WorldWideScience

Sample records for bleach filtrate reuse

  1. Control of the Accumulation of Non-Process Elements in Pulp Mills with Bleach Filtrate Reuse: A Chemical Equilibrium Approach to Predicting the Partitioning of Metals in Pulp Mill and Bleach Plant Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, G.W.; Sinquefield, S.A.; Rorrer, G.L.; Laver, M.L.; Yantasee, W.; Ming, D.

    2000-08-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop fundamental, experimentally based methods for predicting the solubility or organic and inorganic matter and their interactions in recycled effluent from kraft pulp mills and bleach plants. This included: characterizing the capacity of wood pulp and dissolved organic matter to bind metal ions, developing a thermodynamic database of properties needed to describe the solubility of inorganic matter in pulp mill streams, incorporation of the database into equilibrium calculation software for predicting the solubility of the metals of interest, and evaluating its capability to predict the distribution of the metals between pulp fibers, inorganic precipitates, and solution.

  2. Comparative toxicities of oxygen, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chlorine bleaching filtrates - microtox toxicities of raw and processed filtrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ard, T.A.; McDonough, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    It has claimed that effluents from the bleaching of kraft pulp with chlorine and its compounds have deleterious effects on the aquatic environment. It has been further suggested that bleaching without the use of chlorine or its compounds will produce innocuous effluents. To obtain information on the validity of these claims, we have conducted a laboratory study of the toxicity of filtrates from chlorine-based and nonchlorine bleaching processes. We have also examined two related issues. The first is whether any toxicants generated during bleaching are rendered harmless (by neutralization, storage, and biological treatment) before being discharged to the environment. The second related issue is whether any toxicity observed in mill effluents actually originates in the bleaching process, as opposed to being due to raw material components or compounds formed during the pulping step that precedes bleaching. Several conclusions were drawn from this study. (1) There is a background level of toxicity which originates in the oxygen stage, process steps prior to bleaching, or in the wood raw material. It is decreased by neutralization and storage, but residual toxicity may still be detected after two weeks. (2) If the sum of the first and second stage toxicities is taken as an indicator of overall toxicity, the untreated filtrates may be ranked as follows: Control (Background) > D(EO) > Z(EO) > C(EO). However, these toxicities are of no importance in regard to environmental effects because of their ephemeral nature and the likelihood of their being reduced or eliminated prior to effluent discharge. Evidence for this statement is the ease with which all except the C(EO) were detoxified by neutralization and storage. (3) After neutralization and storage for two weeks at room temperature the ranking of toxicities becomes: C(EO) > D(EO) > Z(EO) > Background. The last three are similar in magnitude.

  3. Reuse of discarded deactivated bleaching earth in the bleaching of oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girgis, Adel Y.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Discarded bleaching earth was used after its reactivation for the bleaching of sunflower, soybean and corn oils. The efficiency of reactivated bleaching earth was compared to the efficiency of virgin activated bleaching earth. Acid reactivated earth (pH 2.5-3 had a slightly higher content in silicone than virgin activated or neutralized reactivated earths. The best results in the color of sunflower and corn oils were obtained when neutralized earth (pH 6–7 was used at 1 and 2 % levels. Acid reactivated earth used at 2 % achieved a higher reduction in soybean oil color than virgin earth (pH 3 at the same dosage. Both reactivated earths reduced peroxide value, iron, conjugated dienes and soap, while they increased acidity and conjugated trienes. Furthermore, these reactivated earths determined higher decrements in the oil induction period than virgin earth. Reactivated earth could be used for 5 cycles for the bleaching of soybean or corn oils and for more than 6 cycles for sunflower oil.Tierra decolorante desechada, fue empleada, tras su reactivación para decolorar aceites de girasol, soja y maíz. La eficiencia de la tierra decolorante reactivada fue comparada con la de la virgen activada. La tierra reactivada ácida (pH 2,5–3 tuvo ligeramente mayor contenido en silicona que la tierra virgen o la reactivada neutra. Los mejores resultados en el color de los aceites de girasol y maíz fueron obtenidos cuando se emplearon niveles del 1 y 2 % de tierra reactivada neutra (pH 6-7. La tierra ácida reactivada, usada al 2 % consiguió una mayor reducción del color del aceite de soja, que una misma dosis de tierra virgen (pH 3. Ambas tierras reactivadas redujeron el índice de peróxidos, hierro, dienos conjugados y jabón de los aceites, mientras que hicieron aumentar la acidez y los trienos conjugados. Además, estas tierras reactivadas determinaron mayores descensos en los periodos de inducción del aceite que la tierra virgen. Las tierras

  4. Enzymatic Method for Rapid Determination of Oxalic Acid in Bleaching Filtrates from the Pulp and Paper Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Feng; SJ(O)DE Anders; NILVEBRANT Nils-Olof; J(O)NSSON Leif J.

    2005-01-01

    Bleaching with oxygen-containing agents and recirculation of process streams in the pulp and paper industry has increased the accumulation of oxalic acid and danger for precipitation of calcium oxalate encrusts, scaling. Analysis and control of oxalic acid in bleaching filtrates is therefore becoming increasingly important in the pulp and paper industry.Chromatographic methods, such as IC and HPLC, are generally more time-consuming but are valuable as standard methods for determination of oxalic acid. However, the instrumentation needed is expensive and stationary. In this study, an enzymatic method based on oxalate oxidase and peroxidase was developed to determine oxalic acid in authentic bleaching filtrates using a spectrophotometer. The results showed that bleaching filtrates contain some compounds interfering with the enzymatic method.Pretreatment of the samples with activated charcoal was a successful approach for decreasing problems with interference. By using dilution followed by charcoal treatment, the results obtained from five bleaching filtrates with the colorimetric method correlated very well with those obtained using IC. This study offers a selective, fast and mobile analysis method to determine oxalic acid in bleaching filtrates from the pulp and paper industry. The convenient enzyme-based method improves the possibilities for control of critical oxalic acid concentrations in closed-loop bleaching streams.

  5. Application of integrated ozone biological aerated filters and membrane filtration in water reuse of textile effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaozhong; Wang, Xiaojun; Xu, Jinling; Yan, Jinli; Ge, Qilong; Gu, Xiaoyang; Jian, Lei

    2013-04-01

    A combined process including integrated ozone-BAFs (ozone biological aerated filters) and membrane filtration was first applied for recycling textile effluents in a cotton textile mill with capacity of 5000 m(3)/d. Influent COD (chemical oxygen demand) in the range of 82-120 mg/L, BOD5 (5-day biochemical oxygen demand) of 12.6-23.1 mg/L, suspended solids (SSs) of 38-52 mg/L and color of 32-64° were observed during operation. Outflows with COD≤45 mg/L, BOD5≤7.6 mg/L, SS≤15 mg/L, color≤8° were obtained after being decontaminated by ozone-BAF with ozone dosage of 20-25 mg/L. Besides, the average removal rates of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) and UV254 were 100% and 73.4% respectively. Permeate water produced by RO (reverse osmosis) could be reused in dyeing and finishing processes, while the RO concentrates could be discharged directly under local regulations with COD≤100 mg/L, BOD5≤21 mg/L, SS≤52 mg/L, color≤32°. Results showed that the combined process could guarantee water reuse with high quality, and solve the problem of RO concentrate disposal.

  6. Membrane filtration technologies applied to municipal secondary effluents for potential reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Juan L; Benitez, F Javier; Leal, Ana I; Real, Francisco J; Teva, Fernando

    2010-05-15

    Four UF membranes (denoted GH, GK, PT and PW with MWCO of 1000, 2000, 5000 and 20,000Da, respectively) and four NF membranes (denoted DL, CK, DK and HL, with an approximate MWCO of 150-300Da in all cases) were used for the filtration of an effluent generated in a municipal wastewater plant after a secondary treatment. The influence of the most important operating variables (nature and MWCO of the membranes, transmembrane pressure, tangential velocity, and temperature) on the permeate flux was widely discussed, and the resistances to the permeate flux were determined following the resistances in series model. Rejection coefficients for parameters that measure the global pollutant content of the effluent (chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, absorbance at 254nm, turbidity, total nitrogen and total phosphorus) were also evaluated, and the results revealed that both UF and NF are feasible options for the treatment of this effluent, yielding a permeate stream that can be reused in several applications. Finally, 28 pharmaceutical compounds were initially detected in this effluent, and their respective rejection coefficients were determined, with eliminations higher than 75% in the case of NF with the HL membrane. Therefore, it is concluded that NF is an excellent option for the removal of toxic pharmaceuticals in municipal wastewaters.

  7. Domestic wash water reclamation for reuse as commode water supply using filtration: Reverse-osmosis separation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A combined filtration-reverse-osmosis water recovery system has been evaluated to determine its capability to reclaim domestic wash water for reuse as a commode water supply. The system produced water that met all chemical and physical requirements established by the U.S. Public Health Service for drinking water with the exception of carbon chloroform extractables, methylene blue active substances, and phenols. It is thought that this water is of sufficient quality to be reused as commode supply water. The feasibility of using a combined filtration and reverse-osmosis technique for reclaiming domestic wash water has been established. The use of such a technique for wash-water recovery will require a maintenance filter to remove solid materials including those less than 1 micron in size from the wash water. The reverse-osmosis module, if sufficiently protected from plugging, is an attractive low-energy technique for removing contaminants from domestic wash water.

  8. Techno-economic evaluation of membrane filtration for the recovery and re-use of tanning chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, W; Lucas, M

    2003-04-01

    The majority of pollution generated from leather manufacturing can be contributed to the inefficiency of chemical use in leather processing and to organic substances derived from the hides during processing. In particular, the overall tanning processes performed in drums can be characterized by a high consumption of water and chemicals, most of which are found in the final wastewater. To ensure full penetration and reaction of chemicals with collagen, chemicals are added in excess and are only partly up-taken by the leather. Significant savings of chemicals can be achieved by recovery and recycling of chemicals and water from part streams, thus reducing environmental impacts. This research formed an integrated approach to investigate and exploit the potential of a closed loop operation for various part streams of tanneries. Each of the process streams was separately collected, treated and purified by membrane technologies to obtain a recyclable liquor which can be re-used operationally. In this way a complete recovery of process liquors can be achieved for immediate operational re-use. Membrane technology has been applied to recover chemicals from un-hairing, vegetable tanning, chrome liquors and to polish saline part streams for re-use. By applying membrane filtration up to 90% of the treated liquors can be recovered giving a remaining concentrate volume of only 10%. The permeate obtained from several process areas contained to a high extent chemicals, which were re-used for leather processing.

  9. Treatment of the Bleaching Effluent from Sulfite Pulp Production by Ceramic Membrane Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Ebrahimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulp and paper waste water is one of the major sources of industrial water pollution. This study tested the suitability of ceramic tubular membrane technology as an alternative to conventional waste water treatment in the pulp and paper industry. In this context, in series batch and semi-batch membrane processes comprising microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, ceramic membranes were developed to reduce the chemical oxygen demand (COD and remove residual lignin from the effluent flow during sulfite pulp production. A comparison of the ceramic membranes in terms of separation efficiency and performance revealed that the two-stage process configuration with microfiltration followed by ultrafiltration was most suitable for the efficient treatment of the alkaline bleaching effluent tested herein, reducing the COD concentration and residual lignin levels by more than 35% and 70%, respectively.

  10. Research on ultra- filtration membrane technology used in bathing wastewater reusing%洗浴废水超滤膜处理回用技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛罡; 赵洪宾; 刘胜利; 袁一星; 高金良

    2000-01-01

    By use of ultra-filtration membrane in bathing wastewater reusing, this paper put forward acombined treatment process, which contained slight flocculation fiber filtration and ultra- filtration. Notonly were experiments on the main ccntamentation index of original water CODcr, turbidity and the removing performance of anion detergent LAS carried out, but also control methods of membrane pollutionwere provided in this study. The test results showed that when the flocculant dosage of aluminum sul-phate was 35~40mg/L, the fiber filter flow rate was 20m/h and the ultra-filtration flux was 40L/(m2 · h), combined treatment had many advantages such as high organic matter removal ratio, simpleprocess and easy operation management etc. This new process provided a new important method for dualwater recycling by membrane technology. It is suitbale especially for hotel bathing wastewater reusing.%将超滤膜技术用于洗浴废水处理回用,提出"微絮凝纤维过滤+超滤"组合工艺,分别就试验工艺对原水中主要污染指标CODc,、浊度、阴离子洗涤剂LAS的去除性能进行了试验研究,并提出了膜污染的控制措施。试验结果表明,洗浴废水超滤组合工艺处理效果好,流程简单,占地面积小,易于操作管理。

  11. 色谱法测定制浆造纸工业漂白废液中的草酸浓度%CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF OXALIC ACID IN BLEACHING FILTRATES FROM THE PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪枫; REIMANN Anders; J(O)NSSON Leif-j; NILVEBRANT Nils-olof

    2005-01-01

    Analysis and control of oxalic acid in bleaching filtrates has recently gained considerable attention in the pulp and paper industry due to problems with the formation of calcium oxalate scaling.Chromatographic methods,such as HPLC and ion chromatography(IC),are generally valuable as standard methods for determination of oxalic acid.In this study,a HPLC system equipped with an Aminex HPX-87H column was applied to determine oxalic acid in authentic bleaching filtrates.An established IC method based on separation with an anion-exchange column was used as reference method.The results showed that bleaching filtrates contain compounds interfering with the HPLC method.A strategy, dilution of the samples followed by treatment with activated carbon,was needed to obtain similar oxalic acid concentrations as provided by the reference method.The correlation(R=0.994) between the HPLC method and the IC method is described by the equation y=1.294 7x.The method improves the possibility for control of critical oxalic acid concentration in closed-loop bleaching streams.%近年来草酸钙(草酸垢)的形成在制浆造纸工业中造成诸多问题,因此如何分析及控制漂白废液中的草酸浓度就显得尤为重要.高效液相色谱和离子交换色谱等色谱法一般可以作为测定草酸的标准方法.本研究以一个基于阴离子交换柱的离子交换色谱法作为对照方法,利用一套配备了Aminex HPX-87H液相色谱柱的高效液相色谱系统测定漂白废液中的草酸浓度.结果显示,漂白废液中含有一些干扰高效液相色谱法测定的化合物.通过采用稀释样品后再经活性炭吸附的处理方法,可以得到较为满意的结果.分析发现高效液相色谱法与离子交换色谱(对照法)之间的相关性较好,相关系数为0.994.该方法的建立将有利于监控制浆造纸企业中闭路循环漂液中形成草酸钙时的临界草酸浓度.

  12. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF CMP PULP USING MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Zeinaly

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional bleaching of hardwood CMP pulp with magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH2 show significant benefits over bleaching with sodium hydroxide (NaOH under various conditions. Magnesium hydroxide bleaching generate higher optical properties, higher pulp yield and lower effluent COD at the same chemical charge, but the physical properties were found to be similar for both processes. The initial freeness of the bleached pulps and refining value to reach a target freeness (about 350 ml. CSF were more for the Mg(OH2-based process. The residual peroxide of filtrate from the Mg(OH2-based process was very high as compared to conventional bleaching.

  13. Application of micro filtration-reverse osmosis in wastewater reclamation and reuse in the urban park%微滤-反渗透技术在城市园区污水再生回用中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江; 郑东晟; 杨昆; 郭嘉; 吉春红; 王新春

    2013-01-01

    介绍微滤-反渗透“双膜法”在北京经济技术开发区园区污水再生回用中的应用实践,产水规模为60 000 t/d,相关的工程项目已被列入《2012年国家重点环境保护实用技术示范工程名录》.项目运行结果表明,“双膜法”技术可靠,运行稳定,再生水水质高于国家规范《城市污水再生利用分类》(GB/T 18919-2002)及相应分类再生水水质指标,水质合格率达到100%,水价低于开发区工业自来水水价.项目的实施有效缓解了开发区用水紧张问题,保护了开发区及周边地区的生态环境,同时为今后城市园区污水再生回用的研究和应用提供了参考和借鉴.%The application of micro filtration-reverse osmosis dual membrane system in wastewater reclamation and reuse in Beijing Economic Technological Development Area (BDA) urban park is described in this paper.This wastewater reclamation and reuse project has a scale of 60 000 t/d,and is listed into the "2012 State Key Environmental Protection Practical Technology Demonstration Project Catalog".Operation results show that the dual membrane system has the advantages of reliable technique and stable operation,and the product water quality is higher than "The Reuse of Urban Recycling Water Classified Standard (GB/T 18919-2002)".The product water quality 100% meets the specified requirement and the water producing cost in this project is superiority comparing to the tap water price in BDA.The project is an effective approach to alleviate water shortage in BDA and protects the ecological environment of BDA and its surrounding area.This project also provides reference for the future study and application on urban park wastewater reclamation and reuse.

  14. APPLICATION OF CONTINUOUS TUBULAR MICRO-FILTRATION MEMBRANE + RO MEMBRANE FILTRATION TECHNOLOGY TO TREATMENT AND REUSE OF HEAVY METAL WASTEWATER OF PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD(PCB)%连续管式微滤+RO膜过滤技术在PCB行业重金属废水回用中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永

    2012-01-01

    Continuous tubular micro-filtration membrane +RO membrane filtration technology is used for treatment and reuse of heavy metal wastewater of printed circuit board(PCB).The running result shows that the systems total rate of desalinization is over 99%;removal rate of COD is 98.6%;removal rate of Cu2+ is 99.97%.This system not only commonly meets customers' need but also has strong resistance to overload shock.%采用管式微滤+RO膜过滤技术对PCB厂重金属废水进行处理回用。运行结果表明:回用处理系统总的脱盐率〉99%,COD去除率为98.6%,Cu2+去除率为99.97%;该系统产水完全达到业主要求,且耐冲击负荷强。

  15. Skin Bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Samira M.

    2015-01-01

    In this project, I aim to investigate the reasoning behind the practice of skin bleaching by analyzing the documentary ”Dark Girls”, to gain a better understanding of race and colorism issues. Also this project tries to see if there is a connection with history and if this has been a part of making the european beauty ideal determine the choices black’s make in regards to beauty.

  16. Filtration Fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ken; Hunsaker, Scot

    1997-01-01

    Examines how choice of commercial swimming-pool filtration systems is driven by the project-specific needs of the pools. Also highlighted are definitions of specific terms used when discussing filtration systems. Questions that pool designers can answer to make filtration-system purchasing decisions are listed. (GR)

  17. Wastewater reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan R. Radosavljević

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity and water pollution are some of the crucial issues that must be addressed within local and global perspectives. One of the ways to reduce the impact of water scarcity  and to minimizine water pollution is to expand water and wastewater reuse. The local conditions including regulations, institutions, financial mechanisms, availability of local technology and stakeholder participation have a great influence on the decisions for wastewater reuse. The increasing awareness of food safety and the influence of the countries which import food are influencing policy makers and agriculturists to improve the standards of wastewater reuse in agriculture. The environmental awareness of consumers has been putting pressure on the producers (industries to opt for environmentally sound technologies including those which conserve water and reduce the level of pollution. It may be observed that we have to move forwards to implement strategies and plans for wastewater reuse. However, their success and sustainability will depend on political will, public awareness and active support from national and international agencies to create favorable    environment for the promotion of environmentally sustainable technologies. Wastewater treatment has a long history, especially in agriculture, but also in industry and households. Poor quality of wastewater can pose a significant risk to the health of farmers and users of agricultural products. The World Health Organization (WHO is working on a project for the reuse of wastewater in agriculture. To reduce effects of human activities to the minimum, it is necessary to provide such technical and technological solutions that would on the one hand ensure complying with  the existing regulations and legislation, and on the other hand provide economically viable systems as seen through investments and operating costs. The use of wastewater The practice of using wastewater varies from country to country. Its

  18. Shortening filtrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ENOCHS Edgar E.

    2012-01-01

    Let C be a set of modules.We argue that there is an ordinal κ such that if a module has a filtration by modules in C,then it has a filtration of length κ by direct sums of modules in C.As an application we give another way to prove a result of Saorín and (S)(t)oví(c)ek and of (S)(t)oví(c)ek.

  19. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  20. GSPEL - Air Filtration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Evaluation capabilities for air filtration devices The Air Filtration Lab provides testing of air filtration devices to demonstrate and validate new or legacy system...

