by ELISA and immunohistochemical analysis. Significant serum levels of interleukin 6 and interferon γ were detected, demonstrating effective secretion of transgenic proteins from treated skin into the bloodstream. This in vivo cytokine gene therapy approach provides a system for evaluating the antitumor properties of various cytokines in different tumor models and has potential utility for human cancer gene therapy.

  7. Contrast-enhancing tumor growth dynamics of preoperative, treatment-naive human glioblastoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellingson, BM; Nguyen, HN; Lai, A.(Sezione INFN di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy); Nechifor, RE; Zaw, O; Pope, WB; Yong, WH; Nghiemphu, PL; Liau, LM; Cloughesy, TF

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the natural growth characteristics of untreated glioblastoma before surgical or therapeutic intervention, because patients are rapidly treated after preliminary radiographic diagnosis. Understanding the growth characteristics of uninhibited human glioblastoma may be useful for characterizing changes in response to therapy. Thus, the objective of the current study was to explore tumor growth dynamics in a cohort of patients with untreated glioblastoma before surgical or t...

  8. Effect of melatonin on tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Victorasso Jardim-Perassi

    Full Text Available As neovascularization is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, controlling angiogenesis is a promising tactic in limiting cancer progression. Melatonin has been studied for their inhibitory properties on angiogenesis in cancer. We performed an in vivo study to evaluate the effects of melatonin treatment on angiogenesis in breast cancer. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay after melatonin treatment in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231. After, cells were implanted in athymic nude mice and treated with melatonin or vehicle daily, administered intraperitoneally 1 hour before turning the room light off. Volume of the tumors was measured weekly with a digital caliper and at the end of treatments animals underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT with Technetium-99m tagged vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF C to detect in vivo angiogenesis. In addition, expression of pro-angiogenic/growth factors in the tumor extracts was evaluated by membrane antibody array and collected tumor tissues were analyzed with histochemical staining. Melatonin in vitro treatment (1 mM decreased cell viability (p0.05 images. In addition, there was a decrease of micro-vessel density (Von Willebrand Factor in melatonin treated mice (p<0.05. However, semiquantitative densitometry analysis of membrane array indicated increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor 1 in treated tumors compared to vehicle treated tumors (p<0.05. In conclusion, melatonin treatment showed effectiveness in reducing tumor growth and cell proliferation, as well as in the inhibition of angiogenesis.

  9. Metformin blocks the stimulative effect of a high-energy diet on colon carcinoma growth in vivo and is associated with reduced expression of fatty acid synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algire, Carolyn; Amrein, Lilian; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Panasci, Lawrence; Pollak, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the association of obesity with adverse colon cancer outcomes are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of a high-energy diet on growth of an in vivo colon cancer model. Seventeen days following the injection of 5x10(5) MC38 colon carcinoma cells, tumors from mice on the high-energy diet were approximately twice the volume of those of mice on the control diet. These findings were correlated with the observation that the high-energy diet led to elevated insulin levels, phosphorylated AKT, and increased expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) by the tumor cells. Metformin, an antidiabetic drug, leads to the activation of AMPK and is currently under investigation for its antineoplastic activity. We observed that metformin blocked the effect of the high-energy diet on tumor growth, reduced insulin levels, and attenuated the effect of diet on phosphorylation of AKT and expression of FASN. Furthermore, the administration of metformin led to the activation of AMPK, the inhibitory phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the upregulation of BNIP3 and increased apoptosis as estimated by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Prior work showed that activating mutations of PI3K are associated with increased AKT activation and adverse outcome in colon cancer; our results demonstrate that the aggressive tumor behavior associated with a high-energy diet has similar effects on this signaling pathway. Furthermore, metformin is demonstrated to reverse the effects of the high-energy diet, thus suggesting a potential role for this agent in the management of a metabolically defined subset of colon cancers. PMID:20228137

  10. Blocking rpS6 Phosphorylation Exacerbates Tsc1 Deletion-Induced Kidney Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan; Chen, Jianchun; Xu, Jinxian; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying renal growth and renal growth-induced nephron damage remain poorly understood. Here, we report that in murine models, deletion of the tuberous sclerosis complex protein 1 (Tsc1) in renal proximal tubules induced strikingly enlarged kidneys, with minimal cystogenesis and occasional microscopic tumorigenesis. Signaling studies revealed hyperphosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in activated renal tubules. Notably, knockin of a nonphosphorylatable rpS6 in theseTsc1-mutant mice exacerbated cystogenesis and caused drastic nephron damage and renal fibrosis, leading to kidney failure and a premature death rate of 67% by 9 weeks of age. In contrast,Tsc1single-mutant mice were all alive and had far fewer renal cysts at this age. Mechanistic studies revealed persistent activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling causing hyperphosphorylation and consequent accumulation of 4E-BP1, along with greater cell proliferation, in the renal tubules ofTsc1andrpS6double-mutant mice. Furthermore, pharmacologic treatment ofTsc1single-mutant mice with rapamycin reduced hyperphosphorylation and accumulation of 4E-BP1 but also inhibited phosphorylation of rpS6. Rapamycin also exacerbated cystic and fibrotic lesions and impaired kidney function in these mice, consequently leading to a premature death rate of 40% within 2 weeks of treatment, despite destroying tumors and decreasing kidney size. These findings indicate that Tsc1 prevents aberrant renal growth and tumorigenesis by inhibiting mTORC1 signaling, whereas phosphorylated rpS6 suppresses cystogenesis and fibrosis inTsc1-deleted kidneys. PMID:26296742

  11. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Qingyi [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Qing, Yong, E-mail: qingyongxy@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Xiaohua, E-mail: wuxh@scu.edu.cn [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. - Highlights: • Dioscin inhibits tumor growth in vivo and does not exhibit any toxicity. • Dioscin inhibits angiogenesis within solid tumors. • Dioscin inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. • Dioscin inhibits VEGF–induced blood vessel formation in vivo. • Dioscin inhibits VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathway.

  12. Angiostatin and endostatin: endogenous inhibitors of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, B K; MacDonald, N J; Gubish, E R

    2000-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular structure and mechanistic aspects of Angiostatin and Endostatin, endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors that have been shown to regress tumors in murine models. The growing body of literature surrounding these molecules and on the efficacy of these proteins is in part due to the ability to generate these proteins in recombinant systems as well characterized molecules. Recombinant human Angiostatin and Endostatin are in Phase I trials, following the manufacture of clinical grade material at large scale. This review highlights the recent advances made on understanding the structure and function of Angiostatin and Endostatin. PMID:11191058

  13. The Characteristics of Vascular Growth in VX2 Tumor Measured by MRI and Micro-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-L. Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood supply is crucial for rapid growth of a malignant tumor; medical imaging can play an important role in evaluating the vascular characterstics of tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and micro-computed tomography (CT are able to detect tumors and measure blood volumes of microcirculation in tissue. In this study, we used MR imaging and micro-CT to assess the microcirculation in a VX2 tumor model in rabbits. MRI characterization was performed using the intravascular contrast agent Clariscan (NC100150-Injection; micro-CT with Microfil was used to directly depict blood vessels with diameters as low as 17 um in tissue. Relative blood volume fraction (rBVF in the tumor rim and blood vessel density (rBVD over the whole tumor was calculated using the two imaging methods. Our study indicates that rBVF is negatively related to the volume of the tumor measured by ultrasound (R=0.90. rBVF in the tissue of a VX2 tumor measured by MRI in vivo was qualitatively consistent with the rBVD demonstrated by micro-CT in vitro (R=0.97. The good correlation between the two methods indicates that MRI studies are potentially valuable for assessing characteristics or tumor vascularity and for assessing response to therapy noninvasively.

  14. A Comparison of Imaging Techniques to Monitor Tumor Growth and Cancer Progression in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Puaux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Purpose. Monitoring solid tumor growth and metastasis in small animals is important for cancer research. Noninvasive techniques make longitudinal studies possible, require fewer animals, and have greater statistical power. Such techniques include FDG positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and optical imaging, comprising bioluminescence imaging (BLI and fluorescence imaging (FLI. This study compared the performance and usability of these methods in the context of mouse tumor studies. Methods. B16 tumor-bearing mice (n=4 for each study were used to compare practicality, performance for small tumor detection and tumor burden measurement. Using RETAAD mice, which develop spontaneous melanomas, we examined the performance of MRI (n=6 mice and FDG-PET (n=10 mice for tumor identification. Results. Overall, BLI and FLI were the most practical techniques tested. Both BLI and FDG-PET identified small nonpalpable tumors, whereas MRI and FLI only detected macroscopic, clinically evident tumors. FDG-PET and MRI performed well in the identification of tumors in terms of specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value. Conclusion. Each of the four methods has different strengths that must be understood before selecting them for use.

  15. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  16. Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence in a model of tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dongxi, E-mail: lidongxi@yahoo.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, 710072 (China); Xu, Wei; Sun, Chunyan; Wang, Liang [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, 710072 (China)

    2012-04-30

    We investigate the phenomenon that stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between tumor extinction and recurrence in the model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis–Menten reaction. We analyze the probability transitions between the extinction state and the state of the stable tumor by the Mean First Extinction Time (MFET) and Mean First Return Time (MFRT). It is found that the positional fluctuations hinder the transition, but the environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. The observed behavior could be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer. -- Highlights: ► Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence. ► The probability transitions are investigated. ► The positional fluctuations hinder the transition. ► The environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. ► The observed behavior can be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer.

  17. PI3K/Akt signaling mediated Hexokinase-2 expression inhibits cell apoptosis and promotes tumor growth in pediatric osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuo, Baobiao; Li, Yuan; Li, Zhengwei; Qin, Haihui; Sun, Qingzeng; Zhang, Fengfei; Shen, Yang; Shi, Yingchun [Department of Surgery, The Children' s Hospital of Xuzhou, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province 221006 (China); Wang, Rong, E-mail: wangrong2008163@163.com [Department of Ultrasonography, Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province 221006 (China)

    2015-08-21

    Accumulating evidence has shown that PI3K/Akt pathway is frequently hyperactivated in osteosarcoma (OS) and contributes to tumor initiation and progression. Altered phenotype of glucose metabolism is a key hallmark of cancer cells including OS. However, the relationship between PI3K/Akt pathway and glucose metabolism in OS remains largely unexplored. In this study, we showed that elevated Hexokinase-2 (HK2) expression, which catalyzes the first essential step of glucose metabolism by conversion of glucose into glucose-6-phosphate, was induced by activated PI3K/Akt signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that HK2 was overexpressed in 83.3% (25/30) specimens detected and was closely correlated with Ki67, a cell proliferation index. Silencing of endogenous HK2 resulted in decreased aerobic glycolysis as demonstrated by reduced glucose consumption and lactate production. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling also suppressed aerobic glycolysis and this effect can be reversed by reintroduction of HK2. Furthermore, knockdown of HK2 led to increased cell apoptosis and reduced ability of colony formation; meanwhile, these effects were blocked by 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a glycolysis inhibitor through its actions on hexokinase, indicating that HK2 functions in cell apoptosis and growth were mediated by altered aerobic glycolysis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel relationship between PI3K/Akt signaling and aerobic glycolysis and indicates that PI3K/Akt/HK2 might be potential therapeutic approaches for OS. - Highlights: • PI3K/Akt signaling contributes to elevated expression of HK2 in osteosarcoma. • HK2 inhibits cell apoptosis and promotes tumor growth through enhanced Warburg effect. • Inhibition of glycolysis blocks the oncogenic activity of HK2.

  18. The growth dynamics of tumor subject to both immune surveillance and external therapy intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO YuanZhi; ZHONG WeiRong; WANG FengHua; HE ZhenHui; XIA ZhongJun

    2007-01-01

    Considering the growth of tumor cells modeled by an enzyme dynamic process under an immune surveillance,we studied in anti-tumor immunotherapy the single-variable growth dynamics of tumor cells subject to a multiplicative noise and an external therapy intervention simultaneously.The law of tumor growth of the above anti-tumor immunotherapy model was revealed through numerical simulaions to the relevant stochastic dynamic differential equation.Two simulative parameters of therapy,i.e.,therapy intensity and therapy duty-cycle,were introduced to characterize a treatment process similar to a tumor clinic therapy.There exists a critical therapy boundary which,in an exponent-decaying form,divides the parameter region of therapy into an invalid and a valid treatment zone,respectively.A greater critical therapy duty-cycle is necessary to achieve a valid treatment for a lower therapy intensity while the critical therapy intensity decreases accordingly with an enhancing immunity. primary clinic observation of the patients with the typical non-hodgekin's lymphoma was carried out,and there appears a basic agreement between clinic observations and dynamic simulations.

  19. A chemical energy approach of avascular tumor growth: multiscale modeling and qualitative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampatzoglou, Pantelis; Dassios, George; Hadjinicolaou, Maria; Kourea, Helen P; Vrahatis, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    In the present manuscript we propose a lattice free multiscale model for avascular tumor growth that takes into account the biochemical environment, mitosis, necrosis, cellular signaling and cellular mechanics. This model extends analogous approaches by assuming a function that incorporates the biochemical energy level of the tumor cells and a mechanism that simulates the behavior of cancer stem cells. Numerical simulations of the model are used to investigate the morphology of the tumor at the avascular phase. The obtained results show similar characteristics with those observed in clinical data in the case of the Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) of the breast. PMID:26558163

  20. Effects of modified fractionated irradiation on the growth of sarcoma 180 solid tumor in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present experimental study has been designed and carried out to investigate the effects of various doses and timings of fractionated irradiation of 6 MV X-rays obtained from a linear accelerator on sarcoma 180 solid tumors produced in DDO/Lee mouse. A total of 2700 to approx. 2800 cGy(or rad) was delivered with daily dose of 250/ cGy, 350cGy, and 450cGy every other day to the inoculated site starting on day 2,4,6, and 8 post-inoculation and the tumor size change was observed by measuring a maximum circumference of tumor bearing region. The dose experimentally established in the mouse for one half of animals to produce a solid tumor (TSD50) from ascitic mouse sarcoma 180 was 10/sup 3.87/ cells/ml. The effect of fractionated irradiation on days 2 and 4 post-inoculation was inhibitory to the growth of solid form tumor of experimentally produced sarcoma 180 (p<0.001). The growth of tumor was also inhibited when irradiated on days 6 and 8 post-inoculation but the grade was less. Histologically tumor cells of mouse sarcoma 180 produced in the experimental animal were shown to be destroyed and eradicated by radiation once they were responsive to X-irradiation. The present study suggests that a small or early tumor is benefitted by a small daily dose(e.g. 250 cGy) irradiation whereas a moderately advanced tumor is beneficially treated with a relatively high dose (e.g. 450 cGy) irradiation. A large tumor responded very poorly to irradiation

  1. PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticles as Tumor Ecrosis Factor-α Receptor Blocking Peptide Carriers: Preparation,Characterization and Release in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; YANG Anshu; LI Zhuoya; XU Huibi; YANG Xiangliang

    2007-01-01

    To assess the merits of PEGylated poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PEG-PLGA) nanoparticles as drug carriers for tumor necrosis factor-α receptor blocking peptide (TNFR-BP), PEG-PLGA copolymer,which could be used to prepare the stealth nanoparticles, was synthesized with methoxypolyethyleneglycol,DL-lactide and glycolide. The structure of PEG-PLGA was confirmed with 1H-NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy,and the molecular weight (MW) was determined by gel permeation chromatography. Fluorescent FITC-TNFR-BP was chosen as model protein and encapsulated within PEG-PLGA nanoparticles using the double emulsion method. Atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy were employed to characterize the stealth nanoparticles fabricated for morphology, size with polydispersity index and zeta potential. Encapsulation efficiency (EE) and the release of FITC-TNFR-BP in nanoparticles in vitro were measured by the fluorescence measurement. The stealth nanoparticles were found to have the mean diameter less than 270 nm and zeta potential less than-20 mV. In all nanoparticle formulations, more than 45% of EE were obtained. FITC-TNFR-BP release from the PEG-PLGA nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic pattern, initial burst release and consequently sustained release. The experimental results show that PEG-PLGA nanoparticles possess the potential to develop as drug carriers for controlled release applications of TNFR-BP.

  2. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3 in Ovarian Epithelial Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xiao-yan; DING Ming-xing; ZHANG Ning; LIN Xing-qiu; LI Ji-cheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) in the process of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis in epithelial ovarian tumors. Methods: In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining for VEGF-C were performed in 30 epithelial ovarian carcinomas, 9 borderline tumors and 26 benign tumors. Endothelial cells were immunostained with anti-VEGFR-3 pAb and anti-CD31 mAb, and VEGFR-3 positive vessels and microvessel density (MVD) were assessed by image analysis. Results: VEGF-C mRNA and protein expression were detected in cytoplasm of carcinoma cells. VEGF-C mRNA and protein expression in ovarian epithelial carcinomas were significantly higher than those in borderline tumors and benign tumors (P<0.05 or P<0.01). In ovarian epithelial carcinomas, VEGF-C protein expression, VEGFR-3 positive vessels and MVD were significantly higher in the cases of clinical stage Ⅲ-Ⅳ and with lymph node metastasis than those of clinical stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ and without lymph node metastasis respectively (P<0.05 or P<0.01). VEGFR-3 positive vessels and MVD were significantly higher in VEGF-C protein positive tumors than negative tumors (P<0.05). VEGFR-3 positive vessels was significantly correlated with MVD(P<0.01). Conclusion: VEGF-C might play a role in lymphatic metastasis via lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis in epithelial ovarian tumors, and VBEGF-C could be used as a biologic marker of metastasis in ovarian epithelial tumors.

  3. CUEDC2 down-regulation is associated with tumor growth and poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Longhua; Bai, Lihong; Lin, Gengpeng; Wang, Ran; Liu, Yangli; Cai, Jinghuang; Guo, Yubiao; Zhu, Zhiwen; Xie, Canmao

    2015-08-21

    CUE domain-containing 2 (CUEDC2) is a multi-functional protein, which regulates cell cycle, growth factor signaling and inflammation. We found that CUEDC2 was low in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and lung adenocarcinoma tissues at both mRNA and protein levels. Low levels of CUEDC2 were correlated with a shorter survival time in patients with lung adenocarcinoma (p = 0.004). CUEDC2 expression was correlated with tumor T classification (P = 0.001) at clinical stage (P = 0.001) and tumor size (P = 0.033). Multivariate analysis suggested that CUEDC2 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Ectopic expression of CUEDC2 decreased cell proliferation in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in nude mice in vivo. Knockdown of endogenous CUEDC2 by short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) increased tumor growth. Inhibition of proliferation by CUEDC2 was associated with inactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, induction of p21 and down-regulation of cyclin D1. Our results suggest that decreased expression of CUEDC2 contributes to tumor growth in lung adenocarcinoma, leading to a poor clinical outcome.

  4. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  5. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity as Tumor Growth Promoter and Catalyst of Population Collapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Poleszczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly argued that cancer stem cells are not a cellular phenotype but rather a transient state that cells can acquire, either through intrinsic signaling cascades or in response to environmental cues. While cancer stem cell plasticity is generally associated with increased aggressiveness and treatment resistance, we set out to thoroughly investigate the impact of different rates of plasticity on early and late tumor growth dynamics and the response to therapy. We develop an agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth, in which plasticity is defined as a spontaneous transition between stem and nonstem cancer cell states. Simulations of the model show that plasticity can substantially increase tumor growth rate and invasion. At high rates of plasticity, however, the cells get exhausted and the tumor will undergo spontaneous remission in the long term. In a series of in silico trials, we show that such remission can be facilitated through radiotherapy. The presented study suggests that stem cell plasticity has rather complex, nonintuitive implications on tumor growth and treatment response. Further theoretical, experimental, and integrated studies are needed to fully decipher cancer stem cell plasticity and how it can be harnessed for novel therapeutic approaches.

  6. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase: Growth Promoter or Tumor Suppressor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko O. Laukkanen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3 gene transfer to tissue damage results in increased healing, increased cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration. At molecular level, in vivo SOD3 overexpression reduces superoxide anion (O2- concentration and increases mitogen kinase activation suggesting that SOD3 could have life-supporting characteristics. The hypothesis is further strengthened by the observations showing significantly increased mortality in conditional knockout mice. However, in cancer SOD3 has been shown to either increase or decrease cell proliferation and survival depending on the model system used, indicating that SOD3-derived growth mechanisms are not completely understood. In this paper, the author reviews the main discoveries in SOD3-dependent growth regulation and signal transduction.

  7. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud Chauviere; Haralambos Hatzikirou; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Lowengrub, John S.; Vittorio Cristini

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT) extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of l...

  8. Depletion of tumor associated macrophages slows the growth of chemically-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Fritz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for lung cancer, and low dose aspirin intake reduces lung cancer risk. However, the roles that specific inflammatory cells and their products play in lung carcinogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated. In mice, alveolar macrophage numbers increase as lung tumors progress, and pulmonary macrophage programming changes within 2 weeks of carcinogen exposure. To examine how macrophages specifically affect lung tumor progression, they were depleted in mice bearing urethane-induced lung tumors using clodronate-encapsulated liposomes. Alveolar macrophage populations decreased to ≤ 50% of control levels after 4-6 weeks of liposomal clodronate treatment. Tumor burden decreased by 50% compared to vehicle treated mice, and tumor cell proliferation, as measured by Ki67 staining, was also attenuated. Pulmonary fluid levels of IGF-I, CXCL1, IL-6 and CCL2 diminished with clodronate liposome treatment. Tumor associated macrophages expressed markers of both M1 and M2 programming in vehicle and clodronate liposome treated mice. Mice lacking CCR2 (the receptor for macrophage chemotactic factor CCL2 had comparable numbers of alveolar macrophages and showed no difference in tumor growth rates when compared to similarly treated wild-type mice suggesting that while CCL2 may recruit macrophages to lung tumor microenvironments, redundant pathways can compensate when CCL2/CCR2 signaling is inactivated. Depletion of pulmonary macrophages rather than inhibition of their recruitment may be an advantageous strategy for attenuating lung cancer progression.

  9. Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase Overexpression Reduces Tumor Growth in a Xenograph Medulloblastoma Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica R Cappellari

    Full Text Available Ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5'-NT participates in extracellular ATP catabolism by converting adenosine monophosphate (AMP into adenosine. This enzyme affects the progression and invasiveness of different tumors. Furthermore, the expression of ecto-5'-NT has also been suggested as a favorable prognostic marker, attributing to this enzyme contradictory functions in cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common brain tumor of the cerebellum and affects mainly children.The effects of ecto-5'-NT overexpression on human MB tumor growth were studied in an in vivo model. Balb/c immunodeficient (nude 6 to 14-week-old mice were used for dorsal subcutaneous xenograph tumor implant. Tumor development was evaluated by pathophysiological analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of adenosine receptors were verified.The human MB cell line D283, transfected with ecto-5'-NT (D283hCD73, revealed reduced tumor growth compared to the original cell line transfected with an empty vector. D283hCD73 generated tumors with a reduced proliferative index, lower vascularization, the presence of differentiated cells and increased active caspase-3 expression. Prominent A1 adenosine receptor expression rates were detected in MB cells overexpressing ecto-5'-NT.This work suggests that ecto-5'-NT promotes reduced tumor growth to reduce cell proliferation and vascularization, promote higher differentiation rates and initiate apoptosis, supposedly by accumulating adenosine, which then acts through A1 adenosine receptors. Therefore, ecto-5'-NT might be considered an important prognostic marker, being associated with good prognosis and used as a potential target for therapy.

  10. Circadian disruption accelerates tumor growth and angio/stromagenesis through a Wnt signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Yasuniwa

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies show a high incidence of cancer in shift workers, suggesting a possible relationship between circadian rhythms and tumorigenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism played by circadian rhythms in tumor progression is not known. To identify the possible mechanisms underlying tumor progression related to circadian rhythms, we set up nude mouse xenograft models. HeLa cells were injected in nude mice and nude mice were moved to two different cases, one case is exposed to a 24-hour light cycle (L/L, the other is a more "normal" 12-hour light/dark cycle (L/D. We found a significant increase in tumor volume in the L/L group compared with the L/D group. In addition, tumor microvessels and stroma were strongly increased in L/L mice. Although there was a hypervascularization in L/L tumors, there was no associated increase in the production of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF. DNA microarray analysis showed enhanced expression of WNT10A, and our subsequent study revealed that WNT10A stimulates the growth of both microvascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts in tumors from light-stressed mice, along with marked increases in angio/stromagenesis. Only the tumor stroma stained positive for WNT10A and WNT10A is also highly expressed in keloid dermal fibroblasts but not in normal dermal fibroblasts indicated that WNT10A may be a novel angio/stromagenic growth factor. These findings suggest that circadian disruption induces the progression of malignant tumors via a Wnt signaling pathway.

  11. Characterization of inhibitory anti-insulin-like growth factor receptor antibodies with different epitope specificity and ligand-blocking properties: implications for mechanism of action in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doern, Adam; Cao, Xianjun; Sereno, Arlene; Reyes, Christopher L; Altshuler, Angelina; Huang, Flora; Hession, Cathy; Flavier, Albert; Favis, Michael; Tran, Hon; Ailor, Eric; Levesque, Melissa; Murphy, Tracey; Berquist, Lisa; Tamraz, Susan; Snipas, Tracey; Garber, Ellen; Shestowsky, William S; Rennard, Rachel; Graff, Christilyn P; Wu, Xiufeng; Snyder, William; Cole, Lindsay; Gregson, David; Shields, Michael; Ho, Steffan N; Reff, Mitchell E; Glaser, Scott M; Dong, Jianying; Demarest, Stephen J; Hariharan, Kandasamy

    2009-04-10

    Therapeutic antibodies directed against the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have recently gained significant momentum in the clinic because of preliminary data generated in human patients with cancer. These antibodies inhibit ligand-mediated activation of IGF-1R and the resulting down-stream signaling cascade. Here we generated a panel of antibodies against IGF-1R and screened them for their ability to block the binding of both IGF-1 and IGF-2 at escalating ligand concentrations (>1 microm) to investigate allosteric versus competitive blocking mechanisms. Four distinct inhibitory classes were found as follows: 1) allosteric IGF-1 blockers, 2) allosteric IGF-2 blockers, 3) allosteric IGF-1 and IGF-2 blockers, and 4) competitive IGF-1 and IGF-2 blockers. The epitopes of representative antibodies from each of these classes were mapped using a purified IGF-1R library containing 64 mutations. Most of these antibodies bound overlapping surfaces on the cysteine-rich repeat and L2 domains. One class of allosteric IGF-1 and IGF-2 blocker was identified that bound a separate epitope on the outer surface of the FnIII-1 domain. Using various biophysical techniques, we show that the dual IGF blockers inhibit ligand binding using a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from highly allosteric to purely competitive. Binding of IGF-1 or the inhibitory antibodies was associated with conformational changes in IGF-1R, linked to the ordering of dynamic or unstructured regions of the receptor. These results suggest IGF-1R uses disorder/order within its polypeptide sequence to regulate its activity. Interestingly, the activity of representative allosteric and competitive inhibitors on H322M tumor cell growth in vitro was reflective of their individual ligand-blocking properties. Many of the antibodies in the clinic likely adopt one of the inhibitory mechanisms described here, and the outcome of future clinical studies may reveal whether a particular inhibitory mechanism

  12. SDF-1α mediates wound-promoted tumor growth in a syngeneic orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina H Stuelten

    Full Text Available Increased growth of residual tumors in the proximity of acute surgical wounds has been reported; however, the mechanisms of wound-promoted tumor growth remain unknown. Here, we used a syngeneic, orthotopic mouse model of breast cancer to study mechanisms of wound-promoted tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that exposure of metastatic mouse breast cancer cells (4T1 to SDF-1α, which is increased in wound fluid, results in increased tumor growth. Both, wounding and exposure of 4T1 cells to SDF-1α not only increased tumor growth, but also tumor cell proliferation rate and stromal collagen deposition. Conversely, systemic inhibition of SDF-1α signaling with the small molecule AMD 3100 abolished the effect of wounding, and decreased cell proliferation, collagen deposition, and neoangiogenesis to the levels observed in control animals. Furthermore, using different mouse strains we could demonstrate that the effect of wounding on tumor growth and SDF-1α levels is host dependent and varies between mouse strains. Our results show that wound-promoted tumor growth is mediated by elevated SDF-1α levels and indicate that the effect of acute wounds on tumor growth depends on the predetermined wound response of the host background and its predetermined wound response.

