WorldWideScience

Sample records for bleaching

  1. Coral Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Brinch, Anna; Hemmingsen, Sofie K. Møhlenfeldt; Rosenquist, Camilla; Tangaa, Stine Rosendal

    2010-01-01

    This review scrutinises the different cellular mechanisms and environmental stressors that lead to bleaching and discuss the numerous effects of these. Coral bleaching is characterized by corals losing their symbiotic zooxanthellae. Different environmental stressors, e.g. elevated sea temperatures, irradiance, changing salinity and increasing atmospheric CO2 induce damage in multiple sites of the photosynthetic apparatus of the zooxanthellae, leading to bleaching. Reactive oxygen species ...

  2. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  3. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  5. BLEACHING NEPTUNE BALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONET Maria Angeles

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Posidonia Oceanic is a seaweed from Mediterranean Sea and it is more concentrated at the Balerian SEA. This implies the Valencian Community also. It forms vaste underwater meadows in the sea and are part of the Mediterranean ecosystem. It is a sea-grass specie with fruits and flowers. Leaves are ribbon-like and they grow in winter and at the end of summer some of them are separated and arrive to some sea line. Fuit is separated and can floate, it is known as “the olive of the sea” mainly in Italy, or as the Neptune Balls. As it can be used in different fields, it is is being studied in order ro have the precitice tests. Some authors have reported the manufacturing of fully bio-based comites with a gluten matrix by hot-press molding. And it has been considered as an effective insulator for building industry or even though to determine the presence of mercure in the Mediterranean sea some years ago. As many applications can be designed from that fibers, it has been considered to be bleached in order to used them in fashionable products. Consequently, its original brown color is not the most suitable one and it should be bleached as many other cellulosic fibers. The aim of this paper is to bleache neptune balls however, the inner fibers were not accessible at all and it implied not to bleach the inner fibers in the neptune ball. Further studiesd will consider bleaching the individualized fibers.

  6. Bleaching of Black Human Hair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琳

    2001-01-01

    Bleaching of black human hair has been studied systematically. On the basis of experimental data the technology of human hair bleaching through five processes was established. The optimum technology of improving the whiteness and reducing damage on fibers has been found. The technology can provide good luster,smooth handle and relatively high strength retention to human hair used for wigs or drama articles, meeting the needs of people better. Moreover, it also has important reference value to bleaching of other colored fibers.

  7. Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    COMBO is a spreadsheet-based model for the use of managers, conservationists, and biologists for projecting the effects of climate change on coral reefs at local-to-regional scales. The COMBO (Coral Mortality and Bleaching Output) model calculates the impacts to coral reefs from...

  8. Study on Bleaching Technology of Cotton Fabric with Sodium Percarbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleach cotton fabric with sodium percarbonate solution. Analyse of the effect of the concentration of sodium percarbonate solution, bleaching time, bleaching temperature and the light radiation on the bleaching effect of fabric.The result shows that increasing concentrations of percarbonate,increasing the bleaching time , raising the bleaching temperature and the UV irradiation may whiten the cotton fabric.The most suitable conditions for the bleaching process is concentration of sodium percarbonate solution 6 g/ L, bleaching temperature 80°C and bleaching time 60 min.

  9. BLEACHING EUCALYPTUS PULPS WITH SHORT SEQUENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Flaviana Reis Milagres; Jorge Luiz Colodette; Marcos Sousa Rabelo; Danila Morais de Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp, due to its high content of hexenuronic acids, is quite easy to bleach. Therefore, investigations have been made attempting to decrease the number of stages in the bleaching process in order to minimize capital costs. This study focused on the evaluation of short ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free) and TCF (Totally Chlorine Free) sequences for bleaching oxygen delignified Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp to 90% ISO brightness: PMoDP (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine d...

  10. In vitro penetration of bleaching agents into the pulp chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Valera, M C; Mancini, M N G;

    2004-01-01

    To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures.......To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures....

  11. Biochemical methane potential of kraft bleaching effluent and codigestion with other in-mill streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Dahl, Olli; Master, Emma;

    2016-01-01

    and in combination: total bleaching effluent, alkaline bleaching effluent, kraft evaporator condensate, and chemithermomechanical pulping effluent. The total bleaching effluent, consisting of the chlorine dioxide bleaching and alkaline bleaching effluents, exhibited the highest potential for organic matter...

  12. On luminescence bleaching of tidal channel sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Pejrup, Morten; Murray, Andrew S.;

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the processes responsible for bleaching of the quartz OSL signal from tidal channel sediment. Tidal dynamics are expected to play an important role for complete bleaching of tidal sediments. However, no studies have examined the amount of reworking occurring in tidal channels and o...

  13. Bleaching in vital teeth: a literary review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Fagundes Soares

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth bleaching technique has presented a significant evolution, promoting higher satisfaction and comfort to the patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to present the bleaching agents and the techniques, discussing advantages and disadvantages of each one, and the effect of these agents in the oral environment. The main agents used in the bleaching technique are the hydrogen peroxide and the carbamide peroxide, promoting the bleaching effect through oxidation of organic compounds. The application of these agents can be made at home or at a doctor office. During treatment, it may occur some adverse effects, such as tooth sensibility, increasing of dental porosity, and some interactions with the restorative material. However, these adverse effects can be eliminated or controlled when the treatment is executed under professional orientation. When the bleaching technique is well indicated and correctly conducted, it is associated with significantly positive results.

  14. [Gingival bleaching: teaching and ethnocentrism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Edson Daruich; Goldenberg, Paulete

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify buccal/gingival cosmetic dentistry patterns subjacent to formation and professional practice of the dental surgeon from the ethnocentrism point of view. This is an exploratory study with a qualitative approach based on the thematic analysis. Initially a documental analysis was carried out. Thereafter, dental surgeons were interviewed and semi-structured questions were applied. In the Periodontal teaching field, this study showed that the presence of racial melanosis is omitted or treated as an alteration in the normality patterns and it is considered anti-aesthetic. All the interviewers learnt how to practice gingival bleaching in the post-graduation courses, they were all encouraged to offer this cosmetic dentistry procedure with the opportunity of obtaining a beautiful and healthy smile, thus assuring the belief of the Caucasian racial aesthetic superiority. This study make us think that the offer of gingival bleaching is oriented by the Caucasian pattern of beauty evidencing the ethnocentric character of this procedure. PMID:20640340

  15. THE STUDY ON TCF BLEACHING OF NS REED PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meihong Niu; Shulan Shi; Jinghui Zhou; Yunzhan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we have researched TCF bleaching on reed pulp including oxygen delignification, oxygen delignification with H2O2 intensification and H2O2 bleaching. The results show that Op-P bleaching process on NS reed pulp is suitable and the brightness of bleached pulp is up to 82% ISO.

  16. THE STUDY ON TCF BLEACHING OF NS REED PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MeihongNiu; ShulanShi; JinghuiZhou; YunzhanZhang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we have researched TCF bleaching on reed pulp including oxygen delignification, oxygen delignification with H202 intensification and H2O2 bleaching. The results show that Op-P bleaching process on NS reed pulp is suitable and the brightness of bleached pulp is up to 82%ISO.

  17. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current

  18. PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF LOW-FREENESS TMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Liu; Y. Ni; Z. Li; G. Court

    2004-01-01

    Peroxide bleaching is an essential unit operation to produce value-added mechanical pulp-based paper grade. In this paper, we presented the results from peroxide bleaching of low-freeness TMP for the production of SC paper. Two aspects were addressed; the effect of pulp strength and the formation of anionic trashes. The strength properties,such as tensile, burst and zero-span tensile, are improved after the peroxide bleaching process. The amount of anionic trashes formed is almost proportional to the hydrogen peroxide charge.

  19. Modeling Reef Hydrodynamics to Predict Coral Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James; Steinberg, Craig; Hardy, Tom

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study is to use environmental physics to predict water temperatures around and within coral reefs. Anomalously warm water is the leading cause for mass coral bleaching; thus a clearer understanding of the oceanographic mechanisms that control reef water temperatures will enable better reef management. In March 1998 a major coral bleaching event occurred at Scott Reef, a 40 km-wide lagoon 300 km off the northwest coast of Australia. Meteorological and coral cover observations were collected before, during, and after the event. In this study, two hydrodynamic models are applied to Scott Reef and validated against oceanographic data collected between March and June 2003. The models are then used to hindcast the reef hydrodynamics that led up to the 1998 bleaching event. Results show a positive correlation between poorly mixed regions and bleaching severity.

  20. Laser and LED external teeth-bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Fatima A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-09-01

    Teeth-bleaching is an initial phase in the reproduction of an aesthetic smile; thus, it is very important that the dentist knows how to diagnose the causes of color changes and indicate whitening before proposing dental treatment. Technological advances in teeth-whitening lead to the development of new techniques, improving comfort, security and decreasing time of execution: argon laser, diode Laser, LED whitening, xenon light whitening. The clearing agent used in all techniques, including home whitening, is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in different concentrations. In this study, the authors describe mechanisms of gel activation, the use of Laser and LED"s for teeth-bleaching, the importance of diagnosis and the comfort of the patient in in-office teeth-bleaching techniques.

  1. The Effects of Habitat on Coral Bleaching Responses in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Grimsditch, Gabriel; Mwaura, Jelvas M.; Kilonzo, Joseph; Amiyo, Nassir

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching incidence was monitored for the whole coral community, while zooxanthellae densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea, and Porites cylindrica) during a non-bleaching year (2006) and a year of mild-bleaching (200...

  2. Side effects of external tooth bleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E.M., Bruzell; Pallesen, Ulla; Thoresen, N.R.;

    2013-01-01

    -office = 39.3% [n = 28]; p >0.05; 95% CI [OR]: 0.198‑1.102) whereas prevalence of gingival irritation was higher after in-office treatment (at-home = 14.0%; in-office = 35.7%; p ... attributed to the bleaching treatment in the at-home and in-office groups, respectively. Predictors for side effects were tooth sensitivity, surface loss and gingivitis when observed at inclusion. Treatment-related predictors were bleaching concentration and contact between tray and gingiva. Conclusions...

  3. Detrimental effects of host anemone bleaching on anemonefish populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz-Agudelo, P.; Jones, G. P.; Thorrold, S. R.; Planes, S.

    2011-06-01

    Coral bleaching and related reef degradation have caused significant declines in the abundance of reef-associated fishes. Most attention on the effects of bleaching has focused on corals, but bleaching is also prevalent in other cnidarians, including sea anemones. The consequences of anemone bleaching are unknown, and the demographic effects of bleaching on associated fish recruitment, survival, and reproduction are poorly understood. We examined the effect of habitat degradation including host anemone bleaching on fish abundance, egg production, and recruitment of the panda anemonefish ( Amphiprion polymnus) near Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Following a high-temperature anomaly in shallow waters of the region, most shallow anemones to a depth of 6 m (approximately 35% of all the anemones in this area) were severely bleached. Anemone mortality was low but bleached anemones underwent a ~34% reduction in body size. Total numbers of A. polymnus were not affected by bleaching and reduction in shelter area. While egg production of females living in bleached anemones was reduced by ~38% in 2009 compared to 2008, egg production of females on unbleached anemones did not differ significantly between years. Total recruitment in 2009 was much lower than in 2008. However, we found no evidence of recruiting larvae avoiding bleached anemones at settlement suggesting that other factors or different chemical cues were more important in determining recruitment than habitat quality. These results provide the first field evidence of detrimental effects of climate-induced bleaching and habitat degradation on reproduction and recruitment of anemonefish.

  4. INFLUENCES OF BLAECHING ADDITIVES ON REED PULP FAST BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanjun Tang; Bingyue Liu; Runan Yang; Zheng Lu

    2004-01-01

    The influences of bleaching additives on hypochlorite single-stage high temperature fast bleaching of neutral-sulfite reed pulp were studied. The influencing factors of bleaching velocity and result were as follows: the order and time of adding imide type additives, additives dosage, the dosage of NaOH and MgO used as buffer to turn up pH.

  5. Bleaching and diffusion dynamics in optofluidic dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Asger;

    2007-01-01

    The authors have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in optofluidic dye lasers where the liquid laser dye in a microfluidic channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. They find that for microfluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules...... pumping devices. ©2007 American Institute of Physics....

  6. Fenomena Bleaching Karang Tahun 2009 di Pulau Badi Selat Makassar (Coral Bleaching Event on 2009 in Badi Island Makassar Strait)

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf, Syafyudin; Rani, Chair; Jompa, Jamaluddin

    2010-01-01

    Bleaching event is loss of zooxanthella from the marine organisms tissue, as a caused by enviromental stress. Coral bleaching fenomenom was observed on May and June 2009 in Badi Island on Makassar Strait, Indonesia . The method used in this study is identified the photos coral colonies which bleaching infected were photographed with a Ixus Digital Canon 75 camera in an underwater housing. The results showed that the bleaching corals are caused by temperature anomaly above 1,24oC higher...

  7. BLEACHING EUCALYPTUS PULPS WITH SHORT SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Reis Milagres

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp, due to its high content of hexenuronic acids, is quite easy to bleach. Therefore, investigations have been made attempting to decrease the number of stages in the bleaching process in order to minimize capital costs. This study focused on the evaluation of short ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free and TCF (Totally Chlorine Free sequences for bleaching oxygen delignified Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp to 90% ISO brightness: PMoDP (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoD/P (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, without washing PMoD(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and pressurized peroxide, D(EPODP (chlorine dioxide, extraction oxidative with oxygen and peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoQ(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide, and XPMoQ(PO (Enzyme, molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide. Uncommon pulp treatments, such as molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide (PMo and xylanase (X bleaching stages, were used. Among the ECF alternatives, the two-stage PMoD/P sequence proved highly cost-effective without affecting pulp quality in relation to the traditional D(EPODP sequence and produced better quality effluent in relation to the reference. However, a four stage sequence, XPMoQ(PO, was required to achieve full brightness using the TCF technology. This sequence was highly cost-effective although it only produced pulp of acceptable quality.

  8. Enzymes improve ECF bleaching of pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachenal, D.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The delignification efficiency of different laccase enzymes was examined on the eucalyptus Kraft pulp. The laccase enzyme from Trametes versicolor showing the highest delignification efficiency was selected and used in the elemental chlorine-free bleaching sequence for improving the pulp bleachability. An appreciable reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was also obtained. Further reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was obtained when the same laccase treated pulp was subjected to an acid treatment after the extraction stage followed by the DEPD sequence. Elemental-chlorine free bleaching was also performed using the xylanase-laccase treated pulp. Xylanase treatment was incorporated to the laccase mediator system in the elemental-chlorine free bleaching both sequentially and simultaneously. The bleaching sequence DEPD followed and in both the cases, the reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was greater in comparison to the control. The chlorine dioxide consumption was reduced further when xylanase-laccase treated pulp was given an additional acid treatment. The final pulp properties of the treated pulps were comparable to the control pulp.

  9. REMINERALIZATION POTENTIAL OF A CARBAMIDE BLEACHING AGENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borislavova Marinova-Takorova Mirela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching has gradually became a popular procedure for people searching for aesthetic improvement. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of bleaching with 45% carbamide peroxide on the level of mineralization of enamel, using laser fluorescence. Materials and methods: Sixty extracted human teeth were treated with 45% carbamid peroxide (Opalescence, Ultradent, 4 consecutive days for one hour each day. The effect of the bleaching agent on the level of mineralization of enamel was measured with DIAGNO dent pen. The statistical method we use was descriptive analysis. Results: The average values, measured before the applications of the carbamid peroxide were 6.33. On the first day they were 5.41, on the second 5.38, on the third 5.11 and 5.35 on the forth. Conclusion: There was observed a slight remineralization effect due to the incorporated Ca2+ and F- ions in the bleaching agent that we have used.

  10. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF CMP PULP USING MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Zeinaly

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional bleaching of hardwood CMP pulp with magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH2 show significant benefits over bleaching with sodium hydroxide (NaOH under various conditions. Magnesium hydroxide bleaching generate higher optical properties, higher pulp yield and lower effluent COD at the same chemical charge, but the physical properties were found to be similar for both processes. The initial freeness of the bleached pulps and refining value to reach a target freeness (about 350 ml. CSF were more for the Mg(OH2-based process. The residual peroxide of filtrate from the Mg(OH2-based process was very high as compared to conventional bleaching.

  11. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes. PMID:27197087

  12. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dishon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS to demonstrate a distinct biologically-induced decline of boron (B isotopic composition (δ11B as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded "vital effect" of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure.

  13. Coral bleaching response index: a new tool to standardize and compare susceptibility to thermal bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Timothy D; Vega-Perkins, Jesse B; Oestreich, William K; Triebold, Conrad; DuBois, Emily; Henss, Jillian; Baird, Andrew; Siple, Margaret; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    As coral bleaching events become more frequent and intense, our ability to predict and mitigate future events depends upon our capacity to interpret patterns within previous episodes. Responses to thermal stress vary among coral species; however the diversity of coral assemblages, environmental conditions, assessment protocols, and severity criteria applied in the global effort to document bleaching patterns creates challenges for the development of a systemic metric of taxon-specific response. Here, we describe and validate a novel framework to standardize bleaching response records and estimate their measurement uncertainties. Taxon-specific bleaching and mortality records (2036) of 374 coral taxa (during 1982-2006) at 316 sites were standardized to average percent tissue area affected and a taxon-specific bleaching response index (taxon-BRI) was calculated by averaging taxon-specific response over all sites where a taxon was present. Differential bleaching among corals was widely variable (mean taxon-BRI = 25.06 ± 18.44%, ±SE). Coral response may differ because holobionts are biologically different (intrinsic factors), they were exposed to different environmental conditions (extrinsic factors), or inconsistencies in reporting (measurement uncertainty). We found that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have comparable influence within a given site and event (60% and 40% of bleaching response variance of all records explained, respectively). However, when responses of individual taxa are averaged across sites to obtain taxon-BRI, differential response was primarily driven by intrinsic differences among taxa (65% of taxon-BRI variance explained), not conditions across sites (6% explained), nor measurement uncertainty (29% explained). Thus, taxon-BRI is a robust metric of intrinsic susceptibility of coral taxa. Taxon-BRI provides a broadly applicable framework for standardization and error estimation for disparate historical records and collection of novel

  14. Changes in bleaching susceptibility among corals subject to ocean warming and recurrent bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan S Pratchett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-building corals in Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare bleaching incidence during mass-bleaching events documented in 1991, 1994, 2002 and 2007. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study compared the proportion of colonies that bleached for four major genera of reef-building corals (Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora and Porites, during each of four well-documented bleaching events from 1991 to 2007. Acropora and Montipora consistently bleached in far greater proportions (up to 98% than Pocillopora and Porites. However, there was an apparent and sustained decline in the proportion of colonies that bleached during successive bleaching events, especially for Acropora and Montipora. In 2007, only 77% of Acropora colonies bleached compared with 98% in 1991. Temporal variation in the proportion of coral colonies bleached may be attributable to differences in environmental conditions among years. Alternately, the sustained declines in bleaching incidence among highly susceptible corals may be indicative of acclimation or adaptation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coral genera that are highly susceptible to coral bleaching, and especially Acropora and Montipora, exhibit temporal declines in their susceptibility to thermal anomalies at Moorea, French Polynesia. One possible explanation for these findings is that gradual removal of highly susceptible genotypes (through selective mortality of individuals, populations, and/or species is producing a coral assemblage that is

  15. Reef fishes can recognize bleached habitat during settlement: sea anemone bleaching alters anemonefish host selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Anna; Dixson, Danielle L

    2016-05-25

    Understanding how bleaching impacts the settlement of symbiotic habitat specialists and whether there is flexibility in settlement choices with regard to habitat quality is essential given our changing climate. We used five anemonefishes (Amphiprion clarkii, Amphiprion latezonatus, Amphiprion ocellaris, Amphiprion percula and Premnas biaculeatus) and three host sea anemones (Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis crispa and Heteractis magnifica) in paired-choice flume experiments to determine whether habitat naive juveniles have the olfactory capabilities to distinguish between unbleached and bleached hosts, and how this may affect settlement decisions. All anemonefishes were able to distinguish between bleached and unbleached hosts, and responded only to chemical cues from species-specific host anemones irrespective of health status, indicating a lack of flexibility in host use. While bleached hosts were selected as habitat, this occurred only when unbleached options were unavailable, with the exception of A. latezonatus, which showed strong preferences for H. crispa regardless of health. This study highlights the potential deleterious indirect impacts of declining habitat quality during larval settlement in habitat specialists, which could be important in the field, given that bleaching events are becoming increasingly common. PMID:27226472

  16. Enzymes improve ECF bleaching of pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Lachenal, D.; Bajpai, P. K.; S P Mishra; Sharma, N.; Anand, A; Bajpai, P.

    2006-01-01

    The delignification efficiency of different laccase enzymes was examined on the eucalyptus Kraft pulp. The laccase enzyme from Trametes versicolor showing the highest delignification efficiency was selected and used in the elemental chlorine-free bleaching sequence for improving the pulp bleachability. An appreciable reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was also obtained. Further reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was obtained when the same laccase treated pulp was subjected to an...

  17. Bleached dissolving pulps applying laccase treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Quintana, Elisabet; Valls Vidal, Cristina; Roncero Vivero, María Blanca

    2012-01-01

    A biobleaching sequence, using a laccase enzyme (Trametes Villosa) in combination with different mediators, was applied to softwood dissolving cellulose in order to study its bleaching efficiency and its potential in terms of kappa number, ISO brightness and viscosity. The tested mediators were classified as synthetic compounds such as HBT (1-hydroxybenzotriazole) and VA (violuric acid), and as natural compounds such as SA (syringaldehyde) and pCA (p-coumaric acid). The influence of the enzym...

  18. Dental pulp vascular permeability changes induced by dental bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane da Costa; Sueli Patricia Harumi Miyagi; Marcelo dos Santos; Manoel Eduardo de Lima Machado; Márcia Martins Marques

    2012-01-01

    Aiming to compare the effect of different light sources for dental bleaching on vascular permeability of dental pulps, forty-eight incisors were used. The bleaching agent (35 % hydrogen peroxide) was activated by halogen light; LED (Light Emitting Diode) or LED, followed by laser phototherapy (LPT) (λ = 780 nm; 3 J/cm²). After the bleaching procedures, the animals received an intra-arterial dye injection and one hour later were sacrificed. The teeth were diaphanized and photographed. The...

  19. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Janaina Freitas BORTOLATTO; Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire de; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraq...

  20. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    OpenAIRE

    Hassanein, M. M.M.; El- Shami, S. M.; Taha, F. S.

    2011-01-01

    Peanut hulls (PNH) were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV), reduction in phospholipids (PL) and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN), PNH and Fuller’s e...

  1. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    OpenAIRE

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-01-01

    Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose...

  2. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, J R; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; D. Raingeard; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P.A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P D

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on:...

  3. A global protocol for monitoring of coral bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, J.; Setiasih, N.; Marshall, P.; Hansen, L.

    2004-01-01

    Coral bleaching and subsequent mortality represent a major threat to the future health and productivity of coral reefs. However a lack of reliable data on occurrence, severity and other characteristics of bleaching events hampers research on the causes and consequences of this important phenomenon. This article describes a global protocol for monitoring coral bleaching events, which addresses this problem and can be used by people with different levels of expertise and resources.

  4. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress. PMID:26876092

  5. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahson Berhane Alemu I

    Full Text Available Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  6. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded vital effect of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure. Understanding the frequency of bleaching events is also critical for determining the relationship between natural and anthropogenic causes of these events.

  7. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    OpenAIRE

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; K. Kaczmarek; Bijma, J.; D. F. Gruber; O. Nir; Y. Popovich; D. Tchernov

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events hav...

  8. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    OpenAIRE

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; K. Kaczmarek; Bijma, J.; D. F. Gruber; O. Nir; Y. Popovich; D. Tchernov

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been ex...

  9. PROCESS OPTIMIZATION OF TETRA ACETYL ETHYLENE DIAMINE ACTIVATED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF POPULUS NIGRA CTMP

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Zhao; Junwen Pu; Shulei Mao; Guibo Qi

    2010-01-01

    To enhance the bleaching efficiency, the activator of tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED) was used in conventional H2O2 bleaching. The H2O2/TAED bleaching system can accelerate the reaction rate and shorten bleaching time at relative low temperature, which can reduce the production cost. In this research, the process with hydrogen peroxide activated by TAED bleaching of Populus nigra chemi-thermo mechanical pulp was optimized. Suitable bleaching conditions were confirmed as follows: pulp con...

  10. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad E. Rokaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n=27 according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n=9 according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide, group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide, group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture, and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture. Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Bleach Plant Capital Reduction with Rapid DO Bleaching and Simplified (D/E/D) Stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. McDonough; C. E. Courchene; J-C. Baromes

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the capabilities of a bleaching sequence that combined a short retention time initial chlorine dioxide stage, referred to as rapid D0, (D0R), with simplified bleaching stages, (D1/E/D2), that required only one final bleach washer. The test sequence DR(EPO)(D/E/D/) was compared to a control sequence, D(EPO)D, for both hardwood and softwood pulps. The capabilities of the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence were successfully demonstrated. An existing three- or four-stage bleach plan can be converted to the more powerful DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence without the major capital cost of additional washers. The results from this study showed that the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence can reach 85 brightness on SW with 2.8% total C1O2, while the control sequence, D(EPO)D, required 3.9% C1O2. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX for the test sequence. The strength of pulp bleached in the test sequence was similar to or slightly higher than the control. For the HW pu lp, the test sequence reached 88 brightness with 2.2% C1O2 compared to 3.3% C1O2 for the control. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX generation with the lower chemical requirements. The final viscosity and pulp strength for the test sequence on HW was significantly higher than the corresponding values for the control sequence.

  12. Investigating Motivations for Women's Skin Bleaching in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kelly M.; Robkin, Navit; Gaska, Karie; Njoki, Lillian Carol

    2011-01-01

    Why do many African women continue to use damaging skin-bleaching cosmetics that contain dangerous chemicals (e.g., mercury) that may increase their rates of infertility, skin cancer, and serious skin/brain/kidney disease? To address this question, our study investigated motivations driving the preservation of skin-bleaching practices in Tanzania.…

  13. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section 872.6475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching...

  14. Dental pulp vascular permeability changes induced by dental bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane da Costa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to compare the effect of different light sources for dental bleaching on vascular permeability of dental pulps, forty-eight incisors were used. The bleaching agent (35 % hydrogen peroxide was activated by halogen light; LED (Light Emitting Diode or LED, followed by laser phototherapy (LPT (λ = 780 nm; 3 J/cm². After the bleaching procedures, the animals received an intra-arterial dye injection and one hour later were sacrificed. The teeth were diaphanized and photographed. The amount of blue stain content of each dental pulp was quantified using a computer imaging program. The data was statistically compared (p < 0.05. The results showed a significant higher (p < 0.01 dye content in the groups bleached with halogen light, compared with the control, LED and LED plus LPT groups. Thus, tooth bleaching activated by LED or LED plus LPT induces lesser resulted in increased vascular permeability than halogen light.

  15. The effect of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion of resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Hajizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This experimental study was designed to focus on the effects of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion in three types of composites with different filler size. Materials and Methods: Forty eight disks were prepared from three types of composite and divided into 6 groups. In the first three groups the abrasion test was done. The remaining groups were bleached and the abrasion test was performed. The weight of the samples before and after abrasion was measured. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: There was a significant difference in abrasion of composites with different filler size (P < 0.05. The most amount of abrasion was observed in Z100 after being bleached. An increase in abrasion was noticed in all three types of tested composite after bleaching. Conclusion: According to the findings, it is suggested to use a nano filled resin composite for restoration if the bleaching treatment is required.

  16. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p 3.3). PMID:27034897

  17. The use of lactoperoxidase for the bleaching of fluid whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R E; Kang, E J; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2012-06-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LP) is the second most abundant enzyme in bovine milk and has been used in conjunction with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and thiocyanate (SCN⁻) to work as an antimicrobial in raw milk where pasteurization is not feasible. Thiocyanate is naturally present and the lactoperoxidase system purportedly can be used to bleach dairy products, such as whey, with the addition of very little H₂O₂ to the system. This study had 3 objectives: 1) to quantify the amount of H₂O₂ necessary for bleaching of fluid whey using the LP system, 2) to monitor LP activity from raw milk through manufacture of liquid whey, and 3) to compare the flavor of whey protein concentrate 80% (WPC80) bleached by the LP system to that bleached by traditional H₂O₂ bleaching. Cheddar cheese whey with annatto (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk, annatto with 3% wt/vol norbixin content) was manufactured using a standard Cheddar cheesemaking procedure. Various levels of H₂O₂ (5-100 mg/kg) were added to fluid whey to determine the optimum concentration of H₂O₂ for LP activity, which was measured using an established colorimetric method. In subsequent experiments, fat-separated whey was bleached for 1h with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg (traditional) or 20 mg of H₂O₂/kg (LP system). The WPC80 was manufactured from whey bleached with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg or 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. All samples were subjected to color analysis (Hunter color values and norbixin extraction) and proximate analysis (fat, protein, and moisture). Sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were conducted on WPC80. Optimal LP bleaching in fluid whey occurred with the addition of 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. Bleaching of fluid whey at either 35 or 50°C for 1 h with LP resulted in > 99% norbixin destruction compared with 32 or 47% destruction from bleaching with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg, at 35 or 50°C for 1 h, respectively. Higher aroma intensity and increased lipid oxidation compounds were documented in WPC80 from

  18. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, M. M.; El-Shami, S. M.; Taha, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Peanut hulls (PNH) were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV), reduction in phospholipids (PL) and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN), PNH and Fuller's earth (FE) and PNH and O-passive (OP) and examined. The oxidative stability of oils was determined. Results for the investigated commercial bleaching clays revealed: TN > FE > F > TF > OP. Highest reduction in PV and PL, and highest bleachability were achieved for soybean oil bleached with 2% PNH carbonized at 500 degree centigrade for 30 min (PNH). Mixtures of PNH with the three chosen bleaching clays indicated that 1PNH : 2TN gave the highest bleachability. CSO was miscella bleached in hexane using PNH and resulted in an appreciable improvement in all oil characteristics, especially in bleachability. Oxidative stability of oils was in the following order: TN > control > FE > PNH with Induction period values of 23.1 > 6.43 > 5.73 > 2.85 h, respectively. (Author) 20 refs.

  19. Intrapulpal temperature variation during bleaching with various activation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Masae de Araujo Michida

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intrapulpal temperature variation after bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide using different sources of activation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four human teeth were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction providing 48 specimens, and were divided into 4 groups (n=12: (G1 Control - Bleaching gel without light activation, (G2 Bleaching gel + halogen light, (G3 Bleaching gel + LED, (G4 Bleaching gel + Nd:YAG Laser. The temperatures were recorded using a digital thermometer at 4 time points: before bleaching gel application, 1 min after bleaching gel application, during activation of the bleaching gel, and after the bleaching agent turned from a dark-red into a clear gel. Data were analyzed statistically by the Dunnet's test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. RESULTS: The mean intrapulpal temperature values (ºC in the groups were: G1: 0.617 ± 0.41; G2: 1.800 ± 0.68; G3: 0.975 ± 0.51; and G4: 4.325 ± 1.09. The mean maximum temperature variation (MTV values were: 1.5ºC (G1, 2.9ºC (G2, 1.7ºC (G3 and 6.9ºC (G4. When comparing the experimental groups to the control group, G3 was not statistically different from G1 (p>0.05, but G2 and G4 presented significantly higher (p<0.05 intrapulpal temperatures and MTV. The three experimental groups differed significantly (p<0.05 from each other. CONCLUSIONS: The Nd:YAG laser was the activation method that presented the highest values of intrapulpal temperature variation when compared with LED and halogen light. The group activated by LED light presented the lowest values of temperature variation, which were similar to that of the control group.

  20. A bleaching earth from egyptian local deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Kinawy, Omayma S.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the bleaching of vegetable oils using activated clays collected from some deposits in Egypt as compared to Tonsil FF currently used by local oil industry. The comparison was made; not only on the basis of the decolourising power of the earth, but also on the basis of its effects on the oil acidity, formation of the oil peroxides and the decomposition rate of the formed peroxides to aldehydes and ketones during the bleaching process. The activation of the collected earth samples was made using 4N HCl, 6N HCl and 30 % H2SO4. The bleaching tests of the activated samples were performed using the major four oil types processed in Egypt being cottonseed, sunflower, soybean and palm oils. In addition to the laboratory-evaluation tests, the performance of the activated samples, which showed promise on the lab-scale have been also tested on an industrial scale. The industrial application has proved that the activated local earth's can be successfully used as bleaching earth of local oils. Thus it can be used as a substitute of the varieties currently imported and used by the local oil sector.La presente investigación trata de la decoloración de aceites vegetales usando tierras activadas obtenidas de yacimientos egipcios, comparándola con el Tonsil FF usado normalmente en la industria oleícola local. La comparación se realizó, no sólo sobre la base del poder decolorante de la tierra, sino también sobre la base de sus efectos en la acidez del aceite, la formación de peróxidos y la velocidad de descomposición de los peróxidos formados en aldehidos y cetonas durante el proceso de decoloración. La activación de las muestras de tierras recogidas se hizo utilizando ClH 4N, ClH 6N y H2SO4 30 %. Los tests de decoloración de las muestras activadas se llevaron a cabo usando los cuatro tipos mayoritarios de aceites procesados en Egipto: aceite de semilla de algodón, de girasol, de soja y de palma. Además de los

  1. STUDY ON FORMAMIDINE SULPHINIC ACID BLEACHING OF POPLAR APMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meiyun Zhang; Zhaoqing Lu

    2004-01-01

    Bleaching of poplar APMP with Formamidine sulphinic acid (FAS) was investigated in this paper.The effects of FAS charges, ratio of treatment on the brightness gain, color reduction and pulp strength were studied. A single-stage FAS bleaching was optimized. Under the conditions of 10 % pulp consistency, 60 minutes time and 70℃ reaction temperature and 0.6 %, FAS (on 0.d.pulp), ratio of FAS to NaOH was 2, we produced a bleached pulp with a brightness of 62.3 %(SBD), a brightness gain of 9.2 units.

  2. STUDY ON FORMAMIDINE SULPHINIC ACID BLEACHING OF POPLAR APMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MeiyunZhang; ZhaooinLu

    2004-01-01

    Bleaching of poplar APMP with Formamidinesulphinic acid (FAS) was investigated in this paper.The effects of FAS charges, ratio of treatment on thebrightness gain, color reduction and pulp strengthwere studied. A single-stage FAS bleaching wasoptimized. Under the conditions of 10 % pulpconsistency, 60 minutes time and 70~C reactiontemperature and 0.6 %, FAS (on 0.d.pulp), ratio ofFAS to NaOH was 2, we produced a bleached pulpwith a brightness of 62.3 %(SBD), a brightness gainof 9.2 units.

  3. FRAP analysis: accounting for bleaching during image capture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wu

    Full Text Available The analysis of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP experiments involves mathematical modeling of the fluorescence recovery process. An important feature of FRAP experiments that tends to be ignored in the modeling is that there can be a significant loss of fluorescence due to bleaching during image capture. In this paper, we explicitly include the effects of bleaching during image capture in the model for the recovery process, instead of correcting for the effects of bleaching using reference measurements. Using experimental examples, we demonstrate the usefulness of such an approach in FRAP analysis.

  4. Reuse of discarded deactivated bleaching earth in the bleaching of oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girgis, Adel Y.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Discarded bleaching earth was used after its reactivation for the bleaching of sunflower, soybean and corn oils. The efficiency of reactivated bleaching earth was compared to the efficiency of virgin activated bleaching earth. Acid reactivated earth (pH 2.5-3 had a slightly higher content in silicone than virgin activated or neutralized reactivated earths. The best results in the color of sunflower and corn oils were obtained when neutralized earth (pH 6–7 was used at 1 and 2 % levels. Acid reactivated earth used at 2 % achieved a higher reduction in soybean oil color than virgin earth (pH 3 at the same dosage. Both reactivated earths reduced peroxide value, iron, conjugated dienes and soap, while they increased acidity and conjugated trienes. Furthermore, these reactivated earths determined higher decrements in the oil induction period than virgin earth. Reactivated earth could be used for 5 cycles for the bleaching of soybean or corn oils and for more than 6 cycles for sunflower oil.Tierra decolorante desechada, fue empleada, tras su reactivación para decolorar aceites de girasol, soja y maíz. La eficiencia de la tierra decolorante reactivada fue comparada con la de la virgen activada. La tierra reactivada ácida (pH 2,5–3 tuvo ligeramente mayor contenido en silicona que la tierra virgen o la reactivada neutra. Los mejores resultados en el color de los aceites de girasol y maíz fueron obtenidos cuando se emplearon niveles del 1 y 2 % de tierra reactivada neutra (pH 6-7. La tierra ácida reactivada, usada al 2 % consiguió una mayor reducción del color del aceite de soja, que una misma dosis de tierra virgen (pH 3. Ambas tierras reactivadas redujeron el índice de peróxidos, hierro, dienos conjugados y jabón de los aceites, mientras que hicieron aumentar la acidez y los trienos conjugados. Además, estas tierras reactivadas determinaron mayores descensos en los periodos de inducción del aceite que la tierra virgen. Las tierras

  5. Study of Melanin Bleaching After Immunohistochemistry of Melanin-containing Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hongwu; Wu, Wenqiao

    2015-01-01

    Melanin may interfere with immunohistochemical staining. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) bleaching, potassium permanganate bleaching, and potassium dichromate bleaching on melanin, tissue antigen, and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) using melanin-containing and melanin-free tissue samples. Our results demonstrated that all 3 bleaching methods efficiently bleached melanin and partially destroyed tissue antigen. In addition, potassium perman...

  6. Contrasting Patterns of Coral Bleaching Susceptibility in 2010 Suggest an Adaptive Response to Thermal Stress

    OpenAIRE

    James R Guest; Baird, Andrew H.; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Efin Muttaqin; Alasdair J Edwards; Stuart J Campbell; Katie Yewdall; Yang Amri Affendi; Loke Ming Chou

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surveys to estimate the bleaching ...

  7. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Khoroushi; Tahereh Saneie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were in...

  8. Ecology: Deep and complex ways to survive bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, John M.

    2015-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events can drive reefs from being the domains of corals to becoming dominated by seaweed. But longitudinal data show that more than half of the reefs studied rebound to their former glory. See Letter p.94

  9. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; de Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, Brazil. The patient underwent dental bleaching using one of the new products with reduced hydrogen peroxide concentration, Lase Peroxide Lite 6%, a 6% H2O2 gel containing titanium oxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen (6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2).

  10. New Parameter for In-Office Dental Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; de Carvalho, Priscila Petrucelli Freire; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Floros, Michael Christopher; Junior, Osmir Batista de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Dental bleaching is considered a conservative and biologically safe treatment for discolored teeth. Despite this, one of the major undesirable effects of bleaching is dentin sensitivity which may occur during and after treatment. To address these sensitivity issues, new dental bleaching preparations with lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have recently been introduced to the market. This paper presents a clinical case report of a 20-year-old female patient admitted to the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP, Brazil. The patient underwent dental bleaching using one of the new products with reduced hydrogen peroxide concentration, Lase Peroxide Lite 6%, a 6% H2O2 gel containing titanium oxide nanoparticles doped with nitrogen (6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2). PMID:27375906

  11. Through bleaching and tsunami: Coral reef recovery in the Maldives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morri, Carla; Montefalcone, Monica; Lasagna, Roberta; Gatti, Giulia; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, Giuseppe; Colantoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Carlo Nike

    2015-09-15

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cover, which dropped to less than 10% after the bleaching, returned to pre-bleaching values of around 50% by 2013. The 2004 tsunami had comparatively little effect. In 2014, the coral community was similar to that existing before the bleaching. According to descriptors and metrics adopted, recovery of Maldivian coral reefs took between 6 and 15years, or may even be considered unachieved, as there are species that had not come back yet. PMID:26228070

  12. BLEACHING OF SULFONATED CMP FROM BIO-TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongYu; MenghuaQin; XuemeiLu; YinboQu; PeijiGao

    2004-01-01

    Wheat straw chemi-mechanical pulp was pretreated with a crude xylanase which was secreted by white rot fungus Phanerochaete Chrysosporium prior to hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The process of xylanase pretreatment and hydrogen peroxide bleaching was optimized. The xylanase treated pulp achieved a brightness gain of 5.8% ISO over the untreated pulp. The xylanase treatment was found to liberate reducing sugars and facilitating lignin removal. Fiber morphology of pulp treated with xylanase was also studied by SEM.

  13. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Francisco Lia MONDELLI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser, a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05. Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C. The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C. The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures.

  14. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeland Jozef Gentil De Moor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect.

  15. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; SOARES, Ana Flávia; PANGRAZIO, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; WANG, Linda; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sergio Kiyoshi; BOMBONATTI, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures. PMID:27119761

  16. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Roeland Jozef Gentil De Moor; Jeroen Verheyen; Andrii Diachuk; Peter Verheyen; Maarten August Meire; Peter Jozef De Coster; Filip Keulemans; Mieke De Bruyne; Laurence James Walsh

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocata...

  17. Conservation of Coral Reefs after the 1998 Global Bleaching Event

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, R.L.; Goreau, T.J.; Mcclanahan, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Large-scale coral bleaching has happened repeatedly in the Pacific and Indian oceans and the Caribbean since 1982. Previously it was observed only on a small scale (Williams and Bunkley- Williams 1990;Jokiel & Coles 1990; Glynn 1988, 1991; Goreau et al. 1993; Goreau & Hayes 1994, 1995). The 1998 bleaching event was globally the most extensive such event recorded except in the Caribbean and Central Pacific where a comparison of year-byyear temperature and bl...

  18. Endolithic algae: an alternative source of photoassimilates during coral bleaching.

    OpenAIRE

    Fine, Maoz; Loya, Yossi

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports of worldwide coral bleaching events leading to devastating coral mortality have caused alarm among scientists and resource managers. Differential survival of coral species through bleaching events has been widely documented. We suggest that among the possible factors contributing to survival of coral species during such events are endolithic algae harboured in their skeleton, providing an alternative source of energy. We studied the dynamics of photosynthetic pigment concentrat...

  19. The effect of combined bleaching techniques on oral microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz-Montan Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of 10% and 37% carbamide peroxide during dental bleaching in three different modes. Materials and Methods : This five-week double-blind randomized controlled trial included 32 volunteers assigned to four groups (n = 8. Each group received bleaching agents or placebo as an in-office and at-home treatment. The dental bleaching techniques were: In-office bleaching (37% carbamide peroxide: CP37; at-home bleaching (10% carbamide peroxide: CP10 and the association of both (CP37 and CP10. Saliva samples were collected right before (baseline, right after, 12 hours after, and seven days after the treatment. Counts of total microorganisms, Streptococci, and Mutans streptococci were carried out. Friedman test (α = 0.05 was used to compare the microorganism counts. Results : The number of the all oral microorganisms remained stable during all experiment. Conclusions : No bleaching agent (CP37, CP10 or the combination of both was able to reduce the oral microorganisms tested.

  20. PROCESS OPTIMIZATION OF TETRA ACETYL ETHYLENE DIAMINE ACTIVATED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF POPULUS NIGRA CTMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the bleaching efficiency, the activator of tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED was used in conventional H2O2 bleaching. The H2O2/TAED bleaching system can accelerate the reaction rate and shorten bleaching time at relative low temperature, which can reduce the production cost. In this research, the process with hydrogen peroxide activated by TAED bleaching of Populus nigra chemi-thermo mechanical pulp was optimized. Suitable bleaching conditions were confirmed as follows: pulp consistency 10%, bleaching temperature 70oC, bleaching time 60 min when the charge of H2O2 was 4%, NaOH charge 2%, and molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 0.3. The pulp brightness gain reached 23.6% ISO with the optimized bleaching conditions. FTIR analysis indicated that the H2O2/TAED bleaching system can decrease carbonyl group further than that of conventional H2O2 bleaching, which contributed to the higher bleaching efficiency and final brightness. The H2O2/TAED bleaching had stronger oxidation ability on lignin than that of H2O2 bleaching.

  1. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-01

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  2. Influence of H2SO4 as Activator to ClO2 on the Bleaching Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Xingxiang Ji; Jiachuan Chen; Guihua Yang,; Zhong Jian Tian

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we show that chlorine dioxide activated by 4% Hydrochloric Acid Solution (HCl) has the same bleaching effects as that by sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Chlorine dioxide is an important bleaching agent in ECF bleaching. Stable chlorine dioxide in conjunction with Hydrochloric Acid Solution (HCl) activation in a certain proportion can be applied in the process of pulp bleach with a bleaching result of environment friendly, positive brightness stability, low pollutant bleach and pulp brig...

  3. Bacteria associated with the bleached and cave coral Oculina patagonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Omry; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2008-04-01

    The relative abundance of bacteria in the mucus and tissues of Oculina patagonica taken from bleached and cave (azooxanthellae) corals was determined by analyses of the 16S rRNA genes from cloned libraries of extracted DNA and from isolated colonies. The results were compared to previously published data on healthy O. patagonica. The bacterial community of bleached, cave, and healthy corals were completely different from each other. A tight cluster (>99.5% identity) of bacteria, showing 100% identity to Acinetobacter species, dominated bleached corals, comprising 25% of the 316 clones sequenced. The dominant bacterial cluster found in cave corals, representing 29% of the 97 clones sequenced, showed 98% identity to an uncultured bacterium from the Great Barrier Reef. Vibrio splendidus was the most dominant species in healthy O. patagonica. The culturable bacteria represented 0.1-1.0% of the total bacteria (SYBR Gold staining) of the corals. The most abundant culturable bacteria in bleached, cave, and healthy corals were clusters that most closely matched Microbulbifer sp., an alpha-proteobacterium previously isolated from healthy corals and an alpha-protobacterium (AB026194), respectively. Three generalizations emerge from this study on O. patagonica: (1) More bacteria are associated with coral tissue than mucus; (2) tissue and mucus populations are different; (3) bacterial populations associated with corals change dramatically when corals lack their symbiotic zooxanthellae, either as a result of the bleaching disease or when growing in the absence of light.

  4. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  5. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  6. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm x 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  7. Coral Reef Bleaching at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep Atolls, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramar Vinoth; Mohan Gopi; Thipramalai Thankappanpillai Ajith Kumar; Thirunavukarassu Thangaradjou; Thangavel Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    A survey on coral bleaching was carried out at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep from May to June 2010.Elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the region exceeded the seasonal average and delayed the onset of monsoon,which triggered widespread bleaching of corals.The Agatti reefs showed an average of 73% bleached corals with apparent bleaching-related mortality of sea anemones (87%) and giant clams (83%).The SST increased up to 34 ℃ with an average maximum SST of 32.5℃ during the study period between May and June 2010.Coral reefs on the southern side of the island are fully or partially exposed to sun light during low tide in contrast to the other side.This suggests that the mortality is more likely due to the low tide exposure than exclusively due to the elevated SST.Observations indicated a clear increase in coral bleaching during April 2010,at levels higher than that in normal summer.

  8. Deoiling and Regeneration Efficiencies of Spent Bleaching Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Nursulihatimarsyila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Disposal and reuse of Spent Bleaching Clay (SBC from palm oil processing industry is a problem of growing importance. The residual oil in the SBC can be recovered using hexane as solvent.Approach: In this study, the effect of different solid to solvent ratio on the deoiling efficiency of SBC samples from palm oil refinery and palm kernel refinery were studied. The amount of extracted oil and deoiling efficiency for both types of SBC increases as the solid to solvent ratio is decreased. Results: All the extracted oils, irrespective of the amount of solvent used, have poorer quality than crude oil and may be difficult to be refined to good quality and stability.Conclusion: The deoiled SBC treated using different solid to solvent ratio gave almost similar regeneration efficiency i.e., about 80% for bleaching of CPO and not more than 30% for bleaching of CPKO.

  9. Tooth bleaching--a critical review of the biological aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J E; Pallesen, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    model, indicated that hydrogen peroxide might act as a promoter. Multiple exposures of hydrogen peroxide have resulted in localized effects on the gastric mucosa, decreased food consumption, reduced weight gain, and blood chemistry changes in mice and rats. Our risk assessment revealed that a sufficient......-bleaching technique is used, the first subjective change in tooth color may be observed after 2-4 nights of tooth bleaching, and more than 90% satisfactory results have been reported. Tooth sensitivity is a common side-effect of external tooth bleaching observed in 15%-78% of the patients, but clinical studies...... addressing the risk of other adverse effects are lacking. Direct contact with hydrogen peroxide induced genotoxic effects in bacteria and cultured cells, whereas the effect was reduced or abolished in the presence of metabolizing enzymes. Several tumor-promoting studies, including the hamster cheek pouch...

  10. SUGARCANE BAGASSE PULPING AND BLEACHING: THERMAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Fernandes Pereira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose fibers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse in three stages. Initially sugarcane bagasse was subjected to a pre-treatment process with hydrolyzed acid to eliminate hemicellulose. Whole cellulosic fibers thus obtained were then subjected to a two-stage delignification process and finally to a bleaching process. The chemical structure of the resulting cellulose fibers was studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to analyze the effects of hydrolysis, delignification, and bleaching on the structure of the fibers. Two different thermal analysis techniques were used to study the bleaching cellulose fibers. These techniques confirmed that cellulose fibers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse. A future goal is to use these fibers as reinforcement elements in composites, organic-inorganic hybrid, and membranes for nanofiltration.

  11. Bleaching absorption fronts and beam propagation in laser-heated solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the propagation velocity of bleaching laser-driven heating waves in the supersonic mode is governed by the requirement that the bleached plasma maintains an optical thickness of unity. It is proposed that in the case where the bleached plasma is confined by very large magnetic fields, the diameter of the plasma column may self-regulate so that the bleaching wave propagates at the Alfven velocity

  12. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Ashley J Frisch; Ford, Benjamin M.; Michele Thums; Pablo Saenz-Agudelo; Kathryn A Furby; Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of...

  13. Coral bleaching, rise in sea temperature, and the population of Acanthaster planci in Okinawa

    OpenAIRE

    Arakaki, Yuji; Yamazato, Kiyoshi; 新垣, 裕治; 山里, 清; 名桜大学・国際・観光

    2001-01-01

    Large scale coral bleaching in Japanese waters, extending from the Ryukyus to southern Kyushyu, occurred in 1998 owing to high seawater temperature. In this study, the authors show population fluctuations of Acanthaster planci before and after this bleaching event, and try to explain the reason for these fluctuations in relation to this event. A. planci, a strong coral predator, prefers to prey on acroporid corals. These corals are easily bleached, and most of them died from the bleaching dur...

  14. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Alves Rodrigues Britto; Adriana Simoni Lucato; Heloisa Cristina Valdrighi; Sílvia Amélia Scudeler Vedovello

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied...

  15. Sunflower oil bleaching by adsorption onto acid-activated bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Foletto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Two bentonite clays with different mineralogical compositions from Mendoza, Argentine, were activated with H2SO4 solutions of 4 and 8 N at 90ºC for 3.5 hours. This treatment affected clay structural properties, as was shown by thermogravimetry, infrared spectrometry and chemical analysis. Bleaching efficiency for sunflower oil was strongly dependent on the acid concentration used for clay activation. The samples have bleaching capacity comparable to that observed with a commercial adsorbent standard. The mineralogical composition of natural clays influenced the properties of the activated clays.

  16. MOLYBDENUM CATALYZED ACID PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos S. Rabelo; Jorge L. Colodette; Vera M. Sacon; Marcelo R. Silva; Marco A. B. Azevedo

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum catalyzed peroxide bleaching (PMo Stage) consists of pulp treatment with hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions in the presence of a molybdenum catalyst. Molybdenum is applied in catalytic doses (50-200 mg/kg pulp) and may originate from various sources, including (NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O, Na2MoO4.2H2O, siliconmolybdate, etc. This work is aimed at optimizing the PMo stage and evaluating its industrial application in the OAZDP sequence. Optimum PMo stage conditions for bleaching eucalyp...

  17. Climatological context for large-scale coral bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, A. D.; Casey, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale coral bleaching was first observed in 1979 and has occurred throughout virtually all of the tropics since that time. Severe bleaching may result in the loss of live coral and in a decline of the integrity of the impacted coral reef ecosystem. Despite the extensive scientific research and increased public awareness of coral bleaching, uncertainties remain about the past and future of large-scale coral bleaching. In order to reduce these uncertainties and place large-scale coral bleaching in the longer-term climatological context, specific criteria and methods for using historical sea surface temperature (SST) data to examine coral bleaching-related thermal conditions are proposed by analyzing three, 132 year SST reconstructions: ERSST, HadISST1, and GISST2.3b. These methodologies are applied to case studies at Discovery Bay, Jamaica (77.27°W, 18.45°N), Sombrero Reef, Florida, USA (81.11°W, 24.63°N), Academy Bay, Galápagos, Ecuador (90.31°W, 0.74°S), Pearl and Hermes Reef, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (175.83°W, 27.83°N), Midway Island, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (177.37°W, 28.25°N), Davies Reef, Australia (147.68°E, 18.83°S), and North Male Atoll, Maldives (73.35°E, 4.70°N). The results of this study show that (1) The historical SST data provide a useful long-term record of thermal conditions in reef ecosystems, giving important insight into the thermal history of coral reefs and (2) While coral bleaching and anomalously warm SSTs have occurred over much of the world in recent decades, case studies in the Caribbean, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, and parts of other regions such as the Great Barrier Reef exhibited SST conditions and cumulative thermal stress prior to 1979 that were comparable to those conditions observed during the strong, frequent coral bleaching events since 1979. This climatological context and knowledge of past environmental conditions in reef ecosystems may foster a better understanding of how coral reefs will

  18. KINETICS OF DELIGNIFICATION AND CARBOHYDRATE DEGRADATION DURING OXYGEN BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L Nguyen

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate degradation during oxygen bleaching is associated with cleavage reactions. It is apparent that the loss of the cellulose DP (degree ofpolymisation)is strongly affected by the extent of the delignification. A strong linear correlation can be established between the DP of cellulose chains and the residual lignin in the pulp. The Nuclear Growth concept and Percolation Theory for heterogenous system can be combined to formulate kinetic models for both the delignification and the degradation of carbohydrate. The models prediction is statistically robust and can be applied to different pulps at different bleaching conditions.

