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Sample records for blocks sars virus

  1. A noncovalent class of papain-like protease/deubiquitinase inhibitors blocks SARS virus replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratia, Kiira; Pegan, Scott; Takayama, Jun; Sleeman, Katrina; Coughlin, Melissa; Baliji, Surendranath; Chaudhuri, Rima; Fu, Wentao; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Johnson, Michael E.; Baker, Susan C.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (Loyola); (Purdue); (UIC)

    2008-10-27

    We report the discovery and optimization of a potent inhibitor against the papain-like protease (PLpro) from the coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV). This unique protease is not only responsible for processing the viral polyprotein into its functional units but is also capable of cleaving ubiquitin and ISG15 conjugates and plays a significant role in helping SARS-CoV evade the human immune system. We screened a structurally diverse library of 50,080 compounds for inhibitors of PLpro and discovered a noncovalent lead inhibitor with an IC{sub 50} value of 20 {mu}M, which was improved to 600 nM via synthetic optimization. The resulting compound, GRL0617, inhibited SARS-CoV viral replication in Vero E6 cells with an EC{sub 50} of 15 {mu}M and had no associated cytotoxicity. The X-ray structure of PLpro in complex with GRL0617 indicates that the compound has a unique mode of inhibition whereby it binds within the S4-S3 subsites of the enzyme and induces a loop closure that shuts down catalysis at the active site. These findings provide proof-of-principle that PLpro is a viable target for development of antivirals directed against SARS-CoV, and that potent noncovalent cysteine protease inhibitors can be developed with specificity directed toward pathogenic deubiquitinating enzymes without inhibiting host DUBs.

  2. Glycopeptide Antibiotics Potently Inhibit Cathepsin L in the Late Endosome/Lysosome and Block the Entry of Ebola Virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Junsong; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Xue; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Feng; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Chao; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-04-22

    Ebola virus infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality in humans. The outbreaks of Ebola viruses in 2014 represented the most serious Ebola epidemics in history and greatly threatened public health worldwide. The development of additional effective anti-Ebola therapeutic agents is therefore quite urgent. In this study, via high throughput screening of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, we identified that teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic, potently prevents the entry of Ebola envelope pseudotyped viruses into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, teicoplanin also has an inhibitory effect on transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particles, with an IC50 as low as 330 nm Comparative analysis further demonstrated that teicoplanin is able to block the entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) envelope pseudotyped viruses as well. Teicoplanin derivatives such as dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin can also inhibit the entry of Ebola, MERS, and SARS viruses. Mechanistic studies showed that teicoplanin blocks Ebola virus entry by specifically inhibiting the activity of cathepsin L, opening a novel avenue for the development of additional glycopeptides as potential inhibitors of cathepsin L-dependent viruses. Notably, given that teicoplanin has routinely been used in the clinic with low toxicity, our work provides a promising prospect for the prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola, MERS, and SARS virus infection.

  3. The inhibitory effect of Chinese herb on SARS virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rika; Furuta; Jyunichi; Fujisawa; Toshio; Hattori

    2005-01-01

    [Subject]Severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS)is a contagious atypical pneumonia with a high mortality rate.SARS coronavirus(SARS-CoV)is the pathogenof SARS.We established SARS-CoVS/HIVpseudotyped(SHP)virussystemandthe cell fusion assay systemto screeninhibitors for entry of SARS-CoV.[Materials and methods]SHPor VSV-Gpseudotype(VHP)virus was made bytransfecting pCMVΔR8·2,pHR’CMV-Luc and pCMV/R-SARS-S or pMDGplasmids into293Tcells.5ng p24of SHPor VHPvirus was addedfor eachinfec-tion.Twelve Chinese herbs,wh...

  4. Method of airborne SAR image match integrating multi-information for block adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S. C.; Huang, G. M.; Zhao, Z.; Lu, L. J.

    2015-06-01

    For the automation of SAR image Block Adjustment, this paper proposed a method of SAR image matching integrating multiinformation. It takes full advantage of SAR image geometric information, feature information, gray-related information and external auxiliary terrain information for SAR image matching. And then Image Tie Points (ITPs) of Block Adjustment can be achieved automatically. The main parts of extracting ITPs automatically include: First, SAR images were rectified geometrically based on the geometric information and external auxiliary terrain information (existed DEM) before match. Second, ground grid points with a certain interval can be get in the block area and approximate ITPs were acquired based on external auxiliary terrain information. Then match reference point was extracted for homologous image blocks with Harris feature detection operator and ITPs were obtained with pyramid matching based on gray-related information. At last, ITPs were transferred from rectified images to original SAR images and used in block adjustment. In the experiment, X band airborne SAR images acquired by Chinese airborne SAR system - CASMSAR system were used to make up the block. The result had showed that the method is effective for block adjustment of SAR data.

  5. Bats Found to Carry SARS-like Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ An international consortium headed by CAS researchers has identified that the Chinese horseshoe bat is healthy carriers of a virus that is very closely related to those causing SARS(severe acute respiratory syndrome). Their work was reported online on Sept. 29 by the Science magazine. The finding supports an independent study with similar results by Hong Kong scientists,which is reported by the Sept. 27issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

  6. Distinct Patterns of IFITM-Mediated Restriction of Filoviruses, SARS Coronavirus, and Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    West Nile viruses . In contrast, they do not inhibit replication of murine leukemia virus (MLV), or the entry processes of amphotropic MLV, Machupo virus ...MACV), Lassa virus (LASV), or lympho- cytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Although IFITM proteins are induced by type I and II interferons, most...processes of several highly pathogenic viruses – Marburg virus , Ebola virus , and SARS coronavirus – are similarly disrupted by IFITM proteins. We

  7. Reverse genetics of SARS-related coronavirus using vaccinia virus-based recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd H E van den Worm

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a zoonotic disease caused by SARS-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV that emerged in 2002 to become a global health concern. Although the original outbreak was controlled by classical public health measures, there is a real risk that another SARS-CoV could re-emerge from its natural reservoir, either in its original form or as a more virulent or pathogenic strain; in which case, the virus would be difficult to control in the absence of any effective antiviral drugs or vaccines. Using the well-studied SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849, we developed a vaccinia virus-based SARS-CoV reverse genetic system that is both robust and biosafe. The SARS-CoV genome was cloned in separate vaccinia virus vectors, (vSARS-CoV-5prime and vSARS-CoV-3prime as two cDNAs that were subsequently ligated to create a genome-length SARS-CoV cDNA template for in vitro transcription of SARS-CoV infectious RNA transcripts. Transfection of the RNA transcripts into permissive cells led to the recovery of infectious virus (recSARS-CoV. Characterization of the plaques produced by recSARS-CoV showed that they were similar in size to the parental SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849 but smaller than the SARS-CoV isolate Frankfurt-1. Comparative analysis of replication kinetics showed that the kinetics of recSARS-CoV replication are similar to those of SARS-CoV Frankfurt-1, although the titers of virus released into the culture supernatant are approximately 10-fold less. The reverse genetic system was finally used to generate a recSARS-CoV reporter virus expressing Renilla luciferase in order to facilitate the analysis of SARS-CoV gene expression in human dendritic cells (hDCs. In parallel, a Renilla luciferase gene was also inserted into the genome of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E. Using this approach, we demonstrate that, in contrast to HCoV-229E, SARS-CoV is not able to mediate efficient heterologous gene expression in hDCs.

  8. Reverse Genetics of SARS-Related Coronavirus Using Vaccinia Virus-Based Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevenhoven, Jessika C.; Weber, Friedemann; Züst, Roland; Kuri, Thomas; Dijkman, Ronald; Chang, Guohui; Siddell, Stuart G.; Snijder, Eric J.; Thiel, Volker; Davidson, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a zoonotic disease caused by SARS-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that emerged in 2002 to become a global health concern. Although the original outbreak was controlled by classical public health measures, there is a real risk that another SARS-CoV could re-emerge from its natural reservoir, either in its original form or as a more virulent or pathogenic strain; in which case, the virus would be difficult to control in the absence of any effective antiviral drugs or vaccines. Using the well-studied SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849, we developed a vaccinia virus-based SARS-CoV reverse genetic system that is both robust and biosafe. The SARS-CoV genome was cloned in separate vaccinia virus vectors, (vSARS-CoV-5prime and vSARS-CoV-3prime) as two cDNAs that were subsequently ligated to create a genome-length SARS-CoV cDNA template for in vitro transcription of SARS-CoV infectious RNA transcripts. Transfection of the RNA transcripts into permissive cells led to the recovery of infectious virus (recSARS-CoV). Characterization of the plaques produced by recSARS-CoV showed that they were similar in size to the parental SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849 but smaller than the SARS-CoV isolate Frankfurt-1. Comparative analysis of replication kinetics showed that the kinetics of recSARS-CoV replication are similar to those of SARS-CoV Frankfurt-1, although the titers of virus released into the culture supernatant are approximately 10-fold less. The reverse genetic system was finally used to generate a recSARS-CoV reporter virus expressing Renilla luciferase in order to facilitate the analysis of SARS-CoV gene expression in human dendritic cells (hDCs). In parallel, a Renilla luciferase gene was also inserted into the genome of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E). Using this approach, we demonstrate that, in contrast to HCoV-229E, SARS-CoV is not able to mediate efficient heterologous gene expression in hDCs. PMID:22412934

  9. When animal viruses attack: SARS and avian influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul J; Krilov, Leonard R

    2005-01-01

    SARS and avian influenza have many common features. They both arose in Asia and originated from animal viruses. They both have the potential to become pandemics because human beings lack antibodies to the animal-derived antigens present on the viral surface and rapid dissemination can occur from the relative ease and availability of high speed and far-reaching transportation methods. Pediatricians, in particular, should remain alert about the possibility of pandemic illnesses in their patients. Annual rates of influenza in children may be 1.5 to 3 times those in the adult population, and infection rates during a community epidemic may exceed 40% in preschool-aged children and 30% in school-aged children. Infected children also play a central role in disseminating influenza, as they are the major point of entry for the virus into the household, from which adults spread disease into the community. Of course, children younger than 24 months also are at high risk for complications from influenza. A 1999 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention projection of an influenza pandemic in the US paints a grim picture: 89,000 to 207,000 deaths, 314,000 to 734,000 hospitalizations, 18 million to 42 million outpatient visits, and 20 million to 47 million additional illnesses, at a cost to society of at least dollars 71.3 billion to dollars 166.5 billion. High-risk patients (15% of the population) would account for approximately 84% of all deaths. Although SARS has been kind to the pediatric population so far, there are no guarantees that future outbreaks would be as sparing. To aid readers in remaining up-to-date with SARS and avian influenza, some useful websites are listed in the Sidebar. Two masters of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock and Stephen King, may have been closer to the truth than they ever would have believed. Both birds and a super flu could bring about the end of civilization as we know it. But all is not lost--to paraphrase Thomas Jefferson, the price of health is

  10. Block adjustment of airborne InSAR based on interferogram phase and POS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xijuan; Zhao, Yinghui; Han, Chunming; Dou, Changyong

    2015-12-01

    High-precision surface elevation information in large scale can be obtained efficiently by airborne Interferomatric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) system, which is recently becoming an important tool to acquire remote sensing data and perform mapping applications in the area where surveying and mapping is difficult to be accomplished by spaceborne satellite or field working. . Based on the study of the three-dimensional (3D) positioning model using interferogram phase and Position and Orientation System (POS) data and block adjustment error model, a block adjustment method to produce seamless wide-area mosaic product generated from airborne InSAR data is proposed in this paper. The effect of 6 parameters, including trajectory and attitude of the aircraft, baseline length and incline angle, slant range, and interferometric phase, on the 3D positioning accuracy is quantitatively analyzed. Using the data acquired in the field campaign conducted in Mianyang county Sichuan province, China in June 2011, a mosaic seamless Digital Elevation Model (DEM) product was generated from 76 images in 4 flight strips by the proposed block adjustment model. The residuals of ground control points (GCPs), the absolute positioning accuracy of check points (CPs) and the relative positioning accuracy of tie points (TPs) both in same and adjacent strips were assessed. The experimental results suggest that the DEM and Digital Orthophoto Map (DOM) product generated by the airborne InSAR data with sparse GCPs can meet mapping accuracy requirement at scale of 1:10 000.

  11. How change of public transportation usage reveals fear of the SARS virus in a city.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Ying Wang

    Full Text Available The outbreaks of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic in 2003 resulted in unprecedented impacts on people's daily life. One of the most significant impacts to people is the fear of contacting the SARS virus while engaging daily routine activity. Here we use data from daily underground ridership in Taipei City and daily reported new SARS cases in Taiwan to model the dynamics of the public fear of the SARS virus during the wax and wane of the SARS period. We found that for each reported new SARS case there is an immediate loss of about 1200 underground ridership (the fresh fear. These daily loss rates dissipate to the following days with an e-folding time of about 28 days, reflecting the public perception on the risk of contacting SARS virus when traveling with the underground system (the residual fear. About 50% of daily ridership was lost during the peak of the 2003 SARS period, compared with the loss of 80% daily ridership during the closure of the underground system after Typhoon Nari, the loss of 50-70% ridership due to the closure of the governmental offices and schools during typhoon periods, and the loss of 60% daily ridership during Chinese New Year holidays.

  12. How change of public transportation usage reveals fear of the SARS virus in a city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2014-01-01

    The outbreaks of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 resulted in unprecedented impacts on people's daily life. One of the most significant impacts to people is the fear of contacting the SARS virus while engaging daily routine activity. Here we use data from daily underground ridership in Taipei City and daily reported new SARS cases in Taiwan to model the dynamics of the public fear of the SARS virus during the wax and wane of the SARS period. We found that for each reported new SARS case there is an immediate loss of about 1200 underground ridership (the fresh fear). These daily loss rates dissipate to the following days with an e-folding time of about 28 days, reflecting the public perception on the risk of contacting SARS virus when traveling with the underground system (the residual fear). About 50% of daily ridership was lost during the peak of the 2003 SARS period, compared with the loss of 80% daily ridership during the closure of the underground system after Typhoon Nari, the loss of 50-70% ridership due to the closure of the governmental offices and schools during typhoon periods, and the loss of 60% daily ridership during Chinese New Year holidays.

  13. Anti-SARS virus antibody responses against human SARS-associated coronavirus and animal SARS-associated coronavirus-like virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鸣; 徐慧芳; 莫自耀; 郑伯健; 高阳; 顾菁; 秦鹏哲; 张周斌; 邹晓忠; 梁彩云; 赵宇腾; 高凯

    2004-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious disease first recognized in November 2002 in Guangdong province, China. It was spread to many countries all over the world within a few months.1,2 By April 2003, SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was found to be the etiological agent.

  14. A complete sequence and comparative analysis of a SARS-associated virus (Isolate BJ01)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The genome sequence of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-associated virus provides essential information for the identification of pathogen(s), exploration of etiology and evolution, interpretation of transmission and pathogenesis, development of diagnostics, prevention by future vaccination, and treatment by developing new drugs. We report the complete genome sequence and comparative analysis of an isolate (BJ01) of the coronavirus that has been recognized as a pathogen for SARS. The genome is 29725 nt in size and has 11 ORFs (Open Reading Frames). It is composed of a stable region encoding an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (composed of 2 ORFs) and a variable region representing 4 CDSs (coding sequences) for viral structural genes (the S, E, M, N proteins) and 5 PUPs (putative uncharacterized proteins). Its gene order is identical to that of other known coronaviruses. The sequence alignment with all known RNA viruses places this virus as a member in the family of Coronaviridae. Thirty putative substitutions have been identified by comparative analysis of the 5 SARS- associated virus genome sequences in GenBank. Fifteen of them lead to possible amino acid changes (non-synonymousmutations) in the proteins. Three amino acid changes, with predicted alteration of physical and chemical features, have been detected in the S protein that is postulated to be involved in the immunoreactions between the virus and its host. Two amino acid changes have been detected in the M protein, which could be related to viral envelope formation. Phylogenetic analysis suggests the possibility of non-human origin of the SARS-associated viruses but provides no evidence that they are man-made. Further efforts should focus on identifying the etiology of the SARS-associated virus and ruling out conclusively the existence of other possible SARS-related pathogen(s).

  15. Block-like plate movements in eastern Anatolia observed by InSAR

    KAUST Repository

    Cavalie, Olivier

    2014-01-16

    The question whether continental plates deform internally or move as rigid blocks has been debated for several decades. To further address this question, we use large-scale interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data sets to study how eastern Anatolia and its surrounding plates deform. We find that most of the deformation is focused at the North and East Anatolian faults and little intraplate deformation takes place. Anatolia is therefore moving, at least its eastern part, as a uniform block. We estimate the slip velocity and locking depth of the North Anatolian fault at this location to be 20 mm/yr and ~14 km, respectively. High deformation gradient found near the East Anatolian fault, on the other hand, suggests that little stress is accumulating along the eastern sections of that fault.

  16. The Role of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-Coronavirus Accessory Proteins in Virus Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ruth; Fielding, Burtram C.

    2012-01-01

    A respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus, termed the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was first reported in China in late 2002. The subsequent efficient human-to-human transmission of this virus eventually affected more than 30 countries worldwide, resulting in a mortality rate of ~10% of infected individuals. The spread of the virus was ultimately controlled by isolation of infected individuals and there has been no infections reported since April 2004. However, the natural reservoir of the virus was never identified and it is not known if this virus will re-emerge and, therefore, research on this virus continues. The SARS-CoV genome is about 30 kb in length and is predicted to contain 14 functional open reading frames (ORFs). The genome encodes for proteins that are homologous to known coronavirus proteins, such as the replicase proteins (ORFs 1a and 1b) and the four major structural proteins: nucleocapsid (N), spike (S), membrane (M) and envelope (E). SARS-CoV also encodes for eight unique proteins, called accessory proteins, with no known homologues. This review will summarize the current knowledge on SARS-CoV accessory proteins and will include: (i) expression and processing; (ii) the effects on cellular processes; and (iii) functional studies. PMID:23202509

  17. Establishment of animal model for potency evaluation of inactivated SARS virus experimental vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANMUDONG; QIAN; YANKONG; WENXUELIU; LIHINGYANG; JUNZHIWANG; YONGXINYU; YAOLONGSHU; ZHENGWANG; WEIDONGYIN; QINGYUZHU; HAIFAZHENG

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of source virus strain for the manufacture of the inactivated SARS virus vaccine, and establish an experimental method and preliminary standard for potency evaluation. Mice were divided into groups for being immunized with corresponding serially diluted experimental SARS virus inactivated vaccine. And the rabbits were immunized with undiluted vaccine. Challenge assay was conducted with a heterologous SARS virus. And the neutralization antibody was determined with plaque reduction neutralization test(PRNT), to which the neutralization antibody in the convalescent serum of SARS patients was compared. The experimental vaccine viral strains were proved to be suitable for manufacturing the vaccine. Mice immunized by vaccines of serial dilutions were able to elicit neutralizing antibody. The antibody titer from mice immunized with the undiluted vaccine could reach up to 1:495.2, while those of rabbits immunized with the undiluted vaccine could reach a GMT of 55.0-79.9. The capability of the antibody to neutralize the virus from Guangdong is more efficient than that from Beijing. The GMT of neutralizing antibody in SARS convalescents living in south and north China ranged from 50.12 to 54.95, and the titers of convalescents from north China were higher than those from south China. Mice and rabbits used as the model for evaluation of potency are of sensitivity, and the test is of reproducibility. The candidate challenge viral strains showed a relatively consistent effect on evaluating antibodies produced by various batches and different vaccine-source strains,hence they can be used to evaluate potency of the vaccine. The method for testing the vaccine potency and the evaluation standard was established preliminarily.

  18. Chimeric severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S glycoprotein and influenza matrix 1 efficiently form virus-like particles (VLPs) that protect mice against challenge with SARS-CoV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye V.; Massare, Michael J.; Barnard, Dale L.; Kort, Thomas; Nathan, Margret; Wang, Lei; Smith, Gale

    2011-01-01

    SARS-CoV was the cause of the global pandemic in 2003 that infected over 8000 people in 8 months. Vaccines against SARS are still not available. We developed a novel method to produce high levels of a recombinant SARS virus-like particles (VLPs) vaccine containing the SARS spike (S) protein and the influenza M1 protein using the baculovirus insect cell expression system. These chimeric SARS VLPs have a similar size and morphology to the wild type SARS-CoV. We tested the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of purified chimeric SARS VLPs and full length SARS S protein vaccines in a mouse lethal challenge model. The SARS VLP vaccine, containing 0.8 μg of SARS S protein, completely protected mice from death when administered intramuscular (IM) or intranasal (IN) routes in the absence of an adjuvant. Likewise, the SARS VLP vaccine, containing 4 μg of S protein without adjuvant, reduced lung virus titer to below detectable level, protected mice from weight loss, and elicited a high level of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV. Sf9 cell-produced full length purified SARS S protein was also an effective vaccine against SARS-CoV but only when co-administered IM with aluminum hydroxide. SARS-CoV VLPs are highly immunogenic and induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection against lethal challenge. Sf9 cell-based VLP vaccines are a potential tool to provide protection against novel pandemic agents. PMID:21762752

  19. Relationship of SARS-CoV to other pathogenic RNA viruses explored by tetranucleotide usage profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danchin Antoine

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exact origin of the cause of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS is still an open question. The genomic sequence relationship of SARS-CoV with 30 different single-stranded RNA (ssRNA viruses of various families was studied using two non-standard approaches. Both approaches began with the vectorial profiling of the tetra-nucleotide usage pattern V for each virus. In approach one, a distance measure of a vector V, based on correlation coefficient was devised to construct a relationship tree by the neighbor-joining algorithm. In approach two, a multivariate factor analysis was performed to derive the embedded tetra-nucleotide usage patterns. These patterns were subsequently used to classify the selected viruses. Results Both approaches yielded relationship outcomes that are consistent with the known virus classification. They also indicated that the genome of RNA viruses from the same family conform to a specific pattern of word usage. Based on the correlation of the overall tetra-nucleotide usage patterns, the Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus (TGV and the Feline CoronaVirus (FCoV are closest to SARS-CoV. Surprisingly also, the RNA viruses that do not go through a DNA stage displayed a remarkable discrimination against the CpG and UpA di-nucleotide (z = -77.31, -52.48 respectively and selection for UpG and CpA (z = 65.79,49.99 respectively. Potential factors influencing these biases are discussed. Conclusion The study of genomic word usage is a powerful method to classify RNA viruses. The congruence of the relationship outcomes with the known classification indicates that there exist phylogenetic signals in the tetra-nucleotide usage patterns, that is most prominent in the replicase open reading frames.

  20. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  1. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Graham; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Steffen, Imke; Chaipan, Chawaree; Agudelo, Juliet; Lu, Kai; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Hofmann, Heike; Bates, Paul; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S-activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation. PMID:21435673

  2. Distinct patterns of IFITM-mediated restriction of filoviruses, SARS coronavirus, and influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chueh Huang

    Full Text Available Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins 1, 2, and 3 (IFITM1, 2, and 3 are recently identified viral restriction factors that inhibit infection mediated by the influenza A virus (IAV hemagglutinin (HA protein. Here we show that IFITM proteins restricted infection mediated by the entry glycoproteins (GP(1,2 of Marburg and Ebola filoviruses (MARV, EBOV. Consistent with these observations, interferon-β specifically restricted filovirus and IAV entry processes. IFITM proteins also inhibited replication of infectious MARV and EBOV. We observed distinct patterns of IFITM-mediated restriction: compared with IAV, the entry processes of MARV and EBOV were less restricted by IFITM3, but more restricted by IFITM1. Moreover, murine Ifitm5 and 6 did not restrict IAV, but efficiently inhibited filovirus entry. We further demonstrate that replication of infectious SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV and entry mediated by the SARS-CoV spike (S protein are restricted by IFITM proteins. The profile of IFITM-mediated restriction of SARS-CoV was more similar to that of filoviruses than to IAV. Trypsin treatment of receptor-associated SARS-CoV pseudovirions, which bypasses their dependence on lysosomal cathepsin L, also bypassed IFITM-mediated restriction. However, IFITM proteins did not reduce cellular cathepsin activity or limit access of virions to acidic intracellular compartments. Our data indicate that IFITM-mediated restriction is localized to a late stage in the endocytic pathway. They further show that IFITM proteins differentially restrict the entry of a broad range of enveloped viruses, and modulate cellular tropism independently of viral receptor expression.

  3. Spike protein homology between the SARS-associated virus and murine hepatitis virus implies existence of a putative receptor-binding region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Coronavirus has been determined to be the cause of the recent outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Human coronavirus 229E had been studied well and its receptor-binding domain was restricted to aa417-547 of S protein. However, this region has no homology with the newly separated SARS-associated virus (Hong Kong isolate CUHK-W1). Then we analyzed the phylogenesis of S1 subunit of the coronavirus spike protein (SARS-associated virus, Hong Kong isolate CUHK-W1). Interestingly, the highest homology between murine hepatitis virus (MHV) and SARS-associated coronavirus was found. And the important sites (aa62-65 and aa214-216) on the spike protein of MHV with receptor-binding capacity were highly conservative in comparison with the newly separated SARS-asso- ciated virus (the corresponding sites are aa51-54 and aa195-197). These results from bioinformatics analysis might help us to study the receptor-binding sites of SARS-associ- ated virus and the mechanism of the virus entry into the target cell, and design antiviral drugs and potent vaccines.

  4. SARS-CoV envelope protein palmitoylation or nucleocapid association is not required for promoting virus-like particle production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ying-Tzu; Wang, Shiu-Mei; Huang, Kuo-Jung; Wang, Chin-Tien

    2014-04-27

    Coronavirus membrane (M) proteins are capable of interacting with nucleocapsid (N) and envelope (E) proteins. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) M co-expression with either N or E is sufficient for producing virus-like particles (VLPs), although at a lower level compared to M, N and E co-expression. Whether E can release from cells or E/N interaction exists so as to contribute to enhanced VLP production is unknown. It also remains to be determined whether E palmitoylation or disulfide bond formation plays a role in SARS-CoV virus assembly. SARS-CoV N is released from cells through an association with E protein-containing vesicles. Further analysis suggests that domains involved in E/N interaction are largely located in both carboxyl-terminal regions. Changing all three E cysteine residues to alanines did not exert negative effects on E release, E association with N, or E enhancement of VLP production, suggesting that E palmitoylation modification or disulfide bond formation is not required for SARS-CoV virus assembly. We found that removal of the last E carboxyl-terminal residue markedly affected E release, N association, and VLP incorporation, but did not significantly compromise the contribution of E to efficient VLP production. The independence of the SARS-CoV E enhancement effect on VLP production from its viral packaging capacity suggests a distinct SARS-CoV E role in virus assembly.

  5. Inhibitors for the hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase explored by SAR with advanced machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Iwona E; Filippov, Igor V; Brown, Jodian; Kaushik-Basu, Neerja; Krishnan, Ramalingam; Nicklaus, Marc C; Thorpe, Ian F

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health challenge, affecting approximately 200 million people worldwide. In this study we developed SAR models with advanced machine learning classifiers Random Forest and k Nearest Neighbor Simulated Annealing for 679 small molecules with measured inhibition activity for NS5B genotype 1b. The activity was expressed as a binary value (active/inactive), where actives were considered molecules with IC50 ≤0.95 μM. We applied our SAR models to various drug-like databases and identified novel chemical scaffolds for NS5B inhibitors. Subsequent in vitro antiviral assays suggested a new activity for an existing prodrug, Candesartan cilexetil, which is currently used to treat hypertension and heart failure but has not been previously tested for anti-HCV activity. We also identified NS5B inhibitors with two novel non-nucleoside chemical motifs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The structure of a rigorously conserved RNA element within the SARS virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Robertson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the three-dimensional crystal structure of the stem-loop II motif (s2m RNA element of the SARS virus genome to 2.7-A resolution. SARS and related coronaviruses and astroviruses all possess a motif at the 3' end of their RNA genomes, called the s2m, whose pathogenic importance is inferred from its rigorous sequence conservation in an otherwise rapidly mutable RNA genome. We find that this extreme conservation is clearly explained by the requirement to form a highly structured RNA whose unique tertiary structure includes a sharp 90 degrees kink of the helix axis and several novel longer-range tertiary interactions. The tertiary base interactions create a tunnel that runs perpendicular to the main helical axis whose interior is negatively charged and binds two magnesium ions. These unusual features likely form interaction surfaces with conserved host cell components or other reactive sites required for virus function. Based on its conservation in viral pathogen genomes and its absence in the human genome, we suggest that these unusual structural features in the s2m RNA element are attractive targets for the design of anti-viral therapeutic agents. Structural genomics has sought to deduce protein function based on three-dimensional homology. Here we have extended this approach to RNA by proposing potential functions for a rigorously conserved set of RNA tertiary structural interactions that occur within the SARS RNA genome itself. Based on tertiary structural comparisons, we propose the s2m RNA binds one or more proteins possessing an oligomer-binding-like fold, and we suggest a possible mechanism for SARS viral RNA hijacking of host protein synthesis, both based upon observed s2m RNA macromolecular mimicry of a relevant ribosomal RNA fold.

  7. Coronavirus 3CLpro proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blom Nikolaj

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the passing of more than a year since the first outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS, efficient counter-measures are still few and many believe that reappearance of SARS, or a similar disease caused by a coronavirus, is not unlikely. For other virus families like the picornaviruses it is known that pathology is related to proteolytic cleavage of host proteins by viral proteinases. Furthermore, several studies indicate that virus proliferation can be arrested using specific proteinase inhibitors supporting the belief that proteinases are indeed important during infection. Prompted by this, we set out to analyse and predict cleavage by the coronavirus main proteinase using computational methods. Results We retrieved sequence data on seven fully sequenced coronaviruses and identified the main 3CL proteinase cleavage sites in polyproteins using alignments. A neural network was trained to recognise the cleavage sites in the genomes obtaining a sensitivity of 87.0% and a specificity of 99.0%. Several proteins known to be cleaved by other viruses were submitted to prediction as well as proteins suspected relevant in coronavirus pathology. Cleavage sites were predicted in proteins such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, transcription factors CREB-RP and OCT-1, and components of the ubiquitin pathway. Conclusions Our prediction method NetCorona predicts coronavirus cleavage sites with high specificity and several potential cleavage candidates were identified which might be important to elucidate coronavirus pathology. Furthermore, the method might assist in design of proteinase inhibitors for treatment of SARS and possible future diseases caused by coronaviruses. It is made available for public use at our website: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetCorona/.

  8. In vitro antiviral activity of some novel isatin derivatives against HCV and SARS-CoV viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvam P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available 4-[(1,2-dihydro-2-oxo-3H-indol-3-ylideneamino]-N(4,6-dimethyl-2-pyrimidinybenzene sulphonamide and its derivatives were evaluated for antiviral activity against Pathogenic viruses such as Hepatitis C Virus and SARS-CoV in Vero and Huh 5-2 cells, respectively. The 5-fluoro derivative inhibited the HCV RNA synthesis at 6 µg/ml, without toxicity at a concentration up to 42 µg/ml in Huh 5-2 cells. Among the compounds tested SPIII-5F exhibits the 45% maximum protection against replication of SARS-CoV in Vero cells.

  9. Zn(2+ inhibits coronavirus and arterivirus RNA polymerase activity in vitro and zinc ionophores block the replication of these viruses in cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aartjan J W te Velthuis

    Full Text Available Increasing the intracellular Zn(2+ concentration with zinc-ionophores like pyrithione (PT can efficiently impair the replication of a variety of RNA viruses, including poliovirus and influenza virus. For some viruses this effect has been attributed to interference with viral polyprotein processing. In this study we demonstrate that the combination of Zn(2+ and PT at low concentrations (2 µM Zn(2+ and 2 µM PT inhibits the replication of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV and equine arteritis virus (EAV in cell culture. The RNA synthesis of these two distantly related nidoviruses is catalyzed by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, which is the core enzyme of their multiprotein replication and transcription complex (RTC. Using an activity assay for RTCs isolated from cells infected with SARS-CoV or EAV--thus eliminating the need for PT to transport Zn(2+ across the plasma membrane--we show that Zn(2+ efficiently inhibits the RNA-synthesizing activity of the RTCs of both viruses. Enzymatic studies using recombinant RdRps (SARS-CoV nsp12 and EAV nsp9 purified from E. coli subsequently revealed that Zn(2+ directly inhibited the in vitro activity of both nidovirus polymerases. More specifically, Zn(2+ was found to block the initiation step of EAV RNA synthesis, whereas in the case of the SARS-CoV RdRp elongation was inhibited and template binding reduced. By chelating Zn(2+ with MgEDTA, the inhibitory effect of the divalent cation could be reversed, which provides a novel experimental tool for in vitro studies of the molecular details of nidovirus replication and transcription.

  10. Virus wars: using one virus to block the spread of another

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Paff

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The failure of traditional interventions to block and cure HIV infections has led to novel proposals that involve treating infections with therapeutic viruses–infectious viruses that specifically inhibit HIV propagation in the host. Early efforts in evaluating these proposals have been limited chiefly to mathematical models of dynamics, for lack of suitable empirical systems. Here we propose, develop and analyze an empirical system of a therapeutic virus that protects a host cell population against a lethal virus. The empirical system uses E. coli bacteria as the host cell population, an RNA phage as the lethal virus and a filamentous phage as the therapeutic virus. Basic dynamic properties are established for each virus alone and then together. Observed dynamics broadly agree with those predicted by a computer simulation model, although some differences are noted. Two cases of dynamics are contrasted, differing in whether the therapeutic virus is introduced before the lethal virus or after the lethal virus. The therapeutic virus increases in both cases but by different mechanisms. With the therapeutic virus introduced first, it spreads infectiously without any appreciable change in host dynamics. With the therapeutic virus introduced second, host abundance is depressed at the time therapy is applied; following an initial period of therapeutic virus spread by infection, the subsequent rise of protection is through reproduction by hosts already protected. This latter outcome is due to inheritance of the therapeutic virus state when the protected cell divides. Overall, the work establishes the feasibility and robustness to details of a viral interference using a therapeutic virus.

  11. Challenges and Strategies of Laboratory Diagnosis for Newly Emerging Influenza Viruses in Taiwan: A Decade after SARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Hui Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first case of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in Taiwan was identified in March 2003, viral respiratory infections, in particular the influenza virus, have become a national public health concern. Taiwan would face a serious threat of public health problems if another SARS epidemic overlapped with a flu outbreak. After SARS, the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control accelerated and strengthened domestic research on influenza and expanded the exchange of information with international counterparts. The capacity of influenza A to cross species barriers presents a potential threat to human health. Given the mutations of avian flu viruses such as H7N9, H6N1, and H10N8, all countries, including Taiwan, must equip themselves to face a possible epidemic or pandemic. Such preparedness requires global collaboration.

  12. Transmission of SARS and MERS coronaviruses and influenza virus in healthcare settings: the possible role of dry surface contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, J A; Donskey, C; Yezli, S; Douthwaite, S; Goldenberg, S D; Weber, D J

    2016-03-01

    Viruses with pandemic potential including H1N1, H5N1, and H5N7 influenza viruses, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)/Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses (CoV) have emerged in recent years. SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and influenza virus can survive on surfaces for extended periods, sometimes up to months. Factors influencing the survival of these viruses on surfaces include: strain variation, titre, surface type, suspending medium, mode of deposition, temperature and relative humidity, and the method used to determine the viability of the virus. Environmental sampling has identified contamination in field-settings with SARS-CoV and influenza virus, although the frequent use of molecular detection methods may not necessarily represent the presence of viable virus. The importance of indirect contact transmission (involving contamination of inanimate surfaces) is uncertain compared with other transmission routes, principally direct contact transmission (independent of surface contamination), droplet, and airborne routes. However, influenza virus and SARS-CoV may be shed into the environment and be transferred from environmental surfaces to hands of patients and healthcare providers. Emerging data suggest that MERS-CoV also shares these properties. Once contaminated from the environment, hands can then initiate self-inoculation of mucous membranes of the nose, eyes or mouth. Mathematical and animal models, and intervention studies suggest that contact transmission is the most important route in some scenarios. Infection prevention and control implications include the need for hand hygiene and personal protective equipment to minimize self-contamination and to protect against inoculation of mucosal surfaces and the respiratory tract, and enhanced surface cleaning and disinfection in healthcare settings.

  13. A network integration approach to predict conserved regulators related to pathogenicity of influenza and SARS-CoV respiratory viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh D Mitchell

    Full Text Available Respiratory infections stemming from influenza viruses and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome corona virus (SARS-CoV represent a serious public health threat as emerging pandemics. Despite efforts to identify the critical interactions of these viruses with host machinery, the key regulatory events that lead to disease pathology remain poorly targeted with therapeutics. Here we implement an integrated network interrogation approach, in which proteome and transcriptome datasets from infection of both viruses in human lung epithelial cells are utilized to predict regulatory genes involved in the host response. We take advantage of a novel "crowd-based" approach to identify and combine ranking metrics that isolate genes/proteins likely related to the pathogenicity of SARS-CoV and influenza virus. Subsequently, a multivariate regression model is used to compare predicted lung epithelial regulatory influences with data derived from other respiratory virus infection models. We predicted a small set of regulatory factors with conserved behavior for consideration as important components of viral pathogenesis that might also serve as therapeutic targets for intervention. Our results demonstrate the utility of integrating diverse 'omic datasets to predict and prioritize regulatory features conserved across multiple pathogen infection models.

  14. A Network Integration Approach to Predict Conserved Regulators Related to Pathogenicity of Influenza and SARS-CoV Respiratory Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Hugh D.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Sims, Amy; McDermott, Jason E.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Josset, Laurence; Li, Chengjun; Ellis, Amy L.; Chang, Jean H.; Heegel, Robert A.; Luna, Maria L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Neumann, Gabriele; Benecke, Arndt; Smith, Richard D.; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Katze, Michael G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2013-07-25

    Respiratory infections stemming from influenza viruses and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome corona virus (SARS-CoV) represent a serious public health threat as emerging pandemics. Despite efforts to identify the critical interactions of these viruses with host machinery, the key regulatory events that lead to disease pathology remain poorly targeted with therapeutics. Here we implement an integrated network interrogation approach, in which proteome and transcriptome datasets from infection of both viruses in human lung epithelial cells are utilized to predict regulatory genes involved in the host response. We take advantage of a novel “crowd-based” approach to identify and combine ranking metrics that isolate genes/proteins likely related to the pathogenicity of SARS-CoV and influenza virus. Subsequently, a multivariate regression model is used to compare predicted lung epithelial regulatory influences with data derived from other respiratory virus infection models. We predicted a small set of regulatory factors with conserved behavior for consideration as important components of viral pathogenesis that might also serve as therapeutic targets for intervention. Our results demonstrate the utility of integrating diverse ‘omic datasets to predict and prioritize regulatory features conserved across multiple pathogen infection models.

  15. Infidelity of SARS-CoV Nsp14-Exonuclease Mutant Virus Replication Is Revealed by Complete Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerle, Lance D.; Becker, Michelle M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Li, Kelvin; Venter, Eli; Lu, Xiaotao; Scherbakova, Sana; Graham, Rachel L.; Baric, Ralph S.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Spiro, David J.; Denison, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Most RNA viruses lack the mechanisms to recognize and correct mutations that arise during genome replication, resulting in quasispecies diversity that is required for pathogenesis and adaptation. However, it is not known how viruses encoding large viral RNA genomes such as the Coronaviridae (26 to 32 kb) balance the requirements for genome stability and quasispecies diversity. Further, the limits of replication infidelity during replication of large RNA genomes and how decreased fidelity impacts virus fitness over time are not known. Our previous work demonstrated that genetic inactivation of the coronavirus exoribonuclease (ExoN) in nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14) of murine hepatitis virus results in a 15-fold decrease in replication fidelity. However, it is not known whether nsp14-ExoN is required for replication fidelity of all coronaviruses, nor the impact of decreased fidelity on genome diversity and fitness during replication and passage. We report here the engineering and recovery of nsp14-ExoN mutant viruses of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that have stable growth defects and demonstrate a 21-fold increase in mutation frequency during replication in culture. Analysis of complete genome sequences from SARS-ExoN mutant viral clones revealed unique mutation sets in every genome examined from the same round of replication and a total of 100 unique mutations across the genome. Using novel bioinformatic tools and deep sequencing across the full-length genome following 10 population passages in vitro, we demonstrate retention of ExoN mutations and continued increased diversity and mutational load compared to wild-type SARS-CoV. The results define a novel genetic and bioinformatics model for introduction and identification of multi-allelic mutations in replication competent viruses that will be powerful tools for testing the effects of decreased fidelity and increased quasispecies diversity on viral replication, pathogenesis, and

  16. Anti-saturation block adaptive quantization algorithm for SAR raw data compression over the whole set of saturation degrees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiming Qi; Weidong Yu

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of block adaptive quantization (BAQ) when the output of the analog to digital converter (ADC)is saturated, this paper proposes an anti-saturation BAQ algorithm. First, the concept of the standard deviation of the output signal (SDOS) of the ADC is proposed. Also, unlike traditional normalization processing, SDOS is used and the mapping between SDOS and the average signal magnitude is deduced. Second, the saturation term is introduced to the Lloyd-Max quantizer and an optimal non-uniform scalar quantizer for saturated SAR raw data quantization is proposed. After this, the implementation scheme for the pro-posed algorithm using an FPGA is analyzed in detail. Third, the relationships among the saturation degree of the signal, the peak-to-peak value of the ADC, standard deviation of the input and output signal of the ADC and the average signal magnitude are deduced.Based on these relationships, a power compensation decoder is designed for encoding. Numerical experiment results based on ERS-1 and the simulated data show that the performance of the proposed algorithm is better than that of BAQ.

  17. Understanding SARS with Wolfram Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-WeiLI; Yu-XiPAN; YunDUAN; Zhen-DeHUNG; Ming-QingXU; LinHE

    2004-01-01

    Stepping acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) as another type of disease has been threatening mankind since late last year. Many scientists worldwide are making great efforts to study the etiology of this disease with different approaches. 13 species of SARS virus have been sequenced. However, most people still largely rely on the traditional methods with some disadvantages. In this work, we used Wolfram approach to study the relationship among SARS viruses and between SARS viruses and other types of viruses, the effect of variations on the whole genome and the advantages in the analysis of SARS based on this novel approach. As a result, the similarities between SARS viruses and other coronaviruses are not really higher than those between SARS viruses and non-coronaviruses.

  18. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko, E-mail: ckai@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  19. SARS Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Resources Related Links Clinician Registry Travelers' Health SARS Basics Fact Sheet Language: English Español (Spanish) Format: ... 3 pages] SARS [3 pages] SARS [3 pages] SARS? Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a viral ...

  20. Analysis on Imaging Region Blocking of Airborne Bistatic SAR%机载双站S AR成像区分块分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张剑云; 冉金和; 毛云祥

    2014-01-01

    机载双站SAR的回波数据具有距离向空变性或距离-方位向二维空变性,需要对观测场景进行分块成像。本文从机载双站SAR的斜距历程出发,借助于载机轨迹解耦合公式,推导了观测场景中任一点目标的距离走动和距离弯曲公式。根据距离徙动校正后的残余距离徙动与二阶相位误差研究了机载双站SAR的成像区分块准则。基于分块准则仿真得到了各种构型机载双站SAR的成像区分块结果,分析了双站结构参数与系统参数对成像区的影响,为机载双站SAR宽场景成像时成像区分块提供了理论指导。%The echo data of airborne bistatic SAR has range space variance or range-azimuth space variance,so it is nec-essary to perform block imaging in airborne bistatic SAR focusing.Based on the slant range of airborne bistatic SAR,the range walk and range cure formulas of arbitrary point target in the observing scene are derived with the track decoupling for-mulas.After performing the range cell migration (RCM)correction,imaging region blocking rules are derived with the re-sidual range cell migration and quadratic phase error (QPE).Then imaging region blocking results of airborne bistatic SAR in various configuration are tested with the numerical simulations,moreover,influences of geometry parameters and system parameters on imaging region are also analyzed,and they provide theoretical guidance to imaging region blocking in airborne bistatic SAR wide scene focusing.

  1. Identifying SARS-CoV membrane protein amino acid residues linked to virus-like particle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Tzu Tseng

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV membrane (M proteins are capable of self-assembly and release in the form of membrane-enveloped vesicles, and of forming virus-like particles (VLPs when coexpressed with SARS-CoV nucleocapsid (N protein. According to previous deletion analyses, M self-assembly involves multiple M sequence regions. To identify important M amino acid residues for VLP assembly, we coexpressed N with multiple M mutants containing substitution mutations at the amino-terminal ectodomain, carboxyl-terminal endodomain, or transmembrane segments. Our results indicate that a dileucine motif in the endodomain tail (218LL219 is required for efficient N packaging into VLPs. Results from cross-linking VLP analyses suggest that the cysteine residues 63, 85 and 158 are not in close proximity to the M dimer interface. We noted a significant reduction in M secretion due to serine replacement for C158, but not for C63 or C85. Further analysis suggests that C158 is involved in M-N interaction. In addition to mutations of the highly conserved 107-SWWSFNPE-114 motif, substitutions at codons W19, W57, P58, W91, Y94 or F95 all resulted in significantly reduced VLP yields, largely due to defective M secretion. VLP production was not significantly affected by a tryptophan replacement of Y94 or F95 or a phenylalanine replacement of W19, W57 or W91. Combined, these results indicate the involvement of specific M amino acids during SARS-CoV virus assembly, and suggest that aromatic residue retention at specific positions is critical for M function in terms of directing virus assembly.

  2. SARS: just another viral acronym?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxmeyer, L

    2003-08-01

    Recent observations and experimental evidence have purported that a virus causes SARS, but such viruses have been isolated in only less than half of SARS patients in some studies and virologist Vincent Plummer of Winnipeg's National Microbiology Laboratory found that indeed 1 in 5 perfectly healthy Canadians with a history of recent travel to Asia had the virus. Therefore SARS microbiologic origins remain unclear. Outbreaks of multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and the atypical mycobacteria simulate SARS on clinical, radiologic, epidemiologic, and diagnostic laboratory grounds and it is only logical then to include them in the differential to find a definitive cause and cure for SARS.

  3. Expression of Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome is Blocked by a Nonimmunoglobulin Protein in Plasma from Infected Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P.; Ferrer, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma of cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus contains a soluble factor that blocks the expression of the viral genome in cultured lymphocytes. The blocking factor is not present in plasma of bovine leukemia virus-free cattle or of cattle infected with common bovine viruses. Blocking of bovine leukemia virus expression by the plasma factor is reversible, and seems to be mediated by a nonimmunoglobulin protein molecule.

  4. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice and hamsters of a β-propiolactone inactivated whole virus SARS-CoV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Anjeanette; Lamirande, Elaine W; Vogel, Leatrice; Baras, Benoît; Goossens, Geneviève; Knott, Isabelle; Chen, Jun; Ward, Jerrold M; Vassilev, Ventzislav; Subbarao, Kanta

    2010-10-01

    The immunogenicity and efficacy of β-propiolactone (BPL) inactivated whole virion SARS-CoV (WI-SARS) vaccine was evaluated in BALB/c mice and golden Syrian hamsters. The vaccine preparation was tested with or without adjuvants. Adjuvant Systems AS01(B) and AS03(A) were selected and tested for their capacity to elicit high humoral and cellular immune responses to WI-SARS vaccine. We evaluated the effect of vaccine dose and each adjuvant on immunogenicity and efficacy in mice, and the effect of vaccine dose with or without the AS01(B) adjuvant on the immunogenicity and efficacy in hamsters. Efficacy was evaluated by challenge with wild-type virus at early and late time points (4 and 18 wk post-vaccination). A single dose of vaccine with or without adjuvant was poorly immunogenic in mice; a second dose resulted in a significant boost in antibody levels, even in the absence of adjuvant. The use of adjuvants resulted in higher antibody titers, with the AS01(B)-adjuvanted vaccine being slightly more immunogenic than the AS03(A)-adjuvanted vaccine. Two doses of WI-SARS with and without Adjuvant Systems were highly efficacious in mice. In hamsters, two doses of WI-SARS with and without AS01(B) were immunogenic, and two doses of 2 μg of WI-SARS with and without the adjuvant provided complete protection from early challenge. Although antibody titers had declined in all groups of vaccinated hamsters 18 wk after the second dose, the vaccinated hamsters were still partially protected from wild-type virus challenge. Vaccine with adjuvant provided better protection than non-adjuvanted WI-SARS vaccine at this later time point. Enhanced disease was not observed in the lungs or liver of hamsters following SARS-CoV challenge, regardless of the level of serum neutralizing antibodies.

  5. Matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus blocks autophagosome fusion with lysosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gannagé, Monique; Dormann, Dorothee; Albrecht, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an important human pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality every year and threatening the human population with epidemics and pandemics. Therefore, it is important to understand the biology of this virus to develop strategies to control its pathogenicity. Here, we...... demonstrate that influenza A virus inhibits macroautophagy, a cellular process known to be manipulated by diverse pathogens. Influenza A virus infection causes accumulation of autophagosomes by blocking their fusion with lysosomes, and one viral protein, matrix protein 2, is necessary and sufficient...... for this inhibition of autophagosome degradation. Macroautophagy inhibition by matrix protein 2 compromises survival of influenza virus-infected cells but does not influence viral replication. We propose that influenza A virus, which also encodes proapoptotic proteins, is able to determine the death of its host cell...

  6. A dual drug regimen synergistically blocks human parainfluenza virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Benjamin; Dirr, Larissa; El-Deeb, Ibrahim M.; Altmeyer, Ralf; Guillon, Patrice; von Itzstein, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Human parainfluenza type-3 virus (hPIV-3) is one of the principal aetiological agents of acute respiratory illness in infants worldwide and also shows high disease severity in the elderly and immunocompromised, but neither therapies nor vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection, respectively. Using a multidisciplinary approach we report herein that the approved drug suramin acts as a non-competitive in vitro inhibitor of the hPIV-3 haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Furthermore, the drug inhibits viral replication in mammalian epithelial cells with an IC50 of 30 μM, when applied post-adsorption. Significantly, we show in cell-based drug-combination studies using virus infection blockade assays, that suramin acts synergistically with the anti-influenza virus drug zanamivir. Our data suggests that lower concentrations of both drugs can be used to yield high levels of inhibition. Finally, using NMR spectroscopy and in silico docking simulations we confirmed that suramin binds HN simultaneously with zanamivir. This binding event occurs most likely in the vicinity of the protein primary binding site, resulting in an enhancement of the inhibitory potential of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-based inhibitor. This study offers a potentially exciting avenue for the treatment of parainfluenza infection by a combinatorial repurposing approach of well-established approved drugs.

  7. Solution scattering studies on a virus capsid protein as a building block for nanoscale assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comellas Aragones, M.; Comellas-Aragones, Marta; Sikkema, Friso D.; Delaittre, Guillaume; Terry, Ann E.; King, Stephen M.; Visser, Dirk; Heenan, Richard K.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Feiters, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled protein cages are versatile building blocks in the construction of biomolecular nanostructures. Because of the defined assembly behaviour the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) protein is often used for such applications. Here we report a detailed solution scattering study of the

  8. Sublingual immunization with recombinant adenovirus encoding SARS-CoV spike protein induces systemic and mucosal immunity without redirection of the virus to the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim Byoung-Shik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sublingual (s.l. administration of soluble protein antigens, inactivated viruses, or virus-like particles has been shown to induce broad immune responses in mucosal and extra-mucosal tissues. Recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vectors (rADVs infect mucosa surface and therefore can serve as a mucosal antigen delivery vehicle. In this study we examined whether s.l. immunization with rADV encoding spike protein (S (rADV-S of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV induces protective immunity against SARS-CoV and could serve as a safe mucosal route for delivery of rADV. Results Here, we show that s.l. administration of rADV-S induced serum SARS-CoV neutralizing and airway IgA antibodies in mice. These antibody responses are comparable to those induced by intranasal (i.n. administration. In addition, s.l. immunization induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs that are superior to those induced by intramuscular immunization. Importantly, unlike i.n. administration, s.l. immunization with rADV did not redirect the rADV vector to the olfactory bulb. Conclusion Our study indicates that s.l. immunization with rADV-S is safe and effective in induction of a broad spectrum of immune responses and presumably protection against infection with SARS-CoV.

  9. Bats and SARS

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-11-08

    Bats are a natural reservoir for emerging viruses, among them henipaviruses and rabies virus variants. Dr. Nina Marano, Chief, Geographic Medicine and Health Promotion Branch, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, CDC, explains connection between horseshoe bats and SARS coronavirus transmission.  Created: 11/8/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 11/17/2006.

  10. Bithionol blocks pathogenicity of bacterial toxins, ricin, and Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, William; Zilbermintz, Leeor; Cheng, Luisa W; Zozaya, Josue; Tran, Sharon H; Elliott, Jeffrey H; Polukhina, Kseniya; Manasherob, Robert; Li, Amy; Chi, Xiaoli; Gharaibeh, Dima; Kenny, Tara; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Soloveva, Veronica; Haddow, Andrew D; Nasar, Farooq; Bavari, Sina; Bassik, Michael C; Cohen, Stanley N; Levitin, Anastasia; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2016-09-30

    Diverse pathogenic agents often utilize overlapping host networks, and hub proteins within these networks represent attractive targets for broad-spectrum drugs. Using bacterial toxins, we describe a new approach for discovering broad-spectrum therapies capable of inhibiting host proteins that mediate multiple pathogenic pathways. This approach can be widely used, as it combines genetic-based target identification with cell survival-based and protein function-based multiplex drug screens, and concurrently discovers therapeutic compounds and their protein targets. Using B-lymphoblastoid cells derived from the HapMap Project cohort of persons of African, European, and Asian ancestry we identified host caspases as hub proteins that mediate the lethality of multiple pathogenic agents. We discovered that an approved drug, Bithionol, inhibits host caspases and also reduces the detrimental effects of anthrax lethal toxin, diphtheria toxin, cholera toxin, Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A, Botulinum neurotoxin, ricin, and Zika virus. Our study reveals the practicality of identifying host proteins that mediate multiple disease pathways and discovering broad-spectrum therapies that target these hub proteins.

  11. Bithionol blocks pathogenicity of bacterial toxins, ricin, and Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, William; Zilbermintz, Leeor; Cheng, Luisa W.; Zozaya, Josue; Tran, Sharon H.; Elliott, Jeffrey H.; Polukhina, Kseniya; Manasherob, Robert; Li, Amy; Chi, Xiaoli; Gharaibeh, Dima; Kenny, Tara; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Soloveva, Veronica; Haddow, Andrew D.; Nasar, Farooq; Bavari, Sina; Bassik, Michael C.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Levitin, Anastasia; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Diverse pathogenic agents often utilize overlapping host networks, and hub proteins within these networks represent attractive targets for broad-spectrum drugs. Using bacterial toxins, we describe a new approach for discovering broad-spectrum therapies capable of inhibiting host proteins that mediate multiple pathogenic pathways. This approach can be widely used, as it combines genetic-based target identification with cell survival-based and protein function-based multiplex drug screens, and concurrently discovers therapeutic compounds and their protein targets. Using B-lymphoblastoid cells derived from the HapMap Project cohort of persons of African, European, and Asian ancestry we identified host caspases as hub proteins that mediate the lethality of multiple pathogenic agents. We discovered that an approved drug, Bithionol, inhibits host caspases and also reduces the detrimental effects of anthrax lethal toxin, diphtheria toxin, cholera toxin, Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A, Botulinum neurotoxin, ricin, and Zika virus. Our study reveals the practicality of identifying host proteins that mediate multiple disease pathways and discovering broad-spectrum therapies that target these hub proteins. PMID:27686742

  12. A liquid phase blocking ELISA for the detection of antibodies against infectious bronchitis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso T.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A liquid phase blocking ELISA (LPB-ELISA was developed for the detection and measurement of antibodies against infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. The purified and nonpurified virus used as antigen, the capture and detector antibodies, and the chicken hyperimmune sera were prepared and standardized for this purpose. A total of 156 sera from vaccinated and 100 from specific pathogen-free chickens with no recorded contact with the virus were tested. The respective serum titers obtained in the serum neutralization test (SNT were compared with those obtained in the LPB-ELISA. There was a high correlation (r2 = 0.8926 between the two tests. The LPB-ELISA represents a single test suitable for the rapid detection of antibodies against bronchitis virus in chicken sera, with good sensitivity (88%, specificity (100% and agreement (95.31%.

  13. Macromolecular Antiviral Agents against Zika, Ebola, SARS, and Other Pathogenic Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schandock, Franziska; Riber, Camilla Frich; Röcker, Annika

    2017-01-01

    . This work performs selection of synthetic polymers as novel broadly active agents and demonstrates activity of these polymers against Zika, Ebola, Lassa, Lyssa, Rabies, Marburg, Ebola, influenza, herpes simplex, and human immunodeficiency viruses. Results presented herein offer structure...

  14. IFITM3 restricts influenza A virus entry by blocking the formation of fusion pores following virus-endosome hemifusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanay M Desai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs inhibit infection of diverse enveloped viruses, including the influenza A virus (IAV which is thought to enter from late endosomes. Recent evidence suggests that IFITMs block virus hemifusion (lipid mixing in the absence of viral content release by altering the properties of cell membranes. Consistent with this mechanism, excess cholesterol in late endosomes of IFITM-expressing cells has been reported to inhibit IAV entry. Here, we examined IAV restriction by IFITM3 protein using direct virus-cell fusion assay and single virus imaging in live cells. IFITM3 over-expression did not inhibit lipid mixing, but abrogated the release of viral content into the cytoplasm. Although late endosomes of IFITM3-expressing cells accumulated cholesterol, other interventions leading to aberrantly high levels of this lipid did not inhibit virus fusion. These results imply that excess cholesterol in late endosomes is not the mechanism by which IFITM3 inhibits the transition from hemifusion to full fusion. The IFITM3's ability to block fusion pore formation at a post-hemifusion stage shows that this protein stabilizes the cytoplasmic leaflet of endosomal membranes without adversely affecting the lumenal leaflet. We propose that IFITM3 interferes with pore formation either directly, through partitioning into the cytoplasmic leaflet of a hemifusion intermediate, or indirectly, by modulating the lipid/protein composition of this leaflet. Alternatively, IFITM3 may redirect IAV fusion to a non-productive pathway, perhaps by promoting fusion with intralumenal vesicles within multivesicular bodies/late endosomes.