  13. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Chemaitilly, Wassim [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatric Medicine, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  14. The effects of CO2 pneumoperitoneum on tumor growth in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jian; Wang Yaping; Zhang Airong; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of CO2 pneumoper-itoneum on growth and spread of intraperitoneal tumor in an animal model.Methods:We estab-lished an animal model of epithelial ovarian cancer in immunocompetent rat Fischer 344.Twen-ty rats were randomized to two groups(10rats/group):CO2 insufflation and sham laparotomv.Tumors were excised from the rats in each group 28 days after operation.Ascites,tumor mass.local regional invasion incidence,lymph node involvement.and liver and lung metastases were evaluated.Sections of tumors were made and then the cell cycle fraction were measured by quantitating DNA in individual cells using flow cytometry analysis.The expressions of Ki-67.VEGF,and CD44v6 protein were determined using immunocytochemistry bv flow cytometry.Re-suits:Tumor mass,local regional invasion incidence and the amount of ascites were higher in CO2 insufflation than those in laparotomy,but there were no significant differences between two groups.The expression of CDd4v6 protein was higher in CO2 insufflation than that in laparotomv (P=0.002).There was no significant difference between two groups in the cells cvcle fraction and the expressiones of Ki-67 and VEGF protein.Conclusions:CO2 pneumoperitoneum has effects on intraperitoneal tumor growth and metastasis in the animal model.

  15. Multiphase modeling and qualitative analysis of the growth of tumor cords

    CERN Document Server

    Tosin, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a macroscopic model of tumor cord growth is developed, relying on the mathematical theory of deformable porous media. Tumor is modeled as a saturated mixture of proliferating cells, extracellular fluid and extracellular matrix, that occupies a spatial region close to a blood vessel whence cells get the nutrient needed for their vital functions. Growth of tumor cells takes place within a healthy host tissue, which is in turn modeled as a saturated mixture of non-proliferating cells. Interactions between these two regions are accounted for as an essential mechanism for the growth of the tumor mass. By weakening the role of the extracellular matrix, which is regarded as a rigid non-remodeling scaffold, a system of two partial differential equations is derived, describing the evolution of the cell volume ratio coupled to the dynamics of the nutrient, whose higher and lower concentration levels determine proliferation or death of tumor cells, respectively. Numerical simulations of a reference two-dim...

  16. Expectant Management of Vestibular Schwannoma: A Retrospective Multivariate Analysis of Tumor Growth and Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Mark; Skilbeck, Christopher; Saeed, Shakeel; Bradford, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective observational study to assess the consequences of conservative management of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Data were collected from tertiary neuro-otological referral units in United Kingdom. The study included 59 patients who were managed conservatively with radiological diagnosis of VS. The main outcome measures were growth rate and rate of failure of conservative management. Multivariate analysis sought correlation between tumor growth and (i) demographic feature...

  17. Phytochemical potential of Eruca sativa for inhibition of melanoma tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoobchandani, M; Ganesh, N; Gabbanini, S; Valgimigli, L; Srivastava, M M

    2011-06-01

    Solvent extracts from the aerial and root parts and seed oil from E. sativa (rocket salad) were assayed for anticancer activity against melanoma cells. The seed oil (isothiocyanates rich) significantly (p<0.01) reduced the tumor growth comparable to the control. Remarkably, the seed oil inhibited melanoma growth and angiogenesis in mice without any major toxicity. The findings qualify seed oil for further investigations in the real of cancer prevention and treatment.

  18. Butein Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Prostate Tumor Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Naghma; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Afaq, Farrukh; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common cancers in men in the United States with similar trends worldwide. For several reasons, it is an ideal candidate disease for intervention with dietary botanical antioxidants. Indeed, many botanical antioxidants are showing promise for chemoprevention of PCa. Here, we determined the effect of an antioxidant butein (3,4,2′,4′-tetrahydroxychalone) on cell growth, apoptosis, and signaling pathways in human PCa cells in-vitro and on tumor growth...

  19. A Peptide Antagonist of the ErbB1 Receptor Inhibits Receptor Activation, Tumor Cell Growth and Migration In Vitro and Xenograft Tumor Growth In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruodan Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbBs plays essential roles in tumorigenesis and cancer disease progression, and therefore has become an attractive target for structure-based drug design. ErbB receptors are activated by ligand-induced homo- and heterodimerization. Structural studies have revealed that ErbB receptor dimers are stabilized by receptor–receptor interactions, primarily mediated by a region in the second extracellular domain, termed the “dimerization arm”. The present study is the first biological characterization of a peptide, termed Inherbin3, which constitutes part of the dimerization arm of ErbB3. Inherbin3 binds to the extracellular domains of all four ErbB receptors, with the lowest peptide binding affinity for ErbB4. Inherbin3 functions as an antagonist of epidermal growth factor (EGF-ErbB1 signaling. We show that Inherbin3 inhibits EGF-induced ErbB1 phosphorylation, cell growth, and migration in two human tumor cell lines, A549 and HN5, expressing moderate and high ErbB1 levels, respectively. Furthermore, we show that Inherbin3 inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces apoptosis in a tumor xenograft model employing the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549. The Inherbin3 peptide may be a useful tool for investigating the mechanisms of ErbB receptor homo- and heterodimerization. Moreover, the here described biological effects of Inherbin3 suggest that peptide-based targeting of ErbB receptor dimerization is a promising anti-cancer therapeutic strategy.

  20. Preoperative serum levels of epidermal growth factor receptor, HER2, and vascular endothelial growth factor in malignant and benign ovarian tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl Steffensen, Karina; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Jeppesen, Ulla;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Epidermal growth factor receptors ([EGFRs]; EGFR/HER1 and ErbB2/HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are essential to tumor growth and angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the serum levels of these potential biomarkers in benign, borderline......, and malignant ovarian tumors. Patients and Methods: Serum from 233 patients (75 serous ovarian/tubal/peritoneal cancers, 24 borderline tumors, 110 benign ovarian tumors, and 24 with normal ovaries) were analyzed for EGFR, HER2, and VEGF using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA...

  1. Time until initiation of tumor growth is an effective measure of the anti-angiogenic effect of TNP-470 on human glioblastoma in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, M; Spang-Thomsen, M; Kristjansen, P E

    1999-01-01

    , 11, or 15 days after inoculation. The time from inoculation until initiation of exponential tumor growth was determined along with the post-therapeutic growth delay and the initial tumor doubling time (TD) for each individual tumor (n=103) on the basis of tumor volume growth curves. We found that: i...

  2. RAD001 enhances the potency of BEZ235 to inhibit mTOR signaling and tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat Nyfeler

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is regulated by oncogenic growth factor signals and plays a pivotal role in controlling cellular metabolism, growth and survival. Everolimus (RAD001 is an allosteric mTOR inhibitor that has shown marked efficacy in certain cancers but is unable to completely inhibit mTOR activity. ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors such as NVP-BEZ235 can block rapamycin-insensitive mTOR readouts and have entered clinical development as anti-cancer agents. Here, we show the degree to which RAD001 and BEZ235 can be synergistically combined to inhibit mTOR pathway activation, cell proliferation and tumor growth, both in vitro and in vivo. RAD001 and BEZ235 synergized in cancer lines representing different lineages and genetic backgrounds. Strong synergy is seen in neuronal, renal, breast, lung, and haematopoietic cancer cells harboring abnormalities in PTEN, VHL, LKB1, Her2, or KRAS. Critically, in the presence of RAD001, the mTOR-4EBP1 pathway and tumorigenesis can be fully inhibited using lower doses of BEZ235. This is relevant since RAD001 is relatively well tolerated in patients while the toxicity profiles of ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors are currently unknown.

  3. Inhibition of vimentin or B1 integrin reverts morphology of prostate tumor cells grown in laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels and reduces tumor growth in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xueping; Fournier, Marcia V; Ware, Joy L; Bissell, Mina J; Yacoub, Adly; Zehner, Zendra E

    2008-06-12

    Prostate epithelial cells grown embedded in laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) undergo morphologic changes that closely resemble their architecture in vivo. In this study, growth characteristics of three human prostate epithelial sublines derived from the same cellular lineage, but displaying different tumorigenic and metastatic properties in vivo, were assessed in three-dimensional lrECM gels. M12, a highly tumorigenic and metastatic subline, was derived from the immortalized, prostate epithelial P69 cell line by selection in athymic, nude mice and found to contain a deletion of 19p-q13.1. The stable reintroduction of an intact human chromosome 19 into M12 resulted in a poorly tumorigenic subline, designated F6. When embedded in lrECM gels, the parental, nontumorigenic P69 line produced acini with clearly defined lumena. Immunostaining with antibodies to {beta}-catenin, E-cadherin, or {alpha}6 and {beta}1 integrins showed polarization typical of glandular epithelium. In contrast, the metastatic M12 subline produced highly disorganized cells with no evidence of polarization. The F6 subline reverted to acini-like structures exhibiting basal polarity marked with integrins. Reducing either vimentin levels via small interfering RNA interference or the expression of {alpha}6 and {beta}1 integrins by the addition of blocking antibodies, reorganized the M12 subline into forming polarized acini. The loss of vimentin significantly reduced M12-Vim tumor growth when assessed by s.c. injection in athymic mice. Thus, tumorigenicity in vivo correlated with disorganized growth in three-dimensional lrECM gels. These studies suggest that the levels of vimentin and {beta}1 integrin play a key role in the homeostasis of the normal acinus in prostate and that their dysregulation may lead to tumorigenesis. [Mol Cancer Ther 2009;8(3):499-508].

  4. Growth Hormone Protects the Intestine Preserving Radiotherapy Efficacy on Tumors: A Short-Term Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Caz

    Full Text Available The efficacy of radiotherapy on tumors is hampered by its devastating adverse effects on healthy tissue, particularly that of the gastrointestinal tract. These effects cause acute symptoms that are so disruptive to patients that they can lead to interruption of the radiotherapy program. These adverse effects could limit the intensity of radiation received by the patient, resulting in a sublethal dose to the tumor, thus increasing the risk of tumor resistance. The lack of an effective treatment to protect the bowel during radiation therapy to allow higher radiation doses that are lethal to the tumor has become a barrier to implementing effective therapy. In this study, we present a comparative analysis of both intestinal and tumor tissue in regard to the efficacy and the preventive impact of a short-term growth hormone (GH treatment in tumor-bearing rats as a protective agent during radiotherapy. Our data show that the exogenous administration of GH improved intestinal recovery after radiation treatment while preserving the therapeutic effect against the tumor. GH significantly increased proliferation in the irradiated intestine but not in the irradiated tumors, as assessed by Positron Emission Tomography and the proliferative markers Ki67, cyclin D3, and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen. This proliferative effect was consistent with a significant increase in irradiated intestinal villi and crypt length. Furthermore, GH significantly decreased caspase-3 activity in the intestine, whereas GH did not produce this effect in the irradiated tumors. In conclusion, short-term GH treatment protects the bowel, inducing proliferation while reducing apoptosis in healthy intestinal tissue and preserving radiotherapy efficacy on tumors.

  5. Inhibition of Tumor Growth in Mice by Endostatin Derived from Abdominal Transplanted Encapsulated Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaining TENG; Ying ZHANG; Wei WANG; Xiaojun MA; Jian FEI

    2007-01-01

    Endostatin, a C-terminal fragment of collagen 18a, inhibits the growth of established tumors and metastases in vivo by inhibiting angiogenesis. However, the purification procedures required for largescale production and the attendant cost of these processes, together with the low effectiveness in clinical tests, suggest that alternative delivery methods might be required for efficient therapeutic use of endostatin.In the present study, we transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with a human endostatin gene expression vector and encapsulated the CHO cells in alginate-poly-L-lysine microcapsules. The release of biologically active endostatin was confirmed using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay. The encapsulated endostatin-expressing CHO cells can inhibit the growth of primary tumors in a subcutaneous B16 tumor model when injected into the abdominal cavity of mouse. These results widen the clinical application of the microencapsulated cell endostatin delivery system in cancer treatment.

  6. Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics of Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the difference of biochemical characteristics on gsp-positive and gsp-negative growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumors, 18 GH-secreting pituitary tumors were examined for their clinical characteristics and gsp oncogenes. All patients received the pituitary function combinative stimulating test. It was found that there were no difference in the sex, age, tumor size, course of disease and plasma basal GH levels with gsp- positive and gsp-negative patients. The plasma levels of PRL were increased in most patients (11/18), and the plasma levels of TSH in gsp-positive patients were higher than those in gsp-negative patients (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in the responses to pituitary combinative stimulating test in gsp-positive and gsp-negative patients. It was concluded that there was little difference in the clinical biochemical characteristics of gsp-positive with gsp-negative GH-secreting pituitary tumors.

  7. Fluctuations induced extinction and stochastic resonance effect in a model of tumor growth with periodic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Dongxi, E-mail: lidongxi@mail.nwpu.edu.c [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Xu Wei; Guo, Yongfeng; Xu Yong [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2011-01-31

    We investigate a stochastic model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis-Menten reaction with positional and environmental fluctuations under subthreshold periodic treatment. Firstly, the influences of environmental fluctuations on the treatable stage are analyzed numerically. Applying the standard theory of stochastic resonance derived from the two-state approach, we derive the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analytically, which is used to measure the stochastic resonance phenomenon. It is found that the weak environmental fluctuations could induce the extinction of tumor cells in the subthreshold periodic treatment. The positional stability is better in favor of the treatment of the tumor cells. Besides, the appropriate and feasible treatment intensity and the treatment cycle should be highlighted considered in the treatment of tumor cells.

  8. Enhanced tumor growth in the NaS1 sulfate transporter null mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dawson, Paul Anthony; Choyce, Allison; Chuang, Christine;

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate plays an important role in maintaining normal structure and function of tissues, and its content is decreased in certain cancers including lung carcinoma. In this study, we investigated tumor growth in a mouse model of hyposulfatemia (Nas1(-/-)) and compared it to wild-type (Nas1(+/+)) mi...

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Pancreatic Tumor Growth by Inducing Alternative Polarization of Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esha Mathew

    2016-03-01

    Significance: Targeting the stroma is emerging as a new paradigm in pancreatic cancer; however, efforts to that effect are hampered by our limited understanding of the nature and function of stromal components. Here, we uncover previously unappreciated heterogeneity within the stroma and identify interactions among stromal components that promote tumor growth and could be targeted therapeutically.

  10. Pravastatin inhibits tumor growth through elevating the levels of apolipoprotein A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yeh

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that pravastatin elevated ApoA1, an HDL major constituent with anti-inflammatory characteristics, which displayed strong adversary associations with tumor developments and growth. Increasing the amounts of ApoA1 by pravastatin coupled with DOX may improve the therapeutic efficacy for cancer treatment.

  11. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G.; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  12. Tumstatin transfected into human glioma cell line U251 represses tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Hong-xing; YAO Yu; JIANG Xin-jun; YUAN Xian-rui

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis is a prerequisite for tumor growth and plays an important role in rapidly growing tumors,such as malignant gliomas.A variety of factors controlling the angiogenic balance have been described,and among these,the endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis,tumstatin,has drawn considerable attention.The current study investigated whether expression of tumstatin by glioma cells could alter this balance and prevent tumor formation.Methods We engineered stable transfectants from human glioma cell line U251 to constitutively secrete a human tumstatin protein with c-myc and polyhistidine tags.Production and secretion of the tumstatin-c-myc-His fusion protein by tumstatin-transfected cells were confirmed by Western blotting analysis.In the present study,we identify the anti-angiogenic capacity of tumstatin using several in vitro and in vivo assays.Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used to determine the statistical significance in this study.Results The tumstatin transfectants and control transfectants (stably transfected with a control plasmid) had similar in vitro growth rates compared to their parental cell lines.However,the conditioned medium from the tumstatin transfected tumor cells significantly inhibits proliferation and causes apoptosis of endothelial cells.It also inhibits tube formation of endothelial cells on Matrigel.Examination of armpit tumors arising from cells overexpressing tumstatin repress the growth of tumor,accompanying the decreased density of CD31 positive vessels in tumors ((5.62±1.32)/HP),compared to the control-transfectants group ((23.84+1.71)/HP) and wild type U251 glioma cells group ((29.33+4.45)/HP).Conclusion Anti-angiogenic gene therapy using human tumstatin gene may be an effective strategy for the treatment of glioma.

  13. Carnosine retards tumor growth in vivo in an NIH3T3-HER2/neu mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Meixensberger Jürgen; Gebhardt Rolf; Hengstler Jan; Hermes Matthias; Geiger Kathrin D; Fuchs Beate; Zemitzsch Nadine; Renner Christof; Gaunitz Frank

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background It was previously demonstrated that the dipeptide carnosine inhibits growth of cultured cells isolated from patients with malignant glioma. In the present work we investigated whether carnosine also affects tumor growth in vivo and may therefore be considered for human cancer therapy. Results A mouse model was used to investigate whether tumor growth in vivo can be inhibited by carnosine. Therefore, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, conditionally expressing the human epidermal growth fa...

  14. Gps mutations in Chilean patients harboring growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M C; Codner, E; Eggers, M; Mosso, L; Rodriguez, J A; Cassorla, F

    1999-01-01

    Hypersecretion of GH is usually caused by a pituitary adenoma and about 40% of these tumors exhibit missense gsp mutations in Arg201 or Gln227 of the Gs, gene. We studied 20 pituitary tumors obtained from patients with GH hypersecretion. One tumor was resected from an 11 year-old boy with a 3 year history of accelerated growth, associated with increased concentrations of serum GH and IGF-I, which were not suppressed by glucose administration. The remaining 19 tumors were obtained from adult acromegalic patients, who had elevated baseline serum GH levels that did not show evidence of suppression after administration of glucose. The gsp mutations were studied by enzymatic digestion of the amplified PCR fragment of exon 8 (Arg201) and exon 9 (Gln227) with the enzymes NlaIII and NgoAIV, respectively. The tumors obtained from the boy and from nine of the 19 patients with acromegaly exhibited the gsp mutation R201H. None of the tumors had the Gln227 mutation. The gsp positive patients tended to be older, had smaller tumors, and had preoperative basal serum GH levels which were significantly lower (21 +/- 6 vs 56 +/- 16 microg/l, pgigantism and in approximately half of 19 Chilean adult patients with acromegaly, similar to other populations. PMID:10821217

  15. Monodispersed calcium carbonate nanoparticles modulate local pH and inhibit tumor growth in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Avik; Raliya, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Akers, Walter; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Biswas, Pratim; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3 in tumors increases tumor pH over time. The associated induction of tumor growth stasis is putatively interpreted as a pHe increase. This study establishes an approach to prepare nano-CaCO3 over a wide particle size range, a formulation that stabilizes the nanomaterials in aqueous solutions, and a pH-sensitive nano-platform capable of modulating the acidic environment of cancer for potential therapeutic benefits.The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3

  16. Occurrence of DNET and other brain tumors in Noonan syndrome warrants caution with growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Geoffrey D; SantaCruz, Karen; Hart, Blaine; Clericuzio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway that is well known for its relationship with oncogenesis. An 8.1-fold increased risk of cancer in Noonan syndrome has been reported, including childhood leukemia and solid tumors. The same study found a patient with a dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET) and suggested that DNET tumors are associated with NS. Herein we report an 8-year-old boy with genetically confirmed NS and a DNET. Literature review identified eight other reports, supporting the association between NS and DNETs. The review also ascertained 13 non-DNET brain tumors in individuals with NS, bringing to 22 the total number of NS patients with brain tumors. Tumor growth while receiving growth hormone (GH) occurred in our patient and one other patient. It is unknown whether the development or progression of tumors is augmented by GH therapy, however there is concern based on epidemiological, animal and in vitro studies. This issue was addressed in a 2015 Pediatric Endocrine Society report noting there is not enough data available to assess the safety of GH therapy in children with neoplasia-predisposition syndromes. The authors recommend that GH use in children with such disorders, including NS, be undertaken with appropriate surveillance for malignancies. Our case report and literature review underscore the association of NS with CNS tumors, particularly DNET, and call attention to the recommendation that clinicians treating NS patients with GH do so with awareness of the possibility of increased neoplasia risk. PMID:26377682

  17. Inhibition of tumor vasculogenic mimicry and prolongation of host survival in highly aggressive gallbladder cancers by norcantharidin via blocking the ephrin type a receptor 2/focal adhesion kinase/paxillin signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Vasculogenic mimicry (VM is a newly-defined tumor microcirculation pattern in highly aggressive malignant tumors. We recently reported tumor growth and VM formation of gallbladder cancers through the contribution of the ephrin type a receptor 2 (EphA2/focal adhesion kinase (FAK/Paxillin signaling pathways. In this study, we further investigated the anti-VM activity of norcantharidin (NCTD as a VM inhibitor for gallbladder cancers and the underlying mechanisms. In vivo and in vitro experiments to determine the effects of NCTD on tumor growth, host survival, VM formation of GBC-SD nude mouse xenografts, and vasculogenic-like networks, malignant phenotypes i.e., proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and migration of GBC-SD cells. Expression of VM signaling-related markers EphA2, FAK and Paxillin in vivo and in vitro were examined by immunofluorescence, western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, respectively. The results showed that after treatment with NCTD, GBC-SD cells were unable to form VM structures when injecting into nude mouse, growth of the xenograft was inhibited and these observations were confirmed by facts that VM formation by three-dimensional (3-D matrix, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, migration of GBC-SD cells were affected; and survival time of the xenograft mice was prolonged. Furthermore, expression of EphA2, FAK and Paxillin proteins/mRNAs of the xenografts was downregulated. Thus, we concluded that NCTD has potential anti-VM activity against human gallbladder cancers; one of the underlying mechanisms may be via blocking the EphA2/FAK/Paxillin signaling pathway.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ promotes the tumor growth of human osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbod Rastegar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone with poorly characterized molecular pathways important in its pathogenesis. Increasing evidence indicates that elevated lipid biosynthesis is a characteristic feature of cancer. We sought to investigate the role of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ, aka, AGPAT2 in regulating the proliferation and growth of human osteosarcoma cells. LPAATβ can generate phosphatidic acid, which plays a key role in lipid biosynthesis as well as in cell proliferation and survival. Although elevated expression of LPAATβ has been reported in several types of human tumors, the role of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma progression has yet to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Endogenous expression of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma cell lines is analyzed by using semi-quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of LPAATβ and silencing LPAATβ expression is employed to determine the effect of LPAATβ on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration in vitro and osteosarcoma tumor growth in vivo. We have found that expression of LPAATβ is readily detected in 8 of the 10 analyzed human osteosarcoma lines. Exogenous expression of LPAATβ promotes osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration, while silencing LPAATβ expression inhibits these cellular characteristics. We further demonstrate that exogenous expression of LPAATβ effectively promotes tumor growth, while knockdown of LPAATβ expression inhibits tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of human osteosarcoma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results strongly suggest that LPAATβ expression may be associated with the aggressive phenotypes of human osteosarcoma and that LPAATβ may play an important role in regulating osteosarcoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Thus, targeting LPAATβ may be exploited as a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical management of osteosarcoma. This

  19. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:18823376

  20. Somatostatin receptor-1 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wang, Xiaochi; Li, Wei; Li, Fei; Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Fisher, William E

    2008-11-01

    Functional somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are lost in human pancreatic cancer. Transfection of SSTR-1 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation in vitro. We hypothesize that stable transfection of SSTR-1 may inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in vivo possibly through cell cycle arrest. In this study, we examined the expression of SSTR-1 mRNA in human pancreatic cancer tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of SSTR-1 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth in a subcutaneous nude mouse model. We found that SSTR-1 mRNA was downregulated in the majority of pancreatic cancer tissue specimens. Transfection of SSTR-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) growth phase, with a corresponding decline of cells in the S (mitotic) phase. The overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor size by 71% and 43% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), and inhibited tumor weight by 69% and 47% (n = 5, P < 0.05, Student's t-test), in Panc-SSTR-1 and MIA-SSTR-1 groups, respectively, indicating the potent inhibitory effect of SSTR-1 on pancreatic cancer growth. Our data demonstrate that overexpression of SSTR-1 significantly inhibits pancreatic cancer growth possibly through cell cycle arrest. This study suggests that gene therapy with SSTR-1 may be a potential adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  1. Steering tumor progression through the transcriptional response to growth factors and stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Morris E; Yarden, Yosef

    2014-08-01

    Tumor progression can be understood as a collaborative effort of mutations and growth factors, which propels cell proliferation and matrix invasion, and also enables evasion of drug-induced apoptosis. Concentrating on EGFR, we discuss downstream signaling and the initiation of transcriptional events in response to growth factors. Specifically, we portray a wave-like program, which initiates by rapid disappearance of two-dozen microRNAs, followed by an abrupt rise of immediate early genes (IEGs), relatively short transcripts encoding transcriptional regulators. Concurrent with the fall of IEGs, some 30-60 min after stimulation, a larger group, the delayed early genes, is up-regulated and its own fall overlaps the rise of the final wave of late response genes. This late wave persists and determines long-term phenotype acquisition, such as invasiveness. Key regulatory steps in the orderly response to growth factors provide a trove of potential oncogenes and tumor suppressors. PMID:24873881

  2. Differential gene expression profiling of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing mammary tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Haining Peng; Yingli Zhong; Daiqiang Li; Mi Tang; Xiaofeng Ding; Jian Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is highly expressed in approximately 30% of breast cancer patients,and substantial evidence supports the relationship between HER2 overexpression and poor overall survival. However,the biological function of HER2 signaltransduction pathways is not entirely clear. To investigate gene activation within the pathways, we screened differentially expressed genes in HER2-positive mouse mammary tumor using two-directional suppression subtractive hybridization combined with reverse dot-blotting analysis. Forty genes and expressed sequence tags related to transduction, cell proliferation/growth/apoptosis and secreted/extracellular matrix proteins were differentially expressed in HER2-positive mammary tumor tissue. Among these, 19 were already reported to be differentially expressed in mammary tumor, 11 were first identified to be differentially expressed in mammary tumor in this study but were already reported in other tumors, and 10 correlated with other cancers. These genes can facilitate the understanding of the role of HER2 signaling in breast cancer.