  1. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 双膜法在防伪纸生产废水深度处理与回用中的应用%Application of Continuous Membrane Filtration and Reverse Osmosis to Advanced Treatment and Reuse of Anti-counterfeit Paper Mill Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建立; 戴海平; 董廷尉; 柯永文

    2011-01-01

    针对防伪纸厂废水处理站的二沉池出水,采用中试规模的连续膜过滤(CMF)/反渗透(RO)集成工艺进行深度处理,以期能够满足回用的要求.结果表明,超滤膜有较强的抗污染能力,其过滤出水浊度<0.5 NTU,SS值基本为零,SDI值<3,完全能够满足RO的进水要求;RO产水COD平均为1.7 mg/L,电导率为10 μS/cm,满足防伪纸生产工艺回用水质的要求.采用双膜法深度处理防伪纸生产废水并回用具有工程可行性.%A pilot-scale combined process of continuous membrane filtration (CMF) and reverse osmosis was used for advanced treatment of secondary sedimentation tank effluent in an anti-counterfeit paper mill to meet the wastewater reuse requirement. The results show that the CMF permeate satisfies all requirements of RO influent due to its high anti-pollution capacity, turbidity of less than 0.5 NTU, SS of about zero and SDI of less than 3. RO permeate meets the requirements of water quality for paper manufacturing because its permeate COD is 1.7 mg/L, and the conductivity is less than 10 μS/cm. The combined process for advanced treatment and reuse of anti-counterfeit paper mill wastewater is feasible in engineering application.

  3. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  4. Limits of Software Reuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holenderski, L.

    2006-01-01

    Software reuse is considered one of the main techniques to increasesoftware productivity. We present two simple mathematical argumentsthat show some theoretical limits of reuse. It turns out that the increase of productivity due to internal reuse is at most linear, farfrom the needed exponential gr

  5. BLEACHING NEPTUNE BALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONET Maria Angeles

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Posidonia Oceanic is a seaweed from Mediterranean Sea and it is more concentrated at the Balerian SEA. This implies the Valencian Community also. It forms vaste underwater meadows in the sea and are part of the Mediterranean ecosystem. It is a sea-grass specie with fruits and flowers. Leaves are ribbon-like and they grow in winter and at the end of summer some of them are separated and arrive to some sea line. Fuit is separated and can floate, it is known as “the olive of the sea” mainly in Italy, or as the Neptune Balls. As it can be used in different fields, it is is being studied in order ro have the precitice tests. Some authors have reported the manufacturing of fully bio-based comites with a gluten matrix by hot-press molding. And it has been considered as an effective insulator for building industry or even though to determine the presence of mercure in the Mediterranean sea some years ago. As many applications can be designed from that fibers, it has been considered to be bleached in order to used them in fashionable products. Consequently, its original brown color is not the most suitable one and it should be bleached as many other cellulosic fibers. The aim of this paper is to bleache neptune balls however, the inner fibers were not accessible at all and it implied not to bleach the inner fibers in the neptune ball. Further studiesd will consider bleaching the individualized fibers.

  6. Bleaching of Wool with Sodium Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Yilmazer, MSc.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An untreated wool fabric was bleached both with sodium borohydride (SBH in the presence of sodium bisulphite (SBS solution and with a commercial H2O2 bleaching method. The concentration effects of SBH and SBS, bleaching time, pH and temperature on SBH bleaching process were investigated. Whiteness, yellowness and alkali solubility results were assessed for both bleaching methods. The results showed that whiteness degrees obtained with SBH bleaching was comparable with that of H2O2 bleaching method; whereas the alkali solubility values of the SBH bleaching was superior to the H2O2 bleaching.

  7. GSPEL - Air Filtration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Evaluation capabilities for air filtration devicesThe Air Filtration Lab provides testing of air filtration devices to demonstrate and validate new or legacy system...

  8. Bleaching of Black Human Hair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琳

    2001-01-01

    Bleaching of black human hair has been studied systematically. On the basis of experimental data the technology of human hair bleaching through five processes was established. The optimum technology of improving the whiteness and reducing damage on fibers has been found. The technology can provide good luster,smooth handle and relatively high strength retention to human hair used for wigs or drama articles, meeting the needs of people better. Moreover, it also has important reference value to bleaching of other colored fibers.

  9. Greywater Treatment and Reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Ekrem ÜSTÜN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study, to examine grey water treatment and reuse. For this aim, previous literature studies been research on and interpreted. Project began with study of physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the gray water. At the second part; grey water treatment and reuse were examined. At the third part; the technologies used for the methods treatment of gray water were explained. Then from costs and previous studies about grey water reuse were mentioned.

  10. Water Reclamation and Reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of water reclamation and reuse. This review covers: (1) water resources planning; (2) agriculture and irrigation; (3) ground recharge; (4) industrial reuse; (5) health considerations; and (6) technology developments. A list of 217 references is also presented. (HM)

  11. USING Mg(OH2 IN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF WHEAT STRAW SODA-AQ PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlan Liu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The peroxide bleaching of high yield pulps from wood with Mg(OH2 has been developing recently in the pulp and paper industry. However, there is still a lack of data on the application of Mg(OH2 in peroxide bleaching of non-wood fibres. In this work, our purpose was to study the effect of Mg(OH2 on peroxide bleaching of wheat straw soda-AQ pulp. The results showed that Mg(OH2 significantly improved peroxide bleaching efficiency (expressed as the ratio between the brightness gain and the H2O2 consumption and selectivity (expressed as the ratio between the brightness gain and the viscosity losses of wheat straw soda-AQ pulp. The brightness, viscosity, and yield of bleached pulp can be significantly enhanced by increasing the replacement ratio of Mg(OH2. However, at 100% replacement of NaOH with Mg(OH2, the brightness of bleached pulp was much lower than that of the bleached pulp with NaOH as the sole alkaline source. When 24 to 73% of the NaOH was replaced with Mg(OH2, the COD of the bleaching filtrate was 11 to 38% lower than that of the NaOH as the sole alkaline source. The lower solubility and alkalinity of Mg(OH2, as well as the reduction of Cu ion content in bleached pulp were proposed as accounting for the favorable effect of Mg(OH2 on peroxide bleaching of wheat straw soda-AQ pulp.

  12. Reuse rate of treated wastewater in water reuse system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Yao-bo; YANG Wen-bo; LI Gang; WU Lin-lin; WEI Yuan-song

    2005-01-01

    A water quality model for water reuse was made by mathematics induction. The relationship among the reuse rate of treated wastewater(R), pollutant concentration of reused water( Cs ), pollutant concentration of influent( C0 ), removal efficiency of pollutant in wastewater(E), and the standard of reuse water were discussed in this study. According to the experiment result of a toilet wastewater treatment and reuse with membrane bioreactors, R would be set at less than 40%, on which all the concerned parameters could meet with the reuse water standards. To raise R of reuse water in the toilet, an important way was to improve color removal of the wastewater.

  13. Reuse and Restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Like members of all pre-modern societies, ancient Egyptians practiced various forms of recycling. The reuse of building materials by rulers is attested throughout Egyptian history and was motivated by ideological and economic concerns. Reuse of masonry from the dilapidated monuments of royal predecessors may have given legitimacy to newer constructions, but in some cases, economic considerations or even antipathy towards an earlier ruler were the decisive factors. Private individuals also mad...

  14. Water Reuse: Using Reclaimed Water For Irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    Haering, Kathryn C.; Evanylo, Gregory K.; Benham, Brian Leslie, 1960-; Goatley, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Describes water reuse and reclaimed water, explains how reclaimed water is produced, options for water reuse, water reuse regulations, and agronomic concerns with water reuse, and provides several case studies of water reuse.

  15. Glomerular filtration rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007305.htm Glomerular filtration rate To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check ...

  16. Rotary filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, David T.; Maxwell, David N.

    2011-04-19

    A rotary filtration apparatus for filtering a feed fluid into permeate is provided. The rotary filtration apparatus includes a container that has a feed fluid inlet. A shaft is at least partially disposed in the container and has a passageway for the transport of permeate. A disk stack made of a plurality of filtration disks is mounted onto the shaft so that rotation of the shaft causes rotation of the filtration disks. The filtration disks may be made of steel components and may be welded together. The shaft may penetrate a filtering section of the container at a single location. The rotary filtration apparatus may also incorporate a bellows seal to prevent leakage along the shaft, and an around the shaft union rotary joint to allow for removal of permeate. Various components of the rotary filtration apparatus may be removed as a single assembly.

  17. Aligning the economic modeling of software reuse with reuse practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmus, D.; Meijler, 27696

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to current practices where software reuse is applied recursively and reusable assets are tailored trough parameterization or specialization, existing reuse economic models assume that (i) the cost of reusing a software asset depends on its size and (ii) reusable assets are developed from

  18. Promoter reuse in prokaryotes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijveen, H.; Matus-Garcia, M.; Passel, van M.W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence shows promoters being reused separate from their downstream gene, thus providing a mechanism for the efficient and rapid rewiring of a gene’s transcriptional regulation. We have identified over 4000 groups of highly similar promoters using a conservative sequence similarity search

  19. 21 CFR 582.1975 - Bleached beeswax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bleached beeswax. 582.1975 Section 582.1975 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1975 Bleached beeswax. (a) Product. Bleached beeswax (white wax). (b) Conditions of...

  20. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, T.Y.; Chin, C.J.; Lu, S.C.; Yiacoumi, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [and others

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration consists of two steps: heterogeneous particle flocculation of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles in a stirred tank and high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic-seeding filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic seeding filtration are theoretically and experimentally investigated. A trajectory model that includes hydrodynamic resistance, van der Waals, and electrostatic forces is developed to calculate the flocculation frequency in a turbulent-shear regime. Fractal dimension is introduced to simulate the open structure of aggregates. A magnetic-filtration model that consists of trajectory analysis, a particle build-up model, a breakthrough model, and a bivariate population-balance model is developed to predict the breakthrough curve of magnetic-seeding filtration. A good agreement between modeling results and experimental data is obtained. The results show that the model developed in this study can be used to predict the performance of magnetic-seeding filtration without using empirical coefficients or fitting parameters. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Application of ultrafiltration in the pulp and paper industry: metals removal and whitewater reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C R; Silva, C M; Milanez, A F

    2007-01-01

    In the pulp and paper industry, the water use minimization is a constant target. One way to reduce water use is to recycle the effluent in a closed-cycle concept. In paper mills, the main source of liquid effluent is the so-called whitewater, which is the excess water, originated from pulp stock dewatering and other fibre contaminated water. This research studied the reuse of paper mill whitewater after membrane ultrafiltration (UF) in the paper machine and in the pulp bleach plant of an integrated mill. Contaminant removal and flux behaviour of the UF system were evaluated. The treatment by ultrafiltration was technically feasible and the treated whitewater had good potential to be reused in some processes in the paper machine. The reuse of ultrafiltered whitewater in the bleaching plant was not recommended because of the high level of soluble calcium present in this stream. Therefore, a combined treatment of the whitewater using the principle of precipitation and ultrafiltration was proposed showing good results and enabling the use of the treated whitewater in the bleach plant.

  2. Assessment of the process of cottonseed oil bleaching in hexane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megahed, Ola A.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been initiated to assess the feasibility of bleaching cottonseed oil in miscella as a processing step next to alkali refining in miscella. Alkali refining of cottonseed oil in miscella has several advantages over conventional refining technologies with respect to oil quality, oil losses and process cost. Therefore, the process efficiency of the bleaching of cottonseed oil in presence of hexane (at a volumetric ratio of 1:1, has been studied and compared to that without solvent. The process efficiency has been evaluated according to the decolourization capacity, the oil losses on spent earth, the filtration rate of the oil from the clay and the acidity of the bleached oil as well as its peroxide content. The bleaching in presence of hexane was carried out at 25ºC whereas that by conventional bleaching at 110ºC. Different clay loads were used in each of the two bleaching techniques and the colour indices of the oils before and after bleaching determined in each case. The results were used to predict Freundlich adsorption equations for the oil pigments in both cases. These equations were then used to predict the colour of the oils obtained by bleaching of refined oils of different grades. The results have shown that oil decolourization is more efficient in presence of solvent when the starting oil is of an acceptable grade and the reverse is true for low grade oils. Also, the possibility of oil oxidation during bleaching is less in presence of solvent. Moreover, the bleaching in miscella has proved two other additional advantages over conventional bleaching. The filtration of oil from clay is much faster in miscella bleaching and the oil losses on spent earth is lower. This will be reflected on the overall process economy.Este trabajo ha sido iniciado para evaluar la viabilidad de la decoloración del aceite de semilla de algodón en miscela como un paso de procesado próximo a la refinación alcalina en miscela. La refinaci

  3. Filtration in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    There is a considerable and ongoing effort aimed at understanding the transport and the deposition of suspended particles in porous media, especially non-Fickian transport and non-exponential deposition of particles. In this work, the influential parameters in filtration models are studied...... to understand their effects on the non-Fickian transport and the non-exponential deposition. The filtration models are validated by the comparisons between the modelling results and the experimental data.The elliptic equation with distributed filtration coefficients may be applied to model non-Fickian transport...... and hyperexponential deposition. The filtration model accounting for the migration of surface associated particles may be applied for non-monotonic deposition....

  4. Water Filtration Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    American Water Corporation manufactures water filtration products which incorporate technology originally developed for manned space operations. The formula involves granular activated charcoal and other ingredients, and removes substances by catalytic reactions, mechanical filtration, and absorption. Details are proprietary. A NASA literature search contributed to development of the compound. The technology is being extended to a deodorizing compound called Biofresh which traps gas and moisture inside the unit. Further applications are anticipated.

  5. Bleaching and recovery patterns of corals in Palk Bay, India: An indication of bleaching resilient reef

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manikandan, B.; Ravindran, J.; Vidya, P.J.; ManiMurali, R.

    Frequency and severity of coral bleaching events increased in recent years affecting the recovery and resilience of corals. In this study, influence of bleaching and recovery patterns of corals on the resilience potential of Palk Bay reef...

  6. Modeling chlorine dioxide bleaching of chemical pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Tarvo, Ville

    2010-01-01

    This doctoral thesis deals with the phenomenon-based modeling of pulp bleaching. Previous bleaching models typically utilize one or two empirical correlations to predict the kinetics in kappa number development. Empirical correlations are simple to develop, but their parameters are often tied to the validation system. A major benefit of physico-chemical phenomenon models is that they are valid regardless of the reaction environment. Furthermore, modeling the bleaching processes at molecular l...

  7. PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF LOW-FREENESS TMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongLiu; Y.Ni; Z.Li,G.Court

    2004-01-01

    Peroxide bleaching is an essential unit operation toproduce value-added mechanical pulp-based papergrade. In this paper, we presented the results fromperoxide bleaching of low-freeness TMP for theproduction of SC paper. Two aspects wereaddressed; the effect of pulp strength and theformation of anionic trashes. The strength properties,such as tensile, burst and zero-span tensile, areimproved after the peroxide bleaching process. Theamount of anionic trashes formed is almostproportional to the hydrogen peroxide charge.

  8. Water regeneration and water reuse pilot experience in paper industry; Experiencia piloto de regeneracion y reulitizacion de agua en el sector papelero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estiles Olive, J.; Vidal Parellada, P.

    2008-07-01

    Water scarcity in some geographical areas has promoted water consumption optimization and wastewater regeneration and reuse studies. This paper explains pilot study is a paper mill industry using membrane bioreactor (MBR) and nano filtration (NF), as second pass treatment, to regenerate wastewater in order to be reused in the paper mill process. due to excellent pilot results industrial application is now under study. (Author)

  9. Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Seneca, François O; DeNofrio, Jan C; Krediet, Cory J; Palumbi, Stephen R; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-09-23

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes, and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light.

  10. Visualization of water flow during filtration using flat filtration materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrůza Jakub

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Filtration materials are very important elements of some industrial appliances. Water filtration is a separation of solid materials from fluid. Solid particles are captured on the frontal area of the filtration textile and only liquid passes through it. It is important to know the filtration process in a detailed way to be able to develop filtration materials. Visualization of filtration process enables a better view of the filtration. This method also enables to determine efficiency and homogeneity of filtration using image analysis. For this purpose, a new waterfiltration measuring setup was proposed and constructed. Filtration material is mounted into the optically transparent place in the setup. Laser sheet is directed into this place as in the case of Particle Image Velocimetry measuring method. Monochrome and sensitive camera records the light scattered by seeding particles in water. The seeding particles passing through the filter serve for measuring filtration efficiency, and also for visualization of filtration process. Filtration setup enables to measure also the pressure drop and a flow. The signals are processed by National Instruments compactDAQ system and UMA software. Microfibrous and nanofibrous filtration materials are tested by this measuring method. In the case of nanofibrous filtration, appropriate size of seeding particles is needed to be used to perform a process of filtration.

  11. COOPERATIVE LAND REUSE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-07-30

    The objective of this study was to determine what financial return, if any, DOE would realize if they invest solely in removal of the asbestos from these three Hanford steam plants and the associated large bore distribution piping at the site. Once the asbestos was removed the strategy was to bring in companies that specialize in salvage and material re-use and have them remove, at no cost to DOE, the plants and the associated large bore piping. The salvage companies we contacted had said that if they didn't have to remove asbestos, they may be able to realize enough value from these plants to offset their demolition and/or dismantling cost. The results were not what we expected but they do offer DOE some favorable financial alternatives to their present approach. The study concluded that there was very little salvage and/or re-use value remaining in the steam plant material that could be used to offset the demolition and/or dismantling cost. The notable exception to this is the removal of the 24 inch steam piping that runs from 200E to 200W areas (see IDM executive summary under Dismantling cost). It is estimated that the re-use value of the 24-inch piping would more than pay for the dismantling cost of this piping. On a more favorable note, it does appear as though the cost of conventional demolition can be reduced by a factor of 3 to 5 if the asbestos is removed first and the demolition is performed using competitive and commercial practices. Both estimates in this study are similar except that IDM did not include floor slab removal nor remove the same quantity of piping. This is why we are using a range of 3 to 5 as a reduction factor. The IDM estimate (using union labor) for demolition after removal of asbestos was approximately $1.5M versus $10.0M for accomplishing the work using Hanford practices and rates.

  12. Biochemical methane potential of kraft bleaching effluent and codigestion with other in-mill streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Dahl, Olli; Master, Emma;

    2016-01-01

    and in combination: total bleaching effluent, alkaline bleaching effluent, kraft evaporator condensate, and chemithermomechanical pulping effluent. The total bleaching effluent, consisting of the chlorine dioxide bleaching and alkaline bleaching effluents, exhibited the highest potential for organic matter...

  13. In vitro penetration of bleaching agents into the pulp chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Valera, M C; Mancini, M N G

    2004-01-01

    To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures.......To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures....

  14. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  15. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  16. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depaoli, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This task will investigate the capabilities of magnetic-seeding filtration for the enhanced removal of magnetic and nonmagnetic particulates from liquids. This technology appies to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatant. Magnetic-seeding filtration can be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal-size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes.

  17. Filtration by eyelashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistarakula, Krishna; Bergin, Mike; Hu, David

    2010-11-01

    Nearly every mammalian and avian eye is rimmed with lashes. We investigate experimentally the ability of lashes to reduce airborne particle deposition in the eye. We hypothesize that there is an optimum eyelash length that maximizes both filtration ability and extent of peripheral vision. This hypothesis is tested using a dual approach. Using preserved heads from 36 species of animals at the American Museum of Natural History, we determine the relationship between eye size and eyelash geometry (length and spacing). We test the filtration efficacy of these geometries by deploying outdoor manikins and measuring particle deposition rate as a function of eyelash length.