  19. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage "Chicha Morada" in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio; Tay, Lidia Yileng

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p composite resin regardless of the bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3).

  20. Characterization of fatty acid composition in healthy and bleached corals from Okinawa, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachok, Zainudin; Mfilinge, Prosper; Tsuchiya, Makoto

    2006-11-01

    Under bleaching conditions, corals lose their symbiotic zooxanthellae, and thus, the ability to synthesize fatty acids (FAs) from photosynthetically derived carbon. This study investigated the lipid content and FA composition in healthy and bleached corals from the Odo reef flat in Okinawa, southern Japan, following a bleaching event. It was hypothesized that the FA composition and abundance would change as algae are lost or die, and possibly microbial abundance would increase in corals as a consequence of bleaching. The lipid content and FA composition of three healthy coral species ( Pavona frondifera, Acropora pulchra, and Goniastrea aspera) and of partially bleached and completely bleached colonies of P. frondifera were examined. The FA composition did not differ among healthy corals, but differed significantly among healthy, partially bleached, and completely bleached specimens of P. frondifera. Completely bleached corals contained significantly lower lipid and total FA content, as well as lower relative amounts of polyunsaturated FAs and higher relative amounts of saturated FAs, than healthy and partially bleached corals. Furthermore, there was a significantly higher relative concentration of monounsaturated FAs and odd-numbered branched FAs in completely bleached corals, indicating an increase in bacterial colonization in the bleached corals.

  1. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage "Chicha Morada" in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio; Tay, Lidia Yileng

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3). PMID:27034897

  2. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3). PMID:27034897

  3. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of the discoloration between hybrid composite and nano composite before and after the application of tooth bleaching agent, 38% hydrogen peroxide. Methods: Eighteen disk-shaped specimens (5 mm of each of two composite resins, hybrid and nano filler, were prepared. The each group was treated 3 times and the specimens were divided into two groups consisted of 9 specimens for each, and then immersed in black tea solutions for 72 hours. Next, after having staining and bleaching processes, the color of the specimens was measured with a optic spectrophotometer by using photo with type BPY-47 and digital microvolt. The differences of the light intensity among three measurements were then calculated. Afterwards, GLM MANOVA Repeated Measure and parametric analysis (Independent t-test and Paired t-test were then used to analyze the data. Results: After staining process, it is then known that the nano composite had more discoloration and more affected by the black tea solution than the hybrid one. Conclusion: After bleaching, the discoloration was finally removed completely from both hybride and nano filler composite resins and became brighter from the baseline color.Latar belakang: Salah satu problem estetik adalah adanya perubahan warna pada gigi anterior. Peningkatan pemakaian bahan bleaching semakin popular. Banyak dokter gigi mempunyai problem ketika mereka akan melakukan proses bleaching dan ditemukan banyak

  4. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    KAUST Repository

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.

    2013-08-08

    Background:Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms.Methodology/Principal Findings:This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species) at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%); however, this percentage was much higher (19-100%) during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance.Conclusions/Significance:Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked to the ability of host

  5. Bleaching in vital deciduous teeth – a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pettorossi Imparato

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been growing concern and search for esthetic beauty and harmony over the last few years. This concern does not form part ofadults’ lives only, but also of children’s. Among the substances used for bleaching dental structures, the most outstanding are those whoseactive principle is hydrogen peroxide-based . The present study reports a clinical case of a 4-year-old girl that suffered trauma of tooth 61 with consequent color alteration, but with no alteration in pulp vitality. The main complaint by the patient and her guardians concerned esthetics, therefore external dental bleaching was performed, using Opalescence Xtra® (Ultradent, in two sessions with an interval of one month between them. External in office bleaching was the treatment of choice, due to the tooth vitality, patient’s age and presence of only one darkened tooth. After the bleaching treatments an improvement in the darkening was observed, and both the child and her guardians were satisfied with the esthetic result.

  6. Bahan pemutih gigi dengan sertifikat ADA/ISO (Tooth bleaching material with ADA/ISO certificate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asti Meizarini

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Bleaching of teeth for cosmetic reasons is a popular aspect of cosmetic dentistry because patients realize the aesthetical benefits of these products. The dentist as a clinician's practitioner must be knowledgeable of the products and their application techniques. Bleaching materials which are safe and effective are the ADA accepted or manufactured by those which have already haved ISO certificate. Dentist must have enough knowledge about in-office bleaching prescribed for home-use bleaching including their contra indication and side effects, to advise the patients and provide effective bleaching services.

  7. OZONE BLEACHING AT NEUTRAL PH – A NEW CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Carvalho

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of medium consistency ozone stage pH was evaluated for brown and oxygen delignified eucalyptus kraft pulp samples obtained from VCP - Luiz Antônio pulp mill. These samples were used as such or previously treated with the hot acid stage (A. The main objective of this study was to determine the viability of increasing the ozone stage pH aiming at decreasing bleaching variable costs. The ozone stage was studied in the pH range of 2.5-9.0, taking into account some important variables which affect ozone bleaching: (1 pulp kappa number entering the ozone stage, (2 reactivity of ozone towards lignin versus hexenuronic acids (HexA´s, (3 pulp treatments prior to ozone stage (acid hydrolysis, and (4 pulp treatments after the ozone stage (extraction or a chlorine dioxide stage.  Therefore, the impact of ozone stage pH was investigated in bleaching process such as Z/DEop vs AZ/DEop, Z/DEopD vs AZ/DEopD, Z/E vs AZ/E. The results were interpreted based on ozone stage efficiency and selectivity, and overall bleaching performance measured by the total bleaching chemical consumption required to achieve full brightness, pulp quality and environmental impact. It was concluded that the increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 has a slightly negative impact on the efficiency and selectivity, measured after Z/DEop sequence, but this effect is not expressive in the end of Z/DEopD bleaching sequence. The increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 in the sequence Z/DEopD is cost-effective at industrial level because it represents expressive reduction of sulphuric acid and caustic soda demand for pH control in the bleaching plant. These gain areas achieved without any significant changes in pulp quality and effluent load discharge. Nevertheless, the increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 has a very high negative impact on the efficiency and selectivity for the Z/E and AZ/E processes and it is not recommended in such cases.

  8. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Abi Rached DANTAS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home. Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15: C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE, luminosity (ΔL, green-red axis (Δa, and blue-yellow axis (Δb. The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments.

  9. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DANTAS, Andréa Abi Rached; BORTOLATTO, Janaina Freitas; RONCOLATO, Ávery; MERCHAN, Hugo; FLOROS, Michael Christopher; KUGA, Milton Carlos; de OLIVEIRA, Osmir Batista

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home). Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15): C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE), luminosity (ΔL), green-red axis (Δa), and blue-yellow axis (Δb). The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments. PMID:26814462

  10. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity - case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, Andrés Felipe; Parreiras, Sibelli Olivieri; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2015-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF) and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS) in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  11. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity – case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe CARTAGENA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  12. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dario Acuña

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada, green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n=5: purple corn (P, purple corn + bleaching (PB, green tea (T, green tea + bleaching (TB, distilled water (W, and distilled water + bleaching (WB. In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p3.3.

  13. Monomer release from nanofilled and microhybrid dental composites after bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching on elution of monomers from nanofilled and microhybrid composites.80 samples (5mm diameter and 3mm thickness of each composite were prepared. After curing, half of them were randomly polished. Each group was divided into 8 subgroups and immersed in water or 10%, 20% and 30% H2O2 for 3 or 8 hours. Eluted Bis-GMA (Bis-phenol A Glycidyl Dimethacrylate, TEGDMA (Triethyleneglycol Dimethacrylate, UDMA (Urethane Dimethacrylate and BisEMA (Bis-phenol A ethoxylate Dimethacrylate were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and the results were analyzed by univariate ANOVA and t-test (P<0.05.Bleach significantly increased the overall release of monomers (P<0.001; TEGDMA was released more than Bis-GMA (P<0.001. Supreme released more TEGDMA compared to Z250 (P<0.001. Bleaching increased the release of this monomer (P<0.001. Increasing both the concentration of H2O2, and the immersion time, increased the release of TEGDMA (P<0.001. Polishing had no effect on release of this monomer (P=0.952. Supreme released more Bis-GMA than Z250 (P=0.000. The more concentrated H2O2 caused more elution of Bis-GMA (P= 0.003; while the effect of immersion time was not significant (P=0.824. Polishing increased the release of Bis-GMA (P=0.001. Neither the type of composite nor Bleaching had any effect on release of UDMA (P=0.972 and (P=0.811 respectively. Immersion duration increased the release of UDMA (P=0.002, as well as polishing (P=0.024.Bleaching increased the release of monomers. Nanofilled composites released more monomer than the microfilled.

  14. Susceptibility to Coffee Staining during Enamel Remineralization Following the In-Office Bleaching Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Aline Akemi; Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Benetti, Ana Raquel;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess in situ the enamel mineralization level and susceptibility to coffee staining after in-office bleaching. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six human dental fragments assembled into intraoral devices were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and treated as follows: (group 1) no contact...... with coffee; (group 2) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 7 days, starting 1 week after bleaching; and (group 3) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 14 days, starting immediately after bleaching. Enamel mineralization and color were assessed before bleaching (T1......), immediately after bleaching (T2), and after 7 (T3) and 14 days (T4). The CIE whiteness index (W*) and closeness to white (ΔW*) following bleaching and/or immersion in coffee were calculated. Data were analyzed with Friedman and Wilcoxon tests or Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α = 0.05). RESULTS...

  15. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loke Ming Chou

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached. The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change.

  16. Bacteria are not the primary cause of bleaching in the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, T D; Fine, M; Roff, G; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-01-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when the endosymbiosis between corals and their symbionts disintegrates during stress. Mass coral bleaching events have increased over the past 20 years and are directly correlated with periods of warm sea temperatures. However, some hypotheses have suggested that reef-building corals bleach due to infection by bacterial pathogens. The 'Bacterial Bleaching' hypothesis is based on laboratory studies of the Mediterranean invading coral, Oculina patagonica, and has further generated conclusions such as the coral probiotic hypothesis and coral hologenome theory of evolution. We aimed to investigate the natural microbial ecology of O. patagonica during the annual bleaching using fluorescence in situ hybridization to map bacterial populations within the coral tissue layers, and found that the coral bleaches on the temperate rocky reefs of the Israeli coastline without the presence of Vibrio shiloi or bacterial penetration of its tissue layers. Bacterial communities were found associated with the endolithic layer of bleached coral regions, and a community dominance shift from an apparent cyanobacterial-dominated endolithic layer to an algal-dominated layer was found in bleached coral samples. While bacterial communities certainly play important roles in coral stasis and health, we suggest environmental stressors, such as those documented with reef-building corals, are the primary triggers leading to bleaching of O. patagonica and suggest that bacterial involvement in patterns of bleaching is that of opportunistic colonization. PMID:18059488

  17. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Loke Ming; Toh, Tai Chong; Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change. PMID:27438593

  18. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furby, K. A.; Bouwmeester, J.; Berumen, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea.

  19. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera–Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change. PMID:27438593

  20. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    KAUST Repository

    Furby, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-04

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (<20 % on average). We resurveyed the reefs 7 months later to estimate subsequent mortality. Mortality was highly variable among taxa, with some taxa showing evidence of full recovery and some (e. g., acroporids) apparently suffering nearly complete mortality. The unequal mortality among families resulted in significant change in community composition following the bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Comparing the Effect of Different Bleaching Regims of Carbamide Peroxide on Microhardness of Z250 Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Esmaeili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bleaching products with oxidizing mechanism can exert side effects on the restorative materials existing in the oral cavity. Since bleaching agents are applied in different concentrations, the present study aimed to compare the effect of different bleaching regims of carbamide peroxide on microhardness of Z250 microhybride composite. Methods: In this in vitro study , 32 specimens of micro hybride composite (Z250 were made which were randomly divided into 4 subgroups (n=8: G1: bleached with10% carbamide peroxide 4 hours a day for 2 weeks G2: bleached with 16%carbamide peroxide 3 hours a day for 2 weeks G3: bleached with 22%carbamide peroxide 1hour a day for 2 weeks G4: the control subgroup stored in distilled water at 37◦c for 2 weeks. Microhardness of specimens was measured before and after bleaching using Vickers hardness testing machine. Moreover, the study data were analyzed statistically applying Anova and t-test (&alpha= 0.05. Results: This study findings revealed that using bleaching agent significantly decreased the  microhardness of composite resin in the bleaching groups compared to the control group, though the concentration of carbamide peroxide produced no significant effect on the microhardness value. (p>0.13 Conclusion: Bleaching therapy can cause a reduction in microhardness of Z250 composite and different concentrations of carbamide peroxide can reduce microhardness of Z250 to the same value.

  2. Effect of desensitizer application on shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tooth sensitivity is common after vital tooth bleaching. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a desensitizing agent on shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel; and determine whether a delay of one or two weeks in bonding procedure is sufficient subsequent to bleaching/desensitizer regimen. Materials and Methods: Buccal enamel surfaces of ninety-six human sound molars were prepared and divided into eight groups. The surfaces of specimens in Group 1 as negative control group were bonded by composite resin using the single bond adhesive. Specimens in Groups 2-4 were bleached with an at-home bleaching agent (Daywhite ACP. Relief ACP desensitizing gel alone was applied in Group 5. In Groups 6-8, specimens were bleached same as in Group 2 and relief ACP desensitizing gel was applied same as inGroup 5 subsequent to each bleaching session. Composite cylinders were bonded after 24 h, 7 days and 14 days in Groups 2-4, respectively, and also in Groups 6-8, respectively. The shear bond strengths of the cylinders were tested and data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. Results: The results showed that bleaching and bleaching/desensitizer regimens significantly reduced the bond strength of composite resin to enamel. However, desensitizer alone did not reduce bond strength. No statistically significant differences were found between bleaching and bleaching/desensitizer regarding bond strength. Conclusion: Bleaching or bleaching/desensitizer treatment significantly decreases bond strength of composite resin to enamel. In both regimens, adhesive bonding is recommended after two weeks.

  3. Controlling bleached kraft pulp costs: a predictive modelling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroderus, S.K.

    1988-07-01

    A mathematical model is described which simulates the operation of a bleached kraft paper mill. The model can be used to analyze a wide range of operating conditions and mill configurations. It is structured into the following functional blocks: assignment of process parameters; cooking and brown stock washing; bleaching, evaporation and calculation of black liquor heating value; recovery boiler and recausticizing; secondary heat balance; and generation of heat and electrical power. Computer programs have been developed using the model, usable on inexpensive personal computers, which enable calculation of stream variables, consumption of wood, chemicals, and energy, and operating costs. Examples of model use are presented, calculated for a hypothetical mill featuring a continuous digester and a low-odor type recovery boiler. These examples illustrate the effect of operating conditions on operating costs. 24 refs., 7 figs.

  4. The potential optical coherence tomography in tooth bleaching quantitative assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we report the outcomes from a pilot study on using OCT functional imaging method to evaluate and quantify color alteration in the human teeth in vitro. The image formations of the dental tissues without and with treatment 35% hydrogen peroxide were obtained by an OCT system at a 1310 nm central wavelength. One parameter for the quantification of optical properties from OCT measurements is introduced in our study: attenuate coefficient (μ). And the attenuate coefficient have significant decrease ( p bleaching process. From the experimental results, it is found that attenuate coefficient could be useful to assess color alteration of the human tooth samples. OCT has a potential to become an effective tool for the assessment tooth bleaching. And our experiment offer a now method to evaluate color change in visible region by quantitative analysis of the infrared region information from OCT.

  5. Multicolor bleach-rate imaging enlightens in vivo sterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sage, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    , dehydroergosterol (DHE) in the genetically tractable model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). DHE is structurally very similar to cholesterol and ergosterol, two sterols used by the sterol-auxotroph nematode. We developed a new computational method measuring fluorophore bleaching kinetics at every pixel...... with a lysosomal marker, GFP-LMP1. Our new methods hold great promise for further studies on endosomal sterol transport in C. elegans....

  6. Bleached smear microscopy provides higher yield in diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jithendra Kandati; Suresh Kumar Boorsu; Ramamohan Pathalapati; Madhavulu Buchineni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the major deadliest communicable diseases throughout the world. Worldwide, 9.6 million people are estimated to have fallen ill with TB in 2014, India accounts for 23% of total global cases. The study evaluated the performance of direct sputum smear versus bleach concentration smear in diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Patients more than 10 years of age who presented with history of cough for >2 weeks duration were included. One spot ...

  7. Through bleaching and tsunami : coral reef recovery in the Maldives

    OpenAIRE

    Morri, C.; M. MONTEFALCONE; Lasagna, R.; Gatti, G.; A. Rovere; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, G.; Colantoni, P.; C.N. BIANCHI

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cove...

  8. Poling-assisted bleaching of metal-doped nanocomposite glass

    OpenAIRE

    Deparis, O.; Kazansky, P. G.; Abdolvand, A.; Podlipensky, A.; Seifert, G.; Graener, H

    2004-01-01

    Thermal poling of soda-lime glass which was doped with spherical or ellipsoidal silver nanoparticles has revealed what we believe to be a phenomenon of general interest in the physics of nanocomposite materials: The field-assisted dissolution of metal nanoparticles embedded in glass. Macroscopically, this phenomenon manifested itself as poling-assisted bleaching of the glass in the sense that the glass became more (or even completely) transparent under the anode. The phenomenon is physically ...

  9. KINETICS OF DELIGNIFICATION AND CARBOHYDRATE DEGRADATION DURING OXYGEN BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.LNguyen

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate degradation during oxygen bleaching isassociated with cleavage reactions. It is apparent thatthe loss of the cellulose DPis strongly affected by(degree ofpolymisation) the extent of thedelignification. A strong linear correlation can beestablished between the DP of cellulose chains andthe residual lignin in the pulp. The Nuclear Growthconcept and Percolation Theory for heterogenoussystem can be combined to formulate kinetic modelsfor both the delignification and the degradation ofcarbohydrate. The models prediction is statisticallyrobust and can be applied to different pulps atdifferent bleachin~ conditions.

  10. ALKALINE PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF HOT WATER TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Mustajoki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities for chemical consumption reduction in P-P-Paa-P bleaching (P alkaline peroxide stage, Paa peracetic stage of hot water treated straw and the effect of the wheat straw variability on the process. Papermaking fibre production from wheat straw using such a process could be implemented on a small scale if chemical consumption was low enough to eliminate the need for chemical recovery. The pulp properties obtained with this process are equal to or even superior to the properties of wheat straw soda pulp. The possibility of enhancing the first peroxide stage with oxygen and pressure was studied. The possibility for substitution of sodium hydroxide partially with sodium carbonate was also investigated. The objective was to achieve International Standardization Organization (ISO brightness of 75%, with minimal sodium hydroxide consumption, whilst maintaining the pulp properties. The optimization of the peroxide bleaching is challenging if the final brightness target cannot be reduced. Results indicate that up to 25% of the sodium hydroxide could be substituted with sodium carbonate without losing brightness or affecting pulp properties. Another possibility is a mild alkali treatment between the hot water treatment and the bleaching sequence.

  11. Fracture resistance of bleached teeth restored with different procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the fracture resistance of teeth submitted to internal bleaching and restored with different non-metallic post. Eighty mandibular incisors were endodontically treated and randomly divided in 10 groups (n = 8: G1- restored with composite resin (CR, G2- CR + fiber-reinforced composite post (FRC, Everstick post, Sticktech cemented with resin cement self-etch adhesive (RCS, Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray, G3- CR + FRC + self-adhesive resin cement (SRC, Breeze, Pentral Clinical, G4- CR+ glass fiber post (GF, Exacto Post, Angelus + RCS, G5- CR + GF + SRC. The G6 to G10 were bleached with hydrogen peroxide (HP and restored with the same restorative procedures used for G1 to G5, respectively. After 7 days storage in artificial saliva, the specimens were submitted to the compressive strength test (N at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed and the failure pattern was identified as either reparable (failure showed until 2 mm below the cement-enamel junction or irreparable (the failure showed <2 mm or more below the cement-enamel. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. No significant difference (p < 0.05 was found among G1 to G10. The results suggest that intracoronal bleaching did not significantly weaken the teeth and the failure patterns were predominately reparable for all groups. The non-metallic posts in these teeth did not improve fracture resistance.

  12. Assessment of the process of cottonseed oil bleaching in hexane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megahed, Ola A.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been initiated to assess the feasibility of bleaching cottonseed oil in miscella as a processing step next to alkali refining in miscella. Alkali refining of cottonseed oil in miscella has several advantages over conventional refining technologies with respect to oil quality, oil losses and process cost. Therefore, the process efficiency of the bleaching of cottonseed oil in presence of hexane (at a volumetric ratio of 1:1, has been studied and compared to that without solvent. The process efficiency has been evaluated according to the decolourization capacity, the oil losses on spent earth, the filtration rate of the oil from the clay and the acidity of the bleached oil as well as its peroxide content. The bleaching in presence of hexane was carried out at 25ºC whereas that by conventional bleaching at 110ºC. Different clay loads were used in each of the two bleaching techniques and the colour indices of the oils before and after bleaching determined in each case. The results were used to predict Freundlich adsorption equations for the oil pigments in both cases. These equations were then used to predict the colour of the oils obtained by bleaching of refined oils of different grades. The results have shown that oil decolourization is more efficient in presence of solvent when the starting oil is of an acceptable grade and the reverse is true for low grade oils. Also, the possibility of oil oxidation during bleaching is less in presence of solvent. Moreover, the bleaching in miscella has proved two other additional advantages over conventional bleaching. The filtration of oil from clay is much faster in miscella bleaching and the oil losses on spent earth is lower. This will be reflected on the overall process economy.Este trabajo ha sido iniciado para evaluar la viabilidad de la decoloración del aceite de semilla de algodón en miscela como un paso de procesado próximo a la refinación alcalina en miscela. La refinaci

  13. Examination of native and carbamide peroxide-bleached human tooth enamel by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahringer, Christoph; Fureder, Monika; Kastner, Markus; Ebner, Andreas; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Hannig, Matthias; Kienberger, Ferry; Schilcher, Kurt

    2009-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the effects of bleaching on the morphology of the enamel surface with nanoscale resolution. Samples of human tooth enamel with native (pumiced) or fine-polished surfaces were examined before and after bleaching with 30% carbamide peroxide. The obtained profilometric AFM data revealed significant morphological surface alterations. After 1 h of bleaching, the surface roughness increased significantly from 19 +/- 4nm to 33 +/- 5 nm. Six-hour bleaching did not produce any significant further increase in enamel surface roughness. The interrod junction depth raised more than twice after 1 h of bleaching. After 6 h of bleaching, a further and significant increase in interrod junction depth was recorded. This alteration might be a consequence of oxidation and a subsequent partial lysis of the tooth enamel matrix proteins.

  14. RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY APPROACH FOR OPTIMIZATION OF FLAX SEED OIL BLEACHING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Ondrejovič

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Flax seed is an important source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids essential for human physiology. For low oxidation stability, specific taste and concomitant color compounds this oil is poorly applicable as nutraceutical additive. The aim of this study was optimization of flax seed oil bleaching. The optimal conditions for the bleaching process were determined using response surface methodology. A central composite design was used to investigate the effects of three independent variables, namely solid to liquid ratio, temperature and time, to output parameters of the bleaching process such as crude oil color expressed as optical density at 490 nm, acid and peroxide value. Calculated optimal conditions for the bleaching, expressed by the optical density of the oil were as follows: temperature 50°C, bleaching time 77 minutes and solid-liquid ratio 56 g of bleaching agent to 1 liter of oil.

  15. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts. PMID:16130860

  16. Etiology and prevention of external cervical root resorption associated to teeth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mendes da SILVA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Esthetic dentistry has been prioritizedand the desire for whiter teeth has been increasingly present in dental offices, since whiter teeth tend to indicate health, beauty, youth and a more attractive smile. Teeth bleaching is a conservative method widely used to restore the original color of darkened teeth. However, possible relations with the external cervical root resorption have concerned many researchers and clinicians. Literature review: There are many mechanisms that can activate the external cervical root resorption, such as: chemical and physical action of the bleaching materials used, morphology of the cementoenamel junction associated to the immune system, material concentration, traumas and bleaching technique used. Conclusion: Therefore, considering many factors that are still not conclusive, preventing deleterious effects on teeth and support structures, care must be taken when choosing bleaching agent and bleaching technique, as well as when selecting each case, beyond a proper restoration after teeth bleaching.

  17. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts.

  18. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Added, N.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Curado, J. F.; Francci, C.; Markarian, R.; Mori, M.

    2006-08-01

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a 35Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  19. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Added, N. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: nemitala@dfn.if.usp.br; Rizzutto, M.A. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curado, J.F. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Francci, C. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Markarian, R. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mori, M. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-08-15

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a {sup 35}Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  20. The role of bound chlorine in the brightness reversion of bleached hardwood kraft pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Kátia Maria Morais Eiras; Jorge Luiz Colodette; Vanessa Lopes Silva

    2009-01-01

    Our previous paper showed fragmentary evidence that pulp brightness reversion may be negatively affected by its organically bound chlorine (OX) content. A thorough investigation on eucalyptus kraft pulp led to the conclusion that OX increases reversion of certain pulps but this trend is not universal. Alkaline bleaching stages decrease reversion regardless of pulp OX content. Pulps bleached with high temperature chlorine dioxide revert less than those bleached with conventional chlorine dioxi...

  1. Corrosion Study of Stainless Steels in Peracetic Acid Bleach Media With and Without Chloride and Chelant

    OpenAIRE

    Rohtash; Ajay K Singh; Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The paper industries are adopting non-chlorine containing chemicals e.g. peroxide, ozone, peracids etc. as alternate of chlorine based bleach chemicals e.g. chlorine and chlorine dioxide etc. with the aim of eco-friend atmospheres. Changeover to the new chemicals in the bleaching process is likely to affect the metallurgy of the existing bleach plants due to change in the corrosivity of the media. Accordingly, corrosion investigations were performed in a peracid namely peracetic a...

  2. THE EFFECTS OF HOME BLEACHING ON THE HARDNESS OF AMALGAM FILLING

    OpenAIRE

    Andi Soufyan; Niti Matram

    2015-01-01

    Dental bleaching has been considered as a feasible approach for dental esthetic, and many dental bleaching products can be seen in the market. Therefore, the side effect of such dental product should be studied. This study was aimed to determine the effect of carbamide peroxide-containing home bleaching agent on the hardness of dental amalgam surface structure. Forty amalgam filling specimens were divided into 4 groups, which consist of 3 treatment groups and 1 controu group. Each group was e...

  3. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Dario Acuña; Leyla Delgado-Cotrina; Francisco Aurelio Rumiche; Lidia Yileng Tay

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), gr...

  4. Status of the Coral Reefs of Maldives after the Bleaching Event in 1998

    OpenAIRE

    Zahir, H.

    2000-01-01

    A pilot reef monitoring study was conducted in 1998 to assess the extent of coral bleaching in the Maldives. The aims of this monitoring exercise were: 1. To quantitatively document the post-bleaching status of the shallow-water coral communities on the reefs of the north, central and southern regions of Maldives. 2. To estimate bleaching-induced coral mortality by comparing data yielded by the pilot survey with data from previous surveys, especially those sites for which historical dat...

  5. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanein, M. M. M.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Peanut hulls (PNH were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV, reduction in phospholipids (PL and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN, PNH and Fuller’s earth (FE and PNH and O-passive (OP and examined. The oxidative stability of oils was determined. Results for the investigated commercial bleaching clays revealed: TN > FE > F > TF > OP. Highest reduction in PV and PL, and highest bleachability were achieved for soybean oil bleached with 2% PNH carbonized at 500°C for 30 min (PNH”. Mixtures of PNH” with the three chosen bleaching clays indicated that 1PNH”: 2TN gave the highest bleachability. CSO was miscella bleached in hexane using PNH” and resulted in an appreciable improvement in all oil characteristics, especially in bleachability. Oxidative stability of oils was in the following order: TN > control > FE > PNH” with Induction period values of 23,1 > 6,43 > 5,73 > 2,85 h, respectively.

    Las cáscaras de maní (PNH fueron carbonizadas a diferentes temperaturas y tiempos, y utilizadas a diferentes concentraciones como una alternativa a las tierras decolorantes. La evaluación de un aceite de soja decolorado con PNH se ha basado en sus ácidos grasos libres, reducción del índice de peróxidos (PV, reducción de los fosfolípidos (PL, y en la blanqueabilidad. El rendimiento de varias tierras decolorantes de uso comercial fue evaluado y comparado con el de PNH carbonizada. Las mezclas formuladas incluían: PNH y Tonsil-N (TN, PNH y tierras de Fuller (FE y PNH y O-pasivo (OP. La estabilidad oxidativa de los aceites resultantes fue determinada. Los resultados revelaron que la efectividad de la

  6. EFFECT OF LAST STAGE BLEACHING WITH PERACETIC ACID ON BRIGHTNESS DEVELOPMENT AND PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise P. Barros

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of last stage bleaching with peracetic acid is the main subject of this paper. Proper conditions were established to apply peracetic acid as the last bleaching stage of the D(EpD/Paa, DHT(EpD/Paa, A/D(EpD/Paa, DHT/Q(POPaa and Z/ED/Paa sequences. In addition, the impact of last stage bleaching with Paa on pulp refinability and strength properties was determined. Peracetic acid was consumed relatively fast when applied as the last stage of ECF bleaching sequences. A reaction time of 120 min at 75 oC and pH 5.0 is seemingly adequate regardless of the Paa dose, in the range of 1-5 kg/odt pulp and bleaching sequence. The optimum dose of Paa depends upon the sequence under investigation. In general the Paa application as last bleaching stage caused slight decrease in pulp viscosity, kappa number and HexA content but had no significant effect on pulp reversion and L*a*b* coordinates. The refinability and bonding strength properties of the pulps bleached with the sequences DHT(EpDD and DHT(EpD/Paa were quite similar when the pH of the last bleaching stage of both sequences were near 5. These properties improved slightly when Paa bleaching pH was raised to 8.5.

  7. OSL response bleaching of BeO samples, using fluorescent light and blue LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groppo, Daniela Piai; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: dpgroppo@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is widely used as a dosimetric technique for many applications. In this work, the OSL response bleaching of BeO samples was studied. The samples were irradiated using a beta radiation source ({sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y); the bleaching treatments (fluorescent light and blue LEDs) were performed, and the results were compared. Various optical treatment time intervals were tested until reaching the complete bleaching of the OSL response. The best combination of the time interval and bleaching type was analyzed. (author)

  8. OSL response bleaching of BeO samples, using fluorescent light and blue LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppo, D. P.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is widely used as a dosimetric technique for many applications. In this work, the OSL response bleaching of BeO samples was studied. The samples were irradiated using a beta radiation source (90Sr+90Y); the bleaching treatments (fluorescent light and blue LEDs) were performed, and the results were compared. Various optical treatment time intervals were tested until reaching the complete bleaching of the OSL response. The best combination of the time interval and bleaching type was analyzed.

  9. Bleached Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals catabolize δ13C-enriched lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, Andréa G.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.

    2011-09-01

    Corals rely on stored energy reserves (i.e., lipids, carbohydrates, and protein) to survive bleaching events. To better understand the physiological implications of coral bleaching on lipid catabolism and/or synthesis, we measured the δ13C of coral total lipids (δ13CTL) in experimentally bleached (treatment) and non-bleached (control) Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals immediately after bleaching and after 1.5 and 4 months of recovery on the reef. Overall δ13CTL values in treatment corals were significantly lower than in control corals because of a 1.9 and 3.4‰ decrease in δ13CTL immediately after bleaching in P. compressa and M. capitata, respectively. The decrease in δ13CTL coincided with decreases in total lipid concentration, indicating that corals catabolized δ13C-enriched lipids. Since storage lipids are primarily depleted during bleaching, we hypothesize that they are isotopically enriched relative to other lipid classes. This work further helps clarify our understanding of changes to coral metabolism and biogeochemistry when bleached and helps elucidate how lipid classes may influence recovery from bleaching and ultimately coral survival.

  10. Impacts of the 1998 and 2010 mass coral bleaching events on the Western Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthacheep, Makamas; Yucharoen, Mathinee; Klinthong, Wanlaya; Pengsakun, Sittiporn; Sangmanee, Kanwara; Yeemin, Thamasak

    2013-11-01

    A long-term study of coral reef ecology in the Gulf of Thailand provides a good opportunity to examine the temporal variation on the impact of mass coral bleaching at those reef sites. We compared the bleaching and mortality of corals between the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 at a coral community in the Western Gulf of Thailand. The aim was to identify the coral species which were most likely to suffer from (and to be able to tolerate) changes in seawater temperature. Significant differences in the susceptibility of the coral taxa to bleaching events between the years 1998 and 2010 and among coral species were documented. Bleaching was significantly different between the most dominant corals. Diploastrea heliopora was the most resistant coral to bleaching in both years. Some coral species showed more resistance to bleaching in 2010. The coral mortality following the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 varied significantly between the years and the coral taxa. Mortality of some dominant coral taxa was also lower in 2010. Seven coral species, i.e. Astreopora myriophthalma, Pachyseris rugosa, Turbinaria mesenterina, Goniastrea pectinata, Favia pallida, F. maritima, Favites halicora, Platygyra daedalea and Galaxea fascicularis, were tolerant to the coral bleaching events. An ecosystem-based approach to managing coral reefs in the Gulf of Thailand is needed to identify appropriate marine protected area networks and to strengthen marine and coastal resource policies in order to build coral reef resilience.

  11. Annual coral bleaching and the long-term recovery capacity of coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Grottoli, Andréa G; Levas, Stephen J; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D; Baumann, Justin H; Matsui, Yohei; Warner, Mark E

    2015-11-22

    Mass bleaching events are predicted to occur annually later this century. Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether corals will be able to recover between annual bleaching events. Using a combined tank and field experiment, we simulated annual bleaching by exposing three Caribbean coral species (Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides and Orbicella faveolata) to elevated temperatures for 2.5 weeks in 2 consecutive years. The impact of annual bleaching stress on chlorophyll a, energy reserves, calcification, and tissue C and N isotopes was assessed immediately after the second bleaching and after both short- and long-term recovery on the reef (1.5 and 11 months, respectively). While P. divaricata and O. faveolata were able to recover from repeat bleaching within 1 year, P. astreoides experienced cumulative damage that prevented full recovery within this time frame, suggesting that repeat bleaching had diminished its recovery capacity. Specifically, P. astreoides was not able to recover protein and carbohydrate concentrations. As energy reserves promote bleaching resistance, failure to recover from annual bleaching within 1 year will likely result in the future demise of heat-sensitive coral species. PMID:26582020

  12. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cavalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL and Optibond Solo Plus (SP, respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10 with 10% CP (CP and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF or were left unbleached (control. Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (∝TBS testing. The enamel ∝TBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached were higher (p FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP. The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar ∝TBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  13. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Cristiane Suzy; Rego, Marcos Augusto do; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Giannini, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10) with 10% CP (CP) and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF) or were left unbleached (control). Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP) were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. The enamel μTBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached) were higher (p FL > FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP). The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar μTBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength. PMID:23184165

  14. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo PIROLO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E and lightness (∆L variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05. Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001. All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L. The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively. Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching.

  15. Local bleaching thresholds established by remote sensing techniques vary among reefs with deviating bleaching patterns during the 2012 event in the Arabian/Persian Gulf

    OpenAIRE

    Shuail, Dawood; Wiedenmann, Jörg; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Baird, Andrew H.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Riegl, Bernhard; Burt, John A.; Petrov, Peter; Amos, Carl

    2016-01-01

    A severe bleaching event affected coral communities off the coast of Abu Dhabi, UAE in August/September, 2012. In Saadiyat and Ras Ghanada reefs ~ 40% of the corals showed signs of bleaching. In contrast, only 15% of the corals were affected on Delma reef. Bleaching threshold temperatures for these sites were established using remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) data recorded by MODIS-Aqua. The calculated threshold temperatures varied between locations (34.48 °C, 34.55 °C, 35.05 °C)...

  16. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF HARDWOOD KRAFT PULP WITH ADSORBED BIRCH XYLAN AND ITS EFFECT ON PAPER PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejung Youn

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of xylan on pulp fibers improves the strength properties of paper. However, the optical properties are decreased significantly. The objective of our research was to bleach hardwood kraft pulp with adsorbed birch xylan by hydrogen peroxide and study the effect of bleaching parameters on paper properties. The bleaching parameters studied included bleaching temperature, time, initial pH as well as MgSO4 dosage. The optical properties (whiteness, brightness, opacity and physical properties (tensile index, tearing index, bulk of handsheets made from the pulp bleached with different process variables were measured. The results showed that better optical properties were obtained with higher bleaching temperature, longer bleaching time, and more MgSO4 dosage. Bleaching from an initial pH of 11 provided the highest brightness value. On the other hand, strength properties were improved with decreasing of the bleaching temperature, and increasing the initial pH and MgSO4 dosage. The relationship between strength properties and bleaching time varied depending on bleaching temperature. According to the results, both good mechanical properties and optical properties could be achieved when the operating parameters were controlled properly. Therefore hydrogen peroxide bleaching was proved to be a suitable method for bleaching hardwood kraft pulp with adsorption of birch xylan.

  17. Changes in coral-associated microbial communities during a bleaching event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, David; Iida, Yuki; Uthicke, Sven; Smith-Keune, Carolyn

    2008-04-01

    Environmental stressors such as increased sea surface temperatures are well-known for contributing to coral bleaching; however, the effect of increased temperatures and subsequent bleaching on coral-associated microbial communities is poorly understood. Colonies of the hard coral Acropora millepora were tagged on a reef flat off Magnetic Island (Great Barrier Reef) and surveyed over 2.5 years, which included a severe bleaching event in January/February 2002. Daily average water temperatures exceeded the previous 10-year average by more than 1 degrees C for extended periods with field-based visual surveys recording all tagged colonies displaying signs of bleaching. During the bleaching period, direct counts of coral zooxanthellae densities decreased by approximately 64%, before recovery to pre-bleaching levels after the thermal stress event. A subset of three tagged coral colonies were sampled through the bleaching event and changes in the microbial community elucidated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis demonstrated conserved bacterial banding profiles between the three coral colonies, confirming previous studies highlighting specific microbial associations. As coral colonies bleached, the microbial community shifted and redundancy analysis (RDA) of DGGE banding patterns revealed a correlation of increasing temperature with the appearance of Vibrio-affiliated sequences. Interestingly, this shift to a Vibrio-dominated community commenced prior to visual signs of bleaching. Clone libraries hybridized with Vibrio-specific oligonucleotide probes confirmed an increase in the fraction of Vibrio-affiliated clones during the bleaching period. Post bleaching, the coral microbial associations again shifted, returning to a profile similar to the fingerprints prior to bleaching. This provided further evidence for corals selecting and shaping their microbial partners. For non-bleached samples, a close association with Spongiobacter-related sequences were

  18. Effects of coral bleaching on the obligate coral-dwelling crab Trapezia cymodoce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, J. S.; Munday, P. L.; Jones, G. P.

    2011-09-01

    Corals are an essential and threatened habitat for a diverse range of reef-associated animals. Episodes of coral bleaching are predicted to increase in frequency and intensity over coming decades, yet the effects of coral-host bleaching on the associated animal communities remain poorly understood. The present study investigated the effects of host-colony bleaching on the obligate coral-dwelling crab, Trapezia cymodoce, during a natural bleaching event in the lagoon of Lizard Island, Australia. Branching corals, which harbour the highest diversity of coral associates, comprised 13% of live coral cover at the study site, with 83% affected by bleaching. Crabs on healthy and bleached colonies of Pocillopora damicornis were monitored over a 5-week period to determine whether coral bleaching affected crab density and movement patterns. All coral colonies initially contained one breeding pair of crabs. There was a significant decline in crab density on bleached corals after 5 weeks, with many corals losing one or both crabs, yet all healthy colonies retained a mating pair. Fecundity of crabs collected from bleached and healthy colonies of P. damicornis was also compared. The size of egg clutches of crabs collected from bleached hosts was 40% smaller than those from healthy hosts, indicating a significant reduction in fecundity. A laboratory experiment on movement patterns found that host-colony bleaching also prompted crabs to emigrate in search of more suitable colonies. Emigrant crabs engaged in aggressive interactions with occupants of healthy hosts, with larger crabs always usurping occupants of a smaller size. Decreased densities and clutch sizes, along with increased competitive interactions, could potentially result in a population decline of these important coral associates with cascading effects on coral health.

  19. Nanotribological and Nanomechanical Properties Changes of Tooth After Bleaching and Remineralization in Wet Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dandan; Gao, Shanshan; Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Gao, Shuai; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-12-01

    Teeth bleaching cases had increased with people's desire for oral aesthetic; however, bleached teeth would still undertake chewing actions and remineralizing process in saliva. Nanotribological and nanomechanical properties are proper displays for dental performance of bleached teeth. The purpose of the research was to reveal the effect of bleaching and remineralization on the nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of teeth in wet environment. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the bleaching products used: 12 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) (12HP group); 15 % carbamide peroxide (CP) (15CP group); 35 % CP (35CP group); and artificial saliva (control group). The nanotribological and nanomechanical property changes of tooth enamel after bleaching and remineralization were evaluated respectively by nanoscratch and nanoindentation tests in wet environment, imitating the wet oral environment. The morphology changes were evaluated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After bleaching, 12HP group and 15CP group showed increased scratch depth with more pile ups on the scratch edges, decreased nanohardness, and corroded surface appearance. While the 35CP group showed an increase in nanoscratch depth, no change in nanohardness and surface appearance was observed. The control group showed no change in these measurements. After remineralization, the three bleaching groups showed decreased nanoscratch depth and no change of nanohardness compared with the bleached teeth. And the control group showed no changes in nanotribological and nanomechanical properties. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of the 12HP group and 15CP group were affected by bleaching, but the nanotribological properties recovered partly and the nanomechanical properties got no change after 1 week of remineralization. As for the 35CP group, the nanotribological properties were influenced and the nanomechanical properties were not

  20. Contrasting patterns of coral bleaching susceptibility in 2010 suggest an adaptive response to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Guest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surveys to estimate the bleaching and mortality indices of coral genera were carried out at three locations with contrasting thermal and bleaching histories. Despite the magnitude of thermal stress being similar among locations in 2010, there was a remarkable contrast in the patterns of bleaching susceptibility. Comparisons of bleaching susceptibility within coral taxa and among locations revealed no significant differences between locations with similar thermal histories, but significant differences between locations with contrasting thermal histories (Friedman = 34.97; p<0.001. Bleaching was much less severe at locations that bleached during 1998, that had greater historical temperature variability and lower rates of warming. Remarkably, Acropora and Pocillopora, taxa that are typically highly susceptible, although among the most susceptible in Pulau Weh (Sumatra, Indonesia where respectively, 94% and 87% of colonies died, were among the least susceptible in Singapore, where only 5% and 12% of colonies died. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pattern of susceptibility among coral genera documented here is unprecedented. A parsimonious explanation for these results is that coral populations that bleached during the last major warming event in 1998 have adapted and/or acclimatised to thermal stress. These data also lend support to the hypothesis that corals in regions subject to more variable temperature regimes are more resistant to thermal stress than those in less variable environments.

  1. EFFECT BLEACHING REAGENT ON THE QUALITY OF FLAX CELLULOSE

    OpenAIRE

    Дейкун, Ірина Михайлівна

    2015-01-01

    The paper studies the impact of bleaching chemicals such as chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide and chlorine on the product yield, residual lignin content, a-cellulose, viscosity, ash content and whiteness of flax natron cellulose for chemical processing.It was found that one-step processing of flax pulp with chlorine dioxide consumption rate 0,3…0,5 % and with hydrogen peroxide consumption rate 2…3 % by weight of abs. dry cellulose is more effective than treatment with chlorine water at chlo...

  2. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel;

    2005-01-01

    Electron Microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Twenty intact human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into four groups (n=5) treated as follows: G1- storage in artificial saliva (control group); G2- four 30-minute applications of 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure...... analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities were...

  3. Fabrication of Polymer Nonlinear Directional Coupler by Photo-bleaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of a nonlinear directional coupler in polymer PMMA/DR1 film by photobleaching is studied. We find it easier to obtain a required coupling length by controlling photo-bleaching time than by controlling the dimension of the coupler. The transmittance of each arm is measured when the pulse input light energy changes in our experiment. The experimental results show that the coupling length will change with the intensity of input light due to optical nonlinearities of the polymer PMMA/DR1 at 1064nm.

  4. Detection of Chlorophenolic Compounds in Bleaching Effluents of Chemical Pulps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chhaya Sharma; S.Mohanty; S.Kumar; N.J.Rao; li qian

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory bleaching effluents from the chlorination and caustic extraction stages of mixed wood kraft pulp processing have been analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively for various chlorophenolics by using GC.A number of chlorinated derivaties of phenols,catechols,guaiacols and syringaldehydes have been detected and their concentrations are estimated.The results are compared with that of different agriculture residue / hardwood pulps,which were reported in literature.The concentrations of various compounds detected have also been compared with their reported 96LC50 values.

  5. Reducing bleaching effects in organic nanofibers by coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Rubahn, Horst-Günter;

    Para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) organic nanofibers emit polarized, blue light upon UV excitation with a peak wavelength of the emitted light of 425 nm [1] and a spatially anisotropic distribution of the emitted light [2]. These features could enable future (opto-)electronic applications [3], since......, for example, these molecules in the form of a thin film can function as an OLED [4]. However, the nanofibers exhibit a characteristic photoinduced reaction during illumination with UV light that causes a decrease in luminescence intensity (bleaching) and that is partly attributed to photooxidation [1]. Here...

  6. Effects of the bleaching sequence on the optical brighteners action in eucalyptus kraft pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Manfredi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During the bleaching process the pulp is treated with chemical reagents that can be retained in the pulp and interfere in the action of the optical brighteners. Different bleaching sequences can produce pulps at the same brightness but with different potential to whiteness increase when treated with optical brighteners. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the bleaching sequence on the efficiency of disulphonated and tetrasulphonated optical brighteners. Eucalyptus kraft pulp was bleached using four different bleaching sequences. For each pulp three brightness targets were aimeds. For each bleaching sequence mathematical model was generated for predicting the final pulp whiteness according to the initial brightness and the optical brightener charge applied. The presence of organochlorine residues in the pulp reduced the effectiveness of the optical brighteners. Therefore, bleaching sequences that use low chlorine dioxide charge favors for greater gains in whiteness with the application of optical brighteners. The replacement of the final chlorine dioxide bleaching stage with a hydrogen peroxide one in the sequence increased the efficiency of the optical brightening agents.

  7. WOOD BASIC DENSITY EFFECT OF Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla CLONES ON BLEACHED PULP QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Rodrigues dos Santos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzed the wood basic density effect in two Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla hybrid clones (440 kg/m3 e 508 kg/m3 on bleached pulp quality (fiber dimensions and physical-mechanical properties. The woods performance on pulping, bleaching and beating results were analyzed. The Kraft pulping was carried out in forced circulation digester in order to obtain 17±1 kappa number targets. The pulps were bleached to 90±1 using delignification oxygen and D0EOPD1 bleaching sequence. Bleached pulp of low basic density clone showed, significantly, lowest revolutions number in the PFI mill to reach tensile index of 70 N.m/g, low Schopper Riegler degree and generated sheets with higher values to bulk and opacity. These characteristics and properties allow concluding that bleached pulp of low basic density clone was the most indicated to produce printing and writing sheets. The bleached pulp of high basic density clone showed higher values of bulk and capillarity Klemm and lower water retention value when analyzed without beating. The bleached pulp of high basic density clone showed more favorable characteristics to the production of tissue papers.

  8. In vitro colorimetric evaluation of the efficacy of various bleaching methods and products

    OpenAIRE

    Dietschi, Didier; Rossier, Sandrine; Krejci, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Various bleaching modalities are now offered to patients, either monitored by the dental office or self-directed, for which relative efficacy is unknown. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ability of different bleaching products and protocols to lighten enamel and dentin.

  9. Effect of bleaching on the shear bond strength of the enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Arruda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of dental bleaching on the shear bond strength of enamel. Methods: Fifty molars were selected and divided into five groups (n=10; G1-without bleaching (control; G2-bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide and restored 24h later; G3-bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide and restored seven days later; G4-bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored a 35% and restored 24h later; G5-bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored a 35% and restored seven days later. During the 24h and 7-day intervals the test specimens remained stored in artificial saliva, after which the restorative procedures were performed on the enamel. Results: The microshear bond strength test indicated the following results in MPa (ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc: G1-43.15 a (±5.19; G2-31.34 ab (± 4.41; G3-36.66 ab (± 3.11; G4-22.87 c (±3.76 and G5-35.67 ab (± 4.64. Conclusion: Groups G1, G2, G3 and G5 showed no statistical difference and Group G4 (bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored 24h later showed diminished bond strength between the bleached enamel and resin composite.

  10. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  11. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  12. Bleaching augments lipid peroxidation products in pistachio oil and its cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistachio consumption is associated with reductions in serum cholesterol and oxidative stress due to their constituents of unsaturated fats, phytosterols, fiber, and antioxidants. Bleaching has been applied to whiten nut shells for antifungal and cosmetic purposes. However, the impact of bleaching o...

  13. INDICATORS OF UV EXPOSURE IN CORAL AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND CORAL BLEACHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compelling aspect of the deterioration of coral reefs is the phenomenon of coral bleaching. Bleaching can destroy large areas of a reef with limited recovery or recruitment, and it may be induced by a variety of stressors ranging from exposure to temperature and salinity extrem...

  14. MODIFIED OPAL:A NOVEL STABILIZER FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF PULPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueren Qian; Xianhui An; Wenbo Liu; Gang Yu; Zhanqian Song

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of modified opal as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching was investigated. The results showed that the modified opal in place of sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching is feasible. At the same dosage, above 3% ISO can be increased for both wheat straw pulp and deinked pulp. The stabilizing ability of the modified opal to hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp is improved markedly. It is favorable for bleaching to increase temperature and time within a permissive extent. The suitable process conditions are 10% of pulp consistency, 3% of hydrogen peroxide, 1.5% of sodium hydroxide, 3% of the modified opal, 70℃ and 60 min when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. At these conditions, the brightness gain can reach about 16% ISO for wheat straw pulp. In addition, it is favorable for bleaching to add a little magnesium sulfate when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the brightness of pulp can increase I%ISO if0.05% of magnesium sulfate is added. The cost analysis indicated that the modified opal is superior to sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching in economical aspect and has further the potential of market development.

  15. Assessment of acute phase proteins and oxidative stress status of Nigerians using bleaching agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disruption of primary innate immune function of the epidermal layer of the skin accounts for the susceptibility of individuals using bleaching agents to localized or systemic infections. This subverted innate immunity in these people may lead to other pathological conditions. The resultant effects of skin bleaching and phagocytes activation in response to infections have not been studied in Nigerians using bleaching agents. The present study therefore assessed the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, total antioxidant potential (TAP), total plasma peroxides (TPP), oxidative stress index (OSI) and malonaldehyde (MDA) in the users bleaching agents. Thirty (30) people who had used bleaching agents for average of 4.9 + 1.2 years participated in this study. They were recruited from various schools and markets within the city of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. Thirty apparently healthy staffs of University College Hospital Ibadan, Ibaadan, Nigeria, who had never used bleaching agents served as controls. All the subjects used for this study had no metabolic abnormality and tested negative to both HIV and hepatitis B infections. The mean value of TAP (p 0.20) when compared with the controls. Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are possible consequences of skin bleaching. The users of skin bleaching agents may need antioxidant therapies to avert the risks of oxidative stress. (author)

  16. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  17. Comparing Environmental Influences on Coral Bleaching Across and within Species using Clustered Binomial Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differential susceptibility among reef-building coral species can lead to community shifts and loss of diversity as a result of temperature-induced mass bleaching events. However, the influence of the local environment on species-specific bleaching susceptibilities has not been ...