  3. Non-small-cell lung carcinoma tumor growth without morphological evidence of neo-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzella, F; Pastorino, U; Tagliabue, E; Andreola, S; Sozzi, G; Gasparini, G; Menard, S; Gatter, K C; Harris, A L; Fox, S; Buyse, M; Pilotti, S; Pierotti, M; Rilke, F

    1997-11-01

    Neoplastic growth is usually dependent on blood supply, and it is commonly accepted that this is provided by the formation of new vessels. However, tumors may be able to grow without neovascularization if they find a suitable vascular bed available. We have investigated the pattern of vascularization in a series of 500 primary stage I non-small-cell lung carcinomas. Immunostaining of endothelial cells has highlighted four distinct patterns of vascularization. Three patterns (which we called basal, papillary, and diffuse) have in common the destruction of normal lung and the production of newly formed vessels and stroma. The fourth pattern, which we called alveolar or putative nonangiogenic, was observed in 16% (80/500) of the cases and is characterized by lack of parenchymal destruction and absence of both tumor associated stroma and new vessels. The only vessels present were the ones in the alveolar septa, and their presence highlighted, through the whole tumor, the lung alveoli filled up by the neoplastic cells. This observation suggests that, if an appropriate vascular bed is available, a tumor can exploit it and grows without inducing neo-angiogenesis. This could have implications for strategies aimed at inhibiting tumor growth by vascular targeting or inhibition of angiogenesis.

  4. Efficient anti-tumor effect of photodynamic treatment with polymeric nanoparticles composed of polyethylene glycol and polylactic acid block copolymer encapsulating hydrophobic porphyrin derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Shiraishi, Taro; Araki, Tomoya; Watanabe, Taka-ichi; Ono, Tsutomu; Higaki, Kazutaka

    2016-01-20

    To develop potent and safer formulation of photosensitizer for cancer photodynamic therapy (PDT), we tried to formulate hydrophobic porphyrin derivative, photoprotoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (PppIX-DME), into polymeric nanoparticles composed of polyethylene glycol and polylactic acid block copolymer (PN-Por). The mean particle size of PN-Por prepared was around 80nm and the zeta potential was determined to be weakly negative. In vitro phototoxicity study for PN-Por clearly indicated the significant phototoxicity of PN-Por for three types of tumor cells tested (Colon-26 carcinoma (C26), B16BL6 melanoma and Lewis lung cancer cells) in the PppIX-DME concentration-dependent fashion. Furthermore, it was suggested that the release of PppIX-DME from PN-Por would gradually occur to provide the sustained release of PppIX-DME. In vivo pharmacokinetics of PN-Por after intravenous administration was evaluated in C26 tumor-bearing mice, and PN-Por exhibited low affinity to the liver and spleen and was therefore retained in the blood circulation for a long time, leading to the efficient tumor disposition of PN-Por. Furthermore, significant and highly effective anti-tumor effect was confirmed in C26 tumor-bearing mice with the local light irradiation onto C26 tumor tissues after PN-Por injection. These findings indicate the potency of PN-Por for the development of more efficient PDT-based cancer treatments.

  5. Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 signaling pathway and tumor growth in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chian, Song; Thapa, Ruby; Chi, Zhexu [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Xiu Jun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Tang, Xiuwen, E-mail: xiuwentang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • Luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in mouse liver and in xenografted tumors. • Luteolin markedly inhibits the growth of xenograft tumors. • Luteolin enhances the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin in mice in vivo. • Luteolin could serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC. - Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is over-expressed in many types of tumor, promotes tumor growth, and confers resistance to anticancer therapy. Hence, Nrf2 is regarded as a novel therapeutic target in cancer. Previously, we reported that luteolin is a strong inhibitor of Nrf2 in vitro. Here, we showed that luteolin reduced the constitutive expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in mouse liver in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further, luteolin inhibited the expression of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione transferases, decreasing the reduced glutathione in the liver of wild-type mice under both constitutive and butylated hydroxyanisole-induced conditions. In contrast, such distinct responses were not detected in Nrf2{sup −/−} mice. In addition, oral administration of luteolin, either alone or combined with intraperitoneal injection of the cytotoxic drug cisplatin, greatly inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549 cells grown subcutaneously in athymic nude mice. Cell proliferation, the expression of Nrf2, and antioxidant enzymes were all reduced in tumor xenograft tissues. Furthermore, luteolin enhanced the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin. Together, our findings demonstrated that luteolin inhibits the Nrf2 pathway in vivo and can serve as an adjuvant in the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  6. [Immunophysiological mechanism of origin and maintenance of tumor growth in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, K A; Poniakina, I D

    2010-01-01

    A new concept of malignant tumor growth is presented. In consists in the fact that the tumor cells in the body occur in specific immune tolerance. As s result, they form around the center of regeneration, which consists of activated towards the regeneration cells of the immune system, which support the formation and growth of the tumor. In the early stages of differentiation, precancerous cells are not able to attract immune cells and form the focus of regeneration, so the majority of them die. At the outbreak of chronic inflammation, which contains a high percentage of regeneration of activated immune cells, the conditions exists for the formation of a focus of regeneration and, hence, growth and activation of precancerous cells and their transformation into high-grade malignant cells. This concept defines new approaches to treatment. For effective cancer therapy is necessary to neutralize the regenerator chamber in the tumor tissue. The effectiveness of the regeneration of damaged human tissues can be achieved through regenerator chamber similar to that created in the malignant tissue, and the introduction of a stem cell. PMID:20803946

  7. The c-Met Inhibitor MSC2156119J Effectively Inhibits Tumor Growth in Liver Cancer Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bladt, Friedhelm, E-mail: Friedhelm.Bladt@merckgroup.com; Friese-Hamim, Manja; Ihling, Christian; Wilm, Claudia; Blaukat, Andree [EMD Serono, and Merck Serono Research and Development, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt 64293 (Germany)

    2014-08-19

    The mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-Met) is a receptor tyrosine kinase with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) as its only high-affinity ligand. Aberrant activation of c-Met is associated with many human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We investigated the in vivo antitumor and antimetastatic efficacy of the c-Met inhibitor MSC2156119J (EMD 1214063) in patient-derived tumor explants. BALB/c nude mice were inoculated with MHCC97H cells or with tumor fragments of 10 patient-derived primary liver cancer explants selected according to c-Met/HGF expression levels. MSC2156119J (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) and sorafenib (50 mg/kg) were administered orally as single-agent treatment or in combination, with vehicle as control. Tumor response, metastases formation, and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels were measured. MSC2156119J inhibited tumor growth and induced complete regression in mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic MHCC97H tumors. AFP levels were undetectable after 5 weeks of MSC2156119J treatment, and the number of metastatic lung foci was reduced. Primary liver explant models with strong c-Met/HGF activation showed increased responsiveness to MSC2156119J, with MSC2156119J showing similar or superior activity to sorafenib. Tumors characterized by low c-Met expression were less sensitive to MSC2156119J. MSC2156119J was better tolerated than sorafenib, and combination therapy did not improve efficacy. These findings indicate that selective c-Met/HGF inhibition with MSC2156119J is associated with marked regression of c-Met high-expressing tumors, supporting its clinical development as an antitumor treatment for HCC patients with active c-Met signaling.

  8. Human Sulfatase 2 inhibits in vivo tumor growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracellular human sulfatases modulate growth factor signaling by alteration of the heparin/heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) 6-O-sulfation state. HSPGs bind to numerous growth factor ligands including fibroblast growth factors (FGF), epidermal growth factors (EGF), and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF), and are critically important in the context of cancer cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. We hypothesized that sulfatase activity in the tumor microenvironment would regulate tumor growth in vivo. We established a model of stable expression of sulfatases in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and purified recombinant human Sulfatase 2 (rhSulf2) for exogenous administration. In vitro studies were performed to measure effects on breast cancer cell invasion and proliferation, and groups were statistically compared using Student's t-test. The effects of hSulf2 on tumor progression were tested using in vivo xenografts with two methods. First, MDA-MB-231 cells stably expressing hSulf1, hSulf2, or both hSulf1/hSulf2 were grown as xenografts and the resulting tumor growth and vascularization was compared to controls. Secondly, wild type MDA-MB-231 xenografts were treated by short-term intratumoral injection with rhSulf2 or vehicle during tumor growth. Ultrasound analysis was also used to complement caliper measurement to monitor tumor growth. In vivo studies were statistically analyzed using Student's t test. In vitro, stable expression of hSulf2 or administration of rhSulf2 in breast cancer cells decreased cell proliferation and invasion, corresponding to an inhibition of ERK activation. Stable expression of the sulfatases in xenografts significantly suppressed tumor growth, with complete regression of tumors expressing both hSulf1 and hSulf2 and significantly smaller tumor volumes in groups expressing hSulf1 or hSulf2 compared to control xenografts. Despite significant suppression of tumor volume, sulfatases did not affect vascular

  9. Cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor immune microenvironment in a 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Local inflammation associated with solid tumors commonly results from factors released by tumor cells and the tumor stroma, and promotes tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts comprise a majority of the cells found in tumor stroma and are appealing targets for cancer therapy. Here, our aim was to determine the efficacy of targeting cancer associated fibroblasts for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts are key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment of a 4T1 murine model of metastatic breast cancer. Elimination of cancer associated fibroblasts in vivo by a DNA vaccine targeted to fibroblast activation protein results in a shift of the immune microenvironment from a Th2 to Th1 polarization. This shift is characterized by increased protein expression of IL-2 and IL-7, suppressed recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and decreased tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, the vaccine improved anti-metastatic effects of doxorubicin chemotherapy and enhanced suppression of IL-6 and IL-4 protein expression while increasing recruitment of dendritic cells and CD8(+ T cells. Treatment with the combination therapy also reduced tumor-associated Vegf, Pdgfc, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis through their role as key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment and are valid targets for therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  10. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation.

  11. Electrical impedance scanning in breast tumor imaging: correlation with the growth pattern of lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kan; WANG Ting; FU Feng; JI Zhen-yu; LIU Rui-gang; LIAO Qi-mei; DONG Xiu-zhen

    2009-01-01

    Background This study researched the electric impedance properties of breast tissue and demonstrated the differentcharacteristic of electrical impedance scanning (EIS) images.Methods The impedance character of 40 malignant tumors, 34 benign tumors and some normal breast tissue from 69patients undergoing breast surgery was examined by EIS in vivo measurement and mammography screening, with aseries of frequencies set between 100 Hz-100 kHz in the ex vivo spectroscopy measurement.Results Of the 39 patients with 40 malignant tumors, 24 showed bright spots, 11 showed dark areas in EIS and 5showed no specific image. Of the 30 patients with 34 benign tumors there were almost no specific abnormality shown inthe EIS results. Primary ex vivo spectroscopy experiments showed that the resistivity of various breast tissue take thefollowing pattern: adipose tissue>cancerous tissue>mammary gland and benign tumor tissue.Conclusions There are significant differences in the electrical impedance properties between cancerous tissue andhealthy tissue. The impedivity of benign tumor is lower, and is at the same level with that of the mammary glandulartissue. The distinct growth pattern of breast lesions determined the different electrical impedance characteristics in theEIS results.

  12. Visualization of brain tumor using I-123-vascular endothelial growth factor scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Aim:Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a major angiogenic factor. VEGF receptors have been shown to be overexpressed in a variety of tumor vessels including glioblastoma, which may provide the molecular basis for a successful use of radiolabeled VEGF as tumor angiogenesis tracer. In this study we investigated the usefulness of 1231- VEGF as angiogenesis tracer for imaging brain tumors in vivo. Methods and Results: SPECT examinations were performed 30 minutes and 18 hours after intravenous application of 1231-VEGF (191 ± 15 MBq) in 20 patients with brain tumor. Glioblastomas were visualized in 7 of 8 patients (88 %) shortly after application of 1231- VEGF and were still clearly shown 18 hours post injection. Negative scan results were obtained in one patient with a small glioblastoma size (diameter <2.0 cm) and in 3 patients with benign glioma as well as in 5 patients with glioblastoma after receiving radiotherapy and for chemotherapy. Weak positive results were obtained in 3 patients with brain lymphoma or other tumors. No side effects were observed in patients after administration of 1231- VEG F. Conclusion: Our results indicate that 1231- VEGF scintigraphy may be useful to visualize the angiogenesis of brain tumors and to monitor the treatment response.

  13. Role of vascular endothelial growth factor in reconstructive surgery after surgical excision of malignant tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻鹏; 刘春丽

    2008-01-01

    As a key mediator of normal physiological angiogenesis,vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF)has been regarded as an emancipator to plastic surgeon,and yet a misfortune to oncology surgeon,due to its sin-gular biological effect.Therefore in some clinical cases,especially for some malignant tumor patients having en-dured radical surgery and being craving for a reconstructive surgery,VEGF plays a role full of paradoxes.To make a clinical balance,we should find a point to inhibit tumor cell from utilizing VEGF and make a permission to normal tissues to employ it.

  14. An Adaptive Multigrid Algorithm for Simulating Solid Tumor Growth Using Mixture Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, S.M.; Lowengrub, J.S.; Cristini, V

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we give the details of the numerical solution of a three-dimensional multispecies diffuse interface model of tumor growth, which was derived in (Wise et al., J. Theor. Biol. 253 (2008)) and used to study the development of glioma in (Frieboes et al., NeuroImage 37 (2007) and tumor invasion in (Bearer et al., Cancer Research, 69 (2009)) and (Frieboes et al., J. Theor. Biol. 264 (2010)). The model has a thermodynamic basis, is related to recently developed mixture models, and is c...

  15. Paeonol inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the anti-tumor effects of paeonol in gastric cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.METHODS:Murine gastric cancer cell line mouse forestomach carcinoma(MFC) or human gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 was cultured in the presence or absence of paeonol.Cell proliferation was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay,and cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometry and TUNEL staining.Tumor growth after subcutaneous implantation of MF...

  16. Effect of cyhalothrin on Ehrlich tumor growth and macrophage activity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.M. Quinteiro-Filho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyhalothrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, induces stress-like symptoms, increases c-fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and decreases innate immune responses in laboratory animals. Macrophages are key elements in cellular immune responses and operate at the tumor-host interface. This study investigated the relationship among cyhalothrin effects on Ehrlich tumor growth, serum corticosterone levels and peritoneal macrophage activity in mice. Three experiments were done with 10 experimental (single gavage administration of 3.0 mg/kg cyhalothrin daily for 7 days and 10 control (single gavage administration of 1.0 mL/kg vehicle of cyhalothrin preparation daily for 7 days isogenic BALB/c mice in each experiment. Cyhalothrin i increased Ehrlich ascitic tumor growth after ip administration of 5.0 x 106 tumor cells, i.e., ascitic fluid volume (control = 1.97 ± 0.39 mL and experimental = 2.71 ± 0.92 mL; P < 0.05, concentration of tumor cells/mL in the ascitic fluid (control = 111.95 ± 16.73 x 106 and experimental = 144.60 ± 33.18 x 106; P < 0.05, and total number of tumor cells in the ascitic fluid (control = 226.91 ± 43.22 x 106 and experimental = 349.40 ± 106.38 x 106; P < 0.05; ii increased serum corticosterone levels (control = 200.0 ± 48.3 ng/mL and experimental = 420.0 ± 75.5 ng/mL; P < 0.05, and iii decreased the intensity of macrophage phagocytosis (control = 132.3 ± 19.7 and experimental = 116.2 ± 4.6; P < 0.05 and oxidative burst (control = 173.7 ± 40.8 and experimental= 99.58 ± 41.7; P < 0.05 in vitro in the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. These data provide evidence that cyhalothrin simultaneously alters host resistance to Ehrlich tumor growth, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis function, and peritoneal macrophage activity. The results are discussed in terms of data suggesting a link between stress, HPA axis activation and resistance to tumor growth.

  17. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Benzekry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1 to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2 to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3 to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80% extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70% beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  18. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Guifang [Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cai, Xiaojun [Department of Ophthalmology, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Falck, John R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have

  19. Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008479 Preliminary study of MR elastography in brain tumors. XU Lei(徐磊), et al.Neurosci Imaging Center, Beijing Tiantan Hosp, Capital Med Univ, Beijing 100050.Chin J Radiol 2008;42(6):605-608. Objective To investigate the potential values of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for evaluating the brain tumor consistency in vivo. Methods Fourteen patients with known solid brain tumor (5 male, 9 female; age range: 16-63 years)

  20. Digital holographic microscopy for imaging growth and treatment response in 3D tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-03-01

    While three-dimensional tumor models have emerged as valuable tools in cancer research, the ability to longitudinally visualize the 3D tumor architecture restored by these systems is limited with microscopy techniques that provide only qualitative insight into sample depth, or which require terminal fixation for depth-resolved 3D imaging. Here we report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, non-destructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro 3D tumor models. Following established methods we prepared 3D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple timepoints throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify nodule thickness over time under normal growth, and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  1. Vascular Basement Membrane-derived Multifunctional Peptide, a Novel Inhibitor of Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Guo CAO; Shu-Ping PENG; Li SUN; Hui LI; Li WANG; Han-Wu DENG

    2006-01-01

    Vascular basement membrane-derived multifunctional peptide (VBMDMP) gene (fusion gene of the human immunoglobulin G3 upper hinge region and two tumstatin-derived fragments) obtained by chemical synthesis was cloned into vector pUC 19, and introduced into the expression vector pGEX-4T-1 to construct a prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1-VBMDMP. Recombinant VBMDMP produced in Escherichia coli has been shown to have significant activity of antitumor growth and antimetastasis in Lewis lung carcinoma transplanted into mouse C57B1/6. In the present study, we have studied the ability of rVBMDMP to inhibit endothelial cell tube formation and proliferation, to induce apoptosis in vitro, and to suppress tumor growth in vivo. The experimental results showed that rVBMDMP potently inhibited proliferation of human endothelial (HUVEC-12) cells and human colon cancer (SW480) cells in vitro, with no inhibition of proliferation in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. rVBMDMP also significantly inhibited human endothelial cell tube formation and suppressed tumor growth of SW480 cells in a mouse xenograft model. These results suggest that rVBMDMP is a powerful therapeutic agent for suppressing angiogenesis and tumor growth.

  2. Up-regulation of hepatoma-derived growth factor facilitates tumor progression in malignant melanoma [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-En Tsai

    Full Text Available Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the fastest increasing malignancy in humans. Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF is a novel growth factor identified from human hepatoma cell line. HDGF overexpression is correlated with poor prognosis in various types of cancer including melanoma. However, the underlying mechanism of HDGF overexpression in developing melanoma remains unclear. In this study, human melanoma cell lines (A375, A2058, MEL-RM and MM200 showed higher levels of HDGF gene expression, whereas human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn expressed less. Exogenous application of HDGF stimulated colony formation and invasion of human melanoma cells. Moreover, HDGF overexpression stimulated the degree of invasion and colony formation of B16-F10 melanoma cells whereas HDGF knockdown exerted opposite effects in vitro. To evaluate the effects of HDGF on tumour growth and metastasis in vivo, syngeneic mouse melanoma and metastatic melanoma models were performed by manipulating the gene expression of HDGF in melanoma cells. It was found that mice injected with HDGF-overexpressing melanoma cells had greater tumour growth and higher metastatic capability. In contrast, mice implanted with HDGF-depleted melanoma cells exhibited reduced tumor burden and lung metastasis. Histological analysis of excised tumors revealed higher degree of cell proliferation and neovascularization in HDGF-overexpressing melanoma. The present study provides evidence that HDGF promotes tumor progression of melanoma and targeting HDGF may constitute a novel strategy for the treatment of melanoma.

  3. Multi-targeted inhibition of tumor growth and lung metastasis by redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles loading disulfiram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaopin; Xiao, Jisheng; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Yu, Haijun; Mao, Shirui; Li, Yaping

    2014-03-01

    Metastasis, the main cause of cancer related deaths, remains the greatest challenge in cancer treatment. Disulfiram (DSF), which has multi-targeted anti-tumor activity, was encapsulated into redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles to achieve intracellular targeted delivery and finally inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The crosslinked micelles demonstrated good stability in circulation and specifically released DSF under a reductive environment that mimicked the intracellular conditions of tumor cells. As a result, the DSF-loaded redox-sensitive shell crosslinked micelles (DCMs) dramatically inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis and suppressed cell invasion, as well as impairing tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In addition, the DCMs could accumulate in tumor tissue and stay there for a long time, thereby causing significant inhibition of 4T1 tumor growth and marked prevention in lung metastasis of 4T1 tumors. These results suggested that DCMs could be a promising delivery system in inhibiting the growth and metastasis of breast cancer.

  4. Composite Waves for a Cell Population System Modeling Tumor Growth and Invasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min TANG; Nicolas VAUCHELET; Ibrahim CHEDDADI; Irene VIGNON-CLEMENTEL; Dirk DRASDO; Beno(i)t PERTHAME

    2013-01-01

    In the recent biomechanical theory of cancer growth,solid tumors are considered as liquid-like materials comprising elastic components.In this fluid mechanical view,the expansion ability of a solid tumor into a host tissue is mainly driven by either the cell diffusion constant or the cell division rate,with the latter depending on the local cell density (contact inhibition) or/and on the mechanical stress in the tumor.For the two by two degenerate parabolic/elliptic reaction-diffusion system that results from this modeling,the authors prove that there are always traveling waves above a minimal speed,and analyse their shapes.They appear to be complex with composite shapes and discontinuities.Several small parameters allow for analytical solutions,and in particular,the incompressible cells limit is very singular and related to the Hele-Shaw equation.These singular traveling waves are recovered numerically.

  5. Carnosine retards tumor growth in vivo in an NIH3T3-HER2/neu mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meixensberger Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was previously demonstrated that the dipeptide carnosine inhibits growth of cultured cells isolated from patients with malignant glioma. In the present work we investigated whether carnosine also affects tumor growth in vivo and may therefore be considered for human cancer therapy. Results A mouse model was used to investigate whether tumor growth in vivo can be inhibited by carnosine. Therefore, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, conditionally expressing the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu, were implanted into the dorsal skin of nude mice, and tumor growth in treated animals was compared to control mice. In two independent experiments nude mice that received tumor cells received a daily intra peritoneal injection of 500 μl of 1 M carnosine solution. Measurable tumors were detected 12 days after injection. Aggressive tumor growth in control animals, that received a daily intra peritoneal injection of NaCl solution started at day 16 whereas aggressive growth in mice treated with carnosine was delayed, starting around day 19. A significant effect of carnosine on tumor growth was observed up to day 24. Although carnosine was not able to completely prevent tumor growth, a microscopic examination of tumors revealed that those from carnosine treated animals had a significant lower number of mitosis (p Conclusion As a naturally occurring substance with a high potential to inhibit growth of malignant cells in vivo, carnosine should be considered as a potential anti-cancer drug. Further experiments should be performed in order to understand how carnosine acts at the molecular level.

  6. Use of ultrasonic back-reflection intensity for predicting the onset of crack growth due to low-cycle fatigue in stainless steel under block loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Nurul; Arai, Yoshio; Araki, Wakako

    2015-02-01

    The present study proposes the use of ultrasonic back-reflected waves for evaluating low cycle fatigue crack growth from persistent slip bands (PSBs) of stainless steel under block loading. Fatigue under high-low block loading changes the back-reflected intensity of the ultrasonic wave that emanates from the surface. Measuring the change in ultrasonic intensity can predict the start of crack growth with reasonable accuracy. The present study also proposes a modified constant cumulative plastic strain method and a PSB damage evolution model to predict the onset of crack growth under block loads.

  7. Emprego do cell block de agarose como método complementar no diagnóstico citológico de tumores mamários caninos Employment of cell block of agarose as additional method in the cytological diagnosis of canine mammary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Sousa Zanoni

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Os tumores mamários são neoplasias comuns em diversas espécies, sendo os processos oncológicos de maior incidência em cães. A elevada frequência e agressividade desses processos justificam a busca de métodos diagnósticos e prognósticos rápidos, de custo reduzido e menor invasividade, visando a uma abordagem cirúrgica e terapêutica adequada. O presente estudo avaliou a adequação da utilização da técnica de cell block de agarose como método diagnóstico complementar aos esfregaços tradicionais no diagnóstico desses processos. Para tanto, foram obtidas 51 amostras citológicas de tumores mamários de 30 cadelas que passaram por excisão tumoral no HOVET-UMESP, comparando-se os resultados obtidos a partir dos esfregaços, de cell blocks, e de sua associação (esfregaços cell blocks-1 com o diagnóstico histopatológico. Os melhores resultados foram obtidos mediante a associação dos métodos, reduzindo os resultados falso-negativos e elevando a correlação cito-histológica, reforçando a importância da citologia na rotina oncológica veterinária.The breast tumors are common neoplasms in several species, with high incidence in dogs. The high frequency and aggressiveness of these cases justifies the search for rapid, low cost and less invasive diagnostic methods, seeking for surgical approach and appropriate therapy. This study evaluated the appropriateness of the use of the agarose cell block technique as a diagnostic tool to complement traditional smears in the diagnosis of these processes. Therefore, it was obtained 51 samples from 30 dogs with breast tumors that underwent tumoral excision at the HOVET-UMESP, comparing the results obtained from smears, cell blocks, alone and in association (smears cell blocks-1, with the histopathologic diagnosis. The best results were obtained with the association of smears and cell block analysis, reducing the false negative results and increasing the cyto-histological correlation

  8. Bromelain inhibits COX-2 expression by blocking the activation of MAPK regulated NF-kappa B against skin tumor-initiation triggering mitochondrial death pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhui, Kulpreet; Prasad, Sahdeo; George, Jasmine; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-09-18

    Chemoprevention impels the pursuit for either single targeted or cocktail of multi-targeted agents. Bromelain, potential agent in this regard, is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and fruits of pineapple (Ananas cosmosus), endowed with anti-inflammatory, anti-invasive and anti-metastatic properties. Herein, we report the anti tumor-initiating effects of bromelain in 2-stage mouse skin tumorigenesis model. Pre-treatment of bromelain resulted in reduction in cumulative number of tumors (CNT) and average number of tumors per mouse. Preventive effect was also comprehended in terms of reduction in tumor volume up to a tune of approximately 65%. Components of the cell signaling pathways, connecting proteins involved in cell death were targeted. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in Bcl-2. A marked inhibition in cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression and inactivation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) was recorded, as phosphorylation and consequent degradation of I kappa B alpha was blocked by bromelain. Also, bromelain treatment curtailed extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt activity. The basis of anti tumor-initiating activity of bromelain was revealed by its time dependent reduction in DNA nick formation and increase in percentage prevention. Thus, modulation of inappropriate cell signaling cascades driven by bromelain is a coherent approach in achieving chemoprevention.