  15. Development of a blocking latex agglutination test for the detection of antibodies to chicken anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Dai Quang; Ogawa, Haruko; Bui, Vuong Nghia; Nguyen, Tham Thi Hong; Gronsang, Dulyatad; Baatartsogt, Tugsbaatar; Kizito, Mugimba Kahoza; AboElkhair, Mohammed; Yamaguchi, Shigeo; Nguyen, Viet Khong; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2015-09-01

    A blocking latex agglutination test (b-LAT) developed in this study was evaluated for the detection of antibodies against chicken anemia virus (CAV) in chickens. Polystyrene latex beads were coupled with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CAV (mAb-beads). When mAb-beads were mixed with antigens prepared from the lysate of MDCC-MSB1 cells infected with CAV, agglutination occurred. A short pre-incubation of CAV antigens with CAV-specific antiserum inhibited the agglutination of mAb-beads. The test results were obtained within 5min. The specificity of b-LAT was evaluated using sera from specific pathogen-free chickens and sera containing antibodies to avian influenza virus, Newcastle disease virus, infectious bursal disease virus, and Marek's disease virus; nonspecific agglutination and cross-reactivity with antibodies to unrelated viruses were not observed. The examination of 94 serum samples collected from commercial breeder chickens of various ages (17-63 weeks) revealed good agreement (93.6%, Kappa value=0.82) between b-LAT and a virus neutralization test, known to be most sensitive and specific in the detection of antibodies to CAV. These results indicate that b-LAT, a simple and rapid test, is a useful and reliable tool in CAV serology.

  16. Deletions in the fifth alpha helix of HIV-1 matrix block virus release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, Bridget; Li, Yan; Maly, Connor J.; Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Chen, Han [Center for Biotechnology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Zhou, You [Center for Biotechnology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Nebraska Center for Virology, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The matrix (MA) protein of HIV-1 is the N-terminal component of the Gag structural protein and is critical for the early and late stages of viral replication. MA contains five α-helices (α1–α5). Deletions in the N-terminus of α5 as small as three amino acids impaired virus release. Electron microscopy of one deletion mutant (MA∆96-120) showed that its particles were tethered to the surface of cells by membranous stalks. Immunoblots indicated all mutants were processed completely, but mutants with large deletions had alternative processing intermediates. Consistent with the EM data, MA∆96-120 retained membrane association and multimerization capability. Co-expression of this mutant inhibited wild type particle release. Alanine scanning mutation in this region did not affect virus release, although the progeny virions were poorly infectious. Combined, these data demonstrate that structural ablation of the α5 of MA inhibits virus release. - Highlights: • Deletions were identified in the C-terminus of matrix that block virus release. • These deletion mutants still multimerized and associated with membranes. • TEM showed the mutant particles were tethered to the cell surface. • Amino acid mutagenesis of the region did not affect release. • The data suggests that disruption of matrix structure blocks virus release.

  17. Evaluation of a blocking ELISA for screening of antibodies against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.J.; Bøtner, Anette; Madsen, E.S.

    1997-01-01

    A blocking Elisa was developed for the detection of antibodies against PRRS virus with a view to satisfying the need for examination of blood samples on a large scale. The test was evaluated in comparison with an indirect Elisa and the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. The blocking Elisa was sens......A blocking Elisa was developed for the detection of antibodies against PRRS virus with a view to satisfying the need for examination of blood samples on a large scale. The test was evaluated in comparison with an indirect Elisa and the immunoperoxidase monolayer assay. The blocking Elisa...

  18. Design, synthesis, anti-tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activity, and SARs of 7-methoxycryptopleurine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziwen; Feng, Anzheng; Cui, Mingbo; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Qingmin

    2014-11-01

    A series of 7-methoxycryptopleurine derivatives 2-23 were prepared and evaluated for their antiviral activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) for the first time. The bioassay results showed that most of these compounds exhibited excellent in vivo anti-TMV activity, of which 7-methoxycryptopleurine salt derivatives 16, 19, and 23 displayed significantly higher activity than 7-methoxycryptopleurine (1) and commercial ribavirin and ningnanmycin. Salification, the most commonly employed method for modifying physical-chemical properties, did significantly increase antiviral activity, and different salt forms displayed different antiviral effect. This study provides fundamental support for development and optimization of phenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids as potential inhibitors of plant virus. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Lipoprotein lipase inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV infection by blocking virus cell entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maillard

    Full Text Available A distinctive feature of HCV is that its life cycle depends on lipoprotein metabolism. Viral morphogenesis and secretion follow the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL biogenesis pathway and, consequently, infectious HCV in the serum is associated with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL hydrolyzes TRL within chylomicrons and VLDL but, independently of its catalytic activity, it has a bridging activity, mediating the hepatic uptake of chylomicrons and VLDL remnants. We previously showed that exogenously added LPL increases HCV binding to hepatoma cells by acting as a bridge between virus-associated lipoproteins and cell surface heparan sulfate, while simultaneously decreasing infection levels. We show here that LPL efficiently inhibits cell infection with two HCV strains produced in hepatoma cells or in primary human hepatocytes transplanted into uPA-SCID mice with fully functional human ApoB-lipoprotein profiles. Viruses produced in vitro or in vivo were separated on iodixanol gradients into low and higher density populations, and the infection of Huh 7.5 cells by both virus populations was inhibited by LPL. The effect of LPL depended on its enzymatic activity. However, the lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin restored only a minor part of HCV infectivity, suggesting an important role of the LPL bridging function in the inhibition of infection. We followed HCV cell entry by immunoelectron microscopy with anti-envelope and anti-core antibodies. These analyses demonstrated the internalization of virus particles into hepatoma cells and their presence in intracellular vesicles and associated with lipid droplets. In the presence of LPL, HCV was retained at the cell surface. We conclude that LPL efficiently inhibits HCV infection by acting on TRL associated with HCV particles through mechanisms involving its lipolytic function, but mostly its bridging function. These mechanisms lead to immobilization of the virus at the cell

  20. Native Wolbachia from Aedes albopictus Blocks Chikungunya Virus Infection In Cellulo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raquin, Vincent; Valiente Moro, Claire; Saucereau, Yoann; Tran, Florence-Hélène; Potier, Patrick; Mavingui, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia, a widespread endosymbiont of terrestrial arthropods, can protect its host against viral and parasitic infections, a phenotype called "pathogen blocking". However, in some cases Wolbachia may have no effect or even enhance pathogen infection, depending on the host-Wolbachia-pathogen combination. The tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is naturally infected by two strains of Wolbachia, wAlbA and wAlbB, and is a competent vector for different arboviruses such as dengue virus (DENV) and Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Interestingly, it was shown in some cases that Ae. albopictus native Wolbachia strains are able to inhibit DENV transmission by limiting viral replication in salivary glands, but no such impact was measured on CHIKV replication in vivo. To better understand the Wolbachia/CHIKV/Ae. albopictus interaction, we generated a cellular model using Ae. albopictus derived C6/36 cells that we infected with the wAlbB strain. Our results indicate that CHIKV infection is negatively impacted at both RNA replication and virus assembly/secretion steps in presence of wAlbB. Using FISH, we observed CHIKV and wAlbB in the same mosquito cells, indicating that the virus is still able to enter the cell in the presence of the bacterium. Further work is needed to decipher molecular pathways involved in Wolbachia-CHIKV interaction at the cellular level, but this cellular model can be a useful tool to study the mechanism behind virus blocking phenotype induced by Wolbachia. More broadly, this underlines that despite Wolbachia antiviral potential other complex interactions occur in vivo to determine mosquito vector competence in Ae. albopictus. PMID:25923352

  1. Native Wolbachia from Aedes albopictus Blocks Chikungunya Virus Infection In Cellulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raquin, Vincent; Valiente Moro, Claire; Saucereau, Yoann; Tran, Florence-Hélène; Potier, Patrick; Mavingui, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia, a widespread endosymbiont of terrestrial arthropods, can protect its host against viral and parasitic infections, a phenotype called "pathogen blocking". However, in some cases Wolbachia may have no effect or even enhance pathogen infection, depending on the host-Wolbachia-pathogen combination. The tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is naturally infected by two strains of Wolbachia, wAlbA and wAlbB, and is a competent vector for different arboviruses such as dengue virus (DENV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Interestingly, it was shown in some cases that Ae. albopictus native Wolbachia strains are able to inhibit DENV transmission by limiting viral replication in salivary glands, but no such impact was measured on CHIKV replication in vivo. To better understand the Wolbachia/CHIKV/Ae. albopictus interaction, we generated a cellular model using Ae. albopictus derived C6/36 cells that we infected with the wAlbB strain. Our results indicate that CHIKV infection is negatively impacted at both RNA replication and virus assembly/secretion steps in presence of wAlbB. Using FISH, we observed CHIKV and wAlbB in the same mosquito cells, indicating that the virus is still able to enter the cell in the presence of the bacterium. Further work is needed to decipher molecular pathways involved in Wolbachia-CHIKV interaction at the cellular level, but this cellular model can be a useful tool to study the mechanism behind virus blocking phenotype induced by Wolbachia. More broadly, this put into question the ecological role of Wolbachia symbiont in Ae. albopictus, but also the ability of the CHIKV to counteract Wolbachia's antiviral potential in vivo.

  2. Interferon-induced Sus scrofa Mx1 blocks endocytic traffic of incoming influenza A virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Mélanie; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie; Cornet, François; Desmecht, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The interferon-induced Mx proteins of vertebrates are dynamin-like GTPases, some isoforms of which can additionally inhibit the life cycle of certain RNA viruses. Here we show that the porcine Mx1 protein (poMx1) inhibits replication of influenza A virus and we attempt to identify the step at which the viral life cycle is blocked. In infected cells expressing poMx1, the level of transcripts encoding the viral nucleoprotein is significantly lower than normal, even when secondary transcription is prevented by exposure to cycloheximide. This reveals that a pretranscriptional block participates to the anti-influenza activity. Binding and internalization of incoming virus particles are normal in the presence of poMx1 but centripetal traffic to the late endosomes is interrupted. Surprisingly but decisively, poMx1 significantly alters binding of early endosome autoantigen 1 to early endosomes and/or early endosome size and spatial distribution. This is compatible with impairment of traffic of the endocytic vesicles to the late endosomes.

  3. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC.

  4. Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide inhibits subgroup J avian leucosis virus infection by directly blocking virus infection and improving immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cuilian; Wei, Kai; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Hu, Liping; Zhao, Peng; Meng, Xiuyan; Shao, Mingxu; Wang, Chuanwen; Zhu, Lijun; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yang; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2017-03-13

    Subgroup J avian leucosis virus (ALV-J) generally causes neoplastic diseases, immunosuppression and subsequently increases susceptibility to secondary infection in birds. The spread of ALV-J mainly depends on congenital infection and horizontal contact. Although ALV-J infection causes enormous losses yearly in the poultry industry worldwide, effective measures to control ALV-J remain lacking. In this study, we demonstrated that Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), a natural polysaccharide extracted from Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen, can significantly inhibit ALV-J replication in vitro by blocking viral adsorption to host cells. Electron microscopy and blocking ELISA tests revealed that TPPPS possibly blocks viral adsorption to host cells by interacting with the glycoprotein 85 protein of ALV-J. Furthermore, we artificially established a congenitally ALV-J-infected chicken model to examine the anti-viral effects of TPPPS in vivo. TPPPS significantly inhibited viral shedding and viral loads in immune organs and largely eliminated the immunosuppression caused by congenital ALV-J infection. Additionally, pre-administration of TPPPS obviously reduced the size and delayed the occurrence of tumors induced by acute oncogenic ALV-J infection. This study revealed the prominent effects and feasible mechanisms of TPPPS in inhibiting ALV-J infection, thereby providing a novel prospect to control ALV-J spread.

  5. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2016-12-15

    A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans. Avian influenza viruses, including H5N1 and H7N9, have been associated with severe respiratory disease and fatal outcomes in humans. Although acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and progressive pulmonary endothelial damage

  6. Spironolactone blocks Epstein-Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-03-29

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses.

  7. Hepatitis C virus blocks interferon effector function by inducing protein kinase R phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaigorta, Urtzi; Chisari, Francis V

    2009-12-17

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single-stranded RNA virus encoding a single polyprotein whose translation is driven by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). HCV infection strongly induces antiviral interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in the liver, yet it persists, suggesting that HCV can block ISG effector function. We now show that HCV infection triggers phosphorylation and activation of the RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR, which inhibits eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2 alpha and attenuates ISG protein expression despite normal ISG mRNA induction. ISG protein induction is restored and the antiviral effects of interferon are enhanced when PKR expression is suppressed in interferon-treated infected cells. Whereas host protein translation, including antiviral ISGs, is suppressed by activated PKR, HCV IRES-dependent translation is not. These results suggest that the ability of HCV to activate PKR may, paradoxically, be advantageous for the virus during an IFN response by preferentially suppressing the translation of ISGs.

  8. Development of a blocking ELISA for detection of antibodies against avian hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoyuan; Zhao, Qin; Sun, Yani; Wang, Xinjie; Zhao, Jinan; Du, Taofeng; Wang, Chengbao; Xiao, Shuqi; Mu, Yang; Zhang, Gaiping; Luo, Jianxun; Hsu, Walter H; Zhou, En-Min

    2014-08-01

    A blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA) was developed for the detection of immunoglobulin G antibodies against avian hepatitis E virus (HEV). In the bELISA, the coating antigen was a truncated protein containing C-terminal 268-amino acid region of ORF2 from an avian HEV strain isolated in China (CaHEV) and blocking antibody was a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 1H5 recognizing the epitope within amino acids 384-414 in the C-terminal 268-amino acid region. The concentration of blocking mAb 1H5 was determined as that yielded an OD450nm value of 1.0 for binding to the coating antigen and the antigen concentration and serum dilution were optimized using a checkerboard titration. A cut-off value of 20.7% at the mean percent inhibition plus 3 standard deviations was determined by testing 265 negative sera. The bELISA had a sensitivity of 98.3% by testing 116 positive sera from chickens infected experimentally with CaHEV and had no cross-reaction with other anti-avian virus antibodies. The compliance rates of the bELISA with indirect ELISA and Western blot were 83.7% and 93.3%, respectively, by testing 300 field chicken sera. These results suggested that the bELISA developed in this study can be used for detection of antibodies against avian HEV and showed high reproducibility compared with indirect ELISA and Western blot methods.

  9. Nelfinavir impairs glycosylation of herpes simplex virus 1 envelope proteins and blocks virus maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Gachelet, Eliora; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Barcy, Serge; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Nelfinavir (NFV) is an HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitor that has numerous effects on human cells, which impart attractive antitumor properties. NFV has also been shown to have in vitro inhibitory activity against human herpesviruses (HHVs). Given the apparent absence of an aspartyl protease encoded by HHVs, we investigated the mechanism of action of NFV herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in cultured cells. Selection of HSV-1 resistance to NFV was not achieved despite multiple passages under drug pressure. NFV did not significantly affect the level of expression of late HSV-1 gene products. Normal numbers of viral particles appeared to be produced in NFV-treated cells by electron microscopy but remain within the cytoplasm more often than controls. NFV did not inhibit the activity of the HSV-1 serine protease nor could its antiviral activity be attributed to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. NFV was found to decrease glycosylation of viral glycoproteins B and C and resulted in aberrant subcellular localization, consistent with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response by NFV. These results demonstrate that NFV causes alterations in HSV-1 glycoprotein maturation and egress and likely acts on one or more host cell functions that are important for HHV replication.

  10. Nelfinavir Impairs Glycosylation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Envelope Proteins and Blocks Virus Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Gantt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nelfinavir (NFV is an HIV-1 aspartyl protease inhibitor that has numerous effects on human cells, which impart attractive antitumor properties. NFV has also been shown to have in vitro inhibitory activity against human herpesviruses (HHVs. Given the apparent absence of an aspartyl protease encoded by HHVs, we investigated the mechanism of action of NFV herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in cultured cells. Selection of HSV-1 resistance to NFV was not achieved despite multiple passages under drug pressure. NFV did not significantly affect the level of expression of late HSV-1 gene products. Normal numbers of viral particles appeared to be produced in NFV-treated cells by electron microscopy but remain within the cytoplasm more often than controls. NFV did not inhibit the activity of the HSV-1 serine protease nor could its antiviral activity be attributed to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. NFV was found to decrease glycosylation of viral glycoproteins B and C and resulted in aberrant subcellular localization, consistent with induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response by NFV. These results demonstrate that NFV causes alterations in HSV-1 glycoprotein maturation and egress and likely acts on one or more host cell functions that are important for HHV replication.

  11. Potent neutralization of influenza A virus by a single-domain antibody blocking M2 ion channel protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowei Wei

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus poses serious health threat to humans. Neutralizing antibodies against the highly conserved M2 ion channel is thought to offer broad protection against influenza A viruses. Here, we screened synthetic Camel single-domain antibody (VHH libraries against native M2 ion channel protein. One of the isolated VHHs, M2-7A, specifically bound to M2-expressed cell membrane as well as influenza A virion, inhibited replication of both amantadine-sensitive and resistant influenza A viruses in vitro, and protected mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Moreover, M2-7A showed blocking activity for proton influx through M2 ion channel. These pieces of evidence collectively demonstrate for the first time that a neutralizing antibody against M2 with broad specificity is achievable, and M2-7A may have potential for cross protection against a number of variants and subtypes of influenza A viruses.

  12. Development and evaluation of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay to detect antibodies to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas M.; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV.

  13. Conservation analysis of dengue virus T-cell epitope-based vaccine candidates using peptide block entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Ronn Olsen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Broad coverage of the pathogen population is particularly important when designing CD8+ T-cell epitope vaccines against viral pathogens. Traditional approaches to assembling broadly covering sets of peptides are commonly based on assembling highly conserved epitopes. Peptide block entropy analysis is a novel approach to assembling sets of broadly covering antigens. Since T-cell epitopes are recognized as peptides rather than individual residues, this method is based on calculating the information content of blocks of peptides from a multiple sequence alignment of homologous proteins rather than individual residues. The block entropy analysis provides broad coverage by variant inclusion, since high frequency may not be the sole determinant of the immunogenic potential of a predicted MHC class I binder. We applied block entropy analysis method to the proteomes of the four serotypes of dengue virus and found 1,551 blocks of 9-mer peptides, which covered all available sequences with five or fewer unique peptides. In contrast, the benchmark study by Khan et al. (2008, resulted in 165 9-mers being determined as conserved. Many of the blocks are located consecutively in the proteins, so connecting these blocks resulted in 78 conserved regions which can be covered with 457 subunit peptides. Of the 1551 blocks of 9-mer peptides, 110 blocks consisted of peptides all predicted to bind to MHC with similar affinity and the same HLA restriction. In total, we identified a pool of 333 peptides as T-cell epitope candidates. This set could form the basis for a broadly neutralizing dengue virus vaccine. The peptide block entropy analysis approach significantly increases the number of conserved peptide regions in comparison to traditional conservation analysis of individual residues. We determined 457 subunit peptides with the capacity to encompass the diversity of all sequenced DENV strains.

  14. The spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is cleaved in virus infected Vero-E6 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Spike protein is one of the major structural proteins of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus. It is essential for the interaction of the virons with host cell receptors and subsequent fusion of the viral envelop with host cell membrane to allow infection. Some spike proteins of coronavirus, such as MHV, HCoV-OC43, AIBV and BcoV, are proteolytically cleaved into two subunits, S1 and S2. In contrast, TGV, FIPV and HCoV-229E are not. Many studies have shown that the cleavage of spike protein seriously affects its function. In order to investigate the maturation and proteolytic processing of the S protein of SARS CoV, we generated S1 and S2 subunit specific antibodies (Abs) as well as N, E and 3CL protein-specific Abs. Our results showed that the antibodies could efficiently and specifically bind to their corresponding proteins from E. coli expressed or lysate of SARS-CoV infected Vero-E6 cells by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the anti-S 1 and S2 Abs were proved to be capable of binding to SARS CoV under electron microscope observation. When S2 Ab was used to perform immune precipitation with lysate of SARS-CoV infected cells, a cleaved S2 fragment was detected with S2-specific mAb by Western blot analysis. The data demonstrated that the cleavage of S protein was observed in the lysate, indicating that proteolytic processing of S protein is present in host cells.

  15. Hepatic inflammation mediated by hepatitis C virus core protein is ameliorated by blocking complement activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chen-Ming

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of inflammation and fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection remains unclear. Transgenic mice with constitutive HCV core over-expression display steatosis only. While the reasons for this are unclear, it may be important that core protein production in these models begins during gestation, in contrast to human hepatitis C virus infection, which occurs post-natally and typically in adults. AIMS: To more realistically model the effect of core protein production in the adult liver, we developed a mouse with conditional expression of HCV core and examined the effect of core protein production in the adult liver. Methods Liver biopsy samples from transgenic mice with tetracycline(tet-regulated conditional core protein expression were evaluated immunohistologically. Microarray analysis of HCV core transgenic mice with steatohepatitis pointed to a role of the complement pathway. This was further explored by blocking complement activation by in vivo administration of CD55 (decay accelerating factor for complement, which inhibits activation of C3. Results Transgenic mice exhibited low, intermediate, or high HCV core protein expression when fed a permissive diet of standard chow. Aside from hepatic steatosis, hepatic inflammation and fibrosis were seen in mice with intermediate levels of core protein. Microarray analyses of inflamed liver demonstrated activation of both the complement (C3 up-regulation and coagulation pathways (fibrinogen B up-regulation. Administration of CD55 reduced hepatic inflammation. Conclusion Transgenic mice that conditionally express intermediate HCV core protein develop inflammation, steatosis, and fibrosis. These effects mediated by HCV core are reduced by administration of CD55, a regulator of the complement pathway. The model may be valuable in investigating the pathogenesis of liver inflammation in chronic hepatitis C.

  16. The RNAi pathway plays a small part in Wolbachia-mediated blocking of dengue virus in mosquito cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terradas, Gerard; Joubert, D. Albert; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is an insect endosymbiont known to limit the replication of viruses including dengue and Zika in their primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. Wolbachia is being released into mosquito populations globally in a bid to control the diseases caused by these viruses. It is theorized that Wolbachia’s priming of the insect immune system may confer protection against subsequent viral infection. Other hypotheses posit a role for competition between Wolbachia and viruses for host cellular resources. Using an A. aegypti cell line infected with Wolbachia, we tested the effects of targeting siRNAs against the major innate immune pathways on dengue virus loads. We show that while Wolbachia infection induces genes in the Toll, JAK/STAT and RNAi pathways, only reduced expression of RNAi leads to a rebound of dengue virus loads in Wolbachia-infected cells. The magnitude of the effect explained less than 10% of the total DENV load, demonstrating that blocking must be dependent on other factors in addition to the expression of RNAi. The findings bode well for the long-term stability of blocking given that immunity gene expression would likely be highly plastic and susceptible to rapid evolution. PMID:28262718

  17. Equine tetherin blocks retrovirus release and its activity is antagonized by equine infectious anemia virus envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Hu, Zhe; Gu, Qinyong; Wu, Xingliang; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Wei, Ping; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Human tetherin is a host restriction factor that inhibits replication of enveloped viruses by blocking viral release. Tetherin has an unusual topology that includes an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a single transmembrane domain, an extracellular domain, and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Tetherin is not well conserved across species, so it inhibits viral replication in a species-specific manner. Thus, studies of tetherin activities from different species provide an important tool for understanding its antiviral mechanism. Here, we report cloning of equine tetherin and characterization of its antiviral activity. Equine tetherin shares 53%, 40%, 36%, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with feline, human, simian, and murine tetherins, respectively. Like the feline tetherin, equine tetherin has a shorter N-terminal domain than human tetherin. Equine tetherin is localized on the cell surface and strongly blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) release from virus-producing cells. The antiviral activity of equine tetherin is neutralized by EIAV envelope protein, but not by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu, which is a human tetherin antagonist, and EIAV envelope protein does not counteract human tetherin. These results shed new light on our understanding of the species-specific tetherin antiviral mechanism.

  18. The polysulfonated compound suramin blocks adsorption and lateral difusion of herpes simplex virus type-1 in vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, J S; Rice, M; Wagner, E K

    1999-05-25

    Several polysulfonate compounds have been shown to have the potential to inhibit the replication of herpesviruses by blocking binding and penetration of the host cell. We analyzed the actions of the polysulfonate compound suramin on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and compared them with the actions of heparin. We used the expression of a reporter gene (beta-galactosidase) recombined into the latency-associated transcript region of the 17syn+ strain of HSV-1 to quickly evaluate productive cycle activity and have shown that it can be directly correlated with virus replication under the conditions used. We find that suramin, like heparin, blocks the binding of HSV-1 to the cell membrane. Also, suramin efficiently blocks the cell-to-cell spread of the virus; this effect has not been previously reported. Our control experiments demonstrate that heparin also has some effect on intercellular spread of HSV-1 but to a significantly lesser degree than does suramin. We suggest that suramin and related polysulfonate compounds have potential for developing of antiherpes treatments.

  19. A Novel Blocking ELISA for Detection of Antibodies against Hepatitis E Virus in Domestic Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiyang; Zhao, Qin; Liu, Baoyuan; Wang, Lizhen; Sun, Yani; Li, Huixia; Wang, Xinjie; Syed, Shahid Faraz; Zhang, Gaiping; Zhou, En-Min

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infects both humans and animals, with an overall human mortality rate generally less than 1%, but as high as 20% among pregnant women. HEV strains fall into 4 major genotypes. Zoonotic genotypes 3 and 4 associate with sporadic human and animal HEV cases in many industrialized countries. To date, collective evidence implicates pigs as the main HEV reservoir, justifying the importance of monitoring HEV infection rates in pig herds to prevent human illness. Due to the lack of a robust in vitro cell culture system for viral propagation, no "gold standard" assay has yet been developed to detect HEV infection in domestic pigs. 1E4, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for the C-terminal 268 amino acids of HEV genotype 4 ORF2 capsid protein (sORF2-C), was generated and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for use in a blocking ELISA (bELISA). Optimal sORF2-C coating antigen concentration (8 μg/ml), HRP-1E4 dilution (1:1000), and test pig serum dilution (1:20) were determined using a checkerboard titration test. A cut-off value of 16.9% was chosen to differentiate between positive vs. negative sera after mean percent inhibition (PI) testing of 230 negative pig sera. Compared with the indirect ELISA (iELISA), western blot, and a commercial ELISA kit for detecting anti-HEV antibodies in human sera, the bELISA showed no statistical differences and statistically high coincidence of 93.23%, 92%, and 95% with the other tests, respectively. A blocking ELISA (bELISA) for detecting anti-HEV antibodies in pig serum samples was developed with high sensitivity and high specificity comparable to that of the indirect ELISA. The bELISA results exhibited high agreement with iELISA, western blot, and a commercial ELISA kit designed to detect human anti-HEV antibodies. Therefore, bELISA should serve as an ideal method for large-scale serological investigation of anti-HEV antibodies in domestic pigs.

  20. A Novel Blocking ELISA for Detection of Antibodies against Hepatitis E Virus in Domestic Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyang Chen

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV infects both humans and animals, with an overall human mortality rate generally less than 1%, but as high as 20% among pregnant women. HEV strains fall into 4 major genotypes. Zoonotic genotypes 3 and 4 associate with sporadic human and animal HEV cases in many industrialized countries. To date, collective evidence implicates pigs as the main HEV reservoir, justifying the importance of monitoring HEV infection rates in pig herds to prevent human illness. Due to the lack of a robust in vitro cell culture system for viral propagation, no "gold standard" assay has yet been developed to detect HEV infection in domestic pigs. 1E4, a monoclonal antibody (mAb specific for the C-terminal 268 amino acids of HEV genotype 4 ORF2 capsid protein (sORF2-C, was generated and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP for use in a blocking ELISA (bELISA. Optimal sORF2-C coating antigen concentration (8 μg/ml, HRP-1E4 dilution (1:1000, and test pig serum dilution (1:20 were determined using a checkerboard titration test. A cut-off value of 16.9% was chosen to differentiate between positive vs. negative sera after mean percent inhibition (PI testing of 230 negative pig sera. Compared with the indirect ELISA (iELISA, western blot, and a commercial ELISA kit for detecting anti-HEV antibodies in human sera, the bELISA showed no statistical differences and statistically high coincidence of 93.23%, 92%, and 95% with the other tests, respectively. A blocking ELISA (bELISA for detecting anti-HEV antibodies in pig serum samples was developed with high sensitivity and high specificity comparable to that of the indirect ELISA. The bELISA results exhibited high agreement with iELISA, western blot, and a commercial ELISA kit designed to detect human anti-HEV antibodies. Therefore, bELISA should serve as an ideal method for large-scale serological investigation of anti-HEV antibodies in domestic pigs.

  1. Self-assembly of a nine-residue amyloid-forming peptide fragment of SARS corona virus E-protein: mechanism of self aggregation and amyloid-inhibition of hIAPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anirban; Pithadia, Amit S; Bhat, Jyotsna; Bera, Supriyo; Midya, Anupam; Fierke, Carol A; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-04-01

    Molecular self-assembly, a phenomenon widely observed in nature, has been exploited through organic molecules, proteins, DNA, and peptides to study complex biological systems. These self-assembly systems may also be used in understanding the molecular and structural biology which can inspire the design and synthesis of increasingly complex biomaterials. Specifically, use of these building blocks to investigate protein folding and misfolding has been of particular value since it can provide tremendous insights into peptide aggregation related to a variety of protein misfolding diseases, or amyloid diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type-II diabetes). Herein, the self-assembly of TK9, a nine-residue peptide of the extra membrane C-terminal tail of the SARS corona virus envelope, and its variants were characterized through biophysical, spectroscopic, and simulated studies, and it was confirmed that the structure of these peptides influences their aggregation propensity, hence, mimicking amyloid proteins. TK9, which forms a beta-sheet rich fibril, contains a key sequence motif that may be critical for beta-sheet formation, thus making it an interesting system to study amyloid fibrillation. TK9 aggregates were further examined through simulations to evaluate the possible intra- and interpeptide interactions at the molecular level. These self-assembly peptides can also serve as amyloid inhibitors through hydrophobic and electrophilic recognition interactions. Our results show that TK9 inhibits the fibrillation of hIAPP, a 37 amino acid peptide implicated in the pathology of type-II diabetes. Thus, biophysical and NMR experimental results have revealed a molecular level understanding of peptide folding events, as well as the inhibition of amyloid-protein aggregation are reported.

  2. Mouse Saliva Inhibits Transit of Influenza Virus to the Lower Respiratory Tract by Efficiently Blocking Influenza Virus Neuraminidase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Brad; Ng, Wy Ching; Crawford, Simon; McKimm-Breschkin, Jenny L; Brown, Lorena E

    2017-07-15

    We previously identified a novel inhibitor of influenza virus in mouse saliva that halts the progression of susceptible viruses from the upper to the lower respiratory tract of mice in vivo and neutralizes viral infectivity in MDCK cells. Here, we investigated the viral target of the salivary inhibitor by using reverse genetics to create hybrid viruses with some surface proteins derived from an inhibitor-sensitive strain and others from an inhibitor-resistant strain. These viruses demonstrated that the origin of the viral neuraminidase (NA), but not the hemagglutinin or matrix protein, was the determinant of susceptibility to the inhibitor. Comparison of the NA sequences of a panel of H3N2 viruses with differing sensitivities to the salivary inhibitor revealed that surface residues 368 to 370 (N2 numbering) outside the active site played a key role in resistance. Resistant viruses contained an EDS motif at this location, and mutation to either EES or KDS, found in highly susceptible strains, significantly increased in vitro susceptibility to the inhibitor and reduced the ability of the virus to progress to the lungs when the viral inoculum was initially confined to the upper respiratory tract. In the presence of saliva, viral strains with a susceptible NA could not be efficiently released from the surfaces of infected MDCK cells and had reduced enzymatic activity based on their ability to cleave substrate in vitro This work indicates that the mouse has evolved an innate inhibitor similar in function, though not in mechanism, to what humans have created synthetically as an antiviral drug for influenza virus.IMPORTANCE Despite widespread use of experimental pulmonary infection of the laboratory mouse to study influenza virus infection and pathogenesis, to our knowledge, mice do not naturally succumb to influenza. Here, we show that mice produce their own natural form of neuraminidase inhibitor in saliva that stops the virus from reaching the lungs, providing a

  3. A self-perpetuating repressive state of a viral replication protein blocks superinfection by the same virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Rong; Guo, Qin; Zhang, Shaoyan; Li, Dawei

    2017-01-01

    Diverse animal and plant viruses block the re-infection of host cells by the same or highly similar viruses through superinfection exclusion (SIE), a widely observed, yet poorly understood phenomenon. Here we demonstrate that SIE of turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is exclusively determined by p28, one of the two replication proteins encoded by this virus. p28 expressed from a TCV replicon exerts strong SIE to a different TCV replicon. Transiently expressed p28, delivered simultaneously with, or ahead of, a TCV replicon, largely recapitulates this repressive activity. Interestingly, p28-mediated SIE is dramatically enhanced by C-terminally fused epitope tags or fluorescent proteins, but weakened by N-terminal modifications, and it inversely correlates with the ability of p28 to complement the replication of a p28-defective TCV replicon. Strikingly, p28 in SIE-positive cells forms large, mobile punctate inclusions that trans-aggregate a non-coalescing, SIE-defective, yet replication-competent p28 mutant. These results support a model postulating that TCV SIE is caused by the formation of multimeric p28 complexes capable of intercepting fresh p28 monomers translated from superinfector genomes, thereby abolishing superinfector replication. This model could prove to be applicable to other RNA viruses, and offer novel targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:28267773

  4. Development of a molecular-beacon-based multi-allelic real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of human coronavirus causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV): a general methodology for detecting rapidly mutating viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Farcas, Gabriella A; Demetriou, Victoria L; Mazzulli, Tony; Poutanen, Susan M; Willey, Barbara M; Low, Donald E; Butany, Jagdish; Asa, Sylvia L; Kain, Kevin C; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2011-04-01

    Emerging infectious diseases have caused a global effort for development of fast and accurate detection techniques. The rapidly mutating nature of viruses presents a major difficulty, highlighting the need for specific detection of genetically diverse strains. One such infectious agent is SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV), which emerged in 2003. This study aimed to develop a real-time RT-PCR detection assay specific for SARS-CoV, taking into account its intrinsic polymorphic nature due to genetic drift and recombination and the possibility of continuous and multiple introductions of genetically non-identical strains into the human population, by using mismatch-tolerant molecular beacons designed to specifically detect the SARS-CoV S, E, M and N genes. These were applied in simple, reproducible duplex and multiplex real-time PCR assays on 25 post-mortem samples and constructed RNA controls, and they demonstrated high target detection ability and specificity. This assay can readily be adapted for detection of other emerging and rapidly mutating pathogens.

  5. Comparison of Stable and Transient Wolbachia Infection Models in Aedes aegypti to Block Dengue and West Nile Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Dirk Albert; O'Neill, Scott L

    2017-01-01

    Pathogen replication and transmission in Wolbachia infected insects are currently studied using three Wolbachia infection systems: naturally infected Wolbachia hosts, hosts transinfected with Wolbachia (stably maintained and inherited infections) and hosts transiently infected with Wolbachia. All three systems have been used to test the effect of Wolbachia on mosquito transmitted pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV) and Plasmodium. From these studies it is becoming increasingly clear that the interaction between a particular pathogen and Wolbachia is heavily influenced by the host-Wolbachia interaction and the model of infection. In particular, there is some evidence that under very specific conditions, Wolbachia can enhance pathogen infection in some hosts. In this study, we compared the effect of Wolbachia in two infection models (stable transinfected and transiently infected) on the replication, infection- and transmission rates of two flaviviruses, DENV and WNV (Kunjin strain). Our results indicate that Wolbachia had similar blocking effects in both stable and transient models of infection, however, the magnitude of the blocking effect was significantly lower in mosquitoes transiently infected with Wolbachia. More importantly, no evidence was found for any enhancement of either DENV or WNV (Kunjin strain) infection in Ae. aegypti infected with Wolbachia, supporting a role for Wolbachia as an effective and safe means for restricting transmission of these viruses.

  6. Comparison of Stable and Transient Wolbachia Infection Models in Aedes aegypti to Block Dengue and West Nile Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Dirk Albert; O’Neill, Scott L.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogen replication and transmission in Wolbachia infected insects are currently studied using three Wolbachia infection systems: naturally infected Wolbachia hosts, hosts transinfected with Wolbachia (stably maintained and inherited infections) and hosts transiently infected with Wolbachia. All three systems have been used to test the effect of Wolbachia on mosquito transmitted pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV) and Plasmodium. From these studies it is becoming increasingly clear that the interaction between a particular pathogen and Wolbachia is heavily influenced by the host-Wolbachia interaction and the model of infection. In particular, there is some evidence that under very specific conditions, Wolbachia can enhance pathogen infection in some hosts. In this study, we compared the effect of Wolbachia in two infection models (stable transinfected and transiently infected) on the replication, infection- and transmission rates of two flaviviruses, DENV and WNV (Kunjin strain). Our results indicate that Wolbachia had similar blocking effects in both stable and transient models of infection, however, the magnitude of the blocking effect was significantly lower in mosquitoes transiently infected with Wolbachia. More importantly, no evidence was found for any enhancement of either DENV or WNV (Kunjin strain) infection in Ae. aegypti infected with Wolbachia, supporting a role for Wolbachia as an effective and safe means for restricting transmission of these viruses. PMID:28052065

  7. Blocking of PDL-1 interaction enhances primary and secondary CD8 T cell response to herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudragouda Channappanavar

    Full Text Available The blocking of programmed death ligand-1 (PDL-1 has been shown to enhance virus-specific CD8 T cell function during chronic viral infections. Though, how PDL-1 blocking at the time of priming affects the quality of CD8 T cell response to acute infections is not well understood and remains controversial. This report demonstrates that the magnitude of the primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 infection is subject to control by PDL-1. Our results showed that after footpad HSV-1 infection, PD-1 expression increases on immunodominant SSIEFARL peptide specific CD8 T cells. Additionally, post-infection, the level of PDL-1 expression also increases on CD11c+ dendritic cells. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-PDL-1 monoclonal antibody given one day prior to and three days after cutaneous HSV-1 infection, resulted in a marked increase in effector and memory CD8 T cell response to SSIEFARL peptide. This was shown by measuring the quantity and quality of SSIEFARL-specific CD8 T cells by making use of ex-vivo assays that determine antigen specific CD8 T cell function, such as intracellular cytokine assay, degranulation assay to measure cytotoxicity and viral clearance. Our results are discussed in terms of the beneficial effects of blocking PDL-1 interactions, while giving prophylactic vaccines, to generate a more effective CD8 T cell response to viral infection.

  8. SARS Patients-derived Human Recombinant Antibodies to S and M Proteins Efficiently Neutralize SARS-Coronavirus Infectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI-FANG LIANG; KONG-XING WU; ZHAO-HUI XIONG; QI JIN; DE-XIN LI; RUN-LEI DU; JING-ZHI LIU; CHUAN LI; QUAN-FU ZHANG; LU-LU HAN; JIAN-SHI YU; SHU-MIN DUAN; XIAO-FANG WANG

    2005-01-01

    Objective To develop a specific SARS virus-targeted antibody preparation for emergent prophylaxis and treatment of SARS virus infection. Methods By using phage display technology, we constructed a naive antibody library from convalescent SARS patient lymphocytes. To obtain the neutralizing antibody to SARS virus surface proteins, the library panning procedure was performed on purified SARS virions and the specific Fab antibody clones were enriched by four rounds of repeated panning procedure and screened by highthroughput selection. The selected Fab antibodies expressed in the periplasma of E. Coli were soluble and further purified and tested for their binding properties and antiviral function to SARS virus. The functional Fab antibodies were converted to full human IgG antibodies with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell systems and their neutralizing activities were further determined. Results After four rounds of the panning, a number of SARS-CoV virus-targeted human recombinant Fab antibodies were isolated from the SARS patient antibody library. Most of these were identified to recognize both natural and recombinant SARS spike (S) proteins, two Fab antibodies were specific for the virus membrane (M) protein, only one bound to SARS-CoV nucleocapsid protein. The SARS-CoV S and M protein-targeted Fab or IgG antibodies showed significant neutralizing activities in cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition neutralization test, these antibodies were able to completely neutralize the SARS virus and protect the Vero cells from CPE after virus infection. However, the N protein-targeted Fab or IgG antibodies failed to neutralize the virus. In addition, the SARS N protein-targeted human Fab antibody reacted with the denatured N proteins, whereas none of the S and M protein specific neutralizing antibodies did. These results suggested that the S and M protein-specific neutralizing antibodies could recognize conformational epitopes which might be involved in the binding of virions

  9. Identification of 53 compounds that block Ebola virus-like particle entry via a repurposing screen of approved drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Sun, Wei; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Tawa, Gregory; Shinn, Paul; Chen, Catherine Z; Schimmer, Aaron; Sanderson, Philip; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2014-12-01

    In light of the current outbreak of Ebola virus disease, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutics to treat Ebola infection, and drug repurposing screening is a potentially rapid approach for identifying such therapeutics. We developed a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) 1536-well plate assay to screen for entry inhibitors of Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP) and the matrix VP40 protein fused to a beta-lactamase reporter protein and applied this assay for a rapid drug repurposing screen of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. We report here the identification of 53 drugs with activity of blocking Ebola VLP entry into cells. These 53 active compounds can be divided into categories including microtubule inhibitors, estrogen receptor modulators, antihistamines, antipsychotics, pump/channel antagonists, and anticancer/antibiotics. Several of these compounds, including microtubule inhibitors and estrogen receptor modulators, had previously been reported to be active in BSL-4 infectious Ebola virus replication assays and in animal model studies. Our assay represents a robust, effective and rapid high-throughput screen for the identification of lead compounds in drug development for the treatment of Ebola virus infection.

  10. A sensitive epitope-blocking ELISA for the detection of Chikungunya virus-specific antibodies in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Lucas Y H; Kam, Yiu-Wing; Metz, Stefan W; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Prow, Natalie A; McCarthy, Suzi; Smith, David W; Pijlman, Gorben P; Ng, Lisa F P; Hall, Roy A

    2015-09-15

    Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) has re-emerged as an arboviral disease that mimics clinical symptoms of other diseases such as dengue, malaria, as well as other alphavirus-related illnesses leading to problems with definitive diagnosis of the infection. Herein we describe the development and evaluation of a sensitive epitope-blocking ELISA (EB-ELISA) capable of specifically detecting anti-chikungunya virus (CHIKV) antibodies in clinical samples. The assay uses a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds an epitope on the E2 protein of CHIKV and does not exhibit cross-reactivity to other related alphaviruses. We also demonstrated the use of recombinant CHIK virus-like particles (VLPs) as a safe alternative antigen to infectious virions in the assay. Based on testing of 60 serum samples from patients in the acute or convalescent phase of CHIKV infection, the EB-ELISA provided us with 100% sensitivity, and exhibited 98.5% specificity when Ross River virus (RRV)- or Barmah Forest virus (BFV)-immune serum samples were included. This assay meets the public health demands of a rapid, robust, sensitive and specific, yet simple assay for specifically diagnosing CHIK-infections in humans.

  11. The V protein of Tioman virus is incapable of blocking type I interferon signaling in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Caignard

    Full Text Available The capacity of a virus to cross species barriers is determined by the development of bona fide interactions with cellular components of new hosts, and in particular its ability to block IFN-α/β antiviral signaling. Tioman virus (TioV, a close relative of mumps virus (MuV, has been isolated in giant fruit bats in Southeast Asia. Nipah and Hendra viruses, which are present in the same bat colonies, are highly pathogenic in human. Despite serological evidences of close contacts between TioV and human populations, whether TioV is associated to some human pathology remains undetermined. Here we show that in contrast to the V protein of MuV, the V protein of TioV (TioV-V hardly interacts with human STAT2, does not degrade STAT1, and cannot block IFN-α/β signaling in human cells. In contrast, TioV-V properly binds to human STAT3 and MDA5, and thus interferes with IL-6 signaling and IFN-β promoter induction in human cells. Because STAT2 binding was previously identified as a host restriction factor for some Paramyxoviridae, we established STAT2 sequence from giant fruit bats, and binding to TioV-V was tested. Surprisingly, TioV-V interaction with STAT2 from giant fruit bats is also extremely weak and barely detectable. Altogether, our observations question the capacity of TioV to appropriately control IFN-α/β signaling in both human and giant fruit bats that are considered as its natural host.

  12. SARS Vaccine: Progress and Challenge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhi; James M. Wilson; Hao Shen

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged in 2002 as a severe and highly contagious infectious disease that rapidly spread to a number of different countries. The collaborative efforts of the global scientific community have provided, within a short period of time, substantial insights into the molecular biology and immunology of SARS-CoV. Although the outbreak has been contained, there is continuous concern that the virus may resurface into the human population through seasonal changes, animal reservoirs or laboratory accidents. The severe morbidity and mortality associated with SARS make it imperative that an effective vaccine be developed to prevent reemergence and epidemics in the future. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):101-105.

  13. The stable association of virion with the triple-gene-block protein 3-based complex of Bamboo mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Lin Chou

    Full Text Available The triple-gene-block protein 3 (TGBp3 of Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV is an integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane protein which is assumed to form a membrane complex to deliver the virus intracellularly. However, the virus entity that is delivered to plasmodesmata (PD and its association with TGBp3-based complexes are not known. Results from chemical extraction and partial proteolysis of TGBp3 in membrane vesicles revealed that TGBp3 has a right-side-out membrane topology; i.e., TGBp3 has its C-terminal tail exposed to the outer surface of ER. Analyses of the TGBp3-specific immunoprecipitate of Sarkosyl-extracted TGBp3-based complex revealed that TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, capsid protein (CP, replicase and viral RNA are potential constituents of virus movement complex. Substantial co-fractionation of TGBp2, TGBp3 and CP, but not TGBp1, in the early eluted gel filtration fractions in which virions were detected after TGBp3-specific immunoprecipitation suggested that the TGBp2- and TGBp3-based complex is able to stably associate with the virion. This notion was confirmed by immunogold-labeling transmission electron microscopy (TEM of the purified virions. In addition, mutational and confocal microscopy analyses revealed that TGBp3 plays a key role in virus cell-to-cell movement by enhancing the TGBp2- and TGBp3-dependent PD localization of TGBp1. Taken together, our results suggested that the cell-to-cell movement of potexvirus requires stable association of the virion cargo with the TGBp2- and TGBp3-based membrane complex and recruitment of TGBp1 to the PD by this complex.

  14. Human coronavirus EMC does not require the SARS-coronavirus receptor and maintains broad replicative capability in mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Marcel A; Raj, V Stalin; Muth, Doreen; Meyer, Benjamin; Kallies, Stephan; Smits, Saskia L; Wollny, Robert; Bestebroer, Theo M; Specht, Sabine; Suliman, Tasnim; Zimmermann, Katrin; Binger, Tabea; Eckerle, Isabella; Tschapka, Marco; Zaki, Ali M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Haagmans, Bart L; Drosten, Christian

    2012-12-11

    A new human coronavirus (hCoV-EMC) has emerged very recently in the Middle East. The clinical presentation resembled that of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) as encountered during the epidemic in 2002/2003. In both cases, acute renal failure was observed in humans. HCoV-EMC is a member of the same virus genus as SARS-CoV but constitutes a sister species. Here we investigated whether it might utilize angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the SARS-CoV receptor. Knowledge of the receptor is highly critical because the restriction of the SARS receptor to deep compartments of the human respiratory tract limited the spread of SARS. In baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, lentiviral transduction of human ACE2 (hACE2) conferred permissiveness and replication for SARS-CoV but not for hCoV-EMC. Monkey and human kidney cells (LLC-MK2, Vero, and 769-P) and swine kidney cells were permissive for both viruses, but only SARS-CoV infection could be blocked by anti-hACE2 antibody and could be neutralized by preincubation of virus with soluble ACE2. Our data show that ACE2 is neither necessary nor sufficient for hCoV-EMC replication. Moreover, hCoV-EMC, but not SARS-CoV, replicated in cell lines from Rousettus, Rhinolophus, Pipistrellus, Myotis, and Carollia bats, representing four major chiropteran families from both suborders. As human CoV normally cannot replicate in bat cells from different families, this suggests that hCoV-EMC might use a receptor molecule that is conserved in bats, pigs, and humans, implicating a low barrier against cross-host transmission. IMPORTANCE A new human coronavirus (hCoV) emerged recently in the Middle East. The disease resembled SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), causing a fatal epidemic in 2002/2003. Coronaviruses have a reservoir in bats and because this novel virus is related to SARS-CoV, we investigated whether it might replicate in bat cells and use the same receptor (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 [ACE2]). This knowledge is

  15. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Higa, Luiza M; Pezzuto, Paula; Valadão, Ana Luiza; Garcez, Patrícia P; Monteiro, Fábio L; Loiola, Erick C; Dias, André A; Silva, Fábio J M; Aliota, Matthew T; Caine, Elizabeth A; Osorio, Jorge E; Bellio, Maria; O'Connor, David H; Rehen, Stevens; de Aguiar, Renato Santana; Savarino, Andrea; Campanati, Loraine; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-11-29

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres.

  16. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Delvecchio

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres.

  17. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Block Chikungunya Virus Entry and Release by Targeting an Epitope Critical to Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Liss, Nathan M; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liao, Maofu; Fox, Julie M; Shimak, Raeann M; Fong, Rachel H; Chafets, Daniel; Bakkour, Sonia; Keating, Sheila; Fomin, Marina E; Muench, Marcus O; Sherman, Michael B; Doranz, Benjamin J; Diamond, Michael S; Simmons, Graham

    2015-12-22

    We evaluated the mechanism by which neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies inhibit chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection. Potently neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) blocked infection at multiple steps of the virus life cycle, including entry and release. Cryo-electron microscopy structures of Fab fragments of two human NAbs and chikungunya virus-like particles showed a binding footprint that spanned independent domains on neighboring E2 subunits within one viral spike, suggesting a mechanism for inhibiting low-pH-dependent membrane fusion. Detailed epitope mapping identified amino acid E2-W64 as a critical interaction residue. An escape mutation (E2-W64G) at this residue rendered CHIKV attenuated in mice. Consistent with these data, CHIKV-E2-W64G failed to emerge in vivo under the selection pressure of one of the NAbs, IM-CKV063. As our study suggests that antibodies engaging the residue E2-W64 can potently inhibit CHIKV at multiple stages of infection, antibody-based therapies or immunogens that target this region might have protective value.

  18. Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Block Chikungunya Virus Entry and Release by Targeting an Epitope Critical to Viral Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the mechanism by which neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies inhibit chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection. Potently neutralizing antibodies (NAbs blocked infection at multiple steps of the virus life cycle, including entry and release. Cryo-electron microscopy structures of Fab fragments of two human NAbs and chikungunya virus-like particles showed a binding footprint that spanned independent domains on neighboring E2 subunits within one viral spike, suggesting a mechanism for inhibiting low-pH-dependent membrane fusion. Detailed epitope mapping identified amino acid E2-W64 as a critical interaction residue. An escape mutation (E2-W64G at this residue rendered CHIKV attenuated in mice. Consistent with these data, CHIKV-E2-W64G failed to emerge in vivo under the selection pressure of one of the NAbs, IM-CKV063. As our study suggests that antibodies engaging the residue E2-W64 can potently inhibit CHIKV at multiple stages of infection, antibody-based therapies or immunogens that target this region might have protective value.

  19. Terrain Measurement with SAR/InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deren; Liao, Mingsheng; Balz, Timo; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Tianliang

    2016-08-01

    Terrain measurement and surface motion estimation are the most important applications for commercial and scientific SAR missions. In Dragon-3, we worked on these applications, especially regarding DEM generation, surface motion estimation with SAR time- series for urban subsidence monitoring and landslide motion estimation, as well as developing tomographic SAR processing methods in urban areas.

  20. Peptides derived from HIV-1, HIV-2, Ebola virus, SARS coronavirus and coronavirus 229E exhibit high affinity binding to the formyl peptide receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, John S.

    2007-01-01

    Peptides derived from the membrane proximal region of fusion proteins of human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2, Coronavirus 229 E, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Ebola virus were all potent antagonists of the formyl peptide receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Binding of viral peptides was affected by the naturally occurring polymorphisms at residues 190 and 192, which are located at second extracellular loop-transmembrane helix 5 interface. Substitution of R190 with W190 enhanced the affinity for a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus peptide 6 fold but reduced the affinity for N-formyl-Nle–Leu-Phe by 2.5 fold. A 12 mer peptide derived from coronavirus 229E (ETYIKPWWVWL) was the most potent antagonist of the formyl peptide receptor W190 with a Ki of 230 nM. Fluorescently labeled ETYIKPWWVWL was effectively internalized by all three variants with EC50 of ~25 nM. An HKU-1 coronavirus peptide, MYVKWPWYVWL, was a potent antagonist but N-formyl-MYVKWPWYVWL was a potent agonist. ETYIKPWWVWL did not stimulate GTPγS binding but inhibited the stimulation by formyl-NleLeuPhe. It also blocked β arrestin translocation and receptor downregulation induced by formyl-Nle–Leu–Phe. This indicates that formyl peptide receptor may be important in viral infections and that variations in its sequence among individuals may affect their likelihood of viral and bacterial infections. PMID:16842982

  1. Molecular phylogeny of coronaviruses including human SARS-CoV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic tree of coronaviruses (CoVs) including the human SARS-associated virus is reconstructed from complete genomes by using our newly developed K- string composition approach. The relation of the human SARS-CoV to other coronaviruses, i.e. the rooting of the tree is suggested by choosing an appropriate outgroup. SARS-CoV makes a separate group closer but still distant from G2 (CoVs in mammalian host). The relation between different isolates of the human SARS virus is inferred by first constructing an ultrametric distance matrix from counting sequence variations in the genomes. The resulting tree is consistent with clinic relations between the SARS-CoV isolates. In addition to a larger variety of coronavirus genomes these results provide phylogenetic knowledge based on independent novel methodology as compared to recent phylogenetic studies on SARS-CoV.

  2. The kinase inhibitor SFV785 dislocates dengue virus envelope protein from the replication complex and blocks virus assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlinda Anwar

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is the etiologic agent for dengue fever, for which there is no approved vaccine or specific anti-viral drug. As a remedy for this, we explored the use of compounds that interfere with the action of required host factors and describe here the characterization of a kinase inhibitor (SFV785, which has selective effects on NTRK1 and MAPKAPK5 kinase activity, and anti-viral activity on Hepatitis C, DENV and yellow fever viruses. SFV785 inhibited DENV propagation without inhibiting DENV RNA synthesis or translation. The compound did not cause any changes in the cellular distribution of non-structural 3, a protein critical for DENV RNA synthesis, but altered the distribution of the structural envelope protein from a reticulate network to enlarged discrete vesicles, which altered the co-localization with the DENV replication complex. Ultrastructural electron microscopy analyses of DENV-infected SFV785-treated cells showed the presence of viral particles that were distinctly different from viable enveloped virions within enlarged ER cisternae. These viral particles were devoid of the dense nucleocapsid. The secretion of the viral particles was not inhibited by SFV785, however a reduction in the amount of secreted infectious virions, DENV RNA and capsid were observed. Collectively, these observations suggest that SFV785 inhibited the recruitment and assembly of the nucleocapsid in specific ER compartments during the DENV assembly process and hence the production of infectious DENV. SFV785 and derivative compounds could be useful biochemical probes to explore the DENV lifecycle and could also represent a new class of anti-virals.

  3. Infection of SARS-CoV on juvenile and adult Brandt's vole Microtus brandtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong; PENG Jingpian; DENG Wei; SHI Dazhao; BAO Linlin; WANG Dehua; ZHANG Binglin; QIN Chuan; ZHANG Zhibin

    2005-01-01

    We studied the infectious effect of SARS-CoV virus on juvenile and adult Brandt's Vole (Microtus brandtii) by nasal cavity spraying method (CCID50 is 105.7). SARS virus caused serious deaths in adults. The death adults demonstrated hemorrhage from mouth, nasal cavity and intestine, hemorrhageious interstitial pneumonia and gore in liver, spleen and kidney. The survival adults demonstrated local hemorrhagic spot in lung and emphysema, but the other organs showed no pathological abnormality. SARS virus caused no deaths in juveniles, but locomotion of infected juveniles became slower. In the early stage, there was local pneumonia in lung and SARS viruses were isolated from the pathological tissue. Only one control juvenile lived and the infected juvenile showed local pneumonia in lung. The results demonstrated that SARS-CoV infected Brandt's vole seriously and adults were more susceptive to SARS-CoV than juveniles. The Brandt's vole may be a potential animal model for SARS research.

  4. Association of the pr Peptides with Dengue Virus at Acidic pH Blocks Membrane Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, I.-M.; Holdaway, H.A.; Chipman, P.R.; Kuhn, R.J.; Rossmann, M.G.; Chen, J.; Purdue

    2010-07-27

    Flavivirus assembles into an inert particle that requires proteolytic activation by furin to enable transmission to other hosts. We previously showed that immature virus undergoes a conformational change at low pH that renders it accessible to furin (I. M. Yu, W. Zhang, H. A. Holdaway, L. Li, V. A. Kostyuchenko, P. R. Chipman, R. J. Kuhn, M. G. Rossmann, and J. Chen, Science 319:1834-1837, 2008). Here we show, using cryoelectron microscopy, that the structure of immature dengue virus at pH 6.0 is essentially the same before and after the cleavage of prM. The structure shows that after cleavage, the proteolytic product pr remains associated with the virion at acidic pH, and that furin cleavage by itself does not induce any major conformational changes. We also show by liposome cofloatation experiments that pr retention prevents membrane insertion, suggesting that pr is present on the virion in the trans-Golgi network to protect the progeny virus from fusion within the host cell.

  5. Expanding indole diversity: direct 1-step synthesis of 1,2-fused indoles and spiroindolines from 2-halo anilines for fast SAR antiviral elucidation against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linwei; Liu, Yongxian; Song, Hongjian; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Qingmin

    2017-02-01

    To systematically investigate the influence of the variation of the original skeletons and spatial configuration of 2,3-fused indole natural products on antiviral activities, two types of structurally novel and potent pseudo-indole natural product derivatives, 1,2-fused indole and spiroindoline, with different substituents were direct synthesized from 2-halo anilines, and their antiviral activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were evaluated. The results showed that these compounds exhibited good anti-TMV activity, especially 3f, 3g, 3i, 5e, 5h, and 5l, which were more potent than the commercial anti-virus agent ribavirin. An SAR investigation demonstrates that the original ring size, arrangement, and planarity are not optimal; their anti-TMV activities can be improved by skeleton modification and spatial configuration variation. Both of the structurally novel skeletons provide a new template for antiviral studies, which may also provide some useful information for antiviral mechanism elucidation.