  18. Effect of temperature and bleaching agent on bleaching of liquid Cheddar whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Barbano, D M; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2012-01-01

    The use of whey protein as an ingredient in foods and beverages is increasing, and thus demand for colorless and mild-tasting whey protein is rising. Bleaching is commonly applied to fluid colored cheese whey to decrease color, and different temperatures and bleach concentrations are used. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of hot and cold bleaching, the point of bleaching (before or after fat separation), and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and volatile components of liquid colored and uncolored Cheddar whey. First, Cheddar whey was manufactured, pasteurized, fat-separated, and subjected to one of a number of hot (68°C) or cold (4°C) bleaching applications [hydrogen peroxide (HP) 50 to 500 mg/kg; benzoyl peroxide (BP) 25 to 100 mg/kg] followed by measurement of residual norbixin and color by reflectance. Bleaching agent concentrations were then selected for the second trial. Liquid colored Cheddar whey was manufactured in triplicate and pasteurized. Part of the whey was collected (no separation, NSE) and the rest was subjected to fat separation (FSE). The NSE and FSE wheys were then subdivided and bleaching treatments (BP 50 or 100 mg/kg and HP 250 or 500 mg/kg) at 68°C for 30 min or 4°C for 16 h were applied. Control NSE and FSE with no added bleach were also subjected to each time-temperature combination. Volatile compounds from wheys were evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and norbixin (annatto) was extracted and quantified to compare bleaching efficacy. Proximate analysis, including total solids, protein, and fat contents, was also conducted. Liquid whey subjected to hot bleaching at both concentrations of HP or at 100mg/kg BP had greater lipid oxidation products (aldehydes) compared with unbleached wheys, 50mg/kg BP hot-bleached whey, or cold-bleached wheys. No effect was detected between NSE and FSE liquid Cheddar whey on the relative abundance of volatile lipid oxidation products. Wheys bleached with BP had

  19. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  20. Software reuse environment user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This document describes the services provided by the prototype Software Reuse Environment, which was developed by CTA for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 520. This is one of three guides delivered by CTA as part of the environment. The other two guides are: Software Generation and Installation Guide; and SEMANTX--Defining the Schema. The Software Generation and Installation Guide describes the software source modules that make up the Reuse Environment, with instructions on how to generate and install an executable system from the source code. SEMANTX--Defining the Schema describes how a reuse database is created. Actually this guide is more general than the reuse database, as it describes how to generate a SEMANTX database. SEMANTX is an off-the-shelf tool that we have used to implement the reuse database. It is a product of Semantyk Systems, Inc. The Software Reuse Environment is built upon SEMANTX as well as on the IDE Structured Analysis Integrated Environment. (IDE is Interactive Development Environments, Inc.) SEMANTX itself is built on top of the Unify Database Management System. To use the Software Reuse Environment you should have the User's Manuals for SEMANTX, for Unify, and for the IDE software. CTA has provided all of these with the environment.

  1. Enlargements of filtrations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Corcuera, J M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we review some old and new results about the enlargement of filtrations problem, as well as their applications to credit risk and insider trading problems. The enlargement of filtrations problem consists in the study of conditions under which a semimartingale remains a semimartingale when the filtration is enlarged, and, in such a case, how to find the Doob-Meyer decomposition. Filtrations may be enlarged in different ways. In this paper we consider initial and progressive filtration enlargements made by random variables and processes. Keywords: Credit Risk, Insider Trading, Enlargement of Filtrations

  2. Water Treatment Technology - Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on filtration provides instructional materials for six competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purposes of sedimentation basins and flocculation…

  3. THE STUDY ON TCF BLEACHING OF NS REED PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meihong Niu; Shulan Shi; Jinghui Zhou; Yunzhan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we have researched TCF bleaching on reed pulp including oxygen delignification, oxygen delignification with H2O2 intensification and H2O2 bleaching. The results show that Op-P bleaching process on NS reed pulp is suitable and the brightness of bleached pulp is up to 82% ISO.

  4. THE STUDY ON TCF BLEACHING OF NS REED PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MeihongNiu; ShulanShi; JinghuiZhou; YunzhanZhang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we have researched TCF bleaching on reed pulp including oxygen delignification, oxygen delignification with H202 intensification and H2O2 bleaching. The results show that Op-P bleaching process on NS reed pulp is suitable and the brightness of bleached pulp is up to 82%ISO.

  5. Economic Analysis on Wastewater Reuse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yushan WAN; Na LI

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The shortage of water resources social development. Wastewater reuse is an has become a major limiting factor for effective solution to solve water short- ages, which not only has economic benefits, but also has significant social and en- vironmental benefits. The economic evaluation is an important component in the study of wastewater reuse feasibility and the basis for the program optimization and economic feasibility determination.

  6. Pretreatment of highly turbid coal mine drainage by a chemical agent free filtration system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chunhui; He Xiong; Li Kaihe; Wu Dongsheng; Guo Yanrong; Wang Can

    2012-01-01

    A filtration system used without chemical agents for the pretreatment of turbid coal mine drainage is described in this paper.The influence of different aperture sizes and different motor speeds was investigated during the study.The experimental results show that for aperture diameters of 0.4,0.6,or 0.8 mm smaller apertures provide more complete filtration.Rotations of 12,20,28,or 40 r/min show that higher speeds give more efficient filtration.Suspended solids decreased in both particle size and concentration after the filtration.The separated slime can be directly reused as a fuel.Efficient filtration pretreatment systems for coal mine drainage were investigated and the economic feasibility is analyzed in this article.

  7. Coral bleaching: the role of the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Andrew H; Bhagooli, Ranjeet; Ralph, Peter J; Takahashi, Shunichi

    2009-01-01

    Coral bleaching caused by global warming is one of the major threats to coral reefs. Very recently, research has focused on the possibility of corals switching symbionts as a means of adjusting to accelerating increases in sea surface temperature. Although symbionts are clearly of fundamental importance, many aspects of coral bleaching cannot be readily explained by differences in symbionts among coral species. Here we outline several potential mechanisms by which the host might influence the bleaching response, and conclude that predicting the fate of corals in response to climate change requires both members of the symbiosis to be considered equally.

  8. The role of microorganisms in coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Eugene; Kushmaro, Ariel; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Banin, Ehud; Yossi, Loya

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is the disruption of the symbiosis between the coral host and its endosymbiotic algae. The prevalence and severity of the disease have been correlated with high seawater temperature. During the last decade, the major hypothesis to explain coral bleaching is that high water temperatures cause irreversible damage to the symbiotic algae resulting in loss of pigment and/or algae from the holobiont. Here, we discuss the evidence for an alternative but not mutually exclusive concept, the microbial hypothesis of coral bleaching.

  9. PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF LOW-FREENESS TMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Liu; Y. Ni; Z. Li; G. Court

    2004-01-01

    Peroxide bleaching is an essential unit operation to produce value-added mechanical pulp-based paper grade. In this paper, we presented the results from peroxide bleaching of low-freeness TMP for the production of SC paper. Two aspects were addressed; the effect of pulp strength and the formation of anionic trashes. The strength properties,such as tensile, burst and zero-span tensile, are improved after the peroxide bleaching process. The amount of anionic trashes formed is almost proportional to the hydrogen peroxide charge.

  10. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current

  11. Theoretical information reuse and integration

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Information Reuse and Integration addresses the efficient extension and creation of knowledge through the exploitation of Kolmogorov complexity in the extraction and application of domain symmetry. Knowledge, which seems to be novel, can more often than not be recast as the image of a sequence of transformations, which yield symmetric knowledge. When the size of those transformations and/or the length of that sequence of transforms exceeds the size of the image, then that image is said to be novel or random. It may also be that the new knowledge is random in that no such sequence of transforms, which produces it exists, or is at least known. The nine chapters comprising this volume incorporate symmetry, reuse, and integration as overt operational procedures or as operations built into the formal representations of data and operators employed. Either way, the aforementioned theoretical underpinnings of information reuse and integration are supported.

  12. Magnetic flocculation and filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yiacoumi, Sotira; Chin, Ching-Ju; Yin, Tung-Yu [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Tsouris, C., DePaoli, D.W.; Chattin, M.R.; Spurrier, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A model is available in predicting flocculation frequencies between particles of various properties under the influence of a magnetic field. This model provides a basic understanding of fundamental phenomena, such as particle-particle and particle-collector interactions, occurring in HGMF (high gradient magnetic field), and will be extended to describe experimental data of particle flocculation and filtration and predict the performance of high- gradient magnetic filters. It is also expected that this model will eventually lead to a tool for design and optimization of magnetic filters for environmental, metallurgical, biochemical, and other applications.

  13. Dynamic optical filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Jean-Loup (Inventor); Lu, Edward T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic optical filtration system and method effectively blocks bright light sources without impairing view of the remainder of the scene. A sensor measures light intensity and position so that selected cells of a shading matrix may interrupt the view of the bright light source by a receptor. A beamsplitter may be used so that the sensor may be located away from the receptor. The shading matrix may also be replaced by a digital micromirror device, which selectively sends image data to the receptor.

  14. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  15. Encouraging Reuse of Design Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Saeema

    2005-01-01

    The long-term aim of this research is to develop a method to index design knowledge that is intuitive to an engineering designer and therefore encourage the reuse of information. Eighteen interviews were carried out to understand how designers described the process of designing a particular...

  16. Filtration properties of nonwovens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gador, W; Jankowska, E

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results and conclusions from experimental investigations concerning filtration properties of nonwovens. The needled nonwovens were made from polyester fibres (PTE) with average fibre diameter 12 micrometres and polypropylene fibres (PP) with average fibre diameter 32 micrometres. Nonwovens were produced out of each of those fibres or out of a mixture of polyester and polypropylene fibres. This paper also presents investigations of nonwoven fabric made of polypropylene fibres (PP) with average fibre diameter 2.6 micrometres, which was formed according to melt-blown technology. Oil mist, as challenge aerosol, was used to evaluate the performance of filter media at various aerosol velocities. The average oil mist test aerosol particle diameter was 0.3 micrometre. Filter penetration was measured at oil mist concentration 0.24 g/m(3).

  17. Modus of filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Theodore H

    2006-01-01

    Experience teaches that particles larger than the pores of a filter cannot negotiate its passage. Other retention mechanisms are less obvious than sieve retention or size exclusion. They are electrical in nature, and find expression in the bonding alliances that mutually attract (or repel) filters and particles. The influence of hydrogen bonds, of van der Waals forces, of hydrophobic adsorptions, and of transient polarities on particle retentions are set forth in terms of the double electrical layer concept that also governs colloidal destabilizations. The origins of differences in membrane porosities is explained, as also the importance of the filtration conditions. The singularity of the particle-fluid-filter relationship on organism and/or pore size alteration is stressed.

  18. Air filtration in HVAC systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ginestet, Alain; Tronville, Paolo; Hyttinen, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Air filtration Guidebook will help the designer and user to understand the background and criteria for air filtration, how to select air filters and avoid problems associated with hygienic and other conditions at operation of air filters. The selection of air filters is based on external conditions such as levels of existing pollutants, indoor air quality and energy efficiency requirements.

  19. Local stressors reduce coral resilience to bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carilli, Jessica E; Norris, Richard D; Black, Bryan A; Walsh, Sheila M; McField, Melanie

    2009-07-22

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2-3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change.

  20. On luminescence bleaching of tidal channel sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Pejrup, Morten; Murray, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the processes responsible for bleaching of the quartz OSL signal from tidal channel sediment. Tidal dynamics are expected to play an important role for complete bleaching of tidal sediments. However, no studies have examined the amount of reworking occurring in tidal channels...... and on tidal flats due to the mixing caused by currents and waves. We apply bed level data to evaluate the amount of vertical sediment reworking in modern tidal channels and at a tidal flat. Cycles of deposition and erosion are measured with a bed level sensor, and the results show that gross sedimentation...... on the quantitative measures of sediment reworking, we suggest that repeated depositional and erosional cycles allow for complete bleaching of the tidal flat sediment, and we infer that quartz OSL dating can provide accurate ages for shallow tidal channel fill....

  1. Hemicellulases in the bleaching of chemical pulps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suurnäkki, A; Tenkanen, M; Buchert, J; Viikari, L

    1997-01-01

    Hemicellulase-aided bleaching is the first full-scale biotechnical application in the pulp and paper industry which truly exploits the unique specificity and safety of biocatalysts. Hemicellulases are used to modify the structure of xylan and glucomannan in pulp fibers in order to enhance the chemical delignification. This technology can be combined with various types of kraft pulping processes and bleaching sequences. The aims of the enzymatic treatment depend on the actual mill conditions, and may be related to environmental demands, reduction of chemical costs, or maintenance or even improvement of product quality. The technology is applied on the mill scale in several countries. This review describes the principles of the enzyme-aided bleaching, the composition of the fiber substrates, the basic enzymology involved, and the present knowledge of the mechanisms of the action of enzymes, as well as the practical results and advantages obtained on the laboratory and industrial scale.

  2. Review of the technological approaches for grey water treatment and reuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangyue; Wichmann, Knut; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2009-05-15

    Based on literature review, a non-potable urban grey water reuse standard is proposed and the treatment alternatives and reuse scheme for grey water reuses are evaluated according to grey water characteristics and the proposed standard. The literature review shows that all types of grey water have good biodegradability. The bathroom and the laundry grey water are deficient in both nitrogen and phosphors. The kitchen grey water has a balanced COD: N: P ratio. The review also reveals that physical processes alone are not sufficient to guarantee an adequate reduction of the organics, nutrients and surfactants. The chemical processes can efficiently remove the suspended solids, organic materials and surfactants in the low strength grey water. The combination of aerobic biological process with physical filtration and disinfection is considered to be the most economical and feasible solution for grey water recycling. The MBR appears to be a very attractive solution in collective urban residential buildings.

  3. Reuse and recycling of secondary effluents in refineries employing advanced multi-barrier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahnsteiner, J; Mittal, R

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the reclamation and reuse of municipal secondary effluents, as well as the reclamation and recycling of refinery secondary effluents, are technically and economically evaluated. It is shown that both practices are feasible and sustainable, and that the reclamation costs depend largely on specific circumstances such as legal requirements, price policy, reuse application, raw water composition, etc. The reclaimed water is reused, or respectively recycled, as boiler make-up. Therefore both reclamation plants employ advanced multi-barrier systems including ultra-filtration and reverse osmosis. The employed processes have shown excellent performance with regard to the removal of critical parameters such as silica. For example, this parameter was reduced from 13 mg/l in the raw water to 7 μg/l in the boiler make-up.

  4. On-site greywater treatment and reuse in multi-storey buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedler, E; Kovalio, R; Galil, N I

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a study of a pilot plant treating light greywater for seven flats. The pilot plant combines biological treatment (RBC) with physicochemical treatment (sand filtration and disinfection). The pilot plant produced effluent of excellent quality, meeting the urban reuse quality regulations, and was very efficient in TSS turbidity and BOD removal: 82%, 98% and 96%, respectively. COD removal was somewhat lower (70-75%) indicating that the greywater may contain slowly-biodegradable organics. The RBC (attached growth biological system) was able to retain most of the solids as a result of bioflocculation; further it was proven to have very stable and reliable performance. Faecal coliforms and heterotrophic reductions were very high (100% and 99.99%, respectively) producing effluent that also met drinking water standards. The combination of low organic matter, nutrients and microbial indicators reduces the regrowth and fouling potentials in the reuse system, thus ensuring safe reuse of the treated greywater for toilet flushing.

  5. Bleaching and diffusion dynamics in optofluidic dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Asger

    2007-01-01

    The authors have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in optofluidic dye lasers where the liquid laser dye in a microfluidic channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. They find that for microfluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules...... pumping devices. ©2007 American Institute of Physics....

  6. Side effects of external tooth bleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    E.M., Bruzell; Pallesen, Ulla; Thoresen, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    -office = 39.3% [n = 28]; p >0.05; 95% CI [OR]: 0.198‑1.102) whereas prevalence of gingival irritation was higher after in-office treatment (at-home = 14.0%; in-office = 35.7%; p ... attributed to the bleaching treatment in the at-home and in-office groups, respectively. Predictors for side effects were tooth sensitivity, surface loss and gingivitis when observed at inclusion. Treatment-related predictors were bleaching concentration and contact between tray and gingiva. Conclusions...

  7. Stability improvement in bleached phase holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, K.

    1991-08-01

    An experimental study has been made of the influence of developer composition on the stability against the print-out effect of bleached, photographically recorded two-beam interference grating on Agfa-Gevaert 10E75 NAH plates. The diffraction efficiency has been increased by using potassium iodide and an iodine bleach process that converts a silver image into a dielectric image. An improvement in stability against the print-out effect has been observed by using two new developer compositions. Variation of the maximum diffraction efficiency against exposure to white light is shown graphically.

  8. Record Management and Design Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    2008-01-01

    Government mandated records management requirements apply to retention and long term archival of a wide variety of records. Part of the attention is on permanent accession and retention by the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) but interim requirements for storage by the source agency are included. As government agencies and the Department of Defense move toward implementations, additional goals often include saving design data for reuse. This paper briefly reviews the government records management requirements then investigates candidate meanings of 'reuse' and proposes an enhanced design records retention approach. The recommended strategy that emerges is, for a given program or product family, to invest in rich and readily re-executable preservation of design artifacts for one or two subsequent generations, then downgrade the data in utility through conversions, ultimately reaching the NARA minimum standard for permanent historical-interest archives.

  9. Formalisms for reuse and systems integration

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Reuse and integration are defined as synergistic concepts, where reuse addresses how to minimize redundancy in the creation of components; while, integration focuses on component composition. Integration supports reuse and vice versa. These related concepts support the design of software and systems for maximizing performance while minimizing cost. Knowledge, like data, is subject to reuse; and, each can be interpreted as the other. This means that inherent complexity, a measure of the potential utility of a system, is directly proportional to the extent to which it maximizes reuse and integration. Formal methods can provide an appropriate context for the rigorous handling of these synergistic concepts. Furthermore, formal languages allow for non ambiguous model specification; and, formal verification techniques provide support for insuring the validity of reuse and integration mechanisms.   This edited book includes 12 high quality research papers written by experts in formal aspects of reuse and integratio...

  10. Identifying well-bleached quartz using the different bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Masuda, N.;

    2012-01-01

    When dating older sedimentary deposits using quartz, there are no unambiguous methods for identifying the presence of incomplete bleaching. Current statistical analysis of dose distributions depends entirely on the assumption that incomplete bleaching and mixing are the main causes of any excess...... in relative bleaching rates of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 50 °C by infrared light (IR50) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 290 °C by infrared light after a stimulation at 50 °C (pIRIR290), and use recently deposited samples to determine...... that the large aliquot data are more likely to be correct. We conclude that a comparison of quartz and feldspar doses provides a useful independent method for identifying well-bleached quartz samples, and that it is unwise to apply statistical models to dose distributions without clear evidence for the physical...

  11. Problems of multiphase fluid filtration

    CERN Document Server

    Konovalov, AN

    1994-01-01

    This book deals with a spectrum of problems related to the mathematical modeling of multiphase filtration. Emphasis is placed on an inseparable triad: model - algorithm - computer code. An analysis of new and traditional filtration problems from the point of view of both their numerical implementation and the reproduction of one or another technological characteristics of the processes under consideration is given. The basic principles which underlie the construction of efficient numerical methods taking into account the filtration problems are discussed: non-evolutionary nature, degeneration,

  12. Bleaching of the discolored traumatized tooth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jon E.; Kopperud, Siemen E.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the treatment of discolored traumatized teeth, most of them being non-vital and subsequently, endodontically treated. Tooth bleaching based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent, applied directly or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide pe...... retreatment....

  13. REMINERALIZATION POTENTIAL OF A CARBAMIDE BLEACHING AGENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinova-Takorova Borislavova Mirela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching has gradually became a popular procedure for people searching for aesthetic improvement. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of bleaching with 45% carbamide peroxide on the level of mineralization of enamel, using laser fluorescence. Materials and methods: Sixty extracted human teeth were treated with 45% carbamid peroxide (Opalescence, Ultradent, 4 consecutive days for one hour each day. The effect of the bleaching agent on the level of mineralization of enamel was measured with DIAGNO dent pen. The statistical method we use was descriptive analysis. Results: The average values, measured before the applications of the carbamid peroxide were 6.33. On the first day they were 5.41, on the second 5.38, on the third 5.11 and 5.35 on the forth. Conclusion: There was observed a slight remineralization effect due to the incorporated Ca2+ and F- ions in the bleaching agent that we have used.

  14. BLEACHING EUCALYPTUS PULPS WITH SHORT SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Reis Milagres

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp, due to its high content of hexenuronic acids, is quite easy to bleach. Therefore, investigations have been made attempting to decrease the number of stages in the bleaching process in order to minimize capital costs. This study focused on the evaluation of short ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free and TCF (Totally Chlorine Free sequences for bleaching oxygen delignified Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp to 90% ISO brightness: PMoDP (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoD/P (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, without washing PMoD(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and pressurized peroxide, D(EPODP (chlorine dioxide, extraction oxidative with oxygen and peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoQ(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide, and XPMoQ(PO (Enzyme, molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide. Uncommon pulp treatments, such as molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide (PMo and xylanase (X bleaching stages, were used. Among the ECF alternatives, the two-stage PMoD/P sequence proved highly cost-effective without affecting pulp quality in relation to the traditional D(EPODP sequence and produced better quality effluent in relation to the reference. However, a four stage sequence, XPMoQ(PO, was required to achieve full brightness using the TCF technology. This sequence was highly cost-effective although it only produced pulp of acceptable quality.