  9. PERK promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by limiting oxidative DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, Ekaterina; Grigoriadou, Christina; Pytel, Dariusz; Zhang, Fang; Ye, Jiangbin; Koumenis, Constantinos; Cavener, Douglas; Diehl, J. Alan

    2010-01-01

    In order to proliferate and expand in an environment with limited nutrients, cancer cells co-opt cellular regulatory pathways that facilitate adaptation and thereby maintain tumor growth and survival potential. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is uniquely positioned to sense nutrient deprivation stress and subsequently engage signaling pathways that promote adaptive strategies. As such, components of the ER stress-signaling pathway represent potential anti-neoplastic targets. However, recent investigations into the role of the ER resident protein kinase PERK have paradoxically suggested both pro- and anti-tumorigenic properties. We have utilized animal models of mammary carcinoma to interrogate PERK contribution in the neoplastic process. The ablation of PERK in tumor cells resulted in impaired regeneration of intracellular antioxidants and accumulation of reactive oxygen species triggering oxidative DNA damage. Ultimately, PERK deficiency impeded progression through the cell cycle due to the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data reveal that PERK-dependent signaling is utilized during both tumor initiation and expansion to maintain redox homeostasis and thereby facilitates tumor growth. PMID:20453876

  10. PERK promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by limiting oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovnikova-Marjon, E; Grigoriadou, C; Pytel, D; Zhang, F; Ye, J; Koumenis, C; Cavener, D; Diehl, J A

    2010-07-01

    To proliferate and expand in an environment with limited nutrients, cancer cells co-opt cellular regulatory pathways that facilitate adaptation and thereby maintain tumor growth and survival potential. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is uniquely positioned to sense nutrient deprivation stress and subsequently engage signaling pathways that promote adaptive strategies. As such, components of the ER stress-signaling pathway represent potential antineoplastic targets. However, recent investigations into the role of the ER resident protein kinase, RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) have paradoxically suggested both pro- and anti-tumorigenic properties. We have used animal models of mammary carcinoma to interrogate the contribution of PERK in the neoplastic process. The ablation of PERK in tumor cells resulted in impaired regeneration of intracellular antioxidants and accumulation of reactive oxygen species triggering oxidative DNA damage. Ultimately, PERK deficiency impeded progression through the cell cycle because of the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Our data reveal that PERK-dependent signaling is used during both tumor initiation and expansion to maintain redox homeostasis, thereby facilitating tumor growth.

  11. Withaferin-A suppress AKT induced tumor growth in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P; Sirimulla, Suman; Alatassi, Houda; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-03-22

    The oncogenic activation of AKT gene has emerged as a key determinant of the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC); hence, research has focused on targeting AKT signaling for the treatment of advanced stages of CRC. In this study, we explored the anti-tumorigenic effects of withaferin A (WA) on CRC cells overexpressing AKT in preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) models. Our results indicated that WA, a natural compound, resulted in significant inhibition of AKT activity and led to the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion by downregulating the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers in CRC cells overexpressing AKT. The oral administration of WA significantly suppressed AKT-induced aggressive tumor growth in a xenograft model. Molecular analysis revealed that the decreased expression of AKT and its downstream pro-survival signaling molecules may be responsible for tumor inhibition. Further, significant inhibition of some important EMT markers, i.e., Snail, Slug, β-catenin and vimentin, was observed in WA-treated human CRC cells overexpressing AKT. Significant inhibition of micro-vessel formation and the length of vessels were evident in WA-treated tumors, which correlated with a low expression of the angiogenic marker RETIC. In conclusion, the present study emphasizes the crucial role of AKT activation in inducing cell proliferation, angiogenesis and EMT in CRC cells and suggests that WA may overcome AKT-induced cell proliferation and tumor growth in CRC. PMID:26883103

  12. Silencing of doublecortin-like (DCL results in decreased mitochondrial activity and delayed neuroblastoma tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla S Verissimo

    Full Text Available Doublecortin-like (DCL is a microtubule-binding protein crucial for neuroblastoma (NB cell proliferation. We have investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of DCL knockdown is linked to reduced mitochondrial activity. We found a delay in tumor development after DCL knockdown in vivo in doxycycline-inducible NB tumor xenografts. To understand the mechanisms underlying this tumor growth retardation we performed a series of in vitro experiments in NB cell lines. DCL colocalizes with mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein OMP25/ SYNJ2BP and DCL knockdown results in decreased expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, DCL knockdown decreases cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. We identified the C-terminal Serine/Proline-rich domain and the second microtubule-binding area as crucial DCL domains for the regulation of cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. Furthermore, DCL knockdown causes a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of NB cells under an energetic challenge induced by low glucose availability. Together with our previous studies, our results corroborate DCL as a key player in NB tumor growth in which DCL controls not only mitotic spindle formation and the stabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, but also regulates mitochondrial activity and energy availability, which makes DCL a promising molecular target for NB therapy.

  13. Tumor growth effects of rapamycin on human biliary tract cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heuer Matthias

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver transplantation is an important treatment option for patients with liver-originated tumors including biliary tract carcinomas (BTCs. Post-transplant tumor recurrence remains a limiting factor for long-term survival. The mammalian target of rapamycin-targeting immunosuppressive drug rapamycin could be helpful in lowering BTC recurrence rates. Therein, we investigated the antiproliferative effect of rapamycin on BTC cells and compared it with standard immunosuppressants. Methods We investigated two human BTC cell lines. We performed cell cycle and proliferation analyses after treatment with different doses of rapamycin and the standard immunosuppressants, cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. Results Rapamycin inhibited the growth of two BTC cell lines in vitro. By contrast, an increase in cell growth was observed among the cells treated with the standard immunosuppressants. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that rapamycin inhibits BTC cell proliferation and thus might be the preferred immunosuppressant for patients after a liver transplantation because of BTC.

  14. Established and New Mouse Models Reveal E2f1 and Cdk2 Dependency of Retinoblastoma and Expose Strategies to Block Tumor Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Monika; McCurdy, Sean R.; Livne-bar, Izzy; Ahmad, Mohammad; Wrana, Jeffery L.; Chen, Danian; Bremner, Rod

    2016-01-01

    RB +/− individuals develop retinoblastoma and, subsequently, many other tumors. The Rb relatives p107 and p130 protect the tumor-resistant Rb−/− mouse retina. Determining the mechanism underlying this tumor suppressor function may expose novel strategies to block Rb-pathway cancers. p107/p130 are best known as E2f inhibitors, but here we implicate E2f-independent Cdk2 inhibition as the critical p107 tumor suppressor function in vivo. Like p107 loss, deleting p27 or inactivating its Cdk inhibitor (CKI) function (p27CK−) cooperated with Rb loss to induce retinoblastoma. Genetically, p107 behaved like a CKI because inactivating Rb and one allele each of p27 and p107 was tumorigenic. While Rb loss induced canonical E2f targets, unexpectedly p107 loss did not further induce these genes but instead caused post-transcriptional Skp2-induction and Cdk2 activation. Strikingly, Cdk2 activity correlated with tumor penetrance across all the retinoblastoma models. Therefore, Rb restrains E2f, but p107 inhibits cross-talk to Cdk. While removing either E2f2 or E2f3 genes had little effect, removing only one E2f1 allele blocked tumorigenesis. More importantly, exposing retinoblastoma-prone fetuses to small molecule E2f or Cdk inhibitors for merely one week dramatically inhibited subsequent tumorigenesis in adult mice. Protection was achieved without disrupting normal proliferation. Thus, exquisite sensitivity of the cell-of-origin to E2f and Cdk activity can be exploited to prevent Rb pathway-induced cancer in vivo without perturbing normal cell division. These data suggest that E2f inhibitors, never before tested in vivo, or Cdk inhibitors, largely disappointing as therapeutics, may be effective preventive agents. PMID:22286767

  15. Frondoside A Suppressive Effects on Lung Cancer Survival, Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, Invasion, and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Attoub; Kholoud Arafat; An Gélaude; Mahmood Ahmed Al Sultan; Marc Bracke; Peter Collin; Takashi Takahashi; Thomas E Adrian; Olivier De Wever

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop less toxic drugs that will improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa and was shown to be a highly safe compound. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo alone and in combination with cisplatin. Frondoside A caused concentration...

  16. The non glycanated endocan polypeptide slows tumor growth by inducing stromal inflammatory reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Yassine, Hanane; De Freitas Caires, Nathalie; Depontieu, Florence; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Awad, Ali,; Tsicopoulos, Anne; Leboeuf, Christophe; Janin, Anne; Duez, Catherine; Grigoriu, Bogdan,; Lassalle, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Endocan expression is increasingly studied in various human cancers. Experimental evidence showed that human endocan, through its glycan chain, is implicated in various processes of tumor growth. We functionally characterize mouse endocan which is also a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan but much less glycanated than human endocan. Distant domains from the O-glycanation site, located within exons 1 and 2 determine the glycanation pattern of endocan. In opposite to the human homologue, overexpr...

  17. Angiopoietin-1/Tie-2 activation contributes to vascular survival and tumor growth during VEGF blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jianzhong; Bae, Jae-O; Tsai, Judy P.; Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela; Papa, Joey; Lee, Alice; Zeng, Shan; Kornfeld, Z. Noah; Ullner, Paivi; Zaghloul, Nibal; Ioffe, Ella; Nandor, Sarah; Burova, Elena; Holash, Jocelyn; Thurston, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    Approval of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab by the FDA in 2004 reflected the success of this vascular targeting strategy in extending survival in patients with advanced cancers. However, consistent with previous reports that experimental tumors can grow or recur during VEGF blockade, it has become clear that many patients treated with VEGF inhibitors will ultimately develop progressive disease. Previous studies have shown that disruption of VEGF signali...

  18. IGFBP3 promotes esophageal cancer growth by suppressing oxidative stress in hypoxic tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Kinugasa, Hideaki; Kagawa, Shingo; Whelan, Kelly A.; NAGANUMA, Seiji; Subramanian, Harry; Chang, Sanders; Nakagawa, Kei J; Rustgi, Naryan L; Kita, Yoshiaki; Natsugoe, Shoji; Basu, Devraj; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Diehl, J. Alan

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), a hypoxia-inducible gene, regulates a variety of cellular processes including cell proliferation, senescence, apoptosis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). IGFBP3 has been linked to the pathogenesis of cancers. Most previous studies focus upon proapoptotic tumor suppressor activities of IGFBP3. Nevertheless, IGFBP3 is overexpressed in certain cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), one of the most aggressive ...

  19. Picropodophyllin inhibits tumor growth of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Shu-Cheng [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Wei [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tao, Ze-Zhang, E-mail: zezhangtao@gmail.com [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •We identified that PPP inhibits IGF-1R/Akt pathway in NPC cells. •PPP dose-dependently inhibits NPC cell proliferation in vitro. •PPP suppresses tumor growth of NPC in nude mice. •PPP have little effect on microtubule assembly. -- Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a cell membrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity and plays important roles in cell transformation, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Picropodophyllin (PPP) is a selective IGF-1R inhibitor and shows promising antitumor effects for several human cancers. However, its antitumor effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to investigate the antitumor activity of PPP in NPC using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal model. We found that PPP dose-dependently decreased the IGF-induced phosphorylation and activity of IGF-1R and consequently reduced the phosphorylation of Akt, one downstream target of IGF-1R. In addition, PPP inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PPP for NPC cell line CNE-2 was ⩽1 μM at 24 h after treatment and ⩽0.5 μM at 48 h after treatment, respectively. Moreover, administration of PPP by intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the tumor growth of xenografted NPC in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest targeting IGF-1R by PPP may represent a new strategy for treatment of NPCs with positive IGF-1R expression.

  20. Tumors initiated by constitutive Cdk2 activation exhibit transforming growth factor beta resistance and acquire paracrine mitogenic stimulation during progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corsino, P.; Davis, B.; Law, M.;

    2007-01-01

    sites. Together, these results suggest that deregulation of the Cdk/Rb/E2F axis reprograms mammary epithelial cells to initiate a paracrine loop with tumor-associated fibroblasts involving TGF beta and HGF, resulting in desmoplasia. The MMTV-DIK2 mice should provide a useful model system...... for the development of therapeutic approaches to block the stromal desmoplastic reaction that likely plays an important role in the progression of multiple types of human tumors...

  1. Tocotrienol-adjuvanted dendritic cells inhibit tumor growth and metastasis: a murine model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitti Rahma Abdul Hafid

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL from 4T1 cells (DC+TL once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF inhibited (p<0.05 tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05 levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05 by CD8(+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines.

  2. Inhibition of endothelial Cdk5 reduces tumor growth by promoting non-productive angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Henriette; Zhang, Siwei; Lehr, Thorsten; Müller, Christoph; Ulrich, Melanie; Bibb, James A; Adams, Ralf H; Bracher, Franz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Liebl, Johanna

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic success of VEGF-based anti-angiogenic tumor therapy is limited due to resistance. Thus, new strategies for anti-angiogenic cancer therapy based on novel targets are urgently required. Our previous in vitro work suggested that small molecule Cdk5 inhibitors affect angiogenic processes such as endothelial migration and proliferation. Moreover, we recently uncovered a substantial role of Cdk5 in the development of lymphatic vessels. Here we pin down the in vivo impact of endothelial Cdk5 inhibition in angiogenesis and elucidate the underlying mechanism in order to judge the potential of Cdk5 as a novel anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer target. By the use of endothelial-specific Cdk5 knockout mouse models and various endothelial and tumor cell based assays including human tumor xenograft models, we show that endothelial-specific knockdown of Cdk5 results in excessive but non-productive angiogenesis during development but also in tumors, which subsequently leads to inhibition of tumor growth. As Cdk5 inhibition disrupted Notch function by reducing the generation of the active Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and Cdk5 modulates Notch-dependent endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting, we propose that the Dll4/Notch driven angiogenic signaling hub is an important and promising mechanistic target of Cdk5. In fact, Cdk5 inhibition can sensitize tumors to conventional anti-angiogenic treatment as shown in tumor xenograft models. In summary our data set the stage for Cdk5 as a drugable target to inhibit Notch-driven angiogenesis condensing the view that Cdk5 is a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:26755662

  3. Breast cancer tumor growth is efficiently inhibited by dendritic cell transfusion in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Quoc Pham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of dendritic cells to efficiently present tumor-derived antigens when primed with tumor cell lysates makes them attractive as an approach for cancer treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of dendritic cell transfusion dose on breast cancer tumor growth in a murine model. Dendritic cells were produced from allogeneic bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells that were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 20 ng/mL GM-CSF and 20 ng/mL IL-4 for 7 days. These cells were checked for maturation before being primed with a cancer cell-derived antigen. Cancer cell antigens were produced by a rapid freeze-thaw procedure using a 4T1 cell line. Immature dendritic cells were loaded with 4T1 cellderived antigens. Dendritic cells were transfused into mice bearing tumors at three different doses, included 5.104, 105, and 106 cells/mouse with a control consisting of RPMI 1640 media alone. The results showed that dendritic cell therapy inhibited breast cancer tumors in a murine model; however, this effect depended on dendritic cell dose. After 17 days, in the treated groups, tumor size decreased by 43%, 50%, and 87.5% for the doses of 5 and times; 104, 105, and 106 dendritic cells, respectively, while tumor size in the control group decreased by 44%. This result demonstrated that dendritic cell therapy is a promising therapy for breast cancer treatment. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(3.000: 85-92

  4. Complete adrenocorticotropin deficiency after radiation therapy for brain tumor with a normal growth hormone reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Haruna; Yoshioka, Katsunobu; Yamagami, Keiko [Osaka City General Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-06-01

    A 34-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1, who had received radiation therapy after the excision of a brain tumor 5 years earlier, was admitted to our hospital with vomiting and weight loss. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) were undetectable before and after administration of 100 {mu}g corticotropin releasing hormone. The level of growth hormone without stimulation was 24.7 ng/ml. We diagnosed him to have complete ACTH deficiency attributable to radiation therapy. This is the first known case of a patient with complete ACTH deficiency after radiation therapy and a growth hormone reserve that remained normal. (author)

  5. Effect of tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 on growth inhibition of MG63 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qin; Yang Lin; Wenjian Chen; Wentao Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to establish the osteosarcoma cell sublines which stably expressing tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 (TSLC1) gene and evaluate its effect on growth inhibition of human osteosarcoma cell line MG63. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pCI-TSLC1 was stably transfected into MG63 cells with Lipofectamine 2000. The positive clones were developed by selection by G418. Biological characteristics of one of the 6 cell lines which highly expressing TSLC1, namely, the M8T were studied. Cell growth was analyzed with MTT assay. 2 × 107 cells suspended in 0.2 mL phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected into the two flanks of 5-6-week-old female BALB/C nu/nu athymic nude mice. The volumes of subcutaneous of tumor growth were evaluated and calculated by the formula V= Length × Width × Height × 0.5 once a week. Results: The M8T cell subline which stably expressing TSLC1 was characterized by Western blot. The genetic stability and purity of M8T cells were stable. TSLC1 significantly suppressed the growth of M8T cells in vitro. Moreover, the tumorigenicity of M8T cells was suppressed in vivo. Conclusion: The osteosarcoma cell sublines M8T which stably expressing TSLC1 had been successfully established. The ability of growth and metastasis of M8T was significantly suppressed both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. FBXW7 Acts as an Independent Prognostic Marker and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Human Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanchun Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBXW7 is a potent tumor suppressor in human cancers including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we found that the expressions of FBXW7 protein and mRNA levels in osteosarcoma (OS cases were significantly lower than those in normal bone tissues. Clinical analysis indicated that FBXW7 was expressed at lower levels in OS patients with advanced clinical stage, high T classification and poor histological differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high expression of FBXW7 was correlated with a better 5-year survival of OS patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that FBXW7 was an independent prognostic marker in OS. Our in vitro studies showed that FBXW7 overexpression inhibited cell cycle transition and cell proliferation, and promoted apoptosis in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. In a nude mouse xenograft model, FBXW7 overexpression slowed down tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest. Mechanistically, FBXW7 inversely regulated oncoprotein c-Myc and cyclin E levels in both U2OS and MG-63 cells. Together these findings suggest that FBXW7 may serve as a prognostic biomarker and inhibit tumor progression by inducing apoptosis and growth arrest in OS.

  7. Integrin-linked kinase in gastric cancer cell attachment, invasion and tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Zhao; Li-Li Guo; Jing-Yong Xu; Hua Yang; Mei-Xiong Huang; Gang Xiao

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) on gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo . METHODS: ILK small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells and ILK expression was monitored by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell attachment, proliferation, invasion, microfilament dynamics and the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also measured. Gastric cancer cells treated with ILK siRNA were subcutaneously transplanted into nude mice and tumor growth was assessed. RESULTS: Both ILK mRNA and protein levels were significantly down-regulated by ILK siRNA in human gastric cancer cells. This significantly inhibited cell attachment, proliferation and invasion. The knockdown of ILK also disturbed F-actin assembly and reduced VEGF secretion in conditioned medium by 40% (P < 0.05). Four weeks after injection of ILK siRNA-transfected gastric cancer cells into nude mice, tumor volume and weight were significantly reduced compared with that of tumors induced by cells treated with non-silencing siRNA or by untreated cells (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Targeting ILK with siRNA suppresses the growth of gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo . ILK plays an important role in gastric cancer progression.

  8. Vertical and lateral fluid flow related to a large growth fault, South Eugene Island Block 330 field, offshore Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losh, S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Eglinton, L. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States). Dept. of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry; Schoell, M. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Wood, J. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Data from sediments in and near a large growth fault adjacent to the giant South Eugene Island Block 330 field, offshore Louisiana, indicate that the fault has acted as a conduit for fluids whose flux has varied in space and time. Core and cuttings samples from two wells that penetrated the same fault about 300 m apart show markedly different thermal histories and evidence for mass flux. Sediments within and adjacent to the fault zone in the US Department of Energy-Pennzoil Pathfinder well at about 2200 m SSTVD (subsea true vertical depth) showed little paleothermal or geochemical evidence for through-going fluid flow. The sediments were characterized by low vitrinite reflectances (R{sub {omicron}}), averaging 0.3% R{sub {omicron}}, moderate to high {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C values, and little difference in major or trace element composition between deformed and undeformed sediments. In contrast, faulted sediments from the A6ST well, which intersects the A fault at 1993 m SSTVD, show evidence for a paleothermal anomaly (0.55% R{sub {omicron}}) and depleted {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C values. Overall, indicators of mass and heat flux indicate the main growth fault zone in South Eugene Island Block 330 has acted as a conduit for ascending fluids, although the cumulative fluxes vary along strike. This conclusion is corroborated by oil and gas distribution in downthrown sands in Blocks 330 and 331, which identify the fault system in northwestern Block 330 as a major feeder.

  9. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF-C in serum and tissue of Wilms tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; ZHANG Da; CHEN Xin-rang; FAN Yu-xia; WANG Jia-xiang

    2011-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis and lymphogenesis which were promoted by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)and VEGF-C are important in the growth and metastasis of solid tumors.The high level of VEGF and VEGF-C were distributed in numerous types of cancers,but their distribution and expression in Wilms tumor,the most common pediatric tumor of the kidney,was unclear.Methods To learn about the distribution,mass spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry were used to measure the level of VEGF and VEGF-C in serum and tissue of Wilms tumor.Results The expression level of VEGF in serum of Wilms tumor was the same as in pre-surgery and control,so it was the same case of VEGF-C.Both of these factors were chiefly located in Wilms tumor tissue,but not in borderline and normal.In addition,the higher clinical staging and histopathologic grading were important elements in high expression of VEGF and VEGF-C.Gender,age and the size of tumor have not certainly been implicated in expression level of VEGF and VEGF-C.Conclusions The lymph node metastasis and growth of tumors resulted from angiogenesis and lymphogenesis which were promoted by VEGF and VEGF-C in Wilms tumor.The autocrine and paracrine process of VEGF and VEGF-C were the principal contributor to specific tissues of Wilms tumor but not to the entire body.

  10. Immunological and Nonimmunological Effects of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase on Breast Tumor Growth and Spontaneous Metastasis Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Levina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1, in tumor escape and metastasis formation was analyzed using two pairs of Ido1+ and Ido1− murine breast cancer cell lines. Ido1 expression in 4T1 cells was knocked down by shRNA, and Ido1 expression in NT-5 cells was upregulated by stable transfection. Growth of Ido1− tumors and spontaneous metastasis formation were inhibited in immunocompetent mice. A higher level of cytotoxic T lymphocytes was generated by spleen cells from mice bearing Ido1− tumors than Ido1+ tumors. Tumor and metastatic growth was enhanced in immunodeficient mice, confirming an intensified immune response in the absence of Ido1 expression. However, Ido1+ tumors grow faster than Ido1− tumors in immunodeficient SCID/beige mice (lacking T, B, and NK cells suggesting that some Ido1-controlled nonimmunological mechanisms may be involved in tumor cell growth regulation. In vitro experiments demonstrated that downregulation of Ido1 in tumor cells was associated with decreased cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and changed expression of cell cycle regulatory genes, whereas upregulation of Ido1 in the cells had the opposite effects. Taken together, our findings indicate that Ido1 expression could exert immunological and nonimmunological effects in murine breast tumor cells.

  11. Metastasis genetics, epigenetics, and the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    KISS1 is a member of a family of genes known as metastasis suppressors, defined by their ability to block metastasis without blocking primary tumor development and growth. KISS1 re-expression in multiple metastatic cell lines of diverse cellular origin suppresses metastasis; yet, still allows comple...

  12. Mifepristone inhibits MPA-and FGF2-induced mammary tumor growth but not FGF2-induced mammary hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Cerliani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a crosstalk between fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 and progestins inducing experimental breast cancer growth. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of FGF2 and of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA on the mouse mammary glands and to investigate whether the antiprogestin RU486 was able to reverse the MPA- or FGF2-induced effects on both, mammary gland and tumor growth. We demonstrate that FGF2 administered locally induced an intraductal hyperplasia that was not reverted by RU486, suggesting that FGF2-induced effects are progesterone receptor (PR-independent. However, MPA-induced paraductal hyperplasia was reverted by RU486 and a partial agonistic effect was observed in RU486-treated glands. Using C4-HD tumors which only grow in the presence of MPA, we showed that FGF2 administered intratumorally was able to stimulate tumor growth as MPA. The histology of FGF2-treated tumors showed different degrees of gland differentiation. RU486 inhibited both, MPA or FGF2 induced tumor growth. However, only complete regression was observed in MPA-treated tumors. Our results support the hypothesis that stromal FGF2 activates PR inducing hormone independent tumor growth.