  18. INDICATORS OF UV EXPOSURE IN CORALS AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND CORAL BLEACHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compelling aspect of the deterioration of coral reefs is the phenomenon of coral bleaching. Through interactions with other factors such as sedimentation, pollution, and bacterial infection, bleaching can impact large areas of a reef with limited recovery, and it might be induc...

  19. Project Overview: A Reef Manager’s Guide to Coral Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this report is to provide the latest scientific knowledge and discuss available management options to assist local and regional managers in responding effectively to mass coral bleaching events. Background A Reef Manager’s Guide to Coral Bleaching is...

  20. The Effects of Habitat on Coral Resistance and Resilience to Bleaching.

    OpenAIRE

    Grimsditch, G.; Kilonzo, J.; Amiyo, N.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa Marine Park and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching responses were monitored for the general coral community and zooxanthella densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea and Porites cylindrica ) during a nonbleaching year (20...

  1. Temperature-Regulated Bleaching and Lysis of the Coral Pocillopora damicornis by the Novel Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Haim, Yael; Zicherman-Keren, Maya; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of symbioses between coral animals and their photosynthetic microalgal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae). It has been suggested that large-scale bleaching episodes are linked to global warming. The data presented here demonstrate that Vibrio coralliilyticus is an etiological agent of bleaching of the coral Pocillopora damicornis. This bacterium was present at high levels in bleached P. damicornis but absent from healthy corals. The bacterium was isolated in pure ...

  2. Relationship between anthropogenic impacts and bleaching-associated tissue mortality of corals in Curaçao (Netherlands Antilles)

    OpenAIRE

    Nagelkerken, I.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic anthropogenic impacts can have a negative effect on coral health and on coral energy budgets needed for regeneration of lesions. I therefore hypothesise that during massive bleaching events, the degree of corals showing bleaching-related tissue mortality is higher in areas subject to chronic anthropogenic impacts than in relatively pristine areas. In the present study, the degree of bleaching and bleaching-related tissue mortality was estimated for eight abundant coral species in Cura...

  3. Comparison of the bleaching efficacy of three different agents used for intracoronal bleaching of discolored primary teeth: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyone wants whiter teeth to make them feel younger and to provide beautiful smiles with the accompanying increase in self-esteem. Bleaching is an established, simple, cost-effective and conservative method for improving the color of the discolored teeth. Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the bleaching efficacy of 10% carbamide peroxide, 10% hydrogen peroxide and 2g sodium perborate as bleaching agents on the artificially discolored human primary maxillary central incisors. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human primary central incisors with intact crowns were selected for the study. Pulpectomy was performed and each tooth was artificially stained with 2 ml of fresh human blood and centrifuged. --The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups of 10 teeth each and the baseline color evaluation was performed. 0.04 ml of the bleaching agent is syringed into the access cavity of the tooth and, in the control group, 0.04 ml of distilled water was syringed into the access cavity and it was sealed with IRM and placed at 37°C in an incubator throughout the experiment. The color of the bleached teeth was determined at 0, 7 and 14 days. The data obtained were analyzed using ANOVA and Turkey′s test. Results: There was statistical significance (P = 0.00 among the carbamide peroxide, sodium perborate, hydrogen peroxide and control groups after 7 and 14 days and a significance of P = 0.013 among the carbamide peroxide, sodium perborate and hydrogen peroxide after two bleaching sessions (day 14 was seen. Conclusions: The bleaching efficacy of 10% hydrogen peroxide gel was more effective than 10% carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate in bleaching the artificially discolored primary teeth.

  4. Enamel susceptibility to red wine staining after 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Bittencourt Berger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been expressed regarding the staining of enamel surface by different beverages after bleaching. This study investigated the influence of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on enamel surface stained with wine after whitening treatments. Flat and polished bovine enamel surfaces were submitted to two commercially available 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents or kept in 100% humidity, as a control group (n = 10. Specimens of all groups were immersed in red wine for 48 h at 37°C, immediately, 24 h or 1 week after treatments. All specimens were ground into powder and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. Data were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test at 5% significance level. The amount of wine pigments uptake by enamel submitted to bleaching treatments was statistically higher than that of control group, independently of the evaluation time. Results suggested that wine staining susceptibility was increased by bleaching treatments.

  5. CHLORINE DIOXIDE BLEACHING OF SODA-ANTHRAQUINONE JUTE PULP TO A VERY HIGH BRIGHTNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarwar Jahan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Bleaching of soda-anthraquinone jute pulp by chlorine dioxide (ClO2 was studied to reach a target brightness of above 88% for the purpose of using less bleaching chemicals. The performance of either chlorine dioxide or peroxide in the final bleaching to boost brightness was also studied. The experimental results revealed that the final brightness depended on ClO2 charge in the Do and D1 stages. The brightness reversion was lower when the final stage brightening was done by peroxide. The use of Mg(OH2 in the D1 and D2 stages improved the final brightness due to the formation of less chlorate and chlorite during the Mg(OH2- based ClO2 brightening stages. The strength properties of pulp bleached by peroxide in the final stage was slightly better than that from ClO2 as the final ClO2 bleaching stage.

  6. The combination of sodium perborate and water as intracoronal teeth bleaching agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananta Tantri Budi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The color change on post-endodontic treated teeth can be overcome by intracoronal tooth bleaching using walking bleach. Some agents used in walking bleach are combination of sodium peroxide and hydrogen peroxide, and combination of sodium perborate and water. Purpose: The objective of this review is to provide information and consideration of using safe and effective bleaching agents in the field of dentistry. Reviews: On one side, the use of sodium perborate and water combination does not cause the reduction of dentin hardness, enamel decay, and root resorbtion. On the other side, the use of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide combination indicates that it takes longer time in yielding the proper color of teeth. Conclusion: The use of sodium perborate and water combination as bleaching agents is effective and safe.

  7. Seasonal Dynamical Prediction of Coral Bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillman, C. M.; Alves, O.

    2009-05-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is now recognised as the primary cause of mass coral bleaching events. Coral bleaching occurs during times of stress, particularly when SSTs exceed the coral colony's tolerance level. Global warming is potentially a serious threat to the future of the world's reef systems with predictions by the international community that bleaching will increase in both frequency and severity. Advance warning of anomalous sea surface temperatures, and thus potential bleaching events, would allow for the implementation of management strategies to minimise reef damage. Seasonal SST forecasts from the coupled ocean-atmosphere model POAMA (Bureau of Meteorology) have skill in the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) several months into the future. We will present model forecasts and probabilistic products for use in reef management, and assess model skill in the region. These products will revolutionise the way in which coral bleaching events are monitored and assessed in the Great Barrier Reef and Australian region.

  8. Climate change disables coral bleaching protection on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Tracy D; Heron, Scott F; Ortiz, Juan Carlos; Mumby, Peter J; Grech, Alana; Ogawa, Daisie; Eakin, C Mark; Leggat, William

    2016-04-15

    Coral bleaching events threaten the sustainability of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Here we show that bleaching events of the past three decades have been mitigated by induced thermal tolerance of reef-building corals, and this protective mechanism is likely to be lost under near-future climate change scenarios. We show that 75% of past thermal stress events have been characterized by a temperature trajectory that subjects corals to a protective, sub-bleaching stress, before reaching temperatures that cause bleaching. Such conditions confer thermal tolerance, decreasing coral cell mortality and symbiont loss during bleaching by over 50%. We find that near-future increases in local temperature of as little as 0.5°C result in this protective mechanism being lost, which may increase the rate of degradation of the GBR.

  9. Determination of optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue samples using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Oxidative bleaching changes of human teeth induced changes in the optical properties of dental tissue. We introduced 1310 nm wavelengths of optical coherence tomography (OCT) attenuation coefficient method which is a relatively novel and rarely reported methodology to measure the correlation coefficient during the teeth oxidative bleaching procedure. And the quantitative parameters of enamel optical thickness and disruption of the entrance signal (DES) were extracted from the OCT images. The attenuation coefficient of the bleached tissue is 6.2 mm-1 which is significant (p bleaching oxidation in 35% hydrogen peroxide-induced optical thickness of enamel is similar with unbleached tissue which may indicate the refractive index of enamel is unchanged. Moreover, disruption of the entrance signal (DES) analysis showed that remarkable difference was appeared at enamel surface. The results indicate that optical properties of oxidative bleaching human dental tissue can be determined by attenuation coefficient using OCT system.

  10. Spring ``bleaching'' among Pocillopora in the Sea of Cortez, Eastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajeunesse, T. C.; Reyes-Bonilla, H.; Warner, M. E.

    2007-06-01

    A mild bleaching event was observed among Pocillopora spp. in the southern Gulf of California in the spring of 2006. Uniform bleaching occurred in numerous colonies on the upper portions of their branches. Most (˜90%) colonies that exhibited bleaching contained a species of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium C1b-c, which differed from the Symbiodinium D1 found inhabiting most unbleached colonies. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence, indicated a decline in photosystem II photochemical activity, especially among colonies populated with C1b-c. By early August, most affected colonies had recovered their normal pigmentation and fluorescence values were once again high for all colonies. No mortality was observed among tagged bleached colonies nor did symbiont species composition change during recovery. This unusual episode of bleaching did not appear to be a response to thermal stress, but may have been triggered by high levels of solar radiation during a period of unseasonally high water clarity in the early spring.

  11. Climate change disables coral bleaching protection on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Tracy D; Heron, Scott F; Ortiz, Juan Carlos; Mumby, Peter J; Grech, Alana; Ogawa, Daisie; Eakin, C Mark; Leggat, William

    2016-04-15

    Coral bleaching events threaten the sustainability of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Here we show that bleaching events of the past three decades have been mitigated by induced thermal tolerance of reef-building corals, and this protective mechanism is likely to be lost under near-future climate change scenarios. We show that 75% of past thermal stress events have been characterized by a temperature trajectory that subjects corals to a protective, sub-bleaching stress, before reaching temperatures that cause bleaching. Such conditions confer thermal tolerance, decreasing coral cell mortality and symbiont loss during bleaching by over 50%. We find that near-future increases in local temperature of as little as 0.5°C result in this protective mechanism being lost, which may increase the rate of degradation of the GBR. PMID:27081069

  12. Anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of wastewaters from chlorine and total chlorine-free bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidal, G.; Soto, M.; Field, J.; Mendez-Pampin, R.; Lema, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Chlorine bleaching effluents are problematic for anaerobic wastewater treatment due to their high methanogenic toxicity and low biodegradability. Presently, alternative bleaching processes are being introduced, such as elemental chlorine-free (ECF) and total chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching. The methan

  13. MOLYBDENUM CATALYZED ACID PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos S. Rabelo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum catalyzed peroxide bleaching (PMo Stage consists of pulp treatment with hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions in the presence of a molybdenum catalyst. Molybdenum is applied in catalytic doses (50-200 mg/kg pulp and may originate from various sources, including (NH46Mo7O24.4H2O, Na2MoO4.2H2O, siliconmolybdate, etc. This work is aimed at optimizing the PMo stage and evaluating its industrial application in the OAZDP sequence. Optimum PMo stage conditions for bleaching eucalyptus pulp were 90 ºC, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/adt Mo and 5 kg/adt H2O2. The PMo stage was more efficient to remove pulp hexenuronic acids than lignin. Its efficiency decreased with increasing pH in the range of 1.5-5.5, while it increased with increasing temperature and peroxide and molybdenum doses. The application of the PMo stage as replacement for the A-stage of the AZDP sequence significantly decreased chlorine dioxide demand. The PMo stage caused a decrease of 20-30% in the generation of organically bound chlorine. The quality parameters of the pulp produced during the PMo stage mill trial were comparable to those obtained with the reference A-stage.

  14. Influence of dental bleaching on marginal leakage of Class V restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cristina Ramos Dorini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the in vitro effect of bleaching performed in the dental office and waiting time on the degree of microleakage in class V cavities with margins in enamel, restored with resin composite. Methods: Forty-five human third molars were used, in which the vestibular faces were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated with LED and the palatine faces were not bleached (control. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups with 15 teeth in each: Group 1, restored immediately after bleaching; Group 2, seven days after bleaching; and Group 3, fourteen days after bleaching. After cavity preparation, 35% phosphoric acid, Adper Single Bond 2 adhesive (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Mn, USA, and resin composite Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA were applied. The teeth were thermal cycled and sealed with red nail polish on the bleached faces and blue on the non bleached faces, except for 1mm around the restored region. The samples were classified according to the following scores: 0 = no leakage, 1 = minimum leakage (less than 1 / 3 the length of the wall, 2 = moderate leakage (1/3 to 2/3 of the wall and 3 = extensive leakage (over 2/3 of the wall. The data were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test at a level of significance of 5%. Results: The restorative procedure immediately after bleaching resulted in statistically higher microleakage values (p 0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results, it is advisable to wait at least 7 days after bleaching to make the definitive restoration.

  15. Bleaching of leaf litter and associated microfungi in subboreal and subalpine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Yusuke; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Hobara, Satoru; Mori, Akira S; Hirose, Dai; Osono, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Fungal decomposition of lignin leads to the whitening, or bleaching, of leaf litter, especially in temperate and tropical forests, but less is known about such bleaching in forests of cooler regions, such as boreal and subalpine forests. The purposes of the present study were to examine the extent of bleached area on the surface of leaf litter and its variation with environmental conditions in subboreal and subalpine forests in Japan and to examine the microfungi associated with the bleaching of leaf litter by isolating fungi from the bleached portions of the litter. Bleached area accounted for 21.7%-32.7% and 2.0%-10.0% of total leaf area of Quercus crispula and Betula ermanii, respectively, in subboreal forests, and for 6.3% and 18.6% of total leaf area of B. ermanii and Picea jezoensis var. hondoensis, respectively, in a subalpine forest. In subboreal forests, elevation, C/N ratio and pH of the FH layer, and slope aspect were selected as predictor variables for the bleached leaf area. Leaf mass per area and lignin content were consistently lower in the bleached area than in the nonbleached area of the same leaves, indicating that the selective decomposition of acid unhydrolyzable residue (recalcitrant compounds such as lignin, tannins, and cutins) enhanced the mass loss of leaf tissues in the bleached portions. Isolates of a total of 11 fungal species (6 species of Ascomycota and 5 of Basidiomycota) exhibited leaf-litter-bleaching activity under pure culture conditions. Two fungal species (Coccomyces sp. and Mycena sp.) occurred in both subboreal and subalpine forests, which were separated from each other by approximately 1100 km.

  16. USING Mg(OH2 IN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF WHEAT STRAW SODA-AQ PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlan Liu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The peroxide bleaching of high yield pulps from wood with Mg(OH2 has been developing recently in the pulp and paper industry. However, there is still a lack of data on the application of Mg(OH2 in peroxide bleaching of non-wood fibres. In this work, our purpose was to study the effect of Mg(OH2 on peroxide bleaching of wheat straw soda-AQ pulp. The results showed that Mg(OH2 significantly improved peroxide bleaching efficiency (expressed as the ratio between the brightness gain and the H2O2 consumption and selectivity (expressed as the ratio between the brightness gain and the viscosity losses of wheat straw soda-AQ pulp. The brightness, viscosity, and yield of bleached pulp can be significantly enhanced by increasing the replacement ratio of Mg(OH2. However, at 100% replacement of NaOH with Mg(OH2, the brightness of bleached pulp was much lower than that of the bleached pulp with NaOH as the sole alkaline source. When 24 to 73% of the NaOH was replaced with Mg(OH2, the COD of the bleaching filtrate was 11 to 38% lower than that of the NaOH as the sole alkaline source. The lower solubility and alkalinity of Mg(OH2, as well as the reduction of Cu ion content in bleached pulp were proposed as accounting for the favorable effect of Mg(OH2 on peroxide bleaching of wheat straw soda-AQ pulp.

  17. Can heterotrophic uptake of dissolved organic carbon and zooplankton mitigate carbon budget deficits in annually bleached corals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levas, Stephen; Grottoli, Andréa G.; Schoepf, Verena; Aschaffenburg, Matthew; Baumann, Justin; Bauer, James E.; Warner, Mark E.

    2016-06-01

    Annual coral bleaching events due to increasing sea surface temperatures are predicted to occur globally by the mid-century and as early as 2025 in the Caribbean, and severely impact coral reefs. We hypothesize that heterotrophic carbon (C) in the form of zooplankton and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a significant source of C to bleached corals. Thus, the ability to utilize multiple pools of fixed carbon and/or increase the amount of fixed carbon acquired from one or more pools of fixed carbon (defined here as heterotrophic plasticity) could underlie coral acclimatization and persistence under future ocean-warming scenarios. Here, three species of Caribbean coral— Porites divaricata, P. astreoides, and Orbicella faveolata—were experimentally bleached for 2.5 weeks in two successive years and allowed to recover in the field. Zooplankton feeding was assessed after single and repeat bleaching, while DOC fluxes and the contribution of DOC to the total C budget were determined after single bleaching, 11 months on the reef, and repeat bleaching. Zooplankton was a large C source for P. astreoides, but only following single bleaching. DOC was a source of C for single-bleached corals and accounted for 11-36 % of daily metabolic demand (CHARDOC), but represented a net loss of C in repeat-bleached corals. In repeat-bleached corals, DOC loss exacerbated the negative C budgets in all three species. Thus, the capacity for heterotrophic plasticity in corals is compromised under annual bleaching, and heterotrophic uptake of DOC and zooplankton does not mitigate C budget deficits in annually bleached corals. Overall, these findings suggest that some Caribbean corals may be more susceptible to repeat bleaching than to single bleaching due to a lack of heterotrophic plasticity, and coral persistence under increasing bleaching frequency may ultimately depend on other factors such as energy reserves and symbiont shuffling.

  18. Effect of Temperature on Adhesion of Vibrio Strain AK-1 to Oculina patagonica and on Coral Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    A. Toren; Landau, L; Kushmaro, A.; Y. Loya; Rosenberg, E

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory aquarium experiments demonstrated that Vibrio strain AK-1 caused rapid and extensive bleaching of the coral Oculina patagonica at 29°C, slower and less-complete bleaching at 23°C, and no bleaching at 16°C. At 29°C, the application of approximately 100 Vibrio strain AK-1 cells directly onto the coral caused 50 and 83% bleaching after 10 and 20 days, respectively. At 16°C, there was no bleaching, even with an initial inoculum of 1.2 × 108 bacteria. To begin to understand the effect o...

  19. Excess algal symbionts increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunning, Ross; Baker, Andrew C.

    2013-03-01

    Rising ocean temperatures associated with global climate change are causing mass coral bleaching and mortality worldwide. Understanding the genetic and environmental factors that mitigate coral bleaching susceptibility may aid local management efforts to help coral reefs survive climate change. Although bleaching susceptibility depends partly on the genetic identity of a coral's algal symbionts, the effect of symbiont density, and the factors controlling it, remain poorly understood. By applying a new metric of symbiont density to study the coral Pocillopora damicornis during seasonal warming and acute bleaching, we show that symbiont cell ratio density is a function of both symbiont type and environmental conditions, and that corals with high densities are more susceptible to bleaching. Higher vulnerability of corals with more symbionts establishes a quantitative mechanistic link between symbiont density and the molecular basis for coral bleaching, and indicates that high densities do not buffer corals from thermal stress, as has been previously suggested. These results indicate that environmental conditions that increase symbiont densities, such as nutrient pollution, will exacerbate climate-change-induced coral bleaching, providing a mechanistic explanation for why local management to reduce these stressors will help coral reefs survive future warming.

  20. Influence of hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels on color, opacity, and fluorescence of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, C R G; Ribeiro, C F; Bresciani, E; Borges, A B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 20% and 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels on the color, opacity, and fluorescence of composite resins. Seven composite resin brands were tested and 30 specimens, 3-mm in diameter and 2-mm thick, of each material were fabricated, for a total of 210 specimens. The specimens of each tested material were divided into three subgroups (n=10) according to the bleaching therapy tested: 20% hydrogen peroxide gel, 35% hydroxide peroxide gel, and the control group. The baseline color, opacity, and fluorescence were assessed by spectrophotometry. Four 30-minute bleaching gel applications, two hours in total, were performed. The control group did not receive bleaching treatment and was stored in deionized water. Final assessments were performed, and data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (pColor changes were significant for different tested bleaching therapies (pcolor change observed for 35% hydrogen peroxide gel. No difference in opacity was detected for all analyzed parameters. Fluorescence changes were influenced by composite resin brand (pbrand Z350. It was concluded that 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel generated the greatest color change among all evaluated materials. No statistical opacity changes were detected for all tested variables, and significant fluorescence changes were dependent on the material and bleaching therapy, regardless of the gel concentration. PMID:22433032

  1. MODIFIED OPAL: A NOVEL STABILIZER FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF PULPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuerenQian; XianhuiAn; WenboLiu; GangYu; ZhanqianSong

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of modified opal as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching was investigated. Theresults showed that the modified opal in place ofsodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxidebleaching is feasible. At the same dosage, above 3%ISO can be increased for both wheat straw pulp anddeinked pulp. The stabilizing ability of the modifiedopal to hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp isimproved markedly. It is favorable for bleaching toincrease temperature and time within a permissiveextent. The suitable process conditions are I0% ofpulp consistency, 3% of hydrogen peroxide, 1.5% ofsodium hydroxide, 3% of the modified opal, 70~"and 60 min when the modified opal is used as thestabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. At theseconditions, the brightness gain can reach about 16%ISO for wheat straw pulp. In addition, it is favorablefor bleaching to add a little magnesium sulfate whenthe modified opal is used as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching, the brightness of pulpcan increase 1%ISO if0.05% of magnesium sulfate isadded. The cost analysis indicated that the modifiedopal is superior to sodium silicate as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching in economical aspectand has further the potential of market development.

  2. Relationships between temperature, bleaching and white syndrome on the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, S. S.; Graham, N. A. J.; Connolly, S. R.

    2013-03-01

    Coral bleaching and disease have often been hypothesized to be mutually reinforcing or co-occurring, but much of the research supporting this has only drawn an implicit connection through common environmental predictors. In this study, we examine whether an explicit relationship between white syndrome and bleaching exists using assemblage-level monitoring data from up to 112 sites on reef slopes spread throughout the Great Barrier Reef over 11 years of monitoring. None of the temperature metrics commonly used to predict mass bleaching performed strongly when applied to these data. Furthermore, the inclusion of bleaching as a predictor did not improve model skill over baseline models for predicting white syndrome. Similarly, the inclusion of white syndrome as a predictor did not improve models of bleaching. Evidence for spatial co-occurrence of bleaching and white syndrome at the assemblage level in this data set was also very weak. These results suggest the hypothesized relationship between bleaching and disease events may be weaker than previously thought, and more likely to be driven by common responses to environmental stressors, rather than directly facilitating one another.

  3. Ion release from a composite resin after exposure to different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Plá Rizzolo Bueno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in vitro study evaluated the influence of two 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents - a commercial product (Opalescence PF; Ultradent Products, Inc. and a bleaching agent prepared in a compounding pharmacy - on the chemical degradation of a light-activated composite resin by determining its release of ions before and after exposure to the agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty composite resin (Filtek Z250; 3M/ESPE samples were divided into three groups: group I (exposed to Opalescence PF commercial bleaching agent, group II (exposed to a compounded bleaching agent and group III (control - Milli-Q water. After 14 days of exposure, with a protocol of 8 h of daily exposure to the bleaching agents and 16 h of immersion in Milli-Q water, the analysis of ion release was carried out using a HP 8453 spectrophotometer. The values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, Tukey's test and the paired t-tests. The significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: After 14 days of the experiment, statistically significant difference was found between group II and groups I and III, with greater ion release from the composite resin in group II. CONCLUSIONS: The compounded bleaching agent had a more aggressive effect on the composite resin after 14 days of exposure than the commercial product and the control (no bleaching.

  4. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were prepared from each tooth and placed in colorless translucent acrylic resin. The enamel areas from all the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 6: Group 1 did not undergo any bleaching procedures; Group 2 was bleached with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by bioactive glass (BAG, amorphous calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. The enamel SR was evaluated before and after treatment by atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: SR increased significantly in the HP group. SR decreased significantly in the HP gel modified by BAG group as compared to other groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, incorporation of each one of the three test biomaterials proved effective in decreasing enamel SR subsequent to in-office bleaching technique.

  5. Effect of different restorative procedures on the fracture resistance of teeth submitted to internal bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andiara Ribeiro Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different restorative procedures on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth submitted to intracoronal bleaching. Fifty upper central incisors were distributed into 5 groups: GI - healthy teeth; GII - endodontically treated teeth sealed with Coltosol; GIII - endodontically treated teeth bleached and sealed with Coltosol; GIV - endodontically treated teeth bleached and restored with composite resin; and GV - endodontically treated teeth bleached and restored with a fiberglass post and composite resin. In the bleached specimens, a cervical seal was made prior to bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide. The gel was applied on the buccal surface and in the pulp chamber, and was then light-activated for 45 s. This procedure was repeated three times per session for four sessions, and each group was submitted to the restorative procedures described above. The specimens were submitted to fracture resistance testing in a universal testing machine. There were statistically significant differences among the groups (p 0.05. The restorative procedures using composite resin were found to successfully restore the fracture resistance of endodontically treated and bleached teeth.

  6. Skeletal isotope records of growth perturbations in Porites corals during the 1997-1998 mass bleaching event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A.; Gagan, M.; Fabricius, K.; Isdale, P.; Yukino, I.; Kawahata, H.

    2003-04-01

    Severe coral bleaching occurred throughout the tropics in 1997/98. We report skeletal UV fluorescence, oxygen isotope, and carbon isotope evidence for perturbations in coral skeletal growth due to bleaching at Ishigaki Island, Japan, and Pandora Reef, Great Barrier Reef. Bleached corals showed abrupt reductions in skeletal extension rate immediately after summer temperature maxima, indicating that bleaching inhibits coral calcification. A colony growing at the low tide line in Ishigaki exhibited clear blue UV fluorescent bands associated with recurrent growth interruptions. Based on the length of time-gaps observed in the annual isotopic cycle, the typical time required for a coral to recover from bleaching is estimated to be about 5--6 months. The effect of bleaching on the oxygen isotope ratio -- temperature relationship was negligible. However, the Ishigaki corals showed lower carbon isotope ratios during bleaching indicating depressed coral metabolism associated with a reduction in calcification. In contrast, skeletal carbon isotope ratios in the Pandora Reef corals exhibited little change in response to bleaching. This is because the records for Pandora Reef were derived from the shaded sides of coral colonies, where algal photosynthesis was particularly slow prior to bleaching, thus subduing the carbon isotope response to bleaching. Taken together, the isotopic and UV fluorescence signals can be used to reconstruct past bleaching events.

  7. A comparative analysis of bleached and sound enamel structure through scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the effects of bleaching agent on enamel structure and to characterize the morphological and chemical changes in enamel due to bleaching. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: School of Chemical and Material Engineering (SCME), NUST Islamabad from Feb to May 2013. Materials and Methods: Ten recently extracted pre molars between the 12-22 years age group were randomly assigned into two groups. Group one was a non-bleached control group with sound enamel. Group two was bleached with Everbrite In office tooth whitening system after specimen preparation, surface morphology was observed under SEM (scanned electron microscope) and AFM (Atomic force microscope). Results: The detrimental effects of hydrogen per-oxide on enamel were evident in bleached specimens under SEM, and AFM analysis. Conclusion: There were significant surface alterations found in the bleached specimens as compared to control group. However salivary buffering potentials could overcome the demineralizing effect of bleaching gel. (author)

  8. Dietary shift in corallivorous Drupella snails following a major bleaching event at Koh Tao, Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, B. W.; Scott, C.; True, J. D.

    2013-06-01

    The island Koh Tao in the western Gulf of Thailand suffered severe coral bleaching in 2010. Its mushroom coral fauna of 20 species was surveyed during the bleaching in 2010 and after the bleaching in 2011. Multi-species assemblages of free-living mushroom corals occurred around the island, two of which were invaded by corallivorous Drupella snails after the bleaching. Previously these gastropods were known to mainly consume branching corals and hardly any mushroom corals. The snails were found preying on four fungiid species, three of which were susceptible to bleaching. The dietary shift became apparent after populations of preferred prey species (Acroporidae and Pocilloporidae) had died during the bleaching event. It seems that bleaching mortality reduced the availability of preferred prey, causing the corallivores to switch to less preferred species that occur in dense aggregations.

  9. Influence of H2SO4 as Activator to ClO2 on the Bleaching Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxiang Ji

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we show that chlorine dioxide activated by 4% Hydrochloric Acid Solution (HCl has the same bleaching effects as that by sulfuric acid (H2SO4. Chlorine dioxide is an important bleaching agent in ECF bleaching. Stable chlorine dioxide in conjunction with Hydrochloric Acid Solution (HCl activation in a certain proportion can be applied in the process of pulp bleach with a bleaching result of environment friendly, positive brightness stability, low pollutant bleach and pulp brightness stability, not easy to reverse. By experiment of OD, ODED, ODQP bleach Triploid of Populus Tomentos with stable chlorine dioxide activated by sulfuric acid (H2SO4. Moreover, the result of the experiment can prove that principle of activation of HCl to ClO2 is similar to H2SO4 to ClO2, that is, to provide an acid environment for ClO2.

  10. Effects of different concentrations of carbamide peroxide and bleaching periods on the roughness of dental ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Augusto Morey Ourique

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The wide use of dental bleaching treatment has brought concern about the possible effects of hydrogen peroxide on dental tissue and restorative materials. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of nightguard bleaching on the surface roughness of dental ceramics after different periods of bleaching treatment. Fifteen specimens of 5 × 3 × 1 mm were created with three dental ceramics following the manufacturers' instructions: IPS Classic (Ivoclar-Vivadent; IPS d.Sign (Ivoclar-Vivadent; and VMK-95 (Vita. A profilometer was used to evaluate baseline surface roughness (Ra values of all ceramics by five parallel measurements with five 0.25 mm cut off (Λc at 0.1 mm/s. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to 6-h daily bleaching treatments with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (Whiteness- FGM for 21 days, while control groups from each ceramic system were stored in artificial saliva. The surface roughness of all groups was evaluated after 18 h, 42 h, 84 h, and 126 h of bleaching treatment. The surface roughness of each specimen (n = 5 was based on the mean value of five parallel measurements in each time and all data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05. No significant differences in ceramic surface roughness were observed between untreated and bleached ceramic surfaces, regardless of bleaching intervals or bleaching treatments. This study provided evidence that at-home bleaching systems do not cause detrimental effects on surface roughness of dental ceramics.

  11. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D’Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy. PMID:27708725

  12. Caribbean Corals in Crisis: Record Thermal Stress, Bleaching, and Mortality in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, C. Mark; Morgan, Jessica A.; Heron, Scott F.; Smith, Tyler B.; Liu, Gang; Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Baca, Bart; Bartels, Erich; Bastidas, Carolina; Bouchon, Claude; Brandt, Marilyn; Bruckner, Andrew W.; Bunkley-Williams, Lucy; Cameron, Andrew; Causey, Billy D.; Chiappone, Mark; Christensen, Tyler R. L.; Crabbe, M. James C; Day, Owen; de la Guardia, Elena; Díaz-Pulido, Guillermo; DiResta, Daniel; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L.; Gilliam, David S.; Ginsburg, Robert N.; Gore, Shannon; Guzmán, Héctor M.; Hendee, James C.; Hernández-Delgado, Edwin A.; Husain, Ellen; Jeffrey, Christopher F. G.; Jones, Ross J.; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric; Kaufman, Les S.; Kline, David I.; Kramer, Philip A.; Lang, Judith C.; Lirman, Diego; Mallela, Jennie; Manfrino, Carrie; Maréchal, Jean-Philippe; Marks, Ken; Mihaly, Jennifer; Miller, W. Jeff; Mueller, Erich M.; Muller, Erinn M.; Orozco Toro, Carlos A.; Oxenford, Hazel A.; Ponce-Taylor, Daniel; Quinn, Norman; Ritchie, Kim B.; Rodríguez, Sebastián; Ramírez, Alberto Rodríguez; Romano, Sandra; Samhouri, Jameal F.; Sánchez, Juan A.; Schmahl, George P.; Shank, Burton V.; Skirving, William J.; Steiner, Sascha C. C.; Villamizar, Estrella; Walsh, Sheila M.; Walter, Cory; Weil, Ernesto; Williams, Ernest H.; Roberson, Kimberly Woody; Yusuf, Yusri

    2010-01-01

    Background The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. Methodology/Principal Findings Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. Conclusions/Significance Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks) and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate. PMID:21125021

  13. Seasonal mesophotic coral bleaching of Stylophora pistillata in the Northern Red Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Nir

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching occurs when environmental stress induces breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis and the host initiates algae expulsion. Two types of coral bleaching had been thoroughly discussed in the scientific literature; the first is primarily associated with mass coral bleaching events; the second is a seasonal loss of algae and/or pigments. Here, we describe a phenomenon that has been witnessed for repeated summers in the mesophotic zone (40-63 m in the northern Red Sea: seasonal bleaching and recovery of several hermatypic coral species. In this study, we followed the recurring bleaching process of the common coral Stylophora pistillata. Bleaching occurred from April to September with a 66% decline in chlorophyll a concentration, while recovery began in October. Using aquarium and transplantation experiments, we explored environmental factors such as temperature, photon flux density and heterotrophic food availability. Our experiments and observations did not yield one single factor, alone, responsible for the seasonal bleaching. The dinoflagellate symbionts (of the genus Symbiodinium in shallow (5 m Stylophora pistillata were found to have a net photosynthetic rate of 56.98-92.19 µmol O2 cm(-2 day(-1. However, those from mesophotic depth (60 m during months when they are not bleached are net consumers of oxygen having a net photosynthetic rate between -12.86 - (-10.24 µmol O2 cm(-2 day(-1. But during months when these mesophotic corals are partially-bleached, they yielded higher net production, between -2.83-0.76 µmol O2 cm(-2 day(-1. This study opens research questions as to why mesophotic zooxanthellae are more successfully meeting the corals metabolic requirements when Chl a concentration decreases by over 60% during summer and early fall.

  14. Caribbean corals in crisis: record thermal stress, bleaching, and mortality in 2005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mark Eakin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate.

  15. Coscinaraea marshae corals that have survived prolonged bleaching exhibit signs of increased heterotrophic feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell-Browne, Pia; Stat, Michael; Thomson, Damian; Clode, Peta L.

    2014-09-01

    Colonies of Coscinaraea marshae corals from Rottnest Island, Western Australia have survived for more than 11 months in various bleached states following a severe heating event in the austral summer of 2011. These colonies are situated in a high-latitude, mesophotic environment, which has made their long-term survival of particular interest as such environments typically suffer from minimal thermal pressures. We have investigated corals that remain unbleached, moderately bleached, or severely bleached to better understand potential survival mechanisms utilised in response to thermal stress. Specifically, Symbiodinium (algal symbiont) density and genotype, chlorophyll- a concentrations, and δ13C and δ15N levels were compared between colonies in the three bleaching categories. Severely bleached colonies housed significantly fewer Symbiodinium cells ( p coral in both severely and moderately bleached colonies, with clade C and a mixed clade population detected. In unbleached colonies, only clade B was observed. Levels of δ15N indicate that severely bleached colonies are utilising heterotrophic feeding mechanisms to aid survival whilst bleached. Collectively, these results suggest that these C. marshae colonies can survive with low symbiont and chlorophyll densities, in response to prolonged thermal stress and extended bleaching, and increase heterotrophic feeding levels sufficiently to meet energy demands, thus enabling some colonies to survive and recover over long time frames. This is significant as it suggests that corals in mesophotic and high-latitude environments may possess considerable plasticity and an ability to tolerate and adapt to large environmental fluctuations, thereby improving their chances of survival as climate change impacts coral ecosystems worldwide.

  16. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. Materials and Methods: The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Results: Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (P0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive. PMID:22363363

  17. Tentative Research of Short Process of Jute Degumming and Bleaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-ming; WANG Feng; CAI Zai-sheng; YU Jian-yong

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of combination process of jute degumming and bleaching with alkali-hydrogen peroxide in one-step-one-bath was discussed.The combination process basically has the similar function as the traditional two-step-two-bath method.The factors such as hydrogen peroxide concentration.CBI concentration, sodium hydroxide concentration, treatment time and temperature were studied respectively, and then an orthogonal experiment was designed to study the interactions among the hydrogen peroxide concentration, CBI concentration, sodium hydroxide concentration.After the designed experiments, the optimum treatment conditions were obtained as follows: hydrogen peroxide of 12 g/L, sodium hydroxide of 4 g/L, CBI of 4 g/L, JFC of 1 g/L, treatment time of 60 min and temperature of 75℃

  18. The role of bound chlorine in the brightness reversion of bleached hardwood kraft pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Maria Morais Eiras

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous paper showed fragmentary evidence that pulp brightness reversion may be negatively affected by its organically bound chlorine (OX content. A thorough investigation on eucalyptus kraft pulp led to the conclusion that OX increases reversion of certain pulps but this trend is not universal. Alkaline bleaching stages decrease reversion regardless of pulp OX content. Pulps bleached with high temperature chlorine dioxide revert less than those bleached with conventional chlorine dioxide in sequences ending with a chlorine dioxide stage but similarly in sequences ending with a final peroxide stage. The use of secondary condensate for pulp washing decreases reversion.

  19. Structural modifications of flax and sisal lignin during the pulping and bleaching processes

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Gisela; Gutiérrez Suárez, Ana; Nieto Garrido, Lidia; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Martínez, Ángel T.; Río Andrade, José Carlos del

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the structural modifications of the lignin of flax and sisal during the pulping (soda/AQ) and bleaching (TCF and ECF) processes. The residual lignins were isolated by acidolysis and subsequently characterized by Py-GC/MS and 2D-NMR. Flax residual lignins have a predominance of G-lignin and low amounts of S-lignin units in the unbleached pulp, which are also present in similar abundances in the residual lignin after TCF bleaching. After ECF bleaching, lignin was still present, ...

  20. CHLORINE DIOXIDE BLEACHING OF SODA-ANTHRAQUINONE JUTE PULP TO A VERY HIGH BRIGHTNESS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sarwar Jahan; Yonghao Ni,; Zhibin He

    2010-01-01

    Bleaching of soda-anthraquinone jute pulp by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) was studied to reach a target brightness of above 88% for the purpose of using less bleaching chemicals. The performance of either chlorine dioxide or peroxide in the final bleaching to boost brightness was also studied. The experimental results revealed that the final brightness depended on ClO2 charge in the Do and D1 stages. The brightness reversion was lower when the final stage brightening was done by peroxide. The use ...

  1. Bleaching of browned water yam (Dioscorea alata) with African oil bean seed lipoxygenase (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokwulu, M N

    2004-01-01

    Purified African oil bean seed lipoxygenase was used to bleach water yam tubers that were browned by exposing their cut surfaces to air. The enzyme solution destroyed the polyphenols extracted from the browned water yams and the polyphenols at the browned yam tubers which resulted in the bleaching of the browned yam tubers to their original white colour. The destruction of the polyphenol extract and the bleaching of the browned yam tubers were found to be dependent on the enzyme concentration of the enzyme.

  2. INCLUSION OF A PRESSURIZED ACIDOLYSIS STAGE IN CHEMICAL PULP BLEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar K. Bose

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hardwood soda-AQ pulps are believed to be rich in benzyl sugar ethers (BSE that can be partially cleaved by aqueous acidic treatments. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of acidolysis on final bleached brightness for kraft and soda-AQ (SAQ hardwood pulps. The increase in final brightness due to acidolysis at 110 °C was twice as high for a eucalyptus SAQ pulp as compared to the kraft pulp. An oxygen delignified maple C-SAQ pulp (carbonate pre-treated SAQ was acidolyzed at 120 °C and pH 2.6 for 30 min. When 1.60% ClO2 + 0.25% H2O2 on pulp was used in DEPD final bleaching of the control sample a brightness of 91.5% was achieved. When only 1.00% ClO2 + 0.25% H2O2 on pulp was used for the acidolyzed sample a brightness of 92.0% was attained. Analyses of the maple pulp after the acidolysis showed no major change in lignin content, brightness, or pulp yield. The minor changes suggest that a facile reaction such as benzyl ether cleavage was responsible for the improved bleachability. Preliminary research involving a lignin model compound and commercial birch xylan showed that lignin-carbohydrate condensation products were generated under SAQ cooking conditions. Furthermore, a fraction of these lignin-carbohydrate moieties were subsequently cleaved by acidolysis at pH 2.5 and 105 °C.

  3. Local bleaching thresholds established by remote sensing techniques vary among reefs with deviating bleaching patterns during the 2012 event in the Arabian/Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuail, Dawood; Wiedenmann, Jörg; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Baird, Andrew H; Pratchett, Morgan S; Riegl, Bernhard; Burt, John A; Petrov, Peter; Amos, Carl

    2016-04-30

    A severe bleaching event affected coral communities off the coast of Abu Dhabi, UAE in August/September, 2012. In Saadiyat and Ras Ghanada reefs ~40% of the corals showed signs of bleaching. In contrast, only 15% of the corals were affected on Delma reef. Bleaching threshold temperatures for these sites were established using remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) data recorded by MODIS-Aqua. The calculated threshold temperatures varied between locations (34.48 °C, 34.55 °C, 35.05 °C), resulting in site-specific deviations in the numbers of days during which these thresholds were exceeded. Hence, the less severe bleaching of Delma reef might be explained by the lower relative heat stress experienced by this coral community. However, the dominance of Porites spp. that is associated with the long-term exposure of Delma reef to elevated temperatures, as well as the more pristine setting may have additionally contributed to the higher coral bleaching threshold for this site. PMID:26971815

  4. The effect of two bleaching agents on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy: An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokkalingam Mothilal Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the effect of in-office bleaching agents,-35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agents, on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. Materials and Methods : Forty noncarious, craze-free human maxillary incisors, extracted for periodontal reasons, were used in this study. Baseline Raman spectra from each specimen were obtained before the application of the bleaching agent to assess the phosphate content present in the teeth. The teeth were divided into two groups: Group A - bleached with pola office bleach (35% hydrogen peroxide, potassium nitrate (light activated. Group B - bleached with opalescence Xtra bleach (38% hydrogen peroxide potassium nitrate and fluoride (chemical activated. After the bleaching procedure, the treated specimens were taken to obtain Raman spectra to assess the phosphate loss after bleaching treatment. Results : The results showed that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed less phosphate loss when compared with the light activated bleaching agent. Conclusion : Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed minimal phosphate loss when compared to light activated bleaching agent. The chemically activated bleaching agent was better than the light activated bleaching agent when values were evaluated statistically.

  5. NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program: 2016 Projects Monitoring the Effects of Thermal Stress on Coral Bleaching

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climate change impacts have been identified as one of the greatest global threats to coral reef ecosystems. As temperature rise, mass bleaching, and infectious...

  6. Formalising a mechanistic linkage between heterotrophic feeding and thermal bleaching resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Scott A.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, I utilise the CO2 (sink) limitation model of coral bleaching to propose a new biochemical framework that explains how certain (well-adapted) coral species can utilise heterotrophic carbon acquisition to combat the damaging algal photoinhibition response sequence that underpins thermal bleaching, thereby increasing thermal bleaching resistance. This mechanistic linkage helps to clarify a number of previously challenging experimental responses arising from feeding (versus starved) temperature stress experiments, and isotope labelling (tracer) experiments with heterotrophic carbon sources (e.g., zooplankton). In an era of rapidly warming surface ocean temperatures, the conferred fitness benefits arising from such a mechanistic linkage are considerable. Yet, various ecological constraints are outlined which caution against the ultimate benefit of the mechanism for raising bleaching thresholds at the coral community (reef) scale. Future experiments are suggested that can strengthen these proposed arguments.

  7. High Resolution Imagery of Buck Island Coral Reef Systems Prior to and During Suspected Bleaching Events

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a collection of imagery of Buck Island coral reef systems. They are pairs of imagery where one image was acquired during a suspected bleaching...

  8. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND HYPOCHLOROUS ACID IN BLEACHING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study has demonstrated a rapid spectroscopic method for the determination of chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid concentrations in the pulp bleaching processes. It was found that chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid have an isosbestic wavelength of 295 nm. The soluble lignin in such a system is the main interference, but can be corrected by determining the absorbances at 295 nm, 380 nm, and 480 nm. Thus, based on the spectroscopic measurements at 295 nm (the isosbestic point wavelength for chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid, 380 nm (absorbance wavelength of chlorine dioxide and 480 nm (the acid soluble lignin absorbance wavelength, the chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid concentrations in the bleaching process can be quantified. However, hypochlorous acid was not detected in the real bleaching effluent for its low content. The present method is simple, rapid, accurate, and has the potential for on-line monitoring of the chlorine dioxide bleaching process.

  9. High Resolution Imagery of Keppel Island Coral Reef Systems Prior to and During Suspected Bleaching Events

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a collection of imagery of Keppel Island coral reef systems. They are pairs of imagery where one image was acquired during a suspected bleaching...

  10. High Resolution Imagery of Baker Island Coral Reef Systems Prior to and During Suspected Bleaching Events

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a collection of imagery of Baker Island coral reef systems. They are pairs of imagery where one image was acquired during a suspected bleaching...

  11. A study on the recovery of Tobago's coral reefs following the 2010 mass bleaching event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglass, Salome; Donner, Simon D; Alemu I, Jahson B

    2016-03-15

    In 2010, severe coral bleaching was observed across the southeastern Caribbean, including the island of Tobago, where coral reefs are subject to sedimentation and high nutrient levels from terrestrial runoff. Here we examine changes in corals' colony size distributions over time (2010-2013), juvenile abundances and sedimentation rates for sites across Tobago following the 2010 bleaching event. The results indicated that since pre-bleaching coral cover was already low due to local factors and past disturbance, the 2010 event affected only particular susceptible species' population size structure and increased the proportion of small sized colonies. The low density of juveniles (mean of 5.4±6.3 juveniles/m(-2)) suggests that Tobago's reefs already experienced limited recruitment, especially of large broadcasting species. The juvenile distribution and the response of individual species to the bleaching event support the notion that Caribbean reefs are becoming dominated by weedy non-framework building taxa which are more resilient to disturbances.

  12. Active radiation hardening of Tm-doped silica fiber based on pump bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ying-bin; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Lei; Wang, Yi-bo; Li, Hai-qing; Peng, Jing-gang; Yang, Lv-yun; Dai, Neng-li; Li, Jin-yan

    2015-09-21

    Tm-doped fiber laser or amplifier can be applied in varied adverse environments. In this work, we demonstrate the pump bleaching of Tm-doped silica fiber with 793nm pump source under gamma-ray irradiation in the range 50Gy-675Gy. The recovery time, the fiber slope efficiency and the fiber cladding absorption spectra after irradiation and bleaching have been measured. It is found that the recovery time and radiation induce absorption are positively associated with doses, however, the fiber slope efficiency of irradiated TDF and bleached TDF are both negatively correlated with doses. Based on the simulation of the fiber core temperature, the probable mechanism of pump bleaching is also discussed.

  13. Physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of bleached pomace-olive oil on Tunisian activated clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a contribution to studying bleaching process, which is an important stage in refining of vegetable oils. This process permitted to reduce or convert undesired constituents to harmless ones from oils and fats. Virgin olive oil, considered as reference, and pomace-olive oil were bleached in optimal conditions using Tunisian activated clays ( collected from the South of Tunisia) which were prepared in our laboratory and compared with commercial bleaching earths. It was shown that activated Tunisian clays are characterized by a very important adsorptive capacity, which is similar to that of commercial ones. In addition, the study of physicochemical properties of bleached oils was considered. The fatty acid composition (GC), the triacylglycerol composition (HPLC), and oxidative stability (UV spectrometry) allowed to conclude that treated oils do not undergo considerable physicochemical alterations and their caracteristics remain in concordance with international standards relative to edible refined oils. (Author)

  14. High Resolution Imagery of Arorae Island Coral Reef Systems Prior to and During Suspected Bleaching Events

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a collection of imagery of Arorae Island coral reef systems. They are pairs of imagery where one image was acquired during a suspected bleaching...

  15. High Resolution Imagery of Nikunau Island Coral Reef Systems Prior to and During Suspected Bleaching Events

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a collection of imagery of Nikunau Island coral reef systems. They are pairs of imagery where one image was acquired during a suspected bleaching...

  16. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  17. Prediction of Coral Bleaching in the Florida Keys Using Remotely Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral bleaching has been attributed to extremes or stressful synergy in several physical variables of the coral habitat. Of particular concern have been temperature, ultraviolet radiation, and photosynthetically available radiation. Satellite observing systems allow synoptic-sca...

  18. Short-Term Coral Bleaching Is Not Recorded by Skeletal Boron Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; McCulloch, Malcolm T.; Warner, Mark E.; Levas, Stephen J.; Matsui, Yohei; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2014-01-01

    Coral skeletal boron isotopes have been established as a proxy for seawater pH, yet it remains unclear if and how this proxy is affected by seawater temperature. Specifically, it has never been directly tested whether coral bleaching caused by high water temperatures influences coral boron isotopes. Here we report the results from a controlled bleaching experiment conducted on the Caribbean corals Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides, and Orbicella faveolata. Stable boron (δ11B), carbon (δ13C), oxygen (δ18O) isotopes, Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios, as well as chlorophyll a concentrations and calcification rates were measured on coral skeletal material corresponding to the period during and immediately after the elevated temperature treatment and again after 6 weeks of recovery on the reef. We show that under these conditions, coral bleaching did not affect the boron isotopic signature in any coral species tested, despite significant changes in coral physiology. This contradicts published findings from coral cores, where significant decreases in boron isotopes were interpreted as corresponding to times of known mass bleaching events. In contrast, δ13C and δ18O exhibited major enrichment corresponding to decreases in calcification rates associated with bleaching. Sr/Ca of bleached corals did not consistently record the 1.2°C difference in seawater temperature during the bleaching treatment, or alternatively show a consistent increase due to impaired photosynthesis and calcification. Mg/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca were affected by coral bleaching in some of the coral species, but the observed patterns could not be satisfactorily explained by temperature dependence or changes in coral physiology. This demonstrates that coral boron isotopes do not record short-term bleaching events, and therefore cannot be used as a proxy for past bleaching events. The robustness of coral boron isotopes to changes in coral physiology, however, suggests that reconstruction of

  19. Effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on the flexural strength of enamel-dentin complex following extracoronal bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diatri Nari Ratih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching can affect the mechanical properties of enamel-dentin complex, such as flexural strength. Casein phosphopeptide-amorphus calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP is often used following bleaching treatment to reduce hypersensitivity and to increase demineralization of tooth. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of CPP-ACP on the flexural strength of enamel-dentin complex following extracoronal bleaching. Methods: Forty-eight enamel-dentin plates (size 8 x 2 x 3 mm were randomly assigned into 6 groups, each consisted of 8 samples. Group 1, no bleaching and immersed in artificial saliva. Group 2, no bleaching, CPP-ACP application only. Group 3, bleaching using 15% carbamide peroxide. Group 4, similar to group 3, except application of CPP-ACP for the times between bleaching. Group 5, bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide. Group 6, similar to group 5, except application of CPP-ACP for the times between bleaching. Flexural strength of each enamel-dentin plate was tested by threepoint bending test using universal testing machine. Results: The results showed that 15% carbamide peroxide and 40% hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced flexural strength of enamel-dentin (216.25±26.44 MPa and 206.67±32.07 MPa respectively. Conversely, application of CPP-ACP following both bleachings increased flexural strength (266.75± 28.27MPa and 254.58±36.59 MPa respectively. A two-way Anova revealed that extracoronal bleaching agents significantly reduced flexural strength (p<0.05. Conclusion: Extracoronal bleaching agents reduce flexural strength, whereas application of CPP-ACP following bleaching either with 15% carbamide peroxide or 40% hydrogen peroxide can increase the flexural strength of enamel-dentin complex.

  20. Coral bleaching under unconventional scenarios of climate warming and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Cox, Peter; Halloran, Paul R.; Mumby, Peter J.; Wiltshire, Andy J.

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sea surface temperatures have been shown to cause mass coral bleaching. Widespread bleaching, affecting >90% of global coral reefs and causing coral degradation, has been projected to occur by 2050 under all climate forcing pathways adopted by the IPCC for use within the Fifth Assessment Report. These pathways include an extremely ambitious pathway aimed to limit global mean temperature rise to 2 °C (ref. ; Representative Concentration Pathway 2.6--RCP2.6), which assumes full participation in emissions reductions by all countries, and even the possibility of negative emissions. The conclusions drawn from this body of work, which applied widely used algorithms to estimate coral bleaching, are that we must either accept that the loss of a large percentage of the world’s coral reefs is inevitable, or consider technological solutions to buy those reefs time until atmospheric CO2 concentrations can be reduced. Here we analyse the potential for geoengineering, through stratospheric aerosol-based solar radiation management (SRM), to reduce the extent of global coral bleaching relative to ambitious climate mitigation. Exploring the common criticism of geoengineering--that ocean acidification and its impacts will continue unabated--we focus on the sensitivity of results to the aragonite saturation state dependence of bleaching. We do not, however, address the additional detrimental impacts of ocean acidification on processes such as coral calcification that will further determine the benefit to corals of any SRM-based scenario. Despite the sensitivity of thermal bleaching thresholds to ocean acidification being uncertain, stabilizing radiative forcing at 2020 levels through SRM reduces the risk of global bleaching relative to RCP2.6 under all acidification-bleaching relationships analysed.