  6. Hepatitis B virus polymerase blocks pattern recognition receptor signaling via interaction with DDX3: implications for immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Ryu, Wang-Shick

    2010-07-15

    Viral infection leads to induction of pattern-recognition receptor signaling, which leads to interferon regulatory factor (IRF) activation and ultimately interferon (IFN) production. To establish infection, many viruses have strategies to evade the innate immunity. For the hepatitis B virus (HBV), which causes chronic infection in the liver, the evasion strategy remains uncertain. We now show that HBV polymerase (Pol) blocks IRF signaling, indicating that HBV Pol is the viral molecule that effectively counteracts host innate immune response. In particular, HBV Pol inhibits TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1)/IkappaB kinase-epsilon (IKKepsilon), the effector kinases of IRF signaling. Intriguingly, HBV Pol inhibits TBK1/IKKepsilon activity by disrupting the interaction between IKKepsilon and DDX3 DEAD box RNA helicase, which was recently shown to augment TBK1/IKKepsilon activity. This unexpected role of HBV Pol may explain how HBV evades innate immune response in the early phase of the infection. A therapeutic implication of this work is that a strategy to interfere with the HBV Pol-DDX3 interaction might lead to the resolution of life-long persistent infection.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C stabilizes Gemin3 to block p53-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliang Cai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C, one of the essential latent antigens for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-induced immortalization of primary human B lymphocytes in vitro, has been implicated in regulating cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis via interaction with several cellular and viral factors. Gemin3 (also named DDX20 or DP103 is a member of DEAD RNA helicase family which exhibits diverse cellular functions including DNA transcription, recombination and repair, and RNA metabolism. Gemin3 was initially identified as a binding partner to EBNA2 and EBNA3C. However, the mechanism by which EBNA3C regulates Gemin3 function remains unclear. Here, we report that EBNA3C directly interacts with Gemin3 through its C-terminal domains. This interaction results in increased stability of Gemin3 and its accumulation in both B lymphoma cells and EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Moreover, EBNA3C promotes formation of a complex with p53 and Gemin3 which blocks the DNA-binding affinity of p53. Small hairpin RNA based knockdown of Gemin3 in B lymphoma or LCL cells remarkably attenuates the ability of EBNA3C to inhibit the transcription activity of p53 on its downstream genes p21 and Bax, as well as apoptosis. These findings provide the first evidence that Gemin3 may be a common target of oncogenic viruses for driving cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic activities.

  8. Clomiphene and Its Isomers Block Ebola Virus Particle Entry and Infection with Similar Potency: Potential Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Nelson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV in Western Africa highlighted the need for anti-EBOV therapeutics. Clomiphene is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drug that blocks EBOV entry and infection in cells and significantly protects EBOV-challenged mice. As provided, clomiphene is, approximately, a 60:40 mixture of two stereoisomers, enclomiphene and zuclomiphene. The pharmacokinetic properties of the two isomers vary, but both accumulate in the eye and male reproductive tract, tissues in which EBOV can persist. Here we compared the ability of clomiphene and its isomers to inhibit EBOV using viral-like particle (VLP entry and transcription/replication-competent VLP (trVLP assays. Clomiphene and its isomers inhibited the entry and infection of VLPs and trVLPs with similar potencies. This was demonstrated with VLPs bearing the glycoproteins from three filoviruses (EBOV Mayinga, EBOV Makona, and Marburg virus and in two cell lines (293T/17 and Vero E6. Visual problems have been noted in EBOV survivors, and viral RNA has been isolated from semen up to nine months post-infection. Since the clomiphene isomers accumulate in these affected tissues, clomiphene or one of its isomers warrants consideration as an anti-EBOV agent, for example, to potentially help ameliorate symptoms in EBOV survivors.

  9. Hepatitis B virus polymerase blocks pattern recognition receptor signaling via interaction with DDX3: implications for immune evasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Wang

    Full Text Available Viral infection leads to induction of pattern-recognition receptor signaling, which leads to interferon regulatory factor (IRF activation and ultimately interferon (IFN production. To establish infection, many viruses have strategies to evade the innate immunity. For the hepatitis B virus (HBV, which causes chronic infection in the liver, the evasion strategy remains uncertain. We now show that HBV polymerase (Pol blocks IRF signaling, indicating that HBV Pol is the viral molecule that effectively counteracts host innate immune response. In particular, HBV Pol inhibits TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1/IkappaB kinase-epsilon (IKKepsilon, the effector kinases of IRF signaling. Intriguingly, HBV Pol inhibits TBK1/IKKepsilon activity by disrupting the interaction between IKKepsilon and DDX3 DEAD box RNA helicase, which was recently shown to augment TBK1/IKKepsilon activity. This unexpected role of HBV Pol may explain how HBV evades innate immune response in the early phase of the infection. A therapeutic implication of this work is that a strategy to interfere with the HBV Pol-DDX3 interaction might lead to the resolution of life-long persistent infection.

  10. Modeling the impact on virus transmission of Wolbachia-mediated blocking of dengue virus infection of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Neil M; Kien, Duong Thi Hue; Clapham, Hannah; Aguas, Ricardo; Trung, Vu Tuan; Chau, Tran Nguyen Bich; Popovici, Jean; Ryan, Peter A; O'Neill, Scott L; McGraw, Elizabeth A; Long, Vo Thi; Dui, Le Thi; Nguyen, Hoa L; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Wills, Bridget; Simmons, Cameron P

    2015-03-18

    Dengue is the most common arboviral infection of humans and is a public health burden in more than 100 countries. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes stably infected with strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia are resistant to dengue virus (DENV) infection and are being tested in field trials. To mimic field conditions, we experimentally assessed the vector competence of A. aegypti carrying the Wolbachia strains wMel and wMelPop after challenge with viremic blood from dengue patients. We found that wMelPop conferred strong resistance to DENV infection of mosquito abdomen tissue and largely prevented disseminated infection. wMel conferred less resistance to infection of mosquito abdomen tissue, but it did reduce the prevalence of mosquitoes with infectious saliva. A mathematical model of DENV transmission incorporating the dynamics of viral infection in humans and mosquitoes was fitted to the data collected. Model predictions suggested that wMel would reduce the basic reproduction number, R0, of DENV transmission by 66 to 75%. Our results suggest that establishment of wMelPop-infected A. aegypti at a high frequency in a dengue-endemic setting would result in the complete abatement of DENV transmission. Establishment of wMel-infected A. aegypti is also predicted to have a substantial effect on transmission that would be sufficient to eliminate dengue in low or moderate transmission settings but may be insufficient to achieve complete control in settings where R0 is high. These findings develop a framework for selecting Wolbachia strains for field releases and for calculating their likely impact.

  11. A solid-phase blocking ELISA for detection of type O foot-and-mouth disease virus antibodies suitable for mass serology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chenard, G.; Miedema, K.; Moonen, P.; Schrijver, R.S.; Dekker, A.

    2003-01-01

    A simple solid-phase blocking ELISA for the detection of antibodies directed against type O foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was developed. The ELISA was validated using field sera collected from cattle, pigs and sheep originating from FMDV infected and non-infected Dutch farms, reference sera ob

  12. The outbreak pattern of the SARS cases in Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhibin; SHENG Chengfa; MA Zufei; LI Dianmo

    2004-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused tremendous damage to many Asia countries, especially China. The transmission process and outbreak pattern of SARS is still not well understood. This study aims to find a simple model to describe the outbreak pattern of SARS cases by using SARS case data commonly released by governments. The outbreak pattern of cumulative SARS cases is expected to be a logistic type because the infection will be slowed down due to the increasing control effort by people and/or due to depletion of susceptible individuals. The increase rate of SARS cases is expected to decrease with the cumulative SARS cases, as described by the traditional logistical model, which is widely used in population dynamic studies. The instantaneous rate of increases were significantly and negatively correlated with the cumulative SARS cases in mainland of China (including Beijing, Hebei, Tianjin, Shanxi, the Autonomous Region of Inner Mongolia) and Singapore. The basic reproduction number R0 in Asia ranged from 2.0 to 5.6 (except for Taiwan, China). The R0 of Hebei and Tianjinwere much higher than that of Singapore, Hongkong, Beijing, Shanxi, Inner Mongolia, indicating SARS virus might have originated differently or new mutations occurred during transmission. We demonstrated that the outbreaks of SARS in many regions of Asia were well described by the logistic model, and the control measures implemented by governments are effective. The maximum instantaneous rate of increase, basic reproductive number, and maximum cumulative SARS cases were also calculated by using the logistic model.

  13. The Effect of Temperature on Wolbachia-Mediated Dengue Virus Blocking in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yixin H; Carrasco, Alison M; Dong, Yi; Sgrò, Carla M; McGraw, Elizabeth A

    2016-04-01

    Dengue fever, caused by dengue virus (DENV), is endemic in more than 100 countries. The lack of effective treatment of patients and the suboptimal efficacies of the tetravalent vaccine in trials highlight the urgent need to develop alternative strategies to lessen the burden of dengue fever.Wolbachia pipientis, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is being developed as a biocontrol strategy against dengue because it limits the replication of the DENV in the mosquito vector,Aedes aegypti However, several recent studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of pathogens, vectors, and their symbionts to temperature. To understand how the tripartite interactions between the mosquito, DENV, and Wolbachia may change under different temperature regimes, we assessed the vector competence and transmission potential of DENV-infected mosquitoes reared at a common laboratory setting of a constant 25°C and at two diurnal temperature settings with mean of 25°C and 28°C and a fluctuating range of 8°C (±4°C). Temperature significantly affected DENV infection rate in the mosquitoes. Furthermore, temperature significantly influenced the proportion of mosquitoes that achieved transmission potential as measured by the presence of virus in the saliva. Regardless of the temperature regimes,Wolbachia significantly and efficiently reduced the proportion of mosquitoes achieving infection and transmission potential across all the temperature regimes studied. This work reinforces the robustness of the Wolbachia biocontrol strategy to field conditions in Cairns, Australia, and suggests that similar studies are required for local mosquito genotypes and field relevant temperatures for emerging field release sites globally.

  14. Anti-SARS coronavirus agents: a patent review (2008 - present).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vathan; Jung, Young-Sik; Liang, Po-Huang

    2013-10-01

    A novel coronavirus (CoV), unlike previous typical human coronaviruses (HCoVs), was identified as causative agent for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). SARS first surfaced as a pandemic in late 2002 and originated in southern China. SARS-CoV rapidly spread to > 30 countries by 2003, infecting nearly 8,000 people and causing around 800 fatalities. After 10 years of silence, a 2012 report alarmed researchers about the emergence of a new strain of CoV causing SARS-like disease. To combat SARS, scientists applied for patents on various therapeutic agents, including small-molecule inhibitors targeting the essential proteases, helicase and other proteins of the virus, natural products, approved drugs, molecules binding to the virus, neutralizing antibodies, vaccines, anti-sense RNA, siRNA and ribozyme against SARS-CoV. In this article, the patents published from 2008 to the present for the new therapeutics that could potentially be used in the prophylaxis and treatment of SARS are reviewed. The therapeutic interventions or prophylaxis discussed in this review seems to offer promising solutions to tackle SARS. Rather than being complacent about the results, we should envisage how to transform them into drug candidates that may be useful in combating SARS and related viral infections in the future.

  15. Latent Epstein-Barr virus can inhibit apoptosis in B cells by blocking the induction of NOXA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Jade; White, Robert E; Anderton, Emma; Allday, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been shown to protect Burkitt's lymphoma-derived B cells from apoptosis induced by agents that cause damage to DNA, in the context of mutant p53. This protection requires expression of the latency-associated nuclear proteins EBNA3A and EBNA3C and correlates with their ability to cooperate in the repression of the gene encoding the pro-apoptotic, BH3-only protein BIM. Here we confirm that latent EBV in B cells also inhibits apoptosis induced by two other agents--ionomycin and staurosporine--and show that these act by a distinct pathway that involves a p53-independent increase in expression of another pro-apoptotic, BH3-only protein, NOXA. Analyses employing a variety of B cells infected with naturally occurring EBV or B95.8 EBV-BAC recombinant mutants indicated that the block to NOXA induction does not depend on the well-characterized viral latency-associated genes (EBNAs 1, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, the LMPs or the EBERs) or expression of BIM. Regulation of NOXA was shown to be at least partly at the level of mRNA and the requirement for NOXA to induce cell death in this context was demonstrated by NOXA-specific shRNA-mediated depletion experiments. Although recombinant EBV with a deletion removing the BHRF1 locus--that encodes the BCL2-homologue BHRF1 and three microRNAs--partially abrogates protection against ionomycin and staurosporine, the deletion has no effect on the EBV-mediated block to NOXA accumulation.

  16. Latent Epstein-Barr virus can inhibit apoptosis in B cells by blocking the induction of NOXA expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Yee

    Full Text Available Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV has been shown to protect Burkitt's lymphoma-derived B cells from apoptosis induced by agents that cause damage to DNA, in the context of mutant p53. This protection requires expression of the latency-associated nuclear proteins EBNA3A and EBNA3C and correlates with their ability to cooperate in the repression of the gene encoding the pro-apoptotic, BH3-only protein BIM. Here we confirm that latent EBV in B cells also inhibits apoptosis induced by two other agents--ionomycin and staurosporine--and show that these act by a distinct pathway that involves a p53-independent increase in expression of another pro-apoptotic, BH3-only protein, NOXA. Analyses employing a variety of B cells infected with naturally occurring EBV or B95.8 EBV-BAC recombinant mutants indicated that the block to NOXA induction does not depend on the well-characterized viral latency-associated genes (EBNAs 1, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, the LMPs or the EBERs or expression of BIM. Regulation of NOXA was shown to be at least partly at the level of mRNA and the requirement for NOXA to induce cell death in this context was demonstrated by NOXA-specific shRNA-mediated depletion experiments. Although recombinant EBV with a deletion removing the BHRF1 locus--that encodes the BCL2-homologue BHRF1 and three microRNAs--partially abrogates protection against ionomycin and staurosporine, the deletion has no effect on the EBV-mediated block to NOXA accumulation.

  17. Temporal analysis of hepatitis C virus cell entry with occludin directed blocking antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Sourisseau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major cause of liver disease worldwide. A better understanding of its life cycle, including the process of host cell entry, is important for the development of HCV therapies and model systems. Based on the requirement for numerous host factors, including the two tight junction proteins claudin-1 (CLDN1 and occludin (OCLN, HCV cell entry has been proposed to be a multi-step process. The lack of OCLN-specific inhibitors has prevented a comprehensive analysis of this process. To study the role of OCLN in HCV cell entry, we created OCLN mutants whose HCV cell entry activities could be inhibited by antibodies. These mutants were expressed in polarized HepG2 cells engineered to support the complete HCV life cycle by CD81 and miR-122 expression and synchronized infection assays were performed to define the kinetics of HCV cell entry. During these studies, OCLN utilization differences between HCV isolates were observed, supporting a model that HCV directly interacts with OCLN. In HepG2 cells, both HCV cell entry and tight junction formation were impaired by OCLN silencing and restored by expression of antibody regulatable OCLN mutant. Synchronized infection assays showed that glycosaminoglycans and SR-BI mediated host cell binding, while CD81, CLDN1 and OCLN all acted sequentially at a post-binding stage prior to endosomal acidification. These results fit a model where the tight junction region is the last to be encountered by the virion prior to internalization.

  18. 焦磷酸测序技术在确认北京严重急性呼吸综合征(SARS)病毒株并检测基因突变中的应用%Confirming SARS Virus Isolates in Beijing with Pyrosequencing Technology and Assaying SARS Virus DNA Mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程绍辉; 梁明华; 李泽琳; 张霆; 张珑; 马洪涛; 刘哲伟; 曾毅

    2005-01-01

    结合严重急性呼吸综合征(SARS)病毒株序列信息分析和高通量测序技术,建立一种快速、简单地确定SARS病毒株并筛查SARS病毒突变位点和突变频率的方法.从感染人SARS病毒的Vero-6细胞中提取病毒RNA,反转录为cDNA后,PCR扩增目的基因片段,采用焦磷酸测序技术(Pyrosequencing Technology,PSQ)进行第2 601、7 919、9 479、19 838多个碱基突变位点测序和突变频率分析.通过测序分析多个可能出现突变的位点,确定了该病毒为北京流行株,同时发现第7 919位碱基发生了A/G突变.PSQ技术对于高通量筛选研究病毒基因的突变和确定病毒株型别有着简单、快速、灵敏的特点.利用生物信息学分析核酸多态性,结合实验验证,可以确定SARS病毒流行株的特征,有利于对突发事件及早确定传染来源.

  19. Unraveling the complexities of the interferon response during SARS-CoV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Lang (Anna); T. Baas (Tracey); S.L. Smits (Saskia); M.G. Katze (Michael); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractViruses employ different strategies to circumvent the antiviral actions of the innate immune response. SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a virus that causes severe lung damage encodes an array of proteins able to inhibit induction and signaling of type-I interferons. However, recent studies h

  20. Unraveling the complexities of the interferon response during SARS-CoV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Lang (Anna); T. Baas (Tracey); S.L. Smits (Saskia); M.G. Katze (Michael); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractViruses employ different strategies to circumvent the antiviral actions of the innate immune response. SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a virus that causes severe lung damage encodes an array of proteins able to inhibit induction and signaling of type-I interferons. However, recent studies

  1. Comparison of a Monoclonal Antibody-Blocking Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay and a Strip Immunoblot Assay for Identifying Type-Specific Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Serological Responses

    OpenAIRE

    van Doornum, G. J. J.; Slomka, M.J.; Buimer, M; Groen, J.; van den Hoek, J.A.R.; Cairo, I.; Vyse, A.; Brown, D. W G

    2000-01-01

    Detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-specific antibodies by a monoclonal antibody (MAb)-blocking enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) was compared with detection by a strip immunoblot assay (SIA) in a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic population. The study population consisted of 1,683 genitourinary medicine clinic attendees (582 women and 1,101 men). Sera were tested for the presence of HSV-2 antibody by use of the blocking EIA, in which binding of the MAb AP-1 to HSV-2 glycop...

  2. The virion host shut-off (vhs protein blocks a TLR-independent pathway of herpes simplex virus type 1 recognition in human and mouse dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Cotter

    Full Text Available Molecular pathways underlying the activation of dendritic cells (DCs in response to Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1 are poorly understood. Removal of the HSV virion host shut-off (vhs protein relieves a block to DC activation observed during wild-type infection. In this study, we utilized a potent DC stimulatory HSV-1 recombinant virus lacking vhs as a tool to investigate the mechanisms involved in the activation of DCs by HSV-1. We report that the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by conventional DC (cDC during HSV-1 infection is triggered by both virus replication-dependent and replication-independent pathways. Interestingly, while vhs is capable of inhibiting the release of cytokines during infection of human and mouse cDCs, the secretion of cytokines by plasmacytoid DC (pDC is not affected by vhs. These data prompted us to postulate that infection of cDCs by HSV triggers a TLR independent pathway for cDC activation that is susceptible to blockage by the vhs protein. Using cDCs isolated from mice deficient in both the TLR adaptor protein MyD88 and TLR3, we show that HSV-1 and the vhs-deleted virus can activate cDCs independently of TLR signaling. In addition, virion-associated vhs fails to block cDC activation in response to treatment with TLR agonists, but it efficiently blocked cDC activation triggered by the paramyxoviruses Sendai Virus (SeV and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV. This block to SeV- and NDV-induced activation of cDC resulted in elevated SeV and NDV viral gene expression indicating that infection with HSV-1 enhances the cell's susceptibility to other pathogens through the action of vhs. Our results demonstrate for the first time that a viral protein contained in the tegument of HSV-1 can block the induction of DC activation by TLR-independent pathways of viral recognition.

  3. Modelling strategies for controlling SARS outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumel, Abba B.; Ruan, Shigui; Day, Troy; Watmough, James; Brauer, Fred; van den Driessche, P.; Gabrielson, Dave; Bowman, Chris; Alexander, Murray E.; Ardal, Sten; Wu, Jianhong; Sahai, Beni M.

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a new, highly contagious, viral disease, emerged in China late in 2002 and quickly spread to 32 countries and regions causing in excess of 774 deaths and 8098 infections worldwide. In the absence of a rapid diagnostic test, therapy or vaccine, isolation of individuals diagnosed with SARS and quarantine of individuals feared exposed to SARS virus were used to control the spread of infection. We examine mathematically the impact of isolation and quarantine on the control of SARS during the outbreaks in Toronto, Hong Kong, Singapore and Beijing using a deterministic model that closely mimics the data for cumulative infected cases and SARS-related deaths in the first three regions but not in Beijing until mid-April, when China started to report data more accurately. The results reveal that achieving a reduction in the contact rate between susceptible and diseased individuals by isolating the latter is a critically important strategy that can control SARS outbreaks with or without quarantine. An optimal isolation programme entails timely implementation under stringent hygienic precautions defined by a critical threshold value. Values below this threshold lead to control, but those above are associated with the incidence of new community outbreaks or nosocomial infections, a known cause for the spread of SARS in each region. Allocation of resources to implement optimal isolation is more effective than to implement sub-optimal isolation and quarantine together. A community-wide eradication of SARS is feasible if optimal isolation is combined with a highly effective screening programme at the points of entry. PMID:15539347

  4. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehrig, John T., E-mail: jtr1@cdc.gov [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Bennett, Susan L. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Blair, Carol D. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Huang, Claire Y.-H. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  5. Exosomes in human semen restrict HIV-1 transmission by vaginal cells and block intravaginal replication of LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N; Jones, Philip H; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-08-01

    Exosomes are membranous extracellular nanovesicles secreted by diverse cell types. Exosomes from healthy human semen have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication and to impair progeny virus infectivity. In this study, we examined the ability of healthy human semen exosomes to restrict HIV-1 and LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus transmission in three different model systems. We show that vaginal cells internalize exosomes with concomitant transfer of functional mRNA. Semen exosomes blocked the spread of HIV-1 from vaginal epithelial cells to target cells in our cell-to-cell infection model and suppressed transmission of HIV-1 across the vaginal epithelial barrier in our trans-well model. Our in vivo model shows that human semen exosomes restrict intravaginal transmission and propagation of murine AIDS virus. Our study highlights an antiretroviral role for semen exosomes that may be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission.

  6. The effect of virus-blocking Wolbachia on male competitiveness of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segoli, Michal; Hoffmann, Ary A; Lloyd, Jane; Omodei, Gavin J; Ritchie, Scott A

    2014-12-01

    The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia blocks the transmission of dengue virus by its vector mosquito Aedes aegypti, and is currently being evaluated for control of dengue outbreaks. Wolbachia induces cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) that results in the developmental failure of offspring in the cross between Wolbachia-infected males and uninfected females. This increases the relative success of infected females in the population, thereby enhancing the spread of the beneficial bacterium. However, Wolbachia spread via CI will only be feasible if infected males are sufficiently competitive in obtaining a mate under field conditions. We tested the effect of Wolbachia on the competitiveness of A. aegypti males under semi-field conditions. In a series of experiments we exposed uninfected females to Wolbachia-infected and uninfected males simultaneously. We scored the competitiveness of infected males according to the proportion of females producing non-viable eggs due to incompatibility. We found that infected males were equally successful to uninfected males in securing a mate within experimental tents and semi-field cages. This was true for males infected by the benign wMel Wolbachia strain, but also for males infected by the virulent wMelPop (popcorn) strain. By manipulating male size we found that larger males had a higher success than smaller underfed males in the semi-field cages, regardless of their infection status. The results indicate that Wolbachia infection does not reduce the competitiveness of A. aegypti males. Moreover, the body size effect suggests a potential advantage for lab-reared Wolbachia-males during a field release episode, due to their better nutrition and larger size. This may promote Wolbachia spread via CI in wild mosquito populations and underscores its potential use for disease control.

  7. Inhibitor RNA blocks the protein translation mediated by hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Song Liang; Jian-Qi Lian; Yong-Xing Zhou; Mo-Bin Wan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effect of hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site (HCV IRES) specific inhibitor RNA (IRNA) on gene expression mediated by HCV IRES in vivo.METHODS: By using G418 screening system, hepatoma cells constitutively expressing IRNA or mutant IRNA (mIRNA) were established and characterized, and HCV replicons containing the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) were constructed by using the same method. Cotransfection of pCMVNCRluc containing HCV 5'UTR-luc fusion genes and eukaryotic vector of IRNA into human hepatic carcinoma cells (HepG2) was performed and the eukaryotic expression plasmid of IRNA was transfected transiently into HCV replicons, pCMVNCRluc or pCDNA-luc was cotransfected with pSV40-β Gal into IRNA expressing hepatoma cells by using lipofectamine 2000 in vitro. Then the reporting gene expression level was examined at 48 h after transfection by using a luminometer and the expressing level of HCV C antigen was analysed with a confocal microscope.RESULTS: Transient expression of IRES specific IRNA could significantly inhibit the expression of reporter gene and viral antigen mediated by HCV IRES by 50% to 90% in vivo, but mIRNA lost its inhibitory activity completely. The luciferase gene expression mediated by HCV IRES was blocked in the HHCC constitutively expressing IRNA. At 48 h after transfection, the expression level of reportor gene descreased by 20%, but cap-dependent luciferase gene expression was not affected. IRNA could inhibit the HCV replicon expression 24 h after transfection and the highest inhibitory activity was 80% by 72 h, and the inhibitory activity was not increased until 7d after transfection.CONCLUSION: IRNA can inhibit HCV IRES mediated gene expression in vivo.

  8. Isolation of a mutant MDBK cell line resistant to bovine viral diarrhea virus infection due to a block in viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, E F; Donis, R O

    1995-04-20

    A cell line, termed CRIB, resistant to infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been derived from the MDBK bovine kidney cell line. CRIB cells were obtained by selection and cloning of cells surviving infection with a highly cytolytic BVDV strain. CRIB cells contain no detectable infectious or defective BVDV as ascertained by cocultivation, animal inoculation, indirect immunofluorescence, Western immunoblot, Northern hybridization, and RNA PCR. Inoculation of CRIB cells with 24 cytopathic and noncytopathic BVDV strains does not result in expression of viral genes or amplification of input virus. Karyotype and isoenzyme analyses demonstrated that CRIB are genuine bovine cells. CRIB cells are as susceptible as the parental MDBK cells to 10 other bovine viruses, indicating that these cells do not have a broad defect blocking viral replication. Transfection of CRIB cells with BVDV RNA or virus inoculation in the presence of polyethylene-glycol results in productive infection, indicating that the defect of CRIB cells is at the level of virus entry. CRIB cells are the first bovine cells reported to be resistant to BVDV infection in vitro and may be a useful tool for studying the early interactions of pestiviruses with host cells.

  9. A SARS-like cluster of circulating bat coronaviruses shows potential for human emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachery, Vineet D; Yount, Boyd L; Debbink, Kari; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Gralinski, Lisa E; Plante, Jessica A; Graham, Rachel L; Scobey, Trevor; Ge, Xing-Yi; Donaldson, Eric F; Randell, Scott H; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Marasco, Wayne A; Shi, Zhengli-Li; Baric, Ralph S

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV underscores the threat of cross-species transmission events leading to outbreaks in humans. Here we examine the disease potential of a SARS-like virus, SHC014-CoV, which is currently circulating in Chinese horseshoe bat populations. Using the SARS-CoV reverse genetics system, we generated and characterized a chimeric virus expressing the spike of bat coronavirus SHC014 in a mouse-adapted SARS-CoV backbone. The results indicate that group 2b viruses encoding the SHC014 spike in a wild-type backbone can efficiently use multiple orthologs of the SARS receptor human angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2), replicate efficiently in primary human airway cells and achieve in vitro titers equivalent to epidemic strains of SARS-CoV. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrate replication of the chimeric virus in mouse lung with notable pathogenesis. Evaluation of available SARS-based immune-therapeutic and prophylactic modalities revealed poor efficacy; both monoclonal antibody and vaccine approaches failed to neutralize and protect from infection with CoVs using the novel spike protein. On the basis of these findings, we synthetically re-derived an infectious full-length SHC014 recombinant virus and demonstrate robust viral replication both in vitro and in vivo. Our work suggests a potential risk of SARS-CoV re-emergence from viruses currently circulating in bat populations.

  10. Efficacy of various disinfectants against SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenau, H F; Kampf, G; Cinatl, J; Doerr, H W

    2005-10-01

    The recent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in Asia and Northern America led to broad use of various types of disinfectant in order to control the public spread of the highly contagious virus. However, only limited data were available to demonstrate their efficacy against SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We therefore investigated eight disinfectants for their activity against SARS-CoV according to prEN 14476. Four hand rubs were tested at 30s (Sterillium, based on 45% iso-propanol, 30% n-propanol and 0.2% mecetronium etilsulphate; Sterillium Rub, based on 80% ethanol; Sterillium Gel, based on 85% ethanol; Sterillium Virugard, based on 95% ethanol). Three surface disinfectants were investigated at 0.5% for 30 min and 60 min (Mikrobac forte, based on benzalkonium chloride and laurylamine; Kohrsolin FF, based on benzalkonium chloride, glutaraldehyde and didecyldimonium chloride; Dismozon pur, based on magnesium monoperphthalate), and one instrument disinfectant was investigated at 4% for 15 min, 3% for 30 min and 2% for 60 min [Korsolex basic, based on glutaraldehyde and (ethylenedioxy)dimethanol]. Three types of organic load were used: 0.3% albumin, 10% fetal calf serum, and 0.3% albumin with 0.3% sheep erythrocytes. Virus titres were determined by a quantitative test (endpoint titration) in 96-well microtitre plates. With all tested preparations, SARS-CoV was inactivated to below the limit of detection (reduction factor mostly > or =4), regardless of the type of organic load. In summary, SARS-CoV can be inactivated quite easily with many commonly used disinfectants.

  11. Date of origin of the SARS coronavirus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Lun

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new respiratory infectious epidemic, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, broke out and spread throughout the world. By now the putative pathogen of SARS has been identified as a new coronavirus, a single positive-strand RNA virus. RNA viruses commonly have a high rate of genetic mutation. It is therefore important to know the mutation rate of the SARS coronavirus as it spreads through the population. Moreover, finding a date for the last common ancestor of SARS coronavirus strains would be useful for understanding the circumstances surrounding the emergence of the SARS pandemic and the rate at which SARS coronavirus diverge. Methods We propose a mathematical model to estimate the evolution rate of the SARS coronavirus genome and the time of the last common ancestor of the sequenced SARS strains. Under some common assumptions and justifiable simplifications, a few simple equations incorporating the evolution rate (K and time of the last common ancestor of the strains (T0 can be deduced. We then implemented the least square method to estimate K and T0 from the dataset of sequences and corresponding times. Monte Carlo stimulation was employed to discuss the results. Results Based on 6 strains with accurate dates of host death, we estimated the time of the last common ancestor to be about August or September 2002, and the evolution rate to be about 0.16 base/day, that is, the SARS coronavirus would on average change a base every seven days. We validated our method by dividing the strains into two groups, which coincided with the results from comparative genomics. Conclusion The applied method is simple to implement and avoid the difficulty and subjectivity of choosing the root of phylogenetic tree. Based on 6 strains with accurate date of host death, we estimated a time of the last common ancestor, which is coincident with epidemic investigations, and an evolution rate in the same range as that reported for the HIV-1 virus.

  12. Peptide Mimicrying Between SARS Coronavirus Spike Protein and Human Proteins Reacts with SARS Patient Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-Y. Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mimicry, defined as similar structures shared by molecules from dissimilar genes or proteins, is a general strategy used by pathogens to infect host cells. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a new human respiratory infectious disease caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV. The spike (S protein of SARS-CoV plays an important role in the virus entry into a cell. In this study, eleven synthetic peptides from the S protein were selected based on its sequence homology with human proteins. Two of the peptides D07 (residues 927–937 and D08 (residues 942–951 were recognized by the sera of SARS patients. Murine hyperimmune sera against these peptides bound to proteins of human lung epithelial cells A549. Another peptide D10 (residues 490–502 stimulated A549 to proliferate and secrete IL-8. The present results suggest that the selected S protein regions, which share sequence homology with human proteins, may play important roles in SARS-CoV infection.

  13. Low complexity efficient raw SAR data compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Shantanu; Boufounos, Petros; Vetro, Anthony; Okada, Yu

    2011-06-01

    We present a low-complexity method for compression of raw Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Raw SAR data is typically acquired using a satellite or airborne platform without sufficient computational capabilities to process the data and generate a SAR image on-board. Hence, the raw data needs to be compressed and transmitted to the ground station, where SAR image formation can be carried out. To perform low-complexity compression, our method uses 1-dimensional transforms, followed by quantization and entropy coding. In contrast to previous approaches, which send uncompressed or Huffman-coded bits, we achieve more efficient entropy coding using an arithmetic coder that responds to a continuously updated probability distribution. We present experimental results on compression of raw Ku-SAR data. In those we evaluate the effect of the length of the transform on compression performance and demonstrate the advantages of the proposed framework over a state-of-the-art low complexity scheme called Block Adaptive Quantization (BAQ).

  14. Health Communication during SARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, Ava W.; Steele, Stefanie F.; Weld, Leisa H.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.

    2004-01-01

    During the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, electronic media made it possible to disseminate prevention messages rapidly. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Travelers’ Health Web site was frequently visited in the first half of 2003; more than 2.6 million visits were made to travel alerts, advisories, and other SARS-related documents. PMID:15030717

  15. SARS Pathogenesis: Host Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Lang (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWhile it is hypothesized that Sever Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans is caused by a disproportional immune response illustrated by inappropriate induction of inflammatory cytokines, the exact nature of the host response to SARS coronavirus (CoV) infection causing severe

  16. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, E.; Jong, de M.A.W.P.; Nabatov, A.; Kalay, H.; Kooijk, van Y.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  18. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, E.; Jong, de M.A.W.P.; Nabatov, A.; Kalay, H.; Kooijk, van Y.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  19. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-09-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development.

  20. Blocking ELISA's for the distinction between antibodies against European and American strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K; Strandbygaard, Bertel; Bøtner, Anette

    1998-01-01

    A double blocking ELISA was developed in order to satisfy the need for large scale serological screening for PRRS and simultaneous distinction between infection with European and American strains of PRRSV in pig herds. The Immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and the double blocking ELISA...

  1. PSC-RANTES blocks R5 human immunodeficiency virus infection of Langerhans cells isolated from individuals with a variety of CCR5 diplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tatsuyoshi; Bruse, Shannon E; Abraha, Awet; Sugaya, Makoto; Hartley, Oliver; Offord, Robin E; Arts, Eric J; Zimmerman, Peter A; Blauvelt, Andrew; Bruce, Shannon E

    2004-07-01

    Topical microbicides that effectively block interactions between CCR5(+) immature Langerhans cells (LC) residing within genital epithelia and R5 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may decrease sexual transmission of HIV. Here, we investigated the ability of synthetic RANTES analogues (AOP-, NNY-, and PSC-RANTES) to block R5 HIV infection of human immature LC by using a skin explant model. In initial experiments using activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, each analogue compound demonstrated marked antiviral activity against two R5 HIV isolates. Next, we found that 20-min preincubation of skin explants with each RANTES analogue blocked R5 HIV infection of LC in a dose-dependent manner (1 to 100 nM) and that PSC-RANTES was the most potent of these compounds. Similarly, preincubation of LC with each analogue was able to block LC-mediated infection of cocultured CD4(+) T cells. Competition experiments between primary R5 and X4 HIV isolates showed blocking of R5 HIV by PSC-RANTES and no evidence of increased propagation of X4 HIV, data that are consistent with the specificity of PSC-RANTES for CCR5 and the CCR5(+) CXCR4(-) phenotype of immature LC. Finally, when CCR5 genetic polymorphism data were integrated with results from the in vitro LC infection studies, PSC-RANTES was found to be equally effective in inhibiting R5 HIV in LC isolated from individuals with CCR5 diplotypes known to be associated with low, intermediate, and high cell surface levels of CCR5. In summary, PSC-RANTES is a potent inhibitor of R5 HIV infection in immature LC, suggesting that it may be useful as a topical microbicide to block sexual transmission of HIV.

  2. SARS coronavirus pathogenesis: host innate immune responses and viral antagonism of interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totura, Allison L; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-06-01

    SARS-CoV is a pathogenic coronavirus that emerged from a zoonotic reservoir, leading to global dissemination of the virus. The association SARS-CoV with aberrant cytokine, chemokine, and Interferon Stimulated Gene (ISG) responses in patients provided evidence that SARS-CoV pathogenesis is at least partially controlled by innate immune signaling. Utilizing models for SARS-CoV infection, key components of innate immune signaling pathways have been identified as protective factors against SARS-CoV disease, including STAT1 and MyD88. Gene transcription signatures unique to SARS-CoV disease states have been identified, but host factors that regulate exacerbated disease phenotypes still remain largely undetermined. SARS-CoV encodes several proteins that modulate innate immune signaling through the antagonism of the induction of Interferon and by avoidance of ISG effector functions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Antibody-dependent SARS coronavirus infection is mediated by antibodies against spike proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Yen, Chia-Hung; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tsao, Ching-Han; Shen, Chun-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Hsuan; Liu, Fu-Tong; Liu, Wu-Tse; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Huang, Jason C

    2014-08-22

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) still carries the potential for reemergence, therefore efforts are being made to create a vaccine as a prophylactic strategy for control and prevention. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is a mechanism through which dengue viruses, feline coronaviruses, and HIV viruses take advantage of anti-viral humoral immune responses to infect host target cells. Here we describe our observations of SARS-CoV using ADE to enhance the infectivity of a HL-CZ human promonocyte cell line. Quantitative-PCR and immunofluorescence staining results indicate that SARS-CoV is capable of replication in HL-CZ cells, and of displaying virus-induced cytopathic effects and increased levels of TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-6 two days post-infection. According to flow cytometry data, the HL-CZ cells also expressed angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2, a SARS-CoV receptor) and higher levels of the FcγRII receptor. We found that higher concentrations of anti-sera against SARS-CoV neutralized SARS-CoV infection, while highly diluted anti-sera significantly increased SARS-CoV infection and induced higher levels of apoptosis. Results from infectivity assays indicate that SARS-CoV ADE is primarily mediated by diluted antibodies against envelope spike proteins rather than nucleocapsid proteins. We also generated monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV spike proteins and observed that most of them promoted SARS-CoV infection. Combined, our results suggest that antibodies against SARS-CoV spike proteins may trigger ADE effects. The data raise new questions regarding a potential SARS-CoV vaccine, while shedding light on mechanisms involved in SARS pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ONERA airborne SAR facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, J.M. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), Chatillon (France)

    1996-11-01

    ONERA has developed and operates the RAMSES experimental SAR on board a TRANSALL C160 aircraft. This system has been designed in order to analyze the effect of various parameters, such as frequency, polarization, incidence, resolution,... in the field of air-to-ground radar applications. These applications include SAR imaging for ground radar applications. These applications include SAR imaging for various purposes such as map-matching for navigation update, battlefield surveillance, reconnaissance, treaty applications... It consists of several radar sections operating over a wide range of frequency bands (L, S, C, X, Ku, Ka, W). 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Lack of Innate Interferon Responses during SARS Coronavirus Infection in a Vaccination and Reinfection Ferret Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Mark J.; Kelvin, Alyson A.; Leon, Alberto J.; Cameron, Cheryl M.; Ran, Longsi; Xu, Luoling; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Danesh, Ali; Fang, Yuan; Li, Qianjun; Anderson, Austin; Couch, Ronald C.; Paquette, Stephane G.; Fomukong, Ndingsa G.; Kistner, Otfried; Lauchart, Manfred; Rowe, Thomas; Harrod, Kevin S.; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Kelvin, David J.

    2012-01-01

    In terms of its highly pathogenic nature, there remains a significant need to further define the immune pathology of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection, as well as identify correlates of immunity to help develop vaccines for severe coronaviral infections. Here we use a SARS-CoV infection-reinfection ferret model and a functional genomics approach to gain insight into SARS immunopathogenesis and to identify correlates of immune protection during SARS-CoV-challenge in ferrets previously infected with SARS-CoV or immunized with a SARS virus vaccine. We identified gene expression signatures in the lungs of ferrets associated with primary immune responses to SARS-CoV infection and in ferrets that received an identical second inoculum. Acute SARS-CoV infection prompted coordinated innate immune responses that were dominated by antiviral IFN response gene (IRG) expression. Reinfected ferrets, however, lacked the integrated expression of IRGs that was prevalent during acute infection. The expression of specific IRGs was also absent upon challenge in ferrets immunized with an inactivated, Al(OH)3-adjuvanted whole virus SARS vaccine candidate that protected them against SARS-CoV infection in the lungs. Lack of IFN-mediated immune enhancement in infected ferrets that were previously inoculated with, or vaccinated against, SARS-CoV revealed 9 IRG correlates of protective immunity. This data provides insight into the molecular pathogenesis of SARS-CoV and SARS-like-CoV infections and is an important resource for the development of CoV antiviral therapeutics and vaccines. PMID:23029269

  6. ESTUDIO TEÓRICO DEL VIRUS DEL SÍNDROME RESPIRATORIO AGUDO SEVERO (SARS A TRAVÉS DEL USO DE MÉTODOS DE ACOPLAMIENTO MOLECULAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Vivas Reyes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se ha evaluado por medio de la metodología de acoplamiento molecular una serie de 5 ligandos borados, que son variantes de la molécula FL-078. Estas moléculas tienen actividad inhibitoria frente a la proteasa Mpro responsable de la replicación del SARS-CoV. Haciendo uso del programa SYBYL7.0 se optimizó el homodímero de la Mpro (código 1Q2W, y a través del software FlexX se hizo el acople molecular con el fin de escoger el confórmero más estable de los ligandos aril borados frente a la macromolécula Mpro, encontrándose que la estructura FL-166 fue la de mejor conformación. Los 5 ligandos aril borados tienen la propiedad de interaccionar con el grupo hidroxilo (OH presente en los residuos tales como serinas, treoninas y tirosinas. Los resultados acople molecular muestran que el mejor acercamiento sobre la cavidad se da sobre el conjunto de treoninas 21, 24, 25 y 26, y no como se afirma en la literatura: que se da sobre el conjunto de serinas 139, 144 y 147.

  7. Anti-α4 antibody treatment blocks virus traffic to the brain and gut early, and stabilizes CNS injury late in infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Campbell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Four SIV-infected monkeys with high plasma virus and CNS injury were treated with an anti-α4 blocking antibody (natalizumab once a week for three weeks beginning on 28 days post-infection (late. Infection in the brain and gut were quantified, and neuronal injury in the CNS was assessed by MR spectroscopy, and compared to controls with AIDS and SIV encephalitis. Treatment resulted in stabilization of ongoing neuronal injury (NAA/Cr by 1H MRS, and decreased numbers of monocytes/macrophages and productive infection (SIV p28+, RNA+ in brain and gut. Antibody treatment of six SIV infected monkeys at the time of infection (early for 3 weeks blocked monocyte/macrophage traffic and infection in the CNS, and significantly decreased leukocyte traffic and infection in the gut. SIV - RNA and p28 was absent in the CNS and the gut. SIV DNA was undetectable in brains of five of six early treated macaques, but proviral DNA in guts of treated and control animals was equivalent. Early treated animals had low-to-no plasma LPS and sCD163. These results support the notion that monocyte/macrophage traffic late in infection drives neuronal injury and maintains CNS viral reservoirs and lesions. Leukocyte traffic early in infection seeds the CNS with virus and contributes to productive infection in the gut. Leukocyte traffic early contributes to gut pathology, bacterial translocation, and activation of innate immunity.

  8. Possible meteorological influence on the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) community outbreak at Amoy Gardens, Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Cleo; Chang, Wen L; Yeung, K H; Yu, Ignatius T S

    2007-10-01

    The largest community outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) occurred in the Amoy Gardens residential estate in Hong Kong, in March and April of 2003. It affected more than 300 residents, or 1.7 percent of the total Amoy Gardens population. An airborne pathway has been hypothesized as a possible mode for the spread of the disease. If that hypothesis is correct, meteorological factors may have played a contributory role; the virus-laden aerosols may have been transported between apartment blocks by the ambient wind, low mixing heights may have prevented the efficient dispersion of the aerosols, and a fall in temperature may have fostered the survival of the virus or increased the susceptibility of the exposed population. This information, used in combination with weather forecasts available several days ahead from meteorological services, should be useful for mitigation considerations in the unlikely event of a similar occurrence.

  9. Development of a dose-response model for SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toru; Bartrand, Timothy A; Weir, Mark H; Omura, Tatsuo; Haas, Charles N

    2010-07-01

    In order to develop a dose-response model for SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), the pooled data sets for infection of transgenic mice susceptible to SARS-CoV and infection of mice with murine hepatitis virus strain 1, which may be a clinically relevant model of SARS, were fit to beta-Poisson and exponential models with the maximum likelihood method. The exponential model (k= 4.1 x l0(2)) could describe the dose-response relationship of the pooled data sets. The beta-Poisson model did not provide a statistically significant improvement in fit. With the exponential model, the infectivity of SARS-CoV was calculated and compared with those of other coronaviruses. The does of SARS-CoV corresponding to 10% and 50% responses (illness) were estimated at 43 and 280 PFU, respectively. Its estimated infectivity was comparable to that of HCoV-229E, known as an agent of human common cold, and also similar to those of some animal coronaviruses belonging to the same genetic group. Moreover, the exponential model was applied to the analysis of the epidemiological data of SARS outbreak that occurred at an apartment complex in Hong Kong in 2003. The estimated dose of SARS-CoV for apartment residents during the outbreak, which was back-calculated from the reported number of cases, ranged from 16 to 160 PFU/person, depending on the floor. The exponential model developed here is the sole dose-response model for SARS-CoV at the present and would enable us to understand the possibility for reemergence of SARS.

  10. Discovery and SARs of trans-3-aryl acrylic acids and their analogs as novel anti-tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng; Wang, Ziwen; Meng, Chuisong; Wang, Kailiang; Hu, Yanna; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Qingmin

    2013-01-01

    A series of trans-3-aryl acrylic acids 1-27 and their derivatives 28-34 were prepared and evaluated for their antiviral activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) for the first time. The bioassay results showed that most of these compounds exhibited good antiviral activity against TMV, of which compounds 1, 5, 6, 20, 27 and 34 exhibited significantly higher activity against TMV than commercial Ribavirin both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these compounds have more simple structure than commercial Ribavirin, and can be synthesized more efficiently. These new findings demonstrate that trans-3-aryl acrylic acids and their derivatives represent a new template for antiviral studies and could be considered for novel therapy against plant virus infection.

  11. Discovery and SARs of trans-3-aryl acrylic acids and their analogs as novel anti-tobacco mosaic virus (TMV agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wu

    Full Text Available A series of trans-3-aryl acrylic acids 1-27 and their derivatives 28-34 were prepared and evaluated for their antiviral activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV for the first time. The bioassay results showed that most of these compounds exhibited good antiviral activity against TMV, of which compounds 1, 5, 6, 20, 27 and 34 exhibited significantly higher activity against TMV than commercial Ribavirin both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these compounds have more simple structure than commercial Ribavirin, and can be synthesized more efficiently. These new findings demonstrate that trans-3-aryl acrylic acids and their derivatives represent a new template for antiviral studies and could be considered for novel therapy against plant virus infection.

  12. Development and application of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to differentiate antibodies against live and inactivated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Yanlong; Huang, Zhiqiang; Sun, Yixue; Ran, Wei; Zhu, Lisai; Yang, Guilian; Ding, Xuemei; Yang, Zhanqing; Huang, Xiao; Wang, Chunfeng; Ding, Zhuang

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a method that could differentiate antibodies against live and inactivated vaccines of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). A blocking ELISA (b-ELISA) was established using the PRRSV non-structural protein, Nsp9, as the antigen and a monoclonal antibody, 2D6, against the Nsp9 protein as the capture antibody. The test was validated by using 415 clinical sera in the b-ELISA compared to a commercial kit based on the indirect ELISA using the nucleocapsid (N) protein as antigen. Significant differences were observed for the data obtained by the two detection methods. This may be due to the commercial kit detecting antibodies elicited by live and inactivated virus, whereas the b-ELISA only detects antibodies produced by any active viral replication, such as natural infection or live vaccination. Therefore, the b-ELISA in this study is able to distinguish between antibodies against live and inactivated viruses in pigs.

  13. Antibodies to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 block dendritic cell-mediated enterovirus 71 transmission and prevent virus-induced cells death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiao-Xin; Li, Chuan; Xiong, Si-Dong; Huang, Zhong; Wang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2015-01-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) has been proved to serve as the functional receptor for enterovirus 71 (EV71). We found the abundant expression of PSGL-1 on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). However, we have previously demonstrated that MDDCs did not support efficient replication of EV71. Dendritic cells (DCs) have been described to be subverted by various viruses including EV71 for viral dissemination, we thus explore the potential contribution of PSGL-1 on DC-mediated EV71 transmission. We found that the cell-surface-expressing PSGL-1 on MDDCs mediated EV71 binding, and intriguingly, these loaded-viruses on MDDCs could be transferred to encountered target cells; Prior-treatment with PSGL-1 antibodies or interference with PSGL-1 expression diminished MDDC-mediated EV71 transfer and rescued virus-induced cell death. Our data uncover a novel role of PSGL-1 in DC-mediated EV71 spread, and provide an insight into blocking primary EV71 infection.

  14. Secretion of genome-free hepatitis B virus--single strand blocking model for virion morphogenesis of para-retrovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojun Ning; David Nguyen; Laura Mentzer; Christina Adams; Hyunwook Lee; Robert Ashley; Susan Hafenstein; Jianming Hu

    2011-01-01

    As a para-retrovirus, hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded (DS) DNA genome that is replicated by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the pregenomic RNA or pgRNA. HBV assembly begins with the formation of an “immature” nucleocapsid (NC) incorporating pgRNA, which is converted via reverse transcription within the maturing NC to the DS DNA genome. Only the mature, DS DNA-containing NCs are enveloped and secreted as virions whereas immature NCs containing...

  15. The virion host shutoff RNase plays a key role in blocking the activation of protein kinase R in cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciortino, Maria Teresa; Parisi, Tiziana; Siracusano, Gabriel; Mastino, Antonio; Taddeo, Brunella; Roizman, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Earlier studies have shown that active MEK blocks the activation of protein kinase R (PKR), a component of antiviral innate immune responses. In this report we show that the herpes simplex virus 1 virion host shutoff (VHS) RNase protein and MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) act cooperatively in blocking the activation of PKR. This conclusion is based on the following. (i) In contrast to viral gene expression in the parental cell line or a cell line expressing a constitutively active MEK, the replication of a VHS mutant is particularly impaired in cells expressing dominant negative MEK. In this cell line PKR is activated by phosphorylation, and the accumulation of several viral proteins is delayed. (ii) In transfected cells, wild-type VHS blocked the activation of PKR, whereas PKR was activated in cells transfected with a mutant VHS or with plasmids encoding the VHS RNase and VP16 and VP22, the two viral proteins that neutralize the RNase activity of VHS. The results suggest that early in infection the VHS RNase degrades RNAs that activate PKR. Coupled with published data, the results suggest that inhibition of activation of PKR or its effect on viral replication is staged early in infection by VHS, postsynthesis of VP16 and VP22 by the γ(1)34.5 protein, and very late in infection by the U(S)11 protein.

  16. SARS-like cluster of circulating bat coronavirus pose threat for human emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Yount, Boyd L.; Debbink, Kari; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Plante, Jessica A.; Graham, Rachel L.; Scobey, Trevor; Ge, Xing-Yi; Donaldson, Eric F.; Randell, Scott H.; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Marasco, Wayne A.; Shi, Zhengli-Li; Baric, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)-CoV underscores the threat of cross-species transmission events leading to outbreaks in humans. In this study, we examine the disease potential for SARS-like CoVs currently circulating in Chinese horseshoe bat populations. Utilizing the SARS-CoV infectious clone, we generated and characterized a chimeric virus expressing the spike of bat coronavirus SHC014 in a mouse adapted SARS-CoV backbone. The results indicate that group 2b viruses encoding the SHC014 spike in a wild type backbone can efficiently utilize multiple ACE2 receptor orthologs, replicate efficiently in primary human airway cells, and achieve in vitro titers equivalent to epidemic strains of SARS-CoV. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrate replication of the chimeric virus in mouse lung with notable pathogenesis. Evaluation of available SARS-based immune-therapeutic and prophylactic modalities revealed poor efficacy; both monoclonal antibody and vaccine approaches failed to neutralize and protect from CoVs utilizing the novel spike protein. Importantly, based on these findings, we synthetically rederived an infectious full length SHC014 recombinant virus and demonstrate robust viral replication both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the work highlights a continued risk of SARS-CoV reemergence from viruses currently circulating in bat populations. PMID:26552008

  17. Chikungunya Virus nsP3 Blocks Stress Granule Assembly by Recruitment of G3BP into Cytoplasmic Foci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fros, J.J.; Domeradzka, N.E.; Baggen, J.; Geertsema, C.; Flipse, J.; Vlak, J.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus nonstructural protein nsP3 has an essential but unknown role in alphavirus replication and interacts with Ras-GAP SH3 domain-binding protein (G3BP). Here we describe the first known function of nsP3, to inhibit stress granule assembly by recruiting G3BP into cytoplasmic foci. A con

  18. Chikungunya Virus nsP3 Blocks Stress Granule Assembly by Recruitment of G3BP into Cytoplasmic Foci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fros, J.J.; Domeradzka, N.E.; Baggen, J.; Geertsema, C.; Flipse, J.; Vlak, J.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus nonstructural protein nsP3 has an essential but unknown role in alphavirus replication and interacts with Ras-GAP SH3 domain-binding protein (G3BP). Here we describe the first known function of nsP3, to inhibit stress granule assembly by recruiting G3BP into cytoplasmic foci. A con

  19. Evolution and Variation of the SARS-CoV Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfei Hu; Zizhang Zhang; Wei Wei; Songgang Li; Jun Wang; Jian Wang; Jun Yu; Huanming Yang; Jing Wang; Jing Xu; Wei Li; Yujun Han; Yan Li; Jia Ji; Jia Ye; Zhao Xu

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the evolution of pathogens is of great medical and biological significance to the prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of infectious diseases. In order to understand the origin and evolution of the SARS-CoV (severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus), we collected complete genome sequences of all viruses available in GenBank, and made comparative analyses with the SARSCoV. Genomic signature analysis demonstrates that the coronaviruses all take the TGTT as their richest tetranucleotide except the SARS-CoV. A detailed analysis of the forty-two complete SARS-CoV genome sequences revealed the existence of two distinct genotypes, and showed that these isolates could be classified into four groups. Our manual analysis of the BLASTN results demonstrates that the HE (hemagglutinin-esterase) gene exists in the SARS-CoV, and many mutations made it unfamiliar to us.

  20. Plant Translation Elongation Factor 1Bβ Facilitates Potato Virus X (PVX) Infection and Interacts with PVX Triple Gene Block Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, JeeNa; Lee, Seonhee; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Kang, Jin-Ho; Kang, Min-Young; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (eEF1) has two components: the G-protein eEF1A and the nucleotide exchange factor eEF1B. In plants, eEF1B is itself composed of a structural protein (eEF1Bγ) and two nucleotide exchange subunits (eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ). To test the effects of elongation factors on virus infection, we isolated eEF1A and eEF1B genes from pepper (Capsicum annuum) and suppressed their homologs in Nicotiana benthamiana using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The accumulation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Potato virus X (PVX) was significantly reduced in the eEF1Bβ- or eEF1Bɣ-silenced plants as well as in eEF1A-silenced plants. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ interacted with eEF1A and that eEF1A and eEF1Bβ interacted with triple gene block protein 1 (TGBp1) of PVX. These results suggest that both eEF1A and eEF1Bβ play essential roles in the multiplication of PVX by physically interacting with TGBp1. Furthermore, using eEF1Bβ deletion constructs, we found that both N- (1-64 amino acids) and C-terminal (150-195 amino acids) domains of eEF1Bβ are important for the interaction with PVX TGBp1 and that the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bβ is involved in the interaction with eEF1A. These results suggest that eEF1Bβ could be a potential target for engineering virus-resistant plants.

  1. Analysis of proteins that interact with nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV using 15-mer phage-displayed library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZhengXue; WANG ZhanHui; LIU YingLe; DONG Wei; QI YiPeng

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of proteins that interact with N protein of SARS-CoV using 15-mer phage-displayed library will help to explore the virus pathogenesis and to develop new drugs and vaccines against SARS. In this study, we cloned, expressed and purified N protein of SARS-CoV. This 46-kD N protein was verified by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot. Then, the peptides binding-specific to N protein were identified using 15-mer phage-displayed library. Surprisingly, all of the 89 clones from monoclonal ELISA were positive (S/N>2.1) and the result was further confirmed experimentally once again. Six N protein-binding peptides, designated separately as SNA1, SNA2, SNA4, SNA5, SNA9 and SNG11, were selected for sequencing. Sequence analysis suggested that SNA5 shared approximatively 100% sequence identity to SNA4, SNA2, SNA9 and SNA1. In addition, the binding specificity of the 15-mer peptides with the SARS-CoV N protein was further demonstrated by blocking ELISA using the synthetical 15-mer peptide according to the deduced amino acid sequence of SNA5. Also, the deduced amino sequence of SNA5 was compared with proteins in translated database using the tblastx program, and the results showed that the proteins with the highest homology were Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase iron-sulfur subunits (UCRI or UQCR), otherwise known as the Rieske iron-sulfur proteins (RISP). Notablely, in the [2Fe-2S] redox centre of UCRI, there were 6 residues [GGW(Y)F(Y)CP] compatible to the residues (position 2→7, GGWFCP7) of the NH2-terminal of the 15-mer peptide, which indicated higher binding specificity between the N protein of SARS-CoV and the redox centre of UCRI to some extent. Here, the possible molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV N protein in the pathogenesis of SARS are discussed.