  13. Gap junction enhancer increases efficacy of cisplatin to attenuate mammary tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Shishido

    Full Text Available Cisplatin treatment has an overall 19% response rate in animal models with malignant tumors. Increasing gap junction activity in tumor cells provides the targets to enhance antineoplastic therapies. Previously, a new class of substituted quinolines (PQs acts as gap junction enhancer, ability to increase the gap junctional intercellular communication, in breast cancer cells. We examined the effect of combinational treatment of PQs and antineoplastic drugs in an animal model, showing an increase in efficacy of antineoplastic drugs via the enhancement of gap junctions. Mice were implanted with estradiol-17ß (1.7 mg/pellet before the injection of 1×10⁷ T47D breast cancer cells subcutaneously into the inguinal region of mammary fat pad. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with DMSO (control, cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg, PQ (25 mg/kg, or a combining treatment of cisplatin and PQ. Cisplatin alone decreased mammary tumor growth by 85% while combinational treatment of cisplatin and PQ1 or PQ7 showed an additional reduction of 77% and 22% of tumor growth after 7 treatments at every 2 days, respectively. Histological results showed a significant increase of gap junction proteins, Cx43 and Cx26, in PQ-treated tissues compared to control or cisplatin. Furthermore, evidence of highly stained caspase 3 in tumors of combinational treatment (PQ and cisplatin was seen compared to cisplatin alone. We have showed for the first time an increase in the efficacy of antineoplastic drugs through a combinational treatment with PQs, a specific class of gap junction enhancers.

  14. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  15. Cinacalcet inhibits neuroblastoma tumor growth and upregulates cancer-testis antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalà, Carla; Briansó, Ferran; Castrejón, Nerea; Rodríguez, Eva; Suñol, Mariona; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Lavarino, Cinzia; Mora, Jaume; de Torres, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The calcium–sensing receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that exerts cell-type specific functions in numerous tissues and some cancers. We have previously reported that this receptor exhibits tumor suppressor properties in neuroblastoma. We have now assessed cinacalcet, an allosteric activator of the CaSR approved for clinical use, as targeted therapy for this developmental tumor using neuroblastoma cell lines and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with different MYCN and TP53 status. In vitro, acute exposure to cinacalcet induced endoplasmic reticulum stress coupled to apoptosis via ATF4-CHOP-TRB3 in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells. Both phenotypes were partially abrogated by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. Prolonged in vitro treatment also promoted dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in CaSR-positive, MYCN-amplified cells and, irrespective of MYCN status, differentiation in surviving cells. Cinacalcet significantly inhibited tumor growth in MYCN-amplified xenografts and reduced that of MYCN-non amplified PDX. Morphology assessment showed fibrosis in MYCN-amplified xenografts exposed to the drug. Microarrays analyses revealed up-regulation of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) in cinacalcet-treated MYCN-amplified tumors. These were predominantly CTAs encoded by genes mapping on chromosome X, which are the most immunogenic. Other modulated genes upon prolonged exposure to cinacalcet were involved in differentiation, cell cycle exit, microenvironment remodeling and calcium signaling pathways. CTAs were up-regulated in PDX and in vitro models as well. Moreover, progressive increase of CaSR expression upon cinacalcet treatment was seen both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, cinacalcet reduces neuroblastoma tumor growth and up-regulates CTAs. This effect represents a therapeutic opportunity and provides surrogate circulating markers of neuroblastoma response to this treatment. PMID:26893368

  16. Delphinidin Inhibits Tumor Growth by Acting on VEGF Signalling in Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thérèse Keravis

    Full Text Available The vasculoprotective properties of delphinidin are driven mainly by its action on endothelial cells. Moreover, delphinidin displays anti-angiogenic properties in both in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis models and thereby might prevent the development of tumors associated with excessive vascularization. This study was aimed to test the effect of delphinidin on melanoma-induced tumor growth with emphasis on its molecular mechanism on endothelial cells. Delphinidin treatment significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth induced by B16-F10 melanoma cell xenograft in mice. In vitro, delphinidin was not able to inhibit VEGFR2-mediated B16-F10 melanoma cell proliferation but it specifically reduced basal and VEGFR2-mediated endothelial cell proliferation. The anti-proliferative effect of delphinidin was reversed either by the MEK1/2 MAP kinase inhibitor, U-0126, or the PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002. VEGF-induced proliferation was reduced either by U-0126 or LY-294002. Under these conditions, delphinidin failed to decrease further endothelial cell proliferation. Delphinidin prevented VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK and decreased the expression of the transcription factors, CREB and ATF1. Finally, delphinidin was more potent in inhibiting in vitro cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs, PDE1 and PDE2, compared to PDE3-PDE5. Altogether delphinidin reduced tumor growth of melanoma cell in vivo by acting specifically on endothelial cell proliferation. The mechanism implies an association between inhibition of VEGF-induced proliferation via VEGFR2 signalling, MAPK, PI3K and at transcription level on CREB/ATF1 factors, and the inhibition of PDE2. In conjunction with our previous studies, we demonstrate that delphinidin is a promising compound to prevent pathologies associated with generation of vascular network in tumorigenesis.

  17. Tumor-induced osteomalacia with elevated fibroblast growth factor 23: a case of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor mixed with connective tissue variants and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-Ke Hu; Fang Yuan; Cheng-Ying Jiang; Da-Wei Lv; Bei-Bei Mao; Qiang Zhang; Zeng-Qiang Yuan; Yan Wang

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO),or oncogenic osteomalacia (OOM),is a rare acquired paraneoplastic disease characterized by renal phosphate wasting and hypophosphatemia.Recent evidence shows that tumor-overexpressed fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is responsible for the hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia.The tumors associated with TIO are usually phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor mixed connective tissue variants (PMTMCT).Surgical removal of the responsible tumors is clinically essential for the treatment of TIO.However,identifying the responsible tumors is often difficult.Here,we report a case of a TIO patient with elevated serum FGF23 levels suffering from bone pain and hypophosphatemia for more than three years.A tumor was finally located in first metacarpal bone by octreotide scintigraphy and she was cured by surgery.After complete excision of the tumor,serum FGF23 levels rapidly decreased,dropping to 54.7% of the preoperative level one hour after surgery and eventually to a little below normal.The patient's serum phosphate level rapidly improved and returned to normal level in four days.Accordingly,her clinical symptoms were greatly improved within one month after surgery.There was no sign of tumor recurrence during an 18-month period of follow-up.According to pathology,the tumor was originally diagnosed as “glomangioma” based upon a biopsy sample,“proliferative giant cell tumor of tendon sheath” based upon sections of tumor,and finally diagnosed as PMTMCT by consultation one year after surgery.In conclusion,although an extremely rare disease,clinicians and pathologists should be aware of the existence of TIO and PMTMCT,respectively.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in Combination with Local OK-432 Injection Prolongs Survival and Suppresses Distant Tumor Growth in the Rabbit Model with Intra- and Extrahepatic VX2 Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kageyama, Ken, E-mail: kageyamaken0112@gmail.com; Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: loveakirayamamoto@gmail.com; Okuma, Tomohisa, E-mail: o-kuma@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Hamamoto, Shinichi, E-mail: hamashin_tigers1975@yahoo.co.jp; Takeshita, Toru, E-mail: takeshita3595@view.ocn.ne.jp; Sakai, Yukimasa, E-mail: sakaiy@trust.ocn.ne.jp; Nishida, Norifumi, E-mail: norifumin@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tmatsuoka@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Miki, Yukio, E-mail: yukio.miki@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Osaka City University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and distant tumor growth after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and local OK-432 injection at a single tumor site in a rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors and to examine the effect of this combination therapy, which we termed immuno-radiofrequency ablation (immunoRFA), on systemic antitumor immunity in a rechallenge test. Methods: Our institutional animal care committee approved all experiments. VX2 tumors were implanted to three sites: two in the liver and one in the left ear. Rabbits were randomized into four groups of seven to receive control, RFA alone, OK-432 alone, and immunoRFA treatments at a single liver tumor at 1 week after implantation. Untreated liver and ear tumor volumes were measured after the treatment. As the rechallenge test, tumors were reimplanted into the right ear of rabbits, which survived the 35 weeks and were followed up without additional treatment. Statistical significance was examined by log-rank test for survival and Student's t test for tumor volume. Results: Survival was significantly prolonged in the immunoRFA group compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Untreated liver and ear tumor sizes became significantly smaller after immunoRFA compared to controls (P < 0.05). In the rechallenge test, the reimplanted tumors regressed without further therapy compared to the ear tumors of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: ImmunoRFA led to improved survival and suppression of distant untreated tumor growth. Decreases in size of the distant untreated tumors and reimplanted tumors suggested that systemic antitumor immunity was enhanced by immunoRFA.

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in Combination with Local OK-432 Injection Prolongs Survival and Suppresses Distant Tumor Growth in the Rabbit Model with Intra- and Extrahepatic VX2 Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and distant tumor growth after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and local OK-432 injection at a single tumor site in a rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors and to examine the effect of this combination therapy, which we termed immuno-radiofrequency ablation (immunoRFA), on systemic antitumor immunity in a rechallenge test. Methods: Our institutional animal care committee approved all experiments. VX2 tumors were implanted to three sites: two in the liver and one in the left ear. Rabbits were randomized into four groups of seven to receive control, RFA alone, OK-432 alone, and immunoRFA treatments at a single liver tumor at 1 week after implantation. Untreated liver and ear tumor volumes were measured after the treatment. As the rechallenge test, tumors were reimplanted into the right ear of rabbits, which survived the 35 weeks and were followed up without additional treatment. Statistical significance was examined by log-rank test for survival and Student’s t test for tumor volume. Results: Survival was significantly prolonged in the immunoRFA group compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Untreated liver and ear tumor sizes became significantly smaller after immunoRFA compared to controls (P < 0.05). In the rechallenge test, the reimplanted tumors regressed without further therapy compared to the ear tumors of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: ImmunoRFA led to improved survival and suppression of distant untreated tumor growth. Decreases in size of the distant untreated tumors and reimplanted tumors suggested that systemic antitumor immunity was enhanced by immunoRFA

  20. Global Tumor RNA Expression in Early Establishment of Experimental Tumor Growth and Related Angiogenesis following Cox-Inhibition Evaluated by Microarray Analysis

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    Kent Lundholm

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered expression of COX-2 and overproduction of prostaglandins, particularly prostaglandin E2, are common in malignant tumors. Consequently, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs attenuate tumor net growth, tumor related cachexia, improve appetite and prolong survival. We have also reported that COX-inhibition (indomethacin interfered with early onset of tumor endothelial cell growth, tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis. It is however still unclear whether such effects are restricted to metabolic alterations closely related to eicosanoid pathways and corresponding regulators, or whether a whole variety of gene products are involved both up- and downstream effects of eicosanoids. Therefore, present experiments were performed by the use of an in vivo, intravital chamber technique, where micro-tumor growth and related angiogenesis were analyzed by microarray to evaluate for changes in global RNA expression caused by indomethacin treatment. Indomethacin up-regulated 351 and down-regulated 1852 genes significantly (p < 0.01; 1066 of these genes had unknown biological function. Genes with altered expression occurred on all chromosomes. Our results demonstrate that indomethacin altered expression of a large number of genes distributed among a variety of processes in the carcinogenic progression involving angiogenesis, apoptosis, cell-cycling, cell adhesion, inflammation as well as fatty acid metabolism and proteolysis. It remains a challenge to distinguish primary key alterations from secondary adaptive changes in transcription of genes altered by cyclooxygenase inhibition.

  1. Optimal Design for Informative Protocols in Xenograft Tumor Growth Inhibition Experiments in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestini, Giulia; Mentré, France; Magni, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Tumor growth inhibition (TGI) models are increasingly used during preclinical drug development in oncology for the in vivo evaluation of antitumor effect. Tumor sizes are measured in xenografted mice, often only during and shortly after treatment, thus preventing correct identification of some TGI model parameters. Our aims were (i) to evaluate the importance of including measurements during tumor regrowth and (ii) to investigate the proportions of mice included in each arm. For these purposes, optimal design theory based on the Fisher information matrix implemented in PFIM4.0 was applied. Published xenograft experiments, involving different drugs, schedules, and cell lines, were used to help optimize experimental settings and parameters using the Simeoni TGI model. For each experiment, a two-arm design, i.e., control versus treatment, was optimized with or without the constraint of not sampling during tumor regrowth, i.e., "short" and "long" studies, respectively. In long studies, measurements could be taken up to 6 g of tumor weight, whereas in short studies the experiment was stopped 3 days after the end of treatment. Predicted relative standard errors were smaller in long studies than in corresponding short studies. Some optimal measurement times were located in the regrowth phase, highlighting the importance of continuing the experiment after the end of treatment. In the four-arm designs, the results showed that the proportions of control and treated mice can differ. To conclude, making measurements during tumor regrowth should become a general rule for informative preclinical studies in oncology, especially when a delayed drug effect is suspected. PMID:27306546

  2. Tumor-targeted intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs through the mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakash, Jai; Beljaars, Leonie; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Zeinstra-Smith, Mieke; de Jager-Krikken, Alie; Hessing, Martin; Steen, Herman; Poelstra, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-targeting of anticancer drugs is an interesting approach for the treatment of cancer since chemotherapies possess several adverse effects. In the present study, we propose a novel strategy to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor cells through the mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor

  3. Tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC suppresses tumor growth and enhances chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

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    Laurier Jean-Fabien

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microtubules are considered major therapeutic targets in patients with breast cancer. In spite of their essential role in biological functions including cell motility, cell division and intracellular transport, microtubules have not yet been considered as critical actors influencing tumor cell aggressivity. To evaluate the impact of microtubule mass and dynamics on the phenotype and sensitivity of breast cancer cells, we have targeted tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC, a crucial protein for the proper folding of α and β tubulins into polymerization-competent tubulin heterodimers. Methods We developed variants of human breast cancer cells with increased content of TBCC. Analysis of proliferation, cell cycle distribution and mitotic durations were assayed to investigate the influence of TBCC on the cell phenotype. In vivo growth of tumors was monitored in mice xenografted with breast cancer cells. The microtubule dynamics and the different fractions of tubulins were studied by time-lapse microscopy and lysate fractionation, respectively. In vitro sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents was studied by flow cytometry. In vivo chemosensitivity was assayed by treatment of mice implanted with tumor cells. Results TBCC overexpression influenced tubulin fraction distribution, with higher content of nonpolymerizable tubulins and lower content of polymerizable dimers and microtubules. Microtubule dynamicity was reduced in cells overexpressing TBCC. Cell cycle distribution was altered in cells containing larger amounts of TBCC with higher percentage of cells in G2-M phase and lower percentage in S-phase, along with slower passage into mitosis. While increased content of TBCC had little effect on cell proliferation in vitro, we observed a significant delay in tumor growth with respect to controls when TBCC overexpressing cells were implanted as xenografts in vivo. TBCC overexpressing variants displayed enhanced sensitivity to

  4. Regulation of the pituitary tumor transforming gene by insulin-like-growth factor-I and insulin differs between malignant and non-neoplastic astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reasons for overexpression of the oncogene pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) in tumors are still not fully understood. A possible influence of the insulin-like growth factor I (Igf-I) may be of interest, since enhanced Igf-I signalling was reported in various human tumors. We examined the influence of Igf-I and insulin on PTTG expression in human astrocytoma cells in comparison to proliferating non-neoplastic rat embryonal astrocytes. PTTG mRNA expression and protein levels were increased in malignant astrocytes treated with Igf-I or insulin, whereas in rat embryonic astrocytes PTTG expression and protein levels increased only when cells were exposed to Igf-I. Enhanced transcription did not occur after treatment with inhibitors of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), blocking the two basic signalling pathways of Igf-I and insulin. In addition to this transcriptional regulation, both kinases directly bind to PTTG, suggesting a second regulatory route by phosphorylation. However, the interaction of endogenous PTTG with MAPK and PI3K, as well as PTTG phosphorylation were independent from Igf-I or insulin. The latter results were also found in human testis, which contains high PTTG levels as well as in nonneoplastic astrocytes. This suggest, that PI3K and MAPK signalling is involved in PTTG regulation not only in malignant astrocytomas but also in non-tumorous cells

  5. Methylthioadenosine (MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth

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    Cortés Javier

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer without effective treatment. Methylthioadenosine (MTA is a naturally occurring nucleoside with differential effects on normal and transformed cells. MTA has been widely demonstrated to promote anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses in different cell types. In this study we have assessed the therapeutic potential of MTA in melanoma treatment. Methods To investigate the therapeutic potential of MTA we performed in vitro proliferation and viability assays using six different mouse and human melanoma cell lines wild type for RAS and BRAF or harboring different mutations in RAS pathway. We also have tested its therapeutic capabilities in vivo in a xenograft mouse melanoma model and using variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture we investigated its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. Results In vitro experiments showed that MTA treatment inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and viability in a dose dependent manner, where BRAF mutant melanoma cell lines appear to be more sensitive. Importantly, MTA was effective inhibiting in vivo tumor growth. The molecular analysis of tumor samples and in vitro experiments indicated that MTA induces cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein and inducing the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Conclusions MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth particularly in BRAF mutant melanoma cells. These data reveal a naturally occurring drug potentially useful for melanoma treatment.

  6. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer without effective treatment. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a naturally occurring nucleoside with differential effects on normal and transformed cells. MTA has been widely demonstrated to promote anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses in different cell types. In this study we have assessed the therapeutic potential of MTA in melanoma treatment. To investigate the therapeutic potential of MTA we performed in vitro proliferation and viability assays using six different mouse and human melanoma cell lines wild type for RAS and BRAF or harboring different mutations in RAS pathway. We also have tested its therapeutic capabilities in vivo in a xenograft mouse melanoma model and using variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture we investigated its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. In vitro experiments showed that MTA treatment inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and viability in a dose dependent manner, where BRAF mutant melanoma cell lines appear to be more sensitive. Importantly, MTA was effective inhibiting in vivo tumor growth. The molecular analysis of tumor samples and in vitro experiments indicated that MTA induces cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein and inducing the down-regulation of cyclin D1. MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth particularly in BRAF mutant melanoma cells. These data reveal a naturally occurring drug potentially useful for melanoma treatment

  7. Luteolin and its inhibitory effect on tumor growth in systemic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Shailendra, E-mail: shailendrakapoor@yahoo.com [74 crossing place, Mechanicsville, VA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Lamy et al have provided interesting data in their recent article in your esteemed journal. Luteolin augments apoptosis in a number of systemic malignancies. Luteolin reduces tumor growth in breast carcinomas. Luteolin mediates this effect by up-regulating the expression of Bax and down-regulating the expression of Bcl-xL. EGFR-induced MAPK activation is also attenuated. As a result there is increased G2/ M phase arrest. These effects have been seen both in vivo as well as in vitro. It also reduces ERα expression and causes inhibition of IGF-1 mediated PI3K–Akt pathway. Luteolin also activates p38 resulting in nuclear translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor. Simultaneously it also activates ERK. As a result there is increased intra-tumoral apoptosis which is caspase dependent as well as caspase independent. - Highlights: ► Luteolin and tumor growth in breast carcinomas. ► Luteolin and pulmonary cancer. ► Luteolin and colon cancer.

  8. Sulindac Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vivo in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Mark A. Scheper

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac has antineoplastic effects on various cancer cell lines; consequently, we assessed sulindac's effects on laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, SCC (HEP-2 cells treated with various cyclooxygenase inhibitors or transfected with constitutively active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 or survivin vectors were analyzed using Western blot analysis, annexin V assay, and cell proliferation assay. In parallel, nude mice injected subcutaneously with HEP-2 cells were either treated intraperitoneally with sulindac or left untreated, and analyzed for tumor weight, survivin expression, and tyrosine-phosphorylated Stat3 expression. In vitro studies confirmed the selective antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of sulindac, which also downregulated Stat3 and survivin protein expression. Stat3 or survivin forced expression partially rescued the antiproliferative effects of sulindac. In vivo studies showed significant repression of HEP-2 xenograft growth in sulindactreated mice versus controls, with near-complete resolution at 10 days. Additionally, tumor specimens treated with sulindac showed downregulation of phosphorylated tyrosine-705 Stat3 and survivin expression. Taken together, our data suggest, for the first time, a specific inhibitory effect of sulindac on tumor growth and survivin expression in laryngeal cancer, both in vitro and in vivo, in a Stat3-dependent manner, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach to head and neck cancer.

  9. Atg7 cooperates with Pten loss to drive prostate cancer tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanam, Urmila; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Abate-Shen, Cory; Shen, Michael M; White, Eileen; DiPaola, Robert S

    2016-02-15

    Understanding new therapeutic paradigms for both castrate-sensitive and more aggressive castrate-resistant prostate cancer is essential to improve clinical outcomes. As a critically important cellular process, autophagy promotes stress tolerance by recycling intracellular components to sustain metabolism important for tumor survival. To assess the importance of autophagy in prostate cancer, we generated a new autochthonous genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) with inducible prostate-specific deficiency in the Pten tumor suppressor and autophagy-related-7 (Atg7) genes. Atg7 deficiency produced an autophagy-deficient phenotype and delayed Pten-deficient prostate tumor progression in both castrate-naïve and castrate-resistant cancers. Atg7-deficient tumors display evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, suggesting that autophagy may promote prostate tumorigenesis through management of protein homeostasis. Taken together, these data support the importance of autophagy for both castrate-naïve and castrate-resistant growth in a newly developed GEMM, suggesting a new paradigm and model to study approaches to inhibit autophagy in combination with known and new therapies for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26883359

  10. Persistent STAT3 Activation in Colon Cancer Is Associated with Enhanced Cell Proliferation and Tumor Growth

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    Florian M. Corvinus

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma (CRC is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries. It has so far been molecularly defined mainly by alterations of the Wnt pathway. We show here for the first time that aberrant activities of the signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT3 actively contribute to this malignancy and, thus, are a potential therapeutic target for CRC. Constitutive STAT3 activity was found to be abundant in dedifferentiated cancer cells and infiltrating lymphocytes of CRC samples, but not in non-neoplastic colon epithelium. Cell lines derived from malignant colorectal tumors lost persistent STAT3 activity in culture. However, implantation of colon carcinoma cells into nude mice resulted in restoration of STAT3 activity, suggesting a role of an extracellular stimulus within the tumor microenvironment as a trigger for STAT activation. STAT3 activity in CRC cells triggered through interleukin-6 or through a constitutively active STAT3 mutant promoted cancer cell multiplication, whereas STAT3 inhibition through a dominant-negative variant impaired IL-6-driven proliferation. Blockade of STAT3 activation in CRCderived xenograft tumors slowed down their development, arguing for a contribution of STAT3 to colorectal tumor growth.

  11. Semaphorin 3A suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in mice melanoma model.

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    Goutam Chakraborty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent understanding on cancer therapy indicated that targeting metastatic signature or angiogenic switch could be a promising and rational approach to combat cancer. Advancement in cancer research has demonstrated the potential role of various tumor suppressor proteins in inhibition of cancer progression. Current studies have shown that axonal sprouting inhibitor, semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A acts as a potent suppressor of tumor angiogenesis in various cancer models. However, the function of Sema 3A in regulation of melanoma progression is not well studied, and yet to be the subject of intense investigation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, using multiple in vitro and in vivo approaches we have demonstrated that Sema 3A acts as a potent tumor suppressor in vitro and in vivo mice (C57BL/6 models. Mouse melanoma (B16F10 cells overexpressed with Sema 3A resulted in significant inhibition of cell motility, invasiveness and proliferation as well as suppression of in vivo tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis in mice models. Moreover, we have observed that Sema 3A overexpressed melanoma clone showed increased sensitivity towards curcumin and Dacarbazine, anti-cancer agents. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate, at least in part, the functional approach underlying Sema 3A mediated inhibition of tumorigenesis and angiogenesis and a clear understanding of such a process may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer.

  12. The multifaceted mechanism of Leptin signaling within tumor microenvironment in driving breast cancer growth and progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano eAndò

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adipokines represent likely candidates to mediate the increased breast cancer risk and the enhanced progression associated with obesity. Other contributors to obesity-related cancer progression are insulin/IGF-1 pathways and hormones. Among these, the adipokine leptin is the most intensively studied in both metabolism in general and in cancer due to the fact that leptin levels increase in proportion of fat mass. Leptin is primarily synthesized from adipocytes, but it is also produced by other cells including fibroblasts. In this latter case, it has been well demonstrated how cancer-associated fibroblasts express leptin receptor and secrete leptin which sustains a short autocrine loop and is able to target tumor epithelial cells enhancing breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness. In addition, it has been reported that leptin may induce breast cancer to undergo a transition from epithelial to spindle-like mesenchymal morphology, activating the signaling pathways devoted to the EMT. Thus, it emerges how leptin may play a crucial role in mediating malignant cell and tumor microenvironment interactions. Here, we present an overview of the role of leptin in breast cancer, covering the following topics: 1 leptin as an amplifier of estrogen signaling in tumor epithelial cells contributing to the promotion of carcinogenesis; 2 leptin as a crucial player in mediating tumor-stroma interaction and influencing EMT-linked mechanisms, that may sustain breast cancer growth and progression; 3 leptin and leptin receptor targeting as novel therapeutic strategies for breast cancer treatment.

  13. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated quercetin suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in both transgenic zebrafish and mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinjie; Deng, Senyi; Li, Ling; Sun, Lu; Yang, Xi; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Lei; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2013-11-01

    Quercetin (Que) loaded polymeric micelles were prepared to obtain an aqueous formulation of Que with enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activities. A simple solid dispersion method was used, and the obtained Que micelles had a small particle size (about 31 nm), high drug loading, and high encapsulation efficiency. Que micelles showed improved cellular uptake, an enhanced apoptosis induction effect, and stronger inhibitory effects on proliferation, migration, and invasion of 4T1 cells than free Que. The enhanced in vitro antiangiogenesis effects of Que micelles were proved by the results that Que micelles significantly suppressed proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Subsequently, transgenic zebrafish models were employed to investigate anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of Que micelles, in which stronger inhibitory effects of Que micelles were observed on embryonic angiogenesis, tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor growth, and tumor metastasis. Furthermore, in a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor model, Que micelles were more effective in suppressing tumor growth and spontaneous pulmonary metastasis, and prolonging the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Besides, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays suggested that tumors in the Que micelle-treated group showed more apoptosis, fewer microvessels, and fewer proliferation-positive cells. In conclusion, Que micelles, which are synthesized as an aqueous formulation of Que, possess enhanced anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity, which can serve as potential candidates for cancer therapy.

  14. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5(+) regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, E C; Hamilton, M J; Young, A; Wadsworth, B J; LePard, N E; Lee, H N; Firmino, N; Collier, J L; Bennewith, K L

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C-C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80(+) macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5(+) Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth.