  15. Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Terry P.; Kerry, James T.; Álvarez-Noriega, Mariana; Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G.; Anderson, Kristen D.; Baird, Andrew H.; Babcock, Russell C.; Beger, Maria; Bellwood, David R.; Berkelmans, Ray; Bridge, Tom C.; Butler, Ian R.; Byrne, Maria; Cantin, Neal E.; Comeau, Steeve; Connolly, Sean R.; Cumming, Graeme S.; Dalton, Steven J.; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Eakin, C. Mark; Figueira, Will F.; Gilmour, James P.; Harrison, Hugo B.; Heron, Scott F.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Kennedy, Emma V.; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Lough, Janice M.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Liu, Gang; McCulloch, Malcolm T.; Malcolm, Hamish A.; McWilliam, Michael J.; Pandolfi, John M.; Pears, Rachel J.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Schoepf, Verena; Simpson, Tristan; Skirving, William J.; Sommer, Brigitte; Torda, Gergely; Wachenfeld, David R.; Willis, Bette L.; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2017-03-01

    During 2015–2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

  16. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dishon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS to demonstrate a distinct biologically-induced decline of boron (B isotopic composition (δ11B as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded "vital effect" of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure.

  17. Health benefits of particle filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, W J

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  18. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  19. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  20. ICT reuse in socio-economic enterprises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ongondo, F.O., E-mail: f.ongondo@soton.ac.uk [Centre for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Lanchester Building, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Williams, I.D. [Centre for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Lanchester Building, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Dietrich, J. [Technische Universität Berlin, Centre for Scientific Continuing Education and Cooperation, Cooperation and Consulting for Environmental Questions (kubus) FH10-1, Fraunhoferstraße 33-36, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Carroll, C. [Centre for Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Lanchester Building, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We analyse ICT equipment reuse operations of socio-economic enterprises. • Most common ICT products dealt with are computers and related equipment. • In the UK in 2010, ∼143,750 appliances were reused. • Marketing and legislative difficulties are the common hurdles to reuse activities. • Socio-economic enterprises can significantly contribute to resource efficiency. - Abstract: In Europe, socio-economic enterprises such as charities, voluntary organisations and not-for-profit companies are involved in the repair, refurbishment and reuse of various products. This paper characterises and analyses the operations of socio-economic enterprises that are involved in the reuse of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment. Using findings from a survey, the paper specifically analyses the reuse activities of socio-economic enterprises in the UK from which Europe-wide conclusions are drawn. The amount of ICT products handled by the reuse organisations is quantified and potential barriers and opportunities to their operations are analysed. By-products from reuse activities are discussed and recommendations to improve reuse activities are provided. The most common ICT products dealt with by socio-economic enterprises are computers and related equipment. In the UK in 2010, an estimated 143,750 appliances were reused. However, due to limitations in data, it is difficult to compare this number to the amount of new appliances that entered the UK market or the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment generated in the same period. Difficulties in marketing products and numerous legislative requirements are the most common barriers to reuse operations. Despite various constraints, it is clear that organisations involved in reuse of ICT could contribute significantly to resource efficiency and a circular economy. It is suggested that clustering of their operations into “reuse parks” would enhance both their profile and their

  1. Changes in bleaching susceptibility among corals subject to ocean warming and recurrent bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan S Pratchett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-building corals in Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare bleaching incidence during mass-bleaching events documented in 1991, 1994, 2002 and 2007. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study compared the proportion of colonies that bleached for four major genera of reef-building corals (Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora and Porites, during each of four well-documented bleaching events from 1991 to 2007. Acropora and Montipora consistently bleached in far greater proportions (up to 98% than Pocillopora and Porites. However, there was an apparent and sustained decline in the proportion of colonies that bleached during successive bleaching events, especially for Acropora and Montipora. In 2007, only 77% of Acropora colonies bleached compared with 98% in 1991. Temporal variation in the proportion of coral colonies bleached may be attributable to differences in environmental conditions among years. Alternately, the sustained declines in bleaching incidence among highly susceptible corals may be indicative of acclimation or adaptation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Coral genera that are highly susceptible to coral bleaching, and especially Acropora and Montipora, exhibit temporal declines in their susceptibility to thermal anomalies at Moorea, French Polynesia. One possible explanation for these findings is that gradual removal of highly susceptible genotypes (through selective mortality of individuals, populations, and/or species is producing a coral assemblage that is

  2. Increasing productivity through Total Reuse Management (TRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    Total Reuse Management (TRM) is a new concept currently being promoted by the NASA Langley Software Engineering and Ada Lab (SEAL). It uses concepts similar to those promoted in Total Quality Management (TQM). Both technical and management personnel are continually encouraged to think in terms of reuse. Reuse is not something that is aimed for after a product is completed, but rather it is built into the product from inception through development. Lowering software development costs, reducing risk, and increasing code reliability are the more prominent goals of TRM. Procedures and methods used to adopt and apply TRM are described. Reuse is frequently thought of as only being applicable to code. However, reuse can apply to all products and all phases of the software life cycle. These products include management and quality assurance plans, designs, and testing procedures. Specific examples of successfully reused products are given and future goals are discussed.

  3. Coral bleaching response index: a new tool to standardize and compare susceptibility to thermal bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Timothy D; Vega-Perkins, Jesse B; Oestreich, William K; Triebold, Conrad; DuBois, Emily; Henss, Jillian; Baird, Andrew; Siple, Margaret; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    As coral bleaching events become more frequent and intense, our ability to predict and mitigate future events depends upon our capacity to interpret patterns within previous episodes. Responses to thermal stress vary among coral species; however the diversity of coral assemblages, environmental conditions, assessment protocols, and severity criteria applied in the global effort to document bleaching patterns creates challenges for the development of a systemic metric of taxon-specific response. Here, we describe and validate a novel framework to standardize bleaching response records and estimate their measurement uncertainties. Taxon-specific bleaching and mortality records (2036) of 374 coral taxa (during 1982-2006) at 316 sites were standardized to average percent tissue area affected and a taxon-specific bleaching response index (taxon-BRI) was calculated by averaging taxon-specific response over all sites where a taxon was present. Differential bleaching among corals was widely variable (mean taxon-BRI = 25.06 ± 18.44%, ±SE). Coral response may differ because holobionts are biologically different (intrinsic factors), they were exposed to different environmental conditions (extrinsic factors), or inconsistencies in reporting (measurement uncertainty). We found that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have comparable influence within a given site and event (60% and 40% of bleaching response variance of all records explained, respectively). However, when responses of individual taxa are averaged across sites to obtain taxon-BRI, differential response was primarily driven by intrinsic differences among taxa (65% of taxon-BRI variance explained), not conditions across sites (6% explained), nor measurement uncertainty (29% explained). Thus, taxon-BRI is a robust metric of intrinsic susceptibility of coral taxa. Taxon-BRI provides a broadly applicable framework for standardization and error estimation for disparate historical records and collection of novel

  4. 40 CFR 141.73 - Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filtration. 141.73 Section 141.73... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Filtration and Disinfection § 141.73 Filtration. A public water system..., and does not meet all of the criteria in § 141.71 (a) and (b) for avoiding filtration, must...

  5. Incorporating adaptive responses into future projections of coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cheryl A; Dunne, John P; Eakin, C Mark; Donner, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming threatens to increase mass coral bleaching events, and several studies have projected the demise of tropical coral reefs this century. However, recent evidence indicates corals may be able to respond to thermal stress though adaptive processes (e.g., genetic adaptation, acclimatization, and symbiont shuffling). How these mechanisms might influence warming-induced bleaching remains largely unknown. This study compared how different adaptive processes could affect coral bleaching projections. We used the latest bias-corrected global sea surface temperature (SST) output from the NOAA/GFDL Earth System Model 2 (ESM2M) for the preindustrial period through 2100 to project coral bleaching trajectories. Initial results showed that, in the absence of adaptive processes, application of a preindustrial climatology to the NOAA Coral Reef Watch bleaching prediction method overpredicts the present-day bleaching frequency. This suggests that corals may have already responded adaptively to some warming over the industrial period. We then modified the prediction method so that the bleaching threshold either permanently increased in response to thermal history (e.g., simulating directional genetic selection) or temporarily increased for 2-10 years in response to a bleaching event (e.g., simulating symbiont shuffling). A bleaching threshold that changes relative to the preceding 60 years of thermal history reduced the frequency of mass bleaching events by 20-80% compared with the 'no adaptive response' prediction model by 2100, depending on the emissions scenario. When both types of adaptive responses were applied, up to 14% more reef cells avoided high-frequency bleaching by 2100. However, temporary increases in bleaching thresholds alone only delayed the occurrence of high-frequency bleaching by ca. 10 years in all but the lowest emissions scenario. Future research should test the rate and limit of different adaptive responses for coral species across latitudes and

  6. Software reuse example and challenges at NSIDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, B. W.; Brodzik, M.; Collins, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    NSIDC has created a new data discovery and access system, Searchlight, to provide users with the data they want in the format they want. NSIDC Searchlight supports discovery and access to disparate data types with on-the-fly reprojection, regridding and reformatting. Architected to both reuse open source systems and be reused itself, Searchlight reuses GDAL and Proj4 for manipulating data and format conversions, the netCDF Java library for creating netCDF output, MapServer and OpenLayers for defining spatial criteria and the JTS Topology Suite (JTS) in conjunction with Hibernate Spatial for database interaction and rich OGC-compliant spatial objects. The application reuses popular Java and Java Script libraries including Struts 2, Spring, JPA (Hibernate), Sitemesh, JFreeChart, JQuery, DOJO and a PostGIS PostgreSQL database. Future reuse of Searchlight components is supported at varying architecture levels, ranging from the database and model components to web services. We present the tools, libraries and programs that Searchlight has reused. We describe the architecture of Searchlight and explain the strategies deployed for reusing existing software and how Searchlight is built for reuse. We will discuss NSIDC reuse of the Searchlight components to support rapid development of new data delivery systems.

  7. Reuse of hydroponic waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramasamy Rajesh; Cho, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Attaining sustainable agriculture is a key goal in many parts of the world. The increased environmental awareness and the ongoing attempts to execute agricultural practices that are economically feasible and environmentally safe promote the use of hydroponic cultivation. Hydroponics is a technology for growing plants in nutrient solutions with or without the use of artificial medium to provide mechanical support. Major problems for hydroponic cultivation are higher operational cost and the causing of pollution due to discharge of waste nutrient solution. The nutrient effluent released into the environment can have negative impacts on the surrounding ecosystems as well as the potential to contaminate the groundwater utilized by humans for drinking purposes. The reuse of non-recycled, nutrient-rich hydroponic waste solution for growing plants in greenhouses is the possible way to control environmental pollution. Many researchers have successfully grown several plant species in hydroponic waste solution with high yield. Hence, this review addresses the problems associated with the release of hydroponic waste solution into the environment and possible reuse of hydroponic waste solution as an alternative resource for agriculture development and to control environmental pollution.

  8. Treatment of Pulp Mill D-Stage Bleaching Effluent Using a Pilot-Scale Electrocoagulation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, Yuan-Shing; Wang, Eugene I-Chen

    2016-03-01

    A pilot-scale study was conducted using electrocoagulation technology to treat chlorine dioxide bleaching-stage effluent of a local pulp mill, with the purpose of evaluating the treatment performance. The operating variables were the current density (0 ~ 133.3 A/m(2)) and hydraulic retention time (HRT, 6.5 ~ 16.25 minutes). Water quality indicators investigated were the conductivity, suspended solids (SS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), true color, and hardness. The results showed that electrocoagulation technology can be used to treat D-stage bleaching effluent for water reuse. Under the operating conditions studied, the removal of conductivity and COD always increased with increases in either the current density or HRT. The highest removals obtained at 133.3 A/m(2) and an HRT of 16.25 minutes for conductivity, SS, COD, true color, and hardness were respectively 44.2, 98.5, 75.0, 85.9, and 36.9% with aluminum electrodes. Iron electrodes were not applicable to the D-stage effluent due to formation of dark-colored ferric complexes.

  9. Randomized controlled trial of sealed in-office bleaching effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Mário Artur Pereira; Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata; Oliveira, Alaíde Hermínia de Aguiar; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Faria-e-Silva, André Luis

    2014-01-01

    Regardless of the high success rate, patients commonly report the occurrence of tooth sensitivity during the in-office bleaching procedures. Recently, it has been demonstrated that using a customized tray (called sealed in-office bleaching technique) reduces peroxide penetration. The aim of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate tooth sensitivity and bleaching efficacy of sealed bleaching, in comparison with a conventional in-office technique. Twenty patients were randomized allocated in two groups in which 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was used in a single 45-min application. For the sealed technique, a customized bleaching tray was fabricated and carefully positioned over the bleaching agent during the session. The color was recorded at a baseline, 7 and 28 days after the bleaching session, using Vita Easy Shade spectrophotometer. Tooth sensitivity was recorded during (20 and 40 min) and immediately after the treatment using a visual analogue scale. The bleaching efficacy was evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA, while the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity and its intensity were evaluated by Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). No significant difference on bleaching efficacy was observed between the conventional (7.4 and 8.1 ΔE) and sealed techniques (7.8 and 8.3 ΔE) at both evaluation periods. No significant difference was observed regarding the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity (p=0.15). Sealed technique showed a significant decrease of sensitivity intensity after 40 min (p=0.03). Sealed bleaching technique was able to reduce the sensitivity intensity during the bleaching procedure, without jeopardizing the bleaching efficacy.

  10. A global protocol for monitoring of coral bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, J.; Setiasih, N.; Marshall, P.; Hansen, L

    2004-01-01

    Coral bleaching and subsequent mortality represent a major threat to the future health and productivity of coral reefs. However a lack of reliable data on occurrence, severity and other characteristics of bleaching events hampers research on the causes and consequences of this important phenomenon. This article describes a global protocol for monitoring coral bleaching events, which addresses this problem and can be used by people with different levels of expertise and resources.

  11. Photothermal bleaching in time-lapse photoacoustic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Liang; Wang, Lidai; Li, Chiye; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Lihong V. Wang

    2012-01-01

    We studied the phenomenon of photothermal bleaching — a gradual reduction of contrast agent particles during repeated scans in photoacoustic microscopy. The dependence of the photothermal bleaching rate on the excitation pulse energy, pulse duration, and the absorber’s size was determined while the laser focal diameter was held constant. Our results showed that, the dependence of the photothermal bleaching rate on the excitation pulse energy differed before and after the absorbers were raised...

  12. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, J R; Low, J.; Tun, K.; B. Wilson; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; K. E. Ulstrup; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P.A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D; Chou, L.M.; P. D. Steinberg

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on:...

  13. What is Type-Safe Code Reuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff; Palsberg, Jens

    1991-01-01

    Subclassing is reuse of class definitions. It is usually tied to the use of class names, thus relying on the order in which the particular classes in a program are created. This is a burden, however, both when programming and in theoretical studies. This paper presents a structural notion of subc...... type-safe code reuse....

  14. Computational reuse optimisation for stadium design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Steen, J.; Coenders, J.L.; Pasterkamp, S.; Rolvink, A.; Van Steekelenburg, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a proof of concept study into a computational strategy for reusing structural stadium elements. The strategy goal is overcoming the reuse design strain through implementation of a genetic algorithm. This algorithm is calibrated to search for a structural frame configuration, whil

  15. Integrated pore blockage-cake filtration model for crossflow filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Russell, Renee L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Smith, Harry D.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-07-01

    Crossflow filtration is to be a key process in the treatment and disposal of approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level radioactive waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is assessing filter performance with waste simulant materials that mimic the chemical and physical properties of Hanford tank waste. Prior simulant studies indicated that waste filtration performance may be limited by pore and cake fouling. To limit the shutdown of waste treatment operations, the pre-treatment facility plans to recover filter flux losses from cake formation and filter fouling by frequently backpulsing the filter elements. The objective of the current paper is to develop a simple model of flux decline resulting from cake and pore fouling and potential flux recovery through backpulsing of the filters for Hanford waste filtration operations. To this end, a model capable of characterizing the decline in waste-simulant filter flux as a function of both irreversible pore blockage and reversible cake formation is proposed. This model is used to characterize the filtration behavior of Hanford waste simulants in both continuous and backpulsed operations. The model is then used to infer the optimal backpulse frequency under specific operating conditions.

  16. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-02-15

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  17. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures) varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  18. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahson Berhane Alemu I

    Full Text Available Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  19. ICT reuse in socio-economic enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongondo, F O; Williams, I D; Dietrich, J; Carroll, C

    2013-12-01

    In Europe, socio-economic enterprises such as charities, voluntary organisations and not-for-profit companies are involved in the repair, refurbishment and reuse of various products. This paper characterises and analyses the operations of socio-economic enterprises that are involved in the reuse of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment. Using findings from a survey, the paper specifically analyses the reuse activities of socio-economic enterprises in the U.K. from which Europe-wide conclusions are drawn. The amount of ICT products handled by the reuse organisations is quantified and potential barriers and opportunities to their operations are analysed. By-products from reuse activities are discussed and recommendations to improve reuse activities are provided. The most common ICT products dealt with by socio-economic enterprises are computers and related equipment. In the U.K. in 2010, an estimated 143,750 appliances were reused. However, due to limitations in data, it is difficult to compare this number to the amount of new appliances that entered the U.K. market or the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment generated in the same period. Difficulties in marketing products and numerous legislative requirements are the most common barriers to reuse operations. Despite various constraints, it is clear that organisations involved in reuse of ICT could contribute significantly to resource efficiency and a circular economy. It is suggested that clustering of their operations into "reuse parks" would enhance both their profile and their products. Reuse parks would also improve consumer confidence in and subsequently sales of the products. Further, it is advocated that industrial networking opportunities for the exchange of by-products resulting from the organisations' activities should be investigated. The findings make two significant contributions to the current literature. One, they provide a detailed insight into the reuse operations

  20. Cake creep during filtration of flocculated manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Keiding, Kristian

    the distribution of N and P on the fields. Filtration is a useful method for such a separation. Furthermore, chemicals can be added to flocculate the solids and thereby increase the filterability i.e. the specific filter-cake resistance can be reduced from 1015 m/kg to 1011 m/kg. Both the amount of added chemicals......, and the mixing procedure affect the result, and lab-scale experiments are often used to study how these pre-treatments influence the filtration process. However, the existing mathematical filtration models are based on filtration of inorganic particles and cannot simulate the filtration data obtained when manure...... that the discrepancy between the filtration theory and the observed filtration behaviour is due to a time-dependent collapse of the formed cake (creep). This can also explain the observed behaviour when flocculated manure is filtered. The filtration data can be simulated if cake creep is adopted in the filtration...

  1. Bio-filtration of helminth eggs and coliforms from municipal sewage for agricultural reuse in Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaya Beas, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Where fresh water resources are scarce, treated wastewater becomes an attractive alternative for agricultural irrigation. However, the presence of large amounts of pathogens, even in treated wastewater, constraints its productive use, which is aggravated when sanitation and public health are poor. A

  2. Coagulation & Ultra-filtration of Laundry Waste Waters using the Shower Water Reuse System (SWRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    waste water: Cationic polymers for removal of contaminants and decreased fouling in microfiltration , Journal of Membrane Science (11 2013) Xia... microfiltration of laundry wastewater, Journal of Membrane Science (12 2013) TOTAL: 2 Books Number of Manuscripts: Patents Submitted Patents Awarded...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The objective was to determine the optimal coagulation conditions for pre-treating laundry waste water before microfiltration

  3. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    OpenAIRE

    G. Dishon; Fisch, J; Horn, I.; K Kaczmarek; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D.F.; O. Nir; Y. Popovich; D. Tchernov

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events hav...

  4. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded vital effect of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure. Understanding the frequency of bleaching events is also critical for determining the relationship between natural and anthropogenic causes of these events.

  5. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    OpenAIRE

    G. Dishon; Fisch, J; Horn, I.; K Kaczmarek; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D.F.; O. Nir; Y. Popovich; D. Tchernov

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been ex...

  6. Integrating membrane filtration into bioelectrochemical systems as next generation energy-efficient wastewater treatment technologies for water reclamation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heyang; He, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) represent an energy-efficient approach for wastewater treatment, but the effluent still requires further treatment for direct discharge or reuse. Integrating membrane filtration in BES can achieve high-quality effluents with additional benefits. Three types of filtration membranes, dynamic membrane, ultrafiltration membrane and forward osmosis membrane that are grouped based on pore size, have been studied for integration in BES. The integration can be accomplished either in an internal or an external configuration. In an internal configuration, membranes can act as a separator between the electrodes, or be immersed in the anode/cathode chamber as a filtration component. The external configuration allows BES and membrane module to be operated independently. Given much progress and interest in the integration of membrane filtration into BES, this paper has reviewed the past studies, described various integration methods, discussed the advantages and limitations of each integration, and presented challenges for future development.