  2. Improving the selection and development of influenza vaccine viruses - Report of a WHO informal consultation on improving influenza vaccine virus selection, Hong Kong SAR, China, 18-20 November 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Alan; Barr, Ian; Cox, Nancy; Donis, Ruben O; Siddhivinayak, Hirve; Jernigan, Daniel; Katz, Jacqueline; McCauley, John; Motta, Fernando; Odagiri, Takato; Tam, John S; Waddell, Anthony; Webby, Richard; Ziegler, Thedi; Zhang, Wenqing

    2017-02-22

    Since 2010 the WHO has held a series of informal consultations to explore ways of improving the currently highly complex and time-pressured influenza vaccine virus selection and development process. In November 2015 experts from around the world met to review the current status of efforts in this field. Discussion topics included strengthening influenza surveillance activities to increase the availability of candidate vaccine viruses and improve the extent, timeliness and quality of surveillance data. Consideration was also given to the development and potential application of newer laboratory assays to better characterize candidate vaccine viruses, the potential importance of antibodies directed against influenza virus neuraminidase, and the role of vaccine effectiveness studies. Advances in next generation sequencing and whole genome sequencing of influenza viruses were also discussed, along with associated developments in synthetic genomics technologies, evolutionary analysis and predictive mathematical modelling. Discussions were also held on the late emergence of an antigenic variant influenza A(H3N2) virus in mid-2014 that could not be incorporated in time into the 2014-15 northern hemisphere vaccine. There was broad recognition that given the current highly constrained influenza vaccine development and production timeline it would remain impossible to incorporate any variant virus which emerged significantly long after the relevant WHO biannual influenza vaccine composition meetings. Discussions were also held on the development of pandemic and broadly protective vaccines, and on associated regulatory and manufacturing requirements and constraints. With increasing awareness of the health and economic burdens caused by seasonal influenza, the ever-present threat posed by zoonotic influenza viruses, and the significant impact of the 2014-15 northern hemisphere seasonal influenza vaccine mismatch, this consultation provided a very timely opportunity to share

  3. Potential for Co-Infection of a Mosquito-Specific Flavivirus, Nhumirim Virus, to Block West Nile Virus Transmission in Mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Goenaga

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nhumirim virus (NHUV is an insect-specific virus that phylogenetically affiliates with dual-host mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Previous in vitro co-infection experiments demonstrated prior or concurrent infection of Aedes albopictus C6/36 mosquito cells with NHUV resulted in a 10,000-fold reduction in viral production of West Nile virus (WNV. This interference between WNV and NHUV was observed herein in an additional Ae. albopictus mosquito cell line, C7-10. A WNV 2K peptide (V9M mutant capable of superinfection with a pre-established WNV infection demonstrated a comparable level of interference from NHUV as the parental WNV strain in C6/36 and C7-10 cells. Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex pipiens mosquitoes intrathoracically inoculated with NHUVandWNV, or solely withWNVas a control, were allowed to extrinsically incubate the viruses up to nine and 14 days, respectively, and transmissibility and replication of WNV was determined. The proportion of Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes capable of transmitting WNV was significantly lower for the WNV/NHUV group than the WNV control at seven and nine days post inoculation (dpi, while no differences were observed in the Cx. pipiens inoculation group. By dpi nine, a 40% reduction in transmissibility in mosquitoes from the dual inoculation group was observed compared to the WNV-only control. These data indicate the potential that infection of some Culex spp. vectors with NHUV could serve as a barrier for efficient transmissibility of flaviviruses associated with human disease.

  4. Potential for Co-Infection of a Mosquito-Specific Flavivirus, Nhumirim Virus, to Block West Nile Virus Transmission in Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenaga, Silvina; Kenney, Joan L; Duggal, Nisha K; Delorey, Mark; Ebel, Gregory D; Zhang, Bo; Levis, Silvana C; Enria, Delia A; Brault, Aaron C

    2015-11-11

    Nhumirim virus (NHUV) is an insect-specific virus that phylogenetically affiliates with dual-host mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Previous in vitro co-infection experiments demonstrated prior or concurrent infection of Aedes albopictus C6/36 mosquito cells with NHUV resulted in a 10,000-fold reduction in viral production of West Nile virus (WNV). This interference between WNV and NHUV was observed herein in an additional Ae. albopictus mosquito cell line, C7-10. A WNV 2K peptide (V9M) mutant capable of superinfection with a pre-established WNV infection demonstrated a comparable level of interference from NHUV as the parental WNV strain in C6/36 and C7-10 cells. Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex pipiens mosquitoes intrathoracically inoculated with NHUV and WNV, or solely with WNV as a control, were allowed to extrinsically incubate the viruses up to nine and 14 days, respectively, and transmissibility and replication of WNV was determined. The proportion of Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes capable of transmitting WNV was significantly lower for the WNV/NHUV group than the WNV control at seven and nine days post inoculation (dpi), while no differences were observed in the Cx. pipiens inoculation group. By dpi nine, a 40% reduction in transmissibility in mosquitoes from the dual inoculation group was observed compared to the WNV-only control. These data indicate the potential that infection of some Culex spp. vectors with NHUV could serve as a barrier for efficient transmissibility of flaviviruses associated with human disease.

  5. Phylogeny of SARS-CoV as inferred from complete genome comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    SARS-CoV, as the pathogeny of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), is a mystery that the origin of the virus is still unknown even a few isolates of the virus were completely sequenced. To explore the genesis of SARS-CoV, the FDOD method previously developed by us was applied to comparing complete genomes from 12 SARS-CoV isolates to those from 12 previously identified coronaviruses and an unrooted phylogenetic tree was constructed. Our results show that all SARS-CoV isolates were clustered into a clique and previously identified coronaviruses formed the other clique. Meanwhile, the three groups of coronaviruses depart from each other clearly in our tree that is consistent with the results of prevenient papers. Differently, from the topology of the phylogenetic tree we found that SARS-CoV is more close to group 1 within genus coronavirus. The topology map also shows that the 12 SARS-CoV isolates may be divided into two groups determined by the association with the SARS-CoV from the Hotel M in Hong Kong that may give some information about the infectious relationship of the SARS.

  6. Dimethyl sulfoxide blocks herpes simplex virus-1 productive infection in vitro acting at different stages with positive cooperativity. Application of micro-array analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazal P

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO is frequently used at a concentration of up to 95% in the formulation of antiherpetic agents because of its properties as a skin penetration enhancer. Here, we have analyzed the effect of DMSO on several parameters of Herpes Simplex Virus replication. Methods Productive infection levels of HSV-1 were determined by plaque assay or by reporter gene activity, and its DNA replication was estimated by PCR. Transcript levels were evaluated with HSV-specific DNA micro-arrays. Results DMSO blocks productive infection in vitro in different cell types with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 from 0.7 to 2% depending upon the multiplicity of infection. The concentration dependence exhibits a Hill coefficient greater than 1, indicating that DMSO blocks productive infection by acting at multiple different points (mechanisms of action with positive cooperativity. Consistently, we identified at least three distinct temporal target mechanisms for inhibition of virus growth by DMSO. At late stages of infection, DMSO reduces virion infectivity, and markedly inhibits viral DNA replication. A third mode of action was revealed using an oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray system for HSV. These experiments showed that DMSO reduced the transcript levels of many HSV-1 genes; including several genes coding for proteins involved in forming and assembling the virion. Also, DMSO markedly inhibited some but not all early transcripts indicating a previously unknown mode for inhibiting the early phase of HSV transcription-replication cycle. Conclusion These observations suggest that DMSO itself may have a role in the anti-herpetic activity of formulations utilizing it as a dispersant.

  7. Molecular Advances in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-associated Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ken Yan Ching Chow; Chung Chau Hon; Raymond Kin Hi Hui; Raymond Tsz Yeung Wong; Chi Wai Yip; Fanya Zeng; Frederick Chi Ching Leung

    2003-01-01

    The sudden outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 prompted the establishment of a global scientific network subsuming most of the traditional rivalries in the competitive field of virology. Within months of the SARS outbreak, collaborative work revealed the identity of the disastrous pathogen as SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). However, although the rapid identification of the agent represented an important breakthrough, our understanding of the deadly virus remains limited. Detailed biological knowledge is crucial for the development of effective countermeasures, diagnostic tests, vaccines and antiviral drugs against the SARS-CoV. This article reviews the present state of molecular knowledge about SARS-CoV, from the aspects of comparative genomics, molecular biology of viral genes, evolution, and epidemiology, and describes the diagnostic tests and the anti-viral drugs derived so far based on the available molecular information.

  8. Crop Classification by Polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Henning; Svendsen, Morten Thougaard; Nielsen, Flemming;

    1999-01-01

    Polarimetric SAR-data of agricultural fields have been acquired by the Danish polarimetric L- and C-band SAR (EMISAR) during a number of missions at the Danish agricultural test site Foulum during 1995. The data are used to study the classification potential of polarimetric SAR data using...

  9. A mouse-adapted SARS-coronavirus causes disease and mortality in BALB/c mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjeanette Roberts

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available No single animal model for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS reproduces all aspects of the human disease. Young inbred mice support SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV replication in the respiratory tract and are available in sufficient numbers for statistical evaluation. They are relatively inexpensive and easily accessible, but their use in SARS research is limited because they do not develop illness following infection. Older (12- to 14-mo-old BALB/c mice develop clinical illness and pneumonitis, but they can be hard to procure, and immune senescence complicates pathogenesis studies. We adapted the SARS-CoV (Urbani strain by serial passage in the respiratory tract of young BALB/c mice. Fifteen passages resulted in a virus (MA15 that is lethal for mice following intranasal inoculation. Lethality is preceded by rapid and high titer viral replication in lungs, viremia, and dissemination of virus to extrapulmonary sites accompanied by lymphopenia, neutrophilia, and pathological changes in the lungs. Abundant viral antigen is extensively distributed in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar pneumocytes, and necrotic cellular debris is present in airways and alveoli, with only mild and focal pneumonitis. These observations suggest that mice infected with MA15 die from an overwhelming viral infection with extensive, virally mediated destruction of pneumocytes and ciliated epithelial cells. The MA15 virus has six coding mutations associated with adaptation and increased virulence; when introduced into a recombinant SARS-CoV, these mutations result in a highly virulent and lethal virus (rMA15, duplicating the phenotype of the biologically derived MA15 virus. Intranasal inoculation with MA15 reproduces many aspects of disease seen in severe human cases of SARS. The availability of the MA15 virus will enhance the use of the mouse model for SARS because infection with MA15 causes morbidity, mortality, and pulmonary pathology. This virus will be of value as

  10. TIM-family proteins promote infection of multiple enveloped viruses through virion-associated phosphatidylserine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Jemielity

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin-domain containing proteins (TIM1, 3, and 4 specifically bind phosphatidylserine (PS. TIM1 has been proposed to serve as a cellular receptor for hepatitis A virus and Ebola virus and as an entry factor for dengue virus. Here we show that TIM1 promotes infection of retroviruses and virus-like particles (VLPs pseudotyped with a range of viral entry proteins, in particular those from the filovirus, flavivirus, New World arenavirus and alphavirus families. TIM1 also robustly enhanced the infection of replication-competent viruses from the same families, including dengue, Tacaribe, Sindbis and Ross River viruses. All interactions between TIM1 and pseudoviruses or VLPs were PS-mediated, as demonstrated with liposome blocking and TIM1 mutagenesis experiments. In addition, other PS-binding proteins, such as Axl and TIM4, promoted infection similarly to TIM1. Finally, the blocking of PS receptors on macrophages inhibited the entry of Ebola VLPs, suggesting that PS receptors can contribute to infection in physiologically relevant cells. Notably, infection mediated by the entry proteins of Lassa fever virus, influenza A virus and SARS coronavirus was largely unaffected by TIM1 expression. Taken together our data show that TIM1 and related PS-binding proteins promote infection of diverse families of enveloped viruses, and may therefore be useful targets for broad-spectrum antiviral therapies.

  11. Virus-like particles presenting interleukin-33 molecules: immunization characteristics and potentials of blockingIL-33/ST2 pathway in allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Qiong; Huang, Weiwei; Yao, Yufeng; Yang, Xu; Sun, Wenjia; Jin, Xiaomei; Li, Yang; Chu, Xiaojie; Liu, Cunbao; Peng, Zhikang; Ma, Yanbing

    2014-01-01

    We sought to develop an IL-33 vaccine and evaluate its efficacy in a mouse model of asthma. The full-length molecules of putative mature IL-33 were inserted into the immunodominant epitope region of hepatitis B core antigen using gene recombination techniques. The expressed chimeric protein presented as virus-like particles (VLPs) under observation using an electron microscopy. To investigate immunization characteristics of the VLPs, mice were immunized by using different doses, adjuvants, and routes. The VLPs induced sustained and high titers of IL-33-specific IgG and IgA even without the use of a conventional adjuvant, and the lowered ratio of IgG1/IgG2a in vaccinated mice indicated a shift from Th2 to Th1-like responses. To assess the vaccine effects on blocking the signaling of IL-33/ST2 pathway, mice receiving 3 vaccinations subjected to intraperitoneal sensitization and intranasal challenge with ovalbumin (OVA). Control animals received carrier or PBS in place of the vaccine. Immunization with the VLPs significantly suppressed inflammatory cell number and IL-33 level in BALF. OVA -induced goblet cell hyperplasia and lung tissue inflammatory cell infiltration were significantly suppressed in vaccinated mice. Our data indicate that IL-33 molecule-based vaccine, which may block IL-33/ST2 signaling pathway on a persistent basis, holds potential for treatment of asthma and, by extension, other diseases where overexpressed IL-33 plays a pivotal role in pathogenesis.

  12. Herpes simplex virus 1 ICP22 inhibits the transcription of viral gene promoters by binding to and blocking the recruitment of P-TEFb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Wu, Wen-juan; Liu, Long-ding; Wang, Li-chun; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Lian-qiu; Guan, Ying; Li, Qi-han

    2012-01-01

    ICP22 is a multifunctional herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early protein that functions as a general repressor of a subset of cellular and viral promoters in transient expression systems. Although the exact mechanism of repression remains unclear, this protein induces a decrease in RNA polymerase II Serine 2 (RNAPII Ser-2) phosphorylation, which is critical for transcription elongation. To characterize the mechanism of transcriptional repression by ICP22, we established an in vivo transient expression reporter system. We found that ICP22 inhibits transcription of the HSV-1 α, β and γ gene promoters. The viral tegument protein VP16, which plays vital roles in initiation of viral gene expression and viral proliferation, can overcome the inhibitory effect of ICP22 on α-gene transcription. Further immunoprecipitation studies indicated that both ICP22 and VP16 bind to positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) and form a complex with it in vivo. We extended this to show that P-TEFb regulates transcription of the viral α-gene promoters and affects transcriptional regulation of ICP22 and VP16 on the α-genes. Additionally, ChIP assays demonstrated that ICP22 blocks the recruitment of P-TEFb to the viral promoters, while VP16 reverses this blocking effect by recruiting P-TEFb to the viral α-gene promoters through recognition of the TAATGARAT motif. Taken together, our results suggest that ICP22 interacts with and blocks the recruitment of P-TEFb to viral promoter regions, which inhibits transcription of the viral gene promoters. The transactivator VP16 binds to and induces the recruitment of P-TEFb to viral α-gene promoters, which counteracts the transcriptional repression of ICP22 on α-genes by recruiting p-TEFb to the promoter region.

  13. Rapid inactivation of SARS-like coronaviruses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapil, Sanjay (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Oberst, R. D. (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David; Souza, Caroline Ann; Williams, Cecelia Victoria

    2004-03-01

    Chemical disinfection and inactivation of viruses is largely understudied, but is very important especially in the case of highly infectious viruses. The purpose of this LDRD was to determine the efficacy of the Sandia National Laboratories developed decontamination formulations against Bovine Coronavirus (BCV) as a surrogate for the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans. The outbreak of SARS in late 2002 resulted from a highly infectious virus that was able to survive and remain infectious for extended periods. For this study, preliminary testing with Escherichia coli MS-2 (MS-2) and Escherichia coli T4 (T4) bacteriophages was conducted to develop virucidal methodology for verifying the inactivation after treatment with the test formulations following AOAC germicidal methodologies. After the determination of various experimental parameters (i.e. exposure, concentration) of the formulations, final testing was conducted on BCV. All experiments were conducted with various organic challenges (horse serum, bovine feces, compost) for results that more accurately represent field use condition. The MS-2 and T4 were slightly more resistant than BCV and required a 2 minute exposure while BCV was completely inactivated after a 1 minute exposure. These results were also consistent for the testing conducted in the presence of the various organic challenges indicating that the test formulations are highly effective for real world application.

  14. Multichannel FMCW SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Dorp, Ph. van

    2012-01-01

    A light weight SAR, suitable for use on short range tactical UAV, has been designed and built. The system consists of a fully digital receive array, and a very compact active transmit antenna. The approximate weight of the complete system is 6 kg, with power consumption below 75 W, depending on the

  15. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  16. SARS: clinical presentation, transmission, pathogenesis and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Paul K S; Tang, Julian W; Hui, David S C

    2006-02-01

    SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) appeared as the first emerging infectious disease of this century. It is fortunate that the culprit virus can be grown without much difficulty from a commonly used cell line, allowing an unlimited supply of isolates for further molecular studies and leading to the development of sensitive diagnostic assays. How the virus has successfully jumped the species barrier is still a mystery. The superspreading events that occurred within hospital, hotel and high-density housing estate opens a new chapter in the mechanisms and routes of virus transmission. The old practice of quarantine proved to be still useful in controlling the global outbreak. Despite all the available sophisticated tests, alertness with early recognition by healthcare workers and prompt isolation of suspected cases is still the most important step for containing the spread of the infection. Although the rapidly evolving outbreak did not allow the conducting of systematic clinical trails to evaluate treatment options, the accumulated experience on managing SARS patients will improve the clinical outcome should SARS return. Although SARS led to more than 700 deaths worldwide, the lessons learnt have prepared healthcare systems worldwide to face future emerging and re-emerging infections.

  17. Accessory proteins of SARS-CoV and other coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ding Xiang; Fung, To Sing; Chong, Kelvin Kian-Long; Shukla, Aditi; Hilgenfeld, Rolf

    2014-09-01

    The huge RNA genome of SARS coronavirus comprises a number of open reading frames that code for a total of eight accessory proteins. Although none of these are essential for virus replication, some appear to have a role in virus pathogenesis. Notably, some SARS-CoV accessory proteins have been shown to modulate the interferon signaling pathways and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The structural information on these proteins is also limited, with only two (p7a and p9b) having their structures determined by X-ray crystallography. This review makes an attempt to summarize the published knowledge on SARS-CoV accessory proteins, with an emphasis on their involvement in virus-host interaction. The accessory proteins of other coronaviruses are also briefly discussed. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses" (see Introduction by Hilgenfeld and Peiris (2013)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bistatic sAR data processing algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Xiaolan; Hu, Donghui

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is critical for remote sensing. It works day and night, in good weather or bad. Bistatic SAR is a new kind of SAR system, where the transmitter and receiver are placed on two separate platforms. Bistatic SAR is one of the most important trends in SAR development, as the technology renders SAR more flexible and safer when used in military environments. Imaging is one of the most difficult and important aspects of bistatic SAR data processing. Although traditional SAR signal processing is fully developed, bistatic SAR has a more complex system structure, so sign

  19. SAR++: A Multi-Channel Scalable and Reconfigurable SAR System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Flemming; Christensen, Erik Lintz

    2002-01-01

    SAR++ is a technology program aiming at developing know-how and technology needed to design the next generation civilian SAR systems. Technology has reached a state, which allows major parts of the digital subsystem to be built using custom-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. A design goal is to des......SAR++ is a technology program aiming at developing know-how and technology needed to design the next generation civilian SAR systems. Technology has reached a state, which allows major parts of the digital subsystem to be built using custom-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. A design goal...... is to design a modular, scalable and reconfigurable SAR system using such components, in order to ensure maximum flexibility for the users of the actual system and for future system updates. Having these aspects in mind the SAR++ system is presented with focus on the digital subsystem architecture...... and the analog to digital interface....

  20. SARS coronavirus entry into host cells through a novel clathrin- and caveolae-independent endocytic pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Wang; Peng Yang; Kangtai Liu; Feng Guo; Yanli Zhang; Gongyi Zhang; Chengyu Jiang

    2008-01-01

    While severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)fwas initially thought to enter cells through direct fusion with the plasma membrane, more recent evidence suggests that virus entry may also involve endocytosis. We have found that SARS-CoV enters cells via pH- and receptor-dependent endocytosis. Treatment of cells with either SARS-CoV spike protein or spike-bearing pseudoviruses resulted in the translocation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the functional receptor of SARS-CoV, from the cell surface to endosomes. In addition, the spike-bearing pseudoviruses and early endosome antigen 1 were found to colocalize in endosomes. Further analyses using specific endocytic pathway inhibitors and dominant-negative Eps15 as well as caveolin-1 colocalization study suggested that virus entry was mediated by a clathrin- and caveolae-independent mechanism. Moreover, cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich lipid raft microdomains in the plasma membrane, which have been shown to act as platforms for many physiological signaling pathways, were shown to be involved in virus entry. Endocytic entry of SARS-CoV may expand the cellular range of SARS-CoV infection, and our findings here contribute to the understanding of SARS-CoV pathogenesis, providing new information for anti-viral drug research.

  1. Functional genomics highlights differential induction of antiviral pathways in the lungs of SARS-CoV-infected macaques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Lang (Anna); T. Baas (Tracey); T.H. Teal (Thomas); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); B. Rain (Brandon); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); M.G. Katze (Michael)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is likely mediated by disproportional immune responses and the ability of the virus to circumvent innate immunity. Using functional genomics, we analyzed early host responses to SARS-CoV infection in the lungs o

  2. From SARS coronavirus to novel animal and human coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kelvin K W; Hung, Ivan F N; Chan, Jasper F W; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-08-01

    In 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) caused one of the most devastating epidemics known to the developed world. There were two important lessons from this epidemic. Firstly, coronaviruses, in addition to influenza viruses, can cause severe and rapidly spreading human infections. Secondly, bats can serve as the origin and natural animal reservoir of deadly human viruses. Since then, researchers around the world, especially those in Asia where SARS-CoV was first identified, have turned their focus to find novel coronaviruses infecting humans, bats, and other animals. Two human coronaviruses, HCoV-HKU1 and HCoV-NL63, were identified shortly after the SARS-CoV epidemic as common causes of human respiratory tract infections. In 2012, a novel human coronavirus, now called Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), has emerged in the Middle East to cause fatal human infections in three continents. MERS-CoV human infection is similar to SARS-CoV in having a high fatality rate and the ability to spread from person to person which resulted in secondary cases among close contacts including healthcare workers without travel history to the Middle East. Both viruses also have close relationships with bat coronaviruses. New cases of MERS-CoV infection in humans continue to occur with the origins of the virus still unknown in many cases. A multifaceted approach is necessary to control this evolving MERS-CoV outbreak. Source identification requires detailed epidemiological studies of the infected patients and enhanced surveillance of MERS-CoV or similar coronaviruses in humans and animals. Early diagnosis of infected patients and appropriate infection control measures will limit the spread in hospitals, while social distancing strategies may be necessary to control the outbreak in communities if it remained uncontrolled as in the SARS epidemic.

  3. Development of an HIV-1 Microbicide Based on Caulobacter crescentus: Blocking Infection by High-Density Display of Virus Entry Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Farr

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS pandemic remains an enormous global health concern. Despite effective prevention options, 2.6 million new infections occur annually, with women in developing countries accounting for more than half of these infections. New prevention strategies that can be used by women are urgently needed. Topical microbicides specific for HIV-1 represent a promising prevention strategy. Conceptually, using harmless bacteria to display peptides or proteins capable of blocking entry provides an inexpensive approach to microbicide development. To avoid the potential pitfalls of engineering commensal bacteria, our strategy is to genetically display infection inhibitors on a non-native bacterium and rely on topical application of stabilized bacteria before potential virus exposure. Due to the high density cell-surface display capabilities and the inherent low toxicity of the bacterium, the S-layer mediated protein display capabilities of the non-pathogenic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus has been exploited for this approach. We have demonstrated that C. crescentus displaying MIP1α or CD4 interfered with the virus entry pathway and provided significant protection from HIV-1 pseudovirus representing clade B in a standard single cycle infection assay. Here we have expanded our C. crescentus based microbicide approach with additional and diverse classes of natural and synthetic inhibitors of the HIV-1 entry pathway. All display constructs provided variable but significant protection from HIV-1 infection; some with protection as high as 70%. Further, we describe protection from infection with additional viral clades. These findings indicate the significant potential for engineering C. crescentus to be an effective and readily adaptable HIV-1 microbicide platform.

  4. Novel Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Algorithms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polarimetric SAR interferometry (PolInSAR) is a recently developed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode that combines the capabilities of radar polarimetry...

  5. Expression and Purification of SARS Coronavirus Membrane Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴五星; 雷明军; 吴少庭; 陈智浩; 梁靓; 潘晖榕; 秦莉; 高士同; 袁仕善; 张仁利

    2004-01-01

    To construct a recombinant plasmid Pet23a-M, the gene encoding severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus membrane protein was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into the expression plasmid Pet23a. Results of restriction endonuclease analysis, PCR detection and DNA sequencing analysis revealed that the cloned DNA sequence was the same as that reported. The re combinants were transformed into Escherichia coli (E. Coli) BL21 (DE3) and induced by Isopropylβ-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The expression of 27 kD (1 kD=0. 992 1 ku) protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and pured by metal chelated chromatography. Results of Western-blot showed that this expressed protein could react with antibodies in sera of SARS patients during convalescence. This provided the basis for the further study on SARS virus vaccine and diagnostic agents.

  6. Wetland InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  7. Murine anti-vaccinia virus D8 antibodies target different epitopes and differ in their ability to block D8 binding to CS-E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Matho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The IMV envelope protein D8 is an adhesion molecule and a major immunodominant antigen of vaccinia virus (VACV. Here we identified the optimal D8 ligand to be chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E. CS-E is characterized by a disaccharide moiety with two sulfated hydroxyl groups at positions 4' and 6' of GalNAc. To study the role of antibodies in preventing D8 adhesion to CS-E, we have used a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies, and tested their ability to compete with CS-E for D8 binding. Among four antibody specificity groups, MAbs of one group (group IV fully abrogated CS-E binding, while MAbs of a second group (group III displayed widely varying levels of CS-E blocking. Using EM, we identified the binding site for each antibody specificity group on D8. Recombinant D8 forms a hexameric arrangement, mediated by self-association of a small C-terminal domain of D8. We propose a model in which D8 oligomerization on the IMV would allow VACV to adhere to heterogeneous population of CS, including CS-C and potentially CS-A, while overall increasing binding efficiency to CS-E.

  8. A liquid-phase-blocking concanavalin A enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies against Newcastle disease virus in serum of free-ranging pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Elisabete Schirato; Silva, Ketherson Rodrigues; Fernando, Filipe Santos; Gonçalves, Mariana Costa Mello; Fernandes, Camila Cesário; Borzi, Mariana Monezi; dos Santos, Romeu Moreira; Tamanini, Maria de Lourdes Feres; Montassier, Maria de Fátima da Silva; Montassier, Helio José

    2013-11-01

    A competitive liquid-phase-blocking concanavalin A enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LPB-ConA-ELISA) was developed in the current study. The assay used ConA as a capture reagent, and the sera of specific pathogen-free chickens immunized with nonpurified Newcastle disease virus (NDV) suspension as detector antibodies, to detect and quantify specific antiviral antibodies in serum samples from free-ranging pigeons. The comparison between the LPB-ConA-ELISA and the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for the detection of antibodies in serum samples from 107 pigeons showed significant correlation between the assays (r = 0.875), a high sensitivity (100%), specificity (95.8%), accuracy (96.3%) for the ELISA, and good agreement (κ = 0.83) between the 2 assays. The results of this study suggest that the LPB-ConA-ELISA could be a useful alternative to HI test in the serodiagnosis of NDV in pigeons, or other species of birds.

  9. Rock blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, W.

    2007-01-01

    Consider representation theory associated to symmetric groups, or to Hecke algebras in type A, or to q-Schur algebras, or to finite general linear groups in non-describing characteristic. Rock blocks are certain combinatorially defined blocks appearing in such a representation theory, first observed by R. Rouquier. Rock blocks are much more symmetric than general blocks, and every block is derived equivalent to a Rock block. Motivated by a theorem of J. Chuang and R. Kessar in the case of sym...

  10. Receptor recognition and cross-species infections of SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang

    2013-10-01

    Receptor recognition is a major determinant of the host range, cross-species infections, and pathogenesis of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). A defined receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the SARS-CoV spike protein specifically recognizes its host receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). This article reviews the latest knowledge about how RBDs from different SARS-CoV strains interact with ACE2 from several animal species. Detailed research on these RBD/ACE2 interactions has established important principles on host receptor adaptations, cross-species infections, and future evolution of SARS-CoV. These principles may apply to other emerging animal viruses, including the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Recovering Seasat SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, T. A.; Arko, S. A.; Rosen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of orbital remote sensing for global ocean observations, NASA launched Seasat on June 27th, 1978. Being the first space borne SAR mission, Seasat produced the most detailed SAR images of Earth from space ever seen to that point in time. While much of the data collected in the USA was processed optically, a mere 150 scenes had been digitally processed by March 1980. In fact, only an estimated 3% of Seasat data was ever digitally processed. Thus, for over three decades, the majority of the SAR data from this historic mission has been dormant, virtually unavailable to scientists in the 21st century. Over the last year, researchers at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) have processed the Seasat SAR archives into imagery products. A telemetry decoding system was created and the data were filtered into readily processable signal files. Due to nearly 35 years of bit rot, the bit error rate (BER) for the ASF DAAC Seasat archives was on the order of 1 out of 100 to 1 out of 100,000. This extremely high BER initially seemed to make much of the data undecodable - because the minor frame numbers are just 7 bits and no range line numbers exist in the telemetry even the 'simple' tasks of tracking the minor frame number or locating the start of each range line proved difficult. Eventually, using 5 frame numbers in sequence and a handful of heuristics, the data were successfully decoded into full range lines. Concurrently, all metadata were stored into external files. Recovery of this metadata was also problematic, the BER making the information highly suspect and, initially at least, unusable in any sort of automated fashion. Because of the BER, all of the single bit metadata fields proved unreliable. Even fields that should be constant for a data take (e.g. receiving station, day of the year) showed high variability, each requiring a median filter to be usable. The most challenging, however, were the

  12. Bioinformatic Analysis of Putative Gene Products Encoded in SARS-HCoV Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵心刚; 韩敬东; 宁元亨; 孟安明; 陈晔光

    2003-01-01

    The cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been identified as a new coronavirus named as SARS-HCoV.Using bioinformatic methods, we have performed a detailed domain search.In addition to the viral structure proteins, we have found that several putative polypeptides share sequence similarity to known domains or proteins.This study may provide a basis for future studies on the infection and replication process of this notorious virus.

  13. Analytical SAR-GMTI principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumekh, Mehrdad; Majumder, Uttam K.; Barnes, Christopher; Sobota, David; Minardi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides analytical principles to relate the signature of a moving target to parameters in a SAR system. Our objective is to establish analytical tools that could predict the shift and smearing of a moving target in a subaperture SAR image. Hence, a user could identify the system parameters such as the coherent processing interval for a subaperture that is suitable to localize the signature of a moving target for detection, tracking and geolocating the moving target. The paper begins by outlining two well-known SAR data collection methods to detect moving targets. One uses a scanning beam in the azimuth domain with a relatively high PRF to separate the moving targets and the stationary background (clutter); this is also known as Doppler Beam Sharpening. The other scheme uses two receivers along the track to null the clutter and, thus, provide GMTI. We also present results on implementing our SAR-GMTI analytical principles for the anticipated shift and smearing of a moving target in a simulated code. The code would provide a tool for the user to change the SAR system and moving target parameters, and predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image for a scene that is composed of both stationary and moving targets. Hence, the SAR simulation and imaging code could be used to demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the above analytical principles to predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image.

  14. Inhibition of SARS Pseudovirus Cell Entry by Lactoferrin Binding to Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jianshe; Yang, Ning; Deng, Jiejie; Liu, Kangtai; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Guigen; Jiang, Chengyu

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that lactoferrin (LF) participates in the host immune response against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) invasion by enhancing NK cell activity and stimulating neutrophil aggregation and adhesion. We further investigated the role of LF in the entry of SARS pseudovirus into HEK293E/ACE2-Myc cells. Our results reveal that LF inhibits SARS pseudovirus infection in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis suggested that LF was able to block the binding of spike protein to host cells at 4°C, indicating that LF exerted its inhibitory function at the viral attachment stage. However, LF did not disrupt the interaction of spike protein with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the functional receptor of SARS-CoV. Previous studies have shown that LF colocalizes with the widely distributed cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Our experiments have also confirmed this conclusion. Treatment of the cells with heparinase or exogenous heparin prevented binding of spike protein to host cells and inhibited SARS pseudovirus infection, demonstrating that HSPGs provide the binding sites for SARS-CoV invasion at the early attachment phase. Taken together, our results suggest that, in addition to ACE2, HSPGs are essential cell-surface molecules involved in SARS-CoV cell entry. LF may play a protective role in host defense against SARS-CoV infection through binding to HSPGs and blocking the preliminary interaction between SARS-CoV and host cells. Our findings may provide further understanding of SARS-CoV pathogenesis and aid in treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:21887302

  15. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  16. Reovirus, isolated from SARS patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Qing; SONG Lihua; GAN Yonghua; TAN Hua; JIN Baofeng; LI Huiyan; ZUO Tingting; CHEN Dehui; ZHANG Xuemin; ZHU Hong; YANG Yi; LI Weihua; ZHOU Yusen; HE Jun; HE Kun; ZHANG Haojie; ZHOU Tao

    2003-01-01

    Beijing has been severely affected by SARS, and SARS-associated coronavirus has been confirmed as its cause. However, clinical and experimental evidence implicates the possibility of co-infection. In this report, reovirus was isolated from throat swabs of SARS patients, including the first case in Beijing andher mother. Identification with the electron microscopy revealed the characteristic features of reovirus. 24 of 38 samples from other SARS cases were found to have serologic responses to the reovirus. Primers designed for reovirus have amplified several fragments of DNA, one of which was sequenced (S2 gene fragment), which indicates it as a unique reovirus (orthoreovirus). Preliminary animal experiment showed that inoculation of the reovirus in mice caused death with atypical pneumonia. Nevertheless, the association of reovirus with SARS outbreak requires to be further investigated.

  17. SAR Altimetry Applications over Water

    CERN Document Server

    Martin-Puig, C; Ruffini, G; Raney, R K; Benveniste, J

    2008-01-01

    The application of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) techniques to classical radar altimetry offers the potential for greatly improved Earth surface mapping. This paper provides an overview of the progress of SAMOSA, Development of SAR Altimetry Studies and Applications over Ocean, Coastal zones and Inland waters, an on-going ESA-funded project. The main objective of SAMOSA is to better quantify the improvement of SAR altimetry over conventional altimetry on water surfaces. More specifically, one of the tasks focuses on the reduction of SAR mode data to pulse-limited altimeter data, and a theoretical modelling to characterize the expected gain between high Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF) reduced SAR mode data and low PRF classical Low-Resolution Mode (LRM) data. To this end, theoretical modelling using the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) will be used and the results will be compared to previous theoretical estimates [7], using an analysis akin to that in [8].

  18. Design and Implementation of 10 Bit, 2MS/s Split SAR ADC Using 0.18um CMOS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalmeshwar N. Hosur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on Design and Implementation of 10 Bit, 2MS/s successive approximation Register (SAR Analog to digital converter (ADC using Split DAC architecture. This SAR ADC architecture is designed and simulated using GPDK 0.18um CMOS technology. It consists of different blocks like sample and hold, comparator, Successive Approximation Register (SAR and Split Digital to analog converter (DAC. For each block of SAR ADC power is calculated. DAC is an important component within the SAR ADC. The charge redistribution DAC in a Split capacitor configuration has a total capacitance which is 96.87% smaller compared to a conventional binary weighted design. Hence Split DAC gives an optimized architecture and it consumes less power. Optimized design of DAC architecture ensures the accuracy of the components, which improves the performance of SAR ADC. Comparator constructed from resistances, capacitance and dependent voltage sources instead of MOS transistors. Dynamic range for SAR ADC using split DAC is 60.19dB. The supply voltage is 1.2V. The total Power consumed by SAR ADC using Split array DAC is 95.65114uW and SAR ADC using binary weighted capacitor DAC is 211.19084uW.

  19. Surface vimentin is critical for the cell entry of SARS-CoV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yvonne Ting-Chun; Chien, Ssu-Chia; Chen, I-Yin; Lai, Chia-Tsen; Tsay, Yeou-Guang; Chang, Shin C; Chang, Ming-Fu

    2016-01-22

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) caused a global panic due to its high morbidity and mortality during 2002 and 2003. Soon after the deadly disease outbreak, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) was identified as a functional cellular receptor in vitro and in vivo for SARS-CoV spike protein. However, ACE2 solely is not sufficient to allow host cells to become susceptible to SARS-CoV infection, and other host factors may be involved in SARS-CoV spike protein-ACE2 complex. A host intracellular filamentous cytoskeletal protein vimentin was identified by immunoprecipitation and LC-MS/MS analysis following chemical cross-linking on Vero E6 cells that were pre-incubated with the SARS-CoV spike protein. Moreover, flow cytometry data demonstrated an increase of the cell surface vimentin level by 16.5 % after SARS-CoV permissive Vero E6 cells were treated with SARS-CoV virus-like particles (VLPs). A direct interaction between SARS-CoV spike protein and host surface vimentin was further confirmed by far-Western blotting. In addition, antibody neutralization assay and shRNA knockdown experiments indicated a vital role of vimentin in cell binding and uptake of SARS-CoV VLPs and the viral spike protein. A direct interaction between vimentin and SARS-CoV spike protein during viral entry was observed. Vimentin is a putative anti-viral drug target for preventing/reducing the susceptibility to SARS-CoV infection.

  20. Excretion and detection of SARS coronavirus and its nucleic acid from digestive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Wei Wang; Xiao-Ming Wu; Wen-Jun Xiao; Xiu-Mei Zhu; Chang-Qing Gu; Jing Yin; Wei Wei; Wei Yao; Chao Liu; Jian-Feng Li; Guo-Rong Ou; Jin-Song Li; Min-Nian Wang; Tong-Yu Fang; Gui-Jie Wang; Yao-Hui Qiu; Huai-Huan Wu; Fu-Huan Chao; Jun-Wen Li; Ting-Kai Guo; Bei Zhen; Qing-Xin Kong; Bin Yi; Zhong Li; Nong Song; Min Jin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study whether severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) could be excreted from digestive system.METHODS: Cell culture and semi-nested RT-PCR were used to detect SARS-CoV and its RNA from 21 stool and urine samples, and a kind of electropositive filter media particles was used to concentrate the virus in 10 sewage samples from two hospitals receiving SAPS patients in Beijing in China.RESULTS: It was demonstrated that there was no live SARS-CoV in all samples collected, but the RNA of SARS-CoV could be detected in seven stool samples from SARS patients with any one of the symptoms of fever, malaise,cough, or dyspnea, in 10 sewage samples before disinfection and 3 samples after disinfection from the two hospitals.The RNA could not be detected in urine and stool samples from patients recovered from SARS.CONCLUSION: Nucleic acid of SARS-CoV can be excreted through the stool of patients into sewage system, and the possibility of SARS-CoV transmitting through digestive system cannot be excluded.

  1. Genome sequence variation analysis of two SARS coronavirus isolates after passage in Vero cell culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Weiwu; LI Ning; HU Liangxiang; DU Zhenglin; GAO Qiang; GAO Hong; NING Ye; FENG Jidong; ZHANG Jiansan; YIN Weidong

    2004-01-01

    SARS coronavirus is an RNA virus whose replication is error-prone, which provides possibility for escape of host defenses, and even leads to evolution of new viral strains during the passage or the transmission. Lots of variations have been detected among different SARS-CoV strains. And a study on these variations is helpful for development of efficient vaccine. Moreover, the test of nucleic acid characterization and genetic stability of SARS-CoV is important in the research of inactivated vaccine. The whole genome sequences of two SARS coronavirus strains after passage in Vero cell culture were determined and were compared with those of early passages, respectively. Results showed that both SARS coronavirus strains have high genetic stability, although nearly 10 generations were passed. Four nucleotide variations were observed between the second passage and the 11th passage of Sino1 strain for identification of SARS inactivated vaccine. Moreover, only one nucleotide was different between the third passage and the 10th passage of Sino3 strain for SARS inactivated vaccine. Therefore, this study suggested it was possible to develop inactivated vaccine against SARS-CoV in the future.

  2. Phagocytic cells contribute to the antibody-mediated elimination of pulmonary-infected SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Fumihiko; Kohara, Michinori; Kitabatake, Masahiro; Nishiwaki, Tetsu; Fujii, Hideki; Tateno, Chise; Yoneda, Misako; Morita, Kouichi; Matsushima, Kouji; Koyasu, Shigeo; Kai, Chieko

    2014-04-01

    While the 2002-2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) resulted in 774 deaths, patients who were affected with mild pulmonary symptoms successfully recovered. The objective of the present work was to identify, using SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) mouse infection models, immune factors responsible for clearing of the virus. The elimination of pulmonary SARS-CoV infection required the activation of B cells by CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, passive immunization (post-infection) with homologous (murine) anti-SARS-CoV antiserum showed greater elimination efficacy against SARS-CoV than that with heterologous (rabbit) antiserum, despite the use of equivalent titers of neutralizing antibodies. This distinction was mediated by mouse phagocytic cells (monocyte-derived infiltrating macrophages and partially alveolar macrophages, but not neutrophils), as demonstrated both by adoptive transfer from donors and by immunological depletion of selected cell types. These results indicate that the cooperation of anti-SARS-CoV antibodies and phagocytic cells plays an important role in the elimination of SARS-CoV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  4. State-of-art of Geosynchronous SAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Er-ke; LONG Teng; ZENG Tao; HU Cheng; TIAN Ye

    2012-01-01

    Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Synthetic Aperture Radar (GEO SAR) runs in the height of 360000Km geosynchronous earth orbit,compared with traditional Low Earth Orbit (LEO) SAR (orbit height under 1000Km),GEO SAR has advantages of shorter repeat period,wider swath and so on.Firstly,the basic principle and state-of-art of GEO SAR in domestic and overseas are introduced.Secondly,coverage characteristic of GEO SAR is analyzed.Thirdly,the key problems of yaw steering and imaging on curved trajectory in GEO SAR are discussed in detail,and the corresponding primary solutions are presented in order to promote future research on GEO SAR.

  5. High Resolution Processing with an Active Phased Array SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijenboer, F.J.; Otten, M.P.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Dutch PHARUS system is a polarimetric active phased array SAR capable of performing advanced SAR modes. Advanced SAR modes that are being investigated are: spotlight SAR, sliding spotlight SAR, stepped frequency SAR and interferometric SAR. The flight experiments and automatic beam steering

  6. Exacerbated Innate Host Response to SARS-CoV in Aged Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Saskia L.; de Lang, Anna; van den Brand, Judith M. A.; Leijten, Lonneke M.; van IJcken, Wilfred F.; Eijkemans, Marinus J. C.; van Amerongen, Geert; Kuiken, Thijs; Andeweg, Arno C.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Haagmans, Bart L.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of viral respiratory pathogens with pandemic potential, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and influenza A H5N1, urges the need for deciphering their pathogenesis to develop new intervention strategies. SARS-CoV infection causes acute lung injury (ALI) that may develop into life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with advanced age correlating positively with adverse disease outcome. The molecular pathways, however, that cause virus-induced ALI/ARDS in aged individuals are ill-defined. Here, we show that SARS-CoV-infected aged macaques develop more severe pathology than young adult animals, even though viral replication levels are similar. Comprehensive genomic analyses indicate that aged macaques have a stronger host response to virus infection than young adult macaques, with an increase in differential expression of genes associated with inflammation, with NF-κB as central player, whereas expression of type I interferon (IFN)-β is reduced. Therapeutic treatment of SARS-CoV-infected aged macaques with type I IFN reduces pathology and diminishes pro-inflammatory gene expression, including interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels, without affecting virus replication in the lungs. Thus, ALI in SARS-CoV-infected aged macaques developed as a result of an exacerbated innate host response. The anti-inflammatory action of type I IFN reveals a potential intervention strategy for virus-induced ALI. PMID:20140198

  7. DEM FROM SAR:PRINCIPLE AND APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Deren; Yang Jie

    2003-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the principle and application of generating DEM from SAR, including the principle and processing flow of generating DEM from single SAR and SAR interferometry. Afterwards, the application fields of InSAR for terrain surveying, volcanic terrain surveying and D-InSAR for monitoring ground subsiding are listed and described as well.The problem and prospect of application are also pointed out in the last part of this paper.

  8. The SARS-unique domain (SUD of SARS coronavirus contains two macrodomains that bind G-quadruplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhi Tan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in 2003, the three-dimensional structures of several of the replicase/transcriptase components of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV, the non-structural proteins (Nsps, have been determined. However, within the large Nsp3 (1922 amino-acid residues, the structure and function of the so-called SARS-unique domain (SUD have remained elusive. SUD occurs only in SARS-CoV and the highly related viruses found in certain bats, but is absent from all other coronaviruses. Therefore, it has been speculated that it may be involved in the extreme pathogenicity of SARS-CoV, compared to other coronaviruses, most of which cause only mild infections in humans. In order to help elucidate the function of the SUD, we have determined crystal structures of fragment 389-652 ("SUD(core" of Nsp3, which comprises 264 of the 338 residues of the domain. Both the monoclinic and triclinic crystal forms (2.2 and 2.8 A resolution, respectively revealed that SUD(core forms a homodimer. Each monomer consists of two subdomains, SUD-N and SUD-M, with a macrodomain fold similar to the SARS-CoV X-domain. However, in contrast to the latter, SUD fails to bind ADP-ribose, as determined by zone-interference gel electrophoresis. Instead, the entire SUD(core as well as its individual subdomains interact with oligonucleotides known to form G-quadruplexes. This includes oligodeoxy- as well as oligoribonucleotides. Mutations of selected lysine residues on the surface of the SUD-N subdomain lead to reduction of G-quadruplex binding, whereas mutations in the SUD-M subdomain abolish it. As there is no evidence for Nsp3 entering the nucleus of the host cell, the SARS-CoV genomic RNA or host-cell mRNA containing long G-stretches may be targets of SUD. The SARS-CoV genome is devoid of G-stretches longer than 5-6 nucleotides, but more extended G-stretches are found in the 3'-nontranslated regions of mRNAs coding for certain host-cell proteins

  9. sar Ades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida Angélica Zoqui Paulovic Sabadini

    Full Text Available Este artigo é uma homenagem ao ilustre professor César Ades (1943-2012. Etólogo, Especialista em comportamento animal, Ades foi professor titular do Instituto de Psicologia da Universidade de São Paulo (IPUSP, atuando como docente do Departamento de Psicologia Experimental. O artigo descreve parte de sua rica vida acadêmica e profissional e apresenta, de forma resumida, sua trajetória na Universidade de São Paulo, como aluno, professor, pesquisador e orientador e sua atuação como administrador no Instituto de Psicologia e no Instituto de Estudos Avançados, além de sua atuação na Academia Paulista de Psicologia e em sociedades científicas. São destacados a importância de suas contribuições para a área de Psicologia e seu respeito pela vida, pelas pessoas e pelos animais.

  10. Feature preserving compression of high resolution SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhigao; Hu, Fuxiang; Sun, Tao; Qin, Qianqing

    2006-10-01

    Compression techniques are required to transmit the large amounts of high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data over the available channels. Common Image compression methods may lose detail and weak information in original images, especially at smoothness areas and edges with low contrast. This is known as "smoothing effect". It becomes difficult to extract and recognize some useful image features such as points and lines. We propose a new SAR image compression algorithm that can reduce the "smoothing effect" based on adaptive wavelet packet transform and feature-preserving rate allocation. For the reason that images should be modeled as non-stationary information resources, a SAR image is partitioned to overlapped blocks. Each overlapped block is then transformed by adaptive wavelet packet according to statistical features of different blocks. In quantifying and entropy coding of wavelet coefficients, we integrate feature-preserving technique. Experiments show that quality of our algorithm up to 16:1 compression ratio is improved significantly, and more weak information is reserved.

  11. The virion host shutoff protein of herpes simplex virus 1 blocks the replication-independent activation of NF-κB in dendritic cells in the absence of type I interferon signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Christopher R; Kim, Won-keun; Nguyen, Marie L; Yount, Jacob S; López, Carolina B; Blaho, John A; Moran, Thomas M

    2011-12-01

    Immune evasion is a defining feature of the virus-host relationship. During infection, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) utilizes multiple proteins to manipulate the host immune response. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein blocks the activation of dendritic cells (DCs). Previously, we found that coinfection of wild-type HSV-1 with a panel of RNA viruses resulted in a block to DC activation that was attributable to vhs. These observations led us to hypothesize that the vhs-mediated inhibition was dependent on signaling through the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway. By examining DCs generated from MAVS (IPS-1) knockout (KO) mice, we determined that RLR/MAVS signaling is not essential for the DC response to HSV-1. We also evaluated the requirement for the type I interferon (IFN) signaling pathway in DC activation following infection with HSV-1 and found that stimulation of DCs with wild-type HSV-1 required intact type I IFN signaling for the production of cytokines, whereas the vhs deletion (vhs(-)) mutant virus activated DCs without the need for exogenous IFN signaling. Comparisons of transcription factor activation in DCs infected with wild-type HSV and the vhs(-) mutant virus revealed that NF-κB activation was inhibited by vhs in the early phase of the infection. In contrast, IRF3 activation was not influenced by vhs. In these studies, measurement of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFN release from the infected DCs reflected the activation status of these transcription factors. Taken together, the work presented here (i) describes a novel role for the vhs protein as an inhibitor of the early activation of NF-κB during HSV-1 infection of DCs and (ii) offers a mechanistic explanation of how this protein interferes with DC activation.

  12. A Modified Frequency Domain Imaging Method for One-stationary Bistatic SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ri-chu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (BiSAR in one-stationary mode has many advantages over the traditional monostatic SAR. Its echo, however, shows serious space variance in both range and azimuth directions due to its complex imaging geometry, making it hard to be processed by the frequency methods used in the monostatic SAR. To solve that problem, a method based on blocks and interpolation has been proposed by Wang Yu et al.. With this method, points can be well focused except for those located on the edge of each block. In this paper, a modified method is put forward, which adopts new block-dividing strategy and new mapping relationship in the interpolation. With the proposed method, points on the edge can also be well focused, making the quality of the final image greatly improved.

  13. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  14. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  15. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Arterial blood tests Blood clotting tests Blood chemistry tests Chest x-ray or chest CT scan ... The death rate from SARS was 9 to 12% of those diagnosed. In people over age 65, the death ...

  16. TerraSAR-X mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werninghaus, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    The TerraSAR-X is a German national SAR- satellite system for scientific and commercial applications. It is the continuation of the scientifically and technologically successful radar missions X-SAR (1994) and SRTM (2000) and will bring the national technology developments DESA and TOPAS into operational use. The space segment of TerraSAR-X is an advanced high-resolution X-Band radar satellite. The system design is based on a sound market analysis performed by Infoterra. The TerraSAR-X features an advanced high-resolution X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar based on the active phased array technology which allows the operation in Spotlight-, Stripmap- and ScanSAR Mode with various polarizations. It combines the ability to acquire high resolution images for detailed analysis as well as wide swath images for overview applications. In addition, experimental modes like the Dual Receive Antenna Mode allow for full-polarimetric imaging as well as along track interferometry, i.e. moving target identification. The Ground Segment is optimized for flexible response to (scientific and commercial) User requests and fast image product turn-around times. The TerraSAR-X mission will serve two main goals. The first goal is to provide the strongly supportive scientific community with multi-mode X-Band SAR data. The broad spectrum of scientific application areas include Hydrology, Geology, Climatology, Oceanography, Environmental Monitoring and Disaster Monitoring as well as Cartography (DEM Generation) and Interferometry. The second goal is the establishment of a commercial EO-market in Europe which is driven by Infoterra. The commercial goal is the development of a sustainable EO-business so that the e.g. follow-on systems can be completely financed by industry from the profit. Due to its commercial potential, the TerraSAR-X project will be implemented based on a public-private partnership with the Astrium GmbH. This paper will describe first the mission objectives as well as the

  17. Focusing of bistatic SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bia, Pietro; Ricci, Nicola; Zonno, Mariantonietta; Nico, Giovanni; Catalao, Joao; Tesauro, Manlio

    2014-10-01

    The problems of simulation of bistatic SAR raw data and focusing are studied. A discrete target simulator is described. The simulator introduces the scene topography and compute the integration time of general bistatic configurations providing a means to derived maps of the range and azimuth spatial resolutions. The problem of focusing of bistatic SAR data acquired in a translational-invariant bistatic configuration is studied by deriving the bistatic Point Target Reference spectrum and presenting an analytical solution for its stationary points.

  18. Permanent scatterer InSAR processing: Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehls, John F. [Geological Survey of Norway, Trondheim (Norway)

    2006-04-15

    It has been speculated that slow, aseismic movement may be occurring along some of the fracture zones crosscutting the Forsmark area. The purpose of this study is to determine if it is possible to measure such movement using dInSAR. Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) is a technique that compares the phases of multiple radar images of an area to measure surface change. The method has the potential to detect millimetric surface deformation along the sensor - target line-of-sight. Differences in phase between two images are easily viewed by combining, or interfering, the two phase-images. In the resulting image, the waves will either reinforce or cancel one another, depending upon the relative phases. The resulting image is called an interferogram and contains concentric bands of colour, or fringes, that are related to topography and/or surface deformation. New algorithms use many images acquired over a long time period to determine the movement history of individual objects, referred to as permanent scatterers. In the current project, standard PSInSAR processing was performed on 40 ERS-1 and ERS-2 scenes. The total area processed is approximately 1,500 km{sup 2}. Slightly less than 20,000 permanent scatterers were identified.The highest densities were obtained along the coast and on the islands, where natural outcrops are more abundant. Two main classes of objects act as permanent scatterers in this area. The first are natural reflectors, such as rocks. The second are man-made reflectors, such as parts of buildings. Numerous local movements were found in the study area, relating to building subsidence, or compaction of anthropogenic fill. The dataset was divided into three groups for analysis, based upon the location of regional lineaments provided by SKB. Both statistical and geostatistical techniques were used. The median velocity of the three blocks did not differ by more than 0.2 mm/yr. This is not considered significant, given the possible magnitude of

  19. Protection from SARS coronavirus conferred by live measles vaccine expressing the spike glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escriou, Nicolas; Callendret, Benoît; Lorin, Valérie; Combredet, Chantal; Marianneau, Philippe; Février, Michèle; Tangy, Frédéric

    2014-03-01

    The recent identification of a novel human coronavirus responsible of a SARS-like illness in the Middle-East a decade after the SARS pandemic, demonstrates that reemergence of a SARS-like coronavirus from an animal reservoir remains a credible threat. Because SARS is contracted by aerosolized contamination of the respiratory tract, a vaccine inducing mucosal long-term protection would be an asset to control new epidemics. To this aim, we generated live attenuated recombinant measles vaccine (MV) candidates expressing either the membrane-anchored SARS-CoV spike (S) protein or its secreted soluble ectodomain (Ssol). In mice susceptible to measles virus, recombinant MV expressing the anchored full-length S induced the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies and fully protected immunized animals from intranasal infectious challenge with SARS-CoV. As compared to immunization with adjuvanted recombinant Ssol protein, recombinant MV induced stronger and Th1-biased responses, a hallmark of live attenuated viruses and a highly desirable feature for an antiviral vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bioinformatics analysis of SARS-Cov M protein provides information for vaccine development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wanli; LU Yun; CHEN Yinghua

    2003-01-01

    The pathogen causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is identified to be SARS-Cov. It is urgent to know more about SARS-Cov for developing an efficient SARS vaccine to prevent this epidemic disease. In this report, the homology of SARS-Cov M protein to other members of coronavirus is illustrated, and all amino acid changes in both S and M proteins among all available SARS-Cov isolates in GenBank are described. Furthermore, one topological trans-membrane secondary structure model of M protein is proposed, which is corresponded well with the accepted topology model of M proteins of other members of coronavirus. Hydrophilic profile analysis indicated that one region (aa150~210) on the cytoplasmic domain is fairly hydrophilic, suggesting its property of antigenicity. Based on the fact that cytoplasmic domain of the M protein of some other coronavirus could induce protective activities against virus infection, this region might be one potential target for SARS vaccine development.

  1. Antigen Production in Plant to Tackle Infectious Diseases Flare Up: the Case of SARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia C eDemurtas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS is a dangerous infection with pandemic potential. It emerged in 2002 and its aetiological agent, the SARS Coronavirus (SARS-CoV, crossed the species barrier to infect humans, showing high morbidity and mortality rates. No vaccines are currently licensed for SARS-CoV and important efforts have been performed during the first outbreak to develop diagnostic tools. Here we demonstrate the transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of two important antigenic determinants of the SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N and the membrane protein (M using a virus-derived vector or agro-infiltration, respectively. For the M protein, this is the first description of production in plants, while for plant-derived N protein we demonstrate that it is recognized by sera of patients from the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong in 2003. The availability of recombinant N and M proteins from plants opens the way to further evaluation of their potential utility for the development of diagnostic and protection/therapy tools to be quickly manufactured, at low cost and with minimal risk, to face potential new highly infectious SARS-CoV outbreaks.

  2. Antigen Production in Plant to Tackle Infectious Diseases Flare Up: The Case of SARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demurtas, Olivia C; Massa, Silvia; Illiano, Elena; De Martinis, Domenico; Chan, Paul K S; Di Bonito, Paola; Franconi, Rosella

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a dangerous infection with pandemic potential. It emerged in 2002 and its aetiological agent, the SARS Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), crossed the species barrier to infect humans, showing high morbidity and mortality rates. No vaccines are currently licensed for SARS-CoV and important efforts have been performed during the first outbreak to develop diagnostic tools. Here we demonstrate the transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of two important antigenic determinants of the SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N) and the membrane protein (M) using a virus-derived vector or agro-infiltration, respectively. For the M protein, this is the first description of production in plants, while for plant-derived N protein we demonstrate that it is recognized by sera of patients from the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong in 2003. The availability of recombinant N and M proteins from plants opens the way to further evaluation of their potential utility for the development of diagnostic and protection/therapy tools to be quickly manufactured, at low cost and with minimal risk, to face potential new highly infectious SARS-CoV outbreaks.