  1. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Tavares Angelo Cintra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Dental materials, in general, are tested in different animal models prior to their clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group. Ten animals (control were untreated. The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell counting in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. The counting of fibroblasts was also performed. Scores were attributed to the odontoblastic layer and to vascular changes. The tertiary dentin area and the pulp chamber central area were histomorphometrically measured. Data were compared by the analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05. Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the occlusal third of the coronal pulp until the time of 15 min for both concentrations of bleaching gels. In 30 and 45 min groups of each concentration, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, a reduction in the pulp chamber central area and an enlargement of tertiary dentin area were observed without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extra coronal bleaching showed to be adequate for bleaching protocols studies, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and in the tooth structure caused by different concentrations and periods of application of bleaching agents.

  2. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Soares

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10, each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL or diode laser/violet LED (VHL (experimental: Control (C; 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL; 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL; 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL; 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL; and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental (EXP10VHL. pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm. ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05. Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups.

  3. Understanding the Nature and Reactivity of Residual Lignin for Improved Pulping and Bleaching Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan-Zong Lai

    2001-11-30

    One of the most formidable challenges in kraft pulping to produce bleached chemical pulps is how to effectively remove the last 5-10% of lignin while maintaining the fiber quality. To avoid a severe fiber degradation, kraft pulping is usually terminated in the 25-30 kappa number range and then followed by an elementally chlorine free (ECF) or a totally chlorine free (TCF) bleaching sequence to reduce the environmental impacts.

  4. RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY APPROACH FOR OPTIMIZATION OF FLAX SEED OIL BLEACHING PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Miroslav Ondrejovič; Daniela Chmelová; Tibor Maliar

    2013-01-01

    Flax seed is an important source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids essential for human physiology. For low oxidation stability, specific taste and concomitant color compounds this oil is poorly applicable as nutraceutical additive. The aim of this study was optimization of flax seed oil bleaching. The optimal conditions for the bleaching process were determined using response surface methodology. A central composite design was used to investigate the effects of three independent variable...

  5. Corals differential susceptibilities to bleaching along the Red Sea Coast, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    MONTASER ALY MAHMOUD AL-HAMMADY; AHMED HAMED OBUID-ALLAH; MOHAMMED SHOKRY AHMED AMMAR

    2011-01-01

    Ammar MSA, Obuid-Allah AH, Al-Hammady MAM. 2011. Corals differential susceptibilities to bleaching along the Red Sea Coast, Egypt. Nusantara Bioscience 3: 73-81. Coral bleaching was studied at four sites in four widely geographically separated areas. Three of these sites are subjected to different human activities and the fourth one is considered as a control site. Data were collected by using SCUBA diving equipments and the line transects method. A total of 3940 coral colonies, representing ...

  6. Boring sponges, an increasing threat for coral reefs affected by bleaching events

    OpenAIRE

    Carballo, José L; Bautista, Eric; Nava, Héctor; Cruz-Barraza, José A; Chávez, Jesus A

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a stress response of corals induced by a variety of factors, but these events have become more frequent and intense in response to recent climate-change-related temperature anomalies. We tested the hypothesis that coral reefs affected by bleaching events are currently heavily infested by boring sponges, which are playing a significant role in the destruction of their physical structure. Seventeen reefs that cover the entire distributional range of corals along the Mexican P...

  7. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  8. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    CINTRA, Luciano Tavares Angelo; BENETTI, Francine; FERREIRA, Luciana Louzada; RAHAL, Vanessa; ERVOLINO, Edilson; JACINTO, Rogério de Castilho; GOMES, João Eduardo; BRISO, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats’ vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (p<0.05). Results After 2 days, the amount of inflammatory cells increased in the coronal pulp occlusal third up to the 15-min application groups of each bleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents. PMID:27119766

  9. The effect of remin pro and MI paste plus on bleached enamel surface roughness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleh Heshmat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has led to great developments in bleaching products. The exposure of hard tissues of the tooth to bleaching agents can affect the roughness of the enamel surface. The freshly bleached enamel surface exposed to various surface treatments such as fluoride and other remineralizing agents have been assessed in this study. The aim of this experimental study was to compare the effect of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate with Fluoride (MI Paste Plus and Remin Pro on the enamel surface roughness after bleaching.Thirty enamel samples of sound human permanent molars were prepared for this study. After initial roughness measurement with profilometer, the samples were exposed to 37% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent 20 minutes twice, and randomly divided into three groups of ten. In group 1, a CPP-ACPF containing paste (MI Paste Plus and in group 2, Remin Pro were applied to the teeth during a 15 day period for 5 minutes, twice a day. Samples of group 3 (control were immersed in artificial saliva for 15 days. The roughness of all samples were measured at the beginning, after bleaching and after the study intervention and statistically analyzed.The surface roughness significantly increased in all groups following bleaching, and then it showed a decrease after application of both Remin Pro and CPP-ACPF in comparison to using bleaching agent (P0.05.There was no difference between surface roughness of MI Paste Plus and Remin Pro groups. Also the surface roughness was decreased compared to the initial enamel surface roughness.

  10. Spectrophotometric evaluation of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket in enamel and dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardi, Nadia; Correr, Americo Bortolazzo; RASTELLI, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2014-01-01

    Aware of the diffusion capacity of bleaching in the dental tissues, many orthodontists are subjecting their patients to dental bleaching during orthodontic treatment for esthetic purposes or to anticipate the exchange of esthetic restorations after the orthodontic treatment. For this purpose specific products have been developed in pre-loaded whitening trays designed to fit over and around brackets and wires, with clinical efficacy proven. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluat...

  11. Effect of postoperative bleaching on microleakage of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching the discoloured teeth may affect the tooth/composite interface. The aim of this in vitro experimental study was to evaluate the effect of vital tooth bleaching on microleakage of existent class V composite resin restorations bonded with three dental bonding agents. Methods : Class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of 72 intact, extracted human anterior teeth with gingival margins in dentin and occlusal margins in enamel, and randomly divided into 3 groups. Cavities in the three groups were treated with Scotch bond Multi-Purpose, a total etch system and Prompt L-Pop and iBond, two self-etch adhesives. All teeth were restored with Z250 resin composite material and thermo-cycled. Each group was equally divided into the control and the bleached subgroups (n = 12. The bleached subgroups were bleached with 15% carbamide peroxide gel for 8 hours a day for 15 days. Microleakage scores were evaluated on the incisal and cervical walls. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Bonferroni post-hoc tests (α = 0.05. Results: Bleaching with carbamide peroxide gel significantly increased the microleakage of composite restorations in Prompt L-Pop group at dentinal walls (P = 0.001. Bleaching had no effect on microleakage of restorations in the Scotch bond Multi-Purpose and iBond groups. Conclusion: Vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide gel has an adverse effect on marginal seal of dentinal walls of existent composite resin restorations bonded with prompt L-Pop self-etch adhesive.

  12. Hemicellulases in the bleaching and characterisation of kraft pulps. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suurnaekki, A.

    1996-03-01

    Xylanase-aided bleaching of kraft pulps is the major industrial application of hemicellulases in pulp processing. In addition to process aids, hemicellulases have recently also been shown to be promising tools in fibre analytics. In this work, the role of xylanase and mannanase pretreatments in the bleaching of softwood pulps produced by different sulphate cooking methods was studied. In addition, the action of hemicellulases in kraft fibres was characterized and exploited in the analysis of the suface composition of kraft pulps.

  13. ALKALI DARKENING AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF MECHANICAL PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhibin He; Yonghao Ni; Eric Zhang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of alkalinity, transition metals and oxygen on alkali darkening of mechanical pulp, and its relations to subsequent peroxide bleaching were investigated. The chromophores generated under mild conditions of an alkaline treatment can be destroyed in a subsequent peroxide stage.Peroxide-resistant chromophores are generated only under severe conditions. The results also show that a short alkaline pretreatment can improve the performance of a peroxide bleaching stage.

  14. ALKALI DARKENING AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF MECHANICAL PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhibinHe; Yon2haoNi; EricZhang_

    2004-01-01

    The effect of alkalinity, transition metals and oxygen on alkali darkening of mechanical pulp, and its relations to subsequent peroxide bleaching were investigated. The chromophores generated under mild conditions of an alkaline treatment can be destroyed in a subsequent peroxide stage. Peroxide-resistant chromophores are generated only under severe conditions. The results also show that a short alkaline pretreatment can improve the performance of a peroxide bleaching stage.

  15. Effect of chemical activation of 10% carbamide peroxide gel in tooth bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Arantes, Paula Tamiao; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette; Torres, Carlos Rocha

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of chemical agents to increase the bleaching effectiveness of 10% carbamide peroxide. Two hundred and ninety enamel-dentin discs were prepared from bovine incisors. The color measurement was performed by a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b*system. The groups were divided according to the bleaching treatment: negative control group (NC): without bleaching; positive control group (PC): bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide gel without any chemical activator; Manganese gluconate (MG); Manganese chloride (MC); Ferrous gluconate (FG); Ferric chloride (FC); and Ferrous sulphate (FS). Three different concentrations (MG, MC, FG, FC: 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03% w/w; FS: 0.001, 0.002 and 0.003% w/w) for each agent were tested. The bleaching gel was applied on the specimens for 8 h, after which they were immersed in artificial saliva for 16 h, during 14 days. Color assessments were made after 7 and 14 days. The data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). Generally, the test groups were unable to increase the bleaching effect (ΔE) significantly compared to the PC group. Only for ΔL, significant higher values compared to the PC group could be seen after 7 days in groups MG (0.02%), and FS (0.002 and 0.003%). The NC group showed significantly lower values than all tested groups. It was concluded that for home bleaching procedures, the addition of chemical activators did not produce a bleaching result significantly higher than the use of 10% carbamide peroxide without activation, and that the concentration of chemical activators used did not significantly influence the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:23390623

  16. Global Seasonal Forecasting of Thermal Stress Conducive to Mass Coral Bleaching Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G.; Eakin, C.; Matrosova, L.; Penland, M. C.; Webb, R. S.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Lynds, S.; Christensen, T.; Heron, S. F.; Morgan, J.; Parker, B. A.; Skirving, W. J.; Strong, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    As a consequence of climate change, coral bleaching on global and regional scales has been increasing in both frequency and severity over the past decades. In July 2008, NOAA Coral Reef Watch launched a new seasonal prediction tool for coral bleaching conditions to augment its real-time satellite monitoring. A model predicting thermal stress from two weeks to three months in the future was developed collaboratively by our team to provide outlooks of the risk of coral bleaching well in advance of such events. Our predictive system is built on sea surface temperature forecasts provided by NOAA’s Linear Inverse Model (LIM) that has successfully produced experimental predictions of tropical Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperature anomalies for decades. The outlook worked well for the 2008 boreal bleaching season and the 2009 austral bleaching season. The outlook for 2009 boreal bleaching season showed a potential for significant bleaching in the eastern Caribbean region and its evaluation will be conducted as in-situ observations become available. Natural resource managers in the Caribbean have felt sufficient confidence in the outlook that they have taken steps to prepare for the possible bleaching event in 2009. Next steps for improving the outlook system include developing a similar outlook product based on the NOAA National Center for Environmental Predictions’ Climate Forecast System (CFS) operational model, collaborating with Australian colleagues to implement a similar system with the Bureau of Meteorology’s Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA), and then potentially do the same for other climate models. Such forecasting tools provide critical and timely decision support for coral reef managers and scientists worldwide. Preliminary results indicate the forecast compares favorably with satellite observations of actual thermal stress and is thus useful for coral reef management.

  17. Bleaching susceptibility and mortality of corals are determined by fine-scale differences in symbiont type

    OpenAIRE

    Sampayo, E.M.; Ridgway, T.; Bongaerts, P.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-01-01

    Coral bleaching has been identified as one of the major contributors to coral reef decline, and the occurrence of different symbionts determined by broad genetic groupings (clades A–H) is commonly used to explain thermal responses of reef-building corals. By using Stylophora pistillata as a model, we monitored individual tagged colonies in situ over a two-year period and show that fine level genetic variability within clade C is correlated to differences in bleaching susceptibility. Based on ...

  18. Short-Term Coral Bleaching Is Not Recorded by Skeletal Boron Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schoepf, Verena; Malcolm T McCulloch; Mark E Warner; Stephen J Levas; Matsui, Yohei; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D.; Andréa G Grottoli

    2014-01-01

    Coral skeletal boron isotopes have been established as a proxy for seawater pH, yet it remains unclear if and how this proxy is affected by seawater temperature. Specifically, it has never been directly tested whether coral bleaching caused by high water temperatures influences coral boron isotopes. Here we report the results from a controlled bleaching experiment conducted on the Caribbean corals Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides, and Orbicella faveolata. Stable boron (δ11B), carbon (δ1...

  19. Influence of Coral Bleaching on the Fauna of Tutia Reef, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Öhman, M.C.; Lindahl, U.; Schelten, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, coral reefs of Tanzania were severely affected by bleaching. The coral mortality that followed caused a concern for coral reef degradation and overall resource depletion. In this study, we investigated coral bleaching effects on the coral reef fauna at Tutia Reef in Mafia Island Marine Park, Tanzania. Corals from adjacent reef patches of the species Acropora formosa were transplanted into plots, and reef structure and associated fish assemblages were examined before and after the ble...

  20. Response of coral assemblages to thermal stress: are bleaching intensity and spatial patterns consistent between events ?

    OpenAIRE

    Penin, L.; Vidal-Dupiol, J.; Adjeroud, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Mass bleaching events resulting in coral mortality are among the greatest threats to coral reefs, and are projected to increase in frequency and intensity with global warming. Achieving a better understanding of the consistency of the response of coral assemblages to thermal stress, both spatially and temporally, is essential to determine which reefs are more able to tolerate climate change. We compared variations in spatial and taxonomic patterns between two bleaching events at the scale of ...

  1. Effects of temperature,hypoxia, ammonia and nitrate on the bleaching among three coral species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Baohua; WANG Guangce; HUANG Bo; C. K. Tseng

    2004-01-01

    Coral bleaching, which is defined as the loss of colour in corals due to the loss of their symbiotic algae (commonly called zooxanthellae) or pigments or both, is occurring globally at increasing rates, and its harm becomes more and more serious during these two decades. The significance of these bleaching events to the health of coral reef ecosystems is extreme, as bleached corals exhibited high mortality, reduced fecundity and productivity and increased susceptibility to diseases. This decreased coral fitness is easily to lead to reef degradation and ultimately to the breakdown of the coral reef ecosystems. Recently, the reasons leading to coral bleaching are thought to be as follows: too high or too low temperature, excess ultraviolet exposure, heavy metal pollution, cyanide poison and seasonal cycle. To date there has been little knowledge of whether mariculture can result in coral bleaching and which substance has the worst effect on corals. And no research was conducted on the effect of hypoxia on corals. To address these questions, effects of temperature, hypoxia, ammonia and nitrate on bleaching of three coral species were studied through examination of morphology and the measurement of the number of symbiotic algae of three coral species Acropora nobilis, Palythoa sp.and Alveopora verrilliana. Results showed that increase in temperature and decrease in dissolved oxygen could lead to increasing number of symbiotic algae and more serious bleaching. In addition, the concentration of 0.001 mmol/L ammonia or nitrate could increase significantly the expulsion of the symbiotic algae of the three coral species. Except for Acropora nobilis, the numbers of symbiotic algae of other two corals did not significantly increase with the increasing concentration of ammonia and nitrate. Furthermore, different hosts have different stress susceptibilities on coral bleaching.

  2. Study of the hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent effects on bovine enamel using X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Ruda F.; Calazans, Fernanda S.; Miranda, Mauro S.; Santos, Ramon S.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Assis, Joaquim T. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen Peroxide's a bleaching agent capable of oxidizing a wide range of colored organic, causing discoloration and hence bleaching of the substrate, but some authors related the occurrence of side effects related to bleaching of the tooth structure, such as changes in morphology superficial. It was used 6 bovine incisors, each tooth was initially evaluated six times in different areas to obtain the count of elements phosphorus and calcium using X-Ray Fluorescence. The teeth were randomly divided in two groups: both groups were submitted to bleaching in office with hydrogen peroxide 38%, once a week during three weeks. Group 1 was stored in distilled water and group 2 in artificial saliva, between the sessions. The measurements were repeated every seven days before the bleaching treatment. Besides that, changes in mineral levels were always assessed in the same area and using the same procedure. It was observed that the bleaching was not able to demineralize the tooth enamel studied. (author)

  3. Effect of two bleaching agents on enamel morphology: a SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Bleaching materials are able to change the surface morphology as well as mineral and organic content of tooth structure. Considering that bleaching is done for aesthetic purpose, awareness of the possible effect of these materials on hard tissue is important, because it may affect the restorative treatments. Purpose: The aim of this study was comparing the effect of two bleaching materials, Kimia and Ultradent both containing 35% H2O2, on tooth enamel by SEM. Materials and Methods: Five intact central incisors were cut into three sections vertically and each part was randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (control, without any bleaching. Group 2, bleached with Kimia 35% H2O2. Group 3, bleached with Ultradent 35% H2O2. Each tooth served as its own control. Then the samples were observed by SEM with 250 and 500 magnifications. Results: In the control group some scratches and small white grains were observed which seems to be the result of mastication trauma and pumice powder. In the other groups, morphologic changes like increased surface roughness, deepening of cracks, rod exposure and presence of new cracks were observed. The two experimental materials did not differ in these regards. Conclusion: It seems that both studied materials have limited destructive effects on tooth enamel which seems to be of no clinical importance.

  4. Improved microscopical detection of acid-fast bacilli by the modified bleach method in lymphnode aspirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annam Vamseedhar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To improve the smear microscopy for detection of acid-fast bacilli (AFB in fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of lymph node using the bleach method and also to compare this with cytological diagnosis and the conventional Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN method. Study Design: In 99 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of tuberculosis (TB presenting with lymphadenopathy, FNACs were performed. Smears from the aspirates were processed for routine cytology and the conventional ZN method. The remaining material in the needle hub and/or the syringe was used for the bleach method. The significance of the bleach method over the conventional ZN method and cytology was analyzed using the χ2 test. Results: Of 99 aspirates, 93 were studied and the remaining six were excluded from the study due to diagnosis of malignancy in 4.04% (4/6 and inadequate aspiration in 2.02% (2/6. Among the 93 aspirates, 33.33% (31/93 were positive for AFB on conventional ZN method, 41.94% (39/93 were indicative of TB on cytology and the smear positivity increased to 63.44% (59/93 on bleach method. Conclusion: The bleach method is simple, inexpensive and potent disinfectant, also limiting the risk of laboratory-acquired infections. The implementation of the bleach method clearly improves microscopic detection and can be a useful contribution to routine cytology.

  5. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  6. A Strategic Framework for Responding to Coral Bleaching Events in a Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, J. A.; Johnson, J. E.; Marshall, P. A.; Eakin, C. M.; Goby, G.; Schuttenberg, H.; Spillman, C. M.

    2009-07-01

    The frequency and severity of mass coral bleaching events are predicted to increase as sea temperatures continue to warm under a global regime of rising ocean temperatures. Bleaching events can be disastrous for coral reef ecosystems and, given the number of other stressors to reefs that result from human activities, there is widespread concern about their future. This article provides a strategic framework from the Great Barrier Reef to prepare for and respond to mass bleaching events. The framework presented has two main inter-related components: an early warning system and assessment and monitoring. Both include the need to proactively and consistently communicate information on environmental conditions and the level of bleaching severity to senior decision-makers, stakeholders, and the public. Managers, being the most timely and credible source of information on bleaching events, can facilitate the implementation of strategies that can give reefs the best chance to recover from bleaching and to withstand future disturbances. The proposed framework is readily transferable to other coral reef regions, and can easily be adapted by managers to local financial, technical, and human resources.

  7. Esthetic rehabilitation with tooth bleaching, enamel microabrasion, and direct adhesive restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra-Júnior, Douglas Machado; Silva, Luciana Mendonça; Martins, Leandro de Moura; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to report esthetic rehabilitation with combined tooth bleaching, enamel microabrasion, and anterior restoration replacement in a 26-year-old man. Clinical examination showed deficient restorations in the maxillary anterior teeth, significant discoloration of the maxillary left central incisor, and hypoplastic stains affecting the maxillary right lateral incisor. A radiograph of the left central incisor showed satisfactory endodontic treatment, allowing preparation for the walking bleach technique. For 3 weeks, 37% carbamide peroxide in the pulp chamber was renewed every week. In-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was also performed on the maxillary teeth. After 21 days, all teeth had been bleached to shade A1. After bleaching was completed, enamel microabrasion of the maxillary right lateral incisor was conducted with 6% hydrochloric acid. In later sessions, microhybrid composite resin restorations were placed in all 4 maxillary incisors. A combination of dental bleaching techniques, enamel microabrasion, and resin restorations was a successful and conservative choice for reestablishing the natural appearance of discolored teeth, improving the self-esteem of the patient. PMID:26943091

  8. Quantitative Sensory Testing of the Effect of Desensitizing Treatment After Dental Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Vanessa; Gallinari, Marjorie O; Perdigão, Jorge; Cintra, Luciano T A; dos Santos, Paulo H; Briso, André L F

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify tooth sensitivity during bleaching and after a desensitizing treatment. Sensitivity was measured with a new device, TSA-II, which uses thermal stimuli for Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST). Ten patients underwent bleaching treatment using Whiteness HP Maxx (FGM Produtos Odontológicos Ltda) containing 35% hydrogen peroxide. After the bleaching session, the teeth were cleaned with air/water spray and the product Desensibilize KF 2% (FGM Produtos Odontológicos Ltda) was applied to the upper left teeth. Saline solution at room temperature was applied in the upper right teeth. QST was performed before bleaching, immediately after bleaching, and immediately after desensitizing treatment. In order to standardize tooth analysis, a 100% ethylene copolymer and vinyl acetate tray with circular perforations was used during measurements. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used (a=0.05). Mean temperatures (SD) of cold sensation threshold for the upper right quadrant were: BB-13.898 (4.81), AB- 19.241 (3.68), AD-20.646 (3.72) and for the upper left quadrant they were: BB-14.102 (3.22), AB-19.646 (4.82), AD- 13.835 (3.63). Dental bleaching with highly concentrated peroxides changed dental cold sensation thresholds, but the topical desensitizer changed the immediate cold sensation thresholds produced by the cold stimulus. PMID:27095628

  9. Bonding Effectiveness of Universal Adhesive to Intracoronal Bleached Dentin Treated with Sodium Ascorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Thaís Fantinato; Moura, Luana Kelle Batista; Raucci, Walter; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Colucci, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of restorative protocol with sodium ascorbate on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a universal adhesive to intracoronal bleached dentin. One hundred-and-twenty bovine dentin fragments were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=10), according to the bleaching procedure (unbleached and bleached) and restorative protocol (no treatment, 10% sodium ascorbate -10SA, 35% sodium ascorbate -35SA and two-step etch-and-rinse -ER or one-step self-etch -SE Scotchbond universal adhesive approaches). Four whitening sessions were performed using 35% hydrogen peroxide. The samples from control groups were kept in relative humidity at 37 °C. Immediately after bleaching procedures, the assigned antioxidant solution was applied on dentin and restorative procedures were performed following either the ER or the SE approach. After 24 h, the specimens were subjected to SBS test. Data (MPa) were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (?=0.05). Lower SBS values were found for bleached specimens (8.54 MPa) compared with those unbleached (12.13 MPa) (p0.05). It may be concluded that bond strength of composite resin to intracoronal dentin was affected by restorative protocol and reduced by bleaching. PMID:27224564

  10. An Effective Ostrich Oil Bleaching Technique Using Peroxide Value as an Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Seng Chiew

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ostrich oil has been used extensively in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. However, rancidity causes undesirable chemical changes in flavour, colour, odour and nutritional value. Bleaching is an important process in refining ostrich oil. Bleaching refers to the removal of certain minor constituents (colour pigments, free fatty acid, peroxides, odour and non-fatty materials from crude fats and oils to yield purified glycerides. There is a need to optimize the bleaching process of crude ostrich oil prior to its use for therapeutic purposes. The objective of our study was to establish an effective method to bleach ostrich oil using peroxide value as an indicator of refinement. In our study, we showed that natural earth clay was better than bentonite and acid-activated clay to bleach ostrich oil. It was also found that 1 hour incubation at a 150 °C was suitable to lower peroxide value by 90%. In addition, the nitrogen trap technique in the bleaching process was as effective as the continuous nitrogen flow technique and as such would be the recommended technique due to its cost effectiveness.

  11. Proteomic analysis of bleached and unbleached Acropora palmata, a threatened coral species of the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricaurte, Martha; Schizas, Nikolaos V; Ciborowski, Pawel; Boukli, Nawal M

    2016-06-15

    There has been an increase in the scale and frequency of coral bleaching around the world due mainly to changes in sea temperature. This may occur at large scales, often resulting in significant decline in coral coverage. In order to understand the molecular and cellular basis of the ever-increasing incidence of coral bleaching, we have undertaken a comparative proteomic approach with the endangered Caribbean coral Acropora palmata. Using a proteomic tandem mass spectrometry approach, we identified 285 and 321 expressed protein signatures in bleached and unbleached A. palmata colonies, respectively, in southwestern Puerto Rico. Overall the expression level of 38 key proteins was significantly different between bleached and unbleached corals. A wide range of proteins was detected and categorized, including transcription factors involved mainly in heat stress/UV responses, immunity, apoptosis, biomineralization, the cytoskeleton, and endo-exophagocytosis. The results suggest that for bleached A. palmata, there was an induced differential protein expression response compared with those colonies that did not bleach under the same environmental conditions. PMID:27105725

  12. Trace metal anomalies in bleached Porites coral at Meiji Reef, tropical South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Yu, Kefu; Zhao, Jianxin; Feng, Yuexing; Chen, Tianran

    2016-04-01

    Coral bleaching has generally been recognized as the main reason for tropical coral reef degradation, but there are few long-term records of coral bleaching events. In this study, trace metals including chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), molybdenum (Mo), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), tin (Sn), titanium (Ti), vanadium (V), and yttrium (Y), were analyzed in two Porites corals collected from Meiji Reef in the tropical South China Sea (SCS) to assess differences in trace metal concentrations in bleached compared with unbleached coral growth bands. Ti, V, Cr, and Mo generally showed irregular fluctuations in both corals. Bleached layers contained high concentrations of Mn, Cu, Sn, and Pb. Unbleached layers showed moderately high concentrations of Mn and Cu only. The different distribution of trace metals in Porites may be attributable to different selectivity on the basis of vital utility or toxicity. Ti, V, Cr, and Mo are discriminated against by both coral polyps and zooxanthellae, but Mn, Cu, Sn, and Pb are accumulated by zooxanthellae and only Mn and Cu are accumulated by polyps as essential elements. The marked increase in Cu, Mn, Pb, and Sn are associated with bleaching processes, including mucus secretion, tissue retraction, and zooxanthellae expulsion and occlusion. Variation in these trace elements within the coral skeleton can be used as potential tracers of short-lived bleaching events.

  13. A comparison between boat-based and diver-based methods for quantifying coral bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawada, David G.; Ruzicka, Rob; Colella, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent increases in both the frequency and severity of coral bleaching events have spurred numerous surveys to quantify the immediate impacts and monitor the subsequent community response. Most of these efforts utilize conventional diver-based methods, which are inherently time-consuming, expensive, and limited in spatial scope unless they deploy large teams of scientifically-trained divers. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of the Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS), an automated image-acquisition technology, for assessing a moderate bleaching event that occurred in the summer of 2011 in the Florida Keys. More than 100,000 images were collected over 2.7 km of transects spanning four patch reefs in a 3-h period. In contrast, divers completed 18, 10-m long transects at nine patch reefs over a 5-day period. Corals were assigned to one of four categories: not bleached, pale, partially bleached, and bleached. The prevalence of bleaching estimated by ATRIS was comparable to the results obtained by divers, but only for corals > 41 cm in size. The coral size-threshold computed for ATRIS in this study was constrained by prevailing environmental conditions (turbidity and sea state) and, consequently, needs to be determined on a study-by-study basis. Both ATRIS and diver-based methods have innate strengths and weaknesses that must be weighed with respect to project goals.

  14. Pulpal inflammation after vital tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiny Andriani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In-office vital tooth bleaching is a treatment to remove tooth stains. Tooth sensitivity is one of side effect commonly complained by patients receiving this treatment. Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine histological inflammatory cells infiltration of dental pulp after application of 38% H2O2 as a vital tooth bleaching agent. Methods: Under informed consent, a total of 15 premolars from 8 healthy subjects scheduled for orthodontic extraction were used in this study. Thirty eight percent H2O2 was applied on the buccal surface of the treated group. The treated teeth were extracted after 1 hour, 5, 8, and 15 days. All specimens were embedded in paraffin wax, sectioned serially and stained with Hematoxyllin Eosin. Histological specimens were then observed under a light microscope. Results: All treated groups showed a slight disorganization of odontoblasts layer and slight inflammation in the pulp tissue adjacent to the 38% H2O2 application site. The number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN had increased significantly 1 hour after application of 38% H2O2 (p<0.05, while macrophages had significantly increased 5 days after the application (p<0.05. The most intense PMN and macrophages infiltration was found 5 days after the application and gradually decreased 8 days after application of38% H2O2. Conclusion: Application of 38% H2O2 as a vital tooth bleaching agent induces acute inflammation in human dental pulp; however, the inflammation will decrease 8 days after the application.Latar belakang: Perawatan pemutihan gigi vital metode in-office merupakan tindakan untuk menghilangkan pewarnaan pada gigi. Salah satu efek samping yang sering dikeluhkan oleh pasien yang menjalani perawatan ini adalah sensitivitas gigi. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengamati infiltrasi sel inflamasi pada pulpa gigi setelah aplikasi H2O2 38% sebagai bahan pemutih gigi. Metode: Sampel penelitian ini berupa 15 gigi premolar yang berasal dari 8

  15. Clareamento gengival: ensino e etnocentrismo Gingival bleaching: teaching and ethnocentrism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Daruich Bolla

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou identificar os padrões de estética bucal/gengival subjacentes à formação e prática profissional do cirurgião-dentista, na perspectiva do etnocentrismo. A partir da análise documental e da realização de entrevistas (semiestruturadas com cirurgiões dentistas formados há dez ou mais anos, o estudo recorreu a uma abordagem qualitativa, ancorada na análise temática. No âmbito do ensino da periodontia, o estudo evidenciou que a presença da pigmentação fisiológica é omitida ou tratada como uma alteração de normalidade e/ou antiestética. Todos os entrevistados aprenderam a realizar o clareamento gengival em nível de pós-graduação, sendo estimulados a ofertar tal procedimento em nome de um sorriso saudável e bonito. Diante da supervalorização da eficiência da técnica, ressalta a ausência da discussão da questão estética na perspectiva étnica. Parece que a oferta do clareamento gengival se faz norteada pelo padrão branco de beleza, evidenciando o caráter etnocêntrico do procedimento.The aim of this study was to identify buccal/gingival cosmetic dentistry patterns subjacent to formation and professional practice of the dental surgeon from the ethnocentrism point of view. This is an exploratory study with a qualitative approach based on the thematic analysis. Initially a documental analysis was carried out. Thereafter, dental surgeons were interviewed and semi-structured questions were applied. In the Periodontal teaching field, this study showed that the presence of racial melanosis is omitted or treated as an alteration in the normality patterns and it is considered anti-aesthetic. All the interviewers learnt how to practice gingival bleaching in the post-graduation courses, they were all encouraged to offer this cosmetic dentistry procedure with the opportunity of obtaining a beautiful and healthy smile, thus assuring the belief of the Caucasian racial aesthetic superiority. This study make us

  16. Shear Bond Strength of Resin Bonded to Bleached Enamel Using Different Modified 35% Hydrogen Peroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosavi H

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Bleaching systems with different concentrations and applications are widely used to improve the visual appearance of the teeth, but one of the complications of these materials is reduction of bond strength for immediately bonding to the bleached enamel. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of using different modified hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to the bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight sound extracted premolar teeth were collected, sectioned 1 mm below the CEJ to detach the root. The proximal surfaces of the teeth were flattened using diamond disks and silicon carbide papers to achieve flat homogeneous enamel surfaces without exposure to the dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups as follows (n = 12: group 1: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel; group 2: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel contained (casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP; group 3: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel combined with fluoride; and group 4: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide applying one week before resin restoration placement. Composite resin, Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan, was bonded on each tooth in the mould (4 mm diameter × 3 mm height using Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan. After 24 hours of storage and 1000 cycles of thermocycling, the shear bond strength of the specimens at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min was measured in MPa. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test. Results: The minimum and maximum mean shear bond strength values were observed in groups 2 (15.82 ± 4.41 and 4 (21.00 ± 3.90, respectively. Multiple comparisons of groups revealed no significant differences among the groups except between group 4 and all the other groups. The most common type of failure was adhesive. Conclusions: Using modified bleaching agents decreased the bond

  17. Resilience and climate change: lessons from coral reefs and bleaching in the Western Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obura, David O.

    2005-05-01

    The impact of climate change through thermal stress-related coral bleaching on coral reefs of the Western Indian Ocean has been well documented and is caused by rising sea water temperatures associated with background warming trends and extreme climate events. Recent studies have identified a number of factors that may reduce the impact of coral bleaching and mortality at a reef or sub-reef level. However, there is little scientific consensus as yet, and it is unclear how well current science supports the immediate needs of management responses to climate change. This paper provides evidence from the Western Indian Ocean in support of recent hypotheses on coral and reef vulnerability to thermal stress that have been loosely termed 'resistance and resilience to bleaching'. The paper argues for a more explicit definition of terms, and identifies three concepts affecting coral-zooxanthellae holobiont and reef vulnerability to thermal stress previously termed 'resistance to bleaching': 'thermal protection', where some reefs are protected from the thermal conditions that induce bleaching and/or where local physical conditions reduce bleaching and mortality levels; 'thermal resistance', where individual corals bleach to differing degrees to the same thermal stress; and 'thermal tolerance', where individual corals suffer differing levels of mortality when exposed to the same thermal stress. 'Resilience to bleaching' is a special case of ecological resilience, where recovery following large-scale bleaching mortality varies according to ecological and other processes. These concepts apply across multiple levels of biological organization and temporal and spatial scales. Thermal resistance and tolerance are genetic properties and may interact with environmental protection properties resulting in phenotypic variation in bleaching and mortality of corals. The presence or absence of human threats and varying levels of reef management may alter the influence of the above factors

  18. Phase holograms in silver halide emulsions without a bleaching step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belendez, Augusto; Madrigal, Roque F.; Pascual, Inmaculada V.; Fimia, Antonio

    2000-03-01

    Phase holograms in holographic emulsions are usually obtained by two bath processes (developing and bleaching). In this work we present a one step method to reach phase holograms with silver-halide emulsions. Which is based on the variation of the conditions of the typical developing processes of amplitude holograms. For this, we have used the well-known chemical developer, AAC, which is composed by ascorbic acid as a developing agent and sodium carbonate anhydrous as accelerator. Agfa 8E75 HD and BB-640 plates were used to obtain these phase gratings, whose colors are between yellow and brown. In function of the parameters of this developing method the resulting diffraction efficiency and optical density of the diffraction gratings were studied. One of these parameters studied is the influence of the grain size. In the case of Agfa plates diffraction efficiency around 18% with density emulsion, whose grain is smaller than that of the Agfa, diffraction efficiency near 30% has been obtained. The resulting gratings were analyzed through X-ray spectroscopy showing the differences of the structure of the developed silver when amplitude and transmission gratings are obtained. The angular response of both (transmission and amplitude) gratings were studied, where minimal transmission is showed at the Braggs angle in phase holograms, whilst a maximal value is obtained in amplitude gratings.

  19. Projected coral bleaching in response to future sea surface temperature rises and the uncertainties among climate models

    OpenAIRE

    YARA, Yumiko; Fujii, Masahiko; Yamano, Hiroya; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the effects of rising sea surface temperature (SST) on coral bleaching and the uncertainties resulting from differences in global warming projections. To do so, we used monthly SSTs in the twenty-first century obtained from 23 climate models under the A1B scenario (from the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios) and SST-based indices for coral bleaching. All of the projections indicated that severe bleaching or death of corals will be common and severe in wide area...

  20. The 2014 coral bleaching and freshwater flood events in Kāneʻohe Bay, Hawaiʻi

    OpenAIRE

    Bahr, Keisha D.; Paul L. Jokiel; Rodgers, Kuʻulei S.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, subtropical Hawaiʻi escaped the major bleaching events that have devastated many tropical regions, but the continued increases in global long-term mean temperatures and the apparent ending of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) cool phase have increased the risk of bleaching events. Climate models and observations predict that bleaching in Hawaiʻi will occur with increasing frequency and increasing severity over future decades. A freshwater “kill” event occurred during July ...

  1. Apoptosis and autophagy as mechanisms of dinoflagellate symbiont release during cnidarian bleaching: every which way you lose

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Simon R.; Schnitzler, Christine E; Weis, Virginia M.

    2007-01-01

    Cnidarian bleaching results from the breakdown in the symbiosis between the host cnidarian and its dinoflagellate symbiont. Coral bleaching in recent years has increasingly caused degradation and mortality of coral reefs on a global scale. Although much is understood about the environmental causes of bleaching, the underlying cellular mechanisms of symbiont release that drive the process are just beginning to be described. In this study, we investigated the roles of two cellular pathways, hos...

  2. Ten years after bleaching - facing the consequences of climate change in the Indian Ocean.CORDIO Status Report 2008.

    OpenAIRE

    Grimsditch, G.; Mwaura, J.; Kilonzo, J.; Amiyo, N.; Obura, D.

    2008-01-01

    When a coral bleaches, the obligate symbiosis between the coral polyp and the micro-algal zooxanthellae is disrupted and the zooxanthellae are expelled from the polyp. Although a bleached coral does not necessarily die, it is more vulnerable to disease, algal overgrowth, bioerosion and eventually mortality. Mass bleaching and mortality events in the last decade have prompted increased research into zooxanthellae, and it is possible that zooxanthellae population strategies affect a coral’s tol...

  3. Depth-dependent mortality of reef corals following a severe bleaching event: implications for thermal refuges and population recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Bridge, Tom C.L.; Andrew S Hoey; Stuart J Campbell; Efin Muttaqin; Edi Rudi; Nur Fadli; Baird, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Coral bleaching caused by rising sea temperature is a primary cause of coral reef degradation. However, bleaching patterns often show significant spatial variability, therefore identifying locations where local conditions may provide thermal refuges is a high conservation priority. Coral bleaching mortality often diminishes with increasing depth, but clear depth zonation of coral communities and putative limited overlap in species composition between deep and shallow reef habitats has led to ...

  4. In vitro evaluation of the chemical and morphological changes of the enamel surface using different bleaching techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'In vitro' evaluation through MEV and EDS of the morphological and chemical changes, respectively, of the bovine enamel, submitted to different bleaching techniques. For the MEV evaluation eighteen apical thirds were pigmented and divided into two parts. One half of each sample was the control and the other half was bleached according to the protocol of each test group (n= 6). Group I - home bleaching with a 10% carbamide peroxide; group II bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and LED; group III - bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with diode laser bleaching. The same procedure was done with the eighteen samples which were analyzed through EDS and which had their buccal surface grinded and polished before the bleaching procedure in order to obtain more precise values of the fraction of calcium and phosphorus. The results showed no morphological changes among the analyzed control halves and the bleached halves. There was not a statistical significant difference about Ca and P values, among the control halves and the bleached halves regarding the chemical components (p< 0,05). (author)

  5. ECF bleaching with a final hydrogen peroxide stage: Impact of the chemical composition of Eucalyptus globulus kraft pulps

    OpenAIRE

    Loureiro, Pedro E. G.; Eva F. Domingues; Evtuguin, Dmitry V.; M. Graça Videira Sousa Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    Two industrial elemental chlorine free (ECF) bleaching sequences, D0(EOP)D1(EP)D2 and OQ(PO)DP, are compared with respect to the bulk content of lignin, carboxyl, hexeneuronic acids (HexA), and reducing groups after each bleaching stage. HexA groups contribute significantly to the total content of carboxyl groups, and their degradation during chlorine dioxide bleaching is reflected by a decrease of the carboxyl content. The higher degradation using an enhanced use of oxygen-based bleaching ch...

  6. STUDIES ON XYLANASE AND LACCASE ENZYMATIC PREBLEACHING TO REDUCE CHLORINE-BASED CHEMICALS DURING CEH AND ECF BLEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanta V. Thakur,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The biobleaching efficiency of xylanase and laccase enzymes was studied on kraft pulps from wood and nonwood based raw materials employed in the Indian paper industry. Treatment of these pulps with xylanase enzyme could result in improved properties, showing 2.0% ISO gain in pulp brightness and/or reducing the demand of chlorine-based bleach chemicals by up to 15% with simultaneous reduction of 20 to 25% in AOX generation in bleach effluents. Further, mill-scale trial results revealed that enzymatic prebleaching can be successfully employed with xylanases to reach the same bleach boosting efficacy. Laccase bleaching was also studied on hardwood pulp at a pH around 8.0, where most of the pulp mills in India are operating, in contrast to earlier studies on laccase enzyme bleaching, which were conducted at acidic pHs, i.e. 4.0 to 5.0. In case of laccase bleaching, interesting results were found wherein a bleach-boosting effect was observed even at pH 8.0. Further studies carried out with HOBT as mediator in comparison to the commonly used and expensive ABTS laccase mediator system (LMS resulted in improvement of the bleaching efficiency with reduction in demand of chlorine dioxide by more than 35%. Potential for further reduction was indicated by the brightness gain, when compared with a control using the DE(pD bleach sequence.

  7. Equivocal evidence for a thermostat and unusually low levels of coral bleaching in the Western Pacific Warm Pool

    OpenAIRE

    vanHooidonk, R.; M. Huber

    2009-01-01

    An ocean “thermostat” was recently proposed that limits Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) sea surface temperature (SST) causing anomalously low coral bleaching rates. We analyze WPWP SST trends and bleaching using HadISST data and a coral bleaching database and find no strong evidence for a thermostat or for anomalously low bleaching. A region within the WPWP has a trend of maximum SST near zero, but this signal is not robust – by using different data or periods the signal disappears. We do fi...

  8. Acid demineralization susceptibility of dental enamel submitted to different bleaching techniques and fluoridation regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomão, Dlf; Santos, Dm; Nogueira, Rd; Palma-Dibb, Rg; Geraldo-Martins, Vr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the acid demineralization susceptibility of bleached dental enamel submitted to different fluoride regimens. One hundred bovine enamel blocks (6×6×3 mm) were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=10). Groups 1 and 2 received no bleaching. Groups 3 to 6 were submitted to an at-home bleaching technique using 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3 and G4) or 10% carbamide peroxide (CP; G5 and G6). Groups 7 to 10 were submitted to an in-office bleaching technique using 35% HP (G7 and G8) or 35% CP (G9 and G10). During bleaching, a daily fluoridation regimen of 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) solution was performed on groups 3, 5, 7, and 9, while weekly fluoridation with a 2% NaF gel was performed on groups 4, 6, 8, and 10. The samples in groups 2 to 10 were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days. The samples from all groups were then assessed by cross-sectional Knoop microhardness at different depths from the outer enamel surface. The average Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The comparison between groups 1 and 2 showed that the demineralization method was effective. The comparison among groups 2 to 6 showed the same susceptibility to acid demineralization, regardless of the fluoridation method used. However, the samples from groups 8 and 10 showed more susceptibility to acid demineralization when compared with group 2 (penamel to acid demineralization. However, the use of 35% HP and 35% CP must be associated with a daily fluoridation regimen, otherwise the in-office bleaching makes the bleached enamel more susceptible to acid demineralization.

  9. Surviving coral bleaching events: porites growth anomalies on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal E Cantin

    Full Text Available Mass coral bleaching affected large parts of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR in 1998 and 2002. In this study, we assessed if signatures of these major thermal stress events were recorded in the growth characteristics of massive Porites colonies. In 2005 a suite of short (<50 cm cores were collected from apparently healthy, surviving Porites colonies, from reefs in the central GBR (18-19°S that have documented observations of widespread bleaching. Sites included inshore (Nelly Bay, Pandora Reef, annually affected by freshwater flood events, midshelf (Rib Reef, only occasionally affected by freshwater floods and offshore (Myrmidon Reef locations primarily exposed to open ocean conditions. Annual growth characteristics (extension, density and calcification were measured in 144 cores from 79 coral colonies and analysed over the common 24-year period, 1980-2003. Visual examination of the annual density bands revealed growth hiatuses associated with the bleaching years in the form of abrupt decreases in annual linear extension rates, high density stress bands and partial mortality. The 1998 mass-bleaching event reduced Porites calcification by 13 and 18% on the two inshore locations for 4 years, followed by recovery to baseline calcification rates in 2002. Evidence of partial mortality was apparent in 10% of the offshore colonies in 2002; however no significant effects of the bleaching events were evident in the calcification rates at the mid shelf and offshore sites. These results highlight the spatial variation of mass bleaching events and that all reef locations within the GBR were not equally stressed by the 1998 and 2002 mass bleaching events, as some models tend to suggest, which enabled recovery of calcification on the GBR within 4 years. The dynamics in annual calcification rates and recovery displayed here should be used to improve model outputs that project how coral calcification will respond to ongoing warming of the tropical oceans.

  10. Surviving coral bleaching events: porites growth anomalies on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Neal E; Lough, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Mass coral bleaching affected large parts of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in 1998 and 2002. In this study, we assessed if signatures of these major thermal stress events were recorded in the growth characteristics of massive Porites colonies. In 2005 a suite of short (reefs in the central GBR (18-19°S) that have documented observations of widespread bleaching. Sites included inshore (Nelly Bay, Pandora Reef), annually affected by freshwater flood events, midshelf (Rib Reef), only occasionally affected by freshwater floods and offshore (Myrmidon Reef) locations primarily exposed to open ocean conditions. Annual growth characteristics (extension, density and calcification) were measured in 144 cores from 79 coral colonies and analysed over the common 24-year period, 1980-2003. Visual examination of the annual density bands revealed growth hiatuses associated with the bleaching years in the form of abrupt decreases in annual linear extension rates, high density stress bands and partial mortality. The 1998 mass-bleaching event reduced Porites calcification by 13 and 18% on the two inshore locations for 4 years, followed by recovery to baseline calcification rates in 2002. Evidence of partial mortality was apparent in 10% of the offshore colonies in 2002; however no significant effects of the bleaching events were evident in the calcification rates at the mid shelf and offshore sites. These results highlight the spatial variation of mass bleaching events and that all reef locations within the GBR were not equally stressed by the 1998 and 2002 mass bleaching events, as some models tend to suggest, which enabled recovery of calcification on the GBR within 4 years. The dynamics in annual calcification rates and recovery displayed here should be used to improve model outputs that project how coral calcification will respond to ongoing warming of the tropical oceans.

  11. Effectiveness of home bleaching agents in discolored teeth and influence on enamel microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Sinclér Delfino

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effectiveness of different home bleaching agents on color alteration and their influence on surface and subsurface microhardness of discolored bovine enamel. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five fragments of bovine incisors were randomly allocated into 3 groups (n=15 according to the bleaching agent: 10% carbamide peroxide gel (CP10, 16% carbamide peroxide gel (CP16 and 6.5%-hydrogen-peroxide-based strip (HP6.5. Before bleaching treatment, initial values of Knoop surface microhardness and color (CIEL*a*b* were obtained and the fragments were artificially stained in hemolyzed rat blood. Then, bleaching treatments were performed over a 21-day period. Color changes (ΔE were assessed at 7, 14 and 21 days, and final surface microhardness reading was done after 21 days. Thereafter, the fragments were bisected to obtain subsurface microhardness. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=5%. RESULTS: Color changes produced by CP16 were similar to those of CP10, and the color changes produced by these materials were significantly superior to those produced by HP6.5. Color changes at 21 days were superior to 7 days and similar to 14 days. The time did not influence color changes for CP16, which showed similarity between the 14- and 21-day results. No statistically significant differences were found among the home bleaching agents for surface and subsurface microhardness. CONCLUSIONS: Microhardness of bovine enamel was not affected by the bleaching agents. The 16% carbamide peroxide gel was the most effective for bleaching the stained substrate.

  12. Evaluation of an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Louzada; Rahal, Vanessa; Ervolino, Edilson; Jacinto, Rogério de Castilho; Gomes Filho, João Eduardo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-04-01

    Dental materials in general are tested in different animal models prior to the clinical use in humans, except for bleaching agents. Objectives To evaluate an experimental rat model for comparative studies of bleaching agents, by investigating the influence of different concentrations and application times of H2O2 gel in the pulp tissue during in-office bleaching of rats' vital teeth. Material and Methods The right and left maxillary molars of 50 Wistar rats were bleached with 20% and 35% H2O2 gels, respectively, for 5, 10, 15, 30, or 45 min (n=10 rats/group). Ten animals were untreated (control). The rats were killed after 2 or 30 days, and the maxillae were examined by light microscopy. Inflammation was evaluated through histomorphometric analysis with inflammatory cell count in the coronal and radicular thirds of the pulp. Fibroblasts were also counted. Scores were attributed to odontoblastic layer and vascular changes. Tertiary dentin area and pulp chamber central area were measured histomorphometrically. Data were compared by analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test (pbleaching gel. In the groups exposed to each concentration for 30 and 45 min, the number of inflammatory cells decreased along with the appearance of necrotic areas. After 30 days, reduction on the pulp chamber central area and enlargement of the tertiary dentin area were observed, without the detection of inflammation areas. Conclusion The rat model of extracoronal bleaching showed to be adequate for studies of bleaching protocols, as it was possible to observe alterations in the pulp tissues and tooth structure caused by different concentrations and application periods of bleaching agents. PMID:27119766

  13. Coral bleaching on high-latitude marginal reefs at Sodwana Bay, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celliers, Louis; Schleyer, Michael H

    2002-12-01

    Coral bleaching, involving the expulsion of symbiotic zooxanthellae from the host cells, poses a major threat to coral reefs throughout their distributional range. The role of temperature in coral bleaching has been extensively investigated and is widely accepted. A bleaching event was observed on the marginal high-latitude reefs of South Africa located at Sodwana Bay during the summer months of 2000. This was associated with increased sea temperatures with high seasonal peaks in summer and increased radiation in exceptionally clear water. The bleaching was limited to Two-mile Reef and Nine-mile Reef at Sodwana Bay and affected <12% of the total living cover on Two-mile Reef. Montipora spp., Alveopora spongiosa and Acropora spp. were bleached, as well as some Alcyoniidae (Sinularia dura, Lobophytum depressum, L. patulum). A cyclical increase in sea temperature (with a period of 5-6 years) was recorded during 1998-2000 in addition to the regional temperature increase caused by the El Nino Southern Oscillation phenomenon. The mean sea temperature increased at a rate of 0.27 deg. C year{sup -1} from May 1994 to April 2000. High maximum temperatures were measured (>29 deg. C). The lowest mean monthly and the mean maximum monthly temperatures at which coral bleaching occurred were 27.5 and 28.8 deg. C, respectively, while the duration for which high temperatures occurred in 2000 was 67 days at {>=}27.5 deg. C (4 days at {>=}28.8 deg. C). Increased water clarity and radiation appeared to be a synergistic cause in the coral bleaching encountered at Sodwana Bay.

  14. In vitro study of the pulp chamber temperature rise during light-activated bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaise Graciele Carrasco

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated in vitro the pulp chamber temperature rise induced by the light-activated dental bleaching technique using different light sources. The root portions of 78 extracted sound human mandibular incisors were sectioned approximately 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root cavities of the crowns were enlarged to facilitate the correct placing of the sensor into the pulp chamber. Half of specimens (n=39 was assigned to receive a 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on the buccal surface and the other halt (n=39 not to receive the bleaching agent. Three groups (n=13 were formed for each condition (bleach or no bleach according to the use of 3 light sources recommended for dental bleaching: a light-emitting diode (LEDlaser system, a LED unit and a conventional halogen light. The light sources were positioned perpendicular to the buccal surface at a distance of 5 mm and activated during 30 s. The differences between the initial and the highest temperature readings for each specimen were obtained, and, from the temperature changes, the means for each specimen and each group were calculated. The values of temperature rise were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test at 1% significance level. Temperature rise varied significantly depending on the light-curing unit, with statistically significant differences (p0.01. When the bleaching agent was applied, there were significant differences among groups (p<0.01: halogen light induced the highest temperature rise (1.41±0.64ºC, and LED-laser system the lowest (0.33±0.12ºC; however, there was no difference between LED-laser system and LED unit (0.44±0.11ºC. LED and LED-laser system did not differ significantly from each other regardless the temperature rise occurred with or without bleaching agent application. It may be concluded that during light-activated tooth bleaching, with or without the bleaching agent, halogen light promoted higher pulp chamber temperature rise than LED unit and LED

  15. Correlation between deformation bleaching and mechanoluminescence in coloured alkali halide crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Chandra; M Ramrakhiani; P Sahu; A M Rastogi

    2000-02-01

    The present paper reports the correlation between deformation bleaching of coloration and mechanoluminescence (ML) in coloured alkali halide crystals. When the -centre electrons captured by moving dislocations are picked up by holes, deep traps and other compatible traps, then deformation bleaching occurs. At the same time, radiative recombination of dislocation captured electrons with the holes gives rise to the mechanoluminescence. Expressions are derived for the strain dependence of the density of colour centres in deformed crystals and also for the number of colour centres bleached. So far as strain, temperature, density of colour centres, a and volume dependence are concerned, there exists a correlation between the deformation bleaching and ML in coloured alkali halide crystals. From the strain dependence of the density of colour centres in deformed crystals, the value of coefficient of deformation bleaching is determined and it is found to be 1.93 and 2.00 for KCl and KBr crystals, respectively. The value of $(D + \\mathcal{X})$ is determined from the strain dependence of the ML intensity and it is found to be 2.6 and 3.7 for KCl and KBr crystals, respectively. This gives the value of coefficient of deformation generated compatible traps $\\mathcal{X}$ to be 0.67 and 1.7 for KCl and KBr crystals, respectively.