  7. Demonstration of creep during filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Bugge, Thomas Vistisen; Kirchheiner, Anders Løvenbalk

    The classical filtration theory assumes a unique relationship between the local filter cake porosity and the local effective pressure. For a number of compressible materials, it has however been observed that during the consolidation stage this may not be the case. It has been found that the prod......The classical filtration theory assumes a unique relationship between the local filter cake porosity and the local effective pressure. For a number of compressible materials, it has however been observed that during the consolidation stage this may not be the case. It has been found...... that the production of filtrate also depends on the characteristic time for the filter cake solids to deform. This is formulated in the Terzaghi-Voigt model in which a secondary consolidation is introduced. The secondary consolidation may be visualized by plots of the relative cake deformation (U) v.s. the square...... magnitude as the primary consolidation (defined by the hydraulic retardation), the creep phenomenon may occur during filtration. This will lead to Ruth's plots characterized by a concave with two (more or less) distinct slopes. The slopes are defined by the relationship between the porosity...

  8. Improving IAQ Via Air Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Brian

    1999-01-01

    Provides tips on using air filtration to control indoor air quality in educational facilities, including dedicated spaces with unique air quality conditions such as in libraries, museums and archival storage areas, kitchens and dining areas, and laboratories. The control of particulate contaminants, gaseous contaminants, and moisture buildup are…

  9. Filtration combustion: Smoldering and SHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowsky, Bernard J.

    1995-01-01

    Smolder waves and SHS (self-propagating high-temperature synthesis) waves are both examples of combustion waves propagating in porous media. When delivery of reactants through the pores to the reaction site is an important aspect of the process, it is referred to as filtration combustion. The two types of filtration combustion have a similar mathematical formulation, describing the ignition, propagation and extinction of combustion waves in porous media. The goal in each case, however, is different. In smoldering the desired goal is to prevent propagation, whereas in SHS the goal is to insure propagation of the combustion wave, leading to the synthesis of desired products. In addition, the scales in the two areas of application may well differ. For example, smoldering generally occurs at a relatively low temperature and with a smaller propagation velocity than SHS filtration combustion waves. Nevertheless, the two areas of application have much in common, so that mechanisms learned about in one application can be used to advantage in the other. In this paper we discuss recent results in the areas of filtration combustion.

  10. Ceramic Ultra Filtration Membrane Bioreactor for Domestic Wastewater Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A long term domestic wastewater treatment experiment was conducted using a recirculating ceramic ultra filtration membrane bioreactor (CUFMB) system. Three experiments were run with a hydraulic retention time of 5h, sludge retention times of 5d, 15d, and 30d and a membrane surface flow rate of 4m/s. The experiment studied the membrane fouling mechanism and cleaning techniques. The results show that a CUFMB system can provide continuous good quality effluent which is completely acceptable for reuse. The system is also not affected by fluctuations of the inlet flow. The CUFMB sludge loading rate is similar to that of conventional biological treatment units. However, the volumetric loading rate of the CUFMB is 24 times that of conventional biological treatment units. Membrane fouling occurs due to channel clogging, which could be easily removed, and surface fouling, which can be effectively removed using the method described in this work which includes water rinsing, base cleaning, and acid washing.

  11. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad E. Rokaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n=27 according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n=9 according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide, group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide, group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture, and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture. Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Bleach Plant Capital Reduction with Rapid DO Bleaching and Simplified (D/E/D) Stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. McDonough; C. E. Courchene; J-C. Baromes

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the capabilities of a bleaching sequence that combined a short retention time initial chlorine dioxide stage, referred to as rapid D0, (D0R), with simplified bleaching stages, (D1/E/D2), that required only one final bleach washer. The test sequence DR(EPO)(D/E/D/) was compared to a control sequence, D(EPO)D, for both hardwood and softwood pulps. The capabilities of the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence were successfully demonstrated. An existing three- or four-stage bleach plan can be converted to the more powerful DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence without the major capital cost of additional washers. The results from this study showed that the DR(EPO)(D/E/D) sequence can reach 85 brightness on SW with 2.8% total C1O2, while the control sequence, D(EPO)D, required 3.9% C1O2. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX for the test sequence. The strength of pulp bleached in the test sequence was similar to or slightly higher than the control. For the HW pu lp, the test sequence reached 88 brightness with 2.2% C1O2 compared to 3.3% C1O2 for the control. There was a corresponding decrease in AOX generation with the lower chemical requirements. The final viscosity and pulp strength for the test sequence on HW was significantly higher than the corresponding values for the control sequence.

  13. Filtration Understanding: FY10 Testing Results and Filtration Model Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Peterson, Reid A.; Russell, Renee L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.

    2011-04-04

    This document completes the requirements of Milestone 2-4, Final Report of FY10 Testing, discussed in the scope of work outlined in the EM31 task plan WP-2.3.6-2010-1. The focus of task WP 2.3.6 is to improve the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) understanding of filtration operations for high-level waste (HLW) to improve filtration and cleaning efficiencies, thereby increasing process throughput and reducing the Na demand (through acid neutralization). Developing the cleaning/backpulsing requirements will produce much more efficient operations for both the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Savannah River Site (SRS), thereby significantly increasing throughput by limiting cleaning cycles. The scope of this work is to develop the understanding of filter fouling to allow developing this cleaning/backpulsing strategy.

  14. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning El...

  15. Investigating Motivations for Women's Skin Bleaching in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kelly M.; Robkin, Navit; Gaska, Karie; Njoki, Lillian Carol

    2011-01-01

    Why do many African women continue to use damaging skin-bleaching cosmetics that contain dangerous chemicals (e.g., mercury) that may increase their rates of infertility, skin cancer, and serious skin/brain/kidney disease? To address this question, our study investigated motivations driving the preservation of skin-bleaching practices in Tanzania.…

  16. The Bleaching Syndrome: The Role of Educational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Per the Bleaching Syndrome, people of color, including African, Asian, and Latino Americans, are both victims and perpetrators of color discrimination. The Bleaching Syndrome encompasses perceptual, psychological, and behavioral sectors that affect students' schooling experiences. Education professionals, including teachers, administrators, and…

  17. The effects of habitat on coral bleaching responses in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsditch, Gabriel; Mwaura, Jelvas M; Kilonzo, Joseph; Amiyo, Nassir

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching incidence was monitored for the whole coral community, while zooxanthellae densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea, and Porites cylindrica) during a non-bleaching year (2006) and a year of mild-bleaching (2007). Differences in bleaching responses between habitats were observed, with shallower sites Kanamai and Vipingo exhibiting lower bleaching incidence than deeper sites Nyali and Mombasa. These shallower lagoons display more fluctuating thermal and light environments than the deeper sites, suggesting that corals in the shallower lagoons have acclimatized and/or adapted to the fluctuating environmental conditions they endure on a daily basis and have become more resistant to bleaching stress. In deeper sites that did exhibit higher bleaching (Mombasa and Nyali), it was found that coral recovery occurred more quickly in the protected area than in the non-protected area.

  18. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-02-27

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials.

  19. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p 3.3). PMID:27034897

  20. The effect of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion of resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Hajizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This experimental study was designed to focus on the effects of bleaching on toothbrush abrasion in three types of composites with different filler size. Materials and Methods: Forty eight disks were prepared from three types of composite and divided into 6 groups. In the first three groups the abrasion test was done. The remaining groups were bleached and the abrasion test was performed. The weight of the samples before and after abrasion was measured. Statistical analysis was done with one-way ANOVA and Duncan test. Results: There was a significant difference in abrasion of composites with different filler size (P < 0.05. The most amount of abrasion was observed in Z100 after being bleached. An increase in abrasion was noticed in all three types of tested composite after bleaching. Conclusion: According to the findings, it is suggested to use a nano filled resin composite for restoration if the bleaching treatment is required.

  1. 40 CFR 141.173 - Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filtration. 141.173 Section 141.173... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving 10,000 or More People § 141.173 Filtration. A public water system subject to the requirements of this subpart that...

  2. Mobile surface water filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Vatsyayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To design a mobile system for surface water filtrationMethodology: the filtration of surface impurities begins with their retraction to concentrated thickness using non ionising surfactants, then isolation using surface tension property and sedimentation of impurities in process chamber using electrocoagulation. Result:following studies done to determine the rate of spreading of crude oil on water a method for retraction of spread crude oil to concentrated volumes is developed involving addition of non -ionising surfactants in contrast to use of dispersants. Electrocoagulation process involves multiple processes taking place to lead to depositionof impurities such as oil, grease, metals. Studies of experiments conducted reveals parameters necessary for design of electrocoagulation process chamber though a holistic approach towards system designing is still required. Propeller theory is used in determining the required design of propeller and the desired thrust, the overall structure will finally contribute in deciding the choice of propeller.

  3. Nova tecnologia de branqueamento de celulose adaptada ao fechamento do circuito de água A novel bleaching technology adapted to partial bleach plant closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Moreira Costa

    2006-02-01

    (EOPD(EPD and D(EOPDP, respectively. The mill has an activated sludge effluent treatment plant comprised of two aeration tanks with 20,000 m3 and it is equipped with superficial aerators followed by four secondary clarifiers (two for each reactor. In the last decades, CENIBRA has been optimizing and changing its processes in order to improve environmental performance. Aiming at decreasing effluent volume, COD and AOX loads, the Ahot(EOPD(PO sequence has been proposed and evaluated in lab-scale trials, with partial filtrate recycling. This paper proposes a filtrate recycling scheme that reduces bleach plant effluent volume by 9 m3/adt (air dry ton, i.e., about 50% of the total. The filtrate saved is partially diverted to the recausticizing cycle and to post oxygen washers. The reutilization of the Ahot filtrate in the recausticizing cycle to replace the filtrates currently used to wash lime mud and dregs was shown suitable. The impact of NPE´s in the calcium cycle was not significant. This strategy allowed a recovery of c.a. 12 kg NaOH/adt of pulp that would otherwise be wasted. Pulp bleachability and quality was not significantly affected. The discharged effluent coming from D(PO stages (about 50% showed low color, COD and AOX loads, and good bio-treatability (DBO5/COD.

  4. Centrifugal membrane filtration -- Task 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to demonstrate applications for the SpinTek technology within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the SpinTek STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{micro}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the SpinTek ST-IIL centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. An extended test run of 100 hr performed on a surrogate tank waste solution showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

  5. Dyebath reuse saves money and reduces pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenthal, J.; Eapen, J.; Tawa, A.; Tincher, W.

    1984-10-01

    The article discusses an evaluation of the potential for wastewater recycle or reuse in textile finishing mills. Over a dozen recycle technologies were evaluated in six separate mills. Results of these preliminary studies showed that most of the recycle technologies were technically feasible, but only a few were cost effective: synthetic size recovery and reuse, caustic recovery and reuse, direct wastewater reuse (e.g., countercurrent washing), and direct dyebath reuse. The last-mentioned was singled out for further study because it was seen as having several advantages: low capital cost for implementation, substantial processing cost savings, significant environmental benefits, and the potential for widespread use in the industry. It is estimated that about half of all textile dyeing is performed by batch operations, including most knit fabric, hosiery, and yarn, along with substantial amounts of carpet and some woven fabric. Dyebath reuse technology was first developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology about 10 years ago, but few mills have adopted it to date.

  6. Cake Filtration in Viscoelastic Polymer Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surý, Alexander; Machač, Ivan

    2009-07-01

    In this contribution, the filtration equations for a cake filtration in viscoelastic fluids are presented. They are based on a capillary hybrid model for the flow of a power law fluid. In order to express the elastic pressure drop excess in the flow of viscoelastic filtrate through the filter cake and filter screen, modified Deborah number correction functions are included into these equations. Their validity was examined experimentally. Filtration experiments with suspensions of hardened polystyrene particles (Krasten) in viscoelastic aqueous solutions of polyacryl amides (0.4% and 0.6%wt. Kerafloc) were carried out at a constant pressure on a cylindrical filtration unit using filter screens of different resistance.

  7. The use of lactoperoxidase for the bleaching of fluid whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R E; Kang, E J; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2012-06-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LP) is the second most abundant enzyme in bovine milk and has been used in conjunction with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and thiocyanate (SCN⁻) to work as an antimicrobial in raw milk where pasteurization is not feasible. Thiocyanate is naturally present and the lactoperoxidase system purportedly can be used to bleach dairy products, such as whey, with the addition of very little H₂O₂ to the system. This study had 3 objectives: 1) to quantify the amount of H₂O₂ necessary for bleaching of fluid whey using the LP system, 2) to monitor LP activity from raw milk through manufacture of liquid whey, and 3) to compare the flavor of whey protein concentrate 80% (WPC80) bleached by the LP system to that bleached by traditional H₂O₂ bleaching. Cheddar cheese whey with annatto (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk, annatto with 3% wt/vol norbixin content) was manufactured using a standard Cheddar cheesemaking procedure. Various levels of H₂O₂ (5-100 mg/kg) were added to fluid whey to determine the optimum concentration of H₂O₂ for LP activity, which was measured using an established colorimetric method. In subsequent experiments, fat-separated whey was bleached for 1h with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg (traditional) or 20 mg of H₂O₂/kg (LP system). The WPC80 was manufactured from whey bleached with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg or 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. All samples were subjected to color analysis (Hunter color values and norbixin extraction) and proximate analysis (fat, protein, and moisture). Sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were conducted on WPC80. Optimal LP bleaching in fluid whey occurred with the addition of 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. Bleaching of fluid whey at either 35 or 50°C for 1 h with LP resulted in > 99% norbixin destruction compared with 32 or 47% destruction from bleaching with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg, at 35 or 50°C for 1 h, respectively. Higher aroma intensity and increased lipid oxidation compounds were documented in WPC80 from

  8. Health Effects Associated with Wastewater Treatment, Reuse, and Disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yu, Ruoren; Li, Yuan; Falzone, Charles; Smith, Gregory; Ikehata, Keisuke

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on topics relating to public and environmental health risks associated with wastewater treatment, reuse, and disposal is presented. This review is divided into the following sections: wastewater management, microbial hazards, chemical hazards, wastewater treatment, wastewater reuse, agricultural reuse in different regions, greywater reuse, wastewater disposal, hospital wastewater, industrial wastewater, and sludge and biosolids.

  9. 48 CFR 252.239-7008 - Reuse arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reuse arrangements. 252... Provisions And Clauses 252.239-7008 Reuse arrangements. As prescribed in 239.7411(a), use the following clause: Reuse Arrangements (DEC 1991) (a) When feasible, the Contractor shall reuse canceled...

  10. Developing software for and with reuse: an ontological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falbo, R.A.; Guizzardi, G.; Duarte, K.C.; Natali, A.C.C.

    2002-01-01

    Software reuse has been pointed as one of the most promising technique to deal with quality and productivity problems. To support reuse, software processes have to consider two facets: developing for reuse and developing with reuse. In this paper we present an ontology-based approach for software re

  11. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, M. M.; El-Shami, S. M.; Taha, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Peanut hulls (PNH) were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV), reduction in phospholipids (PL) and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN), PNH and Fuller's earth (FE) and PNH and O-passive (OP) and examined. The oxidative stability of oils was determined. Results for the investigated commercial bleaching clays revealed: TN > FE > F > TF > OP. Highest reduction in PV and PL, and highest bleachability were achieved for soybean oil bleached with 2% PNH carbonized at 500 degree centigrade for 30 min (PNH). Mixtures of PNH with the three chosen bleaching clays indicated that 1PNH : 2TN gave the highest bleachability. CSO was miscella bleached in hexane using PNH and resulted in an appreciable improvement in all oil characteristics, especially in bleachability. Oxidative stability of oils was in the following order: TN > control > FE > PNH with Induction period values of 23.1 > 6.43 > 5.73 > 2.85 h, respectively. (Author) 20 refs.

  12. ECF AND TCF BLEACHING OF SECONDARY FIBER PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ventorim

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ECF and TCF bleaching processes were evaluated for the bleaching of a deinked mixed office waste (MOW pulp sample produced in a pilot plant. The sample was bleached by all processes to a target brightness of 78 % ISO minimum. The results were interpreted on the basis of chemical cost to reach the target brightness, bleaching yield and bleached pulp quality as measured by viscosity, fluorescence and b* color coordinate. Among the ECF sequences, the mosattractive was the DEDD which showed the lowest chemical cost and produced bleached pulp of high quality as measured by viscosity, fluorescence and b* coordinate. The best TCF sequence with ozone was the Q(PO(ZQ(PO which resulted in very high brightness ceiling. This sequence decreased moderately the pulp b* coordinate and viscosity and slightly its fluorescence. Among the TCF sequences without ozone the Q(POQ(PO was the most effective but showed poor flexibility with regard to brightness ceiling. This sequence had little effect on pulp viscosity, fluorescence and b* coordinate. For all three  bleaching processes, it was determined that process yield is negatively affected by hot alkaline stages such as O, P and (PO.

  13. Is It Necessary to Prepare the Enamel before Dental Bleaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Erika Michele dos Santos; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the influence of distinct surface treatments on the microhardness and color of enamel that will be bleached. Surface treatments are tested, accordingly: G1, no treatment; G2, 2% sodium fluoride; G3, casein phosphopeptide paste; G4, 2% fluoride+Nd:YAG laser. Forty blocks from bovine teeth composed the sample that were tested in Knoop microhardness (n = 10) and in color change (n = 10). After 24 h, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was performed for 45 min. Microhardness and color changes (using parameters ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb) were assessed before and after bleaching. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p microhardness occurred immediately after bleaching in all groups, being greater in G1. Enamel color changed in all groups. Immediately after bleaching, there was a decrease on enamel microhardness. However, after 7 days, some of those specimens previously treated before bleaching significantly recovered their initial microhardness without influencing the esthetic results of bleaching. PMID:28280508

  14. 9 CFR 317.10 - Reuse of official inspection marks; reuse of containers bearing official marks, labels, etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reuse of official inspection marks; reuse of containers bearing official marks, labels, etc. 317.10 Section 317.10 Animals and Animal... DEVICES, AND CONTAINERS General § 317.10 Reuse of official inspection marks; reuse of containers...

  15. Intrapulpal temperature variation during bleaching with various activation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Masae de Araujo Michida

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intrapulpal temperature variation after bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide using different sources of activation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four human teeth were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction providing 48 specimens, and were divided into 4 groups (n=12: (G1 Control - Bleaching gel without light activation, (G2 Bleaching gel + halogen light, (G3 Bleaching gel + LED, (G4 Bleaching gel + Nd:YAG Laser. The temperatures were recorded using a digital thermometer at 4 time points: before bleaching gel application, 1 min after bleaching gel application, during activation of the bleaching gel, and after the bleaching agent turned from a dark-red into a clear gel. Data were analyzed statistically by the Dunnet's test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. RESULTS: The mean intrapulpal temperature values (ºC in the groups were: G1: 0.617 ± 0.41; G2: 1.800 ± 0.68; G3: 0.975 ± 0.51; and G4: 4.325 ± 1.09. The mean maximum temperature variation (MTV values were: 1.5ºC (G1, 2.9ºC (G2, 1.7ºC (G3 and 6.9ºC (G4. When comparing the experimental groups to the control group, G3 was not statistically different from G1 (p>0.05, but G2 and G4 presented significantly higher (p<0.05 intrapulpal temperatures and MTV. The three experimental groups differed significantly (p<0.05 from each other. CONCLUSIONS: The Nd:YAG laser was the activation method that presented the highest values of intrapulpal temperature variation when compared with LED and halogen light. The group activated by LED light presented the lowest values of temperature variation, which were similar to that of the control group.

  16. A bleaching earth from egyptian local deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Kinawy, Omayma S.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the bleaching of vegetable oils using activated clays collected from some deposits in Egypt as compared to Tonsil FF currently used by local oil industry. The comparison was made; not only on the basis of the decolourising power of the earth, but also on the basis of its effects on the oil acidity, formation of the oil peroxides and the decomposition rate of the formed peroxides to aldehydes and ketones during the bleaching process. The activation of the collected earth samples was made using 4N HCl, 6N HCl and 30 % H2SO4. The bleaching tests of the activated samples were performed using the major four oil types processed in Egypt being cottonseed, sunflower, soybean and palm oils. In addition to the laboratory-evaluation tests, the performance of the activated samples, which showed promise on the lab-scale have been also tested on an industrial scale. The industrial application has proved that the activated local earth's can be successfully used as bleaching earth of local oils. Thus it can be used as a substitute of the varieties currently imported and used by the local oil sector.La presente investigación trata de la decoloración de aceites vegetales usando tierras activadas obtenidas de yacimientos egipcios, comparándola con el Tonsil FF usado normalmente en la industria oleícola local. La comparación se realizó, no sólo sobre la base del poder decolorante de la tierra, sino también sobre la base de sus efectos en la acidez del aceite, la formación de peróxidos y la velocidad de descomposición de los peróxidos formados en aldehidos y cetonas durante el proceso de decoloración. La activación de las muestras de tierras recogidas se hizo utilizando ClH 4N, ClH 6N y H2SO4 30 %. Los tests de decoloración de las muestras activadas se llevaron a cabo usando los cuatro tipos mayoritarios de aceites procesados en Egipto: aceite de semilla de algodón, de girasol, de soja y de palma. Además de los

  17. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  18. Study of Melanin Bleaching After Immunohistochemistry of Melanin-containing Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Melanin may interfere with immunohistochemical staining. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) bleaching, potassium permanganate bleaching, and potassium dichromate bleaching on melanin, tissue antigen, and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) using melanin-containing and melanin-free tissue samples. Our results demonstrated that all 3 bleaching methods efficiently bleached melanin and partially destroyed tissue antigen. In addition, potassium perman...