  3. The role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in SARS coronavirus-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Frieman, Matthew B

    2017-07-01

    Many survivors of the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) developed residual pulmonary fibrosis with increased severity seen in older patients. Autopsies of patients that died from SARS also showed fibrosis to varying extents. Pulmonary fibrosis can be occasionally seen as a consequence to several respiratory viral infections but is much more common after a SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection. Given the threat of future outbreaks of severe coronavirus disease, including Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), it is important to understand the mechanisms responsible for pulmonary fibrosis, so as to support the development of therapeutic countermeasures and mitigate sequelae of infection. In this article, we summarize pulmonary fibrotic changes observed after a SARS-CoV infection, discuss the extent to which other respiratory viruses induce fibrosis, describe available animal models to study the development of SARS-CoV induced fibrosis and review evidence that pulmonary fibrosis is caused by a hyperactive host response to lung injury mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. We summarize work from our group and others indicating that inhibiting EGFR signaling may prevent an excessive fibrotic response to SARS-CoV and other respiratory viral infections and propose directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Blocking ELISA’s for the destinction between antibodies against European and American strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K. J.; Strandbygaard, Bertel; Bøtner, Anette

    1998-01-01

    A double blocking ELISA was developed in order to satisfy the need for large scale serological screening for PRRS and simultaneous distinction between infection with European and American strains of PRRSV in pig herds. The Immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and the double blocking ELISA...

  5. The effect of inhibition of PP1 and TNFα signaling on pathogenesis of SARS coronavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, Jason E.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Josset, Laurence; Bankhead, Armand; Neumann, Gabriele; Tilton, Susan C.; Schäfer, Alexandra; Li, Chengjun; Fan, Shufang; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S.; Katze, Michael G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2016-09-23

    The complex interplay between viral replication and host immune response during infection remains poorly understood. While many viruses are known to employ antiimmune strategies to facilitate their replication, highly pathogenic virus infections can also cause an excessive immune response that exacerbates, rather than reduces pathogenicity. To investigate this dichotomy in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), we developed a transcriptional network model of SARS-CoV infection in mice and used the model to prioritize candidate regulatory targets for further investigation. We validated our predictions in 18 different knockout (KO) mouse strains, showing that network topology provides significant predictive power to identify genes that are important for viral infection. We identified a novel player in the immune response to virus infection, Kepi, an inhibitory subunit of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complex, which protects against SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We also found that receptors for the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), promote pathogenesis through a parallel feed-forward circuit that promotes inflammation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the role of over-stimulation of the inflammatory response to SARS-CoV in pathogenesis. We conclude that the critical balance between immune response and inflammation can be manipulated to improve the outcome of the infection. Further, our study provides two potential therapeutic strategies for mitigating the effects of SARS-CoV infection, and may provide insight into treatment strategies for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

  6. An immunosuppressed Syrian golden hamster model for SARS-CoV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaecher, Scott R; Stabenow, Jennifer; Oberle, Christina; Schriewer, Jill; Buller, R Mark; Sagartz, John E; Pekosz, Andrew

    2008-10-25

    Several small animal models have been developed for the study of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) replication and pathogenesis. Syrian golden hamsters are among the best small animal models, though little clinical illness and no mortality are observed after virus infection. Cyclophosphamide was used to immunosuppress hamsters leading to a prolonged disease course and higher mortality after SARS-CoV infection. In addition, there was a significant weight loss, expanded tissue tropism, and increased viral pathology in the lung, heart, kidney, and nasal turbinate tissues. Infection with recombinant SARS-CoV viruses bearing disruptions in the gene 7 coding region showed no significant change in replication kinetics, tissue tropism, morbidity, or mortality suggesting that the ORF7a (7a) and ORF7b (7b) proteins are not required for virus replication in immunosuppressed hamsters. This modified hamster model may provide a useful tool for SARS-CoV pathogenesis studies, evaluation of antiviral therapy, and analysis of additional SARS-CoV mutants.

  7. Differentiation of foot-and-mouth disease virus infected animals from vaccinated animals using a blocking ELISA based on baculovirus expressed FMDV 3ABC antigen and a 3ABC monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.J.; de Stricker, K.; Dyrting, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    A blocking ELISA that differentiated foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infected animals from vaccinated animals was developed which uses baculovirus expressed FMDV 3ABC non-structural protein as antigen and monoclonal antibody against FMDV 3ABC non-structural protein as capture and detector...... infected with all seven serotypes of FMDV. The test detected antibodies from days 7 or 9 following experimental infection of non-vaccinated cattle and sheep, and in cattle strong positive reactions persisted for up to 395 days after infection. In vaccinated cattle that became carriers after challenge...... and sheep collected after experimental or natural infection. The blocking ELISA based on recombinant FMDV 3ABC antigen and a monoclonal antibody to 3ABC is a promising tool for FMD control and eradication campaigns, where vaccination has been carried out....

  8. The SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein--forms and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-ke; Hou, Ming-Hon; Chang, Chi-Fon; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Huang, Tai-huang

    2014-03-01

    The nucleocapsid phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV N protein) packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid (RNP) and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. It is a protein with multifarious activities. In this article we will review our current understanding of the N protein structure and its interaction with nucleic acid. Highlights of the progresses include uncovering the modular organization, determining the structures of the structural domains, realizing the roles of protein disorder in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, and visualizing the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) structure inside the virions. It was also demonstrated that N-protein binds to nucleic acid at multiple sites with a coupled-allostery manner. We propose a SARS-CoV RNP model that conforms to existing data and bears resemblance to the existing RNP structures of RNA viruses. The model highlights the critical role of modular organization and intrinsic disorder of the N protein in the formation and functions of the dynamic RNP capsid in RNA viruses. This paper forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bispidine-amino acid conjugates act as a novel scaffold for the design of antivirals that block Japanese encephalitis virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Haridas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is a major cause of viral encephalitis in South and South-East Asia. Lack of antivirals and non-availability of affordable vaccines in these endemic areas are a major setback in combating JEV and other closely related viruses such as West Nile virus and dengue virus. Protein secondary structure mimetics are excellent candidates for inhibiting the protein-protein interactions and therefore serve as an attractive tool in drug development. We synthesized derivatives containing the backbone of naturally occurring lupin alkaloid, sparteine, which act as protein secondary structure mimetics and show that these compounds exhibit antiviral properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have identified 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, commonly called bispidine, as a privileged scaffold to synthesize effective antiviral agents. We have synthesized derivatives of bispidine conjugated with amino acids and found that hydrophobic amino acid residues showed antiviral properties against JEV. We identified a tryptophan derivative, Bisp-W, which at 5 µM concentration inhibited JEV infection in neuroblastoma cells by more than 100-fold. Viral inhibition was at a stage post-entry and prior to viral protein translation possibly at viral RNA replication. We show that similar concentration of Bisp-W was capable of inhibiting viral infection of two other encephalitic viruses namely, West Nile virus and Chandipura virus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have demonstrated that the amino-acid conjugates of 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane can serve as a molecular scaffold for development of potent antivirals against encephalitic viruses. Our findings will provide a novel platform to develop effective inhibitors of JEV and perhaps other RNA viruses causing encephalitis.

  10. Zitongdong Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ The Zitongdong Block (Eastern Zitong Block) is located in the northwest of the Sichuan Basin. Tectonically, it is situated in the east part of Zitong Depression, southeast of mid-Longmenshan folded and faulted belt( as shown on Fig. 8 ), covering an area of 1 730 km2. The traffic is very convenient, the No. 108 national highway passes through the north of the block. Topographically, the area belongs to low hilly land at the elevation of 500-700 m.

  11. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: 'SARS' or 'not SARS'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A M; Hon, K L E; Cheng, W T; Ng, P C; Chan, F Y; Li, C K; Leung, T F; Fok, T F

    2004-01-01

    Accurate clinical diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) based on the current World Health Organization definition is difficult and at times impossible at the early stage of the disease. Both false positive and false negative cases are commonly encountered and this could have far-reaching detrimental effects on the patients, their family and the clinicians alike. Contact history is particularly important in diagnosing SARS in children as their presenting features are often non-specific. The difficulty in making a correct diagnosis is further compounded by the lack of a sensitive rapid diagnostic test. Serology is not particularly helpful in the initial triaging of patients as it takes at least 3 weeks to become positive. Co-infection and other treatable conditions should not be missed and conventional antibiotics should remain as part of the first-line treatment regimen. We report five cases to illustrate the difficulties and dilemmas faced by clinicians in diagnosing SARS in children.

  12. Cellulose acetate phthalate, a common pharmaceutical excipient, inactivates HIV-1 and blocks the coreceptor binding site on the virus envelope glycoprotein gp120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP, a pharmaceutical excipient used for enteric film coating of capsules and tablets, was shown to inhibit infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and several herpesviruses. CAP formulations inactivated HIV-1, herpesvirus types 1 (HSV-1 and 2 (HSV-2 and the major nonviral sexually transmitted disease (STD pathogens and were effective in animal models for vaginal infection by HSV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus. Methods Enzyme-linked immunoassays and flow cytometry were used to demonstrate CAP binding to HIV-1 and to define the binding site on the virus envelope. Results 1 CAP binds to HIV-1 virus particles and to the envelope glycoprotein gp120; 2 this leads to blockade of the gp120 V3 loop and other gp120 sites resulting in diminished reactivity with HIV-1 coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5; 3 CAP binding to HIV-1 virions impairs their infectivity; 4 these findings apply to both HIV-1 IIIB, an X4 virus, and HIV-1 BaL, an R5 virus. Conclusions These results provide support for consideration of CAP as a topical microbicide of choice for prevention of STDs, including HIV-1 infection.

  13. Wave directional spectrum from SAR imagery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.; Vethamony, P.

    Gaussian smoothed SAR image spectra have been evaluated from 512 x 512 pixel sub- scenes of image mode ERS-1 SAR scenes off Goa, Visakhapatnam, Paradeep and Portugal. The two recently acquired scenes off Portugal showed the signature of swell...

  14. SAR Image Enhancement using Particle Filters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this paper, we propose a novel approach to reduce the noise in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images using particle filters. Interpretation of SAR images is a...

  15. Novel Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Algorithms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polarimetric radar interferometry (PolInSAR) is a new SAR imaging mode that is rapidly becoming an important technique for bare earth topographic mapping, tree...

  16. SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Clinician Registry Travelers' Health Fact Sheet for SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts Format: Select one ... of the World Health Organization (WHO) . Symptoms of SARS The illness usually begins with a fever (measured ...

  17. Wave directional spectrum from SAR imagery

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.; Vethamony, P.

    Gaussian smoothed SAR image spectra have been evaluated from 512 x 512 pixel subscenes of image mode ERS-1 SAR scenes off Goa, Visakhapatnam, Paradeep and Portugal. The two recently acquired scenes off Portugal showed the signature of swell...

  18. Accelerated Scientific InSAR Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Neva Ridge Technologies proposes to develop a suite of software tools for the analysis of SAR and InSAR data, focused on having a robust and adopted capability well...

  19. Inhibition of cytokine gene expression and induction of chemokine genes in non-lymphatic cells infected with SARS coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Friedemann

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV is the etiologic agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome. SARS-CoV mainly infects tissues of non-lymphatic origin, and the cytokine profile of those cells can determine the course of disease. Here, we investigated the cytokine response of two human non-lymphatic cell lines, Caco-2 and HEK 293, which are fully permissive for SARS-CoV. Results A comparison with established cytokine-inducing viruses revealed that SARS-CoV only weakly triggered a cytokine response. In particular, SARS-CoV did not activate significant transcription of the interferons IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2/3, as well as of the interferon-induced antiviral genes ISG56 and MxA, the chemokine RANTES and the interleukine IL-6. Interestingly, however, SARS-CoV strongly induced the chemokines IP-10 and IL-8 in the colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, but not in the embryonic kidney cell line 293. Conclusion Our data indicate that SARS-CoV suppresses the antiviral cytokine system of non-immune cells to a large extent, thus buying time for dissemination in the host. However, synthesis of IP-10 and IL-8, which are established markers for acute-stage SARS, escapes the virus-induced silencing at least in some cell types. Therefore, the progressive infiltration of immune cells into the infected lungs observed in SARS patients could be due to the production of these chemokines by the infected tissue cells.

  20. DInSAR Coseismic Deformations Measurements of the 11 May 2011 Lorca Earthquake; Medidas de deformaciones cosismicas con DInSAR para el terremoto de Lorca del 11 de mayo de 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frontera Genovard, T.; Blanco Sanchez, P.; Concha Dimas, A.; Goula Surinach, X.; Perez Aragues, F.; Marturia Alavedra, J.

    2012-07-01

    The coseismic superficial deformation at the region of Lorca (Murcia, south-eastern Spain) due to the Mw 5.1 earthquake, on 11 May 2011, was characterized by a multidisciplinary team, integrating information from DInSAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar Differential Interferometry) and numerical modelling techniques. Despite the moderate magnitude of the event, quantitative information was obtained from the interferometric study of a pair of TerraSAR-X images. The DInSAR results defined the trace of the fault plane and evidenced uplift of some centimetres of the hanging wall block in agreement with the estimated deformation obtained through an elastic rupture dislocation numerical model. Meanwhile, for the footwall block, interferometric results showed that tectonic deformation is masked by an important subsidence related to groundwater extraction previously identified at the area of study. Keywords: Coseismic deformation, DInSAR, Numerical dislocation model. (Author) 29 refs.

  1. Bats and Viruses: a Brief Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Fa Wang

    2009-01-01

    Bats, probably the most abundant, diverse and geographically dispersed vertebrates on earth, have recently been shown to be the reservoir hosts of a number of emerging viruses responsible for severe human and livestock disease outbreaks. Flying foxes have been demonstrated to be the natural reservoir for Hendra and Nipah viruses. Evidence supporting the possibility of bats as potential reservoirs for SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Ebola virus has also been reported. The recent discovery of these viruses and other viruses occurring naturally in the bat population provides a unique insight into a diverse pool of potentially emergent and pathogenic viruses. The factors which influence the ability of zoonotic viruses to effectively cross the species barrier from bats to other animal populations are poorly understood. A brief review is provided here on the recently emerged bat viruses and on current and future strategies for research in this area.

  2. Precision Rectification of Airborne SAR Image

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Liao, M.; Zhang, Zhe

    1997-01-01

    A simple and direct procedure for the rectification of a certain class of airborne SAR data is presented. The relief displacements of SAR data are effectively removed by means of a digital elevation model and the image is transformed to the ground coordinate system. SAR data from the Danish EMISAR...... for the application of SAR data in the difficult process of map revision and updating....

  3. SIMULATION STUDY ON AIRBORNE SAR ECHO SIGNAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Houbing; Liu Zhao

    2004-01-01

    Through analyzing the influence on echo signal by factors of kinematical parameters of airborne SAR platform and radar antenna direction, this letter, on the basis of classical SAR echo signal analogue algorithm, puts forward certain airborne SAR echo signal analogue algorithm of distance directional frequency domain pulse coherent accumulation, and goes through simulation. The simulation results have proved the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  4. Convolutional Neural Networks for SAR Image Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmgren-Hansen, David; Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images has several uses, but it is a difficult task due to a number of properties related to SAR images. In this article we show how Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) can easily be trained for SAR image segmentation with good results. Besides...

  5. SAR Systems and Related Signal Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.; Dekker, R.J.; Otten, M.P.G.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is today a valuable source of remote sensing information. SAR is a side-looking imaging radar and operates from airborne and spacebome platforms. Coverage, resolution and image quality are strongly influenced by the platform. SAR processing can be performed on standard

  6. SAR Systems and Related Signal Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.; Dekker, R.J.; Otten, M.P.G.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is today a valuable source of remote sensing information. SAR is a side-looking imaging radar and operates from airborne and spacebome platforms. Coverage, resolution and image quality are strongly influenced by the platform. SAR processing can be performed on standard

  7. The aetiology of SARS: Koch's postulates fulfilled

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); T. Kuiken (Thijs)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractProof that a newly identified coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the primary cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) came from a series of studies on experimentally infected cynomolgus macaques (Macaca, fascicularis). SARS-CoV-infected

  8. A Sparsity-Based InSAR Phase Denoising Algorithm Using Nonlocal Wavelet Shrinkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Fang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR phase denoising algorithm using the local sparsity of wavelet coefficients and nonlocal similarity of grouped blocks was developed. From the Bayesian perspective, the double- l 1 norm regularization model that enforces the local and nonlocal sparsity constraints was used. Taking advantages of coefficients of the nonlocal similarity between group blocks for the wavelet shrinkage, the proposed algorithm effectively filtered the phase noise. Applying the method to simulated and acquired InSAR data, we obtained satisfactory results. In comparison, the algorithm outperformed several widely-used InSAR phase denoising approaches in terms of the number of residues, root-mean-square errors and other edge preservation indexes.

  9. Polarization Filtering of SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of polarization filtering of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) returns provide hybrid method applied to either (1) maximize signal-to-noise ratio of return from given target or (2) enhance contrast between targets of two different types (that have different polarization properties). Method valid for both point and extended targets and for both monostatic and bistatic radars as well as SAR. Polarization information in return signals provides more complete description of radar-scattering properties of targets and used to obtain additional information about targets for use in classifying them, discriminating between them, or enhancing features of radar images.

  10. PIKA Provides an Adjuvant Effect to Induce Strong Mucosal and Systemic Humoral Immunity Against SARS-CoV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-wei Gai; Yan Zhang; Di-han Zhou; Yao-qing Chen; Jing-yi Yang; Hui-min Yan

    2011-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome(SARS)is a deadly infectious disease caused by SARS Coronavirus(SARS-CoV).Inactivated SARS-CoV has been explored as a vaccine against SARS-CoV.However,safe and potent adjuvants,especially with more efficient and economical needle-free vaccination are always needed more urgently in a pandemic.The development of a safe and effective mucosal adjuvant and vaccine for prevention of emergent infectious diseases such as SARS will be an important advancement.PIKA,a stabilized derivative of Poly(I:C),was previously reported to be safe and potent as adjuvant in mouse models.In the present study,we demonstrated that the intraperitoneal and intranasal co-administration of inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine together with this improved Poly(I:C)derivative induced strong anti-SARS-CoV mucosal and systemic humoral immune responses with neutralizing activity against pseudotyped virus.Although intraperitoneal immunization of inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine alone could induce a certain level of neutralizing activity in serum as well as in mucosal sites,co-administration of inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine with PIKA as adjuvant could induce a much higher neutralizing activity.When intranasal immunization was used,PIKA was obligatorily for inducing neutralizing activity in serum as well as in mucosal sites and was correlated with both mucosal IgA and mucosal IgG response.Overall,PIKA could be a good mucosal adjuvant candidate for inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine for use in possible future pandemic.

  11. Zitongxi Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Zitongxi Block (Western Zitong Block), is located in Zitong County, northwest of Sichuan Province (as shown on Fig. 8 ). Geologically. it is situated in the Zitong Depression, southwest of the middle Longmenshan faulted and folded belt, covering an area of 1 830 km2. Transportation is very convenient. A crisscross network of highways run through the block and the Baocheng railway is nearby. The climate is moderate. Most area belongs to hilly land with the elevation of 500-600 m.The Tongjiang River runs across the area.

  12. Polarimetric scattering and SAR information retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Ya-Qiu

    2013-01-01

    Taking an innovative look at Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), this practical reference fully covers new developments in SAR and its various methodologies and enables readers to interpret SAR imagery An essential reference on polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), this book uses scattering theory and radiative transfer theory as a basis for its treatment of topics. It is organized to include theoretical scattering models and SAR data analysis techniques, and presents cutting-edge research on theoretical modelling of terrain surface. The book includes quantitative app

  13. Development of a Blocking ELISA Using a Monoclonal Antibody to a Dominant Epitope in Non-Structural Protein 3A of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus, as a Matching Test for a Negative-Marker Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuanfang; Li, Pinghua; Cao, Yimei; Wang, Na; Sun, Pu; Shi, Qian; Ji, Xincheng; Bao, Huifang; Li, Dong; Chen, Yingli; Bai, Xingwen; Ma, Xueqing; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Zengjun; Liu, Zaixin

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a devastating animal disease. Strategies for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) remain very important for controlling disease. Development of an epitope-deleted marker vaccine and accompanying diagnostic method will improve the efficiency of DIVA. Here, a monoclonal antibody (Mab) was found to recognize a conserved “AEKNPLE” epitope spanning amino acids 109–115 of non-structural protein (NSP) 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV; O/Tibet/CHA/99 strain), which could be deleted by a reverse-genetic procedure. In addition, a blocking ELISA was developed based on this Mab against NSP 3A, which could serve as a matching test for a negative-marker vaccine. The criterion of this blocking ELISA was determined by detecting panels of sera from different origins. The serum samples with a percentage inhibition (PI) equal or greater than 50% were considered to be from infected animals, and those with <50% PI were considered to be from non-infected animals. This test showed similar performance when compared with other 2 blocking ELISAs based on an anti-NSP 3B Mab. This is the first report of the DIVA test for an NSP antibody based on an Mab against the conserved and predominant “AEKNPLE” epitope in NSP 3A of FMDV. PMID:28107470

  14. Chengzikou Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Chengzikou Block is located in the north of Hekou district, Dongying City, Shandong Province, adjacent to Bohai Bay. It can be geographically divided into three units: onshore, transitional zone and offshore ultrashallow zone, totally covering an area of 470 km2. The southern onshore area is low and gentle in topography;the northern shallow sea is at water depths of 2-8 m below sea level, and the transitional zone occupies more than 60% of the whole block. The climate belongs to temperate zone with seasonal wind. Highways are welldeveloped here, and the traffic is very convenient. The Chengzikou Block is about 80 km away from Dongying City and 290 km from Jinan City in the south. The northern offshore area of the block is 160 km away from Longkou port in the east and only 38 km away in the west from Zhuangxi port.

  15. Longmenshan Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Longmenshan Block is located in Jiange County of Jiangyou City in the northwest of Sichuan Basin. covering an area of 2 628 km2. Geologically, it is situated in the Mid-Longmenshan fault and fold belt, neighbouring Zitong Depression in its southeast. There are mountains surrounding its northwest , the rest area being hilly land,with the elevation of 500-700 m. The BaoCheng railway and the No. 108 highway run through the block, the traffic is very convenient.

  16. Signal processing for FMCW SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meta, A.; Hoogeboom, P.; Ligthart, L.P.

    2007-01-01

    The combination of frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) technology and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) techniques leads to lightweight cost-effective imaging sensors of high resolution. One limiting factor to the use of FMCW sensors is the well-known presence of nonlinearities in the

  17. Canopy reconstruction from interferometric SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varekamp, C.

    2001-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is investigated as a method for 3D tree mapping. When operational, the method may be important for monitoring forests with a persistent cloud cover such as tropical rain forests. The problem of crown displacement due to lay-over in a vegetation with a

  18. Stalking SARS: CDC at Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-22

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the SARS outbreak and how CDC worked to solve the mystery.  Created: 5/22/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 5/22/2014.

  19. Light weight digital array SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, M.; Maas, N.; Bolt, R.; Anitori, L.

    2010-01-01

    A light weight SAR has been designed, suitable for short range tactical UAVs, consisting of a fully digital receive array, and a very compact active transmit antenna. The weight of the complete RF front is expected to be below 3 kg, with a power consumption below 30 W. This X-band system can provide

  20. Bird flu: lessons from SARS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gary W K; Leung, Ting F

    2007-06-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and avian influenza are two important newly emerged infections with pandemic potential. Both infections have crossed the species barrier to infect humans. SARS originated from southern China and spread to many countries in early 2003. The close collaboration of scientists around the world resulted in a rapid identification of the causative agent, and the early isolation of infected cases and meticulous infection control measures were the key to successfully controlling the outbreak of SARS. The first outbreak of human cases of avian influenza was reported in 1997 in Hong Kong. Since 2003, there have been many small outbreaks of human cases around the world, and the reported mortality is greater than 50%. Current evidence suggests that the human-to-human transmission of avian influenza is rather inefficient, but mutation might occur in the future resulting in improved transmission and possibly a pandemic in humans. As with the outbreak of SARS, the development of sensitive and accurate early diagnostic tests is extremely important for successful control of the outbreak at source. The availability of isolation facilities, the stockpiling of antiviral agents and effective and safe vaccination will be extremely important in minimising the damage of a new influenza pandemic.

  1. Protein Subcellular Localization Prediction and Genomic Polymorphism Analysis of the SARS Coronavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季星来; 柳树群; 李岭; 孙之荣

    2004-01-01

    The cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been identified as a new coronavirus (CoV).Several sequences of the complete genome of SARS-CoV have been determined.The subcellular localization (SubLocation) of annotated open-reading frames of the SARS-CoV genome was predicted using a support vector machine.Several gene products were predicted to locate in the Golgi body and cell nucleus.The SubLocation information was combined with predicted transmembrane information to develop a model of the viral life cycle.The results show that this information can be used to predict the functions of genes and even the virus pathogenesis.In addition,the entire SARS viral genome sequences currently available in GenBank were compared to identify the sequence variations among different isolates.Some variations in the Hong Kong strains may be related to the special clinical manifestations and provide clues for understanding the relationship between gene functions and evolution.These variations reflect the evolution of the SARS virus in human populations and may help development of a vaccine.

  2. Computerized ionospheric tomography based on geosynchronous SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cheng; Tian, Ye; Dong, Xichao; Wang, Rui; Long, Teng

    2017-02-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) based on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an emerging technique to construct the three-dimensional (3-D) image of ionosphere. The current studies are all based on the Low Earth Orbit synthetic aperture radar (LEO SAR) which is limited by long repeat period and small coverage. In this paper, a novel ionospheric 3-D CIT technique based on geosynchronous SAR (GEO SAR) is put forward. First, several influences of complex atmospheric environment on GEO SAR focusing are detailedly analyzed, including background ionosphere and multiple scattering effects (induced by turbulent ionosphere), tropospheric effects, and random noises. Then the corresponding GEO SAR signal model is constructed with consideration of the temporal-variant background ionosphere within the GEO SAR long integration time (typically 100 s to 1000 s level). Concurrently, an accurate total electron content (TEC) retrieval method based on GEO SAR data is put forward through subband division in range and subaperture division in azimuth, obtaining variant TEC value with respect to the azimuth time. The processing steps of GEO SAR CIT are given and discussed. Owing to the short repeat period and large coverage area, GEO SAR CIT has potentials of covering the specific space continuously and completely and resultantly has excellent real-time performance. Finally, the TEC retrieval and GEO SAR CIT construction are performed by employing a numerical study based on the meteorological data. The feasibility and correctness of the proposed methods are verified.

  3. [Medical history from SARS to pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Cheng

    2003-05-31

    SARS is a new kind of pneumonia. From the end of 2002 to the beginning of 2003, SARS broke in Guangdong province, Hong Kong and Beijing, and then gradually spread to the world. SARS is extremely contagious. The symptoms of SARS progress very quickly. SARS smashes the people's tranquil life and many people live in horror, worry and anxiety. But if we review the medical history of pneumonia, we would have a better understanding of SARS. This article focuses the history of people's understanding of pneumonia on the historical documents, diagnosis, etiology and treatment. Through the epidemic of SARS, the author hopes to express that contagion will live with us for a long time, but it is not a deadly disease. It is preventable and good care is essential for contagious patients. As Chinese people, we should have the best use of TCM in our combat with contagion.

  4. Yeast based small molecule screen for inhibitors of SARS-CoV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Frieman

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory coronavirus (SARS-CoV emerged in 2002, resulting in roughly 8000 cases worldwide and 10% mortality. The animal reservoirs for SARS-CoV precursors still exist and the likelihood of future outbreaks in the human population is high. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLP is an attractive target for pharmaceutical development because it is essential for virus replication and is conserved among human coronaviruses. A yeast-based assay was established for PLP activity that relies on the ability of PLP to induce a pronounced slow-growth phenotype when expressed in S. cerevisiae. Induction of the slow-growth phenotype was shown to take place over a 60-hour time course, providing the basis for conducting a screen for small molecules that restore growth by inhibiting the function of PLP. Five chemical suppressors of the slow-growth phenotype were identified from the 2000 member NIH Diversity Set library. One of these, NSC158362, potently inhibited SARS-CoV replication in cell culture without toxic effects on cells, and it specifically inhibited SARS-CoV replication but not influenza virus replication. The effect of NSC158362 on PLP protease, deubiquitinase and anti-interferon activities was investigated but the compound did not alter these activities. Another suppressor, NSC158011, demonstrated the ability to inhibit PLP protease activity in a cell-based assay. The identification of these inhibitors demonstrated a strong functional connection between the PLP-based yeast assay, the inhibitory compounds, and SARS-CoV biology. Furthermore the data with NSC158362 suggest a novel mechanism for inhibition of SARS-CoV replication that may involve an unknown activity of PLP, or alternatively a direct effect on a cellular target that modifies or bypasses PLP function in yeast and mammalian cells.

  5. Inhibition of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus replication in a lethal SARS-CoV BALB/c mouse model by stinging nettle lectin, Urtica dioica agglutinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaki, Yohichi; Wandersee, Miles K.; Smith, Aaron J.; Zhou, Yanchen; Simmons, Graham; Nelson, Nathan M.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Vest, Zachary G.; Li, Joseph K.-K.; Chan, Paul Kay-Sheung; Smee, Donald F.; Barnard, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is a small plant monomeric lectin, 8.7 kDa in size, with an N-acetylglucosamine specificity that inhibits viruses from Nidovirales in vitro. In the current study, we first examined the efficacy of UDA on the replication of different SARS-CoV strains in Vero 76 cells. UDA inhibited virus replication in a dose-dependent manner and reduced virus yields of the Urbani strain by 90% at 1.1 ± 0.4 µg/ml in Vero 76 cells. Then, UDA was tested for efficacy in a lethal SARS-CoV-infected BALB/c mouse model. BALB/c mice were infected with two LD50 (575 PFU) of virus for 4 hours before the mice were treated intraperitoneally with UDA at 20, 10, 5 or 0 mg/kg/day for 4 days. Treatment with UDA at 5 mg/kg significantly protected the mice against a lethal infection with mouse-adapted SARS-CoV (pSARS infection in mice leads to a substantial therapeutic effect that protects mice against death and weight loss. Furthermore, the mode of action of UDA in vitro was further investigated using live SARS-CoV Urbani strain virus and retroviral particles pseudotyped with SARS-CoV spike (S). UDA specifically inhibited the replication of live SARS-CoV or SARS-CoV pseudotyped virus when added just before, but not after, adsorption. These data suggested that UDA likely inhibits SARS-CoV infection by targeting early stages of the replication cycle, namely, adsorption or penetration. In addition, we demonstrated that UDA neutralizes the virus infectivity, presumably by binding to the SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein. Finally, the target molecule for inhibition of virus replication was partially characterized. When UDA was exposed to N-acetylglucosamine and then UDA was added to cells just prior to adsorption, UDA did not inhibit the virus infection. These data support the conclusion that UDA might bind to N-acetylglucosamine-like residues present on the glycosylated envelope glycoproteins, thereby preventing virus attachment to cells. PMID:21338626

  6. High-Dose Mannose-Binding Lectin Therapy for Ebola Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    are heavily glycosylated and contain high-mannose. As a result, MBL binds to Ebola and Marburg viruses and mediates com- plement-dependent virus ...host cells. Therefore, MBL preferentially recognizes glycosylated viruses including influenza virus , human immunodeficiency virus , severe acute...respiratory syndrome coronovirus (SARS-CoV), Ebola virus , and Marburg virus . It also recognizes many glycosylated gram- positive and gram-negative bacteria [1

  7. Block floating point for radar data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Lintz

    1999-01-01

    Integer, floating point, and block floating point (BFP) data formats are analyzed and compared in order to establish the mathematical tools for selection of an optimal format which fulfils the demands of high resolution radar (SAR) data to large dynamic range and adequate S/N. The analysis takes...... quantization noise and saturation distortion into account and concludes that it is preferred to use small blocks and a (new) modified BFP format applying fractional exponents. Data from the EMISAR radar system are applied to illustrate the merits of the different schemes....

  8. Preparation, characterization and preliminary in vivo studies of inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Lin; CHANG Guohui; LI Shuangli; ZHANG Xumin; CHEN Xishu; YU Jun; CHEN Ze; WANG Jian; QIN Ede; ZHU Qingyu; YU Man; DING Zhifen; SHI Huiying; CHENG Xiaojie; WANG Caiping

    2003-01-01

    A large quantity of SARS-CoV virus was proliferated in Vero cells, inactivated with β-propiolactone, then purified by Sepharose 4FF column chromatography to prepare inactivated vaccine. The vaccine was identified by Western blot, mass spectrographic analysis, ELISA and electron microscopy. The vaccine with or without aluminum hydroxide adjuvant was inoculated into female BALB/c mice at different dosages. The result showed that the antibodies to SARS-CoV were induced in the mice. The antibody levels induced by the vaccine with aluminum hydroxide were higher than those without aluminum hydroxide.

  9. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21–22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, di...

  10. Refocusing vibrating targets in SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Santhanam, Balu; Pepin, Matthew; Atwood, Tom; Hayat, Majeed M.

    2012-06-01

    In synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) returned signals, ground-target vibrations introduce a phase modulation that is linearly proportional to the vibration displacement. Such modulation, termed the micro-Doppler effect, introduces ghost targets along the azimuth direction in reconstructed SAR images that prevents SAR from forming focused images of the vibrating targets. Recently, a discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFrFT) based method was developed to estimate the vibration frequencies and instantaneous vibration accelerations of the vibrating targets from SAR returned signals. In this paper, a demodulation-based algorithm is proposed to reconstruct focused SAR images of vibrating targets by exploiting the estimation results of the DFrFT-based vibration estimation method. For a single-component harmonic vibration, the history of the vibration displacement is first estimated from the estimated vibration frequency and the instantaneous vibration accelerations. Then a reference signal whose phase is modulated by the estimated vibration displacement with a delay of 180 degree is constructed. After that, the SAR phase history from the vibration target is multiplied by the reference signal and the vibration-induced phase modulation is canceled. Finally, the SAR image containing the re-focused vibration target is obtained by applying the 2-D Fourier transform to the demodulated SAR phase history. This algorithm is applied to simulated SAR data and successfully reconstructs the SAR image containing the re-focused vibrating target.

  11. Chadong Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ The Chadong Block, located in the east of Qaidam Basin, Qinghai Province, covers an area of 12 452 km2. It is bounded by Kunlum Mountains in the south and the northwest is closely adjacent to Aimunike Mountain.Rivers are widely distributed, which always run in NWSE direction, including the Sulunguole, Qaidam and Haluwusu Rivers. The traffic condition is good, the Qinghai-Tibet highway stretching through the whole area and the Lan-Qing railway, 20-50 km away from the block, passing from north to west. A lot of Mongolia minority people have settled there, of which herdsmen always live nearby the Qaidam River drainage area.

  12. Controlling Data Collection to Support SAR Image Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Cordaro, J. Thomas; Burns, Bryan L.

    2008-10-14

    A desired rotation of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image can be facilitated by adjusting a SAR data collection operation based on the desired rotation. The SAR data collected by the adjusted SAR data collection operation can be efficiently exploited to form therefrom a SAR image having the desired rotational orientation.

  13. The effect of inhibition of PP1 and TNFα signaling on pathogenesis of SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Jason E; Mitchell, Hugh D; Gralinski, Lisa E; Eisfeld, Amie J; Josset, Laurence; Bankhead, Armand; Neumann, Gabriele; Tilton, Susan C; Schäfer, Alexandra; Li, Chengjun; Fan, Shufang; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S; Katze, Michael G; Waters, Katrina M

    2016-09-23

    The complex interplay between viral replication and host immune response during infection remains poorly understood. While many viruses are known to employ anti-immune strategies to facilitate their replication, highly pathogenic virus infections can also cause an excessive immune response that exacerbates, rather than reduces pathogenicity. To investigate this dichotomy in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), we developed a transcriptional network model of SARS-CoV infection in mice and used the model to prioritize candidate regulatory targets for further investigation. We validated our predictions in 18 different knockout (KO) mouse strains, showing that network topology provides significant predictive power to identify genes that are important for viral infection. We identified a novel player in the immune response to virus infection, Kepi, an inhibitory subunit of the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complex, which protects against SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We also found that receptors for the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) promote pathogenesis, presumably through excessive inflammation. The current study provides validation of network modeling approaches for identifying important players in virus infection pathogenesis, and a step forward in understanding the host response to an important infectious disease. The results presented here suggest the role of Kepi in the host response to SARS-CoV, as well as inflammatory activity driving pathogenesis through TNFα signaling in SARS-CoV infections. Though we have reported the utility of this approach in bacterial and cell culture studies previously, this is the first comprehensive study to confirm that network topology can be used to predict phenotypes in mice with experimental validation.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a bat SARS-like coronavirus that uses the ACE2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xing-Yi; Li, Jia-Lu; Yang, Xing-Lou; Chmura, Aleksei A; Zhu, Guangjian; Epstein, Jonathan H; Mazet, Jonna K; Hu, Ben; Zhang, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Ji; Luo, Chu-Ming; Tan, Bing; Wang, Ning; Zhu, Yan; Crameri, Gary; Zhang, Shu-Yi; Wang, Lin-Fa; Daszak, Peter; Shi, Zheng-Li

    2013-11-28

    The 2002-3 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was one of the most significant public health events in recent history. An ongoing outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus suggests that this group of viruses remains a key threat and that their distribution is wider than previously recognized. Although bats have been suggested to be the natural reservoirs of both viruses, attempts to isolate the progenitor virus of SARS-CoV from bats have been unsuccessful. Diverse SARS-like coronaviruses (SL-CoVs) have now been reported from bats in China, Europe and Africa, but none is considered a direct progenitor of SARS-CoV because of their phylogenetic disparity from this virus and the inability of their spike proteins to use the SARS-CoV cellular receptor molecule, the human angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE2). Here we report whole-genome sequences of two novel bat coronaviruses from Chinese horseshoe bats (family: Rhinolophidae) in Yunnan, China: RsSHC014 and Rs3367. These viruses are far more closely related to SARS-CoV than any previously identified bat coronaviruses, particularly in the receptor binding domain of the spike protein. Most importantly, we report the first recorded isolation of a live SL-CoV (bat SL-CoV-WIV1) from bat faecal samples in Vero E6 cells, which has typical coronavirus morphology, 99.9% sequence identity to Rs3367 and uses ACE2 from humans, civets and Chinese horseshoe bats for cell entry. Preliminary in vitro testing indicates that WIV1 also has a broad species tropism. Our results provide the strongest evidence to date that Chinese horseshoe bats are natural reservoirs of SARS-CoV, and that intermediate hosts may not be necessary for direct human infection by some bat SL-CoVs. They also highlight the importance of pathogen-discovery programs targeting high-risk wildlife groups in emerging disease hotspots as a strategy for pandemic preparedness.

  15. Study on Geosynchronous Circular SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Geosynchronous Circular SAR (Geo-CSAR is introduced in this paper. With the design of the geosynchronous orbit parameters, a near-circular satellite sub-track could be formed to enable the staring imaging mode, which supports the advanced applications for wide-field and 3-D information acquisition under long-term consistent observation. This paper also analyzes Geo-CSAR's imaging formation capabilities, and concludes its attractive advantages over low-earth orbit spaceborne SAR in terms of instantaneous coverage, consistent observing area, 3-D positioning accuracy and etc.. Encouraging expectations for Geo-CSAR thus could be positively predicted in military investigation and disaster monitoring management applications.

  16. Human LINE1 endonuclease domain as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies involved in the pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wei-ping; SHU Cui-li; LI Bo-an; ZHAO Jun; CHENG Yun

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS)is a disease with a mortality of 9.56%.Although SARS is etiologically linked to a new coronavirus(SARS-CoV)and functional cell receptor has been identified,the pathogenesis of the virus infection is largely unclear.Methods The clinical specimens were processed and analyzed using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in-house.Further investigations of target antigen included reviews of phage display technique,rapid amplification of cDNA ends(RACE)technique,protein expression and purification,Western blotting validation,serological and immunohistochemical staining in postmortem tissue.Results A type of medium or low titer anti-lung tissue antibodies were found in the sera of SARS patients at the early stage of the disease.Human long interspersed nuclear element 1(LINE1)gene endonuclease(EN)domain protein was one of the target autoantigens and it was aberrantly expressed in the lung tissue of SARS patients.Anti-EN antibody was positive in the sera of 40.9% of SARS patients.Conclusions Human LINE1 endonuclease domain was identified as a putative target of SARS-associated autoantibodies,which were presented in the serum of SARS patients and may be involved in the pathogenesis of SARS.

  17. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  18. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  19. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Qiu

    Full Text Available This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR research and application.

  20. Signal Processing for Digital Beamforming FMCW SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the limitations of single channel Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR, Digital Beamforming (DBF technology is introduced to improve system performance. Combined with multiple receive apertures, DBF FMCW SAR can obtain high resolution in low pulse repetition frequency, which can increase the processing gain and decrease the sampling frequency. The received signal model of DBF FMCW SAR is derived. The continuous antenna motion which is the main characteristic of FMCW SAR received signal is taken into account in the whole signal processing. The detailed imaging diagram of DBF FMCW SAR is given. A reference system is also demonstrated in the paper by comparing with a single channel FMCW SAR. The validity of the presented diagram is demonstrated with a point target simulation results.

  1. Building Detection in SAR Imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koch, Mark William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moya, Mary M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goold, Jeremy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. The desire is to present a technique that is effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed technique assumes that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint. Where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. Constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results are provided showing the outcome of the technique.

  2. Class II integrase mutants with changes in putative nuclear localization signals are primarily blocked at a postnuclear entry step of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Richard; Limón, Ana; Devroe, Eric; Silver, Pamela A; Cherepanov, Peter; Engelman, Alan

    2004-12-01

    Integrase has been implicated in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import. Integrase analyses, however, can be complicated by the pleiotropic nature of mutations: whereas class I mutants are integration defective, class II mutants display additional assembly and/or reverse transcription defects. We previously determined that HIV-1(V165A), originally reported as defective for nuclear import, was a class II mutant. Here we analyzed mutants containing changes in other putative nuclear localization signals, including (186)KRK(188)/(211)KELQKQITK(219) and Cys-130. Previous work established HIV-1(K186Q), HIV-1(Q214L/Q216L), and HIV-1(C130G) as replication defective, but phenotypic classification was unclear and nuclear import in nondividing cells was not addressed. Consistent with previous reports, most of the bipartite mutants studied here were replication defective. These mutants as well as HIV-1(V165A) synthesized reduced cDNA levels, but a normal fraction of mutant cDNA localized to dividing and nondividing cell nuclei. Somewhat surprisingly, recombinant class II mutant proteins were catalytically active, and class II Vpr-integrase fusion proteins efficiently complemented class I mutant virus. Since a class I Vpr-integrase mutant efficiently complemented class II mutant viruses under conditions in which class II Vpr-integrases failed to function, we conclude that classes I and II define two distinct complementation groups and suggest that class II mutants are primarily defective at a postnuclear entry step of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1(C130G) was also defective for reverse transcription, but Vpr-integrase(C130G) did not efficiently complement class I mutant HIV-1. Since HIV-1(C130A) grew like the wild type, we conclude that Cys-130 is not essential for replication and speculate that perturbation of integrase structure contributed to the pleiotropic HIV-1(C130G) phenotype.

  3. InSAR Forensics: Tracing InSAR Scatterers in High Resolution Optical Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, XiaoXiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a step towards a better interpretation of the scattering mechanism of different objects and their deformation histories in SAR interferometry (InSAR). The proposed technique traces individual SAR scatterer in high resolution optical images where their geometries, materials, and other properties can be better analyzed and classified. And hence scatterers of a same object can be analyzed in group, which brings us to a new level of InSAR deformation monitoring.

  4. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV.

  5. Extraordinary GU-rich single-strand RNA identified from SARS coronavirus contributes an excessive innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, Ming; Cao, Hongwei; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2013-02-01

    A dangerous cytokine storm occurs in the SARS involving in immune disorder, but many aspects of the pathogenetic mechanism remain obscure since its outbreak. To deeply reveal the interaction of host and SARS-CoV, based on the basic structural feature of pathogen-associated molecular pattern, we created a new bioinformatics method for searching potential pathogenic molecules and identified a set of SARS-CoV specific GU-rich ssRNA fragments with a high-density distribution in the genome. In vitro experiments, the result showed the representative SARS-CoV ssRNAs had powerful immunostimulatory activities to induce considerable level of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-a, IL-6 and IL-12 release via the TLR7 and TLR8, almost 2-fold higher than the strong stimulatory ssRNA40 that was found previously from other virus. Moreover, SARS-CoV ssRNA was able to cause acute lung injury in mice with a high mortality rate in vivo experiment. It suggests that SARS-CoV specific GU-rich ssRNA plays a very important role in the cytokine storm associated with a dysregulation of the innate immunity. This study not only presents new evidence about the immunopathologic damage caused by overactive inflammation during the SARS-CoV infection, but also provides a useful clue for a new therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray for the detection and genotyping of the SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xi; Geng, Peng; Wang, Quan; Cao, Boyang; Liu, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a disease that spread widely in the world during late 2002 to 2004, severely threatened public health. Although there have been no reported infections since 2004, the extremely pathogenic SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), as the causative agent of SARS, has recently been identified in animals, showing the potential for the re-emergence of this disease. Previous studies showed that 27 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations among the spike (S) gene of this virus are correlated closely with the SARS pathogenicity and epidemicity. We have developed a SNP DNA microarray in order to detect and genotype these SNPs, and to obtain related information on the pathogenicity and epidemicity of a given strain. The microarray was hybridized with PCR products amplified from cDNAs obtained from different SARS-CoV strains. We were able to detect 24 SNPs and determine the type of a given strain. The hybridization profile showed that 19 samples were detected and genotyped correctly by using our microarray, with 100% accuracy. Our microarray provides a novel method for the detection and epidemiological surveillance of SARS-CoV.

  7. T-cell immunity of SARS-CoV: Implications for vaccine development against MERS-CoV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, William J; Zhao, Min; Liu, Kefang; Xu, Kun; Wong, Gary; Tan, Wenjie; Gao, George F

    2017-01-01

    Over 12 years have elapsed since severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) triggered the first global alert for coronavirus infections. Virus transmission in humans was quickly halted by public health measures and human infections of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) have not been observed since. However, other coronaviruses still pose a continuous threat to human health, as exemplified by the recent emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in humans. The work on SARS-CoV widens our knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and immunology of coronaviruses and may shed light on MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV). It has been confirmed that T-cell immunity plays an important role in recovery from SARS-CoV infection. Herein, we summarize T-cell immunological studies of SARS-CoV and discuss the potential cross-reactivity of the SARS-CoV-specific immunity against MERS-CoV, which may provide useful recommendations for the development of broad-spectrum vaccines against coronavirus infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Gene 3 (EBI3) Blocking Leads to Induce Antitumor Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response and Suppress Tumor Growth in Colorectal Cancer by Bidirectional Reciprocal-Regulation STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanfang; Chen, Qianqian; Du, Wenjing; Chen, Can; Li, Feifei; Yang, Jingying; Peng, Jianyu; Kang, Dongping; Lin, Bihua; Chai, Xingxing; Zhou, Keyuan; Zeng, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) is a member of the interleukin-12 (IL-12) family structural subunit and can form a heterodimer with IL-27p28 and IL-12p35 subunit to build IL-27 and IL-35, respectively. However, IL-27 stimulates whereas IL-35 inhibits antitumor T cell responses. To date, little is known about the role of EBI3 in tumor microenvironment. In this study, firstly we assessed EBI3, IL-27p28, IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 expression with clinicopathological parameters of colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues; then we evaluated the antitumor T cell responses and tumor growth with a EBI3 blocking peptide. We found that elevated EBI3 may be associated with IL-12p35, gp130, and p-STAT3 to promote CRC progression. EBI3 blocking peptide promoted antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response by inducing Granzyme B, IFN-γ production, and p-STAT3 expression and inhibited CRC cell proliferation and tumor growth to associate with suppressing gp130 and p-STAT3 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that EBI3 may mediate a bidirectional reciprocal-regulation STAT3 signaling pathway to assist the tumor escape immune surveillance in CRC. PMID:27247488

  9. Satellite SAR geocoding with refined RPC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Balz, Timo; Liao, Mingsheng

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies have proved that the Rational Polynomial Camera (RPC) model is able to act as a reliable replacement of the rigorous Range-Doppler (RD) model for the geometric processing of satellite SAR datasets. But its capability in absolute geolocation of SAR images has not been evaluated quantitatively. Therefore, in this article the problems of error analysis and refinement of SAR RPC model are primarily investigated to improve the absolute accuracy of SAR geolocation. Range propagation delay and azimuth timing error are identified as two major error sources for SAR geolocation. An approach based on SAR image simulation and real-to-simulated image matching is developed to estimate and correct these two errors. Afterwards a refined RPC model can be built from the error-corrected RD model and then used in satellite SAR geocoding. Three experiments with different settings are designed and conducted to comprehensively evaluate the accuracies of SAR geolocation with both ordinary and refined RPC models. All the experimental results demonstrate that with RPC model refinement the absolute location accuracies of geocoded SAR images can be improved significantly, particularly in Easting direction. In another experiment the computation efficiencies of SAR geocoding with both RD and RPC models are compared quantitatively. The results show that by using the RPC model such efficiency can be remarkably improved by at least 16 times. In addition the problem of DEM data selection for SAR image simulation in RPC model refinement is studied by a comparative experiment. The results reveal that the best choice should be using the proper DEM datasets of spatial resolution comparable to that of the SAR images.

  10. Cell host response to infection with novel human coronavirus EMC predicts potential antivirals and important differences with SARS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josset, Laurence; Menachery, Vineet D; Gralinski, Lisa E; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Sova, Pavel; Carter, Victoria S; Yount, Boyd L; Graham, Rachel L; Baric, Ralph S; Katze, Michael G

    2013-04-30

    A novel human coronavirus (HCoV-EMC) was recently identified in the Middle East as the causative agent of a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) resembling the illness caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Although derived from the CoV family, the two viruses are genetically distinct and do not use the same receptor. Here, we investigated whether HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV induce similar or distinct host responses after infection of a human lung epithelial cell line. HCoV-EMC was able to replicate as efficiently as SARS-CoV in Calu-3 cells and similarly induced minimal transcriptomic changes before 12 h postinfection. Later in infection, HCoV-EMC induced a massive dysregulation of the host transcriptome, to a much greater extent than SARS-CoV. Both viruses induced a similar activation of pattern recognition receptors and the interleukin 17 (IL-17) pathway, but HCoV-EMC specifically down-regulated the expression of several genes within the antigen presentation pathway, including both type I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. This could have an important impact on the ability of the host to mount an adaptive host response. A unique set of 207 genes was dysregulated early and permanently throughout infection with HCoV-EMC, and was used in a computational screen to predict potential antiviral compounds, including kinase inhibitors and glucocorticoids. Overall, HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV elicit distinct host gene expression responses, which might impact in vivo pathogenesis and could orient therapeutic strategies against that emergent virus. Identification of a novel coronavirus causing fatal respiratory infection in humans raises concerns about a possible widespread outbreak of severe respiratory infection similar to the one caused by SARS-CoV. Using a human lung epithelial cell line and global transcriptomic profiling, we identified differences in the host response between HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV. This enables rapid assessment of viral properties and the

  11. Vaccine efficacy in senescent mice challenged with recombinant SARS-CoV bearing epidemic and zoonotic spike variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon Deming

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV was identified as the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome, a disease characterized by severe pneumonia that sometimes results in death. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that crossed the species barrier, most likely originating from bats or from other species including civets, raccoon dogs, domestic cats, swine, and rodents. A SARS-CoV vaccine should confer long-term protection, especially in vulnerable senescent populations, against both the 2003 epidemic strains and zoonotic strains that may yet emerge from animal reservoirs. We report the comprehensive investigation of SARS vaccine efficacy in young and senescent mice following homologous and heterologous challenge.Using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP expressing the 2003 epidemic Urbani SARS-CoV strain spike (S glycoprotein (VRP-S or the nucleocapsid (N protein from the same strain (VRP-N, we demonstrate that VRP-S, but not VRP-N vaccines provide complete short- and long-term protection against homologous strain challenge in young and senescent mice. To test VRP vaccine efficacy against a heterologous SARS-CoV, we used phylogenetic analyses, synthetic biology, and reverse genetics to construct a chimeric virus (icGDO3-S encoding a synthetic S glycoprotein gene of the most genetically divergent human strain, GDO3, which clusters among the zoonotic SARS-CoV. icGD03-S replicated efficiently in human airway epithelial cells and in the lungs of young and senescent mice, and was highly resistant to neutralization with antisera directed against the Urbani strain. Although VRP-S vaccines provided complete short-term protection against heterologous icGD03-S challenge in young mice, only limited protection was seen in vaccinated senescent animals. VRP-N vaccines not only failed to protect from homologous or heterologous challenge, but resulted in enhanced immunopathology with eosinophilic

  12. MiniSAR: a miniature, lightweight, low cost, scalable SAR system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeghs, T.P.H.; Halsema, D. van; Hoogeboom, P.

    2001-01-01

    TNO-FEL is developing a miniature, lightweight, low cost, and scalable SAR/MTI system called 'MiniSAR'. The MiniSAR system will be unique in its size and architecture. Initially the demonstrator system will be integrated in a two-seater motorglider platform. Wherever possible,

  13. A Research on Airborne Squint Hybrid SAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIANYong; ZHOUYinqing; LIChunsheng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the squint mode hybrid SAR (Synthetic aperture radar) geometry. Based on the squint mode SAR geometry, the hybrid SAR signal model in squint case is derived. Based on this signal model, the hybrid SAR imaging process parameter is discussed. Aimed at the squint case, we analyze not only the relationship between the resolution and SAR system parameters, but also the relation between the time extension of the maximum azimuth signal and SAR system parameters. This research establishes the theoretical foundation for the design of squint hybrid SAR and serves as a good guide for the future work of improving the resolution of squint hybrid SAR. Based on the two-step algorithm, by considering the squint angle and cubic phase term, we are going to use the deramp SC-Chirp Scaling algorithm for squint hybrid SAR imaging. This algorithm uses the deramp method for the first step processing, and the SC-Chirp Scaling algorithm for the second step processing. The process procedure of this algorithm includes the squint angle, has the explicit physical meaning, therefore is convenient for analysis. The computer simulation result proves the validity of the analysis.

  14. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  15. TanDEM-X Bistatic SAR Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Balss, Ulrich; Niedermeier, Andreas; Breit, Helko

    2010-01-01

    In June, 2010 the German SAR satellite TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X-Add-on for Digital Elevation Measurements) will be launched. Together with TerraSAR-X, launched June 15, 2007, it will form the first spaceborne bistatic SAR platform. Usually one of the satellite is transmitting (active satellite), while both are receiving. As both satellites fly in a helix orbit constellation, during a recording a satellite has to be passive, if the other one is close to the line of sight to the observation targ...

  16. DETEKCIJA SPREMEMB V RADARSKIH SLIKAH SAR

    OpenAIRE

    Izak, Rok

    2016-01-01

    V magistrskem delu je opisan princip detekcije sprememb površja Zemlje s pomočjo radarskih slik SAR, ki so bile zajete s satelitom TanDEM-X. Opisani so tudi principi delovanja radarja z umetno odprtino, načini zajema podatkov ter osnove interferometrije V prvem sklopu magistrskega dela, je bil cilj predlagati metodo za zaznavo gozdne površine v slikah SAR. V drugem delu so bile s pomočjo SAR interferometrije zaznane spremembe na kroni gozdov v okolici Postojne. Slike SAR, so bile zajete v raz...

  17. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  18. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction from multistatic SAR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigling, Brian D; Moses, Randolph L

    2005-08-01

    This paper discusses reconstruction of three-dimensional surfaces from multiple bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Techniques for surface reconstruction from multiple monostatic SAR images already exist, including interferometric processing and stereo SAR. We generalize these methods to obtain algorithms for bistatic interferometric SAR and bistatic stereo SAR. We also propose a framework for predicting the performance of our multistatic stereo SAR algorithm, and, from this framework, we suggest a metric for use in planning strategic deployment of multistatic assets.

  19. Knowledge-based detection method for SAR targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Gao; Achang Ru; Jun Wang; Shiyi Mao

    2014-01-01

    When the classical constant false-alarm rate (CFAR) combined with fuzzy C-means (FCM) algorithm is applied to target detection in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with com-plex background, CFAR requires block-by-block estimation of clut-ter models and FCM clustering converges to local optimum. To address these problems, this paper pro-poses a new detection algorithm: knowledge-based combined with improved genetic algorithm-fuzzy C-means (GA-FCM) algorithm. Firstly, the algo-rithm takes target region’s maximum and average intensity, area, length of long axis and long-to-short axis ratio of the external el ipse as factors which influence the target appearing probabil-ity. The knowledge-based detection algorithm can produce pre-process results without the need of estimation of clutter models as CFAR does. Afterward the GA-FCM algorithm is improved to clus-ter pre-process results. It has advantages of incorporating global optimizing ability of GA and local optimizing ability of FCM, which wil further eliminate false alarms and get better results. The ef-fectiveness of the proposed technique is experimental y validated with real SAR images.