  15. Apigenin inhibits HGF-promoted invasive growth and metastasis involving blocking PI3K/Akt pathway and β4 integrin function in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, Met, known to control invasive growth program have recently been shown to play crucial roles in the survival of breast cancer patients. The diet-derived flavonoids have been reported to possess anti-invasion properties; however, knowledge on the pharmacological and molecular mechanisms in suppressing HGF/Met-mediated tumor invasion and metastasis is poorly understood. In our preliminary study, we use HGF as an invasive inducer to investigate the effect of flavonoids including apigenin, naringenin, genistein and kaempferol on HGF-dependent invasive growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Results show that apigenin presents the most potent anti-migration and anti-invasion properties by Boyden chamber assay. Furthermore, apigenin represses the HGF-induced cell motility and scattering and inhibits the HGF-promoted cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of apigenin on HGF-induced signaling activation involving invasive growth was evaluated by immunoblotting analysis, it shows that apigenin blocks the HGF-induced Akt phosphorylation but not Met, ERK, and JNK phosphorylation. In addition to MDA-MB-231 cells, apigenin exhibits inhibitory effect on HGF-induced Akt phosphorylation in hepatoma SK-Hep1 cells and lung carcinoma A549 cells. By indirect immunofluorescence microscopy assay, apigenin inhibits the HGF-induced clustering of β4 integrin at actin-rich adhesive site and lamellipodia through PI3K-dependent manner. Treatment of apigenin inhibited HGF-stimulated integrin β4 function including cell-matrix adhesion and cell-endothelial cells adhesion in MDA-MB-231 cells. By Akt-siRNA transfection analysis, it confirmed that apigenin inhibited HGF-promoted invasive growth involving blocking PI3K/Akt pathway. Finally, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on HGF-promoted metastasis by lung colonization of tumor cells in nude mice and organ metastasis of tumor cells in chick embryo. By

  16. Tumor stromal vascular endothelial growth factor A is predictive of poor outcome in inflammatory breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a highly angiogenic disease; thus, antiangiogenic therapy should result in a clinical response. However, clinical trials have demonstrated only modest responses, and the reasons for these outcomes remain unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prognostic value of protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), one of the main targets of antiangiogenic therapy, and its receptors (VEGF-R1 and -R2) in IBC tumor specimens. Specimens from IBC and normal breast tissues were obtained from Algerian patients. Tumor epithelial and stromal staining of VEGF-A, VEGF-R1, and VEGF-R2 was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis in tumors and normal breast tissues; this expression was correlated with clinicopathological variables and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and disease-free survival (DFS) duration. From a set of 117 IBC samples, we evaluated 103 ductal IBC tissues and 25 normal specimens. Significantly lower epithelial VEGF-A immunostaining was found in IBC tumor cells than in normal breast tissues (P <0.01), cytoplasmic VEGF-R1 and nuclear VEGF-R2 levels were slightly higher, and cytoplasmic VEGF-R2 levels were significantly higher (P = 0.04). Sixty-two percent of IBC tumors had high stromal VEGF-A expression. In univariate analysis, stromal VEGF-A levels predicted BCSS and DFS in IBC patients with estrogen receptor-positive (P <0.01 for both), progesterone receptor-positive (P = 0.04 and P = 0.03), HER2+ (P = 0.04 and P = 0.03), and lymph node involvement (P <0.01 for both). Strikingly, in a multivariate analysis, tumor stromal VEGF-A was identified as an independent predictor of poor BCSS (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.0; 95% CI: 2.0-12.3; P <0.01) and DFS (HR: 4.2; 95% CI: 1.7-10.3; P <0.01). To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that tumor stromal VEGF-A expression is a valuable prognostic indicator of BCSS and DFS at diagnosis and can therefore be used to

  17. Interferon-γ and celecoxib inhibit lung-tumor growth through modulating M2/M1 macrophage ratio in the tumor microenvironment

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    Ren F

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fuqiang Ren,1,2,* Mingyu Fan,1,2,* Jiandong Mei,1,2 Yongqiang Wu,3 Chengwu Liu,1,2 Qiang Pu,1,2 Zongbing You,4–9 Lunxu Liu1,2 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, West China Hospital, 2Western China Collaborative Innovation Center for Early Diagnosis and Multidisciplinary Therapy of Lung Cancer, 3Regenerative Medicine Research Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, 5Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 6Tulane Cancer Center, 7Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium, 8Tulane Center for Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, 9Tulane Center for Aging, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA *These two authors contributed equally to this study Abstract: Tumor-associated macrophages play an important role in tumor growth and progression. These macrophages are heterogeneous with diverse functions, eg, M1 macrophages inhibit tumor growth, whereas M2 macrophages promote tumor growth. In this study, we found that IFNγ and/or celecoxib (cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor treatment consistently inhibited tumor growth in a mouse lung cancer model. IFNγ alone and celecoxib alone increased the percentage of M1 macrophages but decreased the percentage of M2 macrophages in the tumors, and thus the M2/M1 macrophage ratio was reduced to 1.1 and 1.7 by IFNγ alone and celecoxib alone, respectively, compared to the M2/M1 macrophage ratio of 4.4 in the control group. A combination of IFNγ and celecoxib treatment reduced the M2/M1 macrophage ratio to 0.8. Furthermore, IFNγ and/or celecoxib treatment decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF, as well as the density of microvessels in the tumors, compared to the control group. This study provides the proof of principle that IFNγ and/or celecoxib treatment may inhibit lung-tumor growth through modulating the M2/M1 macrophage ratio in the tumor microenvironment, suggesting

  18. Small interfering RNA targeted to IGF-IR delays tumor growth and induces proinflammatory cytokines in a mouse breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiphanie Durfort

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and its type I receptor (IGF-IR play significant roles in tumorigenesis and in immune response. Here, we wanted to know whether an RNA interference approach targeted to IGF-IR could be used for specific antitumor immunostimulation in a breast cancer model. For that, we evaluated short interfering RNA (siRNAs for inhibition of in vivo tumor growth and immunological stimulation in immunocompetent mice. We designed 2'-O-methyl-modified siRNAs to inhibit expression of IGF-IR in two murine breast cancer cell lines (EMT6, C4HD. Cell transfection of IGF-IR siRNAs decreased proliferation, diminished phosphorylation of downstream signaling pathway proteins, AKT and ERK, and caused a G0/G1 cell cycle block. The IGF-IR silencing also induced secretion of two proinflammatory cytokines, TNF- α and IFN-γ. When we transfected C4HD cells with siRNAs targeting IGF-IR, mammary tumor growth was strongly delayed in syngenic mice. Histology of developing tumors in mice grafted with IGF-IR siRNA treated C4HD cells revealed a low mitotic index, and infiltration of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils, suggesting activation of an antitumor immune response. When we used C4HD cells treated with siRNA as an immunogen, we observed an increase in delayed-type hypersensitivity and the presence of cytotoxic splenocytes against wild-type C4HD cells, indicative of evolving immune response. Our findings show that silencing IGF-IR using synthetic siRNA bearing 2'-O-methyl nucleotides may offer a new clinical approach for treatment of mammary tumors expressing IGF-IR. Interestingly, our work also suggests that crosstalk between IGF-I axis and antitumor immune response can mobilize proinflammatory cytokines.

  19. Bleomycin in octaarginine-modified fusogenic liposomes results in improved tumor growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkaryev, Alexander; Piroyan, Aleksandr; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-07-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is an example of an anticancer drug that should be delivered into cytosol for its efficient therapeutic action. With this in mind, we developed octaarginine (R8)-modified fusogenic DOPE-liposomes (R8-DOPE-BLM). R8-modification dramatically increased (up to 50-fold) the cell-liposome interaction. R8-DOPE-liposomes were internalized via macropinocytosis and did not end up in the lysosomes. R8-DOPE-BLM led to a significantly stronger cell death and DNA damage in vitro relative to all controls. R8-DOPE-BLM demonstrated a prominent anticancer effect in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Thus, R8-DOPE-BLM provided efficient intracellular delivery of BLM leading to strong tumor growth inhibition in vivo. PMID:22743614

  20. MMP-9 triggered self-assembly of doxorubicin nanofiber depots halts tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafatovic, Daniela; Nobis, Max; Son, Jiye; Anderson, Kurt I; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-08-01

    A central challenge in cancer care is to ensure that therapeutic compounds reach their targets. One approach is to use enzyme-responsive biomaterials, which reconfigure in response to endogenous enzymes that are overexpressed in diseased tissues, as potential site-specific anti-tumoral therapies. Here we report peptide micelles that upon MMP-9 catalyzed hydrolysis reconfigure to form fibrillar nanostructures. These structures slowly release a doxorubicin payload at the site of action. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrate that the fibrillar depots are formed at the sites of MMP-9 overexpression giving rise to enhanced efficacy of doxorubicin, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth in an animal model. PMID:27192421

  1. Phosphoglycerate Mutase 1 Coordinates Glycolysis and Biosynthesis to Promote Tumor Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitosugi, Taro [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhou, Lu [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Elf, Shannon [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fan, Jun [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kang, Hee-Bum [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Seo, Jae Ho [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shan, Changliang [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Dai, Qing [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Liang [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Xie, Jianxin [Cell Signaling Technology, Inc., Danvers, MA (United States); Gu, Ting-Lei [Cell Signaling Technology, Inc., Danvers, MA (United States); Jin, Peng [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Alečković, Masa [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); LeRoy, Gary [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Kang, Yibin [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sudderth, Jessica A. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); DeBerardinis, Ralph J. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Luan, Chi-Hao [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chen, Georgia Z. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Muller, Susan [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shin, Dong M. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Owonikoko, Taofeek K. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lonial, Sagar [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Arellano, Martha L. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Khoury, Hanna J. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Khuri, Fadlo R. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Benjamin H. [Novartis Inst. for BioMedical Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ye, Keqiang [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Boggon, Titus J. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kang, Sumin [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); He, Chuan [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Chen, Jing [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-11-12

    It is unclear how cancer cells coordinate glycolysis and biosynthesis to support rapidly growing tumors. We found that the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1), commonly upregulated in human cancers due to loss of TP53, contributes to biosynthesis regulation partially by controlling intracellular levels of its substrate, 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), and product, 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PG). 3-PG binds to and inhibits 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), while 2-PG activates 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase to provide feedback control of 3-PG levels. Inhibition of PGAM1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor PGMI-004A results in increased 3-PG and decreased 2-PG levels in cancer cells, leading to significantly decreased glycolysis, PPP flux and biosynthesis, as well as attenuated cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  2. Suppression of peroxiredoxin 4 in glioblastoma cells increases apoptosis and reduces tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyong Kim

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy, is incurable despite the best combination of current cancer therapies. For the development of more effective therapies, discovery of novel candidate tumor drivers is urgently needed. Here, we report that peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4 is a putative tumor driver. PRDX4 levels were highly increased in a majority of human GBMs as well as in a mouse model of GBM. Reducing PRDX4 expression significantly decreased GBM cell growth and radiation resistance in vitro with increased levels of ROS, DNA damage, and apoptosis. In a syngenic orthotopic transplantation model, Prdx4 knockdown limited GBM infiltration and significantly prolonged mouse survival. These data suggest that PRDX4 can be a novel target for GBM therapies in the future.

  3. Inhibition of Rho-Associated Kinase 1/2 Attenuates Tumor Growth in Murine Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Hinsenkamp

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer (GC remains a malignant disease with high mortality. Patients are frequently diagnosed in advanced stages where survival prognosis is poor. Thus, there is high medical need to find novel drug targets and treatment strategies. Recently, the comprehensive molecular characterization of GC subtypes revealed mutations in the small GTPase RHOA as a hallmark of diffuse-type GC. RHOA activates RHO-associated protein kinases (ROCK1/2 which regulate cell contractility, migration and growth and thus may play a role in cancer. However, therapeutic benefit of RHO-pathway inhibition in GC has not been shown so far. The ROCK1/2 inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl-homopiperazine (HA-1077, fasudil is approved for cerebrovascular bleeding in patients. We therefore investigated whether fasudil (i.p., 10 mg/kg per day, 4 times per week, 4 weeks inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical model of GC. Fasudil evoked cell death in human GC cells and reduced the tumor size in the stomach of CEA424-SV40 TAg transgenic mice. Small animal PET/CT confirmed preclinical efficacy. Mass spectrometry imaging identified a translatable biomarker for mouse GC and suggested rapid but incomplete in situ distribution of the drug to gastric tumor tissue. RHOA expression was increased in the neoplastic murine stomach compared with normal non-malignant gastric tissue, and fasudil reduced (auto phosphorylation of ROCK2 at THR249 in vivo and in human GC cells in vitro. In sum, our data suggest that RHO-pathway inhibition may constitute a novel strategy for treatment of GC and that enhanced distribution of future ROCK inhibitors into tumor tissue may further improve efficacy.

  4. Rac2 controls tumor growth, metastasis and M1-M2 macrophage differentiation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Joshi

    Full Text Available Although it is well-established that the macrophage M1 to M2 transition plays a role in tumor progression, the molecular basis for this process remains incompletely understood. Herein, we demonstrate that the small GTPase, Rac2 controls macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and the metastatic phenotype in vivo. Using a genetic approach, combined with syngeneic and orthotopic tumor models we demonstrate that Rac2-/- mice display a marked defect in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Microarray, RT-PCR and metabolomic analysis on bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from the Rac2-/- mice identify an important role for Rac2 in M2 macrophage differentiation. Furthermore, we define a novel molecular mechanism by which signals transmitted from the extracellular matrix via the α4β1 integrin and MCSF receptor lead to the activation of Rac2 and potentially regulate macrophage M2 differentiation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a macrophage autonomous process by which the Rac2 GTPase is activated downstream of the α4β1 integrin and the MCSF receptor to control tumor growth, metastasis and macrophage differentiation into the M2 phenotype. Finally, using gene expression and metabolomic data from our Rac2-/- model, and information related to M1-M2 macrophage differentiation curated from the literature we executed a systems biologic analysis of hierarchical protein-protein interaction networks in an effort to develop an iterative interactome map which will predict additional mechanisms by which Rac2 may coordinately control macrophage M1 to M2 differentiation and metastasis.

  5. Growth of block copolymer stabilized metal nanoparticles probed simultaneously by in situ XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, D; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-01-01

    The growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles from their respective chloride precursors using block copolymer-based reducers has been studied by simultaneous in situ measurement of XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy at the energy-dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS at RRCAT, Indore, India. While the XANES spectra of the precursor give real-time information on the reduction process, the EXAFS spectra reveal the structure of the clusters formed at the intermediate stages of growth. The growth kinetics of both types of nanoparticles are found to be almost similar and are found to follow three stages, though the first stage of nucleation takes place earlier in the case of Au than in the case of Pt nanoparticles due to the difference in the reduction potential of the respective precursors. The first two stages of the growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles as obtained by in situ XAS measurements could be corroborated by simultaneous in situ measurement of UV-Vis spectroscopy also. PMID:26698077

  6. Exosome derived from epigallocatechin gallate treated breast cancer cells suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting tumor-associated macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play an important role in tumor microenvironment. Particularly, M2 macrophages contribute to tumor progression, depending on the expression of NF-κB. Tumor-derived exosomes can modulate tumor microenvironment by transferring miRNAs to immune cells. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has well known anti-tumor effects; however, no data are available on the influence of EGCG on communication with cancer cells and TAM. Murine breast cancer cell lines, 4T1, was used for in vivo and ex vivo studies. Exosome was extracted from EGCG-treated 4T1 cells, and the change of miRNAs was screened using microarray. Tumor cells or TAM isolated from murine tumor graft were incubated with exosomes derived from EGCG-treated and/or miR-16 inhibitor-transfected 4T1 cells. Chemokines for monocytes (CSF-1 and CCL-2), cytokines both with high (IL-6 and TGF-β) and low (TNF-α) expression in M2 macrophages, and molecules in NF-κB pathway (IKKα and Iκ-B) were evaluated by RT-qPCR or western blot. EGCG suppressed tumor growth in murine breast cancer model, which was associated with decreased TAM and M2 macrophage infiltration. Expression of chemokine for monocytes (CSF-1 and CCL-2) were low in tumor cells from EGCG-treated mice, and cytokines of TAM was skewed from M2- into M1-like phenotype by EGCG as evidenced by decreased IL-6 and TGF-β and increased TNF-α. Ex vivo incubation of isolated tumor cells with EGCG inhibited the CSF-1 and CCL-2 expression. Ex vivo incubation of TAM with exosomes from EGCG-treated 4T1 cells led to IKKα suppression and concomitant I-κB accumulation; increase of IL-6 and TGF-β; and, decrease of TNF-α. EGCG up-regulated miR-16 in 4T1 cells and in the exosomes. Treatment of tumor cells or TAM with exosomes derived from EGCG-treated and miR-16-knock-downed 4T1 cells restored the above effects on chemokines, cytokines, and NF-κB pathway elicited by EGCG-treated exosomes. Our data demonstrate that EGCG up-regulates miR-16 in

  7. Withania somnifera Suppresses Tumor Growth of Intracranial Allograft of Glioma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Kumar, Sushil; Chaudhary, Harshita; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2016-08-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent type of primary brain tumor in adults. Their highly proliferative nature, complex cellular composition, and ability to escape therapies have confronted investigators for years, hindering the advancement toward an effective treatment. Agents that are safe and can be administered as dietary supplements have always remained priority to be most feasible for cancer therapy. Withania somnifera (ashwagandha) is an essential ingredient of Ayurvedic preparations and is known to eliminate cancer cells derived from a variety of peripheral tissues. Although our previous studies have addressed the in vitro anti-proliferative and differentiation-inducing properties of ashwagandha on neuronal cell lines, in vivo studies validating the same are lacking. While exploring the mechanism of its action in vitro, we observed that the ashwagandha water extract (ASH-WEX) induced the G2/M phase blockade and caused the activation of multiple pro-apoptotic pathways, leading to suppression of cyclin D1, bcl-xl, and p-Akt, and reduced the expression of polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) as well as the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. ASH-WEX reduced the intracranial tumor volumes in vivo and suppressed the tumor-promoting proteins p-nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p-Akt, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), PSA-NCAM, and cyclin D1 in the rat model of orthotopic glioma allograft. Reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and upregulation of mortalin and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) expression specifically in tumor-bearing tissue further indicated the anti-glioma efficacy of ASH-WEX in vivo. Combining this enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ASH-WEX in glioma with in vivo model system offers new opportunities to develop therapeutic strategy for safe, specific, and effective formulations for treating brain tumors. PMID:26208698

  8. DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine inhibits myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by tumor growth and cyclophosphamide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mikyšková, R; Indrová, M. (Marie); Vlková, V. (Veronika); Bieblová, J. (Jana); Šímová, J; Paračková, Z. (Zuzana); Pajtasz-Piasecka, E.; Rossowska, J.; Reiniš, M

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent one of the key players mediating immunosuppression. These cells accumulate in the TME, lymphoid organs, and blood during tumor growth. Their mobilization was also reported after CY therapy. DNMTi 5AC has been intensively studied as an antitumor agent. In this study, we examined, using two different murine tumor models, the modulatory effects of 5AC on TU-MDSCs and CY-MDSCs tumor growth and CY therapy. Indeed, the percentage of MDSCs in the TME and spleens of 5AC-treated mice b...

  9. A novel nanoparticle containing neuritin peptide with grp170 induces a CTL response to inhibit tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bangqing; Shen, Hanchao; Su, Tonggang; Lin, Li; Chen, Ting; Yang, Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Malignant glioma is among the most challenging of all cancers to treat successfully. Despite recent advances in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, current treatment regimens have only a marginal impact on patient survival. In this study, we constructed a novel nanoparticle containing neuritin peptide with grp170. The nanoparticle could elicit a neuritin-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to lyse glioma cells in vitro. In addition, the nanoparticle could inhibit tumor growth and improve the lifespan of tumor-bearing mice in vivo. Taken together, the results demonstrated that the nanoparticle can inhibit tumor growth and represents a promising therapy for glioma. PMID:26290143

  10. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea, E-mail: caroponti@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rojas, Paola, E-mail: parojas2010@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Chiappini, Florencia, E-mail: florenciachiappini@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sequeira, Gonzalo, E-mail: chicon27_7@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cocca, Claudia, E-mail: cm_cocca@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Radioisótopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Crocci, Máximo, E-mail: info@crescenti.com.ar [Instituto de Inmunooncología Crescenti, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Colombo, Lucas, E-mail: lucascol2003@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Oncología Angel Roffo, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires,Argentina (Argentina); Lanari, Claudia, E-mail: lanari.claudia@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 μM) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 μM) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ► HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ► HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ► HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ► HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ► HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  11. Inhibitory effects of TNP-470 in combination with BCNU on tumor growth of human glioblastoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dongxiao; Zhao, Hongyang; Zhang, Fangcheng; Chen, Jian; Jiang, Xiaobing; Zhu, Xianli

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of TNP-470 in combination with carmustine (BCNU) on the growth of subcutaneously implanted human glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice. Human glioblastoma U-251 cells (1×10(7)) were injected into 24 nude mice subcutaneously. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into 4 groups on the seventh day following tumor implantation: TNP-470 group, in which TNP-470 was given 30 mg/kg subcutaneously every other day 7 times; BCNU group, in which 20 mg/kg BCNU were injected into peritoneal cavity per 4 days 3 times; TNP-470 plus BCNU group, in which TNP-470 and BCNU were coadministered in the same manner as in the TNP-470 group and the BCNU group; control group, in which the mice were given 0.2 mL of the mixture including 3% ethanol, 5% acacia and 0.9% saline subcutaneously every other day 7 times. The tumor size and weights were measured. The tumor microvessel density (MVD) was determined by immunostaining by using goat-anti-mouse polyclonal antibody CD105. The results showed that on the 21th day following treatment, the volume of xenografts in the TNP-470 plus BCNU group was (108.93±17.63)mm(3), markedly lower than that in the TNP-470 group [(576.10±114.29)mm(3)] and the BCNU group [(473.01±48.04)mm(3)] (both P0.05). The inhibition rate of the tumor growth in the TNP-470 plus BCNU group was (92.80±11.37)%, notably higher than that in the TNP-470 group [(61.91±6.29)%] and the BCNU group [(68.73±9.65)%] (both P0.05). The MVD of xenografts in the TNP-470 plus BCNU group was decreased significantly as compared with that in the TNP-470 group or the BCNU group (both P0.05). It was concluded that the combination of TNP-470 and BCNU can significantly inhibit the growth of human glioblastoma xenografts in nude mice without evident side effects. PMID:21181367

  12. Frondoside a suppressive effects on lung cancer survival, tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Gélaude, An; Al Sultan, Mahmood Ahmed; Bracke, Marc; Collin, Peter; Takahashi, Takashi; Adrian, Thomas E; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop less toxic drugs that will improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa and was shown to be a highly safe compound. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo alone and in combination with cisplatin. Frondoside A caused concentration-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35, A549, NCI-H460-Luc2, MDA-MB-435, MCF-7, and HepG2 over 24 hours through a caspase 3/7-dependent cell death pathway. The IC50 concentrations (producing half-maximal inhibition) at 24 h were between 1.7 and 2.5 µM of Frondoside A. In addition, Frondoside A induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. Frondoside A (0.01 and 1 mg/kg/day i.p. for 25 days) significantly decreased the growth, the angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of LNM35 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without obvious toxic side-effects. Frondoside A (0.1-0.5 µM) also significantly prevented basal and bFGF induced angiogenesis in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Moreover, Frondoside A enhanced the inhibition of lung tumor growth induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer. PMID:23308143

  13. Frondoside a suppressive effects on lung cancer survival, tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Attoub

    Full Text Available A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop less toxic drugs that will improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa and was shown to be a highly safe compound. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo alone and in combination with cisplatin. Frondoside A caused concentration-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35, A549, NCI-H460-Luc2, MDA-MB-435, MCF-7, and HepG2 over 24 hours through a caspase 3/7-dependent cell death pathway. The IC50 concentrations (producing half-maximal inhibition at 24 h were between 1.7 and 2.5 µM of Frondoside A. In addition, Frondoside A induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. Frondoside A (0.01 and 1 mg/kg/day i.p. for 25 days significantly decreased the growth, the angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of LNM35 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without obvious toxic side-effects. Frondoside A (0.1-0.5 µM also significantly prevented basal and bFGF induced angiogenesis in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Moreover, Frondoside A enhanced the inhibition of lung tumor growth induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  14. Tumor-promoting phorbol ester transiently down-modulates the p53 level and blocks the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skouv, J; Jensen, P O; Forchhammer, J;

    1994-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway by tumor-promoting phorbol esters, such as 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), induced a decrease in the level of p53 mRNA in several serum-starved human cell lines. Also, the tumor-promoting phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid induced...... a decrease in the p53 mRNA level in the cell lines. Normal diploid as well as various tumor cell lines were tested. Two tumor cell lines, HeLa and A549, both containing the wild-type p53 gene, but very different levels of p53 protein, were studied in detail. In both cell lines, the level of p53 m......RNA was minimal after 9 h of exposure to PMA. After approximately 120 h, the p53 mRNA level was similar to the pretreatment level. PMA induced a similar transient decrease in the level of p53 protein in the A549 cell line. The decrease in the p53 mRNA level could not be explained by changes in the transcriptional...

  15. The Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 pathway regulates growth of lung tumor initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Guerriero, Ilaria; Colelli, Fabiana; Rinaldo, Nicola; Scrima, Marianna; Mirante, Teresa; De Vitis, Claudia; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Miriam; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Federico, Antonella; Franco, Renato; Rocco, Gaetano; Mancini, Rita; Rizzuto, Antonia; Gulletta, Elio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2015-12-15

    Here we report that the PI3K/Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway regulates generation and stem cell-like properties of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumor initiating cells (TICs). Mutant Akt1, mutant PIK3CA or PTEN loss enhances formation of lung cancer spheroids (LCS), self-renewal, expression of stemness markers and tumorigenic potential of human immortalized bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) whereas Akt inhibition suppresses these activities in established (NCI-H460) and primary NSCLC cells. Matched microarray analysis of Akt1-interfered cells and LCSs identified IL-6 as a critical target of Akt signalling in NSCLC TICs. Accordingly, suppression of Akt in NSCLC cells decreases IL-6 levels, phosphorylation of IkK and IkB, NF-kB transcriptional activity, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 whereas active Akt1 up-regulates them. Exposure of LCSs isolated from NSCLC cells to blocking anti-IL-6 mAbs, shRNA to IL-6 receptor or to STAT3 markedly reduces the capability to generate LCSs, to self-renew and to form tumors, whereas administration of IL-6 to Akt-interfered cells restores the capability to generate LCSs. Finally, immunohistochemical studies in NSCLC patients demonstrated a positive correlative trend between activated Akt, IL-6 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation (n = 94; p cells in NSCLC.