  19. Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jongho; Chambers, Valerie; Venkatesh, Varsha; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees - a readily available, inexpensive, biodegradable, and disposable material - can remove bacteria from water by simple pressure-driven filtration. Approximately 3 cm3 of sapwood can filter water at the rate of several liters per day, sufficient to meet the clean drinking water needs of one person. The results demonstrate the potential of plant xylem to address the need for pathogen-free drinking water in developing countries and resource-limited settings.

  20. A New Freeze Concentration Process for Minimum Effluent Process in Bleached Pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Ru-Ying; Botsaris, Gregory D.

    2001-03-06

    This project researches freeze concentration as a primary volume reduction technology for bleaching plant effluents from paper-pulp mills before they are treated by expensive technologies, such as incineration, for the destruction of the adsorbable organic halogens. Previous laboratory studies show that freeze concentration has a greater than 99.5% purification efficiency for volatile, semivolatile, and nonprocess elements, or any other solute, thus producing pure ice that can be reused in the mill as water. The first section evaluates the anticipated regulatory and public pressures associated with implementing the technology; the remaining sections deal with the experimental results from a scaled-up freeze concentration process in a 100-liter pilot-plant at Tufts University. The results of laboratory scale experiments confirmed that the freeze concentration technology could be an efficient volume reduction technology for the above elements and for removing adsorbable organic hologens and or nonprocess elements from recycled water. They also provide the necessary data for designing and operating a larger pilot plant, and identify the technical problems encountered in the scale-up and the way they could be addressed in the larger scale plants. This project was originally planned to include the operation of a large pilot plant in the facilities of Swenson Process Equipment Inc., and a field test at a pulp mill, but the paper company withdrew its financial support for the field test. In place of a final economic evaluation after the field test, a preliminary evaluation based on the small pilot plant data predicts an economically reasonable freeze concentration process in the case of reduction of the bleaching-effluent flow to less than 5 m3/kkg pulp, a target anticipated in the near future.

  1. Pig manure treatment and purification by filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makara, A; Kowalski, Z

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to develop a new, complex pig manure treatment and filtration process. The final scheme, called the AMAK process, comprised the following successive steps: mineralization with mineral acids, alkalization with lime milk, superphosphate addition, a second alkalization, thermal treatment, and pressure filtration. The proposed method produced a filtrate with 95%, 80%, and 96% reductions in chemical oxygen demand, nitrogen content, and phosphorus content, respectively. An advantage of the proposed method was that it incorporated a crystalline phase into the solid organic part of the manure, which enabled high filtration rates (>1000 kg m(-2) h(-1)) and efficient separation. The process also eliminated odor emissions from the filtrate and sediment. The treated filtrate could be used to irrigate crops or it could be further treated in conventional biological wastewater treatment plants. The sediment could be used for producing mineral-organic fertilizer. The AMAK process is inexpensive, and it requires low investment costs.

  2. Bleaching of the red anthocyanin induced by superoxide radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, H; Uefuji, H; Sakihama, Y

    1996-08-01

    Red anthocyanin prepared from petals of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. was photobleached in the EDTA-riboflavin system. The rate of bleaching monitored at 565 nm depended on the light intensity and EDTA concentrations. Anaerobic conditions and/or addition of superoxide dismutase prevented the bleaching of anthocyanin, whereas mannitol and catalase did not. A similar bleaching was observed under dark conditions in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. The results indicate that anthocyanin is bleached by the nonenzymatic reaction with the superoxide radical and suggest that the pigment can function as an antioxidant. The antioxidative efficiency of cyanidin to superoxide was 10-fold higher than that of cyanidin-3-sophoroside as a Hibiscus anthocyanin.

  3. Through bleaching and tsunami: Coral reef recovery in the Maldives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morri, Carla; Montefalcone, Monica; Lasagna, Roberta; Gatti, Giulia; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, Giuseppe; Colantoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Carlo Nike

    2015-09-15

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cover, which dropped to less than 10% after the bleaching, returned to pre-bleaching values of around 50% by 2013. The 2004 tsunami had comparatively little effect. In 2014, the coral community was similar to that existing before the bleaching. According to descriptors and metrics adopted, recovery of Maldivian coral reefs took between 6 and 15years, or may even be considered unachieved, as there are species that had not come back yet.

  4. Ecology: Deep and complex ways to survive bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, John M.

    2015-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events can drive reefs from being the domains of corals to becoming dominated by seaweed. But longitudinal data show that more than half of the reefs studied rebound to their former glory. See Letter p.94

  5. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-20

    This technology evaluation assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers, with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings along with providing information on specific technology and implementation options. This information can be used to assist Federal sites to determine which options may be most appropriate for their applications. This evaluation provides an overview of the characterization of side stream filtration technology, describes typical applications, and details specific types of filtration technology.

  6. Glomerular Filtration Barrier Assembly: An insight

    OpenAIRE

    Arif, Ehtesham; Nihalani, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    A glomerulus is the network of capillaries that resides in the Bowman’s capsule that functions as a filtration unit of kidney. The glomerular function ensures that essential plasma proteins are retained in blood and the filtrate is passed on as urine. The glomerular filtration assembly is composed of three main cellular barriers that are critical for the ultrafiltration process, the fenestrated endothelium, glomerular basement membrane and highly specialized podocytes. The podocytes along wit...

  7. Treatment of leather industrial wastewater via combined advanced oxidation and membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Shafy, Hussein I; El-Khateeb, Mohamed A; Mansour, Mona S M

    The liming/unhairing operation is among the important processes of the leather industry. It generates large amounts of effluent that are highly loaded with organic hazard wastes. Such effluent is considered one of the most obnoxious materials in the leather industry, causing serious environmental pollution and health risks. The effluent is characterized by high concentrations of the pollution parameters. Conventional chemical and/or biological treatment of such wastewater is inefficient to meet the required limits of standard specifications, due to the presence of resistant and toxic compounds. The present investigation deals with an effective treatment approach for the lime/unhair effluent using the Fenton reaction followed by membrane filtration. The experiment was extended to a laboratory pilot-scale in a continuous treatment study. In this study the raw wastewater was treated with the predetermined Fenton's optimum dose followed by membrane filtration. The wastewater was efficiently treated and the final effluent met the standards for unrestricted water reuse.

  8. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; SOARES, Ana Flávia; PANGRAZIO, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; WANG, Linda; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sergio Kiyoshi; BOMBONATTI, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures. PMID:27119761

  9. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Francisco Lia MONDELLI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser, a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05. Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C. The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C. The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures.

  10. BLEACHING OF SULFONATED CMP FROM BIO-TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongYu; MenghuaQin; XuemeiLu; YinboQu; PeijiGao

    2004-01-01

    Wheat straw chemi-mechanical pulp was pretreated with a crude xylanase which was secreted by white rot fungus Phanerochaete Chrysosporium prior to hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The process of xylanase pretreatment and hydrogen peroxide bleaching was optimized. The xylanase treated pulp achieved a brightness gain of 5.8% ISO over the untreated pulp. The xylanase treatment was found to liberate reducing sugars and facilitating lignin removal. Fiber morphology of pulp treated with xylanase was also studied by SEM.

  11. Persistent homology in graph power filtrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Allen D; Marchette, David J

    2016-10-01

    The persistence of homological features in simplicial complex representations of big datasets in R (n) resulting from Vietoris-Rips or Čech filtrations is commonly used to probe the topological structure of such datasets. In this paper, the notion of homological persistence in simplicial complexes obtained from power filtrations of graphs is introduced. Specifically, the rth complex, r ≥ 1, in such a power filtration is the clique complex of the rth power G(r) of a simple graph G. Because the graph distance in G is the relevant proximity parameter, unlike a Euclidean filtration of a dataset where regional scale differences can be an issue, persistence in power filtrations provides a scale-free insight into the topology of G. It is shown that for a power filtration of G, the girth of G defines an r range over which the homology of the complexes in the filtration are guaranteed to persist in all dimensions. The role of chordal graphs as trivial homology delimiters in power filtrations is also discussed and the related notions of 'persistent triviality', 'transient noise' and 'persistent periodicity' in power filtrations are introduced.

  12. Filtration and compression of organic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Keiding, Kristian

    The conventional filtration theory has been based on filtrations of incompressible particles such as anatase, kaolin and clay. The filtration models have later been used for organic slurries but can often not explain the observed experimental data. At constant pressure, the filtrate volume does...... not increase in proportion with square root time when e.g. sewage sludge and manure are filtered. Different explanations have been suggested. However, organic slurries are complex mixtures and it is therefore difficult to evaluate the suggested explanations and develops new models. One possible solution...

  13. Air filtration and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    decent ventilation and air cleaning/air filtration, high indoor air quality cannot be accomplished. The need for effective air filtration has increased with increasing evidence on the hazardous effects of fine particles. Moreover, the air contains gaseous pollutants, removal of which requires various air....... These contradictions should motivate manufacturers and researchers to develop new efficient filtration techniques and/or improve the existing ones. Development of low polluting filtration techniques, which are at the same time easy and inexpensive to maintain is the way forward in the future....

  14. Maximizing Spatial Reuse in Indoor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Leon Gu, Fan Guo, Dongsu Han, Favonia Hou , Glenn Judd, Kaushik Lakshminarayanan, Lei Li, Nan Li, Liu Liu, Amy Lu, George Nychis, Jeff Pang, Amar...pages 293–304, 2010. 7.3 [64] Tae-Suk Kim, Jennifer C. Hou , and Hyuk Lim. Improving spatial reuse through tuning transmit power, carrier sense...reuse using direc- tional access points and clients. In MobiCom, 2010. 1, 1.1, 2.2.3, 5 [77] Xin Liu, Edwin K. P. Chong , and Ness B. Shroff

  15. Reuse-based software production technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Software reuse is viewed as a key technology to improve software product quality and productivity. This paper discusses a series of technologies related with software reuse and software component technology: component model, which describes component's essential characteristics; component acquisition technology, of which domain engineering is the main approach; component management technology, of which component library is the kernel; application integration and composition technology, of which application engineering is the main approach; software evolution technology, of which software reengineering is the main approach, etc. This paper introduces the software development environment: JadeBird Software Production Line System, which effectively integrates the above-mentioned technologies.

  16. Reuse of experience in HazOp

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen, Kristin Marheim; Knudsen, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a study of the effect of reusing experience in the Hazards and Operability Analysis method (HazOp method) with regards to how the effectiveness of the method is affected. The study was conducted by first creating a software tool for experience reuse in HazOp, then testing that tool in a student experiment in which the participants used the tool when conducting a HazOp.During the experiment it was found that students using the tool found 21% more hazards in the system unde...

  17. The effect of combined bleaching techniques on oral microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz-Montan Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of 10% and 37% carbamide peroxide during dental bleaching in three different modes. Materials and Methods : This five-week double-blind randomized controlled trial included 32 volunteers assigned to four groups (n = 8. Each group received bleaching agents or placebo as an in-office and at-home treatment. The dental bleaching techniques were: In-office bleaching (37% carbamide peroxide: CP37; at-home bleaching (10% carbamide peroxide: CP10 and the association of both (CP37 and CP10. Saliva samples were collected right before (baseline, right after, 12 hours after, and seven days after the treatment. Counts of total microorganisms, Streptococci, and Mutans streptococci were carried out. Friedman test (α = 0.05 was used to compare the microorganism counts. Results : The number of the all oral microorganisms remained stable during all experiment. Conclusions : No bleaching agent (CP37, CP10 or the combination of both was able to reduce the oral microorganisms tested.

  18. Hydrous iron oxide modified diatomite as an active filtration medium for phosphate capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Lin, Yan; Wu, Deyi; Kong, Hainan

    2016-02-01

    A simple method to functionalize diatomite with hydrous iron oxide was attempted and its performance as a new active filtration material to remove and recover phosphate from water was investigated under varying solution conditions. The Langmuir phosphate adsorption capacity increased from 0.6 mgP/g for raw diatomite to 4.89, 14.71, 25.02 mgP/g for hydrous iron oxide modified diatomite (HIOMD), depending on the amount of iron loaded. Loading of hydrous iron oxide caused the increase in true and bulk density and a decline in filtration rate, but to a lesser extent. It was shown that the HIOMD product with suitable iron content could retain a good filtration performance with a greatly increased adsorption capacity for phosphate. The phosphate adsorption increased by decreasing pH and by increasing ionic strength at high pH levels. The adsorption process was interpreted by ligand exchange. Coexisting oxyanions of sulfate, nitrate, citrate, carbonate, silicate and humic acid showed different effects on phosphate fixation but it was presumed that their influence at their concentrations and pH levels commonly encountered in effluent or natural waters was limited, i.e., HIOMD had a reasonably good selectivity. Results in repeated adsorption, desorption and regeneration experiment showed that the adsorbed phosphate could be recovered and the material could be reused after regeneration. The column test showed that HIOMD could be potentially utilized as an adsorption filtration medium for phosphate removal and recovery from water.

  19. Nitroxide free radicals protect macular carotenoids against chemical destruction (bleaching) during lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareba, M; Widomska, J; Burke, J M; Subczynski, W K

    2016-12-01

    Macular xanthophylls (MXs) lutein and zeaxanthin are dietary carotenoids that are selectively concentrated in the human eye retina, where they are thought to protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by multiple mechanisms, including filtration of phototoxic blue light and quenching of singlet oxygen and triplet states of photosensitizers. These physical protective mechanisms require that MXs be in their intact structure. Here, we investigated the protection of the intact structure of zeaxanthin incorporated into model membranes subjected to oxidative modification by water- and/or membrane-soluble small nitroxide free radicals. Model membranes were formed from saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines (PCs). Oxidative modification involved autoxidation, iron-mediated, and singlet oxygen-mediated lipid peroxidation. The extent of chemical destruction (bleaching) of zeaxanthin was evaluated from its absorption spectra and compared with the extent of lipid peroxidation evaluated using the thiobarbituric acid assay. Nitroxide free radicals with different polarity (membrane/water partition coefficients) were used. The extent of zeaxanthin bleaching increased with membrane unsaturation and correlated with the rate of PC oxidation. Protection of the intact structure of zeaxanthin by membrane-soluble nitroxides was much stronger than that by water-soluble nitroxides. The combination of zeaxanthin and lipid-soluble nitroxides exerted strong synergistic protection against singlet oxygen-induced lipid peroxidation. The synergistic effect may be explained in terms of protection of the intact zeaxanthin structure by effective scavenging of free radicals by nitroxides, therefore allowing zeaxanthin to quench the primary oxidant, singlet oxygen, effectively by the physical protective mechanism. The redox state of nitroxides was monitored using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Both nitroxide free radicals and their reduced form

  20. Tangential flow filtration of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Andre F; Sun, Guoyong; Harris, David R

    2009-01-01

    Bovine and human hemoglobin (bHb and hHb, respectively) was purified from bovine and human red blood cells via tangential flow filtration (TFF) in four successive stages. TFF is a fast and simple method to purify Hb from RBCs using filtration through hollow fiber (HF) membranes. Most of the Hb was retained in stage III (100 kDa HF membrane) and displayed methemoglobin levels less than 1%, yielding final concentrations of 318 and 300 mg/mL for bHb and hHb, respectively. Purified Hb exhibited much lower endotoxin levels than their respective RBCs. The purity of Hb was initially assessed via SDS-PAGE, and showed tiny impurity bands for the stage III retentate. The oxygen affinity (P(50)) and cooperativity coefficient (n) were regressed from the measured oxygen-RBC/Hb equilibrium curves of RBCs and purified Hb. These results suggest that TFF yielded oxygen affinities of bHb and hHb that are comparable to values in the literature. LC-MS was used to measure the molecular weight of the alpha (alpha) and beta (beta) globin chains of purified Hb. No impurity peaks were present in the HPLC chromatograms of purified Hb. The mass of the molecular ions corresponding to the alpha and beta globin chains agreed well with the calculated theoretical mass of the alpha- and beta- globin chains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HPLC-grade Hb can be generated via TFF. In general, this method can be more broadly applied to purify Hb from any source of RBCs. This work is significant, since it outlines a simple method for generating Hb for synthesis and/or formulation of Hb-based oxygen carriers.

  1. Biodiesel wash-water reuse using microfiltration: toward zero-discharge strategy for cleaner and economized biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jaber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple but economically feasible refining method to treat and re-use biodiesel wash-water was developed. In detail, microfiltration (MF through depth-filtration configuration was used in different hybrid modules. Then, the treated wash-water was mixed with clean water at different ratios, re-used for biodiesel purification and water-washing efficiency was evaluated based on methyl ester purity analysis. The findings of the present study revealed that depth-filtration-based MF combined with sand filtration/activated carbon separation and 70% dilution rate with fresh water not only achieved standard-quality biodiesel product but also led to up to 15% less water consumption after two rounds of production operations. This would be translated into a considerable reduction in the total volume of fresh water used during the operation process and would also strengthen the environmental-friendly aspects of the biodiesel production process for wastewater generation was obviously cut by the same rate as well.

  2. Code Reuse and Modularity in Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Turkel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Computer programs can become long, unwieldy and confusing without special mechanisms for managing complexity. This lesson will show you how to reuse parts of your code by writing Functions and break your programs into Modules, in order to keep everything concise and easier to debug. Being able to remove a single dysfunctional module can save time and effort.

  3. Creating by Reusing Learning Design Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Harrer, Andreas; Dodero, Juan Manuel; Asensio-Pérez, Juan; Burgos, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Hernández-Leo, D., Harrer, A., Dodero, J. M., Asension-Pérez, J. I., & Burgos, D. (2006). Creating by reusing Learning Design solutions. Proceedings of 8th Simposo Internacional de Informática Educativa, León, Spain: IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technology. Retrieved October 3rd, 2006, from

  4. Integration and Reuse in Cognitive Skill Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Dario D.

    2013-01-01

    Previous accounts of cognitive skill acquisition have demonstrated how procedural knowledge can be obtained and transformed over time into skilled task performance. This article focuses on a complementary aspect of skill acquisition, namely the integration and reuse of previously known component skills. The article posits that, in addition to…

  5. Quantifying the Reuse of Learning Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kristine; Sweeney, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of one case study from a larger project, which aims to quantify the claimed efficiencies of reusing learning objects to develop e-learning resources. The case study describes how an online inquiry project "Diabetes: A waste of energy" was developed by searching for, evaluating, modifying and then…

  6. Asset Reuse of Images from a Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    According to Markus's theory of reuse, when digital repositories are deployed to collect and distribute organizational assets, they supposedly help ensure accountability, extend information exchange, and improve productivity. Such repositories require a large investment due to the continuing costs of hardware, software, user licenses, training,…

  7. Determination of burial dose in incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, A.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    We determine the burial dose in three known-age incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz. Estimation of burial dose in incompletely bleached samples requires that the characteristics of the well-bleached part of the distribution are known in order to distinguish between...... well-bleached and poorly bleached grains. It is especially important to investigate if the uncertainties assigned to individual estimates of dose adequately describe the observed variability in well-bleached dose distributions. We investigate this by quantifying the overdispersion in laboratory...

  8. An overview of reclaimed water reuse in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lili Yi; Wentao Jiao; Xiaoning Chen; Weiping Chen

    2011-01-01

    China is facing severe water problems including scarcity and pollution which are now becoming key factors restricting developments.Creating an alternative water resource and reducing effluent discharges,water reuse has been recognized as an integral part of water and wastewater management scheme in China.The government has launched nationwide efforts to optimize the benefits of utilizing reclaimed water.This article reviewed the water reuse activities in China,including:(1) application history and current status; (2)potentials of reclaimed water reuse; (3) laws,policies and regulations governing reclaimed water reuse; (4) risks associated with reclaimed water reuse; (5) issues in reclaimed water reuse.Reclaimed water in Beijing and Tianjin were given as examples.Suggestions for improving the efficiencies of reusing urban wastewater were advanced.Being the largest user of reclaimed wastewater in the world,China's experience can benefit the development of water reuse in other regions.