  20. SARS transmission pattern in Singapore reassessed by viral sequence variation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Liu

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological investigations of infectious disease are mainly dependent on indirect contact information and only occasionally assisted by characterization of pathogen sequence variation from clinical isolates. Direct sequence analysis of the pathogen, particularly at a population level, is generally thought to be too cumbersome, technically difficult, and expensive. We present here a novel application of mass spectrometry (MS-based technology in characterizing viral sequence variations that overcomes these problems, and we apply it retrospectively to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS outbreak in Singapore. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The success rate of the MS-based analysis for detecting SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV sequence variations was determined to be 95% with 75 copies of viral RNA per reaction, which is sufficient to directly analyze both clinical and cultured samples. Analysis of 13 SARS-CoV isolates from the different stages of the Singapore outbreak identified nine sequence variations that could define the molecular relationship between them and pointed to a new, previously unidentified, primary route of introduction of SARS-CoV into the Singapore population. Our direct determination of viral sequence variation from a clinical sample also clarified an unresolved epidemiological link regarding the acquisition of SARS in a German patient. We were also able to detect heterogeneous viral sequences in primary lung tissues, suggesting a possible coevolution of quasispecies of virus within a single host. CONCLUSION: This study has further demonstrated the importance of improving clinical and epidemiological studies of pathogen transmission through the use of genetic analysis and has revealed the MS-based analysis to be a sensitive and accurate method for characterizing SARS-CoV genetic variations in clinical samples. We suggest that this approach should be used routinely during outbreaks of a wide variety of agents, in order

  1. InfoTerra/TerraSAR initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Manfred W.

    2004-01-01

    The overarching goal of the InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative is to establish a self-sustaining operational/commercial business built on Europe"s know-how and experience in space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, in SAR data processing as well as in SAR applications. InfoTerra stands for a new business concept based on supplying innovative geo-information products and services. TerraSAR is a space and ground system conceived to consist of an initial deployment and operation of 2 Radar satellites (one in X- and one in L-band) flying in a tandem configuration in the same orbit. The design of TerraSAR is driven by the market and is user-oriented. TerraSAR is key to capturing a significant proportion of the existing market and to opening new market opportunities, when it becomes operational. The InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative has evolved gradually. It started in 1997 as a joint venture between German (DSS) and British (MMS-UK) space industry, strongly supported by both space agencies, DLR and BNSC. In early 2001, DLR and BNSC submitted to ESA the Formal Programme Proposal for InfoTerra/TerraSAR to become an essential element of ESA"s Earth Watch Programme. In summer 2001, when it became evident that there was not yet sufficient support from the ESA Member States to allow immediate start entering into TerraSAR Phase C/D, it has been decided to implement first a TerraSAR consolidation phase. In early 2002, in order to avoid further delays, a contract was signed between DLR and Astrium GmbH on the development of one component of TerraSAR, the TerraSAR-X, in the frame of a national programme, governed by a Public Private Partnership Agreement. Even if now the different launch dates for TerraSAR-X and TerraSAR-L are narrowing down the window of common data acquisition, it is a reasonable starting point, but it should always be kept in mind that the utmost goal for the longterm is to achieve self sustainability by supplying geo-information products and services

  2. Design and application of 60mer oligonucleotide microarray in SARS coronavirus detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The 60mer oligonucleotide microarray was designed and applied to detecting of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) coronavirus. Thirty 60mer specific oligos were designed to cover the whole genome of the first submitted coronavirus strain, according to the sequence of TOR2 (GENEBANK Accession: AY274119). These primers were synthesized and printed into a microarray with 12×12 spots. RNAs were extracted from the throat swab and gargling fluid of SARS patients and reverse-transcripted into the double strand cDNAs. The cDNAs were prepared as restricted cDNA fragments by the restriction display (RD) technique and labeled by PCR with the Cy5-universal primer. The labeled samples were then applied to the oligo microarray for hybridization. The diagnostic capability of the microarray was evaluated after the washing and scanning steps. The scanning result showed that samples of SARS patients were hybridized with multiple SARS probes on the microarray, and there is no signal on the negative and blank controls. These results indicate that the genome of SARS coronavirus can be detected in parallel by the 60mer oligonucleotide microarray, which can improve the positive ratio of the diagnosis. The oligo microarray can also be used for monitoring the behavior of the virus genes in different stages of the disease status.

  3. Identification of the Mechanisms Causing Reversion to Virulence in an Attenuated SARS-CoV for the Design of a Genetically Stable Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Perlman, Stanley; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-10-01

    A SARS-CoV lacking the full-length E gene (SARS-CoV-∆E) was attenuated and an effective vaccine. Here, we show that this mutant virus regained fitness after serial passages in cell culture or in vivo, resulting in the partial duplication of the membrane gene or in the insertion of a new sequence in gene 8a, respectively. The chimeric proteins generated in cell culture increased virus fitness in vitro but remained attenuated in mice. In contrast, during SARS-CoV-∆E passage in mice, the virus incorporated a mutated variant of 8a protein, resulting in reversion to a virulent phenotype. When the full-length E protein was deleted or its PDZ-binding motif (PBM) was mutated, the revertant viruses either incorporated a novel chimeric protein with a PBM or restored the sequence of the PBM on the E protein, respectively. Similarly, after passage in mice, SARS-CoV-∆E protein 8a mutated, to now encode a PBM, and also regained virulence. These data indicated that the virus requires a PBM on a transmembrane protein to compensate for removal of this motif from the E protein. To increase the genetic stability of the vaccine candidate, we introduced small attenuating deletions in E gene that did not affect the endogenous PBM, preventing the incorporation of novel chimeric proteins in the virus genome. In addition, to increase vaccine biosafety, we introduced additional attenuating mutations into the nsp1 protein. Deletions in the carboxy-terminal region of nsp1 protein led to higher host interferon responses and virus attenuation. Recombinant viruses including attenuating mutations in E and nsp1 genes maintained their attenuation after passage in vitro and in vivo. Further, these viruses fully protected mice against challenge with the lethal parental virus, and are therefore safe and stable vaccine candidates for protection against SARS-CoV.

  4. A 3D model of SARS_CoV 3CL proteinase and its inhibitors design by virtual screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUOCheng; CHENJing; LUOHai-Bin; CHENLi-Li; LIGuo-Wei; SUNTao; YUChang-Ying; YUELi-Duo; SHENJian-Hua; JIANGHua-Liang; XIONGBin; GUIChun-Shan; XUXiao-Ying; DUANWen-Hu; SHENJing-Kang; QINLei; SHITi-Liu; LIYi-Xue; CHENKai-Xian; LUOXiao-Min; SHENXu

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To constructed a three-dimensional (3D) model for the 3C like (3CL) proteinase of SARS coronavirus (SARS_CoV), and to design inhibitors of the 3CL proteinase based on the 3D model. METHODS: Bioinformatics analyses were performed to search the homologous proteins of the SARS_CoV 3CL proteinase from the GenBank and PDB database. A 3D model of the proteinase was constructed by using homology modeling technique. Targeting to the 3D model and its X-ray crystal structure of the main proteinase (Mpro) of transmissible gastroenteritis virus(TGEV), virtual screening was performed employing molecular docking method to identify possible 3CL proteinase inhibitors from small molecular databases. RESULTS:Sequence alignment indicated that the SARS_CoV 3CL proteinase was extremely homologous to TGEV Mpro, especially the substrate-binding pocket (active site). Accordingly, a 3D model for the SARS_CoV 3CL proteinase was constructed based on the crystal structure of TGEV Mpro. The 3D model adopts a similar fold of the TGEV mpro, its structure and binding pocket feature are almost as same as that of TGEV Mpro. The tested virtual screening indicated that 73 available proteinase inhibitors in the MDDR database might dock into both the binding pockets of the TGEV Mpro and the SARS_CoV 3CL proteinase. CONCLUSIONS:Either the 3D model of the SARS_CoV 3CL proteinase or the X-ray crystal stucture of the TGEV Mpro may be used as a starting point for design anti-SARS drugs. Screening the known proteinase inhibitors may be an appreciated shortcut to discover anti-SARS drugs.

  5. Development of animal models against emerging coronaviruses: From SARS to MERS coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Troy C; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-05-01

    Two novel coronaviruses have emerged to cause severe disease in humans. While bats may be the primary reservoir for both viruses, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) likely crossed into humans from civets in China, and MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been transmitted from camels in the Middle East. Unlike SARS-CoV that resolved within a year, continued introductions of MERS-CoV present an on-going public health threat. Animal models are needed to evaluate countermeasures against emerging viruses. With SARS-CoV, several animal species were permissive to infection. In contrast, most laboratory animals are refractory or only semi-permissive to infection with MERS-CoV. This host-range restriction is largely determined by sequence heterogeneity in the MERS-CoV receptor. We describe animal models developed to study coronaviruses, with a focus on host-range restriction at the level of the viral receptor and discuss approaches to consider in developing a model to evaluate countermeasures against MERS-CoV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Infrared thermographic SAR measurements of interstitial hyperthermia applicators: errors due to thermal conduction and convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherar, M D; Gladman, A S; Davidson, S R H; Easty, A C; Joy, M L

    2004-08-01

    Thermal conduction and convection were examined as sources of error in thermographically measured SAR patterns of an interstitial microwave hyperthermia applicator. Measurements were performed in a layered block of muscle-equivalent phantom material using an infrared thermographic technique with varying heating duration. There was a 52.7% reduction in maximum SAR and 75.5% increase in 50% iso-SAR contour area for a 60-s heating duration relative to a 10-s heating duration. A finite element model of heat transfer in an homogeneous medium was used to model conductive and convective heat transfer during the thermographic measurement. Thermal conduction artefacts were found to significantly distort thermographically measured SAR patterns. Convective cooling, which occurs when phantom layers are exposed for thermal image acquisition, was found to significantly affect the magnitude, but not the spatial distribution, of thermographically measured SAR patterns. Results from this investigation suggest that the thermal diffusion artefacts can be minimized if the duration of the applied power pulse is restricted to 10 s or less.

  7. PHARUS: Airborne SAR Development in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.; Koomen, P.J.; Snoeij, P.; Pouwels, H.

    1992-01-01

    The PHARUS project (PHARUS stands for Phased Array Universal SAR) aims for a polarimetric C-band aircraft SAR that will be finalized in 1994. The system will make use of a phased array antenna with solid state amplifiers. The project consists of two phases, a definition phase and a realization

  8. PHARUS: Airborne SAR Development in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, P.; Koomen, P.J.; Snoeij, P.; Pouwels, H.

    1992-01-01

    The PHARUS project (PHARUS stands for Phased Array Universal SAR) aims for a polarimetric C-band aircraft SAR that will be finalized in 1994. The system will make use of a phased array antenna with solid state amplifiers. The project consists of two phases, a definition phase and a realization phase

  9. Advanced antennas for SAR spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail, William B.

    1993-01-01

    Single and multi-frequency antenna concepts were developed to evaluate the feasibility of building large aperture polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems to be launched in low cost vehicles such as the Delta 2. The antennas are 18.9 m long by 2.6 m wide (L-band) and achieve single polarization imaging to an incidence angle of 55 degrees and dual/quad imaging to 42 degrees. When combined with strawman spacecraft designs, both concepts meet the mass and volume constraints imposed by a Delta 2 launch.

  10. SAR processing using SHARC signal processing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxtable, Barton D.; Jackson, Christopher R.; Skaron, Steve A.

    1998-09-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is uniquely suited to help solve the Search and Rescue problem since it can be utilized either day or night and through both dense fog or thick cloud cover. Other papers in this session, and in this session in 1997, describe the various SAR image processing algorithms that are being developed and evaluated within the Search and Rescue Program. All of these approaches to using SAR data require substantial amounts of digital signal processing: for the SAR image formation, and possibly for the subsequent image processing. In recognition of the demanding processing that will be required for an operational Search and Rescue Data Processing System (SARDPS), NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and NASA/Stennis Space Center are conducting a technology demonstration utilizing SHARC multi-chip modules from Boeing to perform SAR image formation processing.

  11. Composite SAR imaging using sequential joint sparsity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Toby; Gelb, Anne; Platte, Rodrigo B.

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates accurate and efficient ℓ1 regularization methods for generating synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Although ℓ1 regularization algorithms are already employed in SAR imaging, practical and efficient implementation in terms of real time imaging remain a challenge. Here we demonstrate that fast numerical operators can be used to robustly implement ℓ1 regularization methods that are as or more efficient than traditional approaches such as back projection, while providing superior image quality. In particular, we develop a sequential joint sparsity model for composite SAR imaging which naturally combines the joint sparsity methodology with composite SAR. Our technique, which can be implemented using standard, fractional, or higher order total variation regularization, is able to reduce the effects of speckle and other noisy artifacts with little additional computational cost. Finally we show that generalizing total variation regularization to non-integer and higher orders provides improved flexibility and robustness for SAR imaging.

  12. SARS: systematic review of treatment effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren J Stockman

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The SARS outbreak of 2002-2003 presented clinicians with a new, life-threatening disease for which they had no experience in treating and no research on the effectiveness of treatment options. The World Health Organization (WHO expert panel on SARS treatment requested a systematic review and comprehensive summary of treatments used for SARS-infected patients in order to guide future treatment and identify priorities for research. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In response to the WHO request we conducted a systematic review of the published literature on ribavirin, corticosteroids, lopinavir and ritonavir (LPV/r, type I interferon (IFN, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG, and SARS convalescent plasma from both in vitro studies and in SARS patients. We also searched for clinical trial evidence of treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome. Sources of data were the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL up to February 2005. Data from publications were extracted and evidence within studies was classified using predefined criteria. In total, 54 SARS treatment studies, 15 in vitro studies, and three acute respiratory distress syndrome studies met our inclusion criteria. Within in vitro studies, ribavirin, lopinavir, and type I IFN showed inhibition of SARS-CoV in tissue culture. In SARS-infected patient reports on ribavirin, 26 studies were classified as inconclusive, and four showed possible harm. Seven studies of convalescent plasma or IVIG, three of IFN type I, and two of LPV/r were inconclusive. In 29 studies of steroid use, 25 were inconclusive and four were classified as causing possible harm. CONCLUSIONS: Despite an extensive literature reporting on SARS treatments, it was not possible to determine whether treatments benefited patients during the SARS outbreak. Some may have been harmful. Clinical trials should be designed to validate a standard protocol for dosage

  13. Multiple alignment analysis on phylogenetic tree of the spread of SARS epidemic using distance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiroch, S.; Pradana, M. S.; Irawan, M. I.; Mukhlash, I.

    2017-09-01

    Multiple Alignment (MA) is a particularly important tool for studying the viral genome and determine the evolutionary process of the specific virus. Application of MA in the case of the spread of the Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic is an interesting thing because this virus epidemic a few years ago spread so quickly that medical attention in many countries. Although there has been a lot of software to process multiple sequences, but the use of pairwise alignment to process MA is very important to consider. In previous research, the alignment between the sequences to process MA algorithm, Super Pairwise Alignment, but in this study used a dynamic programming algorithm Needleman wunchs simulated in Matlab. From the analysis of MA obtained and stable region and unstable which indicates the position where the mutation occurs, the system network topology that produced the phylogenetic tree of the SARS epidemic distance method, and system area networks mutation.

  14. 8-Prenylkaempferol Suppresses Influenza A Virus-Induced RANTES Production in A549 Cells via Blocking PI3K-Mediated Transcriptional Activation of NF-κB and IRF3

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    Wen-Fei Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available 8-Prenylkaempferol (8-PK is a prenylflavonoid isolated from Sophora flavescens, a Chinese herb with antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated its effect on regulated activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES secretion by influenza A virus (H1N1-infected A549 alveolar epithelial cells. Cell inoculation with H1N1 evoked a significant induction in RANTES accumulation accompanied with time-related increase in nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3, but showed no effect on c-Jun phosphorylation. 8-PK could significantly inhibit not only RANTES production but also NF-κB and IRF-3 nuclear translocation. We had proved that both NF-κB and IRF-3 participated in H1N1-induced RANTES production since NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidinedithio carbamate (PDTC and IRF-3 siRNA attenuated significantly RANTES accumulation. H1N1 inoculation also increased PI3K activity as well as Akt phosphorylation and such responsiveness were attenuated by 8-PK. In the presence of wortmannin, nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3 as well as RANTES production by H1N1 infection were all reversed, demonstrating that PI3K-Akt pathway is essential for NF-κB- and IRF-3-mediated RANTES production in A549 cells. Furthermore, 8-PK but not wortmannin, prevented effectively H1N1-evoked IκB degradation. In conclusion, 8-PK might be an anti-inflammatory agent for suppressing influenza A virus-induced RANTES production acts by blocking PI3K-mediated transcriptional activation of NF-κB and IRF-3 and in part by interfering with IκB degradation which subsequently decreases NF-κB translocation.

  15. MicroRNome analysis unravels the molecular basis of SARS infection in bronchoalveolar stem cells.

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    Bibekanand Mallick

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV, is an acute infectious disease with significant mortality. A typical clinical feature associated with SARS is pulmonary fibrosis and associated lung failure. In the aftermath of the SARS epidemic, although significant progress towards understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of the infection has been made, a large gap still remains in our knowledge regarding how SARS-CoV interacts with the host cell at the onset of infection. The rapidly changing viral genome adds another variable to this equation. We have focused on a novel concept of microRNA (miRNA-mediated host-virus interactions in bronchoalveolar stem cells (BASCs at the onset of infection by correlating the "BASC-microRNome" with their targets within BASCs and viral genome. This work encompasses miRNA array data analysis, target prediction, and miRNA-mRNA enrichment analysis and develops a complex interaction map among disease-related factors, miRNAs, and BASCs in SARS pathway, which will provide some clues for diagnostic markers to view an overall interplay leading to disease progression. Our observation reveals the BASCs (Sca-1+ CD34+ CD45- Pecam-, a subset of Oct-4+ ACE2+ epithelial colony cells at the broncho-alveolar duct junction, to be the prime target cells of SARS-CoV infection. Upregulated BASC miRNAs-17*, -574-5p, and -214 are co-opted by SARS-CoV to suppress its own replication and evade immune elimination until successful transmission takes place. Viral Nucleocapsid and Spike protein targets seem to co-opt downregulated miR-223 and miR-98 respectively within BASCs to control the various stages of BASC differentiation, activation of inflammatory chemokines, and downregulation of ACE2. All these effectively accounts for a successful viral transmission and replication within BASCs causing continued deterioration of lung tissues and apparent loss of capacity for lung repair. Overall, this

  16. The supercritical CO₂ extract from the skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor blocks hepatitis B virus antigen secretion in HepG2.2.15 cells.

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    Cui, Xiaoyan; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Wang, Dongliang; Gao, Jianjun; Qi, Fanghua; Gao, Bo; Kokudo, Norihiro; Fang, Dingzhi; Tang, Wei

    2014-02-01

    The skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor has long been used for the treatment of hepatitis B in China and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SC-CO₂) is widely used in extracting active ingredients from natural products. The aim of present study was to assess the anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) effect of the supercritical CO₂ extract from the skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor (SCE-BC). Cytotoxicity of SCE-BC was analyzed using an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay in HepG2.2.15 cells. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), and hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) concentrations in cell culture medium were determined by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. HBV mRNA in cells was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. SCE-BC concentrations below 10(-2) μg/mL had no significant toxicity to HepG2.2.15 cells. SCE-BC at 10(-4) μg/mL effectively inhibited the secretion of HBeAg by 23.36% on day 6. It was more potent than the positive control lamivudine (100 μg/mL) in terms of the inhibition of HBeAg and HBcrAg secretion on day 6. Consistent with the HBV antigen reduction, HBV mRNA expression was markedly inhibited in comparison to the control when HepG2.2.15 cells were treated with SCE-BC. Moreover, SCE-BC had greater inhibitory activity with respect to HBeAg than to HBsAg. Since HBeAg promotes immune tolerance and persistent infection during HBV infection, the present results suggest that immune tolerance induced by HBeAg might be overcome by SCE-BC. Therefore, SCE-BC warrants further investigation.

  17. Validation of burst overlapping for ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry

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    Natsuaki, Ryo; Motohka, Takeshi; Ohki, Masato; Watanabe, Manabu; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2016-10-01

    The Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) aboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite- 2 (ALOS-2, "DAICHI-2") is the latest L-band spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). PALSAR-2 observes the world mainly with 10 m resolution / 70 km swath Stripmap mode and 25 m resolution / 350 km swath ScanSAR mode. The 3-m resolution Stripmap mode is mainly used upon Japan. 350 km ScanSAR observation could detect large scale deformation e.g., the Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake and its aftershocks in 2015. ALOS-2 ScanSAR is the first one that supports ScanSAR-ScanSAR interferometry in L-band spaceborne SAR. However, because of the parameter setting error for the orbit estimation, ALOS-2 PALSAR-2 ScanSAR could achieve little number of interferometric pair until the software modification on February 8, 2015. That is, the burst overlap timing required for the interferometric analysis was insufficient and it depends on the observation date. In this paper, we report the investigation results of this case and discuss the current status of the ALOS-2 ScanSAR InSAR. Some archives achieved before February 8, 2015 can be used for interferometric analysis with after Feb. 8. However, most of them have no interferometric pair. We also report that the archives acquired after February 8, have enough burst overlapping.

  18. Improving Adaptive and Memory Immune Responses of an HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidate MVA-B by Deletion of Vaccinia Virus Genes (C6L and K7R) Blocking Interferon Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Arnáez, Pilar; Gómez, Carmen E; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S; Esteban, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Poxvirus vector Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (termed MVA-B) is a promising HIV/AIDS vaccine candidate, as confirmed from results obtained in a prophylactic phase I clinical trial in humans. To improve the immunogenicity elicited by MVA-B, we have generated and characterized the innate immune sensing and the in vivo immunogenicity profile of a vector with a double deletion in two vaccinia virus (VACV) genes (C6L and K7R) coding for inhibitors of interferon (IFN) signaling pathways. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B deletion mutants (MVA-B ΔC6L and MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R) in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) showed an up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β, IFN-α/β-inducible genes, TNF-α, and other cytokines and chemokines. A DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice revealed that these MVA-B deletion mutants were able to improve the magnitude and quality of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell adaptive and memory immune responses, which were mostly mediated by CD8(+) T cells of an effector phenotype, with MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R being the most immunogenic virus recombinant. CD4(+) T cell responses were mainly directed against Env, while GPN-specific CD8(+) T cell responses were induced preferentially by the MVA-B deletion mutants. Furthermore, antibody levels to Env in the memory phase were slightly enhanced by the MVA-B deletion mutants compared to the parental MVA-B. These findings revealed that double deletion of VACV genes that act blocking intracellularly the IFN signaling pathway confers an immunological benefit, inducing innate immune responses and increases in the magnitude, quality and durability of the HIV-1-specific T cell immune responses. Our observations highlighted the immunomodulatory role of the VACV genes C6L and K7R, and that targeting common pathways, like IRF3/IFN-β signaling, could be a general strategy to improve the immunogenicity

  19. Improving Adaptive and Memory Immune Responses of an HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidate MVA-B by Deletion of Vaccinia Virus Genes (C6L and K7R Blocking Interferon Signaling Pathways.

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    Juan García-Arriaza

    Full Text Available Poxvirus vector Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (termed MVA-B is a promising HIV/AIDS vaccine candidate, as confirmed from results obtained in a prophylactic phase I clinical trial in humans. To improve the immunogenicity elicited by MVA-B, we have generated and characterized the innate immune sensing and the in vivo immunogenicity profile of a vector with a double deletion in two vaccinia virus (VACV genes (C6L and K7R coding for inhibitors of interferon (IFN signaling pathways. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B deletion mutants (MVA-B ΔC6L and MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs showed an up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β, IFN-α/β-inducible genes, TNF-α, and other cytokines and chemokines. A DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice revealed that these MVA-B deletion mutants were able to improve the magnitude and quality of HIV-1-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell adaptive and memory immune responses, which were mostly mediated by CD8(+ T cells of an effector phenotype, with MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R being the most immunogenic virus recombinant. CD4(+ T cell responses were mainly directed against Env, while GPN-specific CD8(+ T cell responses were induced preferentially by the MVA-B deletion mutants. Furthermore, antibody levels to Env in the memory phase were slightly enhanced by the MVA-B deletion mutants compared to the parental MVA-B. These findings revealed that double deletion of VACV genes that act blocking intracellularly the IFN signaling pathway confers an immunological benefit, inducing innate immune responses and increases in the magnitude, quality and durability of the HIV-1-specific T cell immune responses. Our observations highlighted the immunomodulatory role of the VACV genes C6L and K7R, and that targeting common pathways, like IRF3/IFN-β signaling, could be a general strategy to improve the

  20. Updated progress in theories and applications of spaceborne SAR interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Ling; Huang, Cheng; Ding, Xiao-Li; Li, Zhi-Wei

    2006-12-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) and D-InSAR (Differential InSAR) are rapidly developed new technologies of space geodesy during the late 20th century, and now obviously become hot research topics in the field of microwave remote sensing. Compared with the other sensors, InSAR possesses many incomparable advantages such as the capability to work at all-time and under all weather, very high spatial resolution and strong penetrability through the ground surface. This paper introduces general status of SAR, InSAR, D-InSAR technology, and the principles of InSAR and D-InSAR. New theories and the potential problems of (D-)InSAR technology are largely discussed, including multi-baseline interferometry, Pol-InSAR technique, the correction of atmospheric effects, permanent Scatterers method, the synthesization technique between InSAR and GPS, LIDAR etc., and the InSAR parallel algorithm. Then the new applications of InSAR and D-InSAR are described in detail including 3D topographic mapping, deformation monitoring (including surface subsidence, landside monitoring and ITRF's foundation and maintenance, etc.), thematic mapping (including agriculture and forestry, oceanic surveying and flood monitoring, etc.) and meteorology etc.. Finally, the prospect and future trends in InSAR development are summarized.

  1. Differential sensitivity of bat cells to infection by enveloped RNA viruses: coronaviruses, paramyxoviruses, filoviruses, and influenza viruses.

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    Markus Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Bats (Chiroptera host major human pathogenic viruses including corona-, paramyxo, rhabdo- and filoviruses. We analyzed six different cell lines from either Yinpterochiroptera (including African flying foxes and a rhinolophid bat or Yangochiroptera (genera Carollia and Tadarida for susceptibility to infection by different enveloped RNA viruses. None of the cells were sensitive to infection by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, a porcine coronavirus, or to infection mediated by the Spike (S protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV incorporated into pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. The resistance to infection was overcome if cells were transfected to express the respective cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N for TGEV or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 for SARS-CoV. VSV pseudotypes containing the S proteins of two bat SARS-related CoV (Bg08 and Rp3 were unable to infect any of the six tested bat cell lines. By contrast, viral pseudotypes containing the surface protein GP of Marburg virus from the family Filoviridae infected all six cell lines though at different efficiency. Notably, all cells were sensitive to infection by two paramyxoviruses (Sendai virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus and three influenza viruses from different subtypes. These results indicate that bat cells are more resistant to infection by coronaviruses than to infection by paramyxoviruses, filoviruses and influenza viruses. Furthermore, these results show a receptor-dependent restriction of the infection of bat cells by CoV. The implications for the isolation of coronaviruses from bats are discussed.

  2. Identification of residues of SARS-CoV nsp1 that differentially affect inhibition of gene expression and antiviral signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Andrew R; Savalia, Dhruti; Lowry, Virginia K; Farrell, Cara M; Wathelet, Marc G

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) led to the identification of an associated coronavirus, SARS-CoV. This virus evades the host innate immune response in part through the expression of its non-structural protein (nsp) 1, which inhibits both host gene expression and virus- and interferon (IFN)-dependent signaling. Thus, nsp1 is a promising target for drugs, as inhibition of nsp1 would make SARS-CoV more susceptible to the host antiviral defenses. To gain a better understanding of nsp1 mode of action, we generated and analyzed 38 mutants of the SARS-CoV nsp1, targeting 62 solvent exposed residues out of the 180 amino acid protein. From this work, we identified six classes of mutants that abolished, attenuated or increased nsp1 inhibition of host gene expression and/or antiviral signaling. Each class of mutants clustered on SARS-CoV nsp1 surface and suggested nsp1 interacts with distinct host factors to exert its inhibitory activities. Identification of the nsp1 residues critical for its activities and the pathways involved in these activities should help in the design of drugs targeting nsp1. Significantly, several point mutants increased the inhibitory activity of nsp1, suggesting that coronaviruses could evolve a greater ability to evade the host response through mutations of such residues.

  3. Identification of a novel conserved HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope from the spike protein of SARS-CoV

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    Ni Bing

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spike (S protein is a major structural glycoprotein of coronavirus (CoV, the causal agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS. The S protein is a potent target for SARS-specific cell-mediated immune responses. However, the mechanism CoV pathogenesis in SARS and the role of special CTLs in virus clearance are still largely uncharacterized. Here, we describe a study that leads to the identification of a novel HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope from conserved regions of S protein. Results First, different SARS-CoV sequences were analyzed to predict eight candidate peptides from conserved regions of the S protein based upon HLA-A*0201 binding and proteosomal cleavage. Four of eight candidate peptides were tested by HLA-A*0201 binding assays. Among the four candidate peptides, Sp8 (S958-966, VLNDILSRL induced specific CTLs both ex vivo in PBLs of healthy HLA-A2+ donors and in HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice immunized with a plasmid encoding full-length S protein. The immunized mice released IFN-γ and lysed target cells upon stimulation with Sp8 peptide-pulsed autologous dendritic cells in comparison to other candidates. Conclusion These results suggest that Sp8 is a naturally processed epitope. We propose that Sp8 epitope should help in the characterization of mechanisms of virus control and immunopathology in SARS-CoV infection.

  4. Certainties and Uncertainties Facing Emerging Respiratory Infectious Diseases: Lessons from SARS

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    Yee-Chun Chen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Every emerging infectious disease is a challenge to the whole of mankind. There are uncertainties regarding whether there will be a pandemic, if it will be caused by the highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, when or where it will occur, how imminent or how severe it will be. No one can accurately predict if and when a given virus will become a pandemic virus. Pandemic prevention strategies must be based on preparing for the unexpected and being capable of reacting accordingly. There is growing evidence that infection control measures were helpful in containment of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS as well as avian influenza. Compliance of standard infection control measures, intensive promotion of hand and respiratory hygiene, vigilance and triage of patients with febrile illness, and specific infection control measures are key components to contain a highly contagious disease in hospital and to protect healthcare workers, patients and visitors. The importance of standard precautions for any patient and cleaning and disinfection for the healthcare environment cannot be overemphasized. SARS illustrated dramatically the potential of air travel and globalization for the dissemination of an emerging infectious disease. To prevent the potential serious consequences of pandemic influenza, timely implementation of pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical interventions locally within the outbreak area is the key to minimizing global spread. Herein, we relate our perspective on useful lessons derived from a review of the SARS epidemic that may be useful to physicians, especially when looking ahead to the next epidemic.

  5. Functional genomics highlights differential induction of antiviral pathways in the lungs of SARS-CoV-infected macaques.

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    Anna de Lang

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV is likely mediated by disproportional immune responses and the ability of the virus to circumvent innate immunity. Using functional genomics, we analyzed early host responses to SARS-CoV infection in the lungs of adolescent cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis that show lung pathology similar to that observed in human adults with SARS. Analysis of gene signatures revealed induction of a strong innate immune response characterized by the stimulation of various cytokine and chemokine genes, including interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10, which corresponds to the host response seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome. As opposed to many in vitro experiments, SARS-CoV induced a wide range of type I interferons (IFNs and nuclear translocation of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 in the lungs of macaques. Using immunohistochemistry, we revealed that these antiviral signaling pathways were differentially regulated in distinctive subsets of cells. Our studies emphasize that the induction of early IFN signaling may be critical to confer protection against SARS-CoV infection and highlight the strength of combining functional genomics with immunohistochemistry to further unravel the pathogenesis of SARS.

  6. Identification of myricetin and scutellarein as novel chemical inhibitors of the SARS coronavirus helicase, nsP13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mi-Sun; Lee, June; Lee, Jin Moo; Kim, Younggyu; Chin, Young-Won; Jee, Jun-Goo; Keum, Young-Sam; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2012-06-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious disease with a strong potential for transmission upon close personal contact and is caused by the SARS-coronavirus (CoV). However, there are no natural or synthetic compounds currently available that can inhibit SARS-CoV. We examined the inhibitory effects of 64 purified natural compounds against the activity of SARS helicase, nsP13, and the hepatitis C virus (HCV) helicase, NS3h, by conducting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based double-strand (ds) DNA unwinding assay or by using a colorimetry-based ATP hydrolysis assay. While none of the compounds, examined in our study inhibited the DNA unwinding activity or ATPase activity of human HCV helicase protein, we found that myricetin and scutellarein potently inhibit the SARS-CoV helicase protein in vitro by affecting the ATPase activity, but not the unwinding activity, nsP13. In addition, we observed that myricetin and scutellarein did not exhibit cytotoxicity against normal breast epithelial MCF10A cells. Our study demonstrates for the first time that selected naturally-occurring flavonoids, including myricetin and scultellarein might serve as SARS-CoV chemical inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. SARS-CoV ORF1b-encoded nonstructural proteins 12-16: replicative enzymes as antiviral targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Imbert, Isabelle; Ferron, François; Collet, Axelle; Coutard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) pandemic caused ten years ago by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has stimulated a number of studies on the molecular biology of coronaviruses. This research has provided significant new insight into many mechanisms used by the coronavirus replication-transcription complex (RTC). The RTC directs and coordinates processes in order to replicate and transcribe the coronavirus genome, a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA of outstanding length (∼27-32kilobases). Here, we review the up-to-date knowledge on SARS-CoV replicative enzymes encoded in the ORF1b, i.e., the main RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nsp12), the helicase/triphosphatase (nsp13), two unusual ribonucleases (nsp14, nsp15) and RNA-cap methyltransferases (nsp14, nsp16). We also review how these enzymes co-operate with other viral co-factors (nsp7, nsp8, and nsp10) to regulate their activity. These last ten years of research on SARS-CoV have considerably contributed to unravel structural and functional details of one of the most fascinating replication/transcription machineries of the RNA virus world. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Antenna motion errors in bistatic SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Yazıcı, Birsen; Cagri Yanik, H.

    2015-06-01

    Antenna trajectory or motion errors are pervasive in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. Motion errors typically result in smearing and positioning errors in SAR images. Understanding the relationship between the trajectory errors and position errors in reconstructed images is essential in forming focused SAR images. Existing studies on the effect of antenna motion errors are limited to certain geometries, trajectory error models or monostatic SAR configuration. In this paper, we present an analysis of position errors in bistatic SAR imagery due to antenna motion errors. Bistatic SAR imagery is becoming increasingly important in the context of passive imaging and multi-sensor imaging. Our analysis provides an explicit quantitative relationship between the trajectory errors and the positioning errors in bistatic SAR images. The analysis is applicable to arbitrary trajectory errors and arbitrary imaging geometries including wide apertures and large scenes. We present extensive numerical simulations to validate the analysis and to illustrate the results in commonly used bistatic configurations and certain trajectory error models.

  9. SARS - infectious disease of 21st century

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    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is an emerging viral infectious disease. According to the World Health Organization, a suspected case of SARS is defined as documented fever (temperature >38°C, lower respiratory tract symptoms, and contact with a person believed to have had SARS or history of travel to an area of documented transmission. A probable case is a suspected case with chest radiographic findings of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, or an unexplained respiratory illness resulting in death, with autopsy findings of ARDS without identifiable cause. In this article some SARS epidemiological data in Indonesia will also presented. There are 7 SARS suspected cases and 2 probable cases were registered in Indonesia on the period of 1 March to 9 July 2003, and no more cases were reported after that time. How will be SARS progression in the future will be a subject of discussion among scientist, and we will have to wait and be prepared for any development might occur. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 59-63Keywords: SARS, Case Definition, Etiology, Indonesia

  10. Synthesis of sialoglycopolypeptide for potentially blocking influenza virus infection using a rat α2,6-sialyltransferase expressed in BmNPV bacmid-injected silkworm larvae

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    Ogata Makoto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sialic acid is a deoxy uronic acid with a skeleton of nine carbons which is mostly found on cell surface in animals. This sialic acid on cell surface performs various biological functions by acting as a receptor for microorganisms, viruses, toxins, and hormones; by masking receptors; and by regulating the immune system. In order to synthesize an artificial sialoglycoprotein, we developed a large-scale production of rat α2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6Gal1. The ST6Gal1 was expressed in fifth instar silkworm larval hemolymph using recombinant both cysteine protease- and chitinase-deficient Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV-CP--Chi- bacmid. The expressed ST6Gal1 was purified, characterized and used for sialylation of asialoglycopolypeptide. We tested the inhibitory effect of the synthesized α2,6-sialoglycopolypeptide on hemagglutination by Sambucus nigra (SNA lectin. Results FLAG-tagged recombinant ST6Gal1 was expressed efficiently and purified by precipitation with ammonium sulphate followed by affinity chromatography on an anti-FLAG M2 column, generating 2.2 mg purified fusion protein from only 11 silkworm larvae, with a recovery yield of 64%. The purified ST6Gal1 was characterized and its N-glycan patterns were found to be approximately paucimannosidic type by HPLC mapping method. Fluorescently-labelled N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc glycoside containing dansyl group was synthesized chemo-enzymatically as high-sensitivity acceptor substrate for ST6Gal1. The acceptor substrate specificity of the enzyme was similar to that of rat liver ST6Gal1. The fluorescent glycoside is useful as a substrate for a highly sensitive picomole assay of ST6Gal1. Asialoglycopolypeptide was regioselectively and quantitatively sialylated by catalytic reaction at the terminal Gal residue to obtain α2,6-sialoglycopolypeptide using ST6Gal1. The α2,6-sialoglycopolypeptide selectively inhibited hemagglutination induced by Sambucus nigra (SNA lectin

  11. Cell-to-cell movement of Potato virus X: the role of p12 and p8 encoded by the second and third open reading frames of the triple gene block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, A; Meshi, T

    2001-10-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) requires three proteins, p25, p12, and p8, encoded by the triple gene block plus the coat protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement. When each of these proteins was co-expressed with a cytosolic green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana by the microprojectile bombardment-mediated gene delivery method, only p12 enhanced diffusion of co-expressed GFP, indicating an ability to alter plasmodesmal permeability. p25, p12, and CP, expressed transiently in the initially infected cells, transcomplemented the corresponding movement-defective mutants to spread through two or more cell boundaries. Thus, these proteins probably move from cell to cell with the genomic RNA. In contrast, p8 only functioned intracellularly and was not absolutely required for cell-to-cell movement. Since overexpression of p12 overcame the p8 deficiency, p8 appears to facilitate the functioning of p12, presumably by mediating its intracellular trafficking. Considering the likelihood that p12 and p8 are membrane proteins, it is suggested that intercellular as well as intracellular movement of PVX involves a membrane-mediated process.

  12. Land Subsidence Monitoring Using PS-InSAR Technique for L-Band SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, S.; Chatterjee, R. S.; Singh, K. B.; Kumar, D.

    2016-10-01

    Differential SAR-Interferometry (D-InSAR) is one of the potential source to measure land surface motion induced due to underground coal mining. However, this technique has many limitation such as atmospheric in homogeneities, spatial de-correlation, and temporal decorrelation. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry synthetic aperture radar (PS-InSAR) belongs to a family of time series InSAR technique, which utilizes the properties of some of the stable natural and anthropogenic targets which remain coherent over long time period. In this study PS-InSAR technique has been used to monitor land subsidence over selected location of Jharia Coal field which has been correlated with the ground levelling measurement. This time series deformation observed using PS InSAR helped us to understand the nature of the ground surface deformation due to underground mining activity.

  13. Offshore wind mapping Mediterranean area using SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaudi, Rosamaria; Arena, Felice; Badger, Merete;

    2013-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ocean surface, for example from Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR), provide information about the spatial wind variability over large areas. This is of special interest in the Mediterranean Sea, where spatial wind information is only provided by sparse buoys, often...... with long periods of missing data. Here, we focus on evaluating the use of SAR for offshore wind mapping. Preliminary results from the analysis of SAR-based ocean winds in Mediterranean areas show interesting large scale wind flow features consistent with results from previous studies using numerical models...

  14. SAR ATR Based on Convolutional Neural Network

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    Tian Zhuangzhuang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new method of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR image target recognition based on a convolutional neural network. First, we introduce a class separability measure into the cost function to improve this network’s ability to distinguish between categories. Then, we extract SAR image features using the improved convolutional neural network and classify these features using a support vector machine. Experimental results using moving and stationary target acquisition and recognition SAR datasets prove the validity of this method.

  15. Geologic mapping in Greenland with polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Madsen, Søren Nørvang; Brooks, C. K.

    1995-01-01

    The application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for geologic mapping in Greenland is investigated by the Danish Center for Remote Sensing (DCRS) in co-operation with the Danish Lithosphere Centre (DLC). In 1994 a pilot project was conducted in East Greenland. The Danish airborne SAR, EMISAR......, acquired fully polarimetric C-band data which, upon processing and calibration, was interpreted jointly by DCRS and DLC. Several geologic phenomena are readily identified in the SAR imagery, while different lithologies seem to be indistinguishable because they have similar geomorphologies. The geologic...

  16. Analysis of Resolution of Bistatic SAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the spatial resolutions at different directions of bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BiSAR) have been derived from the ambiguity function. Compared with monostatic signal to noise ratio, BiSAR's resolutions of a fixed point target are varying with slow time since BiSAR system is space-variant. Constraints for the assumption of space-invariant bistatic topology are proposed in the paper. Moreover, under the assumption of invariance, the change of resolutions at different point in the image scene is taken into account, and we have specified two key parameters that affect resolutions directly and analyzed the way how they influence on the resolutions.

  17. Geometric calibration of ERS satellite SAR images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2001-01-01

    Geometric calibration of the European Remote Sensing (ERS) Satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) slant range images is important in relation to mapping areas without ground reference points and also in relation to automated processing. The relevant SAR system parameters are discussed...... on a seven-year ERS-1 and a four-year ERS-2 time series, the long term stability is found to be sufficient to allow a single calibration covering the entire mission period. A descending and an ascending orbit tandem pair of the ESA calibration site on Flevoland, suitable for calibration of ERS SAR processors...

  18. SAR observations of coastal zone conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, G. A.; Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology to the observation of coastal zones phenomena are detailed. The conditions observed include gravity wave detection, surf zone location, surface currents, and long-period 'surf beats'. Algorithms have been developed and successfully tested that determine significant wave and current parameters from the sea surface backscatter of microwave energy. Doppler information from the SAR optical correlator allows a rough estimation of near shore surface flow velocities that has been found in agreement with both theory and in situ observations as well. Seasat SAR data of the Scotland and North Carolina coasts are considered, as well as the results of bathymetric updating of coastal area charts.

  19. Stability of SARS Coronavirus in Human Specimens and Environment and Its Sensitivity to Heating and UV Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU-MING DUAN; XIAO-PING DONG; SARS RESEARCH TEAM; XIN-SHENG ZHAO; RUI-FU WEN; JING-JING HUANG; GUO-HUA PI; SU-XIANG ZHANG; JUN HAN; SHENG-LI BI; LI RUAN

    2003-01-01

    The causal agent for SARS is considered as a novel coronavirus that has never been described both in human and animals previously. The stability of SARS coronavirus in human specimens and in environments was studied. Methods Using a SARS coronavirus strain CoV-P9,which was isolated from pharyngeal swab of a probable SARS case in Beijing, its stability in mimic human specimens and in mimic environment including surfaces of commonly used materials or in household conditions, as well as its resistances to temperature and UV irradiation were analyzed. A total of 106 TCID50 viruses were placed in each tested condition, and changes of the viral infectivity in samples after treatments were measured by evaluating cytopathic effect (CPE) in cell line Vero-E6 at 48 h after infectionn. Results The results showed that SARS coronavirus in the testing condition could survive in serum, 1:20 diluted sputum and feces for at least 96 h, whereas it could remain alive in urine for at least 72 h with a low level of infectivity. The survival abilities on the surfaces of eight different materials and in water were quite comparable, revealing reduction of infectivity after 72 to 96 h exposure. Viruses stayed stable at 4℃, at room temperature (20℃) and at 37℃ for at least 2 h without remarkable change in the infectious ability in cells, but were convened to be non-infectious after 90-, 60- and 30-min exposure at 56℃, at 67℃ and at 75℃, respectively. Irradiation of UV for 60 min on the virus in culture medium resulted in the destruction of viral infectivity at an undetectable level. Conclusion The survival ability of SARS coronavirus in human specimens and in environments seems to be relatively strong. Heating and UV irradiation can efficiently eliminate the viral infectivity.

  20. Bistatic Experiment Using TerraSAR-X and DLR’s new F-SAR System

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, Stefan; Rodriguez-Cassolà, Marc; Nottensteiner, Anton; Horn, Ralf; Scheiber, Rolf; Steinbrecher, Ulrich; Metzig, Robert; Limbach, Markus; Mittermayer, Josef; Krieger, Gerhard; Moreira, Alberto; Schwerdt, Marco

    2008-01-01

    A bistatic X-band experiment was successfully performed early November 2007. TerraSAR-X was used as transmitter and DLR’s new airborne radar system F-SAR, which was programmed to acquire data in a quasi-continuous mode to avoid echo window synchronization issues, was used as bistatic receiver. Precise phase and time referencing between both systems, which is essential for obtaining high resolution SAR images, was derived during the bistatic processing. Hardware setup and performance analyses ...

  1. SAR-SIFT: A SIFT-LIKE ALGORITHM FOR SAR IMAGES

    OpenAIRE

    Dellinger, Flora; Delon, Julie; Gousseau, Yann; Michel, Julien; Tupin, Florence

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm is widely used in computer vision to match features between images or to localize and recognize objets. However, mostly because of speckle noise, it does not perform well on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. We present here an improvement of this algorithm for SAR images, named SAR-SIFT. A new gradient computation, yielding an orientation and a magnitude robust to speckle noise, is first introduced. It is then...

  2. GRECO-SAR: An Orbital Polarimetric SAR Simulator of Deterministic Complex Targets for Vessel Classification Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Margarit Martín, Gerard; Mallorquí Franquet, Jordi Joan; Rius Casals, Juan Manuel; Sanz Marcos, Jesús

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) simulator that is able to generate polarimetric SAR (POLSAR) and polarimetric inverse SAR data of complex targets. It solves the electromagnetic problem via high-frequency approximations, such as physical optics and the physical theory of diffraction, with notable computational efficiency. In principle, any orbital monostatic sensor working at any band, resolution, and operating mode can be modeled. To make simulations more realistic, the t...

  3. SARS-A Worldwide Threat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜保华

    2003-01-01

    所谓SARS,即严重急性呼吸道综合症,是一种传染力很强的呼吸道疾病。这种新的疾病最先由世界卫生组织医生Carlo Urbani博士确诊,患者是一位48岁的商人,后来因该病而死亡。Urbani医生本人也因感染该病而于2003年3月29日去世,死时年仅46岁。在此期间,SARS开始蔓延。自SARS发现后的一个半月里,全球已有数千人被感染。

  4. Atmosphere Observations by Geosynchronous SARs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti guarnieri, Andrea; Rocca, Fabio; Wadge, Geoff; Schulz, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    We analyze different geosynchronous Synthetic Aperture RADAR concepts aimed to get both tropospheric and ionospheric delay maps with a revisit time of minutes and sub-continental coverage. Such products could be used either to compensate the delay in LEO-SAR missions and GNSS, or to generate integrated water-vapor maps to be used for Numerical Weather Forecast. The system exploits the principle of RADAR location, by transmitting a pulse with a suitable bandwidth, and the residual non-zero eccentricity of COMmunication SATellites. Different concepts are proposed as payload in COMSAT, or constellations of small satellites, that is monostatic or bistatic/multistatic RADARS. The selection of the best frequency, from L to Ku, and the analysis of performances is presented.

  5. Forward-looking three dimensional imaging technique for InSAR mounted on ground vehicles%车载 InSAR 前视三维成像技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建; 李杨寰; 张汉华; 陆必应; 宋千; 周智敏

    2014-01-01

    It is a difficult task for an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV)to sense obstacles in out fields or unstructured environments.Because the height information is a vital feature to boost the performance of obstacle discrimination,the three-dimensional imaging technique for sensing obstacles ahead UGV of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)was presented.The basic signal process flow of InSAR was reviewed. Special factors of the UGV platform that impact the digital elevation model (DEM)measurement precision were analyzed,such as the baseline length,platform motion errors.The DEMof a partial sight-blocked obstacle scene was obtained by processing the three-dimensional InSAR image, which proved the feasibility of applying InSAR to obstacle sensing of UGV.%野外和非结构化环境下的障碍探测是无人驾驶车(UGV)环境感知的难题之一。基于高度识别障碍是一种有效的解决途径,提出了干涉合成孔径雷达(InSAR)的三维障碍物成像策略,研究了 InSAR 信息处理流程,分析了干涉基线和运动误差对车载 InSAR 高程测量精度的影响,仿真了无人车前场景存在遮挡时的 InSAR 高程测量,证明了 InSAR 用于 UGV 前方环境感知的可行性。

  6. Advanced Antenna for Digital Beamforming SAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a wideband (500 MHz) L-band phased-array antenna for airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) applications based on a novel approach that will make possible...

  7. Introduction to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    18 m L RADARSAT 1995 10 m × 9 m C ENVISAT 2002 25 m × 25 m C TerraSAR-X 2006 < 1 m × 1 m X Radarsat II 2005 3 m × 3 m C SAR-Lupe 2005 < 1 m...1 m X IGS-2b 2008 30 cm × 30 cm X Airborne SAR DOSAR 1989 < 1 m × 1 m S,C,X,Ka CARABAS- II 1997 3 m × 3 m VHF PAMIR 2003 10 cm × 10 cm X...Lynx 1999 10 cm × 10 cm Ku MISAR 2003 0.5 m × 0.5 m Ka RAMSES 1994 10 cm × 10 cm P,L,S,C,X,Ku,Ka,W MEMPHIS 1997 20 cm × 20 cm Ka,W E-SAR 1994 1.5

  8. Ionosphere correction algorithm for spaceborne SAR imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Yang; Mengdao Xing; Guangcai Sun

    2016-01-01

    For spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) ima-ging, the dispersive ionosphere has significant effects on the pro-pagation of the low frequency (especial y P-band) radar signal. The ionospheric effects can be a significant source of the phase error in the radar signal, which causes a degeneration of the image quality in spaceborne SAR imaging system. The background ionospheric effects on spaceborne SAR through modeling and simulation are analyzed, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis based on the spatio-temporal variability of the ionosphere is given. A novel ionosphere correction algorithm (ICA) is proposed to deal with the ionospheric effects on the low frequency spaceborne SAR radar signal. With the proposed algorithm, the degradation of the image quality caused by the ionosphere is corrected. The simulation re-sults show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Evaluation in Mangroves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Kuk; Fatoyinbo,Temilola; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    TanDEM-X (TDX) enables to generate an interferometric coherence without temporal decorrelation effect that is the most critical factor for a successful Pol-InSAR inversion, as have recently been used for forest parameter retrieval. This paper presents mangrove forest height estimation only using single-pass/single-baseline/dual-polarization TDX data by means of new dual-Pol-InSAR inversion technique. To overcome a lack of one polarization in a conventional Pol- InSAR inversion (i.e. an underdetermined problem), the ground phase in the Pol-InSAR model is directly estimated from TDX interferograms assuming flat underlying topography in mangrove forest. The inversion result is validated against lidar measurement data (NASA's G-LiHT data).

  10. Progress in Circular SAR Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Circular SAR (CSAR is a newly developed all-directional high resolution 3D imaging mode in recent years, to satisfy the demand of finer observation. The National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Microwave Imaging, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (MITL, IECAS, had the first test flight experiment in Aug. 2011 with a P-band full polarization SAR system, and successfully obtained the all-directional high resolution circular SAR image. The initial results show that CSAR technique has the encouraging potential capability in the fields of high precision mapping, disaster evaluation, resource management and the other related applications. This paper firstly makes a detailed discussion on the progress of circular SAR imaging technique, which emphases on the several airborne experiments performed these years to show CSAR’s attractive features, then studies and illustrates the key techniques, and finally discusses the development trends.

  11. Cross-calibration of interferometric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Generation of digital elevation models from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data is a well established technique. Achieving a high geometric fidelity calls for a calibration accounting for inaccurate navigation data and system parameters as well as system imperfections. Fully...

  12. Optimal Approach to SAR Image Despeckling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Speckle filtering of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images while preserving the spatial signal variability (texture and fine structures) still remains a challenge. Many algorithms have been proposed for the SAR imagery despeckling. However,simulated annealing (SA) method is one of excellent choices currently. A critical problem in the study on SA is to provide appropriate cooling schedules that ensure fast convergence to near-optimal solutions. This paper gives a new necessary and sufficient condition for the cooling schedule so that the algorithm state converges in all probability to the set of globally minimum cost states.Moreover, it constructs an appropriate objective function for SAR image despeckling. An experimental result of the actual SAR image processing is obtained.

  13. Satellite sar detection of hurricane helene (2006)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ju, Lian; Cheng, Yongcun; Xu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the wind structure of hurricane Helene (2006) over the Atlantic Ocean is investigated from a C-band RADARSAT-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image acquired on 20 September 2006. First, the characteristics, e.g., the center, scale and area of the hurricane eye (HE) are determined....... There is a good agreement between the SAR-estimated HE center location and the best track data from the National Hurricane Center. The wind speeds at 10 m above the ocean surface are also retrieved from the SAR data using the geophysical model function (GMF), CMOD5, and compared with in situ wind speed...... observations from the stepped frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR) on NOAA P3 aircraft. All the results show the capability of hurricane monitoring by satellite SAR. Copyright © 2013 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE)....

  14. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus ORF8 Protein Is Acquired from SARS-Related Coronavirus from Greater Horseshoe Bats through Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K P; Feng, Yun; Chen, Honglin; Luk, Hayes K H; Yang, Wei-Hong; Li, Kenneth S M; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Huang, Yi; Song, Zhi-Zhong; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Ahmed, Syed Shakeel; Yeung, Hazel C; Lam, Carol S F; Cai, Jian-Piao; Wong, Samson S Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-01

    originated from SARSr-CoVs of greater horseshoe bats through recombination, which may be important for animal-to-human transmission. Although horseshoe bats are the primary reservoir of SARS-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoVs), it is still unclear how these bat viruses have evolved to cross the species barrier to infect civets and humans. Most human SARS-CoV epidemic strains contain a signature 29-nucleotide deletion in ORF8, compared to civet SARSr-CoVs, suggesting that ORF8 may be important for interspecies transmission. However, the origin of SARS-CoV ORF8 remains obscure. In particular, SARSr-Rs-BatCoVs from Chinese horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus sinicus) exhibited SARS-CoV in the ORF8 protein. We detected diverse alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses among various bat species in Yunnan, China, including two SARSr-Rf-BatCoVs from greater horseshoe bats that possessed ORF8 proteins with exceptionally high amino acid identities to that of human/civet SARSr-CoVs. We demonstrated recombination events around ORF8 between SARSr-Rf-BatCoVs and SARSr-Rs-BatCoVs, leading to the generation of civet SARSr-CoVs. Our findings offer insight into the evolutionary origin of SARS-CoV ORF8 protein, which was likely acquired from SARSr-CoVs of greater horseshoe bats through recombination. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. On Bistatic Forward-looking SAR Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Viet Thuy; Pettersson, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Left/right ambiguity and low angular (azimuth) resolution are severe problems for monostatic forward-looking SAR imaging. It is strongly believed that these technical issues can definitely be solved with bistatic forward-looking SAR. The analysis presented in this paper points out that the left/right ambiguity problem still exits. However, an appropriate selection of the position of bistatic base line and antenna beamwidth allows us to conceal it. The paper also gives some recommendations whi...

  16. SARS-coronavirus replication is supported by a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kèvin Knoops

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses, a large group including human pathogens such as SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, replicate in the cytoplasm of infected host cells. Their replication complexes are commonly associated with modified host cell membranes. Membrane structures supporting viral RNA synthesis range from distinct spherular membrane invaginations to more elaborate webs of packed membranes and vesicles. Generally, their ultrastructure, morphogenesis, and exact role in viral replication remain to be defined. Poorly characterized double-membrane vesicles (DMVs were previously implicated in SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. We have now applied electron tomography of cryofixed infected cells for the three-dimensional imaging of coronavirus-induced membrane alterations at high resolution. Our analysis defines a unique reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum that integrates convoluted membranes, numerous interconnected DMVs (diameter 200-300 nm, and "vesicle packets" apparently arising from DMV merger. The convoluted membranes were most abundantly immunolabeled for viral replicase subunits. However, double-stranded RNA, presumably revealing the site of viral RNA synthesis, mainly localized to the DMV interior. Since we could not discern a connection between DMV interior and cytosol, our analysis raises several questions about the mechanism of DMV formation and the actual site of SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. Our data document the extensive virus-induced reorganization of host cell membranes into a network that is used to organize viral replication and possibly hide replicating RNA from antiviral defense mechanisms. Together with biochemical studies of the viral enzyme complex, our ultrastructural description of this "replication network" will aid to further dissect the early stages of the coronavirus life cycle and its virus-host interactions.

  17. SARS: Key factors in crisis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsin-Chao; Chen, Thai-Form; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted at a single hospital selected in Taipei during the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak from March to July, 2003 in Taiwan. During this period of time, 104 SARS patients were admitted to the hospital. There were no negative reports related to the selected hospital despite its being located right in the center of an area struck by the epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors enabling the hospital to survive SARS unscathed. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with the nursing directors and nursing managers of the SARS units, along with a review of relevant hospital documents. The five key elements identified as survival factors during this SARS crisis are as follows: 1. good control of timing for crisis management, 2. careful decision-making, 3. thorough implementation, 4. effective communication, and 5. trust between management and employees. The results of this study reconfirmed the selected hospital as a model for good crisis management during the SARS epidemic.

  18. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Ebola virus and Marburg virus By Mayo Clinic Staff Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic ... Africa, where sporadic outbreaks have occurred for decades. Ebola virus and Marburg virus live in animal hosts, ...

  19. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that ... Africa, where sporadic outbreaks have occurred for decades. Ebola virus and Marburg virus live in animal hosts, ...

  20. In-pixel conversion with a 10 bit SAR ADC for next generation X-ray FELs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodola, L., E-mail: luca.lodola01@universitadipavia.it [Università degli Studi di Pavia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Batignani, G. [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Benkechkache, M.A. [TIFPA INFN, I-38123 Trento (Italy); University Constantine 1, Department of Electronics in the Science and Technology Faculty, I-25017 Constantine (Algeria); Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G. [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Comotti, D. [Università degli Studi di Pavia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.F. [Università di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, I-38123 Trento (Italy); TIFPA INFN, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Fabris, L. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Università di Bergamo, Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienze Applicate, I-24044 Dalmine (Italy); Forti, F. [Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Grassi, M. [Università degli Studi di Pavia, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale e dell' Informazione, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Latreche, S. [University Constantine 1, Department of Electronics in the Science and Technology Faculty, I-25017 Constantine (Algeria); and others

    2016-07-11

    This work presents the design of an interleaved Successive Approximation Register (SAR) ADC, part of the readout channel for the PixFEL detector. The PixFEL project aims at substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in the field of 2D X-ray imaging for applications at the next generation Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. For this purpose, the collaboration is developing the fundamental microelectronic building blocks for the readout channel. This work focuses on the design of the ADC carried out in a 65 nm CMOS technology. To obtain a good tradeoff between power consumption, conversion speed and area occupation, an interleaved SAR ADC architecture was adopted.