  16. Influence of microhybrid resin and etching times on bleached enamel for the bonding of ceramic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leily Macedo Firoozmand

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of polycrystalline ceramic brackets (PCB bonded after bleaching treatment using different composite resins and enamel etching times. A total of 144 bovine incisors were randomly divided into two study groups (n = 72, each as follows: G1, enamel bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide, and G2 (control group, enamel unbleached. After the bleaching treatment, the samples were stored in artificial saliva for 14 days. These groups were further divided into two subgroups (n = 36, each as follows: GA, brackets bonded with Transbond XT (3M and GB, brackets bonded with Filtek Z250 (3M. For each resin used, three different etching times with 37% phosphoric acid (15, 30 and 60 seconds were tested. SBS tests were performed using a universal testing machine (EMIC, and the adhesive remnant index (ARI score was verified. Significant differences among the three experimental conditions and interactions between the groups were observed. The type of composite resin accounted for 24% of the influence on the bond strength, whereas the etching time and bleaching treatment accounted for 14.5% and 10% of the influence on bond strength, respectively. The ARI revealed that the most common area of adhesion failure was at the composite resin-bracket interface. The type of composite resin, etching time and external bleaching significantly influenced the SBS of PCB on enamel, even after 14 days of saliva storage.

  17. Melanin bleaching with dilute hydrogen peroxide: a simple and rapid method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Hsing; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Min-Jan; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Chai, Chee-Yin; Huang, Ya-Chun; Tsai, Kun-Bow

    2013-05-01

    Melanins are naturally occurring pigments in both normal and pathologic tissues. Two common bleaching processes are potassium permanganate followed by oxalic acid treatment and dilute hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) process. The potassium permanganate/oxalic acid method is faster and more easily incorporated in conventional daily immunostaining protocols, whereas the dilute H2O2 method requires 24 hours. This study aimed to reduce melanin bleaching time by using a 10% H2O2 dilution. First, reaction time was reduced to 30 minutes by raising the temperature to 65°C. Second, containers with high thermal conductivity were used to improve bleaching effectiveness. Experimental comparisons of melanin treatments with H2O2 contained in an iron jar, a glass coplin jar, and a plastic steel jar obtained bleaching time of 20, 30, and 40 minutes, respectively. These modifications of the conventional bleaching method significantly improve the speed and efficiency of the procedure and are recommended when performing immunohistochemical studies. PMID:23060296

  18. Influence of whitening gel on pulp chamber temperature rise by in-office bleaching technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Cordeiro Loretto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dental bleaching is a conservative method for the aesthetic restoration of stained teeth. However, whitening treatments are likely to cause adverse effects when not well planned and executed. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the influence of whitening gel on temperature rise in the pulp chamber, using the in-office photoactivated dental bleaching technique. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The root portion of an upper central human incisor was sectioned 3mm below the cemento-enamel junction. The root canal was enlarged to permit the insertion of the K-type thermocouple sensor (MT-401 into the pulp chamber, which was filled with thermal paste to facilitate the transfer of heat during bleaching. Three photosensitive whitening agents (35% hydrogen peroxide were used: Whiteness HP (FGM, Whiteness HP Maxx (FGM and Lase Peroxide Sensy (DMC. An LED photocuring light (Flash Lite - Discus Dental was used to activate the whitening gels. Six bleaching cycles were performed on each group tested. The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and LSD t-test (α<0.05. RESULT: The lowest mean temperature variation (ºC was detected for Lase Peroxide Sensy (0.20, while the highest was recorded for Whiteness HP (1.50. CONCLUSION: The Whiteness HP and Whiteness HP Maxx whitening gels significantly affected the temperature rise in the pulp chamber during bleaching, and this variation was dependent on the type of whitening gel used.

  19. Effect of tooth bleaching agents on protein content and mechanical properties of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Bertassoni, Luiz E; Charadram, Nattida; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of two bleaching agents, 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), on the mechanical properties and protein content of human enamel from freshly extracted teeth. The protein components of control and treated enamel were extracted and examined on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Marked reduction of the protein matrix and random fragmentation of the enamel proteins after bleaching treatments was found. The mechanical properties were analyzed with Vickers indentations to characterize fracture toughness, and nanoindentation to establish enamel hardness, elastic modulus and creep deformation. Results indicate that the hardness and elastic modulus of enamel were significantly reduced after treatment with CP and HP. After bleaching, the creep deformation at maximum load increased and the recovery upon unloading reduced. Crack lengths of CP and HP treated enamel were increased, while fracture toughness decreased. Additionally, the microstructures of fractured and indented samples were examined with field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showing distinct differences in the fracture surface morphology between pre- and post-bleached enamel. In conclusion, tooth bleaching agents can produce detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of enamel, possibly as a consequence of damaging or denaturing of its protein components.

  20. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarquinio SBC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Flávio Fernando Demarco1, Sônia Saeger Meireles2, Hugo Ramalho Sarmento1, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes Dantas1, Tatiana Botero3, Sandra Beatriz Chaves Tarquinio11Graduate Program in Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil; 2Department of Operative Dentistry, Federal University of Paraíba, Brazil; 3Cariology, Restorative Science, and Endodontics Department, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, MI, USAAbstract: This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled.Keywords: peroxide, tooth bleaching, enamel, dentin, erosion, abrasion

  1. 3D Surface Profile and Color Stability of Tooth Colored Filling Materials after Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, Bryant Anthony; Irawan, Stacey Natalie; Masudi, Sam'an Malik; Sukminingrum, Ninin; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide home bleaching and in-office bleaching on the color stability and 3D surface profile of dental restorative filling materials. Thirty discs (n = 30) measure 6 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick for each of three restorative materials. These are nanofilled composite Filtek Z350 XT, the submicron composite Estelite Σ Quick, and nanofilled glass ionomer Ketac N100 nanoionomer and were fabricated in shade A2. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n = 10): subgroup A (Opalescence PF), subgroup B (Opalescence Boost in-office bleaching), and subgroup C (distilled water) serving as control. Samples were bleached according to the manufacturer's instructions for a period of two weeks. The Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE L(*), a(*), b(*)) system was chosen for image processing, while 3D surface profile was tested with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Statistical analyses were performed with the Mann-Whitney tests and Krusal-Wallis with a P value of ≤ 0.05. The three restorative materials showed significant color changes (ΔE); P ≤ 0.05. In diminishing order, the mean color changes recorded were Estelite Σ (3.82 ± 1.6) > Ketac Nano (2.97 ± 1.2) > Filtek Z350 XT (2.25 ± 1.0). However, none of the tested materials showed statistically significant changes in surface roughness; P > 0.05. PMID:26558267

  2. Effect of Four Bleaching Regimens on Color Changes and Microhardness of Dental Nanofilled Composite

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    Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the color changes and microhardness of a nanocomposite after four bleaching regimens. Materials. Twenty-five specimens (n=25 were made with a nanocomposite resin (Filtek Supreme XT. The specimens were divided into five groups equally (n=5: bleaching groups and control group, as follows: G1: artificial saliva at 37∘C; (control G2: hydrogen peroxide (HP at 7%; G3: hydrogen peroxide (HP at 35%; G4: carbamide peroxide (CP at 10%; G5: carbamide peroxide (CP 35%. Color measurements were made with spectrophotometer using CIELAB color scale. The Vickers hardness (VHN measurements were performed at the top surface. The data were analyzed with two-way Analysis of Variance. Results. ΔE and VHN mean values into the groups were not statistically different, however, the VHN mean values before and after storage and bleaching showed statistically significant differences. Conclusion. Nanocomposite samples showed no significant alteration (color and microhardness after bleaching. Thus, no replacement of restorations is required after bleaching.

  3. Clarifications, guidelines and questions about the dental bleaching "associated" with orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the best moment for carrying out or recommending dental bleaching to orthodontic patients, some explanations and orientations are given in order to answers the following questions: 1 Why orthodontic treatment completion is considered the best opportunity for carrying out the procedure? 2 Why dental bleaching should not be performed immediately before orthodontic treatment? 3 If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? 4 Why dental bleaching should not be performed during orthodontic treatment? 5 If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? This article highlights why it is essential to protect both the mucosa and the cervical region, regardless of the moment when dental bleaching is performed, whether associated with orthodontic treatment or not. The "how", "why" and "if" of whether or not it is convenient to perform dental bleaching before orthodontic treatment are still a matter of clinical suggestion, as it is a procedure that is under analysis, empirical knowledge waiting for scientific proof or disproof! Although tooth enamel has adamantine fluid flowing within it, providing a specific metabolism that is peculiar to its own and which could scientifically explain and base the option of carrying out teeth whitening before and during orthodontic treatment, we must still be very careful.

  4. Diffuse reflectance study of the effects of bleaching agents in damaged dental pieces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Trejo-Tzab, R.; Macias, J. D.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most important subjects of interest in dentistry and teeth preservation is related to the effects of bleaching agents on the integrity of the dental pieces. This is especially crucial when teeth surface has received some damage, generated by chemical, biological and mechanical agents or weathering in the case of dental pieces recovered from burial sites. In this work the time evolution of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface of dental pieces is monitored using diffuse reflectance in the visible spectrum is reported. The effects were monitored in teeth previously subject to chemical agents. Bleaching was induced using commercial whitening products. It is shown that the time evolution of the reflectance depends strongly on the condition of the surface as well as on the thickness of enamel. Additionally the colorimetric analysis of the samples during the bleaching is presented. This is especially useful in for comparing with previous studies. In order to complement our studies, the effects of the bleaching on the surface of the teeth were monitored by scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Personality Style in Patients Looking for Tooth Bleaching and Its Correlation with Treatment Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Javier; Rivas, Vanessa; Vildósola, Patricio; Moncada, Laura; Oliveira Junior, Osmir B; Saad, José Roberto C; Fernandez, Eduardo; Moncada, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years the focus in dentistry has shifted to an "esthetic dentistry" approach, where patients are concerned about reaching a better look of their teeth. Vital tooth bleaching is a technique with immediate results, which improves the appearance and patient's self-esteem. The aim of this study was to recognize personality characteristics determined by the Millon Index of Personality Styles of participants looking for tooth bleaching and to correlate them to satisfaction with the treatment. Forty participants were included and filled out the Millon Index of Personality Styles form before treatment. Expectation about tooth bleaching was quantified from 1 to 5. Patients were treated with bleaching agent according to manufacturer's directions. One week after treatment, the patient's satisfaction was quantified from 1 to 5. Prevailing personality characteristics were determined. Expectations and satisfaction values of all patients were correlated with each of the presented personality scales by Spearman Rho test. Ten scales prevailed over their counterpart. Median of patient's expectation was 2 and satisfaction 4. Only the score of a single characteristic (extraversing) showed statistically significant correlation with patient satisfaction. Patients looking for tooth bleaching treatment seem to have common personality characteristics. Almost all of them wanted to achieve a moderate change in teeth color and the result of the treatment was usually satisfactory. PMID:27007348

  6. Effectiveness of different carbamide peroxide concentrations used for tooth bleaching: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Saeger Meireles

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of three carbamide peroxide concentrations used for tooth bleaching treatments. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty bovine dental slabs (6x6x3 mm were obtained, sequentially polished, submitted to artificial staining (baseline and randomized into four groups (n=15, according to the bleaching agent concentration: distilled water (control, 10% (CP10, 16% (CP16 or 37% (CP37 carbamide peroxide. CP10 and CP16 were covered with 0.2 mL of the respective bleaching gels, which were applied on enamel surface for 4 h/day during two weeks. Samples of CP37 were covered with 0.2 mL of the bleaching gel for 20 min. The gel was light activated by two 40-s applications spaced by 10-min intervals. The gel was renewed and applied 3 times per clinical session. This cycle was repeated at 3 sessions with 5 days of interval between them. Tooth shade evaluations were done with a digital spectrophotometer at T0 (baseline, T1 (after 1-week of treatment and T2 (1-week post-bleaching. Tooth shade means were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman's tests and color parameters were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: One week after the end of the treatment, all carbamide peroxide concentrations tested produced similar tooth color improvement.

  7. Effects of cold light bleaching on the color stability of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liqun; Huang, Lijuan; Wu, Meisheng; Wei, Hua; Zhao, Shouliang

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of cold light bleaching on the color stability of four restorations using a thermocycling stain challenge. 160 specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were fabricated from 4 composite resins (Gradia Direct-A, Z350XT, Premisa, and Précis) and divided into 4 subgroups. Color was assessed according to the CIEL*a*b* color scale at baseline, after the first cycle of bleaching, after thermocycling stain challenges, and after the second cycle of bleaching. Mean values were compared using three-way analysis of variance, and multiple comparisons of the mean values were performed using the Tukey-Kramer test. All groups showed significant color changes after stain challenge, the color change was more significant in Gradia Direct and Z350XT than in Premisa and Précis. After the second cycle of bleaching, color mostly recovered to its original values. The color stability of Gradia Direct and Z350XT was inferior to that of Premisa and Précis. The discoloration of composite resin materials can be partly removed after cold light bleaching.

  8. REINFORCEMENT POTENTIAL OF BLEACHED SAWDUST KRAFT PULP IN DIFFERENT MECHANICAL PULP FURNISHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risto I. Korpinen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Bleached unrefined and refined sawdust kraft pulps were added to bleached Norway spruce thermomechanical (TMP and pressurised groundwood (PWG pulps in different proportions. Handsheets were prepared and tested for physical properties. In addition, economic calculations were done to estimate the production costs of different bleached pulps in Finland. It was found that the addition of unrefined and refined sawdust kraft pulp improved drainability of the mechanical pulps. Tear strength of PGW furnishes was increased when either unrefined or refined sawdust pulp was added. Tear strength of TMP furnishes was not influenced when different sawdust kraft pulps were added. Up to 30 % of unrefined sawdust kraft pulp could be added and no significant negative effect was observed in TMP and PGW furnishes. On the other hand, when refined sawdust kraft pulp was added into the mechanical pulp furnishes, a clear improvement in the tensile strength was observed. According to the economic calculation the production cost of bleached sawdust kraft pulp is almost as low as the production cost of bleached mechanical pulp. We suggest that economically viable sawdust kraft pulp can be used as a substituent for expensive long fibre reinforcement kraft pulp in the production of mechanical pulp based papers.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF HOME BLEACHING ON THE HARDNESS OF AMALGAM FILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Soufyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental bleaching has been considered as a feasible approach for dental esthetic, and many dental bleaching products can be seen in the market. Therefore, the side effect of such dental product should be studied. This study was aimed to determine the effect of carbamide peroxide-containing home bleaching agent on the hardness of dental amalgam surface structure. Forty amalgam filling specimens were divided into 4 groups, which consist of 3 treatment groups and 1 controu group. Each group was exposed to the bleaching agent daily for 2, 4 and 8 hours within 7 days. The Vickers Microhardness Tester, with loads 98.07 mN for 20 seconds, was used to measure the hardness of amalgam surface. It was revealed that, there was a significant difference between the treatment and the control group on 8 hours period. It was concluded that there was a decrease in hardness of dental amalgam surface after having a contact with carbamide peroxide bleaching agent.

  10. Ocean acidification has no effect on thermal bleaching in the coral Seriatopora caliendrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, C. B.; Fan, T.-Y.; Edmunds, P. J.

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether elevated pCO2 predicted for the year 2100 (85.1 Pa) affects bleaching in the coral Seriatopora caliendrum (Ehrenberg 1834) either independently or interactively with high temperature (30.5 °C). Response variables detected the sequence of events associated with the onset of bleaching: reduction in the photosynthetic performance of symbionts as measured by maximum photochemical efficiency ( F v/ F m) and effective photochemical efficiency (Δ F/ F m') of PSII, declines in net photosynthesis ( P net) and photosynthetic efficiency (alpha, α), and finally, reduced chlorophyll a and symbiont concentrations. S. caliendrum was collected from Nanwan Bay, Taiwan, and subjected to combinations of temperature (27.7 vs. 30.5 °C) and pCO2 (45.1 vs. 85.1 Pa) for 14 days. High temperature reduced values of all dependent variables (i.e., bleaching occurred), but high pCO2 did not affect Symbiodinium photophysiology or productivity, and did not cause bleaching. These results suggest that short-term exposure to 81.5 Pa pCO2, alone and in combination with elevated temperature, does not cause or affect coral bleaching.

  11. Relative Contributions of Various Cellular Mechanisms to Loss of Algae during Cnidarian Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Tamaki; Onishi, Masayuki; Xiang, Tingting; Grossman, Arthur R.; Pringle, John R

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress such as high seawater temperature, corals and other cnidarians can bleach due to loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue and/or loss of pigments from the algae. Although the environmental conditions that trigger bleaching are reasonably well known, its cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have reported the occurrence of at least four different cellular mechanisms for the loss of symbiotic algae from the host tissue: in situ degradation of algae, exocytic release of algae from the host, detachment of host cells containing algae, and death of host cells containing algae. The relative contributions of these several mechanisms to bleaching remain unclear, and it is also not known whether these relative contributions change in animals subjected to different types and/or durations of stresses. In this study, we used a clonal population of the small sea anemone Aiptasia, exposed individuals to various precisely controlled stress conditions, and quantitatively assessed the several possible bleaching mechanisms in parallel. Under all stress conditions tested, except for acute cold shock at 4°C, expulsion of intact algae from the host cells appeared to be by far the predominant mechanism of bleaching. During acute cold shock, in situ degradation of algae and host-cell detachment also became quantitatively significant, and the algae released under these conditions appeared to be severely damaged. PMID:27119147

  12. Effect of different bleaching regimens on the flexural strength of hybrid composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiyeh Feiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The entire effects of different bleaching regimens on the mechanical properties of composite resins have remained unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different bleaching regimens on the flexural strength (FS of hybrid composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 80 bar-shaped specimens of hybrid composite resins were fabricated and randomly divided into four groups, 20 specimens in each group. First group (C was considered as control. The other groups were treated by home bleaching (HB agent, in-office bleaching (IB agent, and the combination regimens (HIB, respectively. The FS was evaluated by three-point bending test by using a Universal Testing Machine. All data were analyzed by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software version 18, analysis of variance (ANOVA, and Turkey′s post hoc statistical tests (α = 0.05. Results: The maximum mean value of FS was seen in HB group with significant differences to other groups (P < 0.05. Also, the minimum FS was observed in group HIB. Conclusion: Application of different bleaching regimens does not have any adverse effect on the FS of hybrid composite resins. However, the administration of HB regimens seemed to have lesser negative impact on the FS.

  13. EFFECT OF BIRCH KRAFT PULP PRIMARY FINES ON BLEACHING AND SHEET PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Anneli Asikainen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available By removing the primary fines from an oxygen-delignified mill birch pulp, a fiber fraction was obtained having low metals content and no extractives. After DEDeD bleaching the fiber fraction had somewhat higher brightness and better brightness stability than the birch pulp containing the primary fines. The fines fraction was enriched with lignin, extractives, xylan, and metals. Bleaching the fines fraction in a QQP sequence did not affect the extractives, whereas a ZeQP sequence clearly reduced the extractives content. In a biorefinery concept, the fines fraction could be utilized as a source of xylan, fatty acids, sterols, and betulinol. Another possibility is to use the fines fraction unbleached or separately bleached as a bonding material in various fiber furnishes.

  14. TCF bleaching sequence in kraft pulping of olive tree pruning residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requejo, A; Rodríguez, A; Colodette, J L; Gomide, J L; Jiménez, L

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to find a suitable Kraft cooking process for olive tree pruning (OTP), in order to produce pulp of kappa number about 17. The Kraft pulp produced under optimized conditions showed a viscosity of 31.5 mPa·s and good physical, mechanical, and optical properties, which are suitable for paper production. The physical-mechanical and optical properties were measured before and after bleaching. Although the OTP pulp was bleached to 90.9% ISO brightness (kappapulp showed a brightness reversion equal to 1.3%. Furthermore, this bleached pulp did not need a high intensity of beating due to high drainability degree in the unbeaten pulp. So that, OTP is suggested as an interesting raw material for cellulosic pulp production because its properties are comparable to those of other agricultural residues, currently used in the paper industry.

  15. Iron speciation in bleached rocks by hydrocarbon leaching in Dushanzi Mud Volcano, NW China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, G D [Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources Research, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Fu, B H; Matsuo, M [Key Laboratory of Earth' s Deep Interior, Institute of Geology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Kuno, A, E-mail: gdzhuk@hotmail.co [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba 3-8-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Mud volcano is a typical petroleum leaching system, which normally result in bleaching effect to surrounding rocks. The result of Moessbauer spectroscopy of rock samples collected from the Dushanzi mud volcano system revealed clear variations in iron species. Compared to the unbleached reddish sedimentary rocks, the bleached rocks are dominated by reducing iron species such as paramagnetic ferrous iron (para-Fe{sup 2+}), ferrous iron in siderite (sid-Fe{sup 2+}), sulphide and pyrite (pyr-Fe{sup 2+}) whereas the original reddish rock is enriched in ferric iron including iron in hematite (hem-Fe{sup 3+}) and paramagnetic ferric iron (para-Fe{sup 3+}). A reduction of ferric iron species and hydrolysis of iron along with oxidation of hydrocarbons should be one of the main processes along bleaching by hydrocarbons to rocks.

  16. The effects of bleach plant effluent recycle in kraft mill green liquors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, B.M.; Uloth, V.C. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Dorris, G.M. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Pointe Claire, PQ (Canada); Stafford, E. C.

    1995-12-31

    A new approach to reducing or eliminating effluent flows from a kraft mill through process changes and by recycling, was presented. A closed system experiment was conducted in which bleach plant effluents and green liquors were used to simulate effluent recycling to the recausticizing area in place of fresh water. Results showed that with current levels of water use, acid effluents from bleaching of softwood pulp could be recycled to the recausticizing area if a 5-18 per cent loss in causticizing efficiency and a 10 per cent decrease in the lime mud settling rate was tolerable. High levels of sodium chloride did not always reduce causticizing efficiency. It was found that bleach plant water usage was very high in the plants studied. New ways to minimize water use in the plant must be found if a significant degree of closure is to be achieved. 15 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs.

  17. Geochemical Records of Bleaching Events and the Associated Stressors From the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, E. B.; McCulloch, M.; Ingram, B. L.; Marshall, J. F.

    2003-12-01

    The health of coral reefs world-wide is increasingly threatened by a wide array of stressors. On the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) these stressors include increased sediment flux associated with land use changes, increased sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity changes due to large floods, the latter two of which are factors in an increased number of bleaching events. The ability to document long-term change in these stressors along with changes in the number of bleaching events would help discern what are natural and anthropogenic changes in this ecosystem. Here we present results of an initial calibration effort aimed at identifying bleaching events and the associated stressors using stable isotopic and trace element analysis in coral cores. Three ˜15-year time series of geochemical measurements (δ 13C, δ 18O, and Sr/Ca) on Porites coral cores obtained from Pandora Reef and the Keppel Islands on the GBR have been developed at near weekly resolution. Since the δ 13C of the coral skeletal carbonate is known to be affected by both environmental factors (e.g. insolation and temperature) and physiological factors (e.g. photosynthesis, calcification, and the statues of the symbiotic relationship between corals and zooxanthellae) it is the most promising proxy for reconstructing past bleaching events. The first record (PAN-98) comes from a coral head that had undergone bleaching and died shortly after the large-scale bleaching events on Pandora Reef in 1998. A second core (PAN-02) was collected from a living coral within 10m of PAN-98 in 2002. Sr/Ca ratios in both cores tracked even the smallest details of an in situ SST record. The increase in SST that occurred three to four weeks prior to bleaching was faithfully recorded by a similar decrease in the Sr/Ca ratio in PAN-98, indicating that calcification continued despite the high SST of 30-31° C. The δ 13C values decreased by about 5‰ , one week after the SST increase, and remained at this value for about 4

  18. Selective visualization of fluorescent sterols in Caenorhabditis elegans by bleach-rate-based image segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Landt Larsen, Ane; Færgeman, Nils J.;

    2010-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a genetically tractable model organism to investigate sterol transport. In vivo imaging of the fluorescent sterol, dehydroergosterol (DHE), is challenged by C. elegans' high autofluorescence in the same spectral region as emission of DHE. We present a method...... to detect DHE selectively, based on its rapid bleaching kinetics compared to cellular autofluorescence. Worms were repeatedly imaged on an ultraviolet-sensitive wide field (UV-WF) microscope, and bleaching kinetics of DHE were fitted on a pixel-basis to mathematical models describing the intensity decay...... autofluorescence and compare our method with three-photon excitation microscopy of sterol in selected tissues. Bleach-rate-based UV-WF imaging is a useful tool for genetic screening experiments on sterol transport, as exemplified by RNA interference against the rme-2 gene coding for the yolk receptor and for worm...

  19. Experimental Bleaching of a Reef-Building Coral Using a Simplified Recirculating Laboratory Exposure System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mace G. Barron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining stressor-response relationships in reef building corals continues to be a critical research need due to global declines in coral reef ecosystems and projected declines for the future. A simplified recirculating coral exposure system was coupled to a solar simulator to allow laboratory testing of a diversity of species and morphologies of reef building corals under ecologically relevant conditions of temperature and solar radiation. Combinations of lamps and attenuating filters allowed for assignment of solar radiation treatments in experimental bleaching studies. Three bleaching experiments were performed using the reef building coral, Pocillopora damicornis, to assess the reproducibility of system performance and coral responses under control and stress conditions. Experiments showed consistent temperature- and solar radiation dependent-changes in pigment, numbers of symbiotic algae, photosystem II quantum yield, and tissue loss during exposure and recovery. The laboratory exposure system is recommended for use in experimental bleaching studies with reef building corals.

  20. Effect of various antioxidants on the shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mageshwaran Thandalam Arumugam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of 10% sodium ascorbate, 6.5% proanthocyanidin, and 5% lycopene on the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Labial enamel surfaces of 100 extracted human maxillary central incisors were used in this study. Twenty teeth served as group I (control and received no bleaching treatment. The remaining 80 teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 20 teeth each, based on the antioxidant used as follows: group II- bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide gel for 30 min without the use of an antioxidant, group III- bleaching followed by use of 10% sodium ascorbate solution, group IV- bleaching followed by use of 6.5% proanthocyanidin, and group V- bleaching followed by use of 5% lycopene. These groups were further subdivided into two subgroups of 10 teeth each, based on whether composite buildup was done immediately (subgroup A or after a delay of 2 weeks (subgroup B post bleaching. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested under universal testing machine. The data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength values were observed in teeth treated with control group prior to bonding, followed by sodium ascorbate group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded all the antioxidants used in this study increased the bond strength of bleached enamel. Among the antioxidant groups, sodium ascorbate showed significantly higher bond strength compared to proanthocyanidin and lycopene.

  1. Efficacy, side-effects and patients' acceptance of different bleaching techniques (OTC, in-office, at-home).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auschill, T.M.; Hellwig, E.; Schmidale, S.; Sculean, A.; Arweiler, N.B.

    2005-01-01

    This clinical study compared the efficacy of three different bleaching techniques with respect to the bleaching times required in order to achieve six grades of whitening in human teeth. Any side effects that were noted and the patients' acceptance of the method were recorded by a visual analog scal

  2. Relationship between anthropogenic impacts and bleaching-associated tissue mortality of corals in Curaçao (Netherlands Antilles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerken, I.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic anthropogenic impacts can have a negative effect on coral health and on coral energy budgets needed for regeneration of lesions. I therefore hypothesise that during massive bleaching events, the degree of corals showing bleaching-related tissue mortality is higher in areas subject to chronic

  3. Model-based assessment of the role of human-induced climate change in the 2005 Caribbean coral bleaching event

    OpenAIRE

    Donner, Simon D.; Knutson, Thomas R.; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Episodes of mass coral bleaching around the world in recent decades have been attributed to periods of anomalously warm ocean temperatures. In 2005, the sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly in the tropical North Atlantic that may have contributed to the strong hurricane season caused widespread coral bleaching in the Eastern Caribbean. Here, we use two global climate models to evaluate the ...

  4. The influence of desensitizing dentifrices on pain induced by in-office bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Thiesen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the use of desensitizing dentifrices used 15 days prior to and after in-office tooth bleaching could eliminate or reduce tooth sensitivity. After institutional review board approval and informed consent, 45 subjects were selected and divided into 3 groups according to the dentifrice selected: Colgate Total (CT, Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief (CS or Sensodyne ProNamel (SP. The subjects used toothpaste and a toothbrush provided to them for 15 days prior to bleaching. They were then submitted to two in-office bleaching sessions (Whiteness HP Blue Calcium. Their tooth sensitivity was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS for a week after each session. Their tooth shade alteration was measured with a Vitapan Classical shade guide to determine if the dentifrices could influence the effectiveness of the bleaching agent. The data were submitted to Wilcoxon, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05. The use of desensitizing dentifrices did not affect the bleaching efficacy. In regard to tooth sensitivity, there was a statistically significant difference between the results of the Control Group and Group T2 after the first session (p = 0.048. There was no statistically significant difference in the results for the other groups after the first session. In regard to the second session, there was no statistically significant difference in the results for all the groups. The use of a desensitizing dentifrice containing nitrate potassium reduced tooth sensitivity during the bleaching regimen. Dentifrices containing arginine and calcium carbonate did not reduce tooth sensitivity. Color change was not influenced by the dentifrices used

  5. Patterns of gene expression in a scleractinian coral undergoing natural bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneca, Francois O; Forêt, Sylvain; Ball, Eldon E; Smith-Keune, Carolyn; Miller, David J; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2010-10-01

    Coral bleaching is a major threat to coral reefs worldwide and is predicted to intensify with increasing global temperature. This study represents the first investigation of gene expression in an Indo-Pacific coral species undergoing natural bleaching which involved the loss of algal symbionts. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments were conducted to select and evaluate coral internal control genes (ICGs), and to investigate selected coral genes of interest (GOIs) for changes in gene expression in nine colonies of the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora undergoing bleaching at Magnetic Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Among the six ICGs tested, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and the ribosomal protein genes S7 and L9 exhibited the most constant expression levels between samples from healthy-looking colonies and samples from the same colonies when severely bleached a year later. These ICGs were therefore utilised for normalisation of expression data for seven selected GOIs. Of the seven GOIs, homologues of catalase, C-type lectin and chromoprotein genes were significantly up-regulated as a result of bleaching by factors of 1.81, 1.46 and 1.61 (linear mixed models analysis of variance, P coral bleaching response genes. In contrast, three genes, including one putative ICG, showed highly variable levels of expression between coral colonies. Potential variation in microhabitat, gene function unrelated to the stress response and individualised stress responses may influence such differences between colonies and need to be better understood when designing and interpreting future studies of gene expression in natural coral populations.

  6. Application of 10% Ascorbic Acid Improves Resin Shear Bond Stregth in Bleached Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamizar Kamizar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Restoration of the teeth immediately after bleaching with H2O2 35% is contraindicated due to the remnants of free radical that will stay inside dentin for 2-3 weeks which will compromise the adhesiveness of composite resin. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 10% ascorbic acid on shear bond strength of composite placed on bleached dentin. Methods:Twenty seven samples were divided equally into three groups. Group 1: dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid; Group 2: dentin was bleached with 35% H2O2 followed by etching with 35% phosphoric acid; Group 3: dentin was bleached with 35% H2O2, followed by application of 10% ascorbic acid and etched with 35% phosphoric acid. All samples were then stored at 370C for 24 hours. The Universal Testing Machine was used to measure shear bond strength and the results were analyzed with Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney test. Results: After nine independent experiments, 10% ascorbic acid application on bleached dentin resulted in highest increased in bond stregth (56.04±11.06MPa compared to Group 2 (29.09±7.63MPa and Group 1 (25.55±2.22MPa and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: Application of 10% ascorbic acid to the bleached dentin improved the shear bond strength of resin composite.

  7. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching. PMID:27747220

  8. Monitoring Coral Health to Determine Coral Bleaching Response at High Latitude Eastern Australian Reefs: An Applied Model for A Changing Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew G. Carroll; Dalton, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Limited information is available on the bleaching susceptibility of coral species that dominate high latitude reefs along the eastern seaboard of Australia. The main aims of this study were to: (i) monitor coral health and spatial patterns of coral bleaching response at the Solitary Islands Marine Park (SIMP) and Lord Howe Island Marine Park (LHIMP), to determine variability of bleaching susceptibility among coral taxa; (ii) predict coral bleaching thresholds at 30 °S and 31.5 °S, extrapolate...

  9. Effect of thickener agents on dental enamel microhardness submitted to at-home bleaching Efeito de agentes espessantes na microdureza do esmalte submetido ao clareamento dental caseiro

    OpenAIRE

    José Augusto Rodrigues; Glauco Paulo Felício Oliveira; Cristiane Mariote Amaral

    2007-01-01

    Dental bleaching occurs due to an oxidation reaction between the bleaching agents and the macromolecules of pigments in the teeth. This reaction is unspecific and the peroxides can also affect the dental matrix causing mineral loss. On the other hand, recent studies have suggested that the thickener agent carbopol can also cause mineral loss. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of at-home dental bleaching on dental enamel microhardness after the use of bleach...

  10. Spatial and temporal patterns of coral bleaching around Buck Island Reef National Monument, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands [poster

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Randall D.; Jeffrey, Christopher F.G.; Woody, Kimberly; Hillis-Starr, Zandy

    2008-01-01

    Limited information currently exists on the recovery periods of bleached corals as well as the spatial extent, causative factors, and the overall impact of bleaching on coral reef ecosystems. During October, 2005, widespread coral bleaching was observed within Buck Island Reef National Monument (BUIS) St. Croix, USVI. The bleaching event was preceded by 10 weeks of higher than average water temperatures (28.9-30.1°C). Random transects (100 square meters) over hard bottom habitats (N=94) revea...

  11. Physiological and Biogeochemical Traits of Bleaching and Recovery in the Mounding Species of Coral Porites lobata: Implications for Resilience in Mounding Corals

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen J Levas; Andréa G Grottoli; Adam Hughes; Christopher L Osburn; Yohei Matsui

    2013-01-01

    Mounding corals survive bleaching events in greater numbers than branching corals. However, no study to date has determined the underlying physiological and biogeochemical trait(s) that are responsible for mounding coral holobiont resilience to bleaching. Furthermore, the potential of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a source of fixed carbon to bleached corals has never been determined. Here, Porites lobata corals were experimentally bleached for 23 days and then allowed to recover for 0, 1,...

  12. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT STABILIZERS ON ALKALINE H2O2 BLEACHING OF NS REED PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MeihongNiu; ShulanShi; YunzhanZhang

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses a new stabilizer of H2O2 bleaching and compares the stabilizing effect of the new stabilizer with that of Na2SiO3. The results show that the new stabilizer is better than the conventional Na2SiO3. The optimum conditions of the stable latterprocess bleaching of H2O2 as follow: NaOH 3%,MgSO4 0.05%, H2O2 3%, stabilizer 3%, temperature80℃, concentration 12%, time 3h.

  13. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT STABILIZERS ON ALKALINE H2O2 BLEACHING OF NS REED PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meihong Niu; Shulan Shi; Yunzhan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses a new stabilizer of H2O2 bleaching and compares the stabilizing effect of the new stabilizer with that of Na2SiO3. The results show that the new stabilizer is better than the conventional Na2SiO3. The optimum conditions of the stable latter process bleaching of H2O2 as follow: NaOH 3%,MgSO4 0.05%, H2O2 3%, stabilizer 3%, temperature 80℃, concentration 12%, time 3h.

  14. Intracoronal bleaching of discolored non-vital teeth using laser irradiation: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesan, Melissa A.; de Castro, Fabiana C.; Matarazzo, Alexandre T.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Zanin, Fatima A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.

    2004-09-01

    Dissemination of blood into the dentinal tubules caused by pulp extirpation or traumatically induced internal pulp bleeding is a possible cause of discoloration of non-vital teeth. Discolored teeth, especially in the anterior region, can result in considerable cosmetic impairment. The whitening of these teeth is an alternative therapeutic method that is relatively non-invasive and conserves dental hard tissue. Recently, intracoronal bleaching of pulpless discolored teeth can be performed with the association of laser irradiation to hydrogen and carbamide peroxide and can even be accomplished in one session. This report shows a clinical case of an endodontically treated tooth submitted to bleaching using LED light and infrared LLLT therapy.

  15. Tooth-Bleaching: A Review of the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Various Tooth Whitening Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, R J

    2015-12-01

    Tooth bleaching (whitening) is one of the most common and inexpensive method for treating discolouration of teeth. Dental aesthetics, especially tooth colour, is of great importance to majority of the people; and discolouration of even a single tooth can negatively influence the quality of life. Therefore, a review of the literature was carried out (limited to aesthetic tooth-bleaching) to provide a broad overview of the efficacy and adverse effects of various tooth whitening products on soft and hard oral tissues. PMID:26691365

  16. 12-Month color stability of enamel, dentine, and enamel-dentine samples after bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Annette; Drebenstedt, S; Roos, Malgorzata; Magalhães, A C; Attin, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The study aimed to quantify the color regression of enamel (E), dentine (D), and combined enamel-dentine (ED) of differently bleached ED specimens over a period of 12 months in vitro. Two ED samples were obtained from the labial surfaces of bovine teeth and prepared to a standardized thickness with the enamel and dentine layer each 1 mm. The ED samples were distributed on four groups (each n = 80), in which the different bleaching products were applied on enamel (1, Whitestrips; 2, Illuminé 1...

  17. Potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) Laser and Dental Bleaching. Literature review.

    OpenAIRE

    Consuelo Arce; Carlos Araya; Roeland De Moor

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determinate if dental bleaching with KTP laser is a safe, effective and efficient technique. The use of KTP laser for dental bleaching was only investigated in combination with a high concentration of hydrogen peroxide (35%). The recommended protocol was: for the use of KTP laser at 3W power and an irradiation time of ten seconds, three to four cycles are needed. For a power of 1W and an irradiation time of thirty seconds the number of cycles is three with a maximum of...

  18. Differential nitric oxide synthesis and host apoptotic events correlate with bleaching susceptibility in reef corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, T. D.; Krueger, T.; Becker, S.; Fisher, P. L.; Davy, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    Coral bleaching poses a threat to coral reefs worldwide. As a consequence of the temperature-induced breakdown in coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis, bleaching can have extensive effects on reef communities. However, our understanding of bleaching at a cellular level is limited, and this is particularly true regarding differential susceptibility among coral species. Recent work suggests that bleaching may represent a host innate immune-like response to symbiont dysfunction that involves synthesis of the signalling compound nitric oxide (NO) and the induction of host apoptotic-like cell death. In this study, we examined the activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes alongside oxidised NO accumulation (a proxy for NO synthesis) in the reef corals Acropora millepora, Montipora digitata, and Pocillopora damicornis during experimental thermal stress. P. damicornis was the most sensitive species, suffering mortality (tissue sloughing) after 5 days at 33 °C but non-lethal bleaching after 9 days at 31.5 °C. A. millepora bleached at 33 °C but remained structurally intact, while M. digitata showed little evidence of bleaching. P. damicornis and A. millepora both exhibited evidence of temperature-induced NO synthesis and, after 5 days of heating, levels of oxidised NO in both species were fivefold higher than in controls maintained at 28.5 °C. These responses preceded bleaching by a number of days and may have occurred before symbiont dysfunction (measured as chlorophyll a degradation and oxidised NO accumulation). In A. millepora, apparent NO synthesis correlated with the induction of host apoptotic-like pathways, while in P. damicornis, the upregulation of apoptotic pathways occurred later. No evidence of elevated NO production or apoptosis was observed in M. digitata at 33 °C and baseline activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes was negligible in this species. These findings provide important physiological data in the context of the responses of corals to global change and

  19. Histological observations in the Hawaiian reef coral, Porites compressa, affected by Porites bleaching with tissue loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudek, M.; Work, T.M.; Aeby, G.S.; Davy, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    The scleractinian finger coral Porites compressa is affected by the coral disease Porites bleaching with tissue loss (PBTL). This disease initially manifests as bleaching of the coenenchyme (tissue between polyps) while the polyps remain brown with eventual tissue loss and subsequent algal overgrowth of the bare skeleton. Histopathological investigation showed a loss of symbiont and melanin-containing granular cells which was more pronounced in the coenenchyme than the polyps. Cell counts confirmed a 65% reduction in symbiont density. Tissue loss was due to tissue fragmentation and necrosis in affected areas. In addition, a reduction in putative bacterial aggregate densities was found in diseased samples but no potential pathogens were observed.

  20. Effect of laser-assisted bleaching with Nd:YAG and diode lasers on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Emadian Razavi, Elham Sadat; Behboodi, Sara; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser-assisted bleaching with neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. One hundred and four extracted human premolars were randomly divided into four groups: group 1: No bleaching applied (control group); group 2: Teeth bleached with 40 % hydrogen peroxide; group 3: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 2.5 W, 25 Hz, pulse duration of 100 μs, 6 mm distance); and group 4: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with diode laser (810 nm, 1 W, CW, 6 mm distance). Equal numbers of teeth in groups 2, 3, and 4 were bonded at start, 1 h, 24 h, and 1 week after bleaching. A universal testing machine measured the SBS of the samples 24 h after bonding. After bracket debonding, the amount of residual adhesive on the enamel surface was observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. The SBS in the unbleached group was significantly higher than that in the bleached groups bonded immediately and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching (P laser-assisted bleaching, the SBS was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group. Significant differences in the ARI scores existed among groups as well. The SBS of brackets seems to increase quickly within an hour after laser-assisted bleaching and 24 h after conventional bleaching. Thus, this protocol can be recommended if it is necessary to bond the brackets on the same day of bleaching.

  1. LED and low level laser therapy association in tooth bleaching using a novel low concentration H2O2/N-doped TiO2 bleaching agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra Dias, Hércules; Teixeira Carrera, Emanuelle; Freitas Bortolatto, Janaína; Ferrarezi de Andrade, Marcelo; Nara de Souza Rastelli, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Since low concentration bleaching agents containing N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles have been introduced as an alternative to conventional agents, it is important to verify their efficacy and the hypersensitivity effect in clinical practice. Six volunteer patients were evaluated for color change and hypersensitivity after bleaching using 35% H2O2 (one session of two 12 min applications) and 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 (one session of three 12 min applications) and after low level laser therapy application (LLLT) (780 nm, 40 mW, 10 J.cm-2, 10 s). Based on this case study, the nanobleaching agent provided better or similar aesthetic results than the conventional agent under high concentration, and its association with LLLT satisfactorily decreased the hypersensitivity. The 6% H2O2/N-doped TiO2 agent could be used instead of conventional in-office bleaching agents under high concentrations to fulfill the rising patient demand for aesthetics.

  2. Clinical Comparison of At-Home and In-Office Dental Bleaching Procedures: A Randomized Trial of a Split-Mouth Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz; Tovar, Nick; Janal, Malvin N; Coelho, Paulo Guilherme; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this split-mouth clinical study was to compare a combination of in-office and at-home dental bleaching with at-home bleaching alone. Two applications of in-office bleaching were performed, with one appointment per week, using 38% hydrogen peroxide. At-home bleaching was performed with or without in-office bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide in a custom-made tray every night for 2 weeks. The factor studied was the bleaching technique on two levels: Technique 1 (in-office bleaching combined with home bleaching) and Technique 2 (home bleaching only). The response variables were color change, dental sensitivity, morphology, and surface roughness. The maxillary right and left hemiarches of the participants were submitted to in-office placebo treatment and in-office bleaching, respectively (Phase 1), and at-home bleaching (Phase 2) treatment was performed on both hemiarches, characterizing a split-mouth design. Enamel surface changes and roughness were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and optical interferometry using epoxy replicas. No statistically significant differences were observed between the bleaching techniques for either the visual or the digital analyses. There was a significant difference in dental sensitivity when both dental bleaching techniques were used, with in-office bleaching producing the highest levels of dental sensitivity after the baseline. Microscopic analysis of the morphology and roughness of the enamel surface showed no significant changes between the bleaching techniques. The two techniques produced similar results in color change, and the combination technique produced the highest levels of sensitivity. Neither technique promoted changes in morphology or surface roughness of enamel. PMID:26901303

  3. Effect of Bleaching on Color Change and Surface Topography of Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Pruthi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on color change and surface topography of different composite veneering materials (Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, Esthet X (Dentsply India, and Admira (Voco, Germany. Methods. 30 samples were fabricated for evaluation of color change using CIELAB color system and Gonioreflectometer (GK 311/M, ZEISS. 45 disc-shaped specimens were made for evaluation of surface topography after bleaching (Nupro White Gold; Dentsply using SEM. Statistical analysis. One way ANOVA and Multiple comparison tests were used to analyze the data. Statistical significance was declared if the P value was .05 or less. Results and conclusion. All the specimens showed significant discoloration (ΔE>3.3 after their immersion in solutions representing food and beverages. The total color change after bleaching as compared to baseline color was significant in Filtek Z350 (P=.000 and Esthet X (P=.002, while it was insignificant for Admira (P=.18. Esthet X showed maximum surface roughness followed by Admira and Filtek Z350. Bleaching was effective in reducing the discoloration to a clinically acceptable value in all the three groups (ΔE<3.3.

  4. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on fracture resistance after endodontic treatment, bleaching and restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Cristina Fagundes JORDÃO-BASSO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the effects of 10% alphatocopherol on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin. Fifty bovine incisors were selected, including 10 sound teeth that constituted the control group (G1 (C. The remaining 40 teeth, which were endodontically treated, were divided into four groups (n = 10: G2 (CR, consisting of teeth immediately restored with composite resin; G3 (HP + CR, consisting of teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin; G4 (HP + SA + CR, which received treatment similar to that used for G3, but with 10% sodium ascorbate gel applied after the bleaching protocol; and G5 (HP + AT + CR, which was similar to G4 but included 10% alphatocopherol gel as an antioxidant. After 24 h, composite restorations were performed, and teeth were subjected to a fracture resistance test at a speed of 0.5 mm/min in an electromechanical testing machine. The axial force was applied with an angle of incidence of 135° relative to the long axis of the root. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05. G1 exhibited the highest fracture resistance (p < 0.05. No significant differences among the other experimental groups were observed. The 10% sodium ascorbate and 10% alphatocopherol gels did not improve the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Low environmental impact bleaching sequences for attaining high brightness level with eucalyptus SPP pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Costa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The alternatives used for minimizing the usage of chlorine dioxide in bleaching sequences included a hot acid hydrolysis (Ahot stage, the use of hot chlorine dioxide (Dhot and ozone stages at medium consistency and high consistency (Zmc and Zhc, in addition to stages with atmospheric hydrogen peroxide (P and pressurized hydrogen peroxide (PO. The results were interpreted based on the cost of the chemical products, bleaching process yields and on minimizing the environmental impact of the bleaching process. In spite of some process restrictions, high ISO brightness levels were kept around 90 % brightness. Additionally, the inclusion of stages like acid hydrolysis, pressurized peroxide and ozone in the bleaching sequences provided an increase in operating flexibility, aimed at reducing environmental impact (ECF Light. The Dhot(EOPD(PO sequence presented lower operating cost for ISO brightness above 92 %. However, this kind of sequence was not allowed for closing the wastewater circuit, even partially. For ISO brightness level around 91%, the AhotZhcDP sequence presented a lower operating cost than the others.

  6. Hurricanes and coral bleaching linked to changes in coral recruitment in Tobago

    OpenAIRE

    Mallela, J.; Crabbe, M. J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes and coral bleaching linked to changes in coral recruitment in Tobago correspondence: Corresponding author. (Mallela, J.) (Mallela, J.) Department of Life Sciences, The University of the West Indies - St Augustine--> , The West Indies--> - TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO (Mallela, J.) ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University - Canb...

  7. A study on the recovery of Tobago's coral reefs following the 2010 mass bleaching event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglass, Salome; Donner, Simon D; Alemu I, Jahson B

    2016-03-15

    In 2010, severe coral bleaching was observed across the southeastern Caribbean, including the island of Tobago, where coral reefs are subject to sedimentation and high nutrient levels from terrestrial runoff. Here we examine changes in corals' colony size distributions over time (2010-2013), juvenile abundances and sedimentation rates for sites across Tobago following the 2010 bleaching event. The results indicated that since pre-bleaching coral cover was already low due to local factors and past disturbance, the 2010 event affected only particular susceptible species' population size structure and increased the proportion of small sized colonies. The low density of juveniles (mean of 5.4±6.3 juveniles/m(-2)) suggests that Tobago's reefs already experienced limited recruitment, especially of large broadcasting species. The juvenile distribution and the response of individual species to the bleaching event support the notion that Caribbean reefs are becoming dominated by weedy non-framework building taxa which are more resilient to disturbances. PMID:26856646

  8. An effective bleaching technique for non-vital, discoloured teeth in children and adolescents.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leith, Rona

    2009-08-01

    Discolouration of a permanent incisor may have a significant social impact on children and adolescents. Intervention should be minimally destructive of tooth tissue and should not compromise future restorative options. This paper reviews the technique of inside\\/outside bleaching, and proposes it as an efficient, effective and acceptable method for use in the compliant younger patient with an unaesthetic non-vital tooth.

  9. Domestic use of bleach and infections in children : a multicentre cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casas, Lidia; Espinosa, Ana; Borràs-Santos, Alícia; Jacobs, José; Krop, Esmeralda; Heederik, Dick; Nemery, Benoit; Pekkanen, Juha; Hyvärinen, Anne; Täubel, Martin; Zock, Jan-Paul

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the effects of bleach use at home on the frequency of infections in 9102 school-age children participating in the HITEA project. METHODS: Parents of pupils aged 6-12 years from schools in Barcelona province (Spain), Utrecht province (the Netherlands) and Eastern and Central Finl

  10. Metagenomic analysis of the coral holobiont during a natural bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Raechel; Willis, Bette L; Bourne, David G

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the effects of elevated seawater temperatures on each member of the coral holobiont (the complex comprised of coral polyps and associated symbiotic microorganisms, including Bacteria, viruses, Fungi, Archaea and endolithic algae) is becoming increasingly important as evidence accumulates that microbial members contribute to overall coral health, particularly during thermal stress. Here we use a metagenomic approach to identify metabolic and taxonomic shifts in microbial communities associated with the hard coral Acropora millepora throughout a natural thermal bleaching event at Magnetic Island (Great Barrier Reef). A direct comparison of metagenomic data sets from healthy versus bleached corals indicated major shifts in microbial associates during heat stress, including Bacteria, Archaea, viruses, Fungi and micro-algae. Overall, metabolism of the microbial community shifted from autotrophy to heterotrophy, including increases in genes associated with the metabolism of fatty acids, proteins, simple carbohydrates, phosphorus and sulfur. In addition, the proportion of virulence genes was higher in the bleached library, indicating an increase in microorganisms capable of pathogenesis following bleaching. These results demonstrate that thermal stress results in shifts in coral-associated microbial communities that may lead to deteriorating coral health. PMID:23761353

  11. Effect of sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of silorane and methacrylate composites after vital bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Guler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of sodium ascorbate (SA on the microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs of different composites to bovine enamel after vital bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (HP or carbamide peroxide (CP. Thirty bovine incisors were randomly divided into five groups and treated with no bleaching application (control, 35% HP alone, 35% HP + 10% SA for 10 minutes (HP + SA, 16% CP alone, or 16% CP + 10% SA for 10 minutes (CP + SA. Specimens were restored with Silorane adhesive and Filtek Silorane composite (designated as S / group or with Clearfil SE bond and Filtek Supreme XT (designated as F / group. Composite build-up was created on the enamel. Sectioned specimens (n = 10 per group; 1 mm2; cross-sectional area were created and stressed in a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The application of 10% SA immediately after bleaching with 16% CP or 35% HP increased the enamel MTBS, regardless of the adhesive / composite resin used. The resulting MTBS values were similar to those of the control groups. Use of 16% CP and 35% HP alone decreased the enamel MTBS, regardless of the adhesive / composite resin used, with F / CP + SA = F / HP + SA = F / CP = S / CP + SA = S / HP + SA = S / C > S / CP = S / HP = F / CP = F / HP (p < 0.05. We concluded that the application of SA for 10 minutes immediately after vital bleaching increases the enamel BS for dimethacrylate- and silorane-based composites

  12. Corrosion Study of Stainless Steels in Peracetic Acid Bleach Media With and Without Chloride and Chelant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohtash

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper industries are adopting non-chlorine containing chemicals e.g. peroxide, ozone, peracids etc. as alternate of chlorine based bleach chemicals e.g. chlorine and chlorine dioxide etc. with the aim of eco-friend atmospheres. Changeover to the new chemicals in the bleaching process is likely to affect the metallurgy of the existing bleach plants due to change in the corrosivity of the media. Accordingly, corrosion investigations were performed in a peracid namely peracetic acid to test the suitability of austenitic stainless steels 654SMO, 265SMO, 2205, 317L and 316L. The performance of above stainless steels was evaluated through long term immersion tests and Electrochemical polarization measurements in peracetic acid (PAA bleach media at pH value 4 maintaining concentration 0.2 % as active oxygen along with three chloride levels 0, 500 and 1000 ppm in pulp-free laboratory. To study the effect of corrosion inhibitors with extending limit of chloride in liquors, measurements were also made with two types of chelants- EDTA & MgSO4. The results showed that corrosivity of PAA reduced by addition of chelant while increased with concentration of Cl¯. The results also exhibited that EDTA is better inhibitor than MgSO4.