  9. Wastewater and sludge reuse in agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavrouziotis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    The reuse of Municipal wastewaters (TMWW) for irrigation of crops, and of sludge for the amendment of soils, is a multidimensional disposal practice aiming at: (i) minimizing the environmental problems by releasing the pressure exerted by these two inputs on the environment, (ii) providing the growing plants with water and nutrients and (ii) improving soil fertility and productivity, The research work conducted in our University in relation to accomplishing a safe reuse has been focused on the study of the following aspects of reuse: (i) heavy metal accumulation in soils and plants with emphasis on their edible part. This aspect has been studied by conducting a series of experiments aiming at the study of the accumulation of heavy metals in soils, and in plant roots, stalks, leaves and fruits. The conclusions drawn so far with regard to the order of accumulation of heavy metals are: Roots>leaves>stalks>fruits ( edible parts) (ii) interactions between heavy metals, plant nutrients and soil chemical and physical properties. After the examinations of hundreds of interactions, and the development of a quantification of the interactions contribution, it was found that considerable quantities of heavy metals and nutrients are contributed to the soil and to various plant parts , emphasizing the important role of the elemental interactions in plants.(iii) assessment of soil pollution with heavy metals based on pollution indices, Three pollution Indices have been established by our research team and were proposed internationally for application in actual practice for the prediction of soil pollution due to long term reuse of wastewater and sludge. These indices are as follows: (a) Elemental pollution Index (EPI), (b) Heavy Metal Load (HML), and (c) Total Concentration Factor (TCF) and (iv) construction of a computer program for the control of the reuse of TMWW and sludge, and forecasting soil pollution due to accumulation of heavy metal by means of pollution indices.

  10. A Mock-Up Tool for Software Component Reuse Repository

    OpenAIRE

    P.Niranjan; C.V.Guru Rao

    2010-01-01

    Software Reuse effectiveness can be improved by reducing cost and investment.Software reuse costs can be reduced when reusable components are easy to locate, adaptand integrate into new efficient applications. Reuse is the key paradigm for increasingsoftware quality in the software development. This paper focuses on the implementationof software tool with a new integrated classification scheme to make classification buildof software components and effective software reuse repositories to faci...

  11. Progress Towards a NASA Earth Science Reuse Enablement System (RES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, James J.; Downs, Robert R.; Mattmann, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    A Reuse Enablement System (RES) allows developers of Earth science software to contribute software for reuse by others and.for users to find, select, and obtain software for reuse in their own systems. This paper describes work that the X4S,4 Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Software Reuse Working Group has completed to date in the development of an RES for NASA.

  12. Reuse Adoption Guidebook. Version 02.00.05

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    reusable assets? Who builds them? Who reuses them? What rights do the customer, developer, and reuser have to the assets? Who pays whom for assets that... reuser have to the assets? Who pays whom for assets that are reused? Who assumes liability for reused assets? " Awns Apprmeuk What processes, methods...34* How are the costs of reuse accounted for? "* What ownership rights do the customer, developer, and reuser have to the assets? "* How is the price

  13. Beneficial reuse `96: The fourth annual conference on the recycle and reuse of radioactive scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    From October 22-24, 1996 the University of Tennessee`s Energy, Environment and Resources Center and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Center for Risk Management cosponsored Beneficial Reuse `96: The Fourth Annual Conference on the Recycle and Reuse of Radioactive Materials. Along with the traditional focus on radioactive scrap metals, this year`s conference included a wide range of topics pertaining to naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), and contaminated concrete reuse applications. As with previous Beneficial Reuse conferences, the primary goal of this year`s conference was to bring together stakeholder representatives for presentations, panel sessions and workshops on significant waste minimization issues surrounding the recycle and reuse of contaminated metals and other materials. A wide range of industry, government and public stakeholder groups participated in this year`s conference. An international presence from Canada, Germany and Korea helped to make Beneficial Reuse `96 a well-rounded affair. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Software Reuse in Agile Development Organizations - A Conceptual Management Tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Wouter; Iacob, Maria; Sinderen, van Marten

    2011-01-01

    The reuse of knowledge is considered a major factor for increasing productivity and quality. In the software industry knowledge is embodied in software assets such as code components, functional designs and test cases. This kind of knowledge reuse is also referred to as software reuse. Although the

  15. 40 CFR 761.35 - Storage for reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage for reuse. 761.35 Section 761... Manufacturing, Processing, Distribution in Commerce, and Use of PCBs and PCB Items § 761.35 Storage for reuse. (a) The owner or operator of a PCB Article may store it for reuse in an area which is not...

  16. Treatment of pulp and paper industry bleaching effluent by electrocoagulant process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridhar, R., E-mail: sridhar36k@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kongu Engineering College, Perundurai, Erode 638052, TN (India); Sivakumar, V., E-mail: drvsivakumar@yahoo.com [Department of Food Technology, Kongu Engineering College, Perundurai, Erode 638052, TN (India); Prince Immanuel, V., E-mail: princeimmanuel79@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Erode Sengunthar Engineering College, Thudupathi, Erode 638057, TN (India); Prakash Maran, J., E-mail: prakashmaran@gmail.com [Department of Food Technology, Kongu Engineering College, Perundurai, Erode 638052, TN (India)

    2011-02-28

    The experiments were carried out in an electrocoagulation reactor with aluminum as sacrificial electrodes. The influence of electrolysis time, current density, pH, NaCl concentration, rotational speed of the stirrer and electrode distance on reduction of color, COD and BOD were studied in detail. From the experimental results, 15 mA/cm{sup 2} current density, pH of 7, 1 g/l NaCl, 100 rpm, 28 deg, C temperature and 3 cm electrode distance were found to be optimum for maximum reduction of color, COD and BOD. The reduction of color, COD and BOD under the optimum condition were found to be 94%, 90% and 87% respectively. The electrode energy consumption was calculated and found to be varied from 10.1 to 12.9 kWh/m{sup 3} depending on the operating conditions. Under optimal operating condition such as 15 mA/cm{sup 2} current density, pH of 7, 1 g/l NaCl, 100 rpm, 28 deg, C temperature and 3 cm electrode distance, the operating cost was found to be 1.56 US $/m{sup 3}. The experimental results proved that the electrocoagulation is a suitable method for treating bleaching plant effluents for reuse.

  17. Recovery of real dye bath wastewater using integrated membrane process: considering water recovery, membrane fouling and reuse potential of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcik-Canbolat, Cigdem; Sengezer, Cisel; Sakar, Hacer; Karagunduz, Ahmet; Keskinler, Bulent

    2016-12-30

    It has been recognized by the whole world that textile industry which produce large amounts of wastewater with strong color and toxic organic compounds is a major problematical industry requiring effective treatment solutions. In this study, reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were tested on biologically treated real dye bath wastewater with and without pretreatment by nanofiltration (NF) membrane to recovery. Also membrane fouling and reuse potential of membranes were investigated by multiple filtrations. Obtained results showed that only NF is not suitable to produce enough quality to reuse the wastewater in a textile industry as process water while RO provide successfully enough permeate quality. The results recommend that integrated NF/RO membrane process is able to reduce membrane fouling and allow long-term operation for real dye bath wastewater.

  18. "Preparing Secondary Effluent for Urban Non- Potable Applications by Floating Media Filtration"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Vaezi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional sand filtration which has become a common wastewater treatment technology to satisfy regulations appointed for effluent reuse, suffers from the disadvantage of high energy for backwashing. The subject of this study is application of downflow floating media prior to coarse sand filtration, which requires less water for backwash. Two pilots have been employed in two stages. For the first stage, a pilot of two columns was used, one was packed with plastic beads and the other with coarse sand. For the second, floating medium was placed on the sand in a unique column. The effluent of Ghods Treatment Plant was selected as the influent for the both pilots and a turbidity of 2NTU for the filter effluent has been specified as the breakthrough. Final results showed the good efficiency of the system in removing pollutants even in the case of using a unique column. Moreover, this system was determined to be able to meet the non potable reuse standards of water recycling in cities. The performance of the system in reducing chlorine demand was also drastic and results indicated a maximum of 66% and a minimum of 50% decrease in this regard.

  19. Bacteria associated with the bleached and cave coral Oculina patagonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Omry; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2008-04-01

    The relative abundance of bacteria in the mucus and tissues of Oculina patagonica taken from bleached and cave (azooxanthellae) corals was determined by analyses of the 16S rRNA genes from cloned libraries of extracted DNA and from isolated colonies. The results were compared to previously published data on healthy O. patagonica. The bacterial community of bleached, cave, and healthy corals were completely different from each other. A tight cluster (>99.5% identity) of bacteria, showing 100% identity to Acinetobacter species, dominated bleached corals, comprising 25% of the 316 clones sequenced. The dominant bacterial cluster found in cave corals, representing 29% of the 97 clones sequenced, showed 98% identity to an uncultured bacterium from the Great Barrier Reef. Vibrio splendidus was the most dominant species in healthy O. patagonica. The culturable bacteria represented 0.1-1.0% of the total bacteria (SYBR Gold staining) of the corals. The most abundant culturable bacteria in bleached, cave, and healthy corals were clusters that most closely matched Microbulbifer sp., an alpha-proteobacterium previously isolated from healthy corals and an alpha-protobacterium (AB026194), respectively. Three generalizations emerge from this study on O. patagonica: (1) More bacteria are associated with coral tissue than mucus; (2) tissue and mucus populations are different; (3) bacterial populations associated with corals change dramatically when corals lack their symbiotic zooxanthellae, either as a result of the bleaching disease or when growing in the absence of light.

  20. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  1. Ultrastructural evaluation of enamel after dental bleaching associated with fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, John A; Bittencourt, Bruna; Michel, Milton; Sabino, Nilson; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara M M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects on human enamel after two bleaching procedures: with a fluoridated bleaching agent and with topical fluoride application postbleaching. It used 43 enamel blocks (3 mm(2) ) that were ground flat (600-2,000 grit) and polished with polishing paste (one and one-fourth). Specimens were randomly divided into three groups according to the bleaching procedure: (1) control group, (2) hydrogen peroxide 35% (HPF) and topical application of fluoride 1.23%, and (3) HP 38% (OP) with fluoride in its composition. Bleaching agents were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three methodologies were used: nanoindentation, to observe surface hardness and elastic modulus; atomic force microscopy, to observe surface roughness (R(a) - R(z)); and scanning electron microscopy, to observe the enamel surface effects. Group OP had a decrease in the elastic modulus after bleaching, which was recovered at 14 days. An increased roughness (R(a); 32%) was observed on group HPF and had an increased erosion on enamel surface (67%). It was concluded that topical application of fluoride, after using the nonfluoridated whitening agent, increased the roughness values and erosion of enamel.

  2. Coral Reef Bleaching at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep Atolls, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramar Vinoth; Mohan Gopi; Thipramalai Thankappanpillai Ajith Kumar; Thirunavukarassu Thangaradjou; Thangavel Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    A survey on coral bleaching was carried out at Agatti Island of Lakshadweep from May to June 2010.Elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) of the region exceeded the seasonal average and delayed the onset of monsoon,which triggered widespread bleaching of corals.The Agatti reefs showed an average of 73% bleached corals with apparent bleaching-related mortality of sea anemones (87%) and giant clams (83%).The SST increased up to 34 ℃ with an average maximum SST of 32.5℃ during the study period between May and June 2010.Coral reefs on the southern side of the island are fully or partially exposed to sun light during low tide in contrast to the other side.This suggests that the mortality is more likely due to the low tide exposure than exclusively due to the elevated SST.Observations indicated a clear increase in coral bleaching during April 2010,at levels higher than that in normal summer.

  3. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  4. PDF-based heterogeneous multiscale filtration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Rutland, Christopher J

    2015-04-21

    Motivated by modeling of gasoline particulate filters (GPFs), a probability density function (PDF) based heterogeneous multiscale filtration (HMF) model is developed to calculate filtration efficiency of clean particulate filters. A new methodology based on statistical theory and classic filtration theory is developed in the HMF model. Based on the analysis of experimental porosimetry data, a pore size probability density function is introduced to represent heterogeneity and multiscale characteristics of the porous wall. The filtration efficiency of a filter can be calculated as the sum of the contributions of individual collectors. The resulting HMF model overcomes the limitations of classic mean filtration models which rely on tuning of the mean collector size. Sensitivity analysis shows that the HMF model recovers the classical mean model when the pore size variance is very small. The HMF model is validated by fundamental filtration experimental data from different scales of filter samples. The model shows a good agreement with experimental data at various operating conditions. The effects of the microstructure of filters on filtration efficiency as well as the most penetrating particle size are correctly predicted by the model.

  5. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 μm. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 μm, and their length is 0.6 μm, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  6. Anaphylaxis, contact urticaria, and allergic asthma caused by persulfates in hair bleaching products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Miriam; Schuttelaar, M.L.; Coenraads, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Persulfate salts are potent oxidizing agents in hair bleach products that accelerate the bleaching process. Ammonium and potassium persulfates may cause delayedtype and immediate skin reactions. Also allergic asthma and rhinitis have been described. Objectives: Ammonium and potassium per

  7. The effects of coral bleaching on settlement preferences and growth of juvenile butterflyfishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, A J; Lawton, R J; Pisapia, C; Pratchett, M S

    2014-07-01

    Coral bleaching and associated mortality is an increasingly prominent threat to coral reef ecosystems. Although the effects of bleaching-induced coral mortality on reef fishes have been well demonstrated, corals can remain bleached for several weeks prior to recovery or death and little is known about how bleaching affects resident fishes during this time period. This study compared growth rates of two species of juvenile butterflyfishes (Chaetodon aureofasciatus and Chaetodon lunulatus) that were restricted to feeding upon either bleached or healthy coral tissue of Acropora spathulata or Pocillopora damicornis. Coral condition (bleached vs. unbleached) had no significant effects on changes in total length or weight over a 23-day period. Likewise, in a habitat choice experiment, juvenile butterflyfishes did not discriminate between healthy and bleached corals, but actively avoided using recently dead colonies. These results indicate that juvenile coral-feeding fishes are relatively robust to short term effects of bleaching events, provided that the corals do recover.

  8. Correlating Dimensions of Inheritance Hierarchy with Complexity & Reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasib S. Gill

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inheritance is the vital feature of any object oriented software which provides reuse of exiting classes for designing new classes. Higher reuse provides higher productivity and greater quality.Inheritance hierarchy is one of the very important artifacts targeted for measurement of reuse and reusability. Reuse through inheritance hierarchy can be measured from two dimensions- Depth and Breadth. Higher depth and breadth may increase complexity of software which makes the software difficult to understand and maintain. This paper aimed to correlate the depth and breadth of inheritance hierarchy with reuse and complexity of inheritance hierarchy using design oriented metrics.

  9. Picking Up Artifacts: Storyboarding as a Gateway to Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Shahtab; Branham, Stacy M.; Cairco, Lauren; McCrickard, D. Scott; Harrison, Steve

    Storyboarding offers designers the opportunity to illustrate a visual narrative of use. Because designers often refer to past ideas, we argue storyboards can be constructed by reusing shared artifacts. We present a study in which we explore how designers reuse artifacts consisting of images and rationale during storyboard construction. We find images can aid in accessing rationale and that connections among features aid in deciding what to reuse, creating new artifacts, and constructing. Based on requirements derived from our findings, we present a storyboarding tool, PIC-UP, to facilitate artifact sharing and reuse and evaluate its use in an exploratory study. We conclude with remarks on facilitating reuse and future work.

  10. Reuse and recycling - reverse logistics opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopicki, R.; Berg, M.J.; Legg, L.

    1993-12-31

    This book is intended to serve as a managerial guide for planning and implementing waste reduction programs. It is based on the premise that proactive management of environmental issues is becoming vital to corporate success, and that these issues are creating new roles and opportunities for logistic professionals. Examined in detail are nonhazardous waste reduction activities; reuse and recycling activities; and source reduction. The book is based on in-depth interviews with seventeen firms and several trade associations acknowledged to be leaders in waste reduction efforts. Topics discussed include adapting inbound supply chains to use more recycled goods; minimizing packaging waste; reverse distribution capabilities for taking back products and packaging; and the use of third party services for recycling, reuse, and source reduction activities. Included are two case analyses of progressive firms like E.I. Dupont Nemours and Home Depot and their waste reduction efforts.

  11. Treated wastewater reuse on potato (Solanum tuberosum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battilani, A.; Plauborg, Finn; Andersen, M. N.

    2014-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out in Northern Italy (Po Valley), within the frame of the EU project SAFIR, to asses the impact of treated wastewater reuse on potato yield, quality and hygiene. The potato crop was drip irrigated and fertigated. Wastewater produced by small communities (≤2000 EI......) was treated by Membrane Bio Reactor (MBR) technology and gravel filter (FTS) during three cropping seasons. Treated wastewater, soil and tubers were analysed for the faecal indicator bacterium E. coli and heavy metals contents. Potato total yield was similar for tap and reused water, while the marketable...... increased by 635 and 765 euro ha-1y-1 with FTS and MBR, respectively. Tubers were not contaminated by E. coli found in treated wastewater used for irrigation. The frequency of heavy metal and nitrate detection in tubers were comparable among water sources, as well as for the average contents. Only for boron...

  12. Combined ultrasound-laccase assisted bleaching of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basto, Carlos; Tzanov, Tzanko; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluates the potential of using ultrasound to enhance the bleaching efficiency of laccase enzyme on cotton fabrics. Ultrasound of low intensity (7W) and relatively short reaction time (30 min) seems to act in a synergistic way with the enzyme in the oxidation/removal of the natural colouring matter of cotton. The increased bleaching effect could be attributed to improved diffusion of the enzyme from the liquid phase to the fibres surface and throughout the textile structure. On the other hand inactivation of the laccase occurred increasing the intensity of the ultrasound. However, at the ultrasound power applied in the bleaching experiments the loss of enzyme activity was not significant enough to justify the use stabilizer such as polyvinyl alcohol. Furthermore, the polyvinyl alcohol appears to be a substrate for the laccase.

  13. Bleaching of red lake paints in encaustic mummy portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliani, Costanza; Daveri, Alessia; Spaabaek, Lin; Romani, Aldo; Manuali, Valentina; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    The present paper reports on the study of the development of whitish opacity in pink paints in encaustic mummy portraits. Non-invasive measurements carried out on two encaustic portraits belonging to the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, by reflectance FTIR and UV-vis fluorescence have shown that the areas prone to the bleaching phenomenon had been painted with melted beeswax and an anthraquinone vegetal lake mixed with calcium sulphate hemihydrate and dihydrate. The hypothesis that the bleaching disease was neither related to a degradation of the dyes nor to an alteration of the wax but rather to a dehydration-hydration reaction of the CaSO4-H2O system, has been corroborated by the analyses of two microsamples from the bleached areas and ascertained by accelerated ageing experiments on encaustic models.

  14. SUGARCANE BAGASSE PULPING AND BLEACHING: THERMAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Fernandes Pereira

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose fibers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse in three stages. Initially sugarcane bagasse was subjected to a pre-treatment process with hydrolyzed acid to eliminate hemicellulose. Whole cellulosic fibers thus obtained were then subjected to a two-stage delignification process and finally to a bleaching process. The chemical structure of the resulting cellulose fibers was studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to analyze the effects of hydrolysis, delignification, and bleaching on the structure of the fibers. Two different thermal analysis techniques were used to study the bleaching cellulose fibers. These techniques confirmed that cellulose fibers were isolated from sugarcane bagasse. A future goal is to use these fibers as reinforcement elements in composites, organic-inorganic hybrid, and membranes for nanofiltration.

  15. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent.

  16. Reusing optical supports using a simple software

    CERN Document Server

    Quatrini, Davide

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show how it is possible to reuse optical supports (CDs, DVDs, etc.) without using chemical or physical transformation, only employing a software that can easily run on domestic computers. This software can make obsolete optical supports useful again, converting de facto WEEE (Waste electric and electronic equipment) into EEE (Electric and electronic equipment). A massive use of such a software can lead to a significant change in EEE every-day use, reducing its production to sustainable levels.

  17. Electrodialysis and water reuse novel approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Marco; Ferreira, Jane

    2014-01-01

    This book presents novel techniques to evaluate electrodialysis processes, to synthesize ionic membranes and to characterize their properties. It shows the potential use of membrane process to the treatment of effluents generated in many industrial sectors such as refineries, leather industries, mining and electroplating processes. The book is based on the results obtained by the author's research group during the past decade. It is useful for students, researchers and engineers interested in membrane technologies for water reuse.