  16. Chrysin inhibits tumor promoter-induced MMP-9 expression by blocking AP-1 via suppression of ERK and JNK pathways in gastric cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xia

    Full Text Available Cell invasion is a crucial mechanism of cancer metastasis and malignancy. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 is an important proteolytic enzyme involved in the cancer cell invasion process. High expression levels of MMP-9 in gastric cancer positively correlate with tumor aggressiveness and have a significant negative correlation with patients' survival times. Recently, mechanisms suppressing MMP-9 by phytochemicals have become increasingly investigated. Chrysin, a naturally occurring chemical in plants, has been reported to suppress tumor metastasis. However, the effects of chrysin on MMP-9 expression in gastric cancer have not been well studied. In the present study, we tested the effects of chrysin on MMP-9 expression in gastric cancer cells, and determined its underlying mechanism. We examined the effects of chrysin on MMP-9 expression and activity via RT-PCR, zymography, promoter study, and western blotting in human gastric cancer AGS cells. Chrysin inhibited phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA-induced MMP-9 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Using AP-1 decoy oligodeoxynucleotides, we confirmed that AP-1 was the crucial transcriptional factor for MMP-9 expression. Chrysin blocked AP-1 via suppression of the phosphorylation of c-Jun and c-Fos through blocking the JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 pathways. Furthermore, AGS cells pretreated with PMA showed markedly enhanced invasiveness, which was partially abrogated by chrysin and MMP-9 antibody. Our results suggest that chrysin may exert at least part of its anticancer effect by controlling MMP-9 expression through suppression of AP-1 activity via a block of the JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in gastric cancer AGS cells.

  17. Mean Exit Time and Escape Probability for a Tumor Growth System under Non-Gaussian Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Jian; Gao, Ting; Kan, Xingye; Duan, Jinqiao

    2011-01-01

    Effects of non-Gaussian $\\alpha-$stable L\\'evy noise on the Gompertz tumor growth model are quantified by considering the mean exit time and escape probability of the cancer cell density from inside a safe or benign domain. The mean exit time and escape probability problems are formulated in a differential-integral equation with a fractional Laplacian operator. Numerical simulations are conducted to evaluate how the mean exit time and escape probability vary or bifurcates when $\\alpha$ changes. Some bifurcation phenomena are observed and their impacts are discussed.

  18. Nuclear Factor κB is Required for Tumor Growth Inhibition Mediated by Enavatuzumab (PDL192), a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody to TweakR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, James W; Kim, Han K; Tanlimco, Sonia G; Doan, Minhtam; Fox, Melvin; Lambert, Peter; Chao, Debra T; Sho, Mien; Wilson, Keith E; Starling, Gary C; Culp, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    TweakR is a TNF receptor family member, whose natural ligand is the multifunctional cytokine TWEAK. The growth inhibitory activity observed following TweakR stimulation in certain cancer cell lines and the overexpression of TweakR in many solid tumor types led to the development of enavatuzumab (PDL192), a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody to TweakR. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of enavatuzumab's tumor growth inhibition and to provide insight into the biology behind TweakR as a cancer therapeutic target. A panel of 105 cancer lines was treated with enavatuzumab in vitro; and 29 cell lines of varying solid tumor backgrounds had >25% growth inhibition in response to the antibody. Treatment of sensitive cell lines with enavatuzumab resulted in the in vitro and in vivo (xenograft) activation of both classical (p50, p65) and non-classical (p52, RelB) NFκB pathways. Using NFκB DNA binding functional ELISAs and microarray analysis, we observed increased activation of NFκB subunits and NFκB-regulated genes in sensitive cells over that observed in resistant cell lines. Inhibiting NFκB subunits (p50, p65, RelB, p52) and upstream kinases (IKK1, IKK2) with siRNA and chemical inhibitors consistently blocked enavatuzumab's activity. Furthermore, enavatuzumab treatment resulted in NFκB-dependent reduction in cell division as seen by the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 both in vitro and in vivo. The finding that NFκB drives the growth inhibitory activity of enavatuzumab suggests that targeting TweakR with enavatuzumab may represent a novel cancer treatment strategy.

  19. Nuclear Factor κB is required for tumor growth inhibition mediated by enavatuzumab (PDL192, a humanized monoclonal antibody to TweakR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Purcell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available TweakR is a TNF receptor family member, whose natural ligand is the multifunctional cytokine TWEAK. The growth inhibitory activity observed following TweakR stimulation in certain cancer cell lines and the overexpression of TweakR in many solid tumor types led to the development of enavatuzumab (PDL192, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody to TweakR. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of enavatuzumab’s tumor growth inhibition and to provide insight into the biology behind TweakR as a cancer therapeutic target. A panel of 105 cancer lines was treated with enavatuzumab in vitro; and 29 cell lines of varying solid tumor backgrounds had >25% growth inhibition in response to the antibody. Treatment of sensitive cell lines with enavatuzumab resulted in the in vitro and in vivo (xenograft activation of both classical (p50, p65 and non-classical (p52, RelB NFκB pathways. Using NFκB DNA binding functional ELISAs and microarray analysis, we observed increased activation of NFκB subunits and NFκB regulated genes in sensitive cells over that observed in resistant cell lines. Inhibiting NFκB subunits (p50, p65, RelB, p52 and upstream kinases (IKK1, IKK2 with siRNA and chemical inhibitors consistently blocked enavatuzumab’s activity. Furthermore, enavatuzumab treatment resulted in NFκB-dependent reduction in cell-division as seen by the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 both in vitro and in vivo. The finding that NFκB drives the growth inhibitory activity of enavatuzumab suggests that targeting TweakR with enavatuzumab may represent a novel cancer treatment strategy.

  20. The isoflavone metabolite 6-methoxyequol inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellou Sofia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased consumption of plant-based diets has been linked to the presence of certain phytochemicals, including polyphenols such as flavonoids. Several of these compounds exert their protective effect via inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Identification of additional phytochemicals with potential antiangiogenic activity is important not only for understanding the mechanism of the preventive effect, but also for developing novel therapeutic interventions. Results In an attempt to identify phytochemicals contributing to the well-documented preventive effect of plant-based diets on cancer incidence and mortality, we have screened a set of hitherto untested phytoestrogen metabolites concerning their anti-angiogenic effect, using endothelial cell proliferation as an end point. Here, we show that a novel phytoestrogen, 6-methoxyequol (6-ME, inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVE cells, whereas VEGF-induced migration and survival of HUVE cells remained unaffected. In addition, 6-ME inhibited FGF-2-induced proliferation of bovine brain capillary endothelial (BBCE cells. In line with its role in cell proliferation, 6-ME inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 MAPK, the key cascade responsible for VEGF-induced proliferation of endothelial cells. In this context, 6-ME inhibited in a dose dependent manner the phosphorylation of MEK1/2, the only known upstream activator of ERK1/2. 6-ME did not alter VEGF-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK or AKT, compatible with the lack of effect on VEGF-induced migration and survival of endothelial cells. Peri-tumor injection of 6-ME in A-431 xenograft tumors resulted in reduced tumor growth with suppressed neovasularization compared to vehicle controls (P  Conclusions 6-ME inhibits VEGF- and FGF2-induced proliferation of ECs by targeting the phosphorylation of MEK1/2 and it downstream substrate ERK1/2, both key components of the mitogenic MAPK

  1. An MMP13-selective inhibitor delays primary tumor growth and the onset of tumor-associated osteolytic lesions in experimental models of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Shah

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of the matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13-selective inhibitor, 5-(4-{4-[4-(4-fluorophenyl-1,3-oxazol-2-yl]phenoxy}phenoxy-5-(2-methoxyethyl pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H-trione (Cmpd-1, on the primary tumor growth and breast cancer-associated bone remodeling using xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. We used human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated into the mammary fat pad and left ventricle of BALB/c Nu/Nu mice, respectively, and spontaneously metastasizing 4T1.2-Luc mouse mammary cells inoculated into mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice. In a prevention setting, treatment with Cmpd-1 markedly delayed the growth of primary tumors in both models, and reduced the onset and severity of osteolytic lesions in the MDA-MB-231 intracardiac model. Intervention treatment with Cmpd-1 on established MDA-MB-231 primary tumors also significantly inhibited subsequent growth. In contrast, no effects of Cmpd-1 were observed on soft organ metastatic burden following intracardiac or mammary fat pad inoculations of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1.2-Luc cells respectively. MMP13 immunostaining of clinical primary breast tumors and experimental mice tumors revealed intra-tumoral and stromal expression in most tumors, and vasculature expression in all. MMP13 was also detected in osteoblasts in clinical samples of breast-to-bone metastases. The data suggest that MMP13-selective inhibitors, which lack musculoskeletal side effects, may have therapeutic potential both in primary breast cancer and cancer-induced bone osteolysis.

  2. Soy isoflavone exposure through all life stages accelerates 17β-estradiol-induced mammary tumor onset and growth, yet reduces tumor burden, in ACI rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Frank Josef; Pemp, Daniela; Soukup, Sebastian T; Wende, Kathleen; Zhang, Xiajie; Zierau, Oliver; Muders, Michael H; Bosland, Maarten C; Kulling, Sabine E; Lehmann, Leane; Vollmer, Günter

    2016-08-01

    There is an ongoing debate whether the intake of soy-derived isoflavones (sISO) mediates beneficial or adverse effects with regard to breast cancer risk. Therefore, we investigated whether nutritional exposure to a sISO-enriched diet from conception until adulthood impacts on 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced carcinogenesis in the rat mammary gland (MG). August-Copenhagen-Irish (ACI) rats were exposed to dietary sISO from conception until postnatal day 285. Silastic tubes containing E2 were used to induce MG tumorigenesis. Body weight, food intake, and tumor growth were recorded weekly. At necropsy, the number, position, size, and weight of each tumor were determined. Plasma samples underwent sISO analysis, and the morphology of MG was analyzed. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were reduced by 20 and 56 %, respectively, in the sISO-exposed rats compared to the control rats. Time-to-tumor onset was shortened from 25 to 20 weeks, and larger tumors developed in the sISO-exposed rats. The histological phenotype of the MG tumors was independent of the sISO diet received, and it included both comedo and cribriform phenotypes. Morphological analyses of the whole-mounted MGs also showed no diet-dependent differences. Lifelong exposure to sISO reduced the overall incidence of MG carcinomas in ACI rats, although the time-to-tumor was significantly shortened. PMID:26861028

  3. Investigation of the effects of long-term infusion of 125I-iododeoxyuridine on tumor growth in mice (solid mouse tumor sarcoma-180)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present experiments were designed to test the therapeutic qualification of 125I incorporated in DNA of tumor cells. The tumor-host system used was the solid mouse tumor sarcoma-180 growing on female albino mice (NMRI). A device was built which makes it possible to intravenously infuse tumor bearing mice with solutions of 125IUdR for several weeks. Three or, respectively, 5 days before the onset of the infusions the mice were inocculated into the right hind leg with 3x105 tumor cells in 0.1 ml physiological salt solution. The total activity administered per mouse was 100 μCi infused during a period of 10 days. After termination of the infusions tumor sizes and retained radioactivities were measured every 5 days until death of the animals occured. In comparison with tumors of control animals tumors of mice infused with 125IUdR showed a mean retardation in growth of about 27% of the volumes of control tumors during the total period of post-infusion observation (25 days). Extension of life expectancy and an increase of the rate of final tumor regression did not occur. Likewise, no significant differences were observed between tumors which were 3 or 5 days old on the first day of infusion. After termination of the infusions the residual whole-body radioactivity per mouse was about 1% of the total activity infused per animal. This was in good agreement with calculations considering rates of incorporation and excretion and confirmed earlier assumptions that only about 5% of the administered IUdR is incorporated initially. The number further confirmed that, during the first 10 days after incorporation, the daily loss of activity - due to cell death - is about 30%. Control animals without tumors showed a faster decrease of incorporated activity or, respectively, loss of cells than tumor bearing mice. This difference could in part be explained by an exhaution of the short-lived cell populations of the reticulo-endothelial system of tumor bearing animals. (orig./MG)

  4. Combination radiofrequency (RF) ablation and IV liposomal heat shock protein suppression: Reduced tumor growth and increased animal endpoint survival in a small animal tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Ahmed, Muneeb; Tasawwar, Beenish; Levchenko, Tatynana; Sawant, Rupa R.; Torchilin, Vladimir; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect of IV liposomal quercetin (a known down-regulator of heat shock proteins) alone and with liposomal doxorubicin on tumor growth and end-point survival when combined with radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation in a rat tumor model. Methods Solitary subcutaneous R3230 mammary adenocarcinoma tumors (1.3–1.5 cm) were implanted in 48 female Fischer rats. Initially, 32 tumors (n=8, each group) were randomized into four experimental groups: (a) conventional monopolar RF alone (70°C for 5 min), (b) IV liposomal quercetin alone (1 mg/kg), (c) IV liposomal quercetin followed 24hr later with RF, and (d) no treatment. Next, 16 additional tumors were randomized into two groups (n=8, each) that received a combined RF and liposomal doxorubicin (15 min post-RF, 8 mg/kg) either with or without liposomal quercetin. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed using a tumor diameter of 3.0 cm as the defined survival endpoint. Results Differences in endpoint survival and tumor doubling time among the groups were highly significant (P<0.001). Endpoint survivals were 12.5±2.2 days for the control group, 16.6±2.9 days for tumors treated with RF alone, 15.5±2.1days for tumors treated with liposomal quercetin alone, and 22.0±3.9 days with combined RF and quercetin. Additionally, combination quercetin/RF/doxorubicin therapy resulted in the longest survival (48.3±20.4 days), followed by RF/doxorubicin (29.9±3.8 days). Conclusions IV liposomal quercetin in combination with RF ablation reduces tumor growth rates and improves animal endpoint survival. Further increases in endpoint survival can be seen by adding an additional anti-tumor adjuvant agent liposomal doxorubicin. This suggests that targeting several post-ablation processes with multi-drug nanotherapies can increase overall ablation efficacy. PMID:22230341

  5. Inhibitory effect of celecoxib combined with cisplatin on growth of human tongue squamous carcinoma Tca8113 cell xenograft tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weizhong Li; Xiaoyan Wang; Zuguo Li; Yanqing Ding

    2010-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to observe the inhibitory effect of application of COX-2 inhibitor,celecoxib,combined with cisplatin on the growth of human tongue squamous carcinoma Tca8113 cell xenograft by animal experiment.Methods:The nude mice were transplanted subcutaneously with Tca 8113 cells,and then were administrated with celecoxib,cisplatin or celecoxib combined with cisplatin respectively,and were sacrificed after 35 days.The weight of xenograft was measured to calculate the tumor inhibition rate.The histological change was studied under light and electron microscope.The COX-2 protein expression was observed by immunohistological staining.And the COX-2 mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR.Results:Celecoxib,the COX-2 inhibitor,could not only inhibit the growth of Tca8113 cell xenograft tumor and COX-2 protein expression,but also enhance the inhibitory effect cisplatin on xenograft tumor growth significantly.The tumor inhibition rates of celecoxib group,cisplatin group and celecoxib plus cisplatin group were 15.63%,37.50% and 82.81%respectively that was statistically significant compared to control group(P < 0.01).The combined application of celecoxib and dsplatin could inhibit tumor growth more significantly than that of separated application(P < 0.01).The inhibitory effect of celecoxib on COX-2 mRNA expression of Tca 8113 cell was weaker and not significant(P= 0.073).Conclusion:Celecoxib can not only inhibit xenograft tumor growth in nude mice,but also enhance the inhibitory effect of CDDP on Tca 8113 trans planted tumor growth in nude mice.The mechanism maybe related to inhibition of COX-2 protein expression,which offers beneficial reference to further explore the mechanism between inhibition of COX-2 enzyme activity and prevention of head and neck tumor.

  6. ING1 and 5-Azacytidine Act Synergistically to Block Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Satbir Thakur; Xiaolan Feng; Zhong Qiao Shi; Amudha Ganapathy; Manoj Kumar Mishra; Peter Atadja; Don Morris; Karl Riabowol

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins are epigenetic "readers" that recognize trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me3) and target histone acetyl transferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) complexes to chromatin. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we asked whether dysregulating two epigenetic pathways with chemical inhibitors showed synergistic effects on breast cancer cell line killing. We also tested whether ING1 could synergize better with chemotherapeutics that targe...

  7. A RNA antagonist of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, EZN-2968, inhibits tumor cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenberger, Lee M; Horak, Ivan D; Filpula, David;

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in angiogenesis, survival, metastasis, drug resistance, and glucose metabolism. Elevated expression of the alpha-subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1alpha), which occurs in response to hypoxia or activation of growth factor...... pathways, is associated with poor prognosis in many types of cancer. Therefore, down-regulation of HIF-1alpha protein by RNA antagonists may control cancer growth. EZN-2968 is a RNA antagonist composed of third-generation oligonucleotide, locked nucleic acid, technology that specifically binds and inhibits...... the expression of HIF-1alpha mRNA. In vitro, in human prostate (15PC3, PC3, and DU145) and glioblastoma (U373) cells, EZN-2968 induced a potent, selective, and durable antagonism of HIF-1 mRNA and protein expression (IC(50), 1-5 nmol/L) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions associated with inhibition of tumor...

  8. Nerve growth factor receptor negates the tumor suppressor p53 as a feedback regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Peng; Luo, Shiwen; Zhang, Minhong; Hu, Guohui; Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Yiwei; Cao, Bo; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Zeng, Shelya X; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer develops and progresses often by inactivating p53. Here, we unveil nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR, p75NTR or CD271) as a novel p53 inactivator. p53 activates NGFR transcription, whereas NGFR inactivates p53 by promoting its MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and by directly binding to its central DNA binding domain and preventing its DNA-binding activity. Inversely, NGFR ablation activates p53, consequently inducing apoptosis, attenuating survival, and reducing clonogenic capability of cancer cells, as well as sensitizing human cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that induce p53 and suppressing mouse xenograft tumor growth. NGFR is highly expressed in human glioblastomas, and its gene is often amplified in breast cancers with wild type p53. Altogether, our results demonstrate that cancers hijack NGFR as an oncogenic inhibitor of p53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15099.001 PMID:27282385

  9. An Atypical Acidophil Cell Line Tumor Showing Focal Differentiation Toward Both Growth Hormone and Prolactin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naritaka, Heiji; Kameya, Toru; Sato, Yuichi; Furuhata, Shigeru; Okui, Junichi; Kamiguchi, Yuji; Otani, Mitsuhiro; Toya, Shigeo

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of giant pituitary adenoma in a child. Computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed a suprasellar extension tumor mass with hydrocephalus. There was no clinical evidence of acromegaly, gigantism, and other hormonal symptoms. Endocrinologic studies showed within normal value of serum growth hormone (GH: 4.2 ng/mL) and slightly increased levels of prolactin (PRL: 78 ng/mL) and other pituitary hormone values were within normal range. On suppression test by bromocryptin, both GH and PRL levels were reduced. Histopathological findings revealed that the tumor consisted of predominantly chromophobic and partly eosinophilic adenoma cells. Immunohistochemical staining detected GH and PRL in a small number of distinctly different adenoma cells, respectively. Nonradioactive in situ hybridization (ISH) also showed GH and PRL mRNA expression in identical immunopositive cells. Electron microscopy (EM) demonstrated adenoma cells with moderate or small numbers of two types of dense granules and without fibrous body which are characteristic of sparsely granulated GH-cell adenomas. The adenoma does not fit into any classification but may be an atypical acidophil cell line tumor showing focal differentiation toward both GH and PRL cells. PMID:12114745

  10. A case of neuroendocrine tumor G1 with unique histopathological growth progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Misuzu; Hirai; Kenshi; Matsumoto; Hiroya; Ueyama; Hirohumi; Fukushima; Takashi; Murakami; Hitoshi; Sasaki; Akihito; Nagahara; Takashi; Yao; Sumio; Watanabe

    2013-01-01

    A gastric neuroendocrine tumor(NET)is generated from deep within the tissue mucosal layers.In many cases,NETs are discovered as submucosal tumor(SMT)-like structures by forming a tumor mass.This case has a clear mucosal demarcation line and developed like a polyp.A dilated blood vessel was found on the surface.The mass lacked the yellow color characteristic of NETs,and a SMT-like form was evident.Therefore,a nonspecific epithelial lesion was suspected and we performed endoscopy with magnifying narrowband imaging(M-NBI).However,this approach did not lead to the diagnosis,as we diagnosed the lesion as a NET by biopsy examination.The lesion was excised by endoscopic submucosal dissection.The histopathological examination proved that the lesion was a polypoid lesion although it was also a NET because the tumorcells extended upward through the normal gland ducts scatteredly.To our knowledge,there is no previous report of NET G1 with such unique histopathological growth progress and macroscopic appearance shown by detailed examination using endoscopy with M-NBI.

  11. Circulating lymphangiogenic growth factors in gastrointestinal solid tumors, could they be of any clinical significance?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodore D Tsirlis; George Papastratis; Kyriaki Masselou; Christos Tsigris; Antonis Papachristodoulou; Alkiviadis Kostakis; Nikolaos I Nikiteas

    2008-01-01

    Metastasis is the principal cause of cancer mortality,with the lymphatic system being the first route of tumor dissemination.The glycoproteins VEGF-C and VEGF-D are members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)family,whose role has been recently recognized as lymphatic system regulators during embryogenesis and in pathological processes such as inflammation,lymphatic system disorders and malignant tumor metastasis.They are ligands for the VEGFR-3 receptor on the membrane of the lymphatic endothelial cell,resulting in dilatation of existing lymphatic vessels as well as in vegetation of new ones (lymphangiogenesis).Their determination is feasible in the circulating blood by immunoabsorption and in the tissue specimen by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Experimental and clinicopathological studies have linked the VEGF-C,VEGF-D/VEGFR3 axis to lymphatic spread as well as to the clinical outcome in several human solid tumors.The majority of these data are derived from surgical specimens and malignant cell series,rendering their clinical application questionable,due to subjectivity factors and post-treatment quantification.In an effort to overcome these drawbacks,an alternative method of immunodetection of the circulating levels of these molecules has been used in studies on gastric,esophageal and colorectal cancer.Their results denote that quantification of VEGF-C and VEGF-D in blood samples could serve as lymph node metastasis predictive biomarkers and contribute to preoperative staging of gastrointestinal malignancies.

  12. Abalone visceral extract inhibit tumor growth and metastasis by modulating Cox-2 levels and CD8+ T cell activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    II Kim Jae

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abalone has long been used as a valuable food source in East Asian countries. Although the nutritional importance of abalone has been reported through in vitro and in vivo studies, there is little evidence about the potential anti-tumor effects of abalone visceral extract. The aim of the present study is to examine anti-tumor efficacy of abalone visceral extract and to elucidate its working mechanism. Methods In the present study, we used breast cancer model using BALB/c mouse-derived 4T1 mammary carcinoma and investigated the effect of abalone visceral extract on tumor development. Inhibitory effect against tumor metastasis was assessed by histopathology of lungs. Cox-2 productions by primary and secondary tumor were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting (IB. Proliferation assay based on [3H]-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cytokines and effector molecules by RT-PCR were used to confirm tumor suppression efficacy of abalone visceral extract by modulating cytolytic CD8+ T cells. The cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cell was compared by JAM test. Results Oral administration of abalone visceral extract reduced tumor growth (tumor volume and weight and showed reduced metastasis as confirmed by decreased level of splenomegaly (spleen size and weight and histological analysis of the lung metastasis (gross analysis and histological staining. Reduced expression of Cox-2 (mRNA and protein from primary tumor and metastasized lung was also detected. In addition, treatment of abalone visceral extract increased anti-tumor activities of CD8+ T cells by increasing the proliferation capacity and their cytolytic activity. Conclusions Our results suggest that abalone visceral extract has anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor growth and lung metastasis through decreasing Cox-2 expression level as well as promoting proliferation and cytolytic function of CD8+ T cells.