  13. Levels of immunity parameters underpin bleaching and disease susceptibility of reef corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline V; Bythell, John C; Willis, Bette L

    2010-06-01

    Immunity is a key life history trait that may explain hierarchies in the susceptibility of corals to disease and thermal bleaching, two of the greatest current threats to coral health and the persistence of tropical reefs. Despite their ongoing and rapid global decline, there have been few investigations into the immunity mechanisms of reef-building corals. Variables commonly associated with invertebrate immunity, including the presence of melanin, size of melanin-containing granular cells, and phenoloxidase (PO) activity, as well as concentrations of fluorescent proteins (FPs), were investigated in hard (Scleractinia) and soft (Alcyonacea) corals spanning 10 families from the Great Barrier Reef. Detectable levels of these indicators were present in all corals investigated, although relative investment differed among coral taxa. Overall levels of investment were inversely correlated to thermal bleaching and disease susceptibility. In addition, PO activity, melanin-containing granular cell size, and FP concentration were each found to be significant predictors of susceptibility and thus may play key roles in coral immunity. Correlative evidence that taxonomic (family-level) variation in the levels of these constituent immunity parameters underpins susceptibility to both thermal bleaching and disease indicates that baseline immunity underlies the vulnerability of corals to these two threats. This reinforces the necessity of a holistic approach to understanding bleaching and disease in order to accurately determine the resilience of coral reefs.

  14. Metagenomic analysis of the coral holobiont during a natural bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Raechel; Willis, Bette L; Bourne, David G

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the effects of elevated seawater temperatures on each member of the coral holobiont (the complex comprised of coral polyps and associated symbiotic microorganisms, including Bacteria, viruses, Fungi, Archaea and endolithic algae) is becoming increasingly important as evidence accumulates that microbial members contribute to overall coral health, particularly during thermal stress. Here we use a metagenomic approach to identify metabolic and taxonomic shifts in microbial communities associated with the hard coral Acropora millepora throughout a natural thermal bleaching event at Magnetic Island (Great Barrier Reef). A direct comparison of metagenomic data sets from healthy versus bleached corals indicated major shifts in microbial associates during heat stress, including Bacteria, Archaea, viruses, Fungi and micro-algae. Overall, metabolism of the microbial community shifted from autotrophy to heterotrophy, including increases in genes associated with the metabolism of fatty acids, proteins, simple carbohydrates, phosphorus and sulfur. In addition, the proportion of virulence genes was higher in the bleached library, indicating an increase in microorganisms capable of pathogenesis following bleaching. These results demonstrate that thermal stress results in shifts in coral-associated microbial communities that may lead to deteriorating coral health.

  15. Excitation Light Dose Engineering to Reduce Photo-bleaching and Photo-toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Colton; Wee, Tse-Luen Erika; Duh, Yan-Rung Silvia; Couto, Melissa P; Ardakani, Kimya H; Brown, Claire M

    2016-01-01

    It is important to determine the most effective method of delivering light onto a specimen for minimal light induced damage. Assays are presented to measure photo-bleaching of fluorophores and photo-toxicity to living cells under different illumination conditions. Turning the light off during part of the experimental time reduced photo-bleaching in a manner proportional to the time of light exposure. The rate of photo-bleaching of EGFP was reduced by 9-fold with light pulsing on the micro-second scale. Similarly, in living cells, rapid line scanning resulted in reduced cell stress as measured by mitochondrial potential, rapid cell protrusion and reduced cell retraction. This was achieved on a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope, without any compromise in image quality, by using rapid laser scan settings and line averaging. Therefore this technique can be implemented broadly without any software or hardware upgrades. Researchers can use the rapid line scanning option to immediately improve image quality on fixed samples, reduce photo-bleaching for large high resolution 3D datasets and improve cell health in live cell experiments. The assays developed here can be applied to other microscopy platforms to measure and optimize light delivery for minimal sample damage and photo-toxicity.

  16. Nutrient enrichment can increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenmann, Jörg; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Smith, Edward G.; Hunt, Alan N.; Legiret, François-Eric; Postle, Anthony D.; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2013-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching, resulting from the breakdown of coral-algal symbiosis has been identified as the most severe threat to coral reef survival on a global scale. Regionally, nutrient enrichment of reef waters is often associated with a significant loss of coral cover and diversity. Recently, increased dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have been linked to a reduction of the temperature threshold of coral bleaching, a phenomenon for which no mechanistic explanation is available. Here we show that increased levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in combination with limited phosphate concentrations result in an increased susceptibility of corals to temperature- and light-induced bleaching. Mass spectrometric analyses of the algal lipidome revealed a marked accumulation of sulpholipids under these conditions. Together with increased phosphatase activities, this change indicates that the imbalanced supply of dissolved inorganic nitrogen results in phosphate starvation of the symbiotic algae. Based on these findings we introduce a conceptual model that links unfavourable ratios of dissolved inorganic nutrients in the water column with established mechanisms of coral bleaching. Notably, this model improves the understanding of the detrimental effects of coastal nutrient enrichment on coral reefs, which is urgently required to support knowledge-based management strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change.

  17. Climate change, coral bleaching and the future of the world's coral reefs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegh-Guldberg, O. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Biological Sciences

    1999-07-01

    Sea temperatures in many tropical regions have increased by almost 1{degree}C over the past 100 years, and are currently increasing at about 1-2{degree}C per century. Mass coral bleaching has occurred in association with episodes of elevated sea temperatures over the past 20 years and involves the loss of the zooxanthellae following chronic photoinhibition. Mass bleaching has resulted in significant losses of live coral in many parts of the world. This paper considers the biochemical, physiological and ecological perspectives of coral bleaching. It also uses the outputs of four runs from three models of global climate change which simulate changes in sea temperature and hence how the frequency and intensity of bleaching events will change over the next 100 years. The results suggest that the thermal tolerances of reef-building corals are likely to be exceeded every year within the next few decades. Events as severe as the 1998 event, the worst on record, are likely to become commonplace within 20 years. Most information suggests that the capacity for acclimation by corals has already been exceeded, and that adaptation will be too slow to avert a decline in the quality of the world's reefs.

  18. PREDICTING CORAL BLEACHING IN RESPONSE TO ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS USING 8 YEARS OF GLOBAL-SCALE DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral reefs are among the most diverse marine ecosystems on the planet (Wilkinson 2002), but have experienced extensive mortality over the past few decades as a result of mass bleaching events (Hoegh-Guldberg 1999, Wilkinson 2002, Hughes 2003, Obura 2005). Historically, elevated...

  19. Thermal stress markers in Colpophyllia natans provide an archive of site-specific bleaching events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallela, Jennie; Hetzinger, Steffen; Halfar, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    Tropical coral reef monitoring relies heavily on in situ diver observations. However, in many reef regions resources are not available to regularly monitor reefs. This lack of historical baseline data makes it difficult to determine how different reefs respond to environmental stressors and what the implications are for management. To test whether coral cores could be used to identify bleaching events retrospectively, three sites in Tobago with pre-existing reef data including water quality and bleaching observations were identified. Colpophyllia natans cores were examined for growth anomalies which occurred during periods of thermal stress. If present, anomalies were compared to in situ, real-time bleaching observations and water quality data. Interestingly, sites with better water quality during the 2005 thermal anomaly were less prone to bleaching. We suggest that by reducing terrestrial run-off (e.g., sediment and nutrients), and therefore improving marine water quality, reef managers could enhance near-shore coral reef resilience during high-temperature events.

  20. THE CONDITION OF CORAL REEFS IN SOUTH FLORIDA (2000) USING CORAL DISEASE AND BLEACHING AS INDICATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The destruction for coral reef habitats is occurring at unprecedented levels. Coral disease epizootics in the Southwestern Atlantic have lead to coral replacement by turf algae, prompting a call to classify some coral species as endangered. In addition, a massive bleaching event ...

  1. Overproduction of the Aspergillus niger feruloyl esterase for pulp bleaching application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Record, E.; Asther, M.; Sigoillot, C.; Pagès, S.; Punt, P.J.; Delattre, M.; Haon, M.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Sigoillot, J.C.; Lesage-Meessen, L.; Asther, M.

    2003-01-01

    A well-known industrial fungus for enzyme production, Aspergillus niger, was selected to produce the feruloyl esterase FAEA by homologous overexpression for pulp bleaching application. The gpd gene promoter was used to drive FAEA expression. Changing the nature and concentration of the carbon source

  2. Coral Reef Recovery Status in South Andaman Islands after the Bleaching Event 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Marimuthu; J. Jerald Wilson; N.V. Vinithkumar; R. Kirubagaran

    2013-01-01

    The Andaman and Nicobar Islands are one of the Union Territories of India,located in the eastern part of the Bay of Bengal.In 2010 summer,the increment in sea surface water temperature (up to 34℃) resulted in the bleaching of about 74% to 77% of corals in the South Andaman.During this event,coral species such as Acropora cerealis,A.humilis,Montipora sp.,Favia pallida,Diploastrea sp.,Goniopora sp.Fungia concinna,Gardineroseries sp.,Porites sp.,Favites abdita and Lobophyllia robusta were severely affected.This study is to assess the recovery status of the reef ecosystem by estimating the percentage of Live Coral cover,Bleached coral cover,Dead coral with algae,Rubble,Sandy fiat,Algal assemblage and other associated organisms.The sedimentation rate (mg cm-2 d-1) and coral coverage (%) were assessed during this study period.The average sedimentation rate was ranged between 0.27 and 0.89mg cm-2 d-1.The observed post bleaching recovery of coral cover was 21.1% at Port Blair Bay and 13.29% at Havelock Island.The mortality rate of coral cover due to this bleaching was estimated as 2.05% at Port Blair Bay and 9.82% at Havelock Island.Once the sea water temperature resumed back to the normal condition,most of the corals were found recovered.

  3. At-home vital bleaching: a comparison of hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berga-Caballero, Amparo; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Amengual-Lorenzo, José

    2006-01-01

    Tray bleaching of vital teeth performed at home by the patient under the dentist s supervision, whether alone or in combination with any of the in-office techniques, provides an interesting alternative to other methods employed in this type of dental treatment. This bleaching procedure applies low-concentration peroxides to the enamel by means of a custom-made mouth tray specifically designed for this purpose. The aim of this study is to examine and compare two commercially-available bleaching products, at equivalent concentrations, for use in this technique: VivaStyle (Vivadent) and FKD (Kin); the former is a 10% carbamide peroxide and the latter a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide formulation. It examines the parameters that must be monitored during the application of this type of procedure and presents 6 cases (3 treated with one of the above-mentioned products and the other 3 with the other), establishing the bleaching power of the products and the appearance and intensity of post-operatory hypersensitivity. The results obtained show that both products are effective for the purpose for which they were designed. In general, dental hypersensitivity was minimal. PMID:16388304

  4. Domestic use of bleach and infections in children: a multicentre cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casas, L.; Espinosa, A.; Borràs-Santos, A.; Jacobs, J.; Krop, E.; Heederik, D.; Nemery, B.; Pekkanen, J.; Hyvärinen, A.; Täubel, M.; Zock, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report the effects of bleach use at home on the frequency of infections in 9102 school-age children participating in the HITEA project. Methods: Parents of pupils aged 6–12 years from schools in Barcelona province (Spain), Utrecht province (the Netherlands) and Eastern and Central Finl

  5. Pigmentation changes in Siderastrea spp. during bleaching events in the costal reefs of northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sassi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here the occurrence of seasonal changes in the pigmentation of colonies of Siderastrea spp. during bleaching events on coastal reefs in northeastern Brazil. Bleached affected almost 50% of coral colonies analyzed in Cabo Branco reefs (Paraiba state in the summer of 2005. The same phenomenon was detected along various coastal reefs in northeastern Brazil during the summer of 2007 and 2008. These events were seasonal, and began with the emergence of pale colonies that became pale-pink and then purple during the rainy months. The patterns and intensity of colonies pigmentation changes varied with the studied sites. The decrease in zooxanthellae density and chlorophyll-a content was quantified in the colonies with their pigmentation pattern altered (bleaching. Microbiological analyses revealed higher densities of bacteria in pink colonies (bleached as compared to brown colonies (normal. Environmental disturbances may lead to the pigmentation changes in Siderastrea spp., but the immediate causes of this phenomenon are not clear and require further investigations.

  6. 驼绒的脱色工艺%Bleaching technique on camel hair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭永利; 孙勇; 李玉梅; 罗灿

    2012-01-01

    驼绒本身带有较深的棕黄色,无法进行染色,必须先进行脱色处理.以双氧水为氧化剂对驼绒进行脱色处理.脱色工艺条件为:浴比1:40,双氧水质量浓度14.5g/L,氧漂稳定剂质量浓度6g/L,脱色时间4h、温度55℃、pH6.5.驼绒的白度由-14.32脱色为62.57,可以满足染色工艺的白度要求;单纤断裂强力由13.3cN降为12.5cN,降幅6.0%,但不影响其正常纺纱所需的强力.SEM分析证明经过脱色处理后的驼绒纤维表而变得规整、洁净,鳞片表面变得粗糙,边缘圆滑.%Camel hair can't be dyed because of its deep brown, so it must be bleached firstly. Camel hair was bleached by hydrogen peroxide as oxidizer in the paper. The bleaching technological conditions were bath ratio 1:40, concentration of hydrogen peroxide 14. 5 g/L, concentration of oxygen bleaching stabilizer 6 g/L, bleaching time 4h, temperature 55 ℃ and pH 6.5. Whiteness of camel hair is bleached from - 14. 32 to 62.57 and can be applied to dyeing. The brute force of camel hair cellfibre has some decrease from 13. 3 cN to 12.5 cN,and decreasing amplitude is 6.0% , which still satisfies the brute force of spinning technology. SEM analysis proves that the surface feature of bleached camel hair is changed obviously from irregular to clear and neat, and the edge of squama is smooth and sleek.

  7. The Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Coral Bleaching and Coral Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooidonk, R. J.; Huber, M.

    2006-12-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) impact coral reef ecology in various ways, they cool down ambient sea surface temperature (SST), damage coral reefs by wave action, decrease salinity, increase nutrients, and increase sedimentation rates on a reef. Here we present an investigation into the effect of TCs on coral bleaching and the effect TCs have on the occurrence of coral diseases. Coral bleaching, the condition where the symbiotic zooxanthellae leave the coral host, is one of the major threats to coral reefs. Bleaching occurs in anomalously warm waters, analysis of historical TC tracks show that TCs frequently occur near coral bleaching episodes. Intriguingly, TCs cool down sea surface temperature by vertical mixing and as SST is the most important factor in coral bleaching this phenomenon might have an impact on the duration, occurrence and the resulting coral mortality, of bleaching events. In recent literature a correlation has been seen in the power of tropical cyclones and average sea surface temperature, making the study of the effect of TCs on the ecology of reefs an urgent one. We will present case studies where a TCs occurred near bleaching episodes and a statistical analysis to quantify this effect. To do this we use historical cyclone track data, satellite SST data, and a dataset of reefs. But there are other TC effects on reefs that bear investigation. Because TCs occur near corals that experience thermal stress, the changes in the corals environment caused by TCs might be anomalously detrimental. For example, data suggests that corals, because they are stressed by increased sedimentation, are more vulnerable to disease and algal overgrowth after TC damage. Nutrients have been shown to increase the severity of coral diseases. With satellite data it can be shown that short-term events such as increased run-off due to tropical cyclones can be an important part of the distribution of pollutants and pathogens affecting reefs. Infectious diseases severely affect

  8. Stable isotopic records of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton of the boulder forming coral Montastraea faveolata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, A. C.; Carilli, J. E.; Norris, R. D.; Charles, C. D.; Deheyn, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    Within boulder forming corals, fixation of dissolved inorganic carbon is performed by symbiotic dinoflagellates within the coral tissue and, to a lesser extent, endolithic algae within the coral skeleton. Endolithic algae produce distinctive green bands in the coral skeleton, and their origin may be related to periods of coral bleaching due to complete loss of dinoflagellate symbionts or “paling” in which symbiont populations are patchily reduced in coral tissue. Stable carbon isotopes were analyzed in coral skeletons across a known bleaching event and 12 blooms of endolithic algae to determine whether either of these types of changes in photosynthesis had a clear isotopic signature. Stable carbon isotopes tended to be enriched in the coral skeleton during the initiation of endolith blooms, consistent with enhanced photosynthesis by endoliths. In contrast, there were no consistent δ13C patterns directly associated with bleaching, suggesting that there is no unique isotopic signature of bleaching. On the other hand, isotopic values after bleaching were lighter 92% of the time when compared to the bleaching interval. This marked drop in skeletal δ13C may reflect increased kinetic fractionation and slow symbiont recolonization for several years after bleaching.

  9. A melanin-bleaching methodology for molecular and histopathological analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joon-Yong; Choi, Jiyeon; Sears, John D; Ylaya, Kris; Perry, Candice; Choi, Chel H; Hong, Seung-Mo; Cho, Hanbyoul; Brown, Kevin M; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2016-10-01

    Removal of excessive melanin from heavily pigmented formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) melanoma tissues is essential for histomorphological and molecular diagnostic assessments. Although there have been efforts to address this issue, current methodologies remain complex and time-consuming, and are not suitable for multiple molecular applications. Herein, we have developed a robust and rapid melanin-bleaching methodology for FFPE tissue specimens. Our approach is based on quick bleaching (15 min) at high temperature (80 °C) with 0.5% diluted hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in Tris-HCl, PBS, or Tris/Tricine/SDS buffer. Immunostaining for Ki-67 and HMB45 was enhanced by bleaching with 0.5% H2O2 in Tris/Tricine/SDS and Tris-HCl, respectively. In addition to histopathological applications, our approach also facilitates recovery of protein and nucleic acid from archival melanin-rich FFPE tissue sections. Protein extracted from bleached FFPE tissues was compatible with western blotting using anti-human GAPDH and AKT antibodies. Our bleaching condition significantly improved RNA quality compared with unbleached tissues without compromising the yield. Notably, the RNA/DNA obtained from bleached tissues was suitable for end point PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR. In conclusion, this improved melanin-bleaching method enhances and simplifies immunostaining procedures, and facilitates the use of melanin-rich FFPE tissues for histomorphological and PCR amplification-based molecular assays.

  10. ECF BLEACHING WITH A FINAL HYDROGEN PEROXIDE STAGE: IMPACT ON THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF Eucalyptus globulus KRAFT PULPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro E. G. Loureiro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Two industrial elemental chlorine free (ECF bleaching sequences, D0(EOPD1(EPD2 and OQ(PODP, are compared with respect to the bulk content of lignin, carboxyl, hexeneuronic acids (HexA, and reducing groups after each bleaching stage. HexA groups contribute significantly to the total content of carboxyl groups, and their degradation during chlorine dioxide bleaching is reflected by a decrease of the carboxyl content. The higher degradation using an enhanced use of oxygen-based bleaching chemicals is associated with a higher fiber charge reduction, mainly due to xylan depletion. Additionally, the effect of process variables of a laboratory final hydrogen peroxide stage on the chemical composition of the fully bleached pulp (D0(EOPD1P and OQ(PODP is studied. The ability of final peroxide bleaching to raise the content of carboxyl groups is dependent on the operating conditions and pulp bleaching history. A balance between carbohydrate oxidation and dissolution of oxidized groups determines the effect on fiber charge. The effect of hydrogen peroxide stabilizers added into the final stage on the content of carboxyl groups is also reported.

  11. The northern limit of corals of the genus Acropora in temperate zones is determined by their resilience to cold bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Tomihiko; Agostini, Sylvain; Casareto, Beatriz Estela; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yuyama, Ikuko

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of corals in Japan covers a wide range of latitudes, encompassing tropical to temperate zones. However, coral communities in temperate zones contain only a small subset of species. Among the parameters that determine the distribution of corals, temperature plays an important role. We tested the resilience to cold stress of three coral species belonging to the genus Acropora in incubation experiments. Acropora pruinosa, which is the northernmost of the three species, bleached at 13 °C, but recovered once temperatures were increased. The two other species, A. hyacinthus and A. solitaryensis, which has a more southerly range than A. pruinosa, died rapidly after bleaching at 13 °C. The physiological effects of cold bleaching on the corals included decreased rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification, similar to the physiological effects observed with bleaching due to high temperature stress. Contrasting hot bleaching, no increases in antioxidant enzyme activities were observed, suggesting that reactive oxygen species play a less important role in bleaching under cold stress. These results confirmed the importance of resilience to cold stress in determining the distribution and northern limits of coral species, as cold events causing coral bleaching and high mortality occur regularly in temperate zones. PMID:26680690

  12. A melanin-bleaching methodology for molecular and histopathological analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joon-Yong; Choi, Jiyeon; Sears, John D; Ylaya, Kris; Perry, Candice; Choi, Chel H; Hong, Seung-Mo; Cho, Hanbyoul; Brown, Kevin M; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2016-10-01

    Removal of excessive melanin from heavily pigmented formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) melanoma tissues is essential for histomorphological and molecular diagnostic assessments. Although there have been efforts to address this issue, current methodologies remain complex and time-consuming, and are not suitable for multiple molecular applications. Herein, we have developed a robust and rapid melanin-bleaching methodology for FFPE tissue specimens. Our approach is based on quick bleaching (15 min) at high temperature (80 °C) with 0.5% diluted hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in Tris-HCl, PBS, or Tris/Tricine/SDS buffer. Immunostaining for Ki-67 and HMB45 was enhanced by bleaching with 0.5% H2O2 in Tris/Tricine/SDS and Tris-HCl, respectively. In addition to histopathological applications, our approach also facilitates recovery of protein and nucleic acid from archival melanin-rich FFPE tissue sections. Protein extracted from bleached FFPE tissues was compatible with western blotting using anti-human GAPDH and AKT antibodies. Our bleaching condition significantly improved RNA quality compared with unbleached tissues without compromising the yield. Notably, the RNA/DNA obtained from bleached tissues was suitable for end point PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR. In conclusion, this improved melanin-bleaching method enhances and simplifies immunostaining procedures, and facilitates the use of melanin-rich FFPE tissues for histomorphological and PCR amplification-based molecular assays. PMID:27548802

  13. Perubahan NIlai pH Media Cair Daerah Permukaan Leher Gigi Pada Perawatan Bleaching Intra Korona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamizar Kamizar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Intra coronal bleaching treatment can cause penetration of bleaching materials into the cervical teeth surface and due to this penetration the pH range would change around these area. From this point the research started by arranging 3 types of bleaching materials i.e. mixture of sodium perborat with water, sodium perborat with H2O2 3% and sodium perborat with H2O2 30%. These bleaching component were conditioned into the pulp 2 mm under cemento enamel junction on the trial tooth whose roots had been filled in, after that it was covered up with zinc phosphat cement and above this paraffin wax and nail. The removed tooth was soaked in a aquabides bottle and pH value was measured from the first day, third and seventh. Result showed that there was a change of pH in the aquabidest. The change appeared firstly on the first day with various levels on each group. Sod. Perborat + H2O2 3% to 7,84 and with water 8,015. As a matter of fact on the third day the change happened to sod. Perborat with water 8,037 and 8,298 with H2O2 3% 8,732 and 8,750. While sod. perborat with H2O2 30% was felt down its concentration into 8,847 and 8,827. As a result the change aquabidest pH was interfered or depended on the mixture of the bleaching materials itself such as; so. Perborat with water=10,15 ; sod. perborat with H2O2 3%= 9,10; sod. perborat with H2O2 30%= 7,60. pH value sod. perborat with water on the seventh day showed up its raising action though it's still below the rest two other groups' concentration pH levels.

  14. 3D Surface Profile and Color Stability of Tooth Colored Filling Materials after Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Anthony Irawan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the effects of vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide home bleaching and in-office bleaching on the color stability and 3D surface profile of dental restorative filling materials. Thirty discs (n=30 measure 6 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick for each of three restorative materials. These are nanofilled composite Filtek Z350 XT, the submicron composite Estelite Σ Quick, and nanofilled glass ionomer Ketac N100 nanoionomer and were fabricated in shade A2. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=10: subgroup A (Opalescence PF, subgroup B (Opalescence Boost in-office bleaching, and subgroup C (distilled water serving as control. Samples were bleached according to the manufacturer’s instructions for a period of two weeks. The Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE L*, a*, b* system was chosen for image processing, while 3D surface profile was tested with atomic force microscopy (AFM. Statistical analyses were performed with the Mann-Whitney tests and Krusal-Wallis with a P value of ≤0.05. The three restorative materials showed significant color changes (ΔE; P≤0.05. In diminishing order, the mean color changes recorded were Estelite Σ (3.82 ± 1.6 > Ketac Nano (2.97 ± 1.2 > Filtek Z350 XT (2.25 ± 1.0. However, none of the tested materials showed statistically significant changes in surface roughness; P>0.05.

  15. Effect of dental bleaching after bracket bonding and debonding using three different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna de Oliveira Gomes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets on dental in-home bleaching, taking into account three different adhesive systems. METHODS: Forty-four bovine incisors were divided into four groups according to the primer system used for orthodontic bracket bonding. Following the debonding of orthodontic brackets, the teeth were stored in staining solution for 96 hours. Then, teeth were whitened using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks at a 6-hour-a-day regime. Standardized digital photographs were taken at the following intervals: T0 (initial; T1 (after debonding; T2 (after pigmentation; T3, T4 and T5 representing 1, 7, and 14 days of bleaching. Repeatability and stability tests were carried out to check the method accuracy. Images were analyzed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software considering (L*a*b*color coordinate values and a modified color difference total (Δ;E'. RESULTS: The results of this study (ANOVA and Tukey; p < 0.01 demonstrated that after 7 days of bleaching, experimental groups showed significantly less teeth whitening compared to the control group. However, there were no significant color differences between the groups after 14 days, according to values of lightness (L*. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the adhesive primer system applied, bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets alters the outcome of tooth whitening in the first 7 days of bleaching, however it has no influence on the whitening of the dental structure after 14 days of in-home dental bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide.

  16. Comparative clinical study of the effectiveness of different dental bleaching methods - two year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Francisco Lia Mondelli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated color change, stability, and tooth sensitivity in patients submitted to different bleaching techniques. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this study, 48 patients were divided into five groups. A half-mouth design was conducted to compare two in-office bleaching techniques (with and without light activation: G1: 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP (Lase Peroxide - DMC Equipments, São Carlos, SP, Brazil + hybrid light (HL (LED/Diode Laser, Whitening Lase II DMC Equipments, São Carlos, SP, Brazil; G2: 35% HP; G3: 38% HP (X-traBoost - Ultradent, South Jordan UT, USA + HL; G4: 38% HP; and G5: 15% carbamide peroxide (CP (Opalescence PF - Ultradent, South Jordan UT, USA. For G1 and G3, HP was applied on the enamel surface for 3 consecutive applications activated by HL. Each application included 3x3' HL activations with 1' between each interval; for G2 and G4, HP was applied 3x15' with 15' between intervals; and for G5, 15% CP was applied for 120'/10 days at home. A spectrophotometer was used to measure color change before the treatment and after 24 h, 1 week, 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. A VAS questionnaire was used to evaluate tooth sensitivity before the treatment, immediately following treatment, 24 h after and finally 1 week after. RESULTS: Statistical analysis did not reveal any significant differences between in-office bleaching with or without HL activation related to effectiveness; nevertheless the time required was less with HL. Statistical differences were observed between the results after 24 h, 1 week and 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months (intergroup. Immediately, in-office bleaching increased tooth sensitivity. The groups activated with HL required less application time with gel. CONCLUSION: All techniques and bleaching agents used were effective and demonstrated similar behaviors.

  17. Halogenated volatile organic compounds from the use of chlorine-bleach-containing household products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Mustafa

    2008-03-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and many organic chemicals contained in household cleaning products may react to generate halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Halogenated VOC emissions from eight different chlorine bleach containing household products (pure and diluted) were investigated by headspace experiments. Chloroform and carbon tetrachloride were the leading compounds along with several halogenated compounds in the headspace of chlorine bleach products. One of the most surprising results was the presence of carbon tetrachloride (a probable human carcinogen and a powerful greenhouse gas that was banned for household use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration) in very high concentrations (up to 101 mg m(-3)). By mixing surfactants or soap with NaOCl, it was shown that the formation of carbon tetrachloride and several other halogenated VOCs is possible. In addition to quantitatively determined halogenated VOCs (n = 15), several nitrogen-containing (n = 4), chlorinated (n = 10), oxygenated compounds (n = 22), and hydrocarbons (n = 14) were identified in the headspace of bleach products. Among these, 1,1-dichlorobutane and 2-chloro-2-nitropropane were the most abundant chlorinated VOCs, whereas trichloronitromethane and hexachloroethane were the most frequently detected ones. Indoor air halogenated VOC concentrations resulting from the use of four selected household products were also measured before, during, and 30 min after bathroom, kitchen, and floor cleaning applications. Chloroform (2.9-24.6 microg m(-3)) and carbon tetrachloride (0.25-459 microg m(-3)) concentrations significantly increased during the use of bleach containing products. During/ before concentration ratios ranged between 8 and 52 (25 +/- 14, average +/- SD) for chloroform and 1-1170 (146 +/- 367, average +/- SD) for carbon tetrachloride, respectively. These results indicated that the bleach use can be important in terms of inhalation exposure to carbon tetrachloride, chloroform and

  18. Mineral loss and color change of enamel after bleaching and staining solutions combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Larissa Sgarbosa Napoleão; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Catelan, Anderson; Fraga Briso, André Luiz; Fraga Zaze, Ana Carolina Soares; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-10-01

    Pigments of food and beverages could affect dental bleaching efficacy. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate color change and mineral loss of tooth enamel as well as the influence of staining solutions normally used by adolescent patients undergoing home bleaching. Initial hardness and baseline color were measured on enamel blocks. Specimens were divided into five groups (n=5): G1 (control) specimens were kept in artificial saliva throughout the experiment (3 weeks); G2 enamel was exposed to 10% carbamide peroxide for 6 h daily, and after this period, the teeth were cleaned and stored in artificial saliva until the next bleaching session; and G3, G4, and G5 received the same treatments as G2, but after bleaching, they were stored for 1 h in cola soft drink, melted chocolate, or red wine, respectively. Mineral loss was obtained by the percentage of hardness reduction, and color change was determined by the difference between the data obtained before and after treatments. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and Fisher's test (α=0.05). G3 and G5 showed higher mineral loss (92.96 ± 5.50 and 94.46 ± 1.00, respectively) compared to the other groups (p ≤ 0.05). G5 showed high-color change (9.34 ± 2.90), whereas G1 presented lower color change (2.22 ± 0.44) (p ≤ 0.05). Acidic drinks cause mineral loss of the enamel, which could modify the surface and reduce staining resistance after bleaching. PMID:24165745

  19. Evaluation of the influence of dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide in orthodontic bracket shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Neiva Nunes do Rego

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the bond strength of brackets bonded to premolars previously subjected to bleaching with a 35% hydrogen peroxide. METHODS: Twenty one healthy premolars were selected and randomly divided into three groups (n = 7. Group I (G1 included teeth that were not submitted to bleaching. The enamel surfaces of Groups II (G2 and III (G3 were submitted to a bleaching process with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP Maxx. On Group II (G2, after bleaching, the teeth were stored for 24 hours in distilled water at 98.6 ºF, and then, premolar metallic brackets were bonded using Transbond XT (3M resin. Group III (G3 was submitted to the same procedure seven days after bleaching. After bonding, all teeth were stored in distilled water at 98.6 ºF for 24 hours. All groups were submitted to a traction test using an EMIC DL2000 universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The bracket resistance to debonding was compared between the groups by the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test (p < 0.05 and it was verified that the bleaching agent significantly reduced bracket adhesion when bonded 24 hours after bleaching. However, seven days after bleaching, there was no significant difference on the resistance to debonding among groups G1 (19,52 kgf and G3 (18,44 kgf, meaning that it is necessary to wait longer after bleaching to bond brackets.

  20. Unprecedented mass bleaching and loss of coral across 12° of latitude in Western Australia in 2010-11.

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    James A Y Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Globally, coral bleaching has been responsible for a significant decline in both coral cover and diversity over the past two decades. During the summer of 2010-11, anomalous large-scale ocean warming induced unprecedented levels of coral bleaching accompanied by substantial storminess across more than 12° of latitude and 1200 kilometers of coastline in Western Australia (WA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Extreme La-Niña conditions caused extensive warming of waters and drove considerable storminess and cyclonic activity across WA from October 2010 to May 2011. Satellite-derived sea surface temperature measurements recorded anomalies of up to 5°C above long-term averages. Benthic surveys quantified the extent of bleaching at 10 locations across four regions from tropical to temperate waters. Bleaching was recorded in all locations across regions and ranged between 17% (±5.5 in the temperate Perth region, to 95% (±3.5 in the Exmouth Gulf of the tropical Ningaloo region. Coincident with high levels of bleaching, three cyclones passed in close proximity to study locations around the time of peak temperatures. Follow-up surveys revealed spatial heterogeneity in coral cover change with four of ten locations recording significant loss of coral cover. Relative decreases ranged between 22%-83.9% of total coral cover, with the greatest losses in the Exmouth Gulf. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The anomalous thermal stress of 2010-11 induced mass bleaching of corals along central and southern WA coral reefs. Significant coral bleaching was observed at multiple locations across the tropical-temperate divide spanning more than 1200 km of coastline. Resultant spatially patchy loss of coral cover under widespread and high levels of bleaching and cyclonic activity, suggests a degree of resilience for WA coral communities. However, the spatial extent of bleaching casts some doubt over hypotheses suggesting that future impacts to coral reefs under

  1. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on the surface of composite restoratives during in-office tooth bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Strakas, Dimitrios; Tsitrou, Effrosyni; Tolidis, Kosmas; Koumpia, Effimia

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on the surface roughness and microhardness of various composite restoratives during in-office tooth bleaching. Five highly viscous composite restoratives and three flowable composite restoratives were investigated. Thirty cylindrical specimens of each material were made using Teflon molds. The specimens of each composite were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10). Group 1 specimens did not receive bleaching treatment, group 2 received a conventional in-office bleaching treatment, and group 3 received a laser-assisted in-office bleaching treatment using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Two-way ANOVA was used to determine significant interactions between materials and bleaching methods. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test were used to compare the mean surface microhardness and roughness between materials for each treatment group (a = 0.05). Τhere were no significant differences in surface microhardness between the two bleached experimental groups for all the tested composites (p > 0.05). The reduction of surface microhardness after bleaching procedures ranged from 0.72 to 16.93 % for the specimens received conventional treatment and from 1.30 to 11.51 % for those received laser-assisted treatment. Moreover, there were no significant differences in Ra values between the experimental groups (p > 0.05) in all cases. The increase of surface roughness after the bleaching treatments was negligible and was between 0.43 and 4.78 %. The use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser during in-office tooth bleaching treatment did not affect the surface microhardness and roughness of the tested composite restorative materials.

  2. Penetuan Bilangan Iodin pada Hydrogenated Palm Kernel Oil (HPKO) dan Refined Bleached Deodorized Palm Kernel Oil (RBDPKO)

    OpenAIRE

    Sitompul, Monica Angelina

    2015-01-01

    Have been conducted Determination of Iodin Value by method titration to some Hydrogenated Palm Kernel Oil (HPKO) and Refined Bleached Deodorized Palm Kernel Oil (RBDPKO). The result of analysis obtained the Iodin Value in Hydrogenated Palm Kernel Oil (A) = 0,16 gr I2/100gr, Hydrogenated Palm Kernel Oil (B) = 0,20 gr I2/100gr, Hydrogenated Palm Kernel Oil (C) = 0,24 gr I2/100gr. And in Refined Bleached Deodorized Palm Kernel Oil (A) = 17,51 gr I2/100gr, Refined Bleached Deodorized Palm Kernel ...

  3. Investigation of photo-bleaching through transmittance method in pigmented solution: understanding possible mechanisms and advantages for photo dental whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, F. L. E.; Lins, E. C.; Portero, Priscila P.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Oliveira, O. B., Jr.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2007-02-01

    The dental bleaching is known for many years. Recently a technique employing light has open up new and exciting possibilities. Besides its vast application there are still many important points to be understood about teeth photon bleaching. In this work we present an "in vitro" experiment to explore the main mechanisms involved during the photon action in tooth whitening. Our results indicated that light at same wavelengths are great absorbed by pigments creating a local heating which considerably increase the bleaching rate. This results in a fast reaction without heating the whole dental structure. We discuss details of our experiment. Work supported by Fapesp and CNPq.

  4. Bleaching effect and nonvola-tile holographic storage in doubly doped LiNbO3:Fe:Cu crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The bleaching effect, i. e. the crystal shows that decoloration after it is illuminated by ultraviolet light, has been observed in congruent LiNbO3:Fe :Cu crystals. Based on this bleaching effect, a new technique including the reco rding phase by two interfering red beams and fixing phase by both UV light and a coherent red beam has been experimentally investigated to realize nonvolatile holographic storage in LiNbO3:Fe:Cu. The results of proof-of-concept experiments confirm that bleaching effect becomes an alternative physical mechanism for nonv olatile holographic storage with high recording sensitivity and weak light-induced scattering noise.

  5. Potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP Laser and Dental Bleaching. Literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Arce

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determinate if dental bleaching with KTP laser is a safe, effective and efficient technique. The use of KTP laser for dental bleaching was only investigated in combination with a high concentration of hydrogen peroxide (35%. The recommended protocol was: for the use of KTP laser at 3W power and an irradiation time of ten seconds, three to four cycles are needed. For a power of 1W and an irradiation time of thirty seconds the number of cycles is three with a maximum of four. Under these conditions KTP laser bleaching was considered not to alter surface morphology, to have no influence on enamel microhardness, to maintain the pulp temperature within normal values, to obtain lighter tooth color which can be maintained for months (no long term studies were conducted. Because the bleaching effect was obtained in a short period of time and maintained for months, KTP laser bleaching was considered an effective and efficient technique. Conclusion: KTP-assisted dental bleaching is a safe, effective and efficient technique when combined with high concentration of hydrogen peroxide. RESUMEN Láser Potasio-Titanil-Fosfato (KTP y Blanqueamiento Dental. Revisión narrativa.Resumen: Objetivo: Determinar si el blanqueamiento dental con láser KTP es una técnica segura, efectiva y eficiente. El uso de láser KTP para blanqueamiento dental fue solo investigado en combinación con una alta concentración de peróxido de hidrogeno (35%. El protocolo recomendado fue: para el uso de láser KTP a 3W de potencia y un tiempo de irradiación de diez segundos, tres a cuatro repeticiones son necesarias. Para una potencia de 1W y un tiempo de irradiación de treinta segundos, el número de repeticiones son tres con un máximo de cuatro veces. Bajo estas condiciones, el blanqueamiento dental con esta técnica no altera la morfología de la superficie dental, no tiene influencia en la microdureza del esmalte, mantiene la temperatura pulpar dentro de

  6. Coral bleaching under thermal stress: putative involvement of host/symbiont recognition mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambutte Sylvie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral bleaching can be defined as the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or their photosynthetic pigments from their cnidarian host. This major disturbance of reef ecosystems is principally induced by increases in water temperature. Since the beginning of the 1980s and the onset of global climate change, this phenomenon has been occurring at increasing rates and scales, and with increasing severity. Several studies have been undertaken in the last few years to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of coral bleaching but the jigsaw puzzle is far from being complete, especially concerning the early events leading to symbiosis breakdown. The aim of the present study was to find molecular actors involved early in the mechanism leading to symbiosis collapse. Results In our experimental procedure, one set of Pocillopora damicornis nubbins was subjected to a gradual increase of water temperature from 28°C to 32°C over 15 days. A second control set kept at constant temperature (28°C. The differentially expressed mRNA between the stressed states (sampled just before the onset of bleaching and the non stressed states (control were isolated by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization. Transcription rates of the most interesting genes (considering their putative function were quantified by Q-RT-PCR, which revealed a significant decrease in transcription of two candidates six days before bleaching. RACE-PCR experiments showed that one of them (PdC-Lectin contained a C-Type-Lectin domain specific for mannose. Immunolocalisation demonstrated that this host gene mediates molecular interactions between the host and the symbionts suggesting a putative role in zooxanthellae acquisition and/or sequestration. The second gene corresponds to a gene putatively involved in calcification processes (Pdcyst-rich. Its down-regulation could reflect a trade-off mechanism leading to the arrest of the mineralization process under stress

  7. Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope Measurement of Local Fundus Reflectance and Autofluorescence Changes Arising from Rhodopsin Bleaching and Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin was measured locally in the retina with a widely available, dual wavelength scanning laser ophthalmoscope that does not require pupil dilation. Increased autofluorescence attendant bleaching arises largely from transient removal of rhodopsin's screening of autofluorescent fluorochromes.

  8. Intensity dependent absorption bleaching of high subband excitons in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, S H; Lee, E H; Chae, K M; Park, S H; Kim, U

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of carrier generation on the absorption bleaching of the n=2 and n=3 excitons in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs). With the excitation near the resonance of the n=1 exciton absorption, the long range coulomb screening and collision broadening had significant effects on the exciton bleaching. At low excitation intensity, the absorption bleaching of the n=2 exciton in 75 A-thick MQWs and that of the n=3 exciton in 150 A-thick MQWs were due to linewidth broadening by the collision broadening effect only. At high excitation intensity, however, the reduction of oscillator strength due to the long range coulomb screening contributed dominantly to absorption bleaching.

  9. Surface effects after a combination of dental bleaching and enamel microabrasion: An in vitro and in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Laura Molinar; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Salomão, Fabio Martins; Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of combining enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching on the physical properties of enamel, using in vitro and in situ conditions and evaluating surface roughness, enamel microhardness and scanning electron microscopy images. One hundred sound bovine teeth were sectioned and cut into discs and randomly divided into 10 study groups (n=10). The results were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures, followed by the Tukey test, with significance at 5%. Enamel surface roughness was significantly influenced by microabrasion, regardless of being combined with dental bleaching, for both HS (Human Saliva) or AS (Artificial Saliva) condition. Enamel microhardness was significantly decreased in the groups in which enamel microabrasion was performed, regardless its combination with dental bleaching; although storage in HS reestablished the initial enamel microhardness. It was concluded that dental bleaching does not cause major damage to microabraided enamel, and that only human saliva recovered the initial enamel microhardness. PMID:26830820

  10. Comparative evaluation of two different remineralizing agents on the microhardness of bleached enamel surface: Results of an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunpriya Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Both GC Tooth Mousse (Recaldent and Toothmin Tooth cream (Abbott Healthcare Pvt.Ltd increase the microhardness of bleached enamel. Toothmin tooth cream is a better agent for increasing microhardness, although difference is not significant.

  11. IMPACT OF BLEACHING STRESS ON THE FUNCTION OF THE OXYGEN EVOLVING COMPLEX OF ZOOXANTHELLAE FROM SCLERACTINIAN CORALS(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ross; Ralph, Peter J

    2008-04-01

    Global climate change is leading to the rise of ocean temperatures and is triggering mass coral bleaching events on reefs around the world. The expulsion of the symbiotic dinoflagellate algae is believed to occur as a result of damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of these symbionts, although the specific site of initial impact is yet to be conclusively resolved. Here, the sensitivity of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) to bleaching stress was studied as well as its natural variation between seasons. The artificial electron donor, diphenyl carbazide (DPC), was added to cultured, freshly isolated and expelled (bleaching treatments only) zooxanthellae suspensions. Chl a fluorescence and oxygen production measurements showed that upon addition of DPC, no restoration of diminished photochemical efficiency occurred under control or bleaching conditions. This result was consistent between 12 h and 5 d bleaching treatments on Pocilloporadamicornis, indicating that the OEC is not the primary site of damage, and that zooxanthellae expulsion from the host is a nonselective process with respect to the functioning of the OEC. Further experiments measuring fast induction curves (FICs) revealed that in both summer and winter, the temperature when OEC function was lost occurred between 7°C and 14°C above the sea surface temperature. FIC and oxygen production measurements of P. damicornis during exposure to bleaching stress demonstrated that the thermotolerance of the OEC increased above the temperature of the bleaching treatment over a 4 h period. This finding indicates that the OEC has the capacity to acclimate between seasons and remains functional at temperatures well above bleaching thresholds. PMID:27041186

  12. Growth and bleaching of the coral Oculina patagonica under different environmental conditions in the western Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio-Portillo, Esther; Vázquez-Luis, Maite; Valle-Pérez, Carlos; Izquierdo Muñoz, Andrés; Ramos-Esplá, Alfonso A

    2014-01-01

    The success that the putative alien species Oculina patagonica is able to survive under different environmental conditions may be benefiting its establishment and spreading along the Mediterranean Basin. Our objectives were to determine the response of this species, in terms of growth and bleaching, under different environmental conditions. Field data on colony growth and bleaching were obtained for a period of 18 months (from June 2010 to December 2011), in the Alicante Harbour (38°20′11″N, ...

  13. Unprecedented Mass Bleaching and Loss of Coral across 12° of Latitude in Western Australia in 2010–11

    OpenAIRE

    James A Y Moore; Bellchambers, Lynda M.; Depczynski, Martial R.; Richard D. Evans; Scott N Evans; Field, Stuart N.; Kim J Friedman; Gilmour, James P; Holmes, Thomas H.; Rachael Middlebrook; Ben T Radford; Tyrone Ridgway; George Shedrawi; Heather Taylor; Thomson, Damian P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Globally, coral bleaching has been responsible for a significant decline in both coral cover and diversity over the past two decades. During the summer of 2010-11, anomalous large-scale ocean warming induced unprecedented levels of coral bleaching accompanied by substantial storminess across more than 12° of latitude and 1200 kilometers of coastline in Western Australia (WA). METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Extreme La-Niña conditions caused extensive warming of waters and drove co...

  14. An In Vitro Comparative Study of Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Bleached Enamel using Synthetic and Herbal Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Suneetha, Ram; Pavithra, S; Thomas, John; Nanga, G Swapna Priya; Shiromany, Aseem; Shivrayan, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Background: The bond strength to bleached enamel is reduced, if adhesive restorations are carried out immediately. So the purpose of this in vitro study was an attempt to regain the lost bond strength, for which, the comparison of shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel was carried out using various antioxidants: 10% Sodium ascorbate, Rosemary extracts, Pedicularis extracts. Materials and Methods: Fifty human extracted single rooted teeth were collected. They were decoronate...

  15. Bleaching effect of a 405-nm diode laser irradiation used with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K.; Kato, J.; Nakazawa, T.; Hirai, Y.

    2007-09-01

    A 405-nm diode laser has recently been developed for soft tissue problems in dentistry. A new in-office bleaching agent consisting of a titanium dioxide photocatalyst and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide has proven to react well with light irradiated at a wavelength of around 400 nm. In this study, we evaluated the bleaching efficacy of a newly developed 405-nm diode laser on bovine teeth treated with a bleaching agent composed of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide. Sixteen bovine incisors were randomly divided into two groups: Group A, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 200 mW; Group B, irradiated by the 405-nm diode laser at 400 mW. The bleaching agent with titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide was applied to bovine enamel and irradiated for 1 min. The specimens were then washed and dried, and the same procedure was repeated nine more times. After irradiation, we assessed the effects of bleaching on the enamel by measuring the color of the specimens with a spectrophotometer and examining the enamel surfaces with a scanning electron microscope. L* rose to a high score, reaching a significantly higher post-treatment level in comparison to pretreatment. In a comparison of the color difference (Δ E) between Group A and Group B, the specimens in Group B showed significantly higher values after 10 min of irradiation for the post-treatment. No remarkable differences in the enamel surface morphology were found between the unbleached and bleached enamel. The use of a 405-nm diode laser in combination with a bleaching agent of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide may be an effective method for bleaching teeth without the risk of tooth damage.

  16. Heat-Stress and Light-Stress Induce Different Cellular Pathologies in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate during Coral Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Downs, C. A.; McDougall, Kathleen E.; Woodley, Cheryl M.; John E Fauth; Richmond, Robert H.; Ariel Kushmaro; Gibb, Stuart W.; Yossi Loya; Ostrander, Gary K.; Esti Kramarsky-Winter

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chlo...

  17. Bleaching Susceptibility and Recovery of Colombian Caribbean Corals in Response to Water Current Exposure and Seasonal Upwelling

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Bayraktarov; Valeria Pizarro; Corvin Eidens; Thomas Wilke; Christian Wild

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching events are globally occurring more frequently and with higher intensity, mainly caused by increases in seawater temperature. In Tayrona National Natural Park (TNNP) in the Colombian Caribbean, local coral communities are subjected to seasonal wind-triggered upwelling events coinciding with stronger water currents depending on location. This natural phenomenon offers the unique opportunity to study potential water current-induced mitigation mechanisms of coral bleaching in an u...

  18. Impact of mass coral bleaching on reef fish community and fishermen catches at Sabang, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Edi Rudi; Taufiq Iskandar; Nur Fadli; Hidayati Hidayati

    2012-01-01

    Mass coral bleaching was observed at Sabang, Aceh in early 2010, and approximately 60% ofhard coral in waters surrounding Sabang died post-event. Coral mortality was expected to affect thecomposition of reef fish due to decrease its function such as providing a shelter, feeding and spawninggrounds for fish and other marine organisms. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the impactof coral bleaching on coral reef fish community and to compare the composition of fishermen catchesbef...

  19. Effectiveness of nano-calcium phosphate paste on sensitivity during and after bleaching: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Dourado LOGUERCIO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of in-office bleaching and associated tooth sensitivity on application of nano-calcium phosphate paste as desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel in 40 patients who were randomly divided into placebo and nano-calcium phosphate paste groups. Bleaching efficacy (BE was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita shade guide. Tooth sensitivity was recorded using a numeric rating scale (0–4 during bleaching and up to 48 h after each session. The primary outcome of absolute risk of tooth sensitivity was compared using the Fisher’s exact test (α = 0.05. The intensity of tooth sensitivity and the efficacy of in-office bleaching were also statistically evaluated. No significant differences in absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity were detected between the groups (p = 1.0 and p = 0.53, respectively. BE was also found to be similar between the groups (p = 0.67. Although the use of a nano-calcium phosphate paste associated with fluoride and potassium nitrate did not influence the whitening outcome, but it also did not reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity.

  20. Impact of mass coral bleaching on reef fish community and fishermen catches at Sabang, Aceh Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Rudi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mass coral bleaching was observed at Sabang, Aceh in early 2010, and approximately 60% ofhard coral in waters surrounding Sabang died post-event. Coral mortality was expected to affect thecomposition of reef fish due to decrease its function such as providing a shelter, feeding and spawninggrounds for fish and other marine organisms. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the impactof coral bleaching on coral reef fish community and to compare the composition of fishermen catchesbefore and after the coral bleaching. The data were collected before (in 2008 and after (in 2010 themass coral bleaching event in Sabang waters by using a photographic method and the data on theaverage catch of fishermen (catch per fishing effort was calculated in kg/hour. The data of theknowledge of fishermen on climate change was collected by questionnaire method. The results showedthat 259 species of coral reef fishes were caught by fishermen in 2008 and 2010. There was nosignificantly difference between the fish catches before and after the mass coral bleaching. However,species richness decreased up to 50% after the mass coral bleaching. The knowledge of fishermen onclimate change issue was very low.

  1. ReefTemp: An interactive monitoring system for coral bleaching using high-resolution SST and improved stress predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Jeffrey A.; Turner, Peter J.; Anthony, Kenneth R. N.; Baird, Andrew H.; Berkelmans, Ray; Eakin, C. Mark; Johnson, Johanna; Marshall, Paul A.; Packer, Gareck R.; Rea, Anthony; Willis, Bette L.

    2008-03-01

    Anomalously high sea surface temperatures (SST) have led to repeated mass coral bleaching events on a global scale. Existing satellite-based systems used to monitor conditions conducive to bleaching are based on low-resolution (0.5°, ~50 km) SST data. While these systems have served the research and management community well, they have inherent weaknesses that limit their capacity to predict stress on coral reefs at local scales, over which bleaching severity is known to vary dramatically. Here we discuss the development and testing of ReefTemp, a new operational remote sensing application for the Great Barrier Reef that assesses bleaching risk daily using: high-resolution (2 km) SST, regionally validated thermal stress indices, and color-graded legends directly related to past observations of bleaching severity. Given projections of sea temperature rise, ReefTemp is timely as it can accurately predict bleaching severity at a local scale and therefore help to give focus to future research and monitoring efforts.