  1. In-pixel conversion with a 10 bit SAR ADC for next generation X-ray FELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodola, L.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Latreche, S.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the design of an interleaved Successive Approximation Register (SAR) ADC, part of the readout channel for the PixFEL detector. The PixFEL project aims at substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in the field of 2D X-ray imaging for applications at the next generation Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. For this purpose, the collaboration is developing the fundamental microelectronic building blocks for the readout channel. This work focuses on the design of the ADC carried out in a 65 nm CMOS technology. To obtain a good tradeoff between power consumption, conversion speed and area occupation, an interleaved SAR ADC architecture was adopted.

  2. Extracts of medicinal herb Sanguisorba officinalis inhibit the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jianguo; Chen, Jianping; Tan, Zhiwu; Peng, Jie; Zheng, Xiao; Nishiura, Kenji; Ng, Jenny; Wang, Zhiyu; Wang, Dongmei; Chen, Zhiwei; Liu, Li

    2013-12-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been successful in reducing HIV-1-associated morbidity and mortality since its introduction in 1996. It, however, fails to eradicate HIV-1 infection thoroughly. The high cost of life-long HAART and the emergence of drug resistance among HIV-1-infected individuals have brought renewed pressure for the discovery of novel antivirals and alternative medicines. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is one of the mainstreams of complementary and alternative medicine, and serves as rich resources for new drug development. Despite almost 100 plant-derived compounds are in clinical trials, few target HIV-1 infection. In this study, we discovered that extract of Sanguisorba officinalis (SOE) has anti-HIV-1 activities. Using a cell-based assay and single-cycle luciferase reporter viruses pseudotyped with envelopes from HIV-1 or control viruses, we found that SOE exhibited significant inhibitory ability against both CCR5 and CXCR4 tropic HIV-1 (ADA and HXB2) with respective IC50 values of 1.91±0.16 μg/ml and 3.70±0.53 μg/ml. Interestingly, SOE also inhibited SIV infection but failed to block vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), SARS-CoV and influeunza H5N1 pseudoviruses. Furthermore, we showed that SOE had no effects on post-entry events of HIV-1 replication. It blocked entry by acting on viral envelope directly because SOE pre-treatment with the virus but not with cell lines expressing viral receptors showed the maximal inhibitory activity. In addition, SOE was able to inhibit reverse-transcription-inhibitor-resistant viruses (K103N, Y188L, and K103N/Y188L/G190A) and a protease-inhibitor-resistant strain (PI-2840). Our findings demonstrated SOE as a novel and specific entry inhibitor, which shed lights on the discovery of anti-HIV-1 drugs from traditional herbal medicines.

  3. FPGA Implementation of a SAR Two-dimensional Autofocus Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Jiangzhe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For real-time autofocus of defocused images produced by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR, the twodimensional autofocus approach proposed in this study is used to correct the residual range cell migration and compensate for the phase error. Next, a block-wise Phase Gradient Autofocus (PGA is used to correct the space-variant phase error. The Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA design procedures, resource utilization, processing speed, accuracy, and autofocus are discussed in detail. The system is able to autofocus an 8K × 8K complex image with single precision within 5.7 s when the FPGA works at 200 MHz. The processing of the measured data verifies the effectiveness and real-time capability of the proposed method.

  4. SARS-unique fold in the Rousettus bat coronavirus HKU9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Robert G; Tan, Xuan; Johnson, Margaret A

    2017-09-01

    The coronavirus nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) is a multifunctional protein that comprises multiple structural domains. This protein assists viral polyprotein cleavage, host immune interference, and may play other roles in genome replication or transcription. Here, we report the solution NMR structure of a protein from the "SARS-unique region" of the bat coronavirus HKU9. The protein contains a frataxin fold or double-wing motif, which is an α + β fold that is associated with protein/protein interactions, DNA binding, and metal ion binding. High structural similarity to the human severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus nsp3 is present. A possible functional site that is conserved among some betacoronaviruses has been identified using bioinformatics and biochemical analyses. This structure provides strong experimental support for the recent proposal advanced by us and others that the "SARS-unique" region is not unique to the human SARS virus, but is conserved among several different phylogenetic groups of coronaviruses and provides essential functions. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  5. SAR-PC: Edge Detection in SAR Images via an Advanced Phase Congruency Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuming Xiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Edge detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images has been a challenging task due to the speckle noise. Ratio-based edge detectors are robust operators for SAR images that provide constant false alarm rates, but they are only optimal for step edges. Edge detectors developed by the phase congruency model provide the identification of different types of edge features, but they suffer from speckle noise. By combining the advantages of the two edge detectors, we propose a SAR phase congruency detector (SAR-PC. Firstly, an improved local energy model for SAR images is obtained by replacing the convolution of raw image and the quadrature filters by the ratio responses. Secondly, a new noise level is estimated for the multiplicative noise. Substituting the SAR local energy and the new noise level into the phase congruency model, SAR-PC is derived. Edge response corresponds to the max moment of SAR-PC. We compare the proposed detector with the ratio-based edge detectors and the phase congruency edge detectors. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves and visual effects are used to evaluate the performance. Experimental results of simulated images and real-world images show that the proposed edge detector is robust to speckle noise and it provides a consecutive edge response.

  6. Online Health Education on SARS to University Students during the SARS Outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mee Lian; Koh, David; Iyer, Prasad; Seow, Adeline; Goh, Lee Gan; Chia, Sin Eng; Lim, Meng Kin; Ng, Daniel; Ong, Choon Nam; Phua, Kai Hong; Tambyah, Paul; Chow, Vincent T K; Chew, Suok Kai; Chandran, Ravi; Lee, Hin Peng

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how online learning may be used to disseminate health information rapidly and widely to large university populations if there is an infectious disease outbreak. During the SARS outbreak in Singapore in 2003, a six-lesson elearning module on SARS was developed for a large university population of 32,000 students. The module…

  7. Synthetic SAR Image Generation using Sensor, Terrain and Target Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Anders; Abulaitijiang, Adili; Dall, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    A tool to generate synthetic SAR images of objects set on a clutter background is described. The purpose is to generate images for training Automatic Target Recognition and Identification algorithms. The tool employs a commercial electromagnetic simulation program to calculate radar cross sections...... of the object using a CAD-model. The raw measurements are input to a SAR system and terrain model, which models thermal noise, terrain clutter, and SAR focusing to produce synthetic SAR images. Examples of SAR images at 0.3m and 0.1m resolution, and a comparison with real SAR imagery from the MSTAR dataset...

  8. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S protein is necessary for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and cell-cell fusion but not interaction with M protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Corrin E.; Machamer, Carolyn E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that generally cause mild disease in humans. However, the recently emerged coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) is the most pathogenic human coronavirus discovered to date. The SARS-CoV spike (S) protein mediates virus entry by binding cellular receptors and inducing fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane. Coronavirus S proteins are palmitoylated, which may affect function. Here, we created a non-palmitoylated SARS-CoV S protein by mutating all nine cytoplasmic cysteine residues. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S was required for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and for cell-cell fusion. Surprisingly, however, palmitoylation of S was not required for interaction with SARS-CoV M protein. This contrasts with the requirement for palmitoylation of mouse hepatitis virus S protein for interaction with M protein, and may point to important differences in assembly and infectivity of these two coronaviruses. PMID:20580052

  9. Multiresolution analysis of SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The 'Multiresolution Analysis of SAR Data' program supported research work in five areas. Geometric hashing theory can now be viewed as a Bayesian approach to object recognition. False alarm rates can be greatly reduced by using certain enhancements and modifications developed under this project. Geometric hashing algorithms now exist for the Connection Machine. Recognition of synthetically-produced dot arrays was demonstrated using a model base of 1024 objects. The work represents a substantial advance over existing model-based vision capabilities. Algorithms were developed for determining the translation and rotation of a sensor given only the image flow field data. These are new algorithms, and are much more stable than existing computer vision algorithms for this task. The algorithms might provide independent verification of gyroscopic data, or might be used to compute relative motion with respect to a moving scene object, or may be useful for motion-based segmentation. Our theories explaining the Dempster/Shafer calculus and developing new uncertainty reasoning calculi were extended, and presented at a conference and were incorporated into the Bayesian interpretation of geometric hashing. 'Wavelet Slice Theorem' was developed in several different versions, any of which yields an alternate approach to image formation. The result may well provide a more stable approach to image formation than the standard Fourier-based projection slide theorem, since interpolation of unknown spectra values is better-founded.

  10. Performance evaluation of SAR/GMTI algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Wendy; Pierson, William; Mcginnis, Ryan; Majumder, Uttam; Minardi, Michael; Sobota, David

    2016-05-01

    There is a history and understanding of exploiting moving targets within ground moving target indicator (GMTI) data, including methods for modeling performance. However, many assumptions valid for GMTI processing are invalid for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. For example, traditional GMTI processing assumes targets are exo-clutter and a system that uses a GMTI waveform, i.e. low bandwidth (BW) and low pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Conversely, SAR imagery is typically formed to focus data at zero Doppler and requires high BW and high PRF. Therefore, many of the techniques used in performance estimation of GMTI systems are not valid for SAR data. However, as demonstrated by papers in the recent literature,1-11 there is interest in exploiting moving targets within SAR data. The techniques employed vary widely, including filter banks to form images at multiple Dopplers, performing smear detection, and attempting to address the issue through waveform design. The above work validates the need for moving target exploitation in SAR data, but it does not represent a theory allowing for the prediction or bounding of performance. This work develops an approach to estimate and/or bound performance for moving target exploitation specific to SAR data. Synthetic SAR data is generated across a range of sensor, environment, and target parameters to test the exploitation algorithms under specific conditions. This provides a design tool allowing radar systems to be tuned for specific moving target exploitation applications. In summary, we derive a set of rules that bound the performance of specific moving target exploitation algorithms under variable operating conditions.

  11. Identification of an HLA-A* 0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitope SSp-1 of SARS-CoV spike protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang B; Yu Y; Wang X; Yang R; Cao X; Chen H; Jiang X; Zhang M; Wan T; Li N; Zhou X; Wu Y; Yang F

    2004-01-01

    A novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV), has been identified as the causal agent of SARS. Spike (S) protein is a major structural glycoprotein of the SARS virus and a potential target for SARS-specific cell-mediated immune responses. A panel of S protein-derived peptides was tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A * 0201 molecules. Peptides with high affinity for HLA-A * 0201 were then assessed for their capacity to elicit specific immune responses mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) both in vivo, in HLA-A2. 1/Kb transgenic mice, and in vitro, from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) harvested from healthy HLA-A2.1 + donors. SARS-CoV protein-derived peptide-1 (SSp-1 RLNEVAKNL), induced peptide-specific CTLs both in vivo (transgenic mice) and in vitro (human PBLs), which specifically released interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) upon stimulation with SSp-1-pulsed autologous dendritic cells (DCs) or T2 cells. SSp-1-specific CTLs also lysed major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched tumor cell lines engineered to express S proteins. HLA-A * 0201-SSp-1 tetramer staining revealed the presence of significant populations of SSp-1-specific CTLs in SSp-1-induced CD8+ T cells. We propose that the newly identified epitope SSp-1 will help in the characterization of virus control mechanisms and immunopathology in SARS-CoV infection, and may be relevant to the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for SARS.

  12. Hydrodynamics of the groundwater-fed Sian Ka'an Wetlands, Mexico, From InSAR and SAR Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondwe, Bibi Ruth Neuman; Hong, S.; Wdowinski, S.

    2008-01-01

    to understand, quantify and predict the wetland dynamics. Remotely sensed Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data offer new opportunities to get hydrodynamic information, which is useful for wetland management. InSAR data produces temporal phase......-changes of the backscattered radar signal, which can be related to the water level changes in vegetated wetlands. SAR data reveals information of surface properties such as the degree of flooding through the amplitude of the backscattered signal. We used RADARSAT-1 InSAR and SAR data to form 36 interferograms and 13 flooding...

  13. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  14. A new implementation of full resolution SBAS-DInSAR processing chain for the effective monitoring of structures and infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonano, Manuela; Buonanno, Sabatino; Ojha, Chandrakanta; Berardino, Paolo; Lanari, Riccardo; Zeni, Giovanni; Manunta, Michele

    2017-04-01

    memory. Moreover, in some processing steps very heavy from the computational point of view, the Graphical Processing Units (GPU) are exploited for the processing of blocks working on a pixel-by-pixel basis, requiring strong modifications on some key parts of the sequential full resolution SBAS-DInSAR processing chain. GPU processing is implemented by efficiently exploiting parallel processing architectures (as CUDA) for increasing the computing performances, in terms of optimization of the available GPU memory, as well as reduction of the Input/Output operations on the GPU and of the whole processing time for specific blocks w.r.t. the corresponding sequential implementation, particularly critical in presence of huge DInSAR datasets. Moreover, to efficiently handle the massive amount of DInSAR measurements provided by the new generation SAR constellations (CSK and Sentinel-1), we perform a proper re-design strategy aimed at the robust assimilation of the full resolution SBAS-DInSAR results into the web-based Geonode platform of the Spatial Data Infrastructure, thus allowing the efficient management, analysis and integration of the interferometric results with different data sources.

  15. The impact of SARS on hospital performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ran-Chou

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the SARS epidemic, healthcare utilization and medical services decreased significantly. However, the long-term impact of SARS on hospital performance needs to be further discussed. Methods A municipal hospital in Taipei City was shut down for a month due to SARS and then became the designated SARS and infectious disease hospital for the city. This study collected the outpatient, inpatient and emergency service volumes for every year from April to March over four years. Average monthly service amount ± standard deviation were used to compare patient volume for the whole hospital, as well as the outpatient numbers accessing different departments. The ARIMA model of outpatient volume in the pre-SARS year was developed. Results The average monthly service volume of outpatient visits for the base year 2002 was 52317 ± 4204 visits per month, and number for 2003 and the following two years were 55%, 82% and 84% of the base year respectively. The average emergency service volume was 4382 ± 356 visits per month at the base year and this became 45%, 77% and 87% of the base year for the following three years respectively. Average inpatient service volume was 8520 ± 909 inpatient days per month at the base year becoming 43%, 81% and 87% of the base year for the following three years respectively. Only the emergency service volume had recovered to the level of a non-significant difference at the second year after SARS. In addition, the departments of family medicine, metabolism and nephrology reached the 2002 patient number in 2003. The ARIMA (2,1,0 model was the most suitable for outpatient volume in pre-SARS year. The MAPE of the ARIMA (2,1,0 model for the pre-SARS year was 6.9%, and 43.2%, 10.6%, 6.2% for following 3 years. Conclusion This study demonstrates that if a hospital is completely shut down due to SARS or a similar disease, the impact is longer than previous reported and different departments may experience

  16. Possible SARS coronavirus transmission during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Michael D; Loutfy, Mona; McDonald, L Clifford; Martinez, Kennth F; Ofner, Mariana; Wong, Tom; Wallington, Tamara; Gold, Wayne L; Mederski, Barbara; Green, Karen; Low, Donald E

    2004-02-01

    Infection of healthcare workers with the severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is thought to occur primarily by either contact or large respiratory droplet transmission. However, infrequent healthcare worker infections occurred despite the use of contact and droplet precautions, particularly during certain aerosol-generating medical procedures. We investigated a possible cluster of SARS-CoV infections in healthcare workers who used contact and droplet precautions during attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation of a SARS patient. Unlike previously reported instances of transmission during aerosol-generating procedures, the index case-patient was unresponsive, and the intubation procedure was performed quickly and without difficulty. However, before intubation, the patient was ventilated with a bag-valve-mask that may have contributed to aerosolization of SARS-CoV. On the basis of the results of this investigation and previous reports of SARS transmission during aerosol-generating procedures, a systematic approach to the problem is outlined, including the use of the following: 1) administrative controls, 2) environmental engineering controls, 3) personal protective equipment, and 4) quality control.

  17. Representations of SARS in the British newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washer, Peter

    2004-12-01

    In the Spring of 2003, there was a huge interest in the global news media following the emergence of a new infectious disease: severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This study examines how this novel disease threat was depicted in the UK newspapers, using social representations theory and in particular existing work on social representations of HIV/AIDS and Ebola to analyse the meanings of the epidemic. It investigates the way that SARS was presented as a dangerous threat to the UK public, whilst almost immediately the threat was said to be 'contained' using the mechanism of 'othering': SARS was said to be unlikely to personally affect the UK reader because the Chinese were so different to 'us'; so 'other'. In this sense, the SARS scare, despite the remarkable speed with which it was played out in the modern global news media, resonates with the meanings attributed to other epidemics of infectious diseases throughout history. Yet this study also highlights a number of differences in the social representations of SARS compared with earlier epidemics. In particular, this study examines the phenomena of 'emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases' over the past 30 or so years and suggests that these have impacted on the faith once widely held that Western biomedicine could 'conquer' infectious disease.

  18. A modified algorithm for SAR parallel imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ju-rong; WANG Fei; CAO Ning; LU Hao

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar can provide two dimension images by converting the acquired echoed SAR signal to targets coordinate and reflectivity. With the advancement of sophisticated SAR signal processing, more and more SAR imaging methods have been proposed for synthetic aperture radar which works at near field and the Fresnel approximation is not appropriate. Time domain correlation is a kind of digital reconstruction method based on processing the synthetic aperture radar data in the two-dimensional frequency domain via Fourier transform. It reconstructs SAR image via simply correlation without any need for approximation or interpolation. But its high computational cost for correlation makes it unsuitable for real time imaging. In order to reduce the computational burden a modified algorithm about time domain correlation was given in this paper. It also can take full advantage of parallel computations of the imaging processor. Its practical implementation was proposed and the preliminary simulation results were presented. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is a computationally efficient way of implementing the reconstruction in real time SAR image processing.

  19. Automated rectification and geocoding of SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, R.; Curlander, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    An automated post-processing system has been developed for rectification and geocoding of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery. The system uses as input a raw uncorrected image from the operational SAR correlator, and produces as a standard output a rectified and geocoded product. The accurate geolocation of SAR image pixels is provided by a spatial transformation model which maps the slant range-azimuth SAR image pixels into their location on a prespecified map grid. This model predicts the geodetic location of each pixel by utilizing: the sensor platform position; a geoid model; the parameters of the data collection system and the processing parameters used in the SAR correlator. Based on their geodetic locations, the pixels are mapped by using the desired cartographic projection equations. This rectification and geocoding technique has been tested with Seasat and SIR-B images. The test results demonstrate absolute location uncertainty of less than 50 m and relative distortion (scale factor and skew) of less than 0.1 percent relative to local variations from the assumed geoid.

  20. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel.

  1. Allelic Variation in the Toll-Like Receptor Adaptor Protein Ticam2 Contributes to SARS-Coronavirus Pathogenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralinski, Lisa E; Menachery, Vineet D; Morgan, Andrew P; Totura, Allison L; Beall, Anne; Kocher, Jacob; Plante, Jessica; Harrison-Shostak, D Corinne; Schäfer, Alexandra; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Ferris, Martin T; Baric, Ralph S

    2017-06-07

    Host genetic variation is known to contribute to differential pathogenesis following infection. Mouse models allow direct assessment of host genetic factors responsible for susceptibility to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Based on an assessment of early stage lines from the Collaborative Cross mouse multi-parent population, we identified two lines showing highly divergent susceptibilities to SARS-CoV: the resistant CC003/Unc and the susceptible CC053/Unc. We generated 264 F2 mice between these strains, and infected them with SARS-CoV. Weight loss, pulmonary hemorrhage, and viral load were all highly correlated disease phenotypes. We identified a quantitative trait locus of major effect on chromosome 18 (27.1-58.6 Mb) which affected weight loss, viral titer and hemorrhage. Additionally, each of these three phenotypes had distinct quantitative trait loci [Chr 9 (weight loss), Chrs 7 and 12 (virus titer), and Chr 15 (hemorrhage)]. We identified Ticam2, an adaptor protein in the TLR signaling pathways, as a candidate driving differential disease at the Chr 18 locus. Ticam2(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to SARS-CoV infection, exhibiting increased weight loss and more pulmonary hemorrhage than control mice. These results indicate a critical role for Ticam2 in SARS-CoV disease, and highlight the importance of host genetic variation in disease responses. Copyright © 2017 Gralinski et al.

  2. Proteolytic activation of the SARS-coronavirus spike protein: cutting enzymes at the cutting edge of antiviral research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Graham; Zmora, Pawel; Gierer, Stefanie; Heurich, Adeline; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) pandemic revealed that zoonotic transmission of animal coronaviruses (CoV) to humans poses a significant threat to public health and warrants surveillance and the development of countermeasures. The activity of host cell proteases, which cleave and activate the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein, is essential for viral infectivity and constitutes a target for intervention. However, the identities of the proteases involved have been unclear. Pioneer studies identified cathepsins and type II transmembrane serine proteases as cellular activators of SARS-CoV and demonstrated that several emerging viruses might exploit these enzymes to promote their spread. Here, we will review the proteolytic systems hijacked by SARS-CoV for S protein activation, we will discuss their contribution to viral spread in the host and we will outline antiviral strategies targeting these enzymes. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses.'' Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploration of Advanced Bistatic SAR Experiments (in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Yun-kai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study concentrates on the results of several advanced hybrid bistatic SAR experiments. The hybrid bistatic configuration applies to the case in which the transmitter and receiver are mounted on different types of platforms, e.g., spaceborne/airborne, airborne/stationary, spaceborne/stationary, and so on. Several hybrid bistatic SAR experiments have been performed successfully, i.e., TerraSAR-X/PAMIR, PAMIR/stationary, and TerraSAR-X/stationary. Furthermore, Multiple Baseline Interferometry SAR (MB-InSAR and Digital Beam-Forming (DBF technologies are validated in the TerraSAR-X/stationary configuration. Note that the DBF experiment results based on the spaceborne illuminator are discussed for the first time in SAR community. In addition, this paper emphasizes imaging geometry, image analysis, and focusing results.

  4. Application of SAR Imagery in Submarine Topography Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁川; 梁开龙; 桂力民

    2004-01-01

    An important research area in oceanographic surveying and mapping is to obtain submarine topography by remote sensing technique, especially by SAR imagery. In this article, problems related to SAR imagery are analyzed to provide references for the further research.

  5. METAPNEUMOVIRUS AND BOKAVIRUS RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN THE STRUCTURE OF SARS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Harlamov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an overview of the literature data about new pneumotropic viruses - metapneumovirus and bokavirus: taxonomy, structural features, pathogenesis, laboratory diagnosis, clinical symptoms of the diseases they cause and complications. The high incidence and bokavirus metapnevmovirus structure of SARS infections in preschool children, the authors have shown the example carried out at the Department of Infectious Diseases in Children Medical University (now RNIMU named after N.I. Pirogov and on the basis of clinical Institute of Virology, multicenter, randomized, blind, placebo-controlled study on the therapeutic efficacy and safety of interferon inducer Kagocel in 120 children aged 2 to 6 years. The findings to point out on significant reduction in the rate of relief of basic clinical manifestations of SARS, regardless of etiology, in children taking Kagocel in compare with a group of children who took a placebo.

  6. SARS Transmission among Hospital Workers in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Joseph T F; Fung, Kitty S.; Wong, Tze Wai; Kim, Jean H; Wong, Eric; Chung, Sydney; Ho, Deborah; Chan, Louis Y; Lui, S F; Cheng, Augustine

    2004-01-01

    Despite infection control measures, breakthrough transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred for many hospital workers in Hong Kong. We conducted a case-control study of 72 hospital workers with SARS and 144 matched controls. Inconsistent use of goggles, gowns, gloves, and caps was associated with a higher risk for SARS infection (unadjusted odds ratio 2.42 to 20.54, p < 0.05). The likelihood of SARS infection was strongly associated with the amount of personal protectio...

  7. PRF Ambiguity Detrmination for Radarsat ScanSAR System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Michael Y.

    1998-01-01

    PRF ambiguity is a potential problem for a spaceborne SAR operated at high frequencies. For a strip mode SAR, there were several approaches to solve this problem. This paper, however, addresses PRF ambiguity determination algorithms suitable for a burst mode SAR system such as the Radarsat ScanSAR. The candidate algorithms include the wavelength diversity algorithm, range look cross correlation algorithm, and multi-PRF algorithm.

  8. Exploration of Advanced Bistatic SAR Experiments (in English)

    OpenAIRE

    Deng Yun-kai; Robert Wang

    2014-01-01

    This study concentrates on the results of several advanced hybrid bistatic SAR experiments. The hybrid bistatic configuration applies to the case in which the transmitter and receiver are mounted on different types of platforms, e.g., spaceborne/airborne, airborne/stationary, spaceborne/stationary, and so on. Several hybrid bistatic SAR experiments have been performed successfully, i.e., TerraSAR-X/PAMIR, PAMIR/stationary, and TerraSAR-X/stationary. Furthermore, Multiple Baseline Interferomet...

  9. Dieckol, a SARS-CoV 3CL(pro) inhibitor, isolated from the edible brown algae Ecklonia cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Young; Kim, Jang Hoon; Kwon, Jung Min; Kwon, Hyung-Jun; Jeong, Hyung Jae; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Doman; Lee, Woo Song; Ryu, Young Bae

    2013-07-01

    SARS-CoV 3CL(pro) plays an important role in viral replication. In this study, we performed a biological evaluation on nine phlorotannins isolated from the edible brown algae Ecklonia cava. The nine isolated phlorotannins (1-9), except phloroglucinol (1), possessed SARS-CoV 3CL(pro) inhibitory activities in a dose-dependently and competitive manner. Of these phlorotannins (1-9), two eckol groups with a diphenyl ether linked dieckol (8) showed the most potent SARS-CoV 3CL(pro) trans/cis-cleavage inhibitory effects (IC(50)s = 2.7 and 68.1 μM, respectively). This is the first report of a (8) phlorotannin chemotype significantly blocking the cleavage of SARS-CoV 3CL(pro) in a cell-based assay with no toxicity. Furthermore, dieckol (8) exhibited a high association rate in the SPR sensorgram and formed extremely strong hydrogen bonds to the catalytic dyad (Cys145 and His41) of the SARS-CoV 3CL(pro).

  10. Infrastructure monitoring with spaceborne SAR sensors

    CERN Document Server

    ANGHEL, ANDREI; CACOVEANU, REMUS

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a novel non-intrusive infrastructure monitoring technique based on the detection and tracking of scattering centers in spaceborne SAR images. The methodology essentially consists of refocusing each available SAR image on an imposed 3D point cloud associated to the envisaged infrastructure element and identifying the reliable scatterers to be monitored by means of four dimensional (4D) tomography. The methodology described in this book provides a new perspective on infrastructure monitoring with spaceborne SAR images, is based on a standalone processing chain, and brings innovative technical aspects relative to conventional approaches. The book is intended primarily for professionals and researchers working in the area of critical infrastructure monitoring by radar remote sensing.

  11. Verification of L-band SAR calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, R. W.; Jackson, P. L.; Kasischke, E.

    1985-01-01

    Absolute calibration of a digital L-band SAR system to an accuracy of better than 3 dB has been verified. This was accomplished with a calibration signal generator that produces the phase history of a point target. This signal relates calibration values to various SAR data sets. Values of radar cross-section (RCS) of reference reflectors were obtained using a derived calibration relationship for the L-band channel on the ERIM/CCRS X-C-L SAR system. Calibrated RCS values were compared to known RCS values of each reference reflector for verification and to obtain an error estimate. The calibration was based on the radar response to 21 calibrated reference reflectors.

  12. Coupling Regular Tessellation with Rjmcmc Algorithm to Segment SAR Image with Unknown Number of Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Li, Y.; Zhao, Q. H.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image segmentation approach with unknown number of classes, which is based on regular tessellation and Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC') algorithm. First of all, an image domain is portioned into a set of blocks by regular tessellation. The image is modeled on the assumption that intensities of its pixels in each homogeneous region satisfy an identical and independent Gamma distribution. By Bayesian paradigm, the posterior distribution is obtained to build the region-based image segmentation model. Then, a RJMCMC algorithm is designed to simulate from the segmentation model to determine the number of homogeneous regions and segment the image. In order to further improve the segmentation accuracy, a refined operation is performed. To illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach, two real SAR image is tested.

  13. A HIGH RESOLUTION WIDE SWATH SAR METHOD BASED ON INTRA-PULSE NULL STEERING AND MIMO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    High Resolution Wide Swath(HRWS)Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR)often Sufiers from low Signal-to-Noise Ratio(SNR)due to small transmitting antenna,especially in phased array antenna systems.Digital Beam Forming(DBF)based on Single Input and Multiple Output(SIMO)achieves receiving array gain at the cost of increasing data rate.This letter proposes a new HRWS SAR method, which employs intra-pulse null steering to get receiving gain in elevation and decrease the data rate,and Multiple Input and Multiple Output(MIMO)using Space-Time Block Coding(STBC)in azimuth to get transmitting gain and receiving array gain simultaneously.The feasibility is verified by deduction and simulations.

  14. Interaction of SARS and MERS Coronaviruses with the Antiviral Interferon Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, E; Thiel, V; Weber, F

    2016-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) are the most severe coronavirus (CoV)-associated diseases in humans. The causative agents, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, are of zoonotic origin but may be transmitted to humans, causing severe and often fatal respiratory disease in their new host. The two coronaviruses are thought to encode an unusually large number of factors that allow them to thrive and replicate in the presence of efficient host defense mechanisms, especially the antiviral interferon system. Here, we review the recent progress in our understanding of the strategies that highly pathogenic coronaviruses employ to escape, dampen, or block the antiviral interferon response in human cells. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  16. Progress Toward Demonstrating SAR Monitoring of Chinese Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weigen; Johannessen, Johnny; Alpers, Werner; Yang, Jingsong

    2010-12-01

    "Demonstrating SAR monitoring of Chinese seas" is a project of the ESA-MOST Dragon 2 program. This paper presents the progress of the project. Retrieval algorithms for SAR monitoring of sea surface currents, oceanic internal waves, sea surface winds, oil spills and ships have been advanced. SAR monitoring of Chinese seas in near-real-time is now in demonstration phase.

  17. (Q)SARs for human toxicological endpoints: a literature search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos E; Schielen P; Masilankiewicz L; CSR; NVIC

    1999-01-01

    Het doel van dit rapport is het beschrijven van humaan toxicologische SARs (structuur-activiteitsrelaties) die beschikbaar zijn in de literatuur alsmede de SARs die gebruikt worden door de US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). De implementatie van het gebruik van SARs voor de effect assessment

  18. (Q)SARs for human toxicological endpoints: a literature search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos E; Schielen P; Masilankiewicz L; CSR; NVIC

    1999-01-01

    The goal here was to describe human toxicological SARs (structure-activity relationships) available in the literature and used by the US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). The CSR laboratory investigated implementation of SARs for the effect assessment. SARs correlate the molecular structure

  19. Is modulating virus virulence by induced systemic resistance realistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faoro, Franco; Gozzo, Franco

    2015-05-01

    Induction of plant resistance, either achieved by chemicals (systemic acquired resistance, SAR) or by rhizobacteria (induced systemic resistance, ISR) is a possible and/or complementary alternative to manage virus infections in crops. SAR mechanisms operating against viruses are diverse, depending on the pathosystem, and may inhibit virus replication as well as cell-to-cell and long-distance movement. Inhibition is often mediated by salicylic acid with the involvement of alternative oxidase and reactive oxygen species. However, salicylate may also stimulate a separate downstream pathway, leading to the induction of an additional mechanism, based on RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1-mediated RNA silencing. Thus, SAR and RNA silencing would closely cooperate in the defence against virus infection. Despite tremendous recent progress in the knowledge of SAR mechanisms, only a few compounds, including benzothiadiazole and chitosan have been shown to reduce the severity of systemic virus disease in controlled environment and, more modestly, in open field. Finally, ISR induction, has proved to be a promising strategy to control virus disease, particularly by seed bacterization with a mixture of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria. However, the use of any of these treatments should be integrated with cultivation practices that reduce vector pressure by the use of insecticides, or by Bt crops.

  20. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  1. Fighting SARS in grand collaboration: Our strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟南山

    2003-01-01

    @@ The war without gunsmoke against severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS), a type of communicable atypical pneumonia (AP), is now outspreading throughout China and many other countries in the world. So far, the disease has swept through nearly 30 countries and regions. Globally, more than 7,000 people have been infected, with a total of over 550 deaths. More than 5,000 people in mainland of China have been affected and approximately 200 have died. In some areas, the current situation remains at large. It is estimated that SARS has caused a financial loss of over 30 billion dollars (US) worldwide.

  2. Geocoding of AIRSAR/TOPSAR SAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecz, Francesco; Lou, Yun-Ling; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated and recognized that radar interferometry is a promising method for the determination of digital elevation information and terrain slope from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. An important application of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) data in areas with topographic variations is that the derived elevation and slope can be directly used for the absolute radiometric calibration of the amplitude SAR data as well as for scattering mechanisms analysis. On the other hand polarimetric SAR data has long been recognized as permitting a more complete inference of natural surfaces than a single channel radar system. In fact, imaging polarimetry provides the measurement of the amplitude and relative phase of all transmit and receive polarizations. On board the NASA DC-8 aircraft, NASA/JPL operates the multifrequency (P, L and C bands) multipolarimetric radar AIRSAR. The TOPSAR, a special mode of the AIRSAR system, is able to collect single-pass interferometric C- and/or L-band VV polarized data. A possible configuration of the AIRSAR/TOPSAR system is to acquire single-pass interferometric data at C-band VV polarization and polarimetric radar data at the two other lower frequencies. The advantage of this system configuration is to get digital topography information at the same time the radar data is collected. The digital elevation information can therefore be used to correctly calibrate the SAR data. This step is directly included in the new AIRSAR Integrated Processor. This processor uses a modification of the full motion compensation algorithm described by Madsen et al. (1993). However, the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with the additional products such as local incidence angle map, and the SAR data are in a geometry which is not convenient, since especially DEMs must be referred to a specific cartographic reference system. Furthermore, geocoding of SAR data is important for multisensor and/or multitemporal purposes. In this paper, a procedure to

  3. Stochastic dynamic model of SARS spreading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yaolin

    2003-01-01

    Based upon the simulation of the stochastic process of infection, onset and spreading of each SARS patient, a system dynamic model of SRAS spreading is constructed. Data from Vietnam is taken as an example for Monte Carlo test. The preliminary results indicate that the time-dependent infection rate is the most important control factor for SARS spreading. The model can be applied to prediction of the course with fluctuations of the epidemics, if the previous history of the epidemics and the future infection rate under control measures are known.

  4. Science data collection with polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Woelders, Kim; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    1996-01-01

    Discusses examples on the use of polarimetric SAR in a number of Earth science studies. The studies are presently being conducted by the Danish Center for Remote Sensing. A few studies of the European Space Agency's EMAC programme are also discussed. The Earth science objectives are presented, an......, and the potential of polarimetric SAR is discussed and illustrated with data collected by the Danish airborne EMISAR system during a number of experiments in 1994 and 1995. The presentation will include samples of data acquired for the different studies...

  5. Substitution at Aspartic Acid 1128 in the SARS Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein Mediates Escape from a S2 Domain-Targeting Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941–50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111–1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus. PMID:25019613

  6. Substitution at aspartic acid 1128 in the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein mediates escape from a S2 domain-targeting neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oi-Wing Ng

    Full Text Available The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs, are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2: 941-50. In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111-1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus.

  7. Substitution at aspartic acid 1128 in the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein mediates escape from a S2 domain-targeting neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J S Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941-50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111-1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus.

  8. Identification of phosphorylation sites in the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang; Shao, Jianmin; Sun, Maomao; Liu, Jinxiu; Xu, Gongjin; Zhang, Xumin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2007-12-01

    After decoding the genome of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), next challenge is to understand how this virus causes the illness at molecular bases. Of the viral structural proteins, the N protein plays a pivot role in assembly process of viral particles as well as viral replication and transcription. The SARS-CoV N proteins expressed in the eukaryotes, such as yeast and HEK293 cells, appeared in the multiple spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), whereas the proteins expressed in E. coli showed a single 2DE spotE These 2DE spots were further examined by Western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and identified as the N proteins with differently apparent pI values and similar molecular mass of 50 kDa. In the light of the observations and other evidences, a hypothesis was postulated that the SARS-CoV N protein could be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. To locate the plausible regions of phosphorylation in the N protein, two truncated N proteins were generated in E. coli and treated with PKC[alpha]. The two truncated N proteins after incubation of PKC[alpha] exhibited the differently electrophoretic behaviors on 2DE, suggesting that the region of 1-256 aa in the N protein was the possible target for PKC[alpha] phosphorylation. Moreover, the SARS-CoV N protein expressed in yeast were partially digested with trypsin and carefully analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In contrast to the completely tryptic digestion, these partially digested fragments generated two new peptide mass signals with neutral loss, and MS/MS analysis revealed two phosphorylated peptides located at the "dense serine" island in the N protein with amino acid sequences, GFYAEGSRGGSQASSRSSSR and GNSGNSTPGSSRGNSPARMASGGGK. With the PKC[alpha] phosphorylation treatment and the partially tryptic digestion, the N protein expressed in E. coli released the same peptides as observed in yeast cells. Thus, this investigation provided the preliminary data to determine the phosphorylation sites in the SARS-CoV N protein, and

  9. Method of Monitoring Urban Area Deformation Based on Differential TomoSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Aichun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While the use of differential TomoSAR based on compressive sensing (CS makes it possible to solve the layover problem and reconstruct the deformation information of an observed urban area scene acquired by moderate-high resolution SAR satellite, the performance of the reconstruction decreases for a sparse and structural observed scene due to ignoring the structural characteristics of the observed scene. To deal with this issue, the method for differential SAR tomography based on Khatri-Rao subspace and block compressive sensing (KRS-BCS is proposed. The proposed method changes the reconstruction of the sparse and structural observed scene into a BCS problem under Khatri-Rao subspace, using the structure information of the observed scene and Khatri-Rao product property of the reconstructed observation matrix for differential TomoSAR, such that the KRS-BCS problem is efficiently solved with a block sparse l1/l2 norm optimization signal model, and the performance of resolution capability and reconstruction estimation is compared and analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by the theoretical analysis and the simulation experiments, all of the results show the propose KRS-BCS method practicably overcomes the problems of CS method, as well as, quite maintains the high resolution characteristics, effectively reduces the probability of false scattering target and greatly improves the reconstruction accurate of scattering point. Finally, the application is taking the urban area of the Mobara(in Chiba, Japan as the test area and using 34 ENVISAT-ASAR images, the accuracy is verifying with the reference deformations derived from first level point data and GPS tracking data, the results show the trend is consistent and the overall deviation is small between reconstruction deformations of the propose KRS-BCS method and the reference deformations, and the accuracy is high in the estimation of the urban area deformation.

  10. Tissue distribution of ACE2 protein, the functional receptor for SARS coronavirus. A first step in understanding SARS pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming, [No Value; Timens, W; Bulthuis, MLC; Lely, AT; Navis, GJ; van Goor, H

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute infectious disease that spreads mainly via the respiratory route. A distinct coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been identified as the aetiological agent of SARS. Recently, a metallopeptidase named angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been identifie

  11. Tissue distribution of ACE2 protein, the functional receptor for SARS coronavirus. A first step in understanding SARS pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming, [No Value; Timens, W; Bulthuis, MLC; Lely, AT; Navis, GJ; van Goor, H

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute infectious disease that spreads mainly via the respiratory route. A distinct coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has been identified as the aetiological agent of SARS. Recently, a metallopeptidase named angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been

  12. SARS knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors: a comparison between Finns and the Dutch during the SARS outbreak in 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vartti, A.M.; Oenema, A.; Schreck, M.; Uutela, A.; Zwart, de O.; Brug, J.; Aro, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SARS outbreak served to test both local and international outbreak management and risk communication practices. PURPOSE: The study compares SARS knowledge, perceptions, behaviors, and information between Finns and the Dutch during the SARS outbreak in 2003. METHOD: The participants

  13. Rice Crop Monitoring and Yield Estimation Through Cosmo Skymed and TerraSAR-X: A SAR-Based Experience in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazhanivelan, S.; Kannan, P.; Nirmala Mary, P. Christy; Subramanian, E.; Jeyaraman, S.; Nelson, A.; Setiyono, T.; Holecz, F.; Barbieri, M.; Yadav, M.

    2015-04-01

    Rice is the most important cereal crop governing food security in Asia. Reliable and regular information on the area under rice production is the basis of policy decisions related to imports, exports and prices which directly affect food security. Recent and planned launches of SAR sensors coupled with automated processing can provide sustainable solutions to the challenges on mapping and monitoring rice systems. High resolution (3m) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imageries were used to map and monitor rice growing areas in selected three sites in TamilNadu, India to determine rice cropping extent, track rice growth and estimate yields. A simple, robust, rule-based classification for mapping rice area with multi-temporal, X-band, HH polarized SAR imagery from COSMO Skymed and TerraSAR X and site specific parameters were used. The robustness of the approach is demonstrated on a very large dataset involving 30 images across 3 footprints obtained during 2013-14. A total of 318 in-season site visits were conducted across 60 monitoring locations for rice classification and 432 field observations were made for accuracy assessment. Rice area and Start of Season (SoS) maps were generated with classification accuracies ranging from 87- 92 per cent. Using ORYZA2000, a weather driven process based crop growth simulation model; yield estimates were made with the inclusion of rice crop parameters derived from the remote sensing products viz., seasonal rice area, SoS and backscatter time series. Yield Simulation accuracy levels of 87 per cent at district level and 85- 96 per cent at block level demonstrated the suitability of remote sensing products for policy decisions ensuring food security and reducing vulnerability of farmers in India.

  14. Quantum-SAR extension of the spectral-SAR algorithm: application to polyphenolic anticancer bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Mihai V; Putz, Ana-Maria; Lazea, Marius; Ienciu, Luciana; Chiriac, Adrian

    2009-03-01

    Aiming to assess the role of individual molecular structures in the molecular mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction correlation analysis, the recent Spectral-SAR approach is employed to introduce the Quantum-SAR (QuaSAR) "wave" and "conversion factor" in terms of difference between inter-endpoint inter-molecular activities for a given set of compounds; this may account for inter-conversion (metabolization) of molecular (concentration) effects while indicating the structural (quantum) based influential/detrimental role on bio-/eco- effect in a causal manner rather than by simple inspection of measured values; the introduced QuaSAR method is then illustrated for a study of the activity of a series of flavonoids on breast cancer resistance protein.

  15. TomoSAR Platform: The New Irstea Service as Demand for SAR, Interferometry, Polarimetry and Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Tong Minh, Dinh; Ngo, Yen-Nhi; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Maurel, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Developing and improving methods to monitor both natural and non-natural environments such as forest and urban in space and time is a timely challenge. To overcome this challenge, we created a software platform - TomoSAR. The kernel of this platform supports the entire processing from SAR, Interferometry, Polarimetry, to Tomography (so called TomoSAR). The objective of this paper is to introduce this platform about its design architecture and its capacity. We showed four examples to highlight the TomoSAR platform capacities. First, the useful of the interferometric coherence of TOPS Sentinel-1 for land cover classification was highlighted. Second, a TOPS Sentinel-1 differential interferogram in a complex scenario volcano was successfully produced. Third, a TOPS Persistent Scatterers Interferometry analysis for estimating subsidence in Ho Chi Minh City area was demonstrated. Finally, the capability of processing and modelling of 3D P-band tomography in volume forest scattering were reported.

  16. Quantum-SAR Extension of the Spectral-SAR Algorithm. Application to Polyphenolic Anticancer Bioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Mihai V.; Putz, Ana-Maria; Lazea, Marius; Ienciu, Luciana; Chiriac, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Aiming to assess the role of individual molecular structures in the molecular mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction correlation analysis, the recent Spectral-SAR approach is employed to introduce the Quantum-SAR (QuaSAR) “wave” and “conversion factor” in terms of difference between inter-endpoint inter-molecular activities for a given set of compounds; this may account for inter-conversion (metabolization) of molecular (concentration) effects while indicating the structural (quantum) based influential/detrimental role on bio-/eco- effect in a causal manner rather than by simple inspection of measured values; the introduced QuaSAR method is then illustrated for a study of the activity of a series of flavonoids on breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:19399244

  17. An Optical Flow Method Applied to Co-Registration of Remote Sensing Images: Example for SAR/SAR, SAR/LIDAR, SAR/Optical Images of BIOSAR 2010 Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin-Koeniguer, Elise

    2016-08-01

    This article proposes an optical flow type method for coregistration of forest remote sensing images. The principle of the algorithm called GeFolki is first explained. Results are shown on the images of the BioSAR 3 campaign, for the production of SAR interferograms, the coregistration a SAR and LIDAR image, and the coregistration an optical image and SAR image.The advantages of such an algorithm over conventional algorithms are explained. Finally, we propose various applications within the operating data for future BIOMASS mission: massive interferometry, ground truth production, upscaling by fusion of LIDAR and SAR data, and image mining.

  18. A Review About SAR Technique for Shallow Water Bathymetry Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has become one of the important tools for shallow water bathymetry surveys. This has significant economic efficiency compared with the traditional bathymetry surveys. Numerical models have been developed to simulate shallow water bathymetry SAR images. Inversion of these models makes it possible to assess the water depths from SAR images. In this paper, these numerical models of SAR technique are reviewed, and examples are illustrated including in the coastal areas of China. Some issues about SAR technique available and the research orientation in future are also discussed.

  19. Pains and Gains from China's Experiences with Emerging Epidemics: From SARS to H7N9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jinwen; Yu, Weijia; Chen, Jiajie; Kang, Kang; Qiu, Congling

    2016-01-01

    Over the recent decades, China experienced several emerging virus outbreaks including those caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome- (SARS-) coronavirus (Cov), H5N1 virus, and H7N9 virus. The SARS tragedy revealed faults in China's infectious disease prevention system, propelling the Chinese government to enact reforms that enabled better combating of the subsequent H1N1 and H7N9 avian flu epidemics. The system is buttressed by three fundamental, mutually reinforcing components: (1) enduring government administration reforms, including legislation establishing a unified public health emergency management system; (2) prioritized funding for biotechnology and biomedicine industrialization, especially in the areas of pathogen identification, drug production, and the development of vaccines and diagnostics; and (3) increasing investment for public health and establishment of a rapid-response infectious diseases prevention and control system. China is now using its hard-gained experience to support the fight against Ebola in Africa and the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in its own country. PMID:27525272

  20. SAR Image Texture Analysis of Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Long; Li, Ying; Liu, Yu

    Oil spills are seriously affecting the marine ecosystem and cause political and scientific concern since they have serious affect on fragile marine and coastal ecosystem. In order to implement an emergency in case of oil spills, it is necessary to monitor oil spill using remote sensing. Spaceborne SAR is considered a promising method to monitor oil spill, which causes attention from many researchers. However, research in SAR image texture analysis of oil spill is rarely reported. On 7 December 2007, a crane-carrying barge hit the Hong Kong-registered tanker "Hebei Spirit", which released an estimated 10,500 metric tons of crude oil into the sea. The texture features on this oil spill were acquired based on extracted GLCM (Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix) by using SAR as data source. The affected area was extracted successfully after evaluating capabilities of different texture features to monitor the oil spill. The results revealed that the texture is an important feature for oil spill monitoring. Key words: oil spill, texture analysis, SAR

  1. Ambiguity noise analysis of a SAR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Haishan; Chang, Wenge; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-12-01

    The presence of range and azimuth (or Doppler) ambiguities in synthetic aperture radars (SARs) is well known. The ambiguity noise is related to the antenna pattern and the value of pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Because a new frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) SAR has the characters of low cost and small size, and the capacity of real-time signal processing, the antenna will likely vibrate or deform due to a lack of the stabilized platform. And the value of PRF cannot be much high because of the high computation burden for the real-time processing. The aim of this study is to access and improve the performance of a new FMCW SAR system based on the ambiguity noise. First, the quantitative analysis of the system's ambiguity noise level is performed; an antenna with low sidelobes is designed. The conclusion is that the range ambiguity noise is small; the azimuth ambiguity noise is somewhat increased, however, it is sufficiently small to have marginal influence on the image quality. Finally, the ambiguity noise level is measured using the imaging data from a Ku-band FMCW SAR. The results of this study show that the measured noise level coincides with the theoretical noise level.

  2. CFAR Edge Detector for Polarimetric SAR Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jesper; Skriver, Henning; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg;

    2003-01-01

    Finding the edges between different regions in an image is one of the fundamental steps of image analysis, and several edge detectors suitable for the special statistics of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) intensity images have previously been developed. In this paper, a new edge detector...

  3. Multichannel imaging with the AMBER FMCW SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Graaf, M.W. van der; Vlothuizen, W.J.; Tan, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    An X-band Digital Array Synthetic Aperture Radar for a Short Range Tactical UAV is presented. The Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave radar principle in combination with digital beam forming over 24 receive channels is used to achieve low power and advanced imaging SAR capabilities on small platform

  4. Satellite sar detection of hurricane helene (2006)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ju, Lian; Cheng, Yongcun; Xu, Qing;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the wind structure of hurricane Helene (2006) over the Atlantic Ocean is investigated from a C-band RADARSAT-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image acquired on 20 September 2006. First, the characteristics, e.g., the center, scale and area of the hurricane eye (HE) are determined...

  5. What is Gammarus campylops of Sars, 1894

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, J.H.; Kant, P.

    1966-01-01

    A revision of the specimens described by Sars, 1894, as Gammarus campylops Leach, 1814, proved that they did not belong to that species, nor to Gammarus ochlos Reid, 1945 (= G. sarsi Reid, 1943), as Reid believed. Reid’s species, of which also original specimens have been reexamined, is identical

  6. Multichannel imaging with the AMBER FMCW SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Graaf, M.W. van der; Vlothuizen, W.J.; Tan, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    An X-band Digital Array Synthetic Aperture Radar for a Short Range Tactical UAV is presented. The Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave radar principle in combination with digital beam forming over 24 receive channels is used to achieve low power and advanced imaging SAR capabilities on small platform

  7. Epidemic Models for SARS and Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozema, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Recent events have led to an increased interest in emerging infectious diseases. This article applies various deterministic models to the SARS epidemic of 2003 and a measles outbreak in the Netherlands in 1999-2000. We take a historical approach beginning with the well-known logistic curve and a lesser-known extension popularized by Pearl and Reed…

  8. Living in the Shadow of SARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUZHU

    2003-01-01

    I Was born in April, when spring is in the air, the sun shines, the sky is blue, and the fragrance of lilacs is everywhere. This year's birthday was unforgettable.As the SARS epidemic had broken out in Beijing, it was spent under the threat of this killer disease.

  9. Multichannel imaging with the AMBER FMCW SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Graaf, M.W. van der; Vlothuizen, W.J.; Tan, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    An X-band Digital Array Synthetic Aperture Radar for a Short Range Tactical UAV is presented. The Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave radar principle in combination with digital beam forming over 24 receive channels is used to achieve low power and advanced imaging SAR capabilities on small

  10. What is Gammarus campylops of Sars, 1894

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, J.H.; Kant, P.

    1966-01-01

    A revision of the specimens described by Sars, 1894, as Gammarus campylops Leach, 1814, proved that they did not belong to that species, nor to Gammarus ochlos Reid, 1945 (= G. sarsi Reid, 1943), as Reid believed. Reid’s species, of which also original specimens have been reexamined, is identical wi

  11. A Real-Time PCR Assay for Bat SARS-Like Coronavirus Detection and Its Application to Italian Greater Horseshoe Bat Faecal Sample Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Balboni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bats are source of coronaviruses closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS virus. Numerous studies have been carried out to identify new bat viruses related to SARS-coronavirus (bat-SARS-like CoVs using a reverse-transcribed-polymerase chain reaction assay. However, a qualitative PCR could underestimate the prevalence of infection, affecting the epidemiological evaluation of bats in viral ecology. In this work an SYBR Green-real time PCR assay was developed for diagnosing infection with SARS-related coronaviruses from bat guano and was applied as screening tool in a survey carried out on 45 greater horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum sampled in Italy in 2009. The assay showed high sensitivity and reproducibility. Its application on bats screening resulted in a prevalence of 42%. This method could be suitable as screening tool in epidemiological surveys about the presence of bat-SARS-like CoVs, consequently to obtain a more realistic scenario of the viral prevalence in the population.

  12. Forest Height Inversion Using Dual-pol Polarimetric SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, W. X.; Guo, H. D.; Xie, C.; Lu, Y. C.; Li, X. W.

    2014-03-01

    Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (PolInSAR) has been extensively applied for forest parameter inversion over different frequencies and polarimetric conditions. So far, most research was based on full-pol SAR images with relatively small coverage. A spaceborne SAR system will have the potential for PolInSAR applications used for global forest monitoring. Spaceborne dual-pol SAR images usually have higher resolution and larger swath than full-pol mode. In this paper, forest height retrieval was attempted by PolInSAR from a L-band spaceborne dual-pol SAR pairs using HH and HV channels. The random volume over ground (RVoG) model was used to retrieve the height and the coherence optimization method was extended to the dual-pol PolInSAR, which makes use of polarimetry to enhance the quality of SAR interferograms. The three-stage process is also used in the dual-pol PolInSAR technique. Finally, the experimental test was performed for forest height estimation on the dual-pol L-band SAR data of the Saihanba forest acquired by the ALOS PALSAR sensor in 2009.

  13. SAR Raw Data Generation for Complex Airport Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The method of generating the SAR raw data of complex airport scenes is studied in this paper. A formulation of the SAR raw signal model of airport scenes is given. Via generating the echoes from the background, aircrafts and buildings, respectively, the SAR raw data of the unified SAR imaging geometry is obtained from their vector additions. The multipath scattering and the shadowing between the background and different ground covers of standing airplanes and buildings are analyzed. Based on the scattering characteristics, coupling scattering models and SAR raw data models of different targets are given, respectively. A procedure is given to generate the SAR raw data of airport scenes. The SAR images from the simulated raw data demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.

  14. The first Sentinel-1 SAR image of a typhoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    In this note, we present the first Sentinel-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) typhoon image acquired in the northwest Pacific on October 4, 2014. The eye shape and sea surface wind patterns associated with Typhoon Phanfone are clearly shown in the high-quality SAR image. SAR winds retrieval procedure was given but the actual wind estimates will only be available after the European Space Agency (ESA) releases the official calibration coefficients in order to accurately derive the SAR-measured normalized radar cross section. This study demonstrates the advantage of Sentinel-1 SAR with regards to imaging fine scale typhoon patterns on the sea surface beneath storm clouds. This paper also advocates the use of Sentinel-1 SAR data that is made freely and openly available worldwide for the first time in civilian SAR history.

  15. Citizens’ Health Information Behaviors During SARS Spread Periods in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nei-Ching Yeh

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the information behaviors of citizens during the periods of SARS spreading in Taiwan. This study is exploratory in nature, and the naturalistic inquiry approach was applied. Sixteen persons, aged from 20 to 62 years old, were interviewed in order to understand their primary information channels of obtaining SARS information, the characteristics of information communication, the methods of infection, the attitudes toward SARS news, and the influences of SARS to life. The findings show that most participants obtained SARS information from televisions. SARS became the major topic of chatting between people, but telephone communication replaced face to face communication. Part of interviewers applied folk medicine to guard against SARS. Participant dissatisfied that governments did not announce much more authoritative information. The results also found participants’ information sharing and information avoidance behaviors.[Article content in Chinese

  16. ANALYSIS OF MULTIPATH PIXELS IN SAR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As the received radar signal is the sum of signal contributions overlaid in one single pixel regardless of the travel path, the multipath effect should be seriously tackled as the multiple bounce returns are added to direct scatter echoes which leads to ghost scatters. Most of the existing solution towards the multipath is to recover the signal propagation path. To facilitate the signal propagation simulation process, plenty of aspects such as sensor parameters, the geometry of the objects (shape, location, orientation, mutual position between adjacent buildings and the physical parameters of the surface (roughness, correlation length, permittivitywhich determine the strength of radar signal backscattered to the SAR sensor should be given in previous. However, it's not practical to obtain the highly detailed object model in unfamiliar area by field survey as it's a laborious work and time-consuming. In this paper, SAR imaging simulation based on RaySAR is conducted at first aiming at basic understanding of multipath effects and for further comparison. Besides of the pre-imaging simulation, the product of the after-imaging, which refers to radar images is also taken into consideration. Both Cosmo-SkyMed ascending and descending SAR images of Lupu Bridge in Shanghai are used for the experiment. As a result, the reflectivity map and signal distribution map of different bounce level are simulated and validated by 3D real model. The statistic indexes such as the phase stability, mean amplitude, amplitude dispersion, coherence and mean-sigma ratio in case of layover are analyzed with combination of the RaySAR output.

  17. BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

    2007-05-24

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

  18. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): knowledge, attitudes, practices and sources of information among physicians answering a SARS fever hotline service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, J-F; Olowokure, B; Kaydos-Daniels, S C; Chang, H-J; Barwick, R S; Lee, M-L; Deng, C-Y; Factor, S H; Chiang, C-E; Maloney, S A

    2006-01-01

    In June 2003, Taiwan introduced a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) telephone hotline service to provide concerned callers with rapid access to information, advice and appropriate referral where necessary. This paper reports an evaluation of the knowledge, attitude, practices and sources of information relating to SARS among physicians who staffed the SARS fever hotline service. A retrospective survey was conducted using a self-administered postal questionnaire. Participants were physicians who staffed a SARS hotline during the SARS epidemic in Taipei, Taiwan from June 1 to 10, 2003. A response rate of 83% was obtained. All respondents knew the causative agent of SARS, and knowledge regarding SARS features and preventive practices was good. However, only 54% of respondents knew the incubation period of SARS. Hospital guidelines and news media were the major information sources. In responding to two case scenarios most physicians were likely to triage callers at high risk of SARS appropriately, but not callers at low risk. Less than half of all respondents answered both scenarios correctly. The results obtained suggest that knowledge of SARS was generally good although obtained from both medical and non-medical sources. Specific knowledge was however lacking in certain areas and this affected the ability to appropriately triage callers. Standardized education and assessment of prior knowledge of SARS could improve the ability of physicians to triage callers in future outbreaks.