  13. Slit2 promotes tumor growth and invasion in chemically induced skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cuiling; Lan, Haimei; Ye, Jie; Li, Weidong; Wei, Ping; Yang, Yang; Guo, Simei; Lan, Tian; Li, Jiangchao; Zhang, Qianqian; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing

    2014-07-01

    Slit, a neuronal guidance cue, binds to Roundabout (Robo) receptors to modulate neuronal, leukocytic, and endothelial migration. Slit has been reported to have an important effect on tumor growth and metastasis. In the current study, we evaluated the role of Slit2 in skin tumor growth and invasion in mice using a two-step chemical carcinogenesis protocol. We found that Slit2 expression correlated with the loss of basement membrane in the samples of human skin squamous cell carcinoma at different stages of disease progression. Slit2-Tg mice developed significantly more skin tumors than wild-type mice. Furthermore, the skin tumors that occurred in Slit2-Tg mice were significantly larger than those in the wild-type mice 10 weeks after 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene initiation until the end of the experiment. We also found that pathological development of the wild-type mice was delayed compared with that of Slit2-Tg mice. To further investigate the mechanism of increasing tumors in Slit2-Tg mice, we analyzed the expression of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in mouse skin lesions and found that the number of BrdU-positive cells and microvessel density in skin lesions were significantly higher in Slit2-Tg mice than in wild-type mice. Histological staining of PAS and type IV collagen and the colocalization of Slit2 and type IV collagen demonstrated varying degrees of loss of the basement membrane in the skin lesions from Slit2-Tg mice that were at the stage of carcinoma in situ. However, the basement membrane was well defined in the wild-type mice. In addition, MMP2, but not MMP9, was upregulated in the skin tissue of Slit2-Tg mice. Interruption of Slit2-Robo1 signaling by the antibody R5 significantly repressed the invasive capability of the squamous cell carcinoma cell line A431. Taken together, our findings reveal that Slit2 promotes DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumorigenesis by increasing cell proliferation, microvessel density, and invasive behavior of cutaneous squamous

  14. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    Dietary factors continue to preside as dominant influences in prostate cancer prevalence and progression-free survival following primary treatment. We investigated the influence of a low carbohydrate diet, compared to a typical Western diet, on prostate cancer (PCa) tumor growth in vivo. LNCaP xenograft tumor growth was studied in both intact and castrated mice, representing a more advanced castration resistant PCa (CRPC). No differences in LNCaP tumor progression (total tumor volume) with diet was observed for intact mice (P = 0.471) however, castrated mice on the Low Carb diet saw a statistically significant reduction in tumor growth rate compared with Western diet fed mice (P = 0.017). No correlation with serum PSA was observed. Steroid profiles, alongside serum cholesterol and cholesteryl ester levels, were significantly altered by both diet and castration. Specifically, DHT concentration with the Low Carb diet was 58% that of the CRPC-bearing mice on the Western diet. Enzymes in the steroidogenesis pathway were directly impacted and tumors isolated from intact mice on the Low Carb diet had higher AKR1C3 protein levels and lower HSD17B2 protein levels than intact mice on the Western diet (ARK1C3: P = 0.074; HSD17B2: P = 0.091, with α = 0.1). In contrast, CRPC tumors from mice on Low Carb diets had higher concentrations of both HSD17B2 (P = 0.016) and SRD5A1 (P = 0.058 with α = 0.1) enzymes. There was no correlation between tumor growth in castrated mice for Low Carb diet versus Western diet and (a) serum insulin (b) GH serum levels (c) insulin receptor (IR) or (d) IGF-1R in tumor tissue. Intact mice fed Western diet had higher serum insulin which was associated with significantly higher blood glucose and tumor tissue IR. We conclude that both diet and castration have a significant impact on the endocrinology of mice bearing LNCaP xenograft tumors. The observed effects of diet on cholesterol and steroid regulation impact tumor tissue DHT specifically and are

  15. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    Dietary factors continue to preside as dominant influences in prostate cancer prevalence and progression-free survival following primary treatment. We investigated the influence of a low carbohydrate diet, compared to a typical Western diet, on prostate cancer (PCa) tumor growth in vivo. LNCaP xenograft tumor growth was studied in both intact and castrated mice, representing a more advanced castration resistant PCa (CRPC). No differences in LNCaP tumor progression (total tumor volume) with diet was observed for intact mice (P = 0.471) however, castrated mice on the Low Carb diet saw a statistically significant reduction in tumor growth rate compared with Western diet fed mice (P = 0.017). No correlation with serum PSA was observed. Steroid profiles, alongside serum cholesterol and cholesteryl ester levels, were significantly altered by both diet and castration. Specifically, DHT concentration with the Low Carb diet was 58% that of the CRPC-bearing mice on the Western diet. Enzymes in the steroidogenesis pathway were directly impacted and tumors isolated from intact mice on the Low Carb diet had higher AKR1C3 protein levels and lower HSD17B2 protein levels than intact mice on the Western diet (ARK1C3: P = 0.074; HSD17B2: P = 0.091, with α = 0.1). In contrast, CRPC tumors from mice on Low Carb diets had higher concentrations of both HSD17B2 (P = 0.016) and SRD5A1 (P = 0.058 with α = 0.1) enzymes. There was no correlation between tumor growth in castrated mice for Low Carb diet versus Western diet and (a) serum insulin (b) GH serum levels (c) insulin receptor (IR) or (d) IGF-1R in tumor tissue. Intact mice fed Western diet had higher serum insulin which was associated with significantly higher blood glucose and tumor tissue IR. We conclude that both diet and castration have a significant impact on the endocrinology of mice bearing LNCaP xenograft tumors. The observed effects of diet on cholesterol and steroid regulation impact tumor tissue DHT specifically and are

  16. A Potent HER3 Monoclonal Antibody That Blocks Both Ligand-Dependent and -Independent Activities: Differential Impacts of PTEN Status on Tumor Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhan; Carrasco, Rosa A; Schifferli, Kevin; Kinneer, Krista; Tammali, Ravinder; Chen, Hong; Rothstein, Ray; Wetzel, Leslie; Yang, Chunning; Chowdhury, Partha; Tsui, Ping; Steiner, Philipp; Jallal, Bahija; Herbst, Ronald; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Tice, David A

    2016-04-01

    HER3/ERBB3 is a kinase-deficient member of the EGFR family receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) that is broadly expressed and activated in human cancers. HER3 is a compelling cancer target due to its important role in activation of the oncogenic PI3K/AKT pathway. It has also been demonstrated to confer tumor resistance to a variety of cancer therapies, especially targeted drugs against EGFR and HER2. HER3 can be activated by its ligand (heregulin/HRG), which induces HER3 heterodimerization with EGFR, HER2, or other RTKs. Alternatively, HER3 can be activated in a ligand-independent manner through heterodimerization with HER2 in HER2-amplified cells. We developed a fully human mAb against HER3 (KTN3379) that efficiently suppressed HER3 activity in both ligand-dependent and independent settings. Correspondingly, KTN3379 inhibited tumor growth in divergent tumor models driven by either ligand-dependent or independent mechanisms in vitro and in vivo Most intriguingly, while investigating the mechanistic underpinnings of tumor response to KTN3379, we discovered an interesting dichotomy in that PTEN loss, a frequently occurring oncogenic lesion in a broad range of cancer types, substantially blunted the tumor response in HER2-amplified cancer, but not in the ligand-driven cancer. To our knowledge, this represents the first study ascertaining the impact of PTEN loss on the antitumor efficacy of a HER3 mAb. KTN3379 is currently undergoing a phase Ib clinical trial in patients with advanced solid tumors. Our current study may help us optimize patient selection schemes for KTN3379 to maximize its clinical benefits. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 689-701. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26880266

  17. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Treatment of Panc1, L3.6pL and Panc28 pancreatic cancer cells with metformin downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes including bcl-2, survivin, cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, and fatty acid synthase. Metformin induced proteasome-dependent degradation of Sps in L3.6pL and Panc28 cells, whereas in Panc1 cells metformin decreased microRNA-27a and induced the Sp repressor, ZBTB10, and disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 by metformin was phosphatase dependent. Metformin also inhibited pancreatic tumor growth and downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in tumors in an orthotopic model where L3.6pL cells were injected directly into the pancreas. The results demonstrate for the first time that the anticancer activities of metformin are also due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes. PMID:23803693

  18. Role of chemokine receptor CXCR2 expression in mammary tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis

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    Kalyan C Nannuru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokines and their receptors have long been known to regulate metastasis in various cancers. Previous studies have shown that CXCR2 expression is upregulated in malignant breast cancer tissues but not in benign ductal epithelial samples. The functional role of CXCR2 in the metastatic phenotype of breast cancer still remains unclear. We hypothesize that the chemokine receptor, CXCR2, mediates tumor cell invasion and migration and promotes metastasis in breast cancer. The objective of this study is to investigate the potential role of CXCR2 in the metastatic phenotype of mouse mammary tumor cells. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the functional role of CXCR2 in breast cancer by stably downregulating the expression of CXCR2 in metastatic mammary tumor cell lines Cl66 and 4T1, using short hairpin RNA (shRNA. The effects of CXCR2 downregulation on tumor growth, invasion and metastatic potential were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results: We demonstrated knock down of CXCR2 in Cl66 and 4T1 cells (Cl66-shCXCR2 and 4T1-shCXCR2 cells by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR at the transcriptional level and by immunohistochemistry at the protein level. We did not observe a significant difference in in vitro cell proliferation between vector control and CXCR2 knock-down Cl66 or 4T1 cells. Next, we examined the invasive potential of Cl66-shCXCR2 cells by in vitro Matrigel invasion assay. We observed a significantly lower number (52 ± 5 of Cl66-shCXCR2 cells invading through Matrigel compared to control cells (Cl66-control (182 ± 3 (P < 0.05. We analyzed the in vivo metastatic potential of Cl66-shCXCR2 using a spontaneous metastasis model by orthotopically implanting cells into the mammary fat pad of female BALB/c mice. Animals were sacrificed 12 weeks post tumor implantation and tissue samples were analyzed for metastatic nodules. CXCR2 downregulation significantly inhibited tumor cell metastasis. All the mice (n = 10

  19. Aminoguanidine impedes human pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis development in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nora A Mohamad; Graciela P Cricco; Lorena A Sambuco; Máximo Croci; Vanina A Medina; Alicia S Gutiérrez; Rosa M Bergoc; Elena S Rivera; Gabriela A Martín

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study the action of aminoguanidine on pancreatic cancer xenografts in relation to cell proliferation, apoptosis, redox status and vascularization.METHODS: Xenografts of PANC-1 cells were developed in nude mice. The animals were separated into two groups: control and aminoguanidine treated. Tumor growth, survival and appearance of metastases were determined in v/vo in both groups. Tumors were excised and ex v/vo histochemical studies were performed. Cell growth was assessed by Ki-67 expression. Apoptosis was studied by intratumoral expression of B cell lymphoma-2 protein (Bcl-2) family proteins and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (Tunel). Redox status was evaluated by the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS),catalase, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD),manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Finally, vascularization was determined by Massons trichromic staining, and by VEGF and CD34 expression.RESULTS: Tumor volumes after 32 d of treatment by aminoguanidine (AG) were significantly lower than in control mice (P < 0.01). Median survival of AG mice was significantly greater than control animals (P < 0.01). The appearance of both homolateral and contralateral palpable metastases was significantly delayed in AG group. Apoptotic cells, intratumoral vascularization (trichromic stain) and the expression of Ki-67, Bax, eNOS, CD34, VEGF, catalase, CuZnSOD and MnSOD were diminished in AG treated mice (P < 0.01),while the expression of Bcl-2 and GPx did not change.CONCLUSION: The antitumoral action of aminoguanidine is associated with decreased cell proliferation, reduced angiogenesis, and reduced expression of antioxidant enzymes.

  20. Dietary administration of scallion extract effectively inhibits colorectal tumor growth: cellular and molecular mechanisms in mice.

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    Palanisamy Arulselvan

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Diet is known to play an important role in the etiology of colon cancer and dietary chemoprevention is receiving increasing attention for prevention and/or alternative treatment of colon cancers. Allium fistulosum L., commonly known as scallion, is popularly used as a spice or vegetable worldwide, and as a traditional medicine in Asian cultures for treating a variety of diseases. In this study we evaluated the possible beneficial effects of dietary scallion on chemoprevention of colon cancer using a mouse model of colon carcinoma (CT-26 cells subcutaneously inoculated into BALB/c mice. Tumor lysates were subjected to western blotting for analysis of key inflammatory markers, ELISA for analysis of cytokines, and immunohistochemistry for analysis of inflammatory markers. Metabolite profiles of scallion extracts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Scallion extracts, particularly hot-water extract, orally fed to mice at 50 mg (dry weight/kg body weight resulted in significant suppression of tumor growth and enhanced the survival rate of test mice. At the molecular level, scallion extracts inhibited the key inflammatory markers COX-2 and iNOS, and suppressed the expression of various cellular markers known to be involved in tumor apoptosis (apoptosis index, proliferation (cyclin D1 and c-Myc, angiogenesis (VEGF and HIF-1α, and tumor invasion (MMP-9 and ICAM-1 when compared with vehicle control-treated mice. Our findings may warrant further investigation of the use of common scallion as a chemopreventive dietary agent to lower the risk of colon cancer.

  1. Effects of ulinastatin and docataxel on breast tumor growth and expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α

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    Luo Jie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study investigated the effects of Ulinastatin (UTI and docataxel (Taxotere, TAX on tumor growth and expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-8 (IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in breast cancer. Methods MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells were cultured in vitro and injected into nude mice to establish breast tumor xenografts in vivo. Cultured cells and mice with tumors were randomly divided into four groups for treatment with TAX, UTI, and TAX+UTI. The effects of these drug treatments on cell proliferation and apoptosis was measured using the MTT assay and the Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI double-staining method, respectively. IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α expression levels were determined by measuring mRNA transcripts in cultured cells by RT-PCR and cytokine proteins in solid tumors using immunohistochemistry. Results UTI, TAX, and UTI+TAX inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro and tumors in vivo. These two drugs, particularly when used in combination, promote tumor cell apoptosis and down-regulate the expression IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α cytokines. Conclusion Both UTI and TAX inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells. UTI enhanced the inhibitory effect of TAX by a mechanism consistent with the down-regulated expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α.

  2. A novel tumor-promoting function residing in the 5' non-coding region of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA.

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    Kiyoshi Masuda

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF is one of the key regulators of tumor development, hence it is considered to be an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment. However, clinical trials have suggested that anti-VEGF monotherapy was less effective than standard chemotherapy. On the basis of the evidence, we hypothesized that vegf mRNA may have unrecognized function(s in cancer cells. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Knockdown of VEGF with vegf-targeting small-interfering (si RNAs increased susceptibility of human colon cancer cell line (HCT116 to apoptosis caused with 5-fluorouracil, etoposide, or doxorubicin. Recombinant human VEGF165 did not completely inhibit this apoptosis. Conversely, overexpression of VEGF165 increased resistance to anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis, while an anti-VEGF165-neutralizing antibody did not completely block the resistance. We prepared plasmids encoding full-length vegf mRNA with mutation of signal sequence, vegf mRNAs lacking untranslated regions (UTRs, or mutated 5'UTRs. Using these plasmids, we revealed that the 5'UTR of vegf mRNA possessed anti-apoptotic activity. The 5'UTR-mediated activity was not affected by a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. We established HCT116 clones stably expressing either the vegf 5'UTR or the mutated 5'UTR. The clones expressing the 5'UTR, but not the mutated one, showed increased anchorage-independent growth in vitro and formed progressive tumors when implanted in athymic nude mice. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses indicated that the vegf 5'UTR-expressing tumors had up-regulated anti-apoptotic genes, multidrug-resistant genes, and growth-promoting genes, while pro-apoptotic genes were down-regulated. Notably, expression of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1 was markedly repressed in the 5'UTR-expressing tumors, resulting in down-regulation of a STAT1-responsive cluster of genes (43 genes. As a result, the

  3. Hypoxia induced HMGB1 and mitochondrial DNA interactions mediate tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through Toll Like Receptor 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Yan, Wei; Tohme, Samer; Chen, Man; Fu, Yu; Tian, Dean; Lotze, Michael; Tang, Daolin; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims The mechanisms of hypoxia-induced tumor growth remain unclear. Hypoxia induces intracellular translocation and release of a variety of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as nuclear HMGB1 and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In inflammation, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9 activation by DNA-containing immune complexes has been shown to be mediated by HMGB1. We thus hypothesize that HMGB1 binds mtDNA in the cytoplasm of hypoxic tumor cells and promotes tumor growth through activating TLR9 signaling pathways. Methods C57BL6 mice were injected with Hepa1-6 cancer cells. TLR9 and HMGB1 were inhibited using shRNA or direct antagonists. Huh7 and Hepa1-6 cancer cells were investigated in vitro to investigate how the interaction of HMGB1 and mtDNA activates TLR9 signaling pathways. Results During hypoxia, HMGB1 translocates from the nucleus to the cytosol and binds to mtDNA released from damaged mitochondria. This complex subsequently activates TLR9 signaling pathways to promote tumor cell proliferation. Loss of HMGB1 or mtDNA leads to a defect in TLR9 signaling pathways in response to hypoxia, resulting in decreased tumor cell proliferation. Also, the addition of HMGB1 and mtDNA leads to the activation of TLR-9 and subsequent tumor cell proliferation. Moreover, TLR9 is overexpressed in both hypoxic tumor cells in vitro and in human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) specimens; and, knockdown of either HMGB1 or TLR9 from HCC cells suppressed tumor growth in vivo after injection in mice. Conclusions Our data reveals a novel mechanism by which the interactions of HMGB1 and mtDNA activate TLR9 signaling during hypoxia to induce tumor growth. PMID:25681553

  4. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity. PMID:27430914

  5. Selenium, but not lycopene or vitamin E, decreases growth of transplantable dunning R3327-H rat prostate tumors.

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    Brian L Lindshield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lycopene, selenium, and vitamin E are three micronutrients commonly consumed and supplemented by men diagnosed with prostate cancer. However, it is not clear whether consumption of these compounds, alone or in combination, results in improved outcomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the effects of dietary lycopene (250 mg/kg diet, selenium (methylselenocysteine, 1 mg/kg diet, and vitamin E (gamma-tocopherol, 200 mg/kg diet alone and in combination on the growth of androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-H rat prostate adenocarcinomas in male, Copenhagen rats. AIN-93G diets containing these micronutrients were prefed for 4 to 6 weeks prior to tumor implantation by subcutaneous injection. Tumors were allowed to grow for approximately 18 weeks. Across diet groups, methylselenocysteine consumption decreased final tumor area (P = 0.003, tumor weight (P = 0.003, and the tumor weight/body weight ratio (P = 0.003, but lycopene and gamma-tocopherol consumption intake did not alter any of these measures. There were no significant interactions among nutrient combinations on tumor growth. Methylselenocysteine consumption also led to small, but significant decreases in body weight (P = 0.007, food intake (P = 0.012, and body weight gain/food intake ratio (P = 0.022. However, neither body weight nor gain/food intake ratio was correlated with tumor weight. Methylselenocysteine, lycopene, and gamma-tocopherol consumed alone and in combination did not alter serum testosterone or dihydrotestosterone concentrations; tumor proliferation or apoptosis rates. In addition, the diets also did not alter tumor or prostate androgen receptor, probasin, selenoprotein 15, selenoprotein P, or selenium binding protein 2 mRNA expression. However, using castration and finasteride-treated tissues from a previous study, we found that androgen ablation altered expression of these selenium-associated proteins. CONCLUSIONS: Of the three micronutrients tested, only

  6. Platelets are associated with xenograft tumor growth and the clinical malignancy of ovarian cancer through an angiogenesis-dependent mechanism.

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    Yuan, Lei; Liu, Xishi

    2015-04-01

    Platelets are known to facilitate tumor metastasis and thrombocytosis has been associated with an adverse prognosis in ovarian cancer. However, the role of platelets in primary tumour growth remains to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated that the expression levels of various markers in platelets, endothelial adherence and angiogenesis, including, platelet glycoprotein IIb (CD41), platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), lysyl oxidase, focal adhesion kinase and breast cancer anti‑estrogen resistance 1, were expressed at higher levels in patients with malignant carcinoma, compared with those with borderline cystadenoma and cystadenoma. In addition, the endothelial markers CD31 and VEGF were found to colocalize with the platelet marker CD41 in the malignant samples. Since mice transplanted with human ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3) demonstrated elevated tumor size and decreased survival rate when treated with thrombin or thrombopoietin (TPO), the platelets appeared to promote primary tumor growth. Depleting platelets using antibodies or by pretreating the cancer cells with hirudin significantly attenuated the transplanted tumor growth. The platelets contributed to late, but not early stages of tumor proliferation, as mice treated with platelet‑depleting antibody 1 day prior to and 11 days after tumor transplantation had the same tumor volumes. By contrast, tumor size in the early TPO‑injected group was increased significantly compared with the late TPO‑injected group. These findings suggested that the interplay between platelets and angiogenesis may contribute to ovarian cancer growth. Therefore, platelets and their associated signaling and adhesive molecules may represent potential therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer. PMID:25502723

  7. Over-expression of p53 mutants in LNCaP cells alters tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study has investigated the impact of three specific dominant-negative p53 mutants (F134L, M237L, and R273H) on tumorigenesis by LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Mutant p53 proteins were associated with an increased subcutaneous 'take rate' in NOD-SCID mice, and increased production of PSA. Tumors expressing F134L and R273H grew slower than controls, and were associated with decreased necrosis and apoptosis, but not hypoxia. Interestingly, hypoxia levels were increased in tumors expressing M237L. There was less proliferation in F134L-bearing tumors compared to control, but this was not statistically significant. Angiogenesis was decreased in tumors expressing F134L and R273H compared with M237L, or controls. Conditioned medium from F134L tumors inhibited growth of normal human umbilical-vein endothelial cells but not telomerase-immortalized bone marrow endothelial cells. F134L tumor supernatants showed lower levels of VEGF and endostatin compared with supernatants from tumors expressing other mutants. Our results support the possibility that decreased angiogenesis might account for reduced growth rate of tumor cells expressing the F134L p53 mutation

  8. Decreased Autocrine EGFR Signaling in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Inhibits Tumor Growth in Bone and Mammary Fat Pad

    OpenAIRE

    Nickerson, Nicole K.; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Gilmore, Jennifer L.; Crismore, Erin; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Guise, Theresa A.; Foley, John

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231), and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and oste...

  9. Inhibition of dendritic cell migration by transforming growth factor-β1 increases tumor-draining lymph node metastasis

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    Imai Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transforming growth factor (TGF-β is known to be produced by progressor tumors and to immobilize dendritic cells (DCs within those tumors. Moreover, although TGF-β1 has been shown to promote tumor progression, there is still no direct, in vivo evidence as to whether TGF-β1 is able to directly induce distant metastasis. Methods To address that issue and investigate the mechanism by which TGF-β1 suppresses DC activity, we subdermally inoculated mouse ears with squamous cell carcinoma cells stably expressing TGF-β1 or empty vector (mock. Results The numbers of DCs within lymph nodes draining the resultant TGF-β1-expressing tumors was significantly lower than within nodes draining tumors not expressing TGF-β1. We then injected fluorescently labeled bone marrow-derived dendritic cells into the tumors, and subsequent analysis confirmed that the tumors were the source of the DCs within the tumor-draining lymph nodes, and that there were significantly fewer immature DCs within the nodes draining TGF-β1-expressing tumors than within nodes draining tumors not expressing TGF-β1. In addition, 14 days after tumor cell inoculation, lymph node metastasis occurred more frequently in mice inoculated with TGF-β1 transfectants than in those inoculated with the mock transfectants. Conclusions These findings provide new evidence that tumor-derived TGF-β1 inhibits migration of DCs from tumors to their draining lymph nodes, and this immunosuppressive effect of TGF-β1 increases the likelihood of metastasis in the affected nodes.

  10. Tumor growth reduction is regulated at the gene level in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats supplemented with fish oil rich in EPA and DHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghetti, G.; Yamazaki, R.K.; Coelho, I.; Pequito, D.C.T.; Schiessel, D.L.; Kryczyk, M.; Mamus, R.; Naliwaiko, K.; Fernandes, L.C. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Setor de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-08-23

    We investigated the effect of fish oil (FO) supplementation on tumor growth, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and RelA gene and protein expression in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats. Male Wistar rats (70 days old) were fed with regular chow (group W) or chow supplemented with 1 g/kg body weight FO daily (group WFO) until they reached 100 days of age. Both groups were then inoculated with a suspension of Walker 256 ascitic tumor cells (3×10{sup 7} cells/mL). After 14 days the rats were killed, total RNA was isolated from the tumor tissue, and relative mRNA expression was measured using the 2{sup -ΔΔCT} method. FO significantly decreased tumor growth (W=13.18±1.58 vs WFO=5.40±0.88 g, P<0.05). FO supplementation also resulted in a significant decrease in COX-2 (W=100.1±1.62 vs WFO=59.39±5.53, P<0.001) and PPARγ (W=100.4±1.04 vs WFO=88.22±1.46, P<0.05) protein expression. Relative mRNA expression was W=1.06±0.022 vs WFO=0.31±0.04 (P<0.001) for COX-2, W=1.08±0.02 vs WFO=0.52±0.08 (P<0.001) for PPARγ, and W=1.04±0.02 vs WFO=0.82±0.04 (P<0.05) for RelA. FO reduced tumor growth by attenuating inflammatory gene expression associated with carcinogenesis.

  11. Tumor growth reduction is regulated at the gene level in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats supplemented with fish oil rich in EPA and DHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, G; Yamazaki, R K; Coelho, I; Pequito, D C T; Schiessel, D L; Kryczyk, M; Mamus, R; Naliwaiko, K; Fernandes, L C

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the effect of fish oil (FO) supplementation on tumor growth, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and RelA gene and protein expression in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats. Male Wistar rats (70 days old) were fed with regular chow (group W) or chow supplemented with 1 g/kg body weight FO daily (group WFO) until they reached 100 days of age. Both groups were then inoculated with a suspension of Walker 256 ascitic tumor cells (3 × 10(7) cells/mL). After 14 days the rats were killed, total RNA was isolated from the tumor tissue, and relative mRNA expression was measured using the 2(-ΔΔCT) method. FO significantly decreased tumor growth (W=13.18 ± 1.58 vs WFO=5.40 ± 0.88 g, Psupplementation also resulted in a significant decrease in COX-2 (W=100.1 ± 1.62 vs WFO=59.39 ± 5.53, Pprotein expression. Relative mRNA expression was W=1.06 ± 0.022 vs WFO=0.31 ± 0.04 (P<0.001) for COX-2, W=1.08 ± 0.02 vs WFO=0.52 ± 0.08 (P<0.001) for PPARγ, and W=1.04 ± 0.02 vs WFO=0.82 ± 0.04 (P<0.05) for RelA. FO reduced tumor growth by attenuating inflammatory gene expression associated with carcinogenesis.

  12. Carbamate-linked lactose: design of clusters and evidence for selectivity to block binding of human lectins to (neo)glycoproteins with increasing degree of branching and to tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Sabine; Specker, Daniel; Bovin, Nicolai V; Lensch, Martin; Kaltner, Herbert; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Wittmann, Valentin

    2009-09-01

    Various pathogenic processes are driven by protein(lectin)-glycan interactions, especially involving beta-galactosides at branch ends of cellular glycans. These emerging insights fuel the interest to design potent inhibitors to block lectins. As a step toward this aim, we prepared a series of ten mono- to tetravalent glycocompounds with lactose as a common headgroup. To obtain activated carbonate for ensuing carbamate formation, conditions for the facile synthesis of pure isomers from anomerically unprotected lactose were identified. To probe for the often encountered intrafamily diversity of human lectins, we selected representative members from the three subgroups of adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins as receptors. Diversity of the glycan display was accounted for by using four (neo)glycoproteins with different degrees of glycan branching as matrices in solid-phase assays. Cases of increased inhibitory potency of lactose clusters compared to free lactose were revealed. Extent of relative inhibition was not directly associated with valency in the glycocompound and depended on the lectin type. Of note for screening protocols, efficacy of blocking appeared to decrease with increased degree of glycan branching in matrix glycoproteins. Binding to tumor cells was impaired with selectivity for galectins-3 and -4. Representative compounds did not impair growth of carcinoma cells up to a concentration of 5 mM of lactose moieties (valence-corrected value) per assay. The reported bioactivity and the delineation of its modulation by structural parameters of lectins and glycans set instructive examples for the further design of selective inhibitors and assay procedures. PMID:19715307

  13. Combined MET inhibition and topoisomerase I inhibition block cell growth of small cell lung cancer.

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    Rolle, Cleo E; Kanteti, Rajani; Surati, Mosmi; Nandi, Suvobroto; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; Yala, Soheil; Tretiakova, Maria; Arif, Qudsia; Hembrough, Todd; Brand, Toni M; Wheeler, Deric L; Husain, Aliya N; Vokes, Everett E; Bharti, Ajit; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a devastating disease, and current therapies have not greatly improved the 5-year survival rates. Topoisomerase (Top) inhibition is a treatment modality for SCLC; however, the response is short lived. Consequently, our research has focused on improving SCLC therapeutics through the identification of novel targets. Previously, we identified MNNG HOS transforming gene (MET) to be overexpressed and functional in SCLC. Herein, we investigated the therapeutic potential of combinatorial targeting of MET using SU11274 and Top1 using 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). MET and TOP1 gene copy numbers and protein expr