  2. Improved sensitivity, safety and laboratory turnaround time in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis by use of bleach sedimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameh James

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inadequate diagnostic processes and human resources in laboratories contribute to a high burden of tuberculosis (TB in low- and middle-income countries. Direct smear microscopy is relied on for TB diagnosis; however, sensitivity rates vary. To improve sensitivity of direct microscopy, the researchers employed several approaches, including sputum digestion and concentration of acid-fast bacilli (AFB, a technique which uses commercial bleach.Objectives: This study compared methods used to diagnose active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.Methods: Three sputum specimens were collected from each of 340 participants in Abuja, Nigeria, over two consecutive days. Direct microscopy was performed on all specimens; following microscopy, one specimen from each patient was selected randomly for bleach sedimentation and one for Lowenstein-Jensen culture.Results: Direct microscopy produced 28.8% AFB-positive results, whilst bleach sedimentation resulted in 30.3%. When compared with the cultures, 26.5% were AFB true positive using direct microscopy and 27.1% using bleach sedimentation. Whilst the specificity rate between these two methods was not statistically significant (P = 0.548, the sensitivity rate was significant (P = 0.004.Conclusion: Based on these results, bleach increases the sensitivity of microscopy compared with direct smear and has similar specificity. When diagnosing new cases of pulmonary TB, one bleach-digested smear is as sensitive as three direct smears, reducing waiting times for patients and ensuring the safety of laboratory technicians.

  3. Coral bleaching in the Caramuanas reef (Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil during the 2010 El Niño event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J Miranda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Episodes of coral bleaching related to El Niño events have been increasing in frequency and severity. This phenomenon is cited as a major cause of degradation of coral reefs. This study evaluates the effects of coral bleaching on the Caramuanas reef community, which occurred during the southern hemisphere summer of 2009/2010. Within this period the sea surface temperature of 31°C and thermal anomalies up to almost 1°C were recorded. During and after this El Niño event, frequency and severity of bleaching, live coral cover, number of colonies, class size, disease occurrence, and mortality rate were monitored on corals larger than 20 cm in diameter. The samples were taken at twelve fixed transects, in three reef stations. Statistical analysis showed that the severity of bleaching was different between the two periods, during and after the 2010 ENSO event. The Caramuanas reef showed sublethal bleaching effects indicating that this reef is tolerant to bleaching when the temperature anomalies do not exceed 0.75°C within one week.

  4. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, CRYSTALLINITY, AND THERMAL DEGRADATION OF BLEACHED AND UNBLEACHED KENAF BAST (Hibiscus cannabinus PULP AND NANOFIBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jonoobi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus nanofibers were isolated from unbleached and bleached pulp by a combination of chemical and mechanical treatments. The chemical methods were based on NaOH-AQ (anthraquinone and three-stage bleaching (DEpD processes, whereas the mechanical techniques involved refining, cryo-crushing, and high-pressure homogenization. The size and morphology of the obtained fibers were characterized by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and the studies showed that the isolated nanofibers from unbleached and bleached pulp had diameters between 10-90 nm, while their length was in the micrometer range. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated that the content of lignin and hemicellulose decreased in the pulping process and that lignin was almost completely removed during bleaching. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA indicated that both pulp types as well as the nanofibers displayed a superior thermal stability as compared to the raw kenaf. Finally, X-ray analyses showed that the chemo-mechanical treatments altered the crystallinity of the pulp and the nanofibers: the bleached pulp had a higher crystallinity than its unbleached counterpart, and the bleached nanofibers presented the highest crystallinity of all the investigated materials.

  5. Long term bleaching of optical glasses darkened by Co60 ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical camera designs include optical glass elements that may be affected by the ionizing radiation present in the natural space environment. Ordinary optical glasses darken at low (10(to the 3rd power) rad) dose levels when exposed to ionizing radiation. This darkening decreases the sensitivity of optical sensors. Optical glass flats of FK 51, LaK 0, PK 51A, and ZK Ny were exposed to a 10.6 krad dose of ionizing radiation. Spectrophotometer traces determined the transmittance of the samples as a function of wavelength in the range 350 to 850 nm before and at various time intervals after the irradiation. These measured values were then use to evaluate the rate of recovery or ''bleaching'' of the exposed samples. To prevent accelerated bleaching, the samples were kept at room temperature and away from light, except during measurement. Tables of the measured data and plots of the transmissivity vs. wavelength at various times after irradiation are presented

  6. Effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on ultrastructure and mineral content of dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Maleknejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ultrastructural changes of dentin induced after exposure to different intracoronal tooth bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: Dental discs of 1 mm thickness were prepared from coronal dentin of sixty-four human maxillary premolars. Experimental specimens were divided into four subgroups: 45% carbamide peroxide, 35% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + water. The specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscope to determine diameter of dentinal tubules and chemical analysis. Results: There was significant difference between dentinal tubule diameter of all test and control groups with the exception of sodium perborate + water. Chemical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between experimental subgroups regarding calcium and sulfur wt%. Conclusions: All bleaching agents increased dentinal tubule diameter and promote alterations in mineral content of dentin with the exception of Sodium perborate mixed with water.

  7. Occupational eczema and asthma in a hairdresser caused by hair-bleaching products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Majken G; Menné, Torkil; Søsted, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    understood. The specific inhalation challenge test is considered to be the gold standard for diagnosing occupational asthma and rhinitis. However, this test is not always accessible. Therefore, the diagnosis of occupational allergic asthma caused by persulfate salts is made by combining a clinical history......Occupational allergic contact eczema and asthma caused by bleaching agents is seen in hairdressers. Bleaching agents contain persulfate salts, which are known to induce immediate reactions such as rhinitis, asthma, contact urticaria, and anaphylaxis. The immunologic mechanism is not, however, fully......, a diagnosis of asthma, and a positive skin prick test (SPT). Standardized methods for performing SPT with persulfate salts are warranted. A case of a young hairdresser with occupational asthma and hand eczema caused by persulfate salts is presented, and the procedure for performing the SPT with ammonium...

  8. Anthropogenic mortality on coral reefs in Caribbean Panama predates coral disease and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Katie L; Jackson, Jeremy B C; Angioletti, Christopher V; Leonard-Pingel, Jill; Guilderson, Thomas P

    2012-06-01

    Caribbean reef corals have declined precipitously since the 1980s due to regional episodes of bleaching, disease and algal overgrowth, but the extent of earlier degradation due to localised historical disturbances such as land clearing and overfishing remains unresolved. We analysed coral and molluscan fossil assemblages from reefs near Bocas del Toro, Panama to construct a timeline of ecological change from the 19th century-present. We report large changes before 1960 in coastal lagoons coincident with extensive deforestation, and after 1960 on offshore reefs. Striking changes include the demise of previously dominant staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis and oyster Dendrostrea frons that lives attached to gorgonians and staghorn corals. Reductions in bivalve size and simplification of gastropod trophic structure further implicate increasing environmental stress on reefs. Our paleoecological data strongly support the hypothesis, from extensive qualitative data, that Caribbean reef degradation predates coral bleaching and disease outbreaks linked to anthropogenic climate change. PMID:22462739

  9. REPLACEMENT OF SOFTWOOD KRAFT PULP WITH ECF-BLEACHED BAMBOO KRAFT PULP IN FINE PAPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglei Zhao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-wood fibers such as bamboo and wheat straw have been playing important roles in the pulp and paper industry in China. In this study an ECF-bleached bamboo kraft pulp was compared with a bleached softwood kraft pulp (NBSK as the reinforcement pulp in fine paper production. Areas that were examined include the refining of pure fibers, influence of bamboo on dewatering, retention, and sizing. The influence of bamboo kraft pulp as a part of a furnish replacing NBSK was compared as well. Results show that fiber shortening was more prominent with bamboo when refined. This resulted in a higher amount of fines, and addition wet-end chemicals may be required to compensate. Handsheets with bamboo as a reinforcement fiber showed similar mechanical and optical properties to handsheets containing NBSK.

  10. An in vitro thermal analysis during different light-activated hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbach, W.; Zezell, D. M.; Bandéca, M. C.; Pereira, T. M.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-09-01

    This study measured the critical temperature reaching time and also the variation of temperature in the surface of the cervical region and within the pulp chamber of human teeth submitted to dental bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by three different light sources. The samples were randomly divided into 3 groups ( n = 15), according to the catalyst light source: Halogen Light (HL), High Intensity Diode Laser (DL), and Light Emmited Diode (LED). The results of temperature variation were submitted to the analysis of variance and Tukey test with p dental bleaching for a short period of time. The LED source did not heat the target tissues significantly within the parameters used in this study.

  11. Papermaking fibers from giant reed (Arundo donax L. by advanced ecologically friendly pulping and bleaching technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira, H.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical structure and chemical composition of the stem-wall material of giant reed is considered from the viewpoint of raw material characterization for industrial fiber production. The effect of stem morphology (nodes and internodes on pulping results and general pulp properties is discussed. The advantages of application of modern organic solvent based (organosolv pulping technologies to giant reed are shown in comparison with the conventional (kraft method. The conditions optimization for Ethanol-Alkali pulping (a selected organosolv pulping process is given, and the chemical kinetics of the principal macromolecular components during ethanol-alkali pulping is described. The bleachability of organosolv pulps by short totally chlorine free (TCF bleaching sequences using hydrogen peroxide and ozone as the active bleaching chemicals without pulp pre-delignification is examined and compared with kraft pulps. The enzymatic pre-treatment of reed organosolv pulps by commercial xylanase preparation is considered as a possibility toward the improvement of pulp bleachability.

  12. Guest-host interactions in the alkaline bleaching of triphenylmethane dyes catalysed by -cyclodextrin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Raj; A Sarathi; T Chandrakala; S Dhanalakshmi; R Sudha; K Rajasekaran

    2009-07-01

    The rates of alkaline bleaching of triphenylmethane dyes crystal violet (CV), malachite green (MG) and rosaniline (RA) have been measured spectrophotometrically in an aqueous medium at 30°C in the presence of -cyclodextrin (CD). At lower concentrations of CD, CV forms productive 1 : 1 (G : H) complex. At higher concentrations of CD, it forms unproductive 1 : 2 (G : H) complex. For the bleaching of MG, CD accelerates or decelerates the rate depending on pH of the medium by forming 1 : 1 (G : H) inclusion complex. Analysis of rate data shows that MG undergoes fading by mixed order process. CD decelerates the water reaction and accelerates hydroxide ion reaction. In the case of RA, both water reaction as well as hydroxide ion reaction are retarded by CD by the formation of inclusion complex.

  13. Calculation of shear angles in holographic gratings recorded in bleached silver-halide emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto; Pascual Villalobos, Inmaculada; Fuentes Rosillo, Rosa; Fimia Gil, Antonio

    1993-01-01

    Shearing phenomena in holographic gratings formed in bleached silver-halide emulsions due to chemical processing are evaluated. These effects are introduced because of the inability of emulsion-thickness changes to explain the anomalous detuning of the peak diffraction efficiency from the expected Bragg condition. Experimental results obtained with transmission and reflection gratings are presented and discussed considering shearing effects, and the values of the shear angles calculated from ...

  14. Validation of Reef-Scale Thermal Stress Satellite Products for Coral Bleaching Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott F. Heron

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite monitoring of thermal stress on coral reefs has become an essential component of reef management practice around the world. A recent development by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Watch (NOAA CRW program provides daily global monitoring at 5 km resolution—at or near the scale of most coral reefs. In this paper, we introduce two new monitoring products in the CRW Decision Support System for coral reef management: Regional Virtual Stations, a regional synthesis of thermal stress conditions, and Seven-day Sea Surface Temperature (SST Trend, describing recent changes in temperature at each location. We describe how these products provided information in support of management activities prior to, during and after the 2014 thermal stress event in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI. Using in situ survey data from this event, we undertake the first quantitative comparison between 5 km satellite monitoring products and coral bleaching observations. Analysis of coral community characteristics, historical temperature conditions and thermal stress revealed a strong influence of coral biodiversity in the patterns of observed bleaching. This resulted in a model based on thermal stress and generic richness that explained 97% of the variance in observed bleaching. These findings illustrate the importance of using local benthic characteristics to interpret the level of impact from thermal stress exposure. In an era of continuing climate change, accurate monitoring of thermal stress and prediction of coral bleaching are essential for stakeholders to direct resources to the most effective management actions to conserve coral reefs.

  15. The role of transcriptome resilience in resistance of corals to bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneca, Francois O; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2015-04-01

    Wild populations increasingly experience extreme conditions as climate change amplifies environmental variability. How individuals respond to environmental extremes determines the impact of climate change overall. The variability of response from individual to individual can represent the opportunity for natural selection to occur as a result of extreme conditions. Here, we experimentally replicated the natural exposure to extreme temperatures of the reef lagoon at Ofu Island (American Samoa), where corals can experience severe heat stress during midday low tide. We investigated the bleaching and transcriptome response of 20 Acropora hyacinthus colonies 5 and 20 h after exposure to control (29 °C) or heated (35 °C) conditions. We found a highly dynamic transcriptome response: 27% of the coral transcriptome was significantly regulated 1 h postheat exposure. Yet 15 h later, when heat-induced coral bleaching became apparent, only 12% of the transcriptome was differentially regulated. A large proportion of responsive genes at the first time point returned to control levels, others remained differentially expressed over time, while an entirely different subset of genes was successively regulated at the second time point. However, a noteworthy variability in gene expression was observed among individual coral colonies. Among the genes of which expression lingered over time, fast return to normal levels was associated with low bleaching. Colonies that maintained higher expression levels of these genes bleached severely. Return to normal levels of gene expression after stress has been termed transcriptome resilience, and in the case of some specific genes may signal the physiological health and response ability of individuals to environmental stress. PMID:25728233

  16. Integrating a xylanase treatment into an industrial-type sequence for eucalyptus kraft pulp bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Fillat Latorre, Úrsula; Roncero Vivero, María Blanca; Sacón, Vera Maria; Bassa, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    The influence of a treatment with two commercial xylanases on pulp and effluents obtained after the bleaching stages in the OXAZDP (O, oxygen stage; X, xylanase treatment; A, acid stage; Z, ozone stage; D, chlorine dioxide stage; P, hydrogen peroxide stage) sequence was studied. Also, the potential saving in chlorine dioxide was assessed. The enzyme treatment was performed on pulp containing some black liquor since the operating conditions were close to the conditions used in the storage towe...

  17. SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND HYPOCHLOROUS ACID IN BLEACHING SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Wang; Kefu Chen; Jun Li Mail; Jun Xu; Shanshan Liu Mail

    2011-01-01

    This study has demonstrated a rapid spectroscopic method for the determination of chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid concentrations in the pulp bleaching processes. It was found that chlorine dioxide and hypochlorous acid have an isosbestic wavelength of 295 nm. The soluble lignin in such a system is the main interference, but can be corrected by determining the absorbances at 295 nm, 380 nm, and 480 nm. Thus, based on the spectroscopic measurements at 295 nm (the isosbestic point wavelen...

  18. Progressive structural changes of Avicel, bleached softwood, and bacterial cellulose during enzymatic hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kabindra Kafle; Heenae Shin; Lee, Christopher M; Sunkyu Park; Kim, Seong H.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive picture of structural changes of cellulosic biomass during enzymatic hydrolysis is essential for a better understanding of enzymatic actions and development of more efficient enzymes. In this study, a suite of analytical techniques including sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed for lignin-free model biomass samples—Avicel, bleached softwood, and bacterial cellu...

  19. HISTOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF THE SEA ANEMONE A. PALLIDA TO BLEACHING INDUCING STRESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Fransolet, David

    2014-01-01

    Tropical Coral reefs are among the richest and most important ecosystem on Earth. This success would not be possible without the symbiosis established between corals and unicellular algae of the genus Symbiodinium that provide them with photosynthesis-derived carbon. Unfortunately, with the climatic upheaval that we witness today, the long-term survival of coral reefs could be in jeopardy. Massive loss of symbiotic algae, a phenomenon known as coral bleaching, becomes indeed more and more fre...

  20. The application of catalase for the elimination of hydrogen peroxide residues after bleaching of cotton fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMORIM ALEXANDRA M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of dyeing of cotton fabrics with a bifunctional reactive dye were significantly improved when the fabric after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide was treated with catalase for the elimination of hydrogen peroxide residues from the fabrics. Compared to processes with a varying number of washing steps, with and without commercial reducing agents, the consumption of water could be significantly reduced, without altering the final color shade.

  1. Changes in Biodiversity and Functioning of Reef Fish Assemblages following Coral Bleaching and Coral Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Nicholas A. J.; Vanessa Messmer; Pratchett, Morgan S; Andrew S. Hoey; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2011-01-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are increasingly subject to severe, large-scale disturbances caused by climate change (e.g., coral bleaching) and other more direct anthropogenic impacts. Many of these disturbances cause coral loss and corresponding changes in habitat structure, which has further important effects on abundance and diversity of coral reef fishes. Declines in the abundance and diversity of coral reef fishes are of considerable concern, given the potential loss of ecosystem function. This ...

  2. Effect of low-level laser therapy on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Horieh; Arjmand, Nooshin; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Zakeri, Majid; Maleknejad, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching. Sixty-six patients enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. Following the in-office procedure with 40 % hydrogen peroxide, the participants were randomly divided into three groups. The patients in group 1 received irradiation from a low-level red laser (LLRL; 660 nm, 200 mW, 15 s, 12 J/cm(2)), whereas participants in group 2 were subjected to a low-level infrared laser (LLIL; 810 nm) under similar conditions as in group 1. In group 3 (placebo), the laser treatment was the same as that in groups 1 and 2, but without energy output. The degree of tooth sensitivity was recorded at 1, 24, and 48 h after bleaching using a visual analog scale (VAS). The change in tooth shade was measured 30 days after tooth whitening. The intensity of tooth sensitivity was not significantly different between groups at 1 h after bleaching (p > 0.05). At 24 h after therapy, pain level was significantly lower in the LLIL group compared to the LLRL and placebo groups (p  0.05) and both were significantly lower than that of the placebo group (p  0.05). LLLT with an infrared diode laser could be recommended as a suitable strategy to reduce the intensity of tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching. PMID:26964798

  3. Influence of Different Types and Concentrations of Chemical Catalysts on Dental Bleaching Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Guimarães, Carolina Anne; Ribeiro, Zulene Eveline Abreu; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different types and concentrations of chemical catalysts on the efficiency of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on dental bleaching. Enamel-dentin disks were obtained from bovine incisors and the initial color was assessed. The groups were divided according to the type and concentration of catalyst added to an experimental gel: ferrous sulphate (FS) (0.001, 0.002 and 0.003%); ferrous gluconate (Fg) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); ferric chloride (FC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); manganese gluconate (MG) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); and manganese chloride (MC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%). The positive control (PC) group received the bleaching gel without any catalyst, while in the negative control (NC) the specimens remained in artificial saliva. Three applications of the bleaching gels were performed for 10 minutes each, repeated after 7 days. Color assessments were performed 7 days after the first session and 7 days after the second. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva and assessed again after 1 year. The data were analyzed by parametric analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Some of the chemical catalysts tested were effective in reducing the yellowish color of the samples in relation to the positive control group after 1 and 2 applications and diminished the color relapse over time. After 1 year, the FS was the most effective catalyst tested. We concluded that some chemical catalysts increased the efficiency of dental bleaching.

  4. Influence of Different Types and Concentrations of Chemical Catalysts on Dental Bleaching Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Guimarães, Carolina Anne; Ribeiro, Zulene Eveline Abreu; Borges, Alessandra Bühler

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different types and concentrations of chemical catalysts on the efficiency of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel on dental bleaching. Enamel-dentin disks were obtained from bovine incisors and the initial color was assessed. The groups were divided according to the type and concentration of catalyst added to an experimental gel: ferrous sulphate (FS) (0.001, 0.002 and 0.003%); ferrous gluconate (Fg) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); ferric chloride (FC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); manganese gluconate (MG) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%); and manganese chloride (MC) (0.01, 0.02 and 0.03%). The positive control (PC) group received the bleaching gel without any catalyst, while in the negative control (NC) the specimens remained in artificial saliva. Three applications of the bleaching gels were performed for 10 minutes each, repeated after 7 days. Color assessments were performed 7 days after the first session and 7 days after the second. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva and assessed again after 1 year. The data were analyzed by parametric analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Some of the chemical catalysts tested were effective in reducing the yellowish color of the samples in relation to the positive control group after 1 and 2 applications and diminished the color relapse over time. After 1 year, the FS was the most effective catalyst tested. We concluded that some chemical catalysts increased the efficiency of dental bleaching. PMID:26718298

  5. The effect of two in-office and home bleaching gels on microhardness of composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizadeh Oskoee P.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Bleaching products as chemical materials can exert side effects on soft and hard tissues and existing restorative materials with oxidizing mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 15% and 35% carbamide peroxide gels as home and in-office bleaching agents respectively, on microhardness and surface topography of composite resin.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, a total of 75 disc shaped specimens were prepared from Z100  composite resin (3M and randomly divided into three groups with following treatment designs: group 1, 370C distilled water, group 2, 15% carbamide peroxide, 6 hours/day for 3 weeks, group 3, 35% carbamide peroxide 30 minutes/week for 3 weeks. The microhardness (Vickers hardness of samples was measured using Shimadzu set on three different points of each sample. 8 samples of each group were selected randomly to be assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM for probable changes in surface topography. Data were analyzed using one way ANOVA and Duncan tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. Results: 15% carbamide peroxide group had the maximum amount of microhardness (84.59±1.87 and 35% carbamide peroxide group had the minimum (76. 14±1.77. Only the difference between home bleaching and control group was not statistically significant (P=0.24. The SEM assessing revealed no changes in surface topography.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, in-office bleaching may decrease the microhardness of composite resin.

  6. Anaerobic treatment of cellulose bleach plant wastewater: chlorinated organics and genotoxicity removal

    OpenAIRE

    T. R. Chaparro; E. C. Pires

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the removal efficiency of organic matter and how it relates to the decrease of toxic and mutagenic effects when an anaerobic reactor is used to treat the bleaching effluent from two kraft pulp mills. Parameters such as COD (chemical oxygen demand), DOC (dissolved organic carbon), AOX (adsorbable organic halogen), ASL (acid soluble lignin), color, chlorides, total phenols and absorbance values in the UV-VIS spectral region were measured. The acute and chronic toxicity and g...

  7. Penentuan Kadar Phosfor dari Crude Palm Oil (CPO) dan Refened Of Bleached Deodorized Palm Olein (RBDPO)

    OpenAIRE

    Ulfah, Afhami

    2015-01-01

    Analysis has been performed Determination of Phosphorus Levels on Crude Plam Oil (CPO) and Refened Bleaching Deodorized Plam Olein (RBDPO) in PT.SMART.Tbk Medan-Belawan. Determination of phosphorus content in CPO and RBDPO is performed using UV-Visible Spectofotometry. Result obtained phosphorus levels on CPO is 11, 1243 ppm and phosphorus levels on RBDPO is 2, 5837 ppm. This result indicates that the phosphorus in the CPO and RBDPO standards are a maximum of 30 ppm for CPO ...

  8. Molecular analysis of tooth enamel by Raman spectroscopy after treatment with bleaching agents at different concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in the concentration of the v1 phosphate molecule of the surface of dentin enamel are treated and researched with bleaching agents of chemical activation to basis of hydrogen peroxide than 9,5% and 14% and carbamide peroxide than 38%, for a period of 28 days. Raman spectroscopy was used and 30 dental pieces extracted, of which, were to be free of blemishes and pigmentations, without possessing fractures of the enamel, decay nor any other type of defect. The Raman spectrum was obtained of each dental piece prior to the application of bleaching agents. The specimens were separated into three experimental groups according to the concentration of whitening. The concentration of the v1 phosphate molecule was measured in the tooth enamel to the second and fourth week of treatment. In addition, ANOVA was performed for respective measurements (p≤0.05). A reduction of the v1 phosphate molecule were observed during and after the bleaching process in the experimental groups that have used of hydrogen peroxide to 14% and carbamide peroxide 38%. In the group of hydrogen peroxide to 9,5% has remained unproven a significant reduction. Within the limitations of this study is concluded that the bleaching agent causes a loss of v1 phosphate. This loss has been greater in the whitening of higher concentration. In spite, that the possible effect remineralizing of the saliva on a teeth whitening process has been unevaluated, it is recommended using during and after the treatment, toothpastes, mouthwashes, chewing gums, dental floss, among others, that contain ACP to help to cushion the potential loss of phosphate from tooth enamel. (author)

  9. Regulation of apoptotic pathways by Stylophora pistillata (Anthozoa, Pocilloporidae to survive thermal stress and bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagit Kvitt

    Full Text Available Elevated seawater temperatures are associated with coral bleaching events and related mortality. Nevertheless, some coral species are able to survive bleaching and recover. The apoptotic responses associated to this ability were studied over 3 years in the coral Stylophora pistillata from the Gulf of Eilat subjected to long term thermal stress. These include caspase activity and the expression profiles of the S. pistillata caspase and Bcl-2 genes (StyCasp and StyBcl-2-like cloned in this study. In corals exposed to thermal stress (32 or 34°C, caspase activity and the expression levels of the StyBcl-2-like gene increased over time (6-48 h and declined to basal levels within 72 h of thermal stress. Distinct transcript levels were obtained for the StyCasp gene, with stimulated expression from 6 to 48 h of 34°C thermal stress, coinciding with the onset of bleaching. Increased cell death was detected in situ only between 6 to 48 h of stress and was limited to the gastroderm. The bleached corals survived up to one month at 32°C, and recovered back symbionts when placed at 24°C. These results point to a two-stage response in corals that withstand thermal stress: (i the onset of apoptosis, accompanied by rapid activation of anti-oxidant/anti-apoptotic mediators that block the progression of apoptosis to other cells and (ii acclimatization of the coral to the chronic thermal stress alongside the completion of symbiosis breakdown. Accordingly, the coral's ability to rapidly curb apoptosis appears to be the most important trait affecting the coral's thermotolerance and survival.

  10. Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) as an Indicator of Bleaching Tolerance in Scleractinian Corals

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Graham B.; Stacey King

    2015-01-01

    Thermal tolerance tests on Acropora millepora, a common Indo-Pacific hard coral, have shown that adult corals can acquire increased thermal tolerance by shuffling existing type C to type D Symbiodinium zooxanthellae when subjected to increased seawater temperatures. We report here dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) concentrations in A. millepora and examine links between DMSP concentrations, zooxanthellae clade, and bleaching tolerance. DMSP analysis on native and transplanted corals from th...

  11. Ocean acidification causes bleaching and productivity loss in coral reef builders

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony, K. R. N.; Kline, D. I.; Diaz-Pulido, G.; Dove, S.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-01-01

    Ocean acidification represents a key threat to coral reefs by reducing the calcification rate of framework builders. In addition, acidification is likely to affect the relationship between corals and their symbiotic dinoflagellates and the productivity of this association. However, little is known about how acidification impacts on the physiology of reef builders and how acidification interacts with warming. Here, we report on an 8-week study that compared bleaching, productivity, and calcifi...

  12. Modelling coral calcification accounting for the impacts of coral bleaching and ocean acidification

    OpenAIRE

    C. Evenhuis; A. Lenton; Cantin, N. E.; Lough, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are diverse ecosystems that are threatened by rising CO2 levels through increases in sea surface temperature and ocean acidification. Here we present a new unified model that links changes in temperature and carbonate chemistry to coral health. Changes in coral health and population are explicitly modelled by linking rates of growth, recovery and calcification to rates of bleaching and temperature-stress-induced mortality. The model is underpinned by four key pri...

  13. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Cavalli; Priscila Cristiane Suzy Liporoni; Marcos Augusto do Rego; Sandrine Bittencourt Berger; Marcelo Giannini

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age th...

  14. Effect on Micro-Leakage of Composite Resoration with Two Different Adhesives after Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Nazish Fatima; Sidr Mohiuddin; Wasif Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of two different adhesive systems after bleaching with 38% Hydrogen peroxide onmicroleakage of Class V composite resin restorations. MATERIALS & METHODS: The materials used in this study included Nano composite (Filtek Z350), Scotchbond™ Dual Cure Dental Adhesive (3M™ ESPE™), Prime and bond elect (Dentsply) and Power whitening gel (White Smile 2011, Germany). Sixty sound human premolars were stored in thymol solution (Buffered 0.1% pH 7.00) for about one ...

  15. Sonochemical and hydrodynamic cavitation reactors for laccase/hydrogen peroxide cotton bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Idalina; Martins, Madalena; Loureiro, Ana; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Silva, Carla

    2014-03-01

    The main goal of this work is to develop a novel and environmental-friendly technology for cotton bleaching with reduced processing costs. This work exploits a combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide process assisted by ultrasound. For this purpose, specific reactors were studied, namely ultrasonic power generator type K8 (850 kHz) and ultrasonic bath equipment Ultrasonic cleaner USC600TH (45 kHz). The optimal operating conditions for bleaching were chosen considering the highest levels of hydroxyl radical production and the lowest energy input. The capacity to produce hydroxyl radicals by hydrodynamic cavitation was also assessed in two homogenizers, EmulsiFlex®-C3 and APV-2000. Laccase nanoemulsions were produced by high pressure homogenization using BSA (bovine serum albumin) as emulsifier. The bleaching efficiency of these formulations was tested and the results showed higher whiteness values when compared to free laccase. The combination of laccase-hydrogen peroxide process with ultrasound energy produced higher whiteness levels than those obtained by conventional methods. The amount of hydrogen peroxide was reduced 50% as well as the energy consumption in terms of temperature (reduction of 40 °C) and operating time (reduction of 90 min). PMID:24035719

  16. Whiteness improvement of citric acid crosslinked cotton fabrics: H2O2 bleaching under alkaline condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Peixin; Ji, Bolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-08-20

    Polycarboxylic acids have been employed as formaldehyde-free crosslinking agents in anti-wrinkle treatment for cotton fabrics. Cotton fabrics treated by citric acid (CA) catalyzed with effective catalysts have shown satisfactory anti-wrinkle properties. Meanwhile, CA is a natural-based and environmental friendly compound. However, the yellowing of CA treated fabrics is a stumbling block for its practical application. Due to the fact that CA firstly forms aconitic acid (AA) before forming anhydrides, the cause of the yellowing, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching was adopted to treat the CA treated fabrics in order to break the CC bond structure and reduce the yellow color but retaining the desired anti-wrinkle properties. Thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the reactions. The results revealed that the H2O2 bleaching can effectively improve the whiteness and also maintain a good anti-wrinkle performance of the CA treated fabrics under an appropriate bleaching temperature and time. PMID:27178918

  17. Transcriptomic responses to heat stress and bleaching in the elkhorn coral Acropora palmata

    KAUST Repository

    DeSalvo, MK

    2010-03-08

    The emergence of genomic tools for reef-building corals and symbiotic anemones comes at a time when alarming losses in coral cover are being observed worldwide. These tools hold great promise in elucidating novel and unforeseen cellular processes underlying the successful mutualism between corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts Symbiodinium spp. Since thermal stress triggers a breakdown in the symbiosis (coral bleaching), measuring the transcriptomic response to thermal stress-induced bleaching offers an extraordinary view of cellular processes that are specific to coral–algal symbioses. In the present study, we utilized a cDNA microarray containing 2059 genes of the threatened Caribbean elkhorn coral Acropora palmata to identify genes that are differentially expressed upon thermal stress. Fragments from replicate colonies were exposed to elevated temperature for 2 d, and samples were frozen for microarray analysis after 24 and 48 h. Totals of 204 and 104 genes were differentially expressed in samples that were collected 1 and 2 d after thermal stress, respectively. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicates a cellular stress response in A. palmata involving (1) growth arrest, (2) chaperone activity, (3) nucleic acid stabilization and repair, and (4) removal of damaged macromolecules. Other differentially expressed processes include sensory perception, metabolite transfer between host and endosymbiont, nitric oxide signaling, and modifications to the actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. The results are compared with those from a previous coral microarray study of thermal stress in Montastraea faveolata, and point to an overall evolutionary conserved bleaching response in scleractinian corals.

  18. 'In vitro' study of the efficacy of diode laser and LED irradiation during dental bleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of LED and laser diode irradiation during the dental bleaching procedure, using two bleaching agents (Opalescence X-tra and HP Whiteness). The diode laser and the LED were operated in the continuous mode, with wavelength of 808 nm and 470 nm, respectively. The results of the irradiations were characterized with the CIELAB system calculating the L*a*b* values for the darkened and the bleached teeth (60 bovine incisors). This is to our knowledge the first time that light sources laser and LED are compared with respect to their whitening capability when applied to different agents. Significant differences in the chroma value are obtained for the two whitening agents and for the different light sources, too. Also, in terms of luminance, the combination of laser/ Whiteness HP showed significantly better results than when the same agent was used alone or in combination with LED. Best overall results are obtained with the combination of Whiteness HP and laser. (author)

  19. Analysis of the effect of wash water reduction on bleached pulp characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigieri, Tânia Cristina; Ventorim, Gustavo; Savi, Antônio Francisco; Favaro, Jaqueline Silveira Comelato

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyse cost reduction by reducing the use of fresh water in the cellulose bleaching process and to make it easier to obtain water in a closed circuit. Eucalyptus oxygen delignified industrial pulp was used. The pulp was bleached 10 times in the D(E+P)DP sequence in the same conditions. Counter current washing was used in the bleaching stages, and each sequence was carried out with different wash factors: 9, 6, 3, and 0 m³ of distilled water/ton of oven dry pulp. The goal was to reach brightness of 92±0.5% ISO. The results showed that there was a chemical oxygen demand (COD) increase and brightness reversion, but the kappa number and viscosity did not change. The apparent colour was increased by increasing COD in the effluent during the cycles and by decreasing the wash water. Up to 3 m³/t of water was tolerable and even recommended to wash pulp. Nine cubic metre per tonne of fresh water is most commonly used in the industry, so water savings make the implementation of the process possible.

  20. Forecasting decadal changes in sea surface temperatures and coral bleaching within a Caribbean coral reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angang; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2014-09-01

    Elevated sea surface temperature (SST) caused by global warming is one of the major threats to coral reefs. While increased SST has been shown to negatively affect the health of coral reefs by increasing rates of coral bleaching, how changes to atmospheric heating impact SST distributions, modified by local flow environments, has been less understood. This study aimed to simulate future water flow patterns and water surface heating in response to increased air temperature within a coral reef system in Bocas del Toro, Panama, located within the Caribbean Sea. Water flow and SST were modeled using the Delft3D-FLOWcomputer simulation package. Locally measured physical parameters, including bathymetry, astronomic tidal forcing, and coral habitat distribution were input into the model and water flow, and SST was simulated over a four-month period under present day, as well as projected warming scenarios in 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Changes in SST, and hence the thermal stress to corals, were quantified by degree heating weeks. Results showed that present-day reported bleaching sites were consistent with localized regions of continuous high SST. Regions with highest SST were located within shallow coastal sites adjacent to the mainland or within the interior of the bay, and characterized by low currents with high water retention times. Under projected increases in SSTs, shallow reef areas in low flow regions were found to be hot spots for future bleaching.

  1. Susceptibility of Enamel Treated with Bleaching Agents to Mineral Loss after Cariogenic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Tezel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Controversial reports exist whether bleaching agents cause a susceptibility to demineralization. The aim of this study was to compare the calcium loss of enamel treated with different bleaching agents and activation methods. Method and Materials. The specimens obtained from human premolars were treated in accordance with manufacturer protocols; 10% carbamide peroxide, 38% hydrogen peroxide light-activated, 38% hydrogen peroxide laser-activated, and no treatment (control. After cariogenic challenge calcium concentrations were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Results. No differences were found between the calcium loss of the laser-activated group and 10% carbamide peroxide group (>0.05. However, the differences between laser-activated and control groups were statistically significant (0.05. On the other hand, the light-activated group showed a significantly higher calcium loss compared with the other groups (<0.05. Conclusions. The results show that bleaching agents may cause calcium loss but it seems to be a negligible quantity for clinical aspects.

  2. The walking bleach procedure: an in vitro study to measure microleakage of five temporary sealing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, N; Cox, C F; Arai, T; Nakamura, J

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the in vitro sealing capacity of five materials, each used as a temporary sealing agent for the walking bleach technique. All teeth received traditional biomechanical root canal instrumentation, after which the walking bleach agent was placed in the pulp chamber space. The occlusal access was sealed with one of five temporary materials: two hydraulic filling materials, a photoactivated resin composite, a zinc oxide-eugenol cement, and a zinc oxide phosphate cement with/without the placement of a piece of rubber sheet that was placed as a barrier to isolate filling material from the bleaching agent. All teeth were stored in a 1% solution of Alcian blue with thermal cycling stress. After 1 wk, they were sectioned longitudinally, and ranked by graded scores of 0 to 3, according to the degree of the dye penetration. Significantly less dye microleakage was observed in the two hydraulic materials than in the photoactivated resin. Both zinc oxide-eugenol and zinc phosphate cements showed a considerable amount of microleakage. There were no significant differences between the groups with and without a rubber sheet. Our data demonstrate that hydraulic filling materials provide the most favorable cavosurface seal when they are firmly packed into the cavity space to prevent microleakage.

  3. Transient turbid water mass reduces temperature-induced coral bleaching and mortality in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenford, Hazel A; Vallès, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is seen as one of the greatest threats to the world's coral reefs and, with the continued rise in sea surface temperature predicted into the future, there is a great need for further understanding of how to prevent and address the damaging impacts. This is particularly so for countries whose economies depend heavily on healthy reefs, such as those of the eastern Caribbean. Here, we compare the severity of bleaching and mortality for five dominant coral species at six representative reef sites in Barbados during the two most significant warm-water events ever recorded in the eastern Caribbean, i.e., 2005 and 2010, and describe prevailing island-scale sea water conditions during both events. In so doing, we demonstrate that coral bleaching and subsequent mortality were considerably lower in 2010 than in 2005 for all species, irrespective of site, even though the anomalously warm water temperature profiles were very similar between years. We also show that during the 2010 event, Barbados was engulfed by a transient dark green turbid water mass of riverine origin coming from South America. We suggest that reduced exposure to high solar radiation associated with this transient water mass was the primary contributing factor to the lower bleaching and mortality observed in all corals. We conclude that monitoring these episodic mesoscale oceanographic features might improve risk assessments of southeastern Caribbean reefs to warm-water events in the future. PMID:27326377

  4. [Bleaching of Baikalian Sponge Affects The Taxonomic Composition of Symbiotic Microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzhnaya, O V; Itskovich, V B

    2015-11-01

    The diversity of 16S rRNA genes in the microbial community of endemic sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis with bleached patches of tissue was studied. Eight bacterial phyla were identified in the sponge microbiome: Cyanobacteria (27.3%; n = 36; 2 OTU, operational taxonomic unit), Proteobacteria (22.7%; n = 30; 5 OTU), Actinobacteria (16.7%; n = 22; 7 OTU, operation taxonomic unit), Verrucomicrobia (15.2%; n = 20; 4 OTU), Plactomycetes (9%; n = 12; 3 OTU), Bacteroidetes (4.5%; n = 6; 3 OTU), WS5 (3%; n = 4; 1 OTU), and TM7 (1.5%; n = 2; 1 OTU). The basic phyla typical of freshwater sponge microbiomes are present in the community. However, in contrast to previously studied L. baicalensis bacterial associations, a dominance of Cyanobacteria and a low number of representatives of the Bacteroidetes and Betaproteobacteria were observed in the bleached sponge community. Phylotypes exhibiting a high percentage of similarity with the microorganisms inhabiting substrates rich in organic matter were also found. Clearly, the bleaching processes of Baikal sponges affect the composition and the ratio of the major taxonomic groups of sponge-associated bacteria.

  5. Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP as an Indicator of Bleaching Tolerance in Scleractinian Corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham B. Jones

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal tolerance tests on Acropora millepora, a common Indo-Pacific hard coral, have shown that adult corals can acquire increased thermal tolerance by shuffling existing type C to type D Symbiodinium zooxanthellae when subjected to increased seawater temperatures. We report here dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP concentrations in A. millepora and examine links between DMSP concentrations, zooxanthellae clade, and bleaching tolerance. DMSP analysis on native and transplanted corals from three locations in the Great Barrier Reef indicated that the lower thermal tolerance in type C zooxanthellae coincided with variable DMSP concentrations, whilst the more thermal tolerant type D zooxanthellae had more stable areal DMSP concentrations as seawater temperatures increased. Our results suggest this increased thermal tolerance in type D zooxanthellae may reflect the ability of these coral symbionts to conserve their antioxidant DMSP levels to relatively constant concentrations, enabling the coral to overcome the build-up of oxygen free radicals in the cytoplasm of A. millepora. A conceptual diagram illustrates how the antioxidants DMS (P participate in the bleaching process by scavenging oxygen free radicals and form DMSO, thus moderating coral bleaching and increasing thermotolerance.

  6. A citizen science approach to monitoring bleaching in the zoantharian Palythoa tuberculosa

    KAUST Repository

    Parkinson, John Everett

    2016-03-28

    Coral reef bleaching events are expected to become more frequent and severe in the near future as climate changes. The zoantharian Palythoa tuberculosa bleaches earlier than many scleractinian corals and may serve as an indicator species. Basic monitoring of such species could help to detect and even anticipate bleaching events, especially in areas where more sophisticated approaches that rely on buoy or satellite measurements of sea surface temperature are unavailable or too coarse. One simple and inexpensive monitoring method involves training volunteers to record observations of host color as a proxy for symbiosis quality. Here, we trained university students to take the ‘color fingerprint’ of a reef by assessing the color of multiple randomly selected colonies of P. tuberculosa at one time point in Okinawa Island, Japan. We tested the reliability of the students’ color scores and whether they matched expectations based on previous monthly monitoring of tagged colonies at the same locations. We also measured three traditional metrics of symbiosis quality for comparison: symbiont morphological condition, cell density, and chlorophyll a content. We found that P. tuberculosa color score, although highly correlated among observers, provided little predictive power for the other variables. This was likely due to inherent variation in colony color among generally healthy zoantharians in midwinter, as well as low sample size and brief training owing to the course structure. Despite certain limitations of P. tuberculosa as a focal organism, the citizen science approach to color monitoring has promise, and we outline steps that could improve similar efforts in the future.

  7. A citizen science approach to monitoring bleaching in the zoantharian Palythoa tuberculosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, John Everett; Yang, Sung-Yin; Kawamura, Iori; Byron, Gordon; Todd, Peter Alan; Reimer, James Davis

    2016-01-01

    Coral reef bleaching events are expected to become more frequent and severe in the near future as climate changes. The zoantharian Palythoa tuberculosa bleaches earlier than many scleractinian corals and may serve as an indicator species. Basic monitoring of such species could help to detect and even anticipate bleaching events, especially in areas where more sophisticated approaches that rely on buoy or satellite measurements of sea surface temperature are unavailable or too coarse. One simple and inexpensive monitoring method involves training volunteers to record observations of host color as a proxy for symbiosis quality. Here, we trained university students to take the 'color fingerprint' of a reef by assessing the color of multiple randomly selected colonies of P. tuberculosa at one time point in Okinawa Island, Japan. We tested the reliability of the students' color scores and whether they matched expectations based on previous monthly monitoring of tagged colonies at the same locations. We also measured three traditional metrics of symbiosis quality for comparison: symbiont morphological condition, cell density, and chlorophyll a content. We found that P. tuberculosa color score, although highly correlated among observers, provided little predictive power for the other variables. This was likely due to inherent variation in colony color among generally healthy zoantharians in midwinter, as well as low sample size and brief training owing to the course structure. Despite certain limitations of P. tuberculosa as a focal organism, the citizen science approach to color monitoring has promise, and we outline steps that could improve similar efforts in the future. PMID:27069784

  8. A Study on Damage to PLA Knitted Fabrics During Scouring and Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig Gulzar A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ingeo® PLA (polylactic acid knitted fabric was scoured through an exhaust technique. The scouring was carried out with sodium carbonate in the presence of a detergent at various concentrations and temperatures. The scoured fabric was bleached with various oxidative bleaching agents. Bleaching was carried out with hydrogen peroxide, sodium chlorite and sodium hypochlorite. Hydrogen peroxide was applied by exhaust and cold pad batch (CPB techniques. It was observed that during scouring PLA fabric was degraded at high alkali concentrations and processing temperatures. The scouring temperature above 60ºC proved to be deleterious due to the scouring solution penetrating into the polymer structure and damaged the fiber. Sodium chlorite and sodium hypochlorite caused little damage to the mechanical properties of PLA. Hydrogen peroxide when applied by the CPB technique did not reduce strength appreciably but when applied by the exhaust technique decreased the strength significantly. SEM analysis revealed that hydrogen peroxide caused holes and slit formation in the fiber structure.

  9. "Super-quenching" state protects Symbiodinium from thermal stress - Implications for coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavov, Chavdar; Schrameyer, Verena; Reus, Michael; Ralph, Peter J; Hill, Ross; Büchel, Claudia; Larkum, Anthony W D; Holzwarth, Alfred R

    2016-06-01

    The global rise in sea surface temperatures causes regular exposure of corals to high temperature and high light stress, leading to worldwide disastrous coral bleaching events (loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) from reef-building corals). Our picosecond chlorophyll fluorescence experiments on cultured Symbiodinium clade C cells exposed to coral bleaching conditions uncovered the transformations of the alga's photosynthetic apparatus (PSA) that activate an extremely efficient non-photochemical "super-quenching" mechanism. The mechanism is associated with a transition from an initially heterogeneous photosystem II (PSII) pool to a homogeneous "spillover" pool, where nearly all excitation energy is transferred to photosystem I (PSI). There, the inherently higher stability of PSI and high quenching efficiency of P(700)(+) allow dumping of PSII excess excitation energy into heat, resulting in almost complete cessation of photosynthetic electron transport (PET). This potentially reversible "super-quenching" mechanism protects the PSA against destruction at the cost of a loss of photosynthetic activity. We suggest that the inhibition of PET and the consequent inhibition of organic carbon production (e.g. sugars) in the symbiotic Symbiodinium provide a trigger for the symbiont expulsion, i.e. bleaching. PMID:26869375

  10. Microbial dinitrogen fixation in coral holobionts exposed to thermal stress and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardini, Ulisse; van Hoytema, Nanne; Bednarz, Vanessa N; Rix, Laura; Foster, Rachel A; Al-Rshaidat, Mamoon M D; Wild, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Coral holobionts (i.e., coral-algal-prokaryote symbioses) exhibit dissimilar thermal sensitivities that may determine which coral species will adapt to global warming. Nonetheless, studies simultaneously investigating the effects of warming on all holobiont members are lacking. Here we show that exposure to increased temperature affects key physiological traits of all members (herein: animal host, zooxanthellae and diazotrophs) of both Stylophora pistillata and Acropora hemprichii during and after thermal stress. S. pistillata experienced severe loss of zooxanthellae (i.e., bleaching) with no net photosynthesis at the end of the experiment. Conversely, A. hemprichii was more resilient to thermal stress. Exposure to increased temperature (+ 6°C) resulted in a drastic increase in daylight dinitrogen (N2 ) fixation, particularly in A. hemprichii (threefold compared with controls). After the temperature was reduced again to in situ levels, diazotrophs exhibited a reversed diel pattern of activity, with increased N2 fixation rates recorded only in the dark, particularly in bleached S. pistillata (twofold compared to controls). Concurrently, both animal hosts, but particularly bleached S. pistillata, reduced both organic matter release and heterotrophic feeding on picoplankton. Our findings indicate that physiological plasticity by coral-associated diazotrophs may play an important role in determining the response of coral holobionts to ocean warming. PMID:27234003

  11. ENZYMATIC BLEACHING OF COTTON FIBRES WITH LACCASE/MEDIATOR SYSTEMS COMBINED WITH OXYGEN AND OZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba İNKAYA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes should be used in every step of pretreatment of cotton textiles in order to minimize energy and water consumption while keeping the effluent control within the tolerable standards. It has been investigated whether enzymatic bleaching of cotton textiles could be replaced with hydrogen peroxide bleaching, which is a water and energy consuming step. In this study, fungal laccase, laccase moderator systems and also oxygen and ozone feed to these systems have been experimented. The initial whiteness of the desizied fabric before bleaching was 49 stensby degree. This value did not increase over 51 stensby degree by use of enzyme and also enzyme moderator systems. Oxygen and ozone feeding at a gas flow rate of 1000 ml/min and ozone concentration of 32 mg/min have been conducted in order to increase whiteness. Oxygen feed did not have a considerable effect and whiteness degrees raised up to only 51 stensby degree, however, ozone feed enhanced to raise the whiteness of the fabric upto 68 stensby degree by enzyme alone and 70 stensby degree by enzyme moderator systems.

  12. HE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-IRON ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumeng Zhao; Shuhui Yang; Liang Sheng; Yonghao Ni

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide bleaching has been extensively used in high-yield pulp bleaching. Unfortunately,hydrogen peroxide can be decomposed under alkaline condition, especially when transition metal ions exit. Experiments show that the valence of transition metal ion is also responsible for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.Iron ions are present in two oxidation states, Fe2+ and Fe3+. They are both catalytically active to hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Because Fe3+ is brown, it can affect the brightness of pulp directly, it can also combine with phenol, forming complexes which not only are stable structures and are difficult to be removed from pulp, but also significantly affect the brightness of pulp because of their color.Sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate, when used together, can greatly decrease hydrogen peroxide decomposition. The optimum dosage of sodium silicate is about 0.1% (on solution) for Fe2+ and 0.25% (on solution) for Fe3+. Adding chelants such as DTPA or EDTA with stabilizers simultaneously can obviously improve pulp brightness. For iron ions, the chelate effect of DTPA is better than that of EDTA.Under acidic conditions, sodium hyposulfite and cellulose can reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+ effectively, and pulp brightness is improved greatly. Adding sodium thiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate,sodium silicate, and DTPA to alkaline peroxide solution can result in higher brightness of pulp.pH is a key parameter during hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the optimum pH value should be 10.5-12.

  13. Exogenous bleaching evaluation on dentin using chemical activated technique compared with diode laser technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This in vitro study compared the results of different exogenous bleaching proceedings on dentin after treatment of enamel surface. Thirty human canine were hewn preserving the vestibular half of the crown and 3 mm of root, showing a vestibular-lingual thickness average of 3,5 mm, measuring in the third middle of the crown. Ali teeth were maintained in wet chamber during the experiment. Digital photographs were taken of the dentin surface at 3 experimental times (LI: initial record, L0: immediate pos-bleaching record and L 15: 15 days after bleaching). The teeth were divided into 3 experimental groups of 10 teeth in each. The Control Group did not receive any kind of treatment. The Laser Group received 2 session of laser bleaching, with 3 applications each, using 35% hydrogen peroxide, activated by diode laser during 30 seconds, by scanning the enamel surface from incisal edge to the top of the crown, from mesial to distal portion of the crown and circularly, each movement during 10 seconds. The following parameters being adopted: wavelength of 808 nm, power of 1,5 W and optic fiber with 600 μm (core). The Peroxide Group received 28 daily applications, during 4 hours each application, using 16% carbamide peroxide. The bleaching records were analysed using a computer, through RGBK (red, green , blue and black). The K averages (K=100% for black and K=0% for white) of the records for Control Group were: LI=50,1 %, L0=50,3% and L 15=50,6%. For Laser Group the K averages were LI=48,5%, L0=50,0% and L 15=47,7%. And for the Peroxide Group were LI=50,5%, L0=35,9% and L 15=37,3%. The statistical analysis showed no significant difference of the K between the Control Group and the Laser Group, as to LI, L0 and L 15. Only Peroxide Group showed significant statistical difference between LI with L0 and L 15 (0,1%), and L0 in comparison with L 15 did not show any difference. (author)

  14. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Residual Oil Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli Mat

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, semi-refined and refined vegetable oils are used as a feedstock in biodiesel production. However, due to competition with conventional fossil fuel, economic reasons, shortage supply of food and its social impact on the global scale has somewhat slowed the development of biodiesel industry. Studies have been conducted to recover oil from mill palm oil operation especially from the spent bleaching earth. Hence, the study was to investigate the potential recovery of oil from spent bleaching earth to be used as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The effect of different types of catalysts (sodium hydroxide alkali and sulfuric acid catalysts on biodiesel yield was studied. In addition, the effect of volume addition of methanol to the weight of spent bleaching earth on the product yield was also studied. Furthermore, the effect of ratio of hexane to methanol was also carried out to determine its product yield. The studies were carried out in an in-situ biodiesel reactor system and the biodiesel product was analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Result shows that the use of alkali catalyst produced the highest yield of biodiesel and the most optimum biodiesel yield was obtained when the methanol to spent bleaching earth ratio was 3.2:1 (gram of methanol: gram of SBE and hexane to methanol ratio of 0.6:1 (volume of hexane: volume of methanol. © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 19th December 2010, Revised: 10th May 2011; Accepted: 18th May 2011[How to Cite: R. Mat, O.S. Ling, A. Johari, M. Mohamed. (2011. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Residual Oil Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6(1: 53-57. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.678.53-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.678.53-57 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/678 ] | View in 

  15. Pengaruh % Charge Klorin Dioksida (Clo2) Terhadap Penurunan Bilangan Kappa Dari Proses Unbleach Blending Ke Proses Bleaching D0 Stage Di PT. Toba Pulp Lestari, Tbk Porsea

    OpenAIRE

    Sagala, Winarto

    2011-01-01

    Kappa number is one of quality parameters in pulp industry. Kappa number is used to measure the degree of pulp delignification in bleaching plant. By making the variations of % charge chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in stage one of bleaching plant, it will obtained by varying kappa numbers. Kappa number analysis is done by titrimetric using oxidation – reduction methods. From the analysis, the greater the % charge chlorine dioxide (ClO¬2) in bleaching plant, kappa number will be more small.