  19. SARS hCoV papain-like protease is a unique Lys48 linkage-specific di-distributive deubiquitinating enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Békés, Miklós; Rut, Wioletta; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Mulder, Monique P C; Ovaa, Huib; Drag, Marcin; Lima, Christopher D; Huang, Tony T

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) and the Ub-like (Ubl) modifier interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) participate in the host defence of viral infections. Viruses, including the severe acute respiratory syndrome human coronavirus (SARS hCoV), have co-opted Ub-ISG15 conjugation pathways for their own advantage or have evolved effector proteins to counter pro-inflammatory properties of Ub-ISG15-conjugated host proteins. In the present study, we compare substrate specificities of the papain-like protease (PLpro) from the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) hCoV to the related protease from SARS, SARS PLpro. Through biochemical assays, we show that, similar to SARS PLpro, MERS PLpro is both a deubiquitinating (DUB) and a deISGylating enzyme. Further analysis of the intrinsic DUB activity of these viral proteases revealed unique differences between the recognition and cleavage specificities of polyUb chains. First, MERS PLpro shows broad linkage specificity for the cleavage of polyUb chains, whereas SARS PLpro prefers to cleave Lys48-linked polyUb chains. Secondly, MERS PLpro cleaves polyUb chains in a 'mono-distributive' manner (one Ub at a time) and SARS PLpro prefers to cleave Lys48-linked polyUb chains by sensing a di-Ub moiety as a minimal recognition element using a 'di-distributive' cleavage mechanism. The di-distributive cleavage mechanism for SARS PLpro appears to be uncommon among USP (Ub-specific protease)-family DUBs, as related USP family members from humans do not display such a mechanism. We propose that these intrinsic enzymatic differences between SARS and MERS PLpro will help to identify pro-inflammatory substrates of these viral DUBs and can guide in the design of therapeutics to combat infection by coronaviruses.

  20. Neutralizing antibody blocks adenovirus infection by arresting microtubule-dependent cytoplasmic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason G; Cassany, Aurelia; Gerace, Larry; Ralston, Robert; Nemerow, Glen R

    2008-07-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are commonly elicited by viral infection. Most antibodies that have been characterized block early stages of virus entry that occur before membrane penetration, whereas inhibition of late stages in entry that occurs after membrane penetration has been poorly characterized. Here we provide evidence that the neutralizing antihexon monoclonal antibody 9C12 inhibits adenovirus infection by blocking microtubule-dependent translocation of the virus to the microtubule-organizing center following endosome penetration. These studies identify a previously undescribed mechanism by which neutralizing antibodies block virus infection, a situation that may be relevant for other nonenveloped viruses that use microtubule-dependent transport during cell entry.

  1. Neutralizing Antibody Blocks Adenovirus Infection by Arresting Microtubule-Dependent Cytoplasmic Transport▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason G.; Cassany, Aurelia; Gerace, Larry; Ralston, Robert; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2008-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are commonly elicited by viral infection. Most antibodies that have been characterized block early stages of virus entry that occur before membrane penetration, whereas inhibition of late stages in entry that occurs after membrane penetration has been poorly characterized. Here we provide evidence that the neutralizing antihexon monoclonal antibody 9C12 inhibits adenovirus infection by blocking microtubule-dependent translocation of the virus to the microtubule-organizing center following endosome penetration. These studies identify a previously undescribed mechanism by which neutralizing antibodies block virus infection, a situation that may be relevant for other nonenveloped viruses that use microtubule-dependent transport during cell entry. PMID:18448546

  2. Simulation of SAR backscatter for forest vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Richa; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most recent imaging technology to study the forest parameters. The invincible characteristics of microwave acquisition in cloudy regions and night imaging makes it a powerful tool to study dense forest regions. A coherent combination of radar polarimetry and interferometry (PolInSAR) enhances the accuracy of retrieved biophysical parameters. This paper attempts to address the issue of estimation of forest structural information caused due to instability of radar platforms through simulation of SAR image. The Terai Central Forest region situated at Haldwani area in Uttarakhand state of India was chosen as the study area. The system characteristics of PolInSAR dataset of Radarsat-2 SAR sensor was used for simulation process. Geometric and system specifications like platform altitude, center frequency, mean incidence angle, azimuth and range resolution were taken from metadata. From the field data it was observed that average tree height and forest stand density were 25 m and 300 stems/ha respectively. The obtained simulated results were compared with the sensor acquired master and slave intensity images. It was analyzed that for co-polarized horizontal component (HH), the mean values of simulated and real master image had a difference of 0.3645 with standard deviation of 0.63. Cross-polarized (HV) channel showed better results with mean difference of 0.06 and standard deviation of 0.1 while co-polarized vertical component (VV) did not show similar values. In case of HV polarization, mean variation between simulated and real slave images was found to be the least. Since cross-polarized channel is more sensitive to vegetation feature therefore better simulated results were obtained for this channel. Further the simulated images were processed using PolInSAR inversion modelling approach using three different techniques DEM differencing, Coherence Amplitude Inversion and Random Volume over Ground Inversion. DEM differencing

  3. SAR Ice Classification Using Fuzzy Screening Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R. S.

    2003-04-01

    A semi-automatic SAR sea ice classification algorithm is described. It is based on combining the information in the original SAR data with those in the three 'image' products derived from it, namely Power-to-Mean Ratio (PMR), the Gamma distribution and the second order texture parameter entropy, respectively. The latter products contain information which is often useful during the manual interpretation of the images. The technique used to fuse the information in these products is based on a method c lled Multi Experts Multi Criteria Decision Making fuzzy a screening. The Multiple Experts in this case are the above four 'image' products. The two criteria used currently for making decisions are the Kolmogorov-Smirnov distribution matching and the statistical mean of different surface classes. The algorithm classifies an image into any number of predefined classes of sea ice and open water. The representative classes of these surface types are manually identified by the user. Further, as SAR signals from sea ice covered regions and open water are ambiguous, it was found that a minimum of 4 pre-identified surface classes (calm and turbulent water and sea ice with low and high backscatter values) are required to accurately classify an image. Best results are obtained when a total of 8 surface classes (2 each of sea ice and open water in the near range and a similar number in the far range of the SAR image) are used. The main advantage of using this image classification scheme is that, like neural networks, no prior knowledge is required of the statistical distribution of the different surface types. Furthermore, unlike the methods based on neural networks, no prior data sets are required to train the algorithm. All the information needed for image classification by the method is contained in the individual SAR images and associated products. Initial results illustrating the potential of this ice classification algorithm using the RADARSAT ScanSAR Wide data are presented

  4. Spaceborne Polarimetric SAR Interferometry: Performance Analysis and Mission Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cloude Shane R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate multichannel imaging radar systems employing coherent combinations of polarimetry and interferometry (Pol-InSAR. Such systems are well suited for the extraction of bio- and geophysical parameters by evaluating the combined scattering from surfaces and volumes. This combination leads to several important differences between the design of Pol-InSAR sensors and conventional single polarisation SAR interferometers. We first highlight these differences and then investigate the Pol-InSAR performance of two proposed spaceborne SAR systems (ALOS/PalSAR and TerraSAR-L operating in repeat-pass mode. For this, we introduce the novel concept of a phase tube which enables (1 a quantitative assessment of the Pol-InSAR performance, (2 a comparison between different sensor configurations, and (3 an optimization of the instrument settings for different Pol-InSAR applications. The phase tube may hence serve as an interface between system engineers and application-oriented scientists. The performance analysis reveals major limitations for even moderate levels of temporal decorrelation. Such deteriorations may be avoided in single-pass sensor configurations and we demonstrate the potential benefits from the use of future bi- and multistatic SAR interferometers.

  5. Federated query services provided by the Seamless SAR Archive project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Meertens, C. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Fielding, E. J.; Nicoll, J.; Youn, C.; Baru, C.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) seamless synthetic aperture radar (SAR) archive (SSARA) project is a 2-year collaboration between UNAVCO, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and OpenTopography at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to design and implement a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. interferograms). A major milestone for the first year of the SSARA project was a unified application programming interface (API) for SAR data search and results at ASF and UNAVCO (WInSAR and EarthScope data archives) through the use of simple web services. A federated query service was developed using the unified APIs, providing users a single search interface for both archives (http://www.unavco.org/ws/brokered/ssara/sar/search). A command line client that utilizes this new service is provided as an open source utility for the community on GitHub (https://github.com/bakerunavco/SSARA). Further API development and enhancements added more InSAR specific keywords and quality control parameters (Doppler centroid, faraday rotation, InSAR stack size, and perpendicular baselines). To facilitate InSAR processing, the federated query service incorporated URLs for DEM (from OpenTopography) and tropospheric corrections (from the JPL OSCAR service) in addition to the URLs for SAR data. This federated query service will provide relevant QC metadata for selecting pairs of SAR data for InSAR processing and all the URLs necessary for interferogram generation. Interest from the international community has prompted an effort to incorporate other SAR data archives (the ESA Virtual Archive 4 and the DLR TerraSAR-X_SSC Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories collections) into the federated query service which provide data for researchers outside the US and North America.

  6. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB.

  7. The flight test of Pi-SAR(L) for the repeat-pass interferometric SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohmi, Hitoshi; Shimada, Masanobu; Miyawaki, Masanori

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the experiment of the repeat pass interferometric SAR using Pi-SAR(L). The air-borne repeat-pass interferometric SAR is expected as an effective method to detect landslide or predict a volcano eruption. To obtain a high-quality interferometric image, it is necessary to make two flights on the same flight pass. In addition, since the antenna of the Pi-SAR(L) is secured to the aircraft, it is necessary to fly at the same drift angle to keep the observation direction same. We built a flight control system using an auto pilot which has been installed in the airplane. This navigation system measures position and altitude precisely with using a differential GPS, and the PC Navigator outputs a difference from the desired course to the auto pilot. Since the air density is thinner and the speed is higher than the landing situation, the gain of the control system is required to be adjusted during the repeat pass flight. The observation direction could be controlled to some extent by adjusting a drift angle with using a flight speed control. The repeat-pass flight was conducted in Japan for three days in late November. The flight was stable and the deviation was within a few meters for both horizontal and vertical direction even in the gusty condition. The SAR data were processed in time domain based on range Doppler algorism to make the complete motion compensation. Thus, the interferometric image processed after precise phase compensation is shown.

  8. SAR Target Recognition via Supervised Discriminative Dictionary Learning and Sparse Representation of the SAR-HOG Feature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengli Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Automatic target recognition (ATR in synthetic aperture radar (SAR images plays an important role in both national defense and civil applications. Although many methods have been proposed, SAR ATR is still very challenging due to the complex application environment. Feature extraction and classification are key points in SAR ATR. In this paper, we first design a novel feature, which is a histogram of oriented gradients (HOG-like feature for SAR ATR (called SAR-HOG. Then, we propose a supervised discriminative dictionary learning (SDDL method to learn a discriminative dictionary for SAR ATR and propose a strategy to simplify the optimization problem. Finally, we propose a SAR ATR classifier based on SDDL and sparse representation (called SDDLSR, in which both the reconstruction error and the classification error are considered. Extensive experiments are performed on the MSTAR database under standard operating conditions and extended operating conditions. The experimental results show that SAR-HOG can reliably capture the structures of targets in SAR images, and SDDL can further capture subtle differences among the different classes. By virtue of the SAR-HOG feature and SDDLSR, the proposed method achieves the state-of-the-art performance on MSTAR database. Especially for the extended operating conditions (EOC scenario “Training 17 ∘ —Testing 45 ∘ ”, the proposed method improves remarkably with respect to the previous works.

  9. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  10. MCA: a multichannel approach to SAR autofocus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Robert L; Do, Minh N; Munson, David C

    2009-04-01

    We present a new noniterative approach to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) autofocus, termed the multichannel autofocus (MCA) algorithm. The key in the approach is to exploit the multichannel redundancy of the defocusing operation to create a linear subspace, where the unknown perfectly focused image resides, expressed in terms of a known basis formed from the given defocused image. A unique solution for the perfectly focused image is then directly determined through a linear algebraic formulation by invoking an additional image support condition. The MCA approach is found to be computationally efficient and robust and does not require prior assumptions about the SAR scene used in existing methods. In addition, the vector-space formulation of MCA allows sharpness metric optimization to be easily incorporated within the restoration framework as a regularization term. We present experimental results characterizing the performance of MCA in comparison with conventional autofocus methods and discuss the practical implementation of the technique.

  11. How SARS Taught Me to Cook

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAVALEE

    2003-01-01

    DURING the week-long May Day holiday I usually hold a party, or enjoy the good weather on outings with friends, but thanks to the SARS epidemic in Beijing this year, I stayed at home the entire May Day holiday. It was no problem finding something to do with my ample spare time, as I can surf the Internet for hours on end. My biggest headache was eating.Having dined in cafeterias and restaurants for the previous ten years or so, I had never learned to cook, but as SARS had begun to spread in Beijing in late April, the cafeteria in my work unit and most restaurants were closed for the holiday.

  12. Non-parametric partitioning of SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delyon, G.; Galland, F.; Réfrégier, Ph.

    2006-09-01

    We describe and analyse a generalization of a parametric segmentation technique adapted to Gamma distributed SAR images to a simple non parametric noise model. The partition is obtained by minimizing the stochastic complexity of a quantized version on Q levels of the SAR image and lead to a criterion without parameters to be tuned by the user. We analyse the reliability of the proposed approach on synthetic images. The quality of the obtained partition will be studied for different possible strategies. In particular, one will discuss the reliability of the proposed optimization procedure. Finally, we will precisely study the performance of the proposed approach in comparison with the statistical parametric technique adapted to Gamma noise. These studies will be led by analyzing the number of misclassified pixels, the standard Hausdorff distance and the number of estimated regions.

  13. Automated preprocessing of spaceborne SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlander, J. C.; Wu, C.; Pang, A.

    1982-01-01

    An efficient algorithm has been developed for estimation of the echo phase delay in spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. This algorithm utilizes the spacecraft ephemeris data and the radar echo data to produce estimates of two parameters: (1) the centroid of the Doppler frequency spectrum f(d) and (2) the Doppler frequency rate. Results are presented from tests conducted with Seasat SAR data. The test data indicates that estimation accuracies of 3 Hz for f(d) and 0.3 Hz/sec for the Doppler frequency rate are attainable. The clutterlock and autofocus techniques used for estimation of f(d) and the Doppler frequency rate, respectively are discussed and the algorithm developed for optimal implementation of these techniques is presented.

  14. SARS: Safeguards Accounting and Reporting Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammedi, B.; Saadi, S.; Ait-Mohamed, S.

    In order to satisfy the requirements of the SSAC (State System for Accounting and Control of nuclear materials), for recording and reporting objectives; this computer program comes to bridge the gape between nuclear facilities operators and national inspection verifying records and delivering reports. The SARS maintains and generates at-facility safeguards accounting records and generates International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards reports based on accounting data input by the user at any nuclear facility. A database structure is built and BORLAND DELPHI programming language has been used. The software is designed to be user-friendly, to make extensive and flexible management of menus and graphs. SARS functions include basic physical inventory tacking, transaction histories and reporting. Access controls are made by different passwords.

  15. Estimating the Doppler centroid of SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    1989-01-01

    After reviewing frequency-domain techniques for estimating the Doppler centroid of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) data, the author describes a time-domain method and highlights its advantages. In particular, a nonlinear time-domain algorithm called the sign-Doppler estimator (SDE) is shown to have...... attractive properties. An evaluation based on an existing SEASAT processor is reported. The time-domain algorithms are shown to be extremely efficient with respect to requirements on calculations and memory, and hence they are well suited to real-time systems where the Doppler estimation is based on raw SAR...... data. For offline processors where the Doppler estimation is performed on processed data, which removes the problem of partial coverage of bright targets, the ΔE estimator and the CDE (correlation Doppler estimator) algorithm give similar performance. However, for nonhomogeneous scenes it is found...

  16. Fast SAR Imaging Algorithm for FLGPR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A fast SAR imaging algorithm for near- field subsurface forward-looking ground penetrating radar (FLGPR) is presented. By using nonstationary convolution filter, the refocused image spectrum can be reconstructed directly from the backscattered signal spectrum of target area. The experimental results show the proposed method can fast achieve image refocusing. Also it has higher computational efficiency than the phase-shift migration approach and the delay-and-sum (DAS) approach.

  17. Adaptive Filter in SAR Interferometry Derived DEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Caijun; WANG Hua; WANG Jianglin; GE Linlin

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the performance of median filter, elevation dependent adaptive sigma median filter, and directionally dependent adaptive sigma median filter are tested on both InSAR Tandem DEM and simulated high-level noisy DEM. Through the comparison, the directionally dependent adaptive sigma median filter is proved to be the most effective one not only in the noise removing but also in the boundary preserve.

  18. Bistatic SAR tomography: processing and experimental results

    OpenAIRE

    Duque Biarge, Sergio; López Dekker, Francisco J.; Merlano Duncan, Juan Carlos; Mallorquí Franquet, Jordi Joan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents across-track tomography applied to a bistatic geometry with fixed receivers. This kind of geometry can overcome some of the classical monostatic tomography limitations such as temporal decorrelation and irregular baseline distribution. The Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSLab)of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) has implemented a SAR Bistatic Receiver for INterferometric Applications,SABRINA, with 4-channels. SABRINA has been used to carry out a bistatic tomogr...

  19. Multiplier-free filters for wideband SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen; Christensen, Erik Lintz

    2001-01-01

    This paper derives a set of parameters to be optimized when designing filters for digital demodulation and range prefiltering in SAR systems. Aiming at an implementation in field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), an approach for the design of multiplier-free filters is outlined. Design results ar...... are presented in terms of filter complexity and performance. One filter has been coded in VHDL and preliminary results indicate that the filter can meet a 2 GHz input sample rate....

  20. Digital demodulator for wide bandwidth SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørn Hjelm

    2000-01-01

    A novel approach to the design of efficient digital quadrature demodulators for wide bandwidth SAR systems is described. Efficiency is obtained by setting the intermediate frequency to 1/4 the ADC sampling frequency. One channel is made filter-free by synchronizing the local oscillator...... with the output decimator. The filter required by the other channel is optimized through global search using the system level performance metrics integrated sidelobe level ratio (ISLR) and peak sidelobe level ratio (PSLR)....

  1. SAR Product Improvements and Enhancements - SARprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    paper on current fields at Orkney, Scotland, was accepted for publication in IEEE - TGARS and is currently in press (available on IEEE Xplore as Early...Sea surface velocity vector retrieval using dual-beam interferometry: First demonstration, IEEE TGARS, 43, 2494- 2502, 2005. [2] Chapron, B., F...Bight by airborne along-track interferometric SAR, Proc. IGARSS 2002, 1822-1824, IEEE , 2002. [4] Bjerklie, D.M., S.L. Dingman, C.J. Vorosmarty, C.H

  2. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... yield lines around the block leads to simple interaction formulas similar to other interaction formulas in the codes.......Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...

  3. Low-SAR metamaterial-inspired printed monopole antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M. I.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a low-SAR metamaterial-embedded planar monopole antenna is introduced for a wireless communication system. A printed monopole antenna is designed for modern mobile, which operates in GSM, UMTS, LTE, WLAN, and Bluetooth frequency bands. A metamaterial structure is designed to use in the mobile handset with a multi-band printed monopole antenna. The finite integration technique of the CST microwave studio is used in this study. The measurement of antenna performances is taken in an anechoic chamber, and the SAR values are measured using COMOSAR system. The results indicate that metamaterial structure leads to reduce SAR without affecting antenna performance significantly. According to the measured results, the metamaterial attachment leads to reduce 87.7% peak SAR, 68.2% 1-g SAR, and 46.78% 10-g SAR compared to antenna without metamaterial.

  4. Efficient Bistatic SAR Raw Signal Simulator of Extended Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bistatic SAR system is a new mode that allocates the radar transmitter and receiver on different platforms and has more advantages compared to the monostatic case. However, the existing bistatic SAR raw data simulator in the frequency domain can only handle the case of translation invariant system. In this paper, an efficient 2D frequency-domain raw data simulator of extended scenes for bistatic SAR of translation variant system is proposed by a geometric transformation method for the first time, where inverse STOLT interpolation is used to formulate the range migration terms. The presented simulator can accommodate the translation variant bistatic SAR system compared with existing bistatic SAR simulator. And it is more efficient than the time domain one by making use of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT. Simulation results for point targets and a real SAR image demonstrate its validity and effectiveness.

  5. SARS-CoV Genome Polymorphism: A Bioinformatics Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordana M. Pavlovi(c)-Lazeti(c); Nenad S. Miti(c); Andrija M. Tomovi(c); Mirjana D. Pavlovi(c); Milo(s) V.Beljanski

    2005-01-01

    A dataset of 103 SARS-CoV isolates (101 human patients and 2 palm civets) was investigated on different aspects of genome polymorphism and isolate classification.The number and the distribution of single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and insertions and deletions, with respect to a "profile", were determined and discussed ("profile" being a sequence containing the most represented letter per position).Distribution of substitution categories per codon positions, as well as synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions in coding regions of annotated isolates, was determined, along with amino acid (a.a.) property changes. Similar analysis was performed for the spike (S) protein in all the isolates (55 of them being predicted for the first time). The ratio Ka/Ks confirmed that the S gene was subjected to the Darwinian selection during virus transmission from animals to humans. Isolates from the dataset were classified according to genome polymorphism and genotypes. Genome polymorphism yields to two groups, one with a small number of SNVs and another with a large number of SNVs, with up to four subgroups with respect to insertions and deletions. We identified three basic nine-locus genotypes:TTTT/TTCGG, CGCC/TTCAT, and TGCC/TTCGT, with four subgenotypes.Both classifications proposed are in accordance with the new insights into possible epidemiological spread, both in space and time.

  6. SARS epidemical forecast research in mathematical model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Guanghong; LIU Chang; GONG Jianqiu; WANG Ling; CHENG Ke; ZHANG Di

    2004-01-01

    The SIJR model, simplified from the SEIJR model, is adopted to analyze the important parameters of the model of SARS epidemic such as the transmission rate, basic reproductive number. And some important parameters are obtained such as the transmission rate by applying this model to analyzing the situation in Hong Kong, Singapore and Canada at the outbreak of SARS. Then forecast of the transmission of SARS is drawn out here by the adjustment of parameters (such as quarantined rate) in the model. It is obvious that inflexion lies on the crunode of the graph, which indicates the big difference in transmission characteristics between the epidemic under control and not under control. This model can also be used in the comparison of the control effectiveness among different regions. The results from this model match well with the actual data in Hong Kong, Singapore and Canada and as a by-product, the index of the effectiveness of control in the later period can be acquired. It offers some quantitative indexes, which may help the further research in epidemic diseases.

  7. Study on Protective Clothing against SARS Using PTFE/Poly(ether-ester) Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Xin-min; ZHANG Jian-chun; GUO Yu-hai

    2004-01-01

    By means of texturing with organic conductive fiber, and then being treated with JAM-Y1 anti-bacteria agent, in the end, treated with the XL-550 waterproof agent, the PET fabric has permanent antistatic, anti-bacteria and waterproof and anti-oil properties. The PET fabric was laminated with PTFE membrane by paste dot coating, and then coated by Poly(ether-ester) solution in a direct process. The filter efficiency of NaCl aerosol, penetration property of poliomyelitis virus in liquid and animalcule in air of PET fabric laminated with PTFE membrane are measured. The properties show that the PET fabric laminated with PTFE membrane can separate SARS virus in air and liquid. The protective mechanism is also discussed in the article.

  8. The SARS coronavirus papain like protease can inhibit IRF3 at a post activation step that requires deubiquitination activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Krystal; Schäfer, Alexandra; Pham, Alissa; Frieman, Matthew

    2014-12-07

    The outcome of a viral infection is regulated by complex interactions of viral and host factors. SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) engages and regulates several innate immune response pathways during infection. We have previously shown that the SARS-CoV Papain-like Protease (PLpro) inhibits type I interferon (IFN) by inhibiting IRF3 phosphorylation thereby blocking downstream Interferon induction. This finding prompted us to identify other potential mechanisms of inhibition of PLpro on IFN induction. We have used plasmids expressing PLpro and IRF3 including an IRF3 mutant that is constitutively active, called IRF3(5D). In these experiments we utilize transfections, chromatin immunoprecipitation, Electro-mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) and protein localization to identify where IRF3 and IRF3(5D) are inhibited by PLpro. Here we show that PLpro also inhibits IRF3 activation at a step after phosphorylation and that this inhibition is dependent on the de-ubiquitination (DUB) activity of PLpro. We found that PLpro is able to block the type I IFN induction of a constitutively active IRF3, but does not inhibit IRF3 dimerization, nuclear localization or DNA binding. However, inhibition of PLpro's DUB activity by mutagenesis blocked the IRF3 inhibition activity of PLpro, suggesting a role for IRF3 ubiquitination in induction of a type I IFN innate immune response. These results demonstrate an additional mechanism that PLpro is able to inhibit IRF3 signaling. These data suggest novel innate immune antagonism activities of PLpro that may contribute to SARS-CoV pathogenesis.

  9. Monitoring Building Deformation with InSAR: Experiments and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kui; Yan, Li; Huang, Guoman; Chen, Chu; Wu, Zhengpeng

    2016-12-20

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) techniques are increasingly applied for monitoring land subsidence. The advantages of InSAR include high accuracy and the ability to cover large areas; nevertheless, research validating the use of InSAR on building deformation is limited. In this paper, we test the monitoring capability of the InSAR in experiments using two landmark buildings; the Bohai Building and the China Theater, located in Tianjin, China. They were selected as real examples to compare InSAR and leveling approaches for building deformation. Ten TerraSAR-X images spanning half a year were used in Permanent Scatterer InSAR processing. These extracted InSAR results were processed considering the diversity in both direction and spatial distribution, and were compared with true leveling values in both Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and measurement of error analyses. The detailed experimental results for the Bohai Building and the China Theater showed a high correlation between InSAR results and the leveling values. At the same time, the two Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) indexes had values of approximately 1 mm. These analyses show that a millimeter level of accuracy can be achieved by means of InSAR technique when measuring building deformation. We discuss the differences in accuracy between OLS regression and measurement of error analyses, and compare the accuracy index of leveling in order to propose InSAR accuracy levels appropriate for monitoring buildings deformation. After assessing the advantages and limitations of InSAR techniques in monitoring buildings, further applications are evaluated.

  10. Death of a SARS case from secondary aspergillus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧君; 丁彦青; 徐军; 李欣; 李学锋; 杨磊; 张文丽; 耿健; 申洪; 蔡俊杰; 康伟; 吴正容; 赵菲; 钟南山

    2004-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute infectious disease which has been found to spread mainly via respiration. The first case was idnetified in Guangdong, southem China in November 2002. This disease has resulted in a severe epidemic outbreak in 27 countries and regions. In order to investigate the etiology and clinicopathologic characteristics of SARS, we reported here a patient with SARS who died of aspergillosis after prolonged treatment with corticosteroids.

  11. Efficient Bistatic SAR Raw Signal Simulator of Extended Scenes

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Yang; Weidong Yu; Shichao Zheng; Lei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Bistatic SAR system is a new mode that allocates the radar transmitter and receiver on different platforms and has more advantages compared to the monostatic case. However, the existing bistatic SAR raw data simulator in the frequency domain can only handle the case of translation invariant system. In this paper, an efficient 2D frequency-domain raw data simulator of extended scenes for bistatic SAR of translation variant system is proposed by a geometric transformation method for the first t...

  12. Ezrin interacts with the SARS coronavirus Spike protein and restrains infection at the entry stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Kaoru Millet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Entry of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV and its envelope fusion with host cell membrane are controlled by a series of complex molecular mechanisms, largely dependent on the viral envelope glycoprotein Spike (S. There are still many unknowns on the implication of cellular factors that regulate the entry process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using as bait the carboxy-terminal endodomain of S, which faces the cytosol during and after opening of the fusion pore at early stages of the virus life cycle. Here we show that the ezrin membrane-actin linker interacts with S endodomain through the F1 lobe of its FERM domain and that both the eight carboxy-terminal amino-acids and a membrane-proximal cysteine cluster of S endodomain are important for this interaction in vitro. Interestingly, we found that ezrin is present at the site of entry of S-pseudotyped lentiviral particles in Vero E6 cells. Targeting ezrin function by small interfering RNA increased S-mediated entry of pseudotyped particles in epithelial cells. Furthermore, deletion of the eight carboxy-terminal amino acids of S enhanced S-pseudotyped particles infection. Expression of the ezrin dominant negative FERM domain enhanced cell susceptibility to infection by SARS-CoV and S-pseudotyped particles and potentiated S-dependent membrane fusion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ezrin interacts with SARS-CoV S endodomain and limits virus entry and fusion. Our data present a novel mechanism involving a cellular factor in the regulation of S-dependent early events of infection.

  13. Ezrin Interacts with the SARS Coronavirus Spike Protein and Restrains Infection at the Entry Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Kien, François; Cheung, Chung-Yan; Siu, Yu-Lam; Chan, Wing-Lim; Li, Huiying; Leung, Hiu-Lan; Jaume, Martial; Bruzzone, Roberto; Malik Peiris, Joseph S.; Altmeyer, Ralf Marius; Nal, Béatrice

    2012-01-01

    Background Entry of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and its envelope fusion with host cell membrane are controlled by a series of complex molecular mechanisms, largely dependent on the viral envelope glycoprotein Spike (S). There are still many unknowns on the implication of cellular factors that regulate the entry process. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using as bait the carboxy-terminal endodomain of S, which faces the cytosol during and after opening of the fusion pore at early stages of the virus life cycle. Here we show that the ezrin membrane-actin linker interacts with S endodomain through the F1 lobe of its FERM domain and that both the eight carboxy-terminal amino-acids and a membrane-proximal cysteine cluster of S endodomain are important for this interaction in vitro. Interestingly, we found that ezrin is present at the site of entry of S-pseudotyped lentiviral particles in Vero E6 cells. Targeting ezrin function by small interfering RNA increased S-mediated entry of pseudotyped particles in epithelial cells. Furthermore, deletion of the eight carboxy-terminal amino acids of S enhanced S-pseudotyped particles infection. Expression of the ezrin dominant negative FERM domain enhanced cell susceptibility to infection by SARS-CoV and S-pseudotyped particles and potentiated S-dependent membrane fusion. Conclusions/Significance Ezrin interacts with SARS-CoV S endodomain and limits virus entry and fusion. Our data present a novel mechanism involving a cellular factor in the regulation of S-dependent early events of infection. PMID:23185364

  14. Piecewise linear mapping algorithm for SAR raw data compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI HaiMing; YU WeiDong; CHEN Xi

    2008-01-01

    When the saturation degree (SD) of space-borne SAR raw data is high, the performance of conventional block adaptive quantization (BAQ) deteriorates obviously. In order to overcome the drawback, this paper studies the mapping between the average signal magnitude (ASM) and the standard deviation of the input signal (SDIS) to the A/D from the original reference. Then, it points out the mistake of the mapping and introduces the concept of the standard deviation of the output signal (SDOS) from the A/D. After that, this paper educes the mapping between the ASM and SDOS from the A/D. Monte-Carlo experiment shows that none of the above two mappings is the optimal in the whole set of SD. Thus, this paper proposes the concept of piecewise linear mapping and the searching algorithm in the whole set of SD. According to the linear part, this paper gives the certification and analytical value of k and for nonlinear part, and utilizes the searching algorithm mentioned above to search the corresponding value of k. Experimental results based on simulated data and real data show that the performance of new algorithm is better than conventional BAQ when raw data is in heavy SD.

  15. SARS-like WIV1-CoV poised for human emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Yount, Boyd L.; Sims, Amy C.; Debbink, Kari; Agnihothram, Sudhakar S.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Graham, Rachel L.; Scobey, Trevor; Plante, Jessica A.; Royal, Scott R.; Swanstrom, Jesica; Sheahan, Timothy P.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Corti, Davide; Randell, Scott H.; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Marasco, Wayne A.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks from zoonotic sources represent a threat to both human disease as well as the global economy. Despite a wealth of metagenomics studies, methods to leverage these datasets to identify future threats are underdeveloped. In this study, we describe an approach that combines existing metagenomics data with reverse genetics to engineer reagents to evaluate emergence and pathogenic potential of circulating zoonotic viruses. Focusing on the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-like viruses, the results indicate that the WIV1-coronavirus (CoV) cluster has the ability to directly infect and may undergo limited transmission in human populations. However, in vivo attenuation suggests additional adaptation is required for epidemic disease. Importantly, available SARS monoclonal antibodies offered success in limiting viral infection absent from available vaccine approaches. Together, the data highlight the utility of a platform to identify and prioritize prepandemic strains harbored in animal reservoirs and document the threat posed by WIV1-CoV for emergence in human populations. PMID:26976607

  16. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrola, E. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its second year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE will provide a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that will enable scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products without first requiring them to develop detailed expertise in radar processing methods. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. The NRC Decadal Survey-recommended DESDynI mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment is planned to become a key element in processing DESDynI data into higher level data products and it is expected to enable a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data, than current approaches. At the core of ISCE is both legacy processing software from the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package as well as a new InSAR processing package containing more efficient and more accurate processing algorithms being developed at Stanford for this project that is based on experience gained in developing processors for missions such as SRTM and UAVSAR. Around the core InSAR processing programs we are building object-oriented wrappers to enable their incorporation into a more modern, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models, and a robust, intuitive user interface with

  17. Conservation analysis of dengue virust-cell epitope-based vaccine candidates using peptide block entropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.

    2011-01-01

    residues. The block entropy analysis provides broad coverage of variant antigens. We applied the block entropy analysis method to the proteomes of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) and found 1,551 blocks of 9-mer peptides, which cover 99% of available sequences with five or fewer unique peptides...

  18. Risk Factors for SARS-Related Deaths in 2003, Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN LIU; WAN-NIAN LIANG; QI CHEN; XUE-QIN XIE; JIANG WU; XIONG HE; ZE-JUN LIU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the potential risk factors for severe acute respiratory syndromes (SARS)-related deaths in Beijing. Methods Epidemiological data were collected among the confirmed SARS patients officially reported by Beijing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (BCDC), and information was also supplemented by a follow-up case survey. Chi-square test and multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis were performed. Results Old age (over 60 years) was found to be significantly associated with SARS-related deaths in the univariate analysis. Also, history of contacting SARS patients within 2 weeks prior to the onset of illness, health occupation, and inferior hospital ranking as well as longer interval of clinic consulting (longer than 1 day) were the risk factors for SARS-related deaths. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis found four risk factors for SARS-related deaths. Conclusion Old age (over 60 years) is the major risk factor for SARS-related deaths.Moreover, hospital health workers, the designated hospitals for SARS clinical services and the interval of consulting doctors (less than 1 day) are protective factors for surviving from SARS.

  19. Geometric registration and rectification of spaceborne SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlander, J. C.; Pang, S. N.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the development of automated location and geometric rectification techniques for digitally processed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. A software package has been developed that is capable of determining the absolute location of an image pixel to within 60 m using only the spacecraft ephemeris data and the characteristics of the SAR data collection and processing system. Based on this location capability algorithms have been developed that geometrically rectify the imagery, register it to a common coordinate system and mosaic multiple frames to form extended digital SAR maps. These algorithms have been optimized using parallel processing techniques to minimize the operating time. Test results are given using Seasat SAR data.

  20. Landslide Inventory and Monitoring Using Sentinel-1 SAR Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monserrat, Oriol; Crosetto, Michele; Devanthery, Nuria; Cuevas-Gonzalez, Maria; Barra, Anna; Crippa, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    An important application of differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR) and Persistent Scatterer Interferometry is landslide detection and monitoring. Several studies have been published, which make use of the entire spectrum of SAR data types available in the last 25 years. This paper describes a procedure to update landslide inventory maps using Sentinel-1 data. The paper briefly discusses the main advantages of the Sentinel-1 SAR data. Then it describes the data analysis procedure used to update landslide inventory maps using interferometric data and a number of additional information layers. The effectiveness of the procedure is illustrated by the results of a study area located in the Molise region, in Southern Italy.

  1. Bistatic SAR: State of the Art and Development Trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Tao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bistatic SAR (BiSAR systems have attracted the interests from global researchers and become a hotspot in the international radar community due to the progress of radar technology and rapidly increased applications nowadays. Based on the BiSAR experiments and breakthrough of the key technology, the paper summarized the general progresses of BiSAR systems, especially in European radar community, from different aspects such as system design, processing idea and topology etc. Different bistatic image formation algorithms have been analyzed and reviewed. Finally, the development trend is discussed in the paper.

  2. Motion measurement errors and autofocus in bistatic SAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigling, Brian D; Moses, Randolph L

    2006-04-01

    This paper discusses the effect of motion measurement errors (MMEs) on measured bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) phase history data that has been motion compensated to the scene origin. We characterize the effect of low-frequency MMEs on bistatic SAR images, and, based on this characterization, we derive limits on the allowable MMEs to be used as system specifications. Finally, we demonstrate that proper orientation of a bistatic SAR image during the image formation process allows application of monostatic SAR autofocus algorithms in postprocessing to mitigate image defocus.

  3. Coastline detection in SAR images using discriminant cuts segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xianwen; Zou, Xiaolin; Yu, Tan

    2016-11-01

    The discriminant cut algorithm is used to detect coastlines in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The proposed approach is a region-based one, which is able to capture and utilize spatial information in the image. The real SAR images, e.g. ALOS-1 PALSAR and COSMO-SkyMed SAR images, together with in-situ GPS data were collected and used to validate the performance of the proposed approach for coastline detection in SAR images. The accuracy is better than 4 times the image resolution. The efficiency is also tested.

  4. Crop identification of SAR data using digital textural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuesch, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    After preprocessing SEASAT SAR data which included slant to ground range transformation, registration to LANDSAT MSS data and appropriate filtering of the raw SAR data to minimize coherent speckle, textural features were developed based upon the spatial gray level dependence method (SGLDM) to compute entropy and inertia as textural measures. It is indicated that the consideration of texture features are very important in SAR data analysis. The SEASAT SAR data are useful for the improvement of field boundary definitions and for an earlier season estimate of corn and soybean area location than is supported by LANDSAT alone.

  5. Reverse genetic characterization of the natural genomic deletion in SARS-Coronavirus strain Frankfurt-1 open reading frame 7b reveals an attenuating function of the 7b protein in-vitro and in-vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grywna Klaus

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the outbreak of SARS in 2002/3, a prototype virus was isolated from a patient in Frankfurt/Germany (strain Frankfurt-1. As opposed to all other SARS-Coronavirus strains, Frankfurt-1 has a 45-nucleotide deletion in the transmembrane domain of its ORF 7b protein. When over-expressed in HEK 293 cells, the full-length protein but not the variant with the deletion caused interferon beta induction and cleavage of procaspase 3. To study the role of ORF 7b in the context of virus replication, we cloned a full genome cDNA copy of Frankfurt-1 in a bacterial artificial chromosome downstream of a T7 RNA polymerase promoter. Transfection of capped RNA transcribed from this construct yielded infectious virus that was indistinguishable from the original virus isolate. The presumed Frankfurt-1 ancestor with an intact ORF 7b was reconstructed. In CaCo-2 and HUH7 cells, but not in Vero cells, the variant carrying the ORF 7b deletion had a replicative advantage against the parental virus (4- and 6-fold increase of virus RNA in supernatant, respectively. This effect was neither associated with changes in the induction or secretion of type I interferon, nor with altered induction of apoptosis in cell culture. However, pretreatment of cells with interferon beta caused the deleted virus to replicate to higher titers than the parental strain (3.4-fold in Vero cells, 7.9-fold in CaCo-2 cells. In Syrian Golden Hamsters inoculated intranasally with 10e4 plaque forming units of either virus, mean titers of infectious virus and viral RNA in the lungs after 24 h were increased 23- and 94.8-fold, respectively, with the deleted virus. This difference could explain earlier observations of enhanced virulence of Frankfurt-1 in Hamsters as compared to other SARS-Coronavirus reference strains and identifies the SARS-CoV 7b protein as an attenuating factor with the SARS-Coronavirus genome. Because attenuation was focused on the early phase of infection in-vivo, ORF 7

  6. BLOCK H-MATRICES AND SPECTRUM OF BLOCK MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄廷祝; 黎稳

    2002-01-01

    The block H-matrices are studied by the concept of G-functions, several concepts of block matrices are introduced. Equivalent characters of block H-matrices are obtained. Spectrum localizations claracterized by Gfunctions for block matrices are got.

  7. Block TERM factorization of block matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHE Yiyuan; HAO Pengwei

    2004-01-01

    Reversible integer mapping (or integer transform) is a useful way to realize Iossless coding, and this technique has been used for multi-component image compression in the new international image compression standard JPEG 2000. For any nonsingular linear transform of finite dimension, its integer transform can be implemented by factorizing the transform matrix into 3 triangular elementary reversible matrices (TERMs) or a series of single-row elementary reversible matrices (SERMs). To speed up and parallelize integer transforms, we study block TERM and SERM factorizations in this paper. First, to guarantee flexible scaling manners, the classical determinant (det) is generalized to a matrix function, DET, which is shown to have many important properties analogous to those of det. Then based on DET, a generic block TERM factorization,BLUS, is presented for any nonsingular block matrix. Our conclusions can cover the early optimal point factorizations and provide an efficient way to implement integer transforms for large matrices.

  8. Fruit bats as a natural reservoir of zoonotic viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    As a natural reservoir of manifold zoonotic viruses, fruit bats have been involved in at least three emerging zoonoses in recent years. This paper aims to introduce the epidemiological characteristics of these diseases emerged in the Australasian region between 1994 and 1999, transmission pathways of the newly discovered viruses and the relationship between the changed entironment of fruit bats and occurrences of these emerging diseases and provide a clue for the epidemiological investigations of SARS.

  9. Dysregulated Type I Interferon and Inflammatory Monocyte-Macrophage Responses Cause Lethal Pneumonia in SARS-CoV-Infected Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fehr, Anthony R; Vijay, Rahul; Mack, Matthias; Zhao, Jincun; Meyerholz, David K; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-02-10

    Highly pathogenic human respiratory coronaviruses cause acute lethal disease characterized by exuberant inflammatory responses and lung damage. However, the factors leading to lung pathology are not well understood. Using mice infected with SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV, we show that robust virus replication accompanied by delayed type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling orchestrates inflammatory responses and lung immunopathology with diminished survival. IFN-I remains detectable until after virus titers peak, but early IFN-I administration ameliorates immunopathology. This delayed IFN-I signaling promotes the accumulation of pathogenic inflammatory monocyte-macrophages (IMMs), resulting in elevated lung cytokine/chemokine levels, vascular leakage, and impaired virus-specific T cell responses. Genetic ablation of the IFN-αβ receptor (IFNAR) or IMM depletion protects mice from lethal infection, without affecting viral load. These results demonstrate that IFN-I and IMM promote lethal SARS-CoV infection and identify IFN-I and IMMs as potential therapeutic targets in patients infected with pathogenic coronavirus and perhaps other respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lesson Thirteen Trifascicular Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 王劲

    2005-01-01

    @@ A complete trifascicular block would result in complete AV block. The idio ventricular rhythm has a slower rate and a wide QRS complex because the pacemaker is located at the peripheral part of the conduction system distal to the sites of the block1. Such a rhythm may be difficult to differentiate from bifascicular or bundle branch block combined with complete block at a higher level such as the AV node or His bundle2. Besides a slower ventricular rate, a change in the morphology of the QRS complex from a previous known bifascicular pattern would be strongly suggestive of a trifascicular origin of the complete AV block3. A His bundle recording is required for a definitive diagnosis, however.

  11. A chimeric virus-mouse model system for evaluating the function and inhibition of papain-like proteases of emerging coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xufang; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Mielech, Anna M; Nichols, Daniel B; Wilson, Michael W; StJohn, Sarah E; Larsen, Scott D; Mesecar, Andrew D; Lenschow, Deborah J; Baric, Ralph S; Baker, Susan C

    2014-10-01

    To combat emerging coronaviruses, developing safe and efficient platforms to evaluate viral protease activities and the efficacy of protease inhibitors is a high priority. Here, we exploit a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) chimeric Sindbis virus system to evaluate protease activities and the efficacy of inhibitors directed against the papain-like protease (PLpro) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), a biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) pathogen. We engineered Sindbis virus to coexpress PLpro and a substrate, murine interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), and found that PLpro mediates removal of ISG15 (deISGylation) from cellular proteins. Mutation of the catalytic cysteine residue of PLpro or addition of a PLpro inhibitor blocked deISGylation in virus-infected cells. Thus, deISGylation is a marker of PLpro activity. Infection of alpha/beta interferon receptor knockout (IFNAR(-/-)) mice with these chimeric viruses revealed that PLpro deISGylation activity removed ISG15-mediated protection during viral infection. Importantly, administration of a PLpro inhibitor protected these mice from lethal infection, demonstrating the efficacy of a coronavirus protease inhibitor in a mouse model. However, this PLpro inhibitor was not sufficient to protect the mice from lethal infection with SARS-CoV MA15, suggesting that further optimization of the delivery and stability of PLpro inhibitors is needed. We extended the chimeric-virus platform to evaluate the papain-like protease/deISGylating activity of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) to provide a small-animal model to evaluate PLpro inhibitors of this recently emerged pathogen. This platform has the potential to be universally adaptable to other viral and cellular enzymes that have deISGylating activities. Importance: Evaluating viral protease inhibitors in a small-animal model is a critical step in the path toward antiviral drug development. We modified a biosafety level 2 chimeric virus system to

  12. Influenza and SARS-coronavirus activating proteases TMPRSS2 and HAT are expressed at multiple sites in human respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts.

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    Stephanie Bertram

    Full Text Available The type II transmembrane serine proteases TMPRSS2 and HAT activate influenza viruses and the SARS-coronavirus (TMPRSS2 in cell culture and may play an important role in viral spread and pathogenesis in the infected host. However, it is at present largely unclear to what extent these proteases are expressed in viral target cells in human tissues. Here, we show that both HAT and TMPRSS2 are coexpressed with 2,6-linked sialic acids, the major receptor determinant of human influenza viruses, throughout the human respiratory tract. Similarly, coexpression of ACE2, the SARS-coronavirus receptor, and TMPRSS2 was frequently found in the upper and lower aerodigestive tract, with the exception of the vocal folds, epiglottis and trachea. Finally, activation of influenza virus was conserved between human, avian and porcine TMPRSS2, suggesting that this protease might activate influenza virus in reservoir-, intermediate- and human hosts. In sum, our results show that TMPRSS2 and HAT are expressed by important influenza and SARS-coronavirus target cells and could thus support viral spread in the human host.

  13. Simultaneous Inversion of GPS and InSAR for Regional Kinematics and Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, R.

    2009-12-01

    The growth of continuous GPS networks and acquisition of InSAR data require fully time-dependent methods for their tectonic analyses. We are working on developing the merger of the kinematic block-model approach with transient deformation with the aim of interpreting the entire geodetic time series. The steady linear motions of the GPS sites are estimated through parameters that describe the block motions (angular velocities) plus elastic strain rates from locked faults and anelastic strain rates from distributed deformation. Through the kinematic model, the steady site velocities have a high degree of spatial correlation. Transients such as earthquakes, after-slip, slow-slip events and volcanic sources are described by a small number of free parameters that are estimated by direct inversion of the position time series simultaneously with the kinematic model parameters. InSAR data are used as line-of-sight displacements between two times (acquisition dates) and are matched by the time-dependent deformation model. We utilize both continuous and survey-mode GPS time series. To date we have applied the method to Cascadia, New Zealand, Sumatra, Papua (Indonesia), Yellowstone (Payne et al., this meeting), and Japan (Ohzono et al., this meeting). In addition to the information we can gain about the kinematics and transients, the method has applications in event detection and outlier removal.

  14. Dietary cholesterol modulates pathogen blocking by Wolbachia.

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    Eric P Caragata

    Full Text Available The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis protects its hosts from a range of pathogens by limiting their ability to form infections inside the insect. This "pathogen blocking" could be explained by innate immune priming by the symbiont, competition for host-derived resources between pathogens and Wolbachia, or the direct modification of the cell or cellular environment by Wolbachia. Recent comparative work in Drosophila and the mosquito Aedes aegypti has shown that an immune response is not required for pathogen blocking, implying that there must be an additional component to the mechanism. Here we have examined the involvement of cholesterol in pathogen blocking using a system of dietary manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster in combination with challenge by Drosophila C virus (DCV, a common fly pathogen. We observed that flies reared on cholesterol-enriched diets infected with the Wolbachia strains wMelPop and wMelCS exhibited reduced pathogen blocking, with viral-induced mortality occurring 2-5 days earlier than flies reared on Standard diet. This shift toward greater virulence in the presence of cholesterol also corresponded to higher viral copy numbers in the host. Interestingly, an increase in dietary cholesterol did not have an effect on Wolbachia density except in one case, but this did not directly affect the strength of pathogen blocking. Our results indicate that host cholesterol levels are involved with the ability of Wolbachia-infected flies to resist DCV infections, suggesting that cholesterol contributes to the underlying mechanism of pathogen blocking.

  15. 基于线性最小均方误差估计的 SAR 图像降噪%SAR image denoising via linear minimum meansquare error estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘书君; 吴国庆; 张新征; 沈晓东; 李勇明

    2016-01-01

    针对合成孔径雷达(synthetic aperture radar,SAR)图像降噪过程中容易引起细节纹理信息损失的问题,该文结合 SAR 图像相干斑噪声的统计特性,提出了一种基于变换域系数线性最小均方误差(linear mini-mum mean-square error,LMMSE)估计的 SAR 图像降噪方法。首先通过 SAR 场景下的 Kmeans 聚类算法将相似图像块聚类;然后针对每一类相似图像块集合进行奇异值分解(singular value decomposition,SVD),得到同时包含图像块集合行列相关信息的含噪奇异值系数;为从含噪奇异值系数中更准确地估计出真实图像奇异值的系数,先通过加性独立信号噪声(additive signal-dependent noise,ASDN)模型将乘性噪声转化为加性噪声,再利用LMMSE 准则对奇异值系数进行估计,最后将估计结果重构得到降噪后的图像块集合。实验结果表明,该方法充分利用相似图像块集合奇异值系数稀疏的特性,采用 LMMSE 准则估计奇异值系数,既保证了系数中噪声分量的去除又避免了图像纹理细节对应小系数的丢失,不仅去噪效果明显,同时能有效地保持图像纹理细节,具有良好的图像视觉效果。%In order to solve the problem that many detail texture information is lost during the synthetic ap-erture radar (SAR)image denoising process,SAR image denoising approach based on the estimated transform domain coefficients by the means of linear minimum mean square error (LMMSE)is proposed,which combines the statistical characteristics of the speckle noise in the SAR image.Firstly,cluster image blocks into disjoint sets of similar blocks through Kmeans corresponding to the SAR scene.Secondly,perform singular value de-composition (SVD)for each set of similar blocks,and the noisy singular value coefficients containing the corre-lation of rows and columns of the set of similar blocks can be obtained.In order to estimate the noise

  16. Cross-reactive antibodies in convalescent SARS patients' sera against the emerging novel human coronavirus EMC (2012) by both immunofluorescent and neutralizing antibody tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwok-Hung; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Tse, Herman; Chen, Honglin; Lau, Candy Choi-Yi; Cai, Jian-Piao; Tsang, Alan Ka-Lun; Xiao, Xincai; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Lau, Susanna Kar-Pui; Woo, Patrick Chiu-Yat; Zheng, Bo-Jiang; Wang, Ming; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-08-01

    A severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-like disease due to a novel betacoronavirus, human coronavirus EMC (HCoV-EMC), has emerged recently. HCoV-EMC is phylogenetically closely related to Tylonycteris-bat-coronavirus-HKU4 and Pipistrellus-bat-coronavirus-HKU5 in Hong Kong. We conducted a seroprevalence study on archived sera from 94 game-food animal handlers at a wild life market, 28 SARS patients, and 152 healthy blood donors in Southern China to assess the zoonotic potential and evidence for intrusion of HCoV-EMC and related viruses into humans. Anti-HCoV-EMC and anti-SARS-CoV antibodies were detected using screening indirect immunofluorescence (IF) and confirmatory neutralizing antibody tests. Two (2.1%) animal handlers had IF antibody titer of ≥ 1:20 against both HCoV-EMC and SARS-CoV with neutralizing antibody titer of SARS patients had significant IF antibody titers with 7/28 (25%) having anti-HCoV-EMC neutralizing antibodies at low titers which significantly correlated with that of HCoV-OC43. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated a significant B-cell epitope overlapping the heptad repeat-2 region of Spike protein. Virulence of SARS-CoV over other betacoronaviruses may boost cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against other betacoronaviruses. Convalescent SARS sera may contain cross-reactive antibodies against other betacoronaviruses and confound seroprevalence study for HCoV-EMC. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. DInSAR Coseismic Deformation of the May 2011 Mw 5.1 Lorca Earthquake (southeastern Spain

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    F. Pérez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The coseismic superficial deformation at the region of Lorca (Murcia, southeastern Spain due to the Mw 5.1 earthquake on 11 May 2011 was characterized by a multidisciplinary team, integrating information from DInSAR, GPS and numerical modelling techniques. Despite the moderate magnitude of the event, quantitative information was obtained from the interferometric study of a pair of TerraSAR-X images. The DinSAR results defined the trace of the fault plane and evidenced uplift of the hanging wall block in agreement with the estimated deformation obtained through an elastic rupture dislocation numerical model. Meanwhile for the footwall block, interferometric results showed that tectonic deformation is masked by an important subsidence related to groundwater extraction previously identified at the area of study. Horizontal crustal deformation rates and velocity vectors, obtained from GPS stations existent at the area, were also coherent with the tectonic setting of the southern margin of the Iberian Peninsula and with the focal mechanism calculated for the Lorca event. The analysis of a continuous GPS site in Lorca showed good agreement with the horizontal N–S direction component relative to the numerical model and tectonics of the region. This is the first time at this seismic active area that a multi-technique analysis has been performed immediately after the occurrence of a seismic event, comparing the existing deformation data with a theoretical numerical model based on estimated seismic rupture dislocation.

  18. MULTI-TEMPORAL SAR INTERFEROMETRY FOR LANDSLIDE MONITORING

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    R. Dwivedi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, SAR Interferometry specially InSAR and D-InSAR were extensively used for deformation monitoring related applications. Due to temporal and spatial decorrelation in dense vegetated areas, effectiveness of InSAR and D-InSAR observations were always under scrutiny. Multi-temporal InSAR methods are developed in recent times to retrieve the deformation signal from pixels with different scattering characteristics. Presently, two classes of multi-temporal InSAR algorithms are available- Persistent Scatterer (PS and Small Baseline (SB methods. This paper discusses the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterer (StaMPS based PS-InSAR and the Small Baselines Subset (SBAS techniques to estimate the surface deformation in Tehri dam reservoir region in Uttarkhand, India. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS approaches used sixteen ENVISAT ASAR C-Band images for generating single master and multiple master interferograms stack respectively and their StaMPS processing resulted in time series 1D-Line of Sight (LOS mean velocity maps which are indicative of deformation in terms of movement towards and away from the satellites. From 1D LOS velocity maps, localization of landslide is evident along the reservoir rim area which was also investigated in the previous studies. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS effectively extract measurement pixels in the study region, and the general results provided by both approaches show a similar deformation pattern along the Tehri reservoir region. Further, we conclude that StaMPS based PS-InSAR method performs better in terms of extracting more number of measurement pixels and in the estimation of mean Line of Sight (LOS velocity as compared to SBAS method. It is also proposed to take up a few major landslides area in Uttarakhand for slope stability assessment.

  19. Multi-Temporal SAR Interferometry for Landslide Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, R.; Narayan, A. B.; Tiwari, A.; Dikshit, O.; Singh, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    In the past few years, SAR Interferometry specially InSAR and D-InSAR were extensively used for deformation monitoring related applications. Due to temporal and spatial decorrelation in dense vegetated areas, effectiveness of InSAR and D-InSAR observations were always under scrutiny. Multi-temporal InSAR methods are developed in recent times to retrieve the deformation signal from pixels with different scattering characteristics. Presently, two classes of multi-temporal InSAR algorithms are available- Persistent Scatterer (PS) and Small Baseline (SB) methods. This paper discusses the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterer (StaMPS) based PS-InSAR and the Small Baselines Subset (SBAS) techniques to estimate the surface deformation in Tehri dam reservoir region in Uttarkhand, India. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS approaches used sixteen ENVISAT ASAR C-Band images for generating single master and multiple master interferograms stack respectively and their StaMPS processing resulted in time series 1D-Line of Sight (LOS) mean velocity maps which are indicative of deformation in terms of movement towards and away from the satellites. From 1D LOS velocity maps, localization of landslide is evident along the reservoir rim area which was also investigated in the previous studies. Both PS-InSAR and SBAS effectively extract measurement pixels in the study region, and the general results provided by both approaches show a similar deformation pattern along the Tehri reservoir region. Further, we conclude that StaMPS based PS-InSAR method performs better in terms of extracting more number of measurement pixels and in the estimation of mean Line of Sight (LOS) velocity as compared to SBAS method. It is also proposed to take up a few major landslides area in Uttarakhand for slope stability assessment.

  20. Impact of the Regulators SigB, Rot, SarA and sarS on the Toxic Shock Tst Promoter and TSST-1 Expression in Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Diego O Andrey

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen manifesting virulence through diverse disease forms, ranging from acute skin infections to life-threatening bacteremia or systemic toxic shock syndromes. In the latter case, the prototypical superantigen is TSST-1 (Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1, encoded by tst(H, and carried on a mobile genetic element that is not present in all S. aureus strains. Transcriptional regulation of tst is only partially understood. In this study, we dissected the role of sarA, sarS (sarH1, RNAIII, rot, and the alternative stress sigma factor sigB (σB. By examining tst promoter regulation predominantly in the context of its native sequence within the SaPI1 pathogenicity island of strain RN4282, we discovered that σB emerged as a particularly important tst regulator. We did not detect a consensus σB site within the tst promoter, and thus the effect of σB is likely indirect. We found that σB strongly repressed the expression of the toxin via at least two distinct regulatory pathways dependent upon sarA and agr. Furthermore rot, a member of SarA family, was shown to repress tst expression when overexpressed, although its deletion had no consistent measurable effect. We could not find any detectable effect of sarS, either by deletion or overexpression, suggesting that this regulator plays a minimal role in TSST-1 expression except when combined with disruption of sarA. Collectively, our results extend our understanding of complex multifactorial regulation of tst, revealing several layers of negative regulation. In addition to environmental stimuli thought to impact TSST-1 production, these findings support a model whereby sporadic mutation in a few key negative regulators can profoundly affect and enhance TSST-1 expression.