  16. The Effect of Fiber Bleaching Treatment on the Properties of Poly(lactic acid)/Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Marwah Rayung; Nor Azowa Ibrahim; Norhazlin Zainuddin; Wan Zuhainis Saad; Nur Inani Abdul Razak; Buong Woei Chieng

    2014-01-01

    In this work, biodegradable composites from poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber were prepared by melt blending method. Prior to mixing, the fiber was modified through bleaching treatment using hydrogen peroxide. Bleached fiber composite showed an improvement in mechanical properties as compared to untreated fiber composite due to the enhanced fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion. Interestingly, fiber bleaching treatment also improved the physical appearance of th...

  17. Comparative clinical and psychosocial benefits of tooth bleaching: different light activation of a 38% peroxide gel in a preliminary case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderini, Angelo; Sciara, Simona; Semeria, Chiara; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Polizzi, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    Tooth bleaching is a widespread dental treatment with important psychosocial antecedents and outcomes involved. In the activation of in-office bleaching agents, a selective light radiation, that is, a diode laser seems to be a positive choice to decrease the time of bleaching without surface modification and with no residual tooth sensitivity for maximum effect and minimal clinical and psychological side effects. PMID:27525071

  18. Whole transcriptome analysis reveals changes in expression of immune-related genes during and after bleaching in a reef-building coral

    OpenAIRE

    Pinzón, Jorge H.; Kamel, Bishoy; Burge, Colleen A.; Harvell, C. Drew; Medina, Mónica; Weil, Ernesto; Mydlarz, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is negatively affecting the stability of natural ecosystems, especially coral reefs. The dissociation of the symbiosis between reef-building corals and their algal symbiont, or coral bleaching, has been linked to increased sea surface temperatures. Coral bleaching has significant impacts on corals, including an increase in disease outbreaks that can permanently change the entire reef ecosystem. Yet, little is known about the impacts of coral bleaching on the coral immune system...

  19. Climate change and coral reef bleaching: An ecological assessment of long-term impacts, recovery trends and future outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Andrew C.; Glynn, Peter W.; Riegl, Bernhard

    2008-12-01

    Since the early 1980s, episodes of coral reef bleaching and mortality, due primarily to climate-induced ocean warming, have occurred almost annually in one or more of the world's tropical or subtropical seas. Bleaching is episodic, with the most severe events typically accompanying coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomena, such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which result in sustained regional elevations of ocean temperature. Using this extended dataset (25+ years), we review the short- and long-term ecological impacts of coral bleaching on reef ecosystems, and quantitatively synthesize recovery data worldwide. Bleaching episodes have resulted in catastrophic loss of coral cover in some locations, and have changed coral community structure in many others, with a potentially critical influence on the maintenance of biodiversity in the marine tropics. Bleaching has also set the stage for other declines in reef health, such as increases in coral diseases, the breakdown of reef framework by bioeroders, and the loss of critical habitat for associated reef fishes and other biota. Secondary ecological effects, such as the concentration of predators on remnant surviving coral populations, have also accelerated the pace of decline in some areas. Although bleaching severity and recovery have been variable across all spatial scales, some reefs have experienced relatively rapid recovery from severe bleaching impacts. There has been a significant overall recovery of coral cover in the Indian Ocean, where many reefs were devastated by a single large bleaching event in 1998. In contrast, coral cover on western Atlantic reefs has generally continued to decline in response to multiple smaller bleaching events and a diverse set of chronic secondary stressors. No clear trends are apparent in the eastern Pacific, the central-southern-western Pacific or the Arabian Gulf, where some reefs are recovering and others are not. The majority of survivors and new recruits on

  20. Specializing on vulnerable habitat: Acropora selectivity among damselfish recruits and the risk of bleaching-induced habitat loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, M. C.

    2012-03-01

    Coral reef habitats are increasingly being degraded and destroyed by a range of disturbances, most notably climate-induced coral bleaching. Habitat specialists, particularly those associated with susceptible coral species, are clearly among the most vulnerable to population decline or extinction. However, the degree of specialization on coral microhabitats is still unclear for one of the most ubiquitous, abundant and well studied of coral reef fish families—the damselfishes (Pomacentridae). Using high taxonomic resolution surveys of microhabitat use and availability, this study provides the first species-level description of patterns of Acropora selectivity among recruits of 10 damselfish species in order to determine their vulnerability to habitat degradation. In addition, surveys of the bleaching susceptibility of 16 branching coral species revealed which preferred recruitment microhabitats are at highest risk of decline as a result of chronic coral bleaching. Four species (i.e., Chrysiptera parasema, Pomacentrus moluccensis, Dascyllus melanurus and Chromis retrofasciata) were identified as highly vulnerable because they used only branching hard corals as recruitment habitat and primarily associated with only 2-4 coral species. The bleaching surveys revealed that five species of Acropora were highly susceptible to bleaching, with more than 50% of colonies either severely bleached or already dead. These highly susceptible corals included two of the preferred microhabitats of the specialist C. parasema and represented a significant proportion of its total recruitment microhabitat. In contrast, highly susceptible corals were rarely used by another specialist, P. moluccensis, suggesting that this species faces a lower risk of bleaching-induced habitat loss compared to C. parasema. As degradation to coral reef habitats continues, specialists will increasingly be forced to use alternative recruitment microhabitats, and this is likely to reduce population

  1. Coral disease following massive bleaching in 2005 causes 60% decline in coral cover on reefs in the US Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Muller, E.; Rogers, C.; Waara, R.; Atkinson, A.; Whelan, K.R.T.; Patterson, M.; Witcher, B.

    2009-01-01

    In the northeast Caribbean, doldrum-like conditions combined with elevated water temperatures in the summer/fall 2005 created the most severe coral bleaching event ever documented within this region. Video monitoring of 100 randomly chosen, permanent transects at five study sites in the US Virgin Islands revealed over 90% of the scleractinian coral cover showed signs of thermal stress by paling or becoming completely white. Lower water temperatures in October allowed some re-coloring of corals; however, a subsequent unprecedented regional outbreak of coral disease affected all sites. Five known diseases or syndromes were recorded; however, most lesions showed signs similar to white plague. Nineteen scleractinian species were affected by disease, with >90% of the disease-induced lesions occurring on the genus Montastraea. The disease outbreak peaked several months after the onset of bleaching at all sites but did not occur at the same time. The mean number of disease-induced lesions increased 51-fold and the mean area of disease-associated mortality increased 13-fold when compared with pre-bleaching disease levels. In the 12 months following the onset of bleaching, coral cover declined at all sites (average loss: 51.5%, range: 42.4-61.8%) reducing the five-site average from 21.4% before bleaching to 10.3% with most mortality caused by white plague disease, not bleaching. Continued losses through October 2007 reduced the average coral cover of the five sites to 8.3% (average 2-year loss: 61.1%, range: 53.0-79.3%). Mean cover by M. annularis (complex) decreased 51%, Colpophyllia natans 78% and Agaricia agaricites 87%. Isolated disease outbreaks have been documented before in the Virgin Islands, but never as widespread or devastating as the one that occurred after the 2005 Caribbean coral-bleaching event. This study provides insight into the effects of continued seawater warming and subsequent coral bleaching events in the Caribbean and highlights the need to

  2. Remote monitoring of chlorophyll fluorescence in two reef corals during the 2005 bleaching event at Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzello, D.; Warner, M.; Stabenau, E.; Hendee, J.; Lesser, M.; Jankulak, M.

    2009-03-01

    Zooxanthellae fluorescence was measured in situ, remotely, and in near real-time with a pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometer for a colony of Siderastrea siderea and Agaricia tenuifolia at Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas during the Caribbean-wide 2005 bleaching event. These colonies displayed evidence of photosystem II (PS II) inactivation coincident with thermal stress and seasonally high doses of solar radiation. Hurricane-associated declines in temperature and light appear to have facilitated the recovery of maximum quantum yield of PS II within these two colonies, although both corals responded differently to individual storms. PAM fluorometry, coupled with long-term measurement of in situ light and temperature, provides much more detail of coral photobiology on a seasonal time scale and during possible bleaching conditions than sporadic, subjective, and qualitative observations. S. siderea displayed evidence of PS II inactivation over a month prior to the issuing of a satellite-based, sea surface temperature (SST) bleaching alert by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In fact, recovery had already begun in S. siderea when the bleaching alert was issued. Fluorescence data for A. tenuifolia were difficult to interpret because the shaded parts of a colony were monitored and thus did not perfectly coincide with thermal stress and seasonally high doses of solar radiation as in S. siderea. These results further emphasize the limitations of solely monitoring SST (satellite or in situ) as a bleaching indicator without considering the physiological status of coral-zooxanthellae symbioses.

  3. Thermographic and spectrophotometric analysis of the extrinsic tooth bleaching using a diode laser and a LED system. In vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the intra-pulpal temperature change, as well as to compare the bleaching power of a 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Xtra Boost- Ultradent. Inc), when activated with a diode laser, with a LED system and without activation, in the extrinsic tooth bleaching in vitro. Ten mandibular human incisors, a thermocouple, 45 bovine incisors and a spectrophotometer (Shade Eye- Shofu) for the color analysis. The samples were divided into 3 groups: 38% hydrogen peroxide activated by a diode laser (ZAP lasers, wavelength 808 nm ± 5, power of 1,4 W); 38% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED (Bright LEC-Mmoptics, wavelength 470 nm ± 25, power of 380 mW); 38% hydrogen peroxide without activation. After the artificial pigmentation, the bleaching agent acted for the same time in the 3 groups, differing only by the type of activation. The results of temperature showed that the LED activation was safer than the diode laser, which, in some measures exceeded the limit of 5.6 deg C. The luminosity of the samples did not show significantly statistics differences in none of the groups and moments of this study. The diode laser and LED activation did not influenced at the bleaching power of the peroxide, which showed effective for removing stains, with great capacity of bleaching bovine tooth artificially darkened. (author)

  4. Water quality and coral bleaching thresholds: formalising the linkage for the inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Scott A

    2009-05-01

    The threats of wide-scale coral bleaching and reef demise associated with anthropogenic climate change are widely known. Here, the additional role of poor water quality in lowering the thermal tolerance (i.e. bleaching 'resistance') of symbiotic reef corals is considered. In particular, a quantitative linkage is established between terrestrially-sourced dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) loading and the upper thermal bleaching thresholds of inshore reefs on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Significantly, this biophysical linkage provides concrete evidence for the oft-expressed belief that improved coral reef management will increase the regional-scale survival prospects of corals reefs to global climate change. Indeed, for inshore reef areas with a high runoff exposure risk, it is shown that the potential benefit of this 'local' management imperative is equivalent to approximately 2.0-2.5 degrees C in relation to the upper thermal bleaching limit; though in this case, a potentially cost-prohibitive reduction in end-of-river DIN of >50-80% would be required. An integrated socio-economic modelling framework is outlined that will assist future efforts to understand (optimise) the alternate tradeoffs that the water quality/coral bleaching linkage presents.

  5. Model-based assessment of the role of human-induced climate change in the 2005 Caribbean coral bleaching event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donner, S.D. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Knutson, T.R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Princeton, NJ (United States). Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab.; Oppenheimer, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geosciences

    2007-03-27

    Episodes of mass coral bleaching around the world in recent decades have been attributed to periods of anomalously warm ocean temperatures. In 2005, the sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly in the tropical North Atlantic that may have contributed to the strong hurricane season caused widespread coral bleaching in the Eastern Caribbean. Here, the authors use two global climate models to evaluate the contribution of natural climate variability and anthropogenic forcing to the thermal stress that caused the 2005 coral bleaching event. Historical temperature data and simulations for the 1870-2000 period show that the observed warming in the region is unlikely to be due to unforced climate variability alone. Simulation of background climate variability suggests that anthropogenic warming may have increased the probability of occurrence of significant thermal stress events for corals in this region by an order of magnitude. Under scenarios of future greenhouse gas emissions, mass coral bleaching in the Eastern Caribbean may become a biannual event in 20-30 years. However, if corals and their symbionts can adapt by 1-1.5{sup o}C, such mass bleaching events may not begin to recur at potentially harmful intervals until the latter half of the century. The delay could enable more time to alter the path of greenhouse gas emissions, although long-term 'committed warming' even after stabilization of atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels may still represent an additional long-term threat to corals.

  6. Differential coral bleaching-Contrasting the activity and response of enzymatic antioxidants in symbiotic partners under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Thomas; Hawkins, Thomas D; Becker, Susanne; Pontasch, Stefanie; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Leggat, William; Fisher, Paul L; Davy, Simon K

    2015-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching due to thermal stress represents a major threat to the integrity and functioning of coral reefs. Thermal thresholds vary, however, between corals, partly as a result of the specific type of endosymbiotic dinoflagellate (Symbiodinium sp.) they harbour. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in corals under thermal and light stress has been recognised as one mechanism that can lead to cellular damage and the loss of their symbiont population (Oxidative Theory of Coral Bleaching). Here, we compared the response of symbiont and host enzymatic antioxidants in the coral species Acropora millepora and Montipora digitata at 28°C and 33°C. A. millepora at 33°C showed a decrease in photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) and increase in maximum midday excitation pressure on PSII, with subsequent bleaching (declining photosynthetic pigment and symbiont density). M. digitata exhibited no bleaching response and photochemical changes in its symbionts were minor. The symbiont antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and catalase peroxidase showed no significant upregulation to elevated temperatures in either coral, while only catalase was significantly elevated in both coral hosts at 33°C. Increased host catalase activity in the susceptible coral after 5days at 33°C was independent of antioxidant responses in the symbiont and preceded significant declines in PSII photochemical efficiencies. This finding suggests a potential decoupling of host redox mechanisms from symbiont photophysiology and raises questions about the importance of symbiont-derived ROS in initiating coral bleaching. PMID:26310104

  7. Model-based assessment of the role of human-induced climate change in the 2005 Caribbean coral bleaching event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Simon D; Knutson, Thomas R; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2007-03-27

    Episodes of mass coral bleaching around the world in recent decades have been attributed to periods of anomalously warm ocean temperatures. In 2005, the sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly in the tropical North Atlantic that may have contributed to the strong hurricane season caused widespread coral bleaching in the Eastern Caribbean. Here, we use two global climate models to evaluate the contribution of natural climate variability and anthropogenic forcing to the thermal stress that caused the 2005 coral bleaching event. Historical temperature data and simulations for the 1870-2000 period show that the observed warming in the region is unlikely to be due to unforced climate variability alone. Simulation of background climate variability suggests that anthropogenic warming may have increased the probability of occurrence of significant thermal stress events for corals in this region by an order of magnitude. Under scenarios of future greenhouse gas emissions, mass coral bleaching in the Eastern Caribbean may become a biannual event in 20-30 years. However, if corals and their symbionts can adapt by 1-1.5 degrees C, such mass bleaching events may not begin to recur at potentially harmful intervals until the latter half of the century. The delay could enable more time to alter the path of greenhouse gas emissions, although long-term "committed warming" even after stabilization of atmospheric CO(2) levels may still represent an additional long-term threat to corals. PMID:17360373

  8. Quantification of peroxide ion passage in dentin, enamel, and cementum after internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, R M; Bonetti-Filho, I; Valera, M C; Camargo, C H R; Camargo, Sea; Moura-Netto, C; Pameijer, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of peroxide passage from the pulp chamber to the external enamel surface during the internal bleaching technique. Fifty bovine teeth were sectioned transversally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the remaining part of the root was sealed with a 2-mm layer of glass ionomer cement. The external surface of the samples was coated with nail varnish, with the exception of standardized circular areas (6-mm diameter) located on the enamel, exposed dentin, or cementum surface of the tooth. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups according to exposed areas close to the CEJ and into two control groups (n=10/group), as follows: GE, enamel exposure area; GC, cementum exposed area; GD, dentin exposed area; Negative control, no presence of internal bleaching agent and uncoated surface; and Positive control, pulp chamber filled with bleaching agent and external surface totally coated with nail varnish. The pulp chamber was filled with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Endo, Ultradent). Each sample was placed inside of individual flasks with 1000 μL of acetate buffer solution, 2 M (pH 4.5). After seven days, the buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube, in which 100 μL of leuco-crystal violet and 50 μL of horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). All experimental groups presented passage of peroxide to the external surface that was statistically different from that observed in the control groups. It was verified that the passage of peroxide was higher in GD than in GE (ppermeable than were the dentin and enamel surfaces. PMID:22621165

  9. A citizen science approach to monitoring bleaching in the zoantharian Palythoa tuberculosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sung-Yin; Kawamura, Iori; Byron, Gordon; Todd, Peter Alan; Reimer, James Davis

    2016-01-01

    Coral reef bleaching events are expected to become more frequent and severe in the near future as climate changes. The zoantharian Palythoa tuberculosa bleaches earlier than many scleractinian corals and may serve as an indicator species. Basic monitoring of such species could help to detect and even anticipate bleaching events, especially in areas where more sophisticated approaches that rely on buoy or satellite measurements of sea surface temperature are unavailable or too coarse. One simple and inexpensive monitoring method involves training volunteers to record observations of host color as a proxy for symbiosis quality. Here, we trained university students to take the ‘color fingerprint’ of a reef by assessing the color of multiple randomly selected colonies of P. tuberculosa at one time point in Okinawa Island, Japan. We tested the reliability of the students’ color scores and whether they matched expectations based on previous monthly monitoring of tagged colonies at the same locations. We also measured three traditional metrics of symbiosis quality for comparison: symbiont morphological condition, cell density, and chlorophyll a content. We found that P. tuberculosa color score, although highly correlated among observers, provided little predictive power for the other variables. This was likely due to inherent variation in colony color among generally healthy zoantharians in midwinter, as well as low sample size and brief training owing to the course structure. Despite certain limitations of P. tuberculosa as a focal organism, the citizen science approach to color monitoring has promise, and we outline steps that could improve similar efforts in the future. PMID:27069784

  10. Bond strength of dentin submitted to bleaching and restored with different materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelize Marcelino Pessarello

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of adhesive composite resin with fluoride and with greater fluidity can be favorable to the restoration of the palatal/lingual face of teeth submitted to internal bleaching. Objective: This study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive systems and composite resins to bleached dentin. Material and methods: Forty maxillary canines were sectioned to obtain 40 blocks (5 x 5 mm of intracoronary dentin. The fragments were included and bleached with 37% carbamide peroxide. After 7 days, the specimens were divided into two groups according to the adhesive system: with (Optibond Solo Plus and without (Single Bond fluoride and subdivided into 2 subgroups (n = 10 according to the composite resin: microhybrid (Z250 and flowable (Z350. The restoration was carried out through a bipartite matrix. After 24 hours, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test. The data (MPa were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. Results: The best results (p < 0.05 were obtained for fluoridated adhesive (7.44 ± 2.35 compared with that without fluoride (5.36 ± 2.01; flowable resin (7.76 ± 2.23 performed better than microhybrid resin (5.03 ± 1.72. When the two variables were associated, the highest results were obtained for the specimens restored with fluoridated adhesive and flowable resin(9.04 ± 1.92. Lower results were observed for non-fluoridated adhesive + microhybrid resin – control (4.24 ± 1.59, without statistically

  11. Influence of bleaching agents on the microhardness of nanoparticle resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of bleaching agents on the microhardness of nanoparticle resin composite. Methods: Twenty-eight cylindrical test specimens (8x1mm of FiltekTM Supreme XT resin (3M/ESPE were prepared and divided into 5 groups. The initial Vickers microhardness was measured (load of 50 grams force for 30 seconds on the top surface of the test specimens. The groupswere treated and divided as follows: G1 – artificial saliva (21 days - control; G2 - 7% hydrogen peroxide gel applied for 4h/day, for 14 days; G3 - 10% carbamide peroxide for 4h/day, for 14 days: G4 – 35% hydrogen peroxide gel applied in three sessions of 30 minutes each, with an interval of one week (21 days between the sessions; G5 - 35% carbamide peroxide, three sessions of 30 minutes each, with an interval of one week (21 days between the sessions. The top surfaces of the test specimens received treatment and were submitted to the Vickers microhardness test. Results: The results obtained were submitted to the Analysis of Variance at a fixed criterion, at a level of significance of p=0.05. No significant differences were observed among the treatments tested (p=0.42 when compared with G1. Significant differences (Tukey test were found when the initial microhardness values were compared with the values after experimental treatments (p<0.01. Conclusion: The application of bleaching agents did not alter the microhardness of resin composites. Therefore, there is no need to change restorations after bleaching.

  12. Effect of electrolyte bleaching on the stability and performance of dye solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, Simone; Asghar, Imran; Miettunen, Kati; Halme, Janne; Lanuti, Alessandro; Brown, Thomas M; Lund, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Degradation of dye solar cells (DSCs) under severe ageing conditions may lead to loss of the tri-iodide in the electrolyte - a phenomenon known as electrolyte bleaching. Monitoring changes in the tri-iodide concentration as a result of degradation mechanisms and understanding their causes and effects are fundamental for improving the long-term stability of DSCs. In this contribution a strongly accelerated ageing test (1 Sun visible light, 1.5 Suns UV light, T = 110 °C for 12 h) was performed on DSCs in a double-sealed masterplate configuration to purposely induce severe electrolyte bleaching, and its effects on the performance and stability of DSCs with different initial tri-iodide concentrations [I3(-)]0 were investigated. The cells with low [I3(-)]0 suffered a severe loss in short circuit current density JSC (up to 85%). Also a significant loss of open circuit voltage VOC was observed and this loss was proportional to [I3(-)]0 with the highest VOC drop observed with the highest [I3(-)]0. Non-destructive analysis techniques based on the limited current density, JSCvs. light intensity, and photographic image analysis, were used to quantify the [I3(-)] loss, which was found to be ca. 50 mM and independent of [I3(-)]0. Quantitative model based VOC analysis in terms of changing [I3(-)] revealed that the degradation responsible for the VOC drop was dominated by an unknown mechanism that is unrelated to [I3(-)]0. The methods and results reported here help separating and identifying different degradation mechanisms related to electrolyte bleaching in DSCs.

  13. Differential thermal bleaching susceptibilities amongst coral taxa: re-posing the role of the host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Scott A.

    2014-03-01

    It is well established that different coral species have different susceptibilities to thermal stress, yet it is less clear which biological or physical mechanisms allow some corals to resist thermal stress, whereas other corals bleach and die. Although the type of symbiont is clearly of fundamental importance, many aspects of coral bleaching cannot be explained solely by differences in symbionts amongst coral species. Here, I use the CO2 (sink) limitation model of coral bleaching to repose various host traits believed to influence thermal tolerance (e.g. metabolic rates, colony tissue thickness, skeletal growth form, mucus production rates, tissue concentration of fluorescent pigments and heterotrophic feedings capacity) in terms of an integrated strategy to reduce the likelihood of CO2 limitation around its intracellular photosymbionts. Contrasting observational data for the skeletal vital effect on oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) partitions two alternate evolutionary strategies. The first strategy is heavily reliant on a sea water supply chain of CO2 to supplement respiratory CO2(met). In contrast, the alternate strategy is less reliant on the sea water supply source, potentially facilitated by increased basal respiration rates and/or a lower photosynthetic demand for CO2. The comparative vulnerability of these alternative strategies to modern ocean conditions is used to explain the global-wide observation that corals with branching morphologies (and thin tissue layers) are generally more thermally sensitive than corals with massive morphologies (and thick tissue layers). The life history implications of this new framework are discussed in terms of contrasting fitness drivers and past environmental constraints, which delivers ominous predictions for the viability of thin-tissued branching and plating species during the present human-dominated ("Anthropocene") era of the Earth System.

  14. Coral bleaching: one disturbance too many for near-shore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A. A.; Dolman, A. M.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic nature of coral communities can make it difficult to judge whether a reef system is resilient to the current disturbance regime. To address this question of resilience for near-shore coral communities of the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) a data set consisting of 350 annual observations of benthic community change was compiled from existing monitoring data. These data spanned the period 1985-2007 and were derived from coral reefs within 20 km of the coast. During years without major disturbance events, cover increase of the Acroporidae was much faster than it was for other coral families; a median of 11% per annum compared to medians of less than 4% for other coral families. Conversely, Acroporidae were more severely affected by cyclones and bleaching events than most other families. A simulation model parameterised with these observations indicated that while recovery rates of hard corals were sufficient to compensate for impacts associated with cyclones and crown-of-thorns starfish, the advent of mass bleaching has lead to a significant change in the composition of the community and a rapid decline in hard coral cover. Furthermore, if bleaching events continue to occur with the same frequency and severity as in the recent past, the model predicts that the cover of Acroporidae will continue to decline. Although significant cover of live coral remains on near-shore reefs, and recovery is observed during inter-disturbance periods, it appears that this system will not be resilient to the recent disturbance regime over the long term. Conservation strategies for coral reefs should focus on both mitigating local factors that act synergistically to increase the susceptibility of Acroporidae to climate change while promoting initiatives that maximise the recovery potential from inevitable disturbances.

  15. Penetration Capacity, Color Alteration and Biological Response of Two In-office Bleaching Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; Ferreira, Luciana Louzada; Gomes-Filho, João Eduardo; Ervolino, Edilson; Gallinari, Marjorie de Oliveira; Rahal, Vanessa; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) penetrates into the dental hard tissues causing color alteration but also alterations in pulpal tissues. Hard-tissue penetration, color alteration and the pulp response alterations were evaluated for two in-office bleaching protocols with H2O2. For trans-enamel/dentin penetration and color alteration, discs of bovine teeth were attached to an artificial pulp chamber and bleached according to the groups: BLU (20% H2O2 - 1x50 min, Whiteness HP Blue); MAX (35% H2O2 - 3x15 min, Whiteness HP Maxx); Control (1x50 min, placebo). Trans-enamel/dentin penetration was quantified based on the reaction of H2O2 with leucocrystal violet and the color analyzed by CIELab System. Twenty Wistar rats were divided into two groups (BLU and MAX) and their maxillary right molars were treated according to the same protocols of the in vitro study; the maxillary left molars were used as controls. After 2 days, the animals were killed and their maxillae were examined by light microscopy. The inflammation of pulp tissue was scored according to the inflammatory infiltrate (1, absent; 2, mild; 3, moderate; 4, severe/necrosis). Data were analyzed by statistical tests (α=0.05). MAX showed higher trans-enamel/dentinal penetration of H2O2 (p0.05), and different when compared to Control group (pbleaching protocols using lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide should be preferred due to their reduced trans-enamel/dentinal penetration since they cause less pulp damage and provide same bleaching efficiency. PMID:27058379

  16. Influence of bleaching technologies on the aerobic biodegradability of effluents from Eucalyptus kraft pulps factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Vidal

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic biodegradability of effluents from different Eucalyptus kraft pulp bleaching processes was studied. Bleaching effluents were obtained from: i Chlorine Bleaching (CB processes, with partial substitution of chlorine by chlorine dioxide and ii Total Chlorine Free (TCF processes. The overall biodegradability, in terms of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD was higher for TCF effluents (96-98% than for CB ones (82-93%. Taking into account the higher organic load of CB effluents, this fact implied a much higher residual COD for them (100-180 mg/L than for TCF effluents (10-30 mg/L. Furthermore, a refractory fraction of molecular weight higher than 43,000 Da was found in CB effluent, which implied the necessity of a further specific treatment. The toxicity was completely removed after the biological treatmentA biodegradabilidade aerobica das águas residuais provenientes de diferentes procesos de branqueos de pulpa kraft foi estudada. Os efluentes são gerados no branqueo com cloro ou parcialmente sustituido com dioxido de cloro (CB ou bem em processos livres do cloro (TCF. A biodegradabilidade, quantificada como DQO foi maior para as águas do processo CB. Tendo em conta o elevado conteúdo orgânico do efluente CB obteinse uma maior concentraç&ão do DQO final neste efluente comparado com o efluente TCF. Uma fracçao recalcitrante maior a 43,000 Da no effluente BC foi encontrada, isto significa um tratamento adicional específico para sua eliminaçã o. A toxicidade foi totalmente eliminada despois do tratamento aeração.

  17. Downscaled projections of Caribbean coral bleaching that can inform conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooidonk, Ruben; Maynard, Jeffrey Allen; Liu, Yanyun; Lee, Sang-Ki

    2015-09-01

    Projections of climate change impacts on coral reefs produced at the coarse resolution (~1°) of Global Climate Models (GCMs) have informed debate but have not helped target local management actions. Here, projections of the onset of annual coral bleaching conditions in the Caribbean under Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 are produced using an ensemble of 33 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase-5 models and via dynamical and statistical downscaling. A high-resolution (~11 km) regional ocean model (MOM4.1) is used for the dynamical downscaling. For statistical downscaling, sea surface temperature (SST) means and annual cycles in all the GCMs are replaced with observed data from the ~4-km NOAA Pathfinder SST dataset. Spatial patterns in all three projections are broadly similar; the average year for the onset of annual severe bleaching is 2040-2043 for all projections. However, downscaled projections show many locations where the onset of annual severe bleaching (ASB) varies 10 or more years within a single GCM grid cell. Managers in locations where this applies (e.g., Florida, Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic, among others) can identify locations that represent relative albeit temporary refugia. Both downscaled projections are different for the Bahamas compared to the GCM projections. The dynamically downscaled projections suggest an earlier onset of ASB linked to projected changes in regional currents, a feature not resolved in GCMs. This result demonstrates the value of dynamical downscaling for this application and means statistically downscaled projections have to be interpreted with caution. However, aside from west of Andros Island, the projections for the two types of downscaling are mostly aligned; projected onset of ASB is within ±10 years for 72% of the reef locations. PMID:25833698

  18. Increased cell proliferation and mucocyte density in the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida recovering from bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fransolet

    Full Text Available Recovery of coral after bleaching episodes is a critical period for the health of the reef ecosystem. While events such as symbiont (genus Symbiodinium shifting/shuffling or tissue apoptosis have been demonstrated to occur following bleaching, little is known concerning tissue recovery or cell proliferation. Here, we studied the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida exposed to a transient elevation of water temperature combined with high illumination (33°C and 1900 µmol photons x m(-2 x s(-1 for 30 h. Following such treatment bleached anemones showed a significant reduction of their Symbiodinium density. Cell proliferation in the ectodermis and gastrodermis was determined by assessing the densities of cells labeled with a thymidine analogue (EdU. Cell proliferation significantly increased during the first day following stress in both tissue types. This increased cell proliferation returned to pre-stress values after one week. Although cell proliferation was higher in the ectodermis in absence of stress, it was relatively more pronounced in the gastrodermis of stressed anemones. In addition, the ratio of ectodermal mucocytes significantly increased three weeks after induced stress. These results suggest that thermal/photic stress coupled with the loss of the symbionts is able to enhance cell proliferation in both gastrodermis and ectodermis of cnidarians. While new cells formed in the gastrodermis are likely to host new Symbiodinium, the fate of new cells in the ectodermis was only partially revealed. Some new ectodermal cells may, in part, contribute to the increased number of mucocytes which could eventually help strengthen the heterotrophic state until restoration of the symbiosis.

  19. Gas Chromatography Analysis of Resin and Fatty Acids from Laboratory Generated Bleach Plant Effluents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chhaya Sharma; S. Mohanty; S. Kumar; N.J. Rao

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory generated spent bleached liquor from the chlorination, caustic extraction stage of mixed wood kraft pulp processing has been analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively for various resin & fatty acids by using GC. A number of resin acids,saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, chloro fatty and resin acid have been detected and their concentrations are estimated. The results are compared with results on different agriculture residue/hardwood pulps, which were reported earlier. The concentrations of various compounds detected have also been compared with their reported LC50 values.

  20. Analysis of a radioactive lens and of the correlated UV light bleaching properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzocchi, Olaf [European Patent Office, The Hague (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics; Romanello, Vincenco [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE)

    2015-07-01

    Topic of the present work is the measurement of the activity of a reflex camera objective, known to include radioactive glass lenses, using a Geiger-Mueller counter and HPGe detectors. Using the calculated data, the dose to the eye lens during normal use is also estimated. Since thoriated lenses get a yellow tint with age, the effectiveness of UV light on the bleaching of the lens is is quantified. As last step, the thickest glas element has been cut and used to produce a long self-exposure on film.

  1. Application of xylanases from Amazon Forest fungal species in bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Garcia Medeiros

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Crude xylanase preparations from Penicillium corylophilum, Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma longibrachiatum were used to treat Eucalyptus kraft pulp, prior to chlorine dioxide and alkaline bleaching sequences. The enzyme pretreatment improved brightness and delignification of non-delignified and oxygen-bleached samples of eucalyptus kraft pulp. Xylanase preparations from T. longibrachiatum and P. corylophilum were more effective to reduce pulp kappa number. A small reduction in viscosity was obtained when the oxygen-bleached pulp was treated with xylanase preparation from A. niger. For all enzyme samples, the best release of chromophoric material from the pulp was at 237 nm. The enzyme preparation from P. corylophilum was responsible for the highest release of reducing sugar at a dosage interval of 10-20 IU/g dry weight pulp. Scanning electron microscopy studies of oxygen-bleached pulp after xylanase treatment revealed morphological changes, including holes, cracks, filament forming and peeling.Amostras de xilanases de extratos brutos de Penicillium corylophilum, Aspergillus niger e Trichoderma longibrachiatum foram utilizadas no branqueamento de polpa kraft de eucalipto antes das seqüências alcalina e dióxido de cloro. O pré-tratamento enzimático melhorou a alvura e o processo de deslignificação de amostras de polpa kraft de eucalipto não-tratada e tratada com oxigênio. Amostras de xilanases de T. longibrachiatum e P. corylophilum foram mais efetivas na redução do número kappa da polpa. A polpa tratada com oxigênio sofreu uma pequena redução na sua viscosidade quando incubada com amostra de xilanase de A. niger. Para todas as amostras de xilanases, a maior liberação de cromóforos da polpa foi a 237 nm. A amostra de xilanase de P. corylophilum liberou maior quantidade de açúcar redutor da polpa, utilizando dosagem de 10-20 UI/g de peso seco da polpa. Estudos de microscopia eletrônica de varredura revelaram várias altera

  2. Final chlorine dioxide stage at near-neutral pH for bleaching eucalypt pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Robisnéa A. Ribeiro; Fernando J. B. Gomes; José N. Floriani; Renato A. P. Damásio; Iara F. Demuner; Jorge L. Colodette

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that pH is an important parameter for controlling the eucalyptus pulp bleaching when using the final chlorine dioxide stage, since it affects the effectiveness of the process. Recommendations found in the literature for operating are in the 3.5 to 4.0 range. However, in this paper it was shown that final chlorine dioxide has better performance, with significant brightness gain while also preserving pulp quality, when it is operated at near neutral pH. This result can be expla...

  3. Final chlorine dioxide stage at near-neutral pH for bleaching eucalypt pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robisnéa A. Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that pH is an important parameter for controlling the eucalyptus pulp bleaching when using the final chlorine dioxide stage, since it affects the effectiveness of the process. Recommendations found in the literature for operating are in the 3.5 to 4.0 range. However, in this paper it was shown that final chlorine dioxide has better performance, with significant brightness gain while also preserving pulp quality, when it is operated at near neutral pH. This result can be explained by the generation of sodium bicarbonate in situ upon adding carbon dioxide at this stage.

  4. Transient turbid water mass reduces temperature-induced coral bleaching and mortality in Barbados

    OpenAIRE

    Hazel A Oxenford; Vallès, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Global warming is seen as one of the greatest threats to the world’s coral reefs and, with the continued rise in sea surface temperature predicted into the future, there is a great need for further understanding of how to prevent and address the damaging impacts. This is particularly so for countries whose economies depend heavily on healthy reefs, such as those of the eastern Caribbean. Here, we compare the severity of bleaching and mortality for five dominant coral species at six representa...

  5. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    OpenAIRE

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes co...

  6. Genotoxicity and toxicity evaluations of ECF cellulose bleaching effluents using the Allium cepa L. test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, O; Yeber, M C; Venegas, W

    2012-08-01

    Toxicity and genotoxicity tests were performed on root cells of Allium cepa in order to evaluate wastewater quality following an ECF cellulose bleaching process. The results revealed a toxic effect of the effluent, with inhibition of meristem growth and generally lower values of metaphase, anaphase and telophase indices at pH 10.5 than pH 7 for all effluent concentrations. The genotoxicity effect was different from the toxic effect given that the micronucleus and the chromosomal aberration tests in anaphase-telophase cells were low over all ranges of the studied effluent concentrations. PMID:22990817

  7. Penetration of the Coral-Bleaching Bacterium Vibrio shiloi into Oculina patagonica

    OpenAIRE

    Banin, E.; Israely, T.; Kushmaro, A.; Y. Loya; Orr, E; Rosenberg, E

    2000-01-01

    Inoculation of the coral-bleaching bacterium Vibrio shiloi into seawater containing its host Oculina patagonica led to adhesion of the bacteria to the coral surface via a β-d-galactose receptor, followed by penetration of the bacteria into the coral tissue. The internalized V. shiloi cells were observed inside the exodermal layer of the coral by electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy using specific anti-V. shiloi antibodies to stain the intracellular bacteria. At 29°C, 80% of the bac...

  8. Bleaching of sol-gel glass film with embedded gold nanoparticles by thermal poling

    OpenAIRE

    Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Carvalho, Isabel C. S.; Kazansky, Peter G.; Kawazu, Mitsuhiro; SAKAGUCHI, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Gold clusters embedded in glass are expected to be hard to dissolve in the form of ions since gold is essentially a nonreactive metal. In spite of that, bleaching of Au-doped nanocomposite sol-gel glass film on a soda-lime glass substrate is demonstrated in which electric-field thermal poling is employed to effectively dissolve randomly distributed gold nanoparticles (15 nm in diameter) embedded in a low conductivity sol-gel glass film with a volume filling factor as small as 2.3%. The surfac...

  9. Removal of hexenuronic acid by xylanase to reduce adsorbable organic halides formation in chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shuangxi; Wang, Shuangfei; Qin, Chengrong; Yao, Shuangquan; Ebonka, Johnbull Friday; Song, Xueping; Li, Kecheng

    2015-11-01

    Xylanase-aided chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp was investigated. The pulp was pretreated with xylanase and followed a chlorine dioxide bleaching stage. The ATR-FTIR and XPS were employed to determine the surface chemistry of the control pulp, xylanase treated and chlorine dioxide treated pulps. The hexenuronic acid (HexA) could obviously be reduced after xylanase pretreatment, and the adsorbable organic halides (AOX) were reduced after chlorine dioxide bleaching. Compared to the control pulp, AOX could be reduced by 21.4-26.6% with xylanase treatment. Chlorine dioxide demand could be reduced by 12.5-22% to achieve the same brightness. The ATR-FTIR and XPS results showed that lignin and hemicellulose (mainly HexA) were the main source for AOX formation. Xylanase pretreatment could remove HexA and expose more lignin, which decreased the chlorine dioxide demand and thus reduced formation of AOX. PMID:26263004

  10. 'In vitro' assessment to instrumented indentation hardness tests in enamel of bovine teeth, before and after dental bleaching by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser enamel bleaching is a common used procedure due to its satisfactory esthetic results. The possible changes on the dental structures caused by the bleaching technique are of great importance. The enamel superficial microhardness changes through instrumented indentation hardness on bovine teeth were analyzed in this present study. The samples were divided in two halves, one being the control and the other irradiated with a diode laser (808 nm) or with a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) to activate the Whiteness HP bleaching gel (hydrogen peroxide at 35%). It was possible to conclude that there was a statistical significant increase on the enamel superficial microhardness (Group I, sample 1 and Group II, sample 1) despite this increase did not seem to indicate a concern regarding the enamel surface resistance change. There was not a significant statistical change on the enamel microhardness on the other samples. The final conclusion is that there was no superficial enamel morphological change after these treatments. (author)

  11. Coronal microleakage with five different temporary restorative materials following walking bleach technique: An ex-vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. V Srikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Walking bleach technique uses 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate, and this paste mixture causes loosening of the coronal temporary restorative materials and thus decreasing its clinical effectiveness and causing irritation to the patients oral tissues. In the present study, sealing ability of hygroscopic coronal temporary restorative materials were compared with the other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Aim: To evaluate the effects of walking bleach material on the marginal sealing ability and coronal microleakage of the hydrophilic temporary restorative materials with that of the other commonly used temporary restorative materials in endodontic practice. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth were prepared chemo-mechanically and obturated with gutta-percha in lateral condensation technique. Surface of each tooth was double coated with cyanoacrylate glue. All the teeth were randomly divided in to five groups. Out of 15 teeth in each group, 10 teeth served as experimental specimens, in which bleaching agent was placed in the pulp chamber and 5 teeth served as control, in which no bleaching agent was placed. The access cavities were restored with temporary restorative materials being tested per each group respectively. The specimens were then immersed in 1% India ink dye and subjected to thermo cycling for 7 days. All the teeth were longitudinally sectioned and observed with stereomicroscope and were graded according to the depth of linear dye penetration. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Hydrophilic temporary restorative materials Cavit G and Coltosol F have shown minimal coronal dye leakage with better sealing ability when exposed to walking bleach paste mixture in the dye penetration tests compared to other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Conclusion: Marginal sealing ability of Cavit G and Coltosol F were

  12. High-efficiency tooth bleaching using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with low concentration of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seoul Hee NAM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Light-activated tooth bleaching with a high hydrogen peroxide (HP; H2O2 concentration has risks and the actual role of the light source is doubtful. The use of conventional light might result in an increase in the temperature and cause thermal damage to the health of the tooth tissue. Objective This study investigated the efficacy of tooth bleaching using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NAPP with 15% carbamide peroxide (CP; CH6N2O3 including 5.4% HP, as compared with conventional light sources. Material and Methods Forty human teeth were randomly divided into four groups: Group I (CP+NAPP, Group II (CP+plasma arc lamp; PAC, Group III (CP+diode laser, and Group IV (CP alone. Color changes (∆E of the tooth and tooth surface temperatures were measured. Data were evaluated by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's tests. Results Group I showed the highest bleaching efficacy, with a ∆E value of 1.92-, 2.61 and 2.97-fold greater than those of Groups II, III and IV, respectively (P<0.05. The tooth surface temperature was maintained around 37°C in Group I, but it reached 43°C in Groups II and III. Conclusions The NAPP has a greater capability for effective tooth bleaching than conventional light sources with a low concentration of HP without causing thermal damage. Tooth bleaching using NAPP can become a major technique for in-office bleaching in the near future.

  13. Effect of a Home Bleaching Agent on the Fracture Toughness of Resin Composites: using short rod design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagheri R.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Resin composites are brittle materials and their major shortcomings are manifested in their sensitivity to flaws and defects. Although various mechanical properties of resin composites have been described, few studies are available on assessing the effect of bleaching agents on resin composites using the short rod design. Materials and Method: Specimens were prepared from three resin composites; Rok (SDI, Esthet (Dentsply, and Estelite (Tokuyama. For each material, a total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were prepared using a custom-made mould. Specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups of 8 and conditioned in 37°C distilled water for either 24 hours, or 21 days. 21 day specimens were tested both with and without applying bleaching agent; Polanight (SDI. Study group specimens were bleached for 21 days, 2 hours a day. The specimens were loaded using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per minute. The maximum load at specimen failure was recorded and the KIc (MPa. M 0.5 was calculated. Results: Statistical analysis using two-way ANOVA showed a significant relationship between material and time (p< 0.05. Tukey’s test showed that after 24 h of immersion in distilled water, Rok revealed the highest KIc followed by Esthet and Estelite. The bleaching agent significantly improved the fracture toughness values of Esthet while it decreased that of Estelite. Conclusion: The fracture toughness of the resin composites was affected by the bleaching agent and distilled water. In comparison with Rok and Estelite, fracture toughness of Esthet was increased due to aging and application of bleaching agent.

  14. Modulation of light-enhancement to symbiotic algae by light-scattering in corals and evolutionary trends in bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa A Marcelino

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate skeletons of scleractinian corals amplify light availability to their algal symbionts by diffuse scattering, optimizing photosynthetic energy acquisition. However, the mechanism of scattering and its role in coral evolution and dissolution of algal symbioses during "bleaching" events are largely unknown. Here we show that differences in skeletal fractal architecture at nano/micro-lengthscales within 96 coral taxa result in an 8-fold variation in light-scattering and considerably alter the algal light environment. We identified a continuum of properties that fall between two extremes: (1 corals with low skeletal fractality that are efficient at transporting and redistributing light throughout the colony with low scatter but are at higher risk of bleaching and (2 corals with high skeletal fractality that are inefficient at transporting and redistributing light with high scatter and are at lower risk of bleaching. While levels of excess light derived from the coral skeleton is similar in both groups, the low-scatter corals have a higher rate of light-amplification increase when symbiont concentration is reduced during bleaching, thus creating a positive feedback-loop between symbiont concentration and light-amplification that exposes the remaining symbionts to increasingly higher light intensities. By placing our findings in an evolutionary framework, in conjunction with a novel empirical index of coral bleaching susceptibility, we find significant correlations between bleaching susceptibility and light-scattering despite rich homoplasy in both characters; suggesting that the cost of enhancing light-amplification to the algae is revealed in decreased resilience of the partnership to stress.

  15. Bleaching, disease and recovery in the threatened scleractinian coral Acropora palmata in St. John, US Virgin Islands: 2003-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C.S.; Muller, E.M.

    2012-01-01

    A long-term study of the scleractinian coral Acropora palmata in the US Virgin Islands (USVI) showed that diseases, particularly white pox, are limiting the recovery of this threatened species. Colonies of A. palmata in Haulover Bay, within Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, were examined monthly in situ for signs of disease and other stressors from January 2003 through December 2009. During the study, 89.9 % of the colonies (n = 69) exhibited disease, including white pox (87 %), white band (13 %), and unknown (9 %). Monthly disease prevalence ranged from 0 to 57 %, and disease was the most significant cause of complete colony mortality (n = 17). A positive correlation was found between water temperature and disease prevalence, but not incidence. Annual average disease prevalence and incidence remained constant during the study. Colonies generally showed an increase in the estimated amount of total living tissue from growth, but 25 (36.2 %) of the colonies died. Acropora palmata bleached in the USVI for the first time during the 2005 Caribbean bleaching event. Only one of the 23 colonies that bleached appeared to die directly from bleaching. In 2005, corals that bleached had greater disease prevalence than those that did not bleach. Just over half (52 %) of the colonies incurred some physical damage. Monitoring of fragments (broken branches) that were generated by physical damage through June 2007 showed that 46.1 % died and 28.4 % remained alive; the fragments that attached to the substrate survived longer than those that did not. Recent surveys showed an increase in the total number of colonies within the reef area, formed from both asexual and sexual reproduction. Genotype analysis of 48 of the originally monitored corals indicated that 43 grew from sexual recruits supporting the conclusion that both asexual and sexual reproduction are contributing to an increase in colony density at this site.

  16. Coral Diseases Following Massive Bleaching in 2005 Cause 60 Percent Decline in Coral Cover and Mortality of the Threatened Species, Acropora Palmata, on Reefs in the U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Caroline S.

    2008-01-01

    Record-high seawater temperatures and calm seas in the summer of 2005 led to the most severe coral bleaching (greater than 90 percent bleached coral cover) ever observed in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) (figs. 1 and 2). All but a few coral species bleached, including the threatened species, Acropora palmata. Bleaching was seen from the surface to depths over 20 meters.

  17. Monitoring Coral Health to Determine Coral Bleaching Response at High Latitude Eastern Australian Reefs: An Applied Model for A Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G. Carroll

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Limited information is available on the bleaching susceptibility of coral species that dominate high latitude reefs along the eastern seaboard of Australia. The main aims of this study were to: (i monitor coral health and spatial patterns of coral bleaching response at the Solitary Islands Marine Park (SIMP and Lord Howe Island Marine Park (LHIMP, to determine variability of bleaching susceptibility among coral taxa; (ii predict coral bleaching thresholds at 30 °S and 31.5 °S, extrapolated from published bleaching threshold data; and (iii propose a subtropical northern New South Wales coral bleaching model from biological and physical data. Between 2005 and 2007 minor bleaching was observed in dominant coral families including Pocilloporidae, Poritidae and Dendrophylliidae in the SIMP and Pocilloporidae, Poritidae and Acroporidae (Isopora and Montipora spp. in the LHIMP, with a clear difference in bleaching susceptibility found between sites, both within and between locations. Bleaching susceptibility was highest in Porites spp. at the most offshore island site within the SIMP during summer 2005. Patterns of subtropical family bleaching susceptibility within the SIMP and LHIMP differed to those previously reported for the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR. These differences may be due to a number of factors, including temperature history and/or the coral hosts association with different zooxanthellae clades, which may have lower thermal tolerances. An analysis of published estimates of coral bleaching thresholds from the Caribbean, South Africa, GBR and central and northern Pacific regions suggests that the bleaching threshold at 30–31.5 °S ranges between 26.5–26.8 °C. This predicted threshold was confirmed by an extensive coral bleaching event on the world’s southernmost coral reef at Lord Howe Island, during the 2010 austral summer season. These results imply that dominant coral taxa at subtropical reefs along the eastern Australian

  18. The reef coral Goniastrea aspera: a `winner' becomes a `loser' during a severe bleaching event in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, B. E.; Dunne, R. P.; Phongsuwan, N.; Patchim, L.; Hawkridge, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    The reef coral Goniastrea aspera is regarded as one of the most environmentally tolerant species on Indo-Pacific reefs. Its demise, following a severe bleaching event in the Andaman Sea in the north-eastern Indian Ocean in 2010, was surprising in view of the rapid recovery of co-existing species such as Porites lutea. Demographic studies of G. aspera at this site showed the population was mainly composed of large individuals, which recruited in the early 1990s. These results, and size-specific mortality observed in G. aspera, post-bleaching, suggest that factors, related to size and age, may have contributed to the coral's marked decline.

  19. Coral bleaching in the Caramuanas reef (Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil) during the 2010 El Niño event

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo J. Miranda; Cruz, Igor C. S.; Zelinda M.A.N. Leão

    2013-01-01

    Episodes of coral bleaching related to El Niño events have been increasing in frequency and severity. This phenomenon is cited as a major cause of degradation of coral reefs. This study evaluates the effects of coral bleaching on the Caramuanas reef community, which occurred during the southern hemisphere summer of 2009/2010. Within this period the sea surface temperature of 31°C and thermal anomalies up to almost 1°C were recorded. During and after this El Niño event, frequency and severity ...

  20. Characteristics of bleaching of sandstone in northeast of Ordos Basin and its relationship with natural gas leakage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; YanPing; LIU; ChiYang; ZHAO; JunFeng; HUANG; Lei; YU; Lin; WANG; JianQiang

    2007-01-01

    Bleaching of sandstone has significant applications to tracing hydrocarbon pathways and evaluating the scale of natural gas seepage. Bleaching of sandstones in the northeast of Ordos Basin is mainly distributed in the Mesozoic Yan'an Formation. Studying on petrology, major elements, REEs and trace elements of bleached sandstones and comparing with adjacent sandstones, combining with geologic-geochemical evidences of gas seepage in the northeast of the basin, the bleached sandstones are formed in the acid environment and reducing fluids. Characteristics of petrology show that the contents of kaolinite are high and the color of margin of ferric oxide minerals is lighter than that of the center. Major elements of sandstone samples show high contents of Al2O3 and low ratio of Fe3+/Fe2+. The TFe2O3 content of the bleached sandstone is lower than that of red rock. REE data show that bleached sandstones have low ∑REE contents and Eu-depleted and slightly Ce-enriched. Trace elements show that the bleached sandstones enrich in Co, deplete in Sr, and slightly enrich in Zr and Hf which are close to the values for the green alteration sandstones, and slightly lower than ore-bearing sandstones. Geochemical characteristics of oil-bearing sandstone in the northern basin suggest that the oil-shows are formed by matured Carboniferous-Permian coal bed methane escaping to the surface, and natural gas in field could migrate to the north margin of the basin. The δ13C (PDB) andδ18O(PDB) values of calcite cement in the study area range from -11.729‰ to -10.210‰ and -14.104‰ to -12.481‰, respectively. Theδ13C (PDB) values less than -10‰ imply the carbon sources part from organic carbon. Comprehensive study suggests that the gas leakage has occurred in the northeastern basin, which is responsible for bleaching of the sandstone on top of the Yan'an Formation.