  18. Hygiene Aspects of Greywater and Greywater Reuse

    OpenAIRE

    Ottosson, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Greywater is domestic household wastewater without inputfrom the toilet, i.e. wastewater from sinks, the shower,washing machine and dishwasher in a home. Source separation ofgreywater can be a strategy to enhance recirculation of plantnutrients and/or improve water use. The risk for transmissionof disease when reusing greywater is largely dependent on thecross-contamination by faeces. High levels of faecalindicators, mainly thermotolerant coliform bacteria, have beenreported in greywater, ind...

  19. Tooth-bleaching procedures and their controversial effects: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Alqahtani, Mohammed Q.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: This review article will help clinicians improve their understanding of the history of bleaching procedures, bleaching types, components, mechanisms, and their effects on soft tissue, tooth structures, resin composite, and bonding. Methods: The controversial issues about bleaching procedures and their effects are reviewed. Additionally, the consequences of pre- and post-bleaching on the bonding potential of composite resin restorations to tooth structure are discussed. Conclusion: ...

  20. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other types of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.

  1. Assessment and reuse of secondary batteries cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, E. L.; Kindlein, W.; Souza, S.; Malfatti, C. F.

    The popularity of portable electronic devices and the ever-growing production of the same have led to an increase in the use of rechargeable batteries. These are often discarded even before the end of their useful life. This, in turn, leads to great waste in material and natural resources and to contamination of the environment. The objective of this study was thus to develop a methodology to assess and reuse NiMH battery cells that have been disposed of before the end of their life cycle, when they can still be used. For such, the capacity of these cells, which were still in good operating conditions when the batteries were discarded, was assessed, and the percentage was estimated. The results reveal that at the end of the assessment process, a considerable number of these cells still had reuse potential, with approximately 37% of all discarded and tested cells being approved for reuse. The methodology introduced in this study showed it is possible to establish an environmentally correct alternative to reduce the amount of this sort of electronic trash.

  2. Coral diseases and bleaching on Colombian Caribbean coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Camacho, Raúl; Gil-Agudelo, Diego Luis; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Alberto; Reyes-Nivia, María Catalina; Garzón-Ferreira, Jaime

    2010-05-01

    Since 1998 the National Monitoring System for the Coral Reefs of Colombia (SIMAC) has monitored the occurrence of coral bleaching and diseases in some Colombian coral reefs (permanent stations at San Andres Island, Rosario Islands, Tayrona, San Bernardo Islands and Urabá). The main purpose is to evaluate their health status and to understand the factors that have been contributing to their decline. To estimate these occurrences, annual surveys in 126 permanent belt transects (10 x 2m) with different depth intervals (3-6 meters, 9-12 meters and 15-18 meters) are performed at all reef sites. Data from the 1998-2004 period, revealed that San Andrés Island had many colonies with diseases (38.9 colonies/m2), and Urabá had high numbers with bleaching (54.4 colonies/m2). Of the seven reported coral diseases studied, Dark Spots Disease (DSD), and White Plague Disease (WPD) were noteworthy because they occurred in all Caribbean monitored sites, and because of their high interannual infection incidence. Thirty five species of scleractinian corals were affected by at least one disease and a high incidence of coral diseases on the main reef builders is documented. Bleaching was present in 34 species. During the whole monitoring period, Agaricia agaricites and Siderastrea siderea were the species most severely affected by DSD and bleaching, respectively. Diseases on species such as Agaricia fragilis, A. grahamae, A. humilis, Diploria clivosa, Eusmilia fastigiata, Millepora complanata, and Mycetophyllia aliciae are recorded for first time in Colombia. We present bleaching and disease incidences, kinds of diseases, coral species affected, reef localities studied, depth intervals of surveys, and temporal (years) variation for each geographic area. This variation makes difficult to clearly determine defined patterns or general trends for monitored reefs. This is the first long-term study of coral diseases and bleaching in the Southwestern Caribbean, and one of the few long

  3. 40 CFR 430.20 - Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. 430.20 Section 430.20 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Bleached Papergrade Kraft and Soda Subcategory § 430.20 Applicability; description of the bleached papergrade kraft and soda subcategory. The provisions of this subpart apply...

  4. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage "Chicha Morada" in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio; Tay, Lidia Yileng

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p composite resin regardless of the bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3).

  5. Effect of nightguard vital bleaching gel on the color stability of provisional restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Omar Bajunaid

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Composite-based provisional material showed highest color stability when exposed to vital tooth bleaching gel, whereas methacrylate-based material was the least color stable. Polycarbonate crowns were more color stable when exposed to 15% bleaching gel as opposed to 10% bleaching gel.

  6. KINETICS OF DELIGNIFICATION AND CARBOHYDRATE DEGRADATION DURING OXYGEN BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L Nguyen

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate degradation during oxygen bleaching is associated with cleavage reactions. It is apparent that the loss of the cellulose DP (degree ofpolymisation)is strongly affected by the extent of the delignification. A strong linear correlation can be established between the DP of cellulose chains and the residual lignin in the pulp. The Nuclear Growth concept and Percolation Theory for heterogenous system can be combined to formulate kinetic models for both the delignification and the degradation of carbohydrate. The models prediction is statistically robust and can be applied to different pulps at different bleaching conditions.

  7. Climatological context for large-scale coral bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, A. D.; Casey, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Large-scale coral bleaching was first observed in 1979 and has occurred throughout virtually all of the tropics since that time. Severe bleaching may result in the loss of live coral and in a decline of the integrity of the impacted coral reef ecosystem. Despite the extensive scientific research and increased public awareness of coral bleaching, uncertainties remain about the past and future of large-scale coral bleaching. In order to reduce these uncertainties and place large-scale coral bleaching in the longer-term climatological context, specific criteria and methods for using historical sea surface temperature (SST) data to examine coral bleaching-related thermal conditions are proposed by analyzing three, 132 year SST reconstructions: ERSST, HadISST1, and GISST2.3b. These methodologies are applied to case studies at Discovery Bay, Jamaica (77.27°W, 18.45°N), Sombrero Reef, Florida, USA (81.11°W, 24.63°N), Academy Bay, Galápagos, Ecuador (90.31°W, 0.74°S), Pearl and Hermes Reef, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (175.83°W, 27.83°N), Midway Island, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, USA (177.37°W, 28.25°N), Davies Reef, Australia (147.68°E, 18.83°S), and North Male Atoll, Maldives (73.35°E, 4.70°N). The results of this study show that (1) The historical SST data provide a useful long-term record of thermal conditions in reef ecosystems, giving important insight into the thermal history of coral reefs and (2) While coral bleaching and anomalously warm SSTs have occurred over much of the world in recent decades, case studies in the Caribbean, Northwest Hawaiian Islands, and parts of other regions such as the Great Barrier Reef exhibited SST conditions and cumulative thermal stress prior to 1979 that were comparable to those conditions observed during the strong, frequent coral bleaching events since 1979. This climatological context and knowledge of past environmental conditions in reef ecosystems may foster a better understanding of how coral reefs will

  8. Sunflower oil bleaching by adsorption onto acid-activated bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Foletto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Two bentonite clays with different mineralogical compositions from Mendoza, Argentine, were activated with H2SO4 solutions of 4 and 8 N at 90ºC for 3.5 hours. This treatment affected clay structural properties, as was shown by thermogravimetry, infrared spectrometry and chemical analysis. Bleaching efficiency for sunflower oil was strongly dependent on the acid concentration used for clay activation. The samples have bleaching capacity comparable to that observed with a commercial adsorbent standard. The mineralogical composition of natural clays influenced the properties of the activated clays.

  9. Filtration in coal liquefaction - Influence of filtration conditions in non-hydrogenated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J. W.; Rantell, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out to study the effects of filtration conditions upon the rate of filtration of non-hydrogenated coal digests. The results show the dependence of cake resistivity on both the filtration temperature and pressure. Filter cakes were found to be compressible, resulting in smaller increases in rate with increasing pressure than with incompressible cakes. The filtration temperature determines the packing of residual solids in the cake which in turn affects the cake resistivity. An empirical relation has been derived between filtration temperature and resistivity. With increasing temperature there is an increase in filtration rate due to the reduced viscosity, but a reduction owing to a higher packing density of solids in the filter cake.

  10. The Glomerular Filtration Barrier: Components and Crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    Madhav C. Menon; Chuang, Peter Y.; Cijiang John He

    2012-01-01

    The glomerular filtration barrier is a highly specialized blood filtration interface that displays a high conductance to small and midsized solutes in plasma but retains relative impermeability to macromolecules. Its integrity is maintained by physicochemical and signalling interplay among its three core constituents—the glomerular endothelial cell, the basement membrane and visceral epithelial cell (podocyte). Understanding the pathomechanisms of inherited and acquired human diseases as well...

  11. Complications and Management of the Filtration Bleb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Clement; W; N; Chan

    1992-01-01

    Filtration surgery is the commonest operation performed for closed angle or open angle glaucoma when medical treatment or laser trabeculoplasty has failed to control the intraocular pressure. It is characterized by the formation of an artificial drainage fistula between the anterior chamber and subconjunctival space. The successful operation is evidenced by the appearance of a subconjunctival filtration bleb which in turn depends on the patency of this pathway. Despite numerous modification, the procedu...

  12. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of the discoloration between hybrid composite and nano composite before and after the application of tooth bleaching agent, 38% hydrogen peroxide. Methods: Eighteen disk-shaped specimens (5 mm of each of two composite resins, hybrid and nano filler, were prepared. The each group was treated 3 times and the specimens were divided into two groups consisted of 9 specimens for each, and then immersed in black tea solutions for 72 hours. Next, after having staining and bleaching processes, the color of the specimens was measured with a optic spectrophotometer by using photo with type BPY-47 and digital microvolt. The differences of the light intensity among three measurements were then calculated. Afterwards, GLM MANOVA Repeated Measure and parametric analysis (Independent t-test and Paired t-test were then used to analyze the data. Results: After staining process, it is then known that the nano composite had more discoloration and more affected by the black tea solution than the hybrid one. Conclusion: After bleaching, the discoloration was finally removed completely from both hybride and nano filler composite resins and became brighter from the baseline color.Latar belakang: Salah satu problem estetik adalah adanya perubahan warna pada gigi anterior. Peningkatan pemakaian bahan bleaching semakin popular. Banyak dokter gigi mempunyai problem ketika mereka akan melakukan proses bleaching dan ditemukan banyak

  13. Three-month evaluation of vital tooth bleaching using light units-a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polydorou, O; Wirsching, M; Wokewitz, M; Hahn, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the color stability of vital bleaching using a halogen unit, laser, or only chemical activation up to three months after treatment. A total of 60 patients were divided into three groups, and their teeth were bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide using three methods: acceleration of the bleaching process with halogen (eight minutes), laser (30 seconds), or chemical activation only. All teeth were bleached a maximum of four times (4 × 15 minutes) until a change of six shade tabs took place. The color was evaluated both visually and with a spectrophotometer before bleaching, immediately after bleaching, and one and three months after bleaching. Directly after bleaching, the use of halogen showed better results than laser (p≤0.05). One and three months after bleaching, no significant difference was found between the tested methods relative to the shade change, independent of the method of shade evaluation (p>0.05). As far as the color stability is concerned, bleaching with halogen resulted in stable color throughout the three months (p>0.05), whereas the other two methods resulted in whiter teeth after one and three months compared with the color directly after bleaching (p≤0.05). Bleaching with laser needed more time than halogen for the desired shade change (p≤0.05). Although directly after treatment bleaching with halogen resulted in better results, one and three months after bleaching the kind of acceleration used in the bleaching process did not have any effect on the esthetic results.

  14. Taxonomic, Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Bleaching in Anemones Inhabited by Anemonefishes

    KAUST Repository

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.

    2013-08-08

    Background:Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments). Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms.Methodology/Principal Findings:This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species) at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%); however, this percentage was much higher (19-100%) during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance.Conclusions/Significance:Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked to the ability of host

  15. Taxonomic, spatial and temporal patterns of bleaching in anemones inhabited by anemonefishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul A Hobbs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rising sea temperatures are causing significant destruction to coral reef ecosystems due to coral mortality from thermally-induced bleaching (loss of symbiotic algae and/or their photosynthetic pigments. Although bleaching has been intensively studied in corals, little is known about the causes and consequences of bleaching in other tropical symbiotic organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study used underwater visual surveys to investigate bleaching in the 10 species of anemones that host anemonefishes. Bleaching was confirmed in seven anemone species (with anecdotal reports of bleaching in the other three species at 10 of 19 survey locations spanning the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea, indicating that anemone bleaching is taxonomically and geographically widespread. In total, bleaching was observed in 490 of the 13,896 surveyed anemones (3.5%; however, this percentage was much higher (19-100% during five major bleaching events that were associated with periods of elevated water temperatures and coral bleaching. There was considerable spatial variation in anemone bleaching during most of these events, suggesting that certain sites and deeper waters might act as refuges. Susceptibility to bleaching varied between species, and in some species, bleaching caused reductions in size and abundance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Anemones are long-lived with low natural mortality, which makes them particularly vulnerable to predicted increases in severity and frequency of bleaching events. Population viability will be severely compromised if anemones and their symbionts cannot acclimate or adapt to rising sea temperatures. Anemone bleaching also has negative effects to other species, particularly those that have an obligate relationship with anemones. These effects include reductions in abundance and reproductive output of anemonefishes. Therefore, the future of these iconic and commercially valuable coral reef fishes is inextricably linked

  16. Inheritance Hierarchy Based Reuse & Reusability Metrics in OOSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasib S. Gill,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reuse and reusability are two major aspects in object oriented software which can be measured from inheritance hierarchy. Reusability is the prerequisite of reuse but both may or may not bemeasured using same metric. This paper characterizes metrics of reuse and reusability in Object Oriented Software Development (OOSD. Reuse metrics compute the extent to which classes have been reused and reusability metrics computes the extent to which classes can be reused. In this paper five new metrics namely- Breadth of Inheritance Tree (BIT, Method Reuse Per Inheritance Relation (MRPIR,Attribute Reuse Per Inheritance Relation (ARPIR, Generality of Class (GC and Reuse Probability (RP have been proposed. These metrics help to evaluate reuse and reusability of object oriented software.Four extensively validated existing object oriented metrics, namely- Depth of Inheritance Tree (DIT, Number of Children (NOC, Method Inheritance Factor (MIF and Attribute Inheritance Factor (AIFhave been selected and investigated for comparison with proposed metrics. All metrics can be computed from inheritance hierarchies and classified according to their characteristics. Further, metrics areevaluated against a case study. These metrics are helpful in comparing alternative inheritance hierarchies at design time to select best alternative, so that the development time and cost can be reduced.

  17. Rotating Reverse Osmosis for Wastewater Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Yoon, Yeomin; Pederson, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Our previous work established the concept of a low-pressure rotating reverse osmosis membrane system. The rotation of the cylindrical RO filter produces shear and Taylor vortices in the annulus of the device that decrease the concentration polarization and fouling commonly seen with conventional RO filtration techniques. A mathematical model based on the film theory and the solution-diffusion model agrees well with the experimental results obtained using this first generation prototype. However, based on the model, the filtrate flux and contaminant rejection depend strongly on the transmembrane pressure. Therefore, the goal of our current work is to improve the flux of the device by increasing the transmembrane pressure by a factor of 3 to 4. In addition, the rejections for a wider variety of inorganic and organic compounds typically found in space mission wastewater are measured.

  18. Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation in vitro and in situ: Absorption and fluorescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvezdanovic, Jelena [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia)], E-mail: jelite74@yahoo.com; Cvetic, Tijana [Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Takovska 43, Belgrade 11000 (Serbia); Veljovic-Jovanovic, Sonja [Center for Multidisciplinary Studies, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava la, Belgrade 11030 (Serbia); Markovic, Dejan [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia)], E-mail: dejan_markovic57@yahoo.com

    2009-01-15

    Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation has been studied by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy in extracts containing mixtures of photosynthetic pigments, in acetone and n-hexane solutions, and in aqueous thylakoid suspensions. Chlorophyll undergoes destruction (bleaching) accompanied by fluorescent transient formation obeying first-order kinetics. The bleaching is governed by UV-photon energy input, as well as by different chlorophyll molecular organizations in solvents of different polarities (in vitro), and in thylakoids (in situ). UV-C-induced bleaching of chlorophylls in thylakoids is probably caused by different mechanisms compared to UV-A- and UV-B-induced bleaching.

  19. 21 CFR 177.2910 - Ultra-filtration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ultra-filtration membranes. 177.2910 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2910 Ultra-filtration membranes. Ultra-filtration... the processing of food, under the following prescribed conditions; (a)(1) Ultra-filtration...

  20. Chlorine bleaches - A significant long term source of mercury pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, S. M.; Eshleman, A.

    1975-01-01

    Products of industrial electrolysis of brine - NaOCl-based bleaches and NaOH - yielded 17 to 1290 ppb of Hg upon flameless atomic absorption analysis. Compared with current U.S. rejection value of 5 ppb for potable waters, the above levels seem sufficiently high to be a matter of environmental concern.

  1. Bleaching in vital deciduous teeth – a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pettorossi Imparato

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been growing concern and search for esthetic beauty and harmony over the last few years. This concern does not form part ofadults’ lives only, but also of children’s. Among the substances used for bleaching dental structures, the most outstanding are those whoseactive principle is hydrogen peroxide-based . The present study reports a clinical case of a 4-year-old girl that suffered trauma of tooth 61 with consequent color alteration, but with no alteration in pulp vitality. The main complaint by the patient and her guardians concerned esthetics, therefore external dental bleaching was performed, using Opalescence Xtra® (Ultradent, in two sessions with an interval of one month between them. External in office bleaching was the treatment of choice, due to the tooth vitality, patient’s age and presence of only one darkened tooth. After the bleaching treatments an improvement in the darkening was observed, and both the child and her guardians were satisfied with the esthetic result.

  2. Quantification of cross-bleaching during infrared (IR) light stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzer, Sebastian; Hülle, Daniela; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov;

    2013-01-01

    The cross-bleaching behaviour of automated Risø TL/OSL (DA-12, DA-15, DA-20) luminescence readers is investigated. By design, up to 24 or 48 aliquots can be stored on a carousel in a single measurement chamber. Due to this construction, irradiation or illumination on one sample may affect...... measurements of feldspar or polymineral samples it is important to keep the time constant between the (midpoint of the) irradiation and the subsequent read out to avoid the malign effects of anomalous fading in laboratory constructed dose response curves. This may be achieved by running all measurements...... on subsequent samples. Here we investigate the size of this reduction due to cross-bleaching from the IR diodes and quantify the cross-bleaching for 10 different Risø TL/OSL readers produced between 1994 and 2011. We find that cross-bleaching from the IR diodes is worse than from the blue diodes. Using the “run...

  3. OZONE BLEACHING AT NEUTRAL PH – A NEW CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Carvalho

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of medium consistency ozone stage pH was evaluated for brown and oxygen delignified eucalyptus kraft pulp samples obtained from VCP - Luiz Antônio pulp mill. These samples were used as such or previously treated with the hot acid stage (A. The main objective of this study was to determine the viability of increasing the ozone stage pH aiming at decreasing bleaching variable costs. The ozone stage was studied in the pH range of 2.5-9.0, taking into account some important variables which affect ozone bleaching: (1 pulp kappa number entering the ozone stage, (2 reactivity of ozone towards lignin versus hexenuronic acids (HexA´s, (3 pulp treatments prior to ozone stage (acid hydrolysis, and (4 pulp treatments after the ozone stage (extraction or a chlorine dioxide stage.  Therefore, the impact of ozone stage pH was investigated in bleaching process such as Z/DEop vs AZ/DEop, Z/DEopD vs AZ/DEopD, Z/E vs AZ/E. The results were interpreted based on ozone stage efficiency and selectivity, and overall bleaching performance measured by the total bleaching chemical consumption required to achieve full brightness, pulp quality and environmental impact. It was concluded that the increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 has a slightly negative impact on the efficiency and selectivity, measured after Z/DEop sequence, but this effect is not expressive in the end of Z/DEopD bleaching sequence. The increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 in the sequence Z/DEopD is cost-effective at industrial level because it represents expressive reduction of sulphuric acid and caustic soda demand for pH control in the bleaching plant. These gain areas achieved without any significant changes in pulp quality and effluent load discharge. Nevertheless, the increase of ozone stage pH from 2.5 to 7.0 has a very high negative impact on the efficiency and selectivity for the Z/E and AZ/E processes and it is not recommended in such cases.

  4. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Abi Rached DANTAS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home. Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15: C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE, luminosity (ΔL, green-red axis (Δa, and blue-yellow axis (Δb. The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments.

  5. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity - case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, Andrés Felipe; Parreiras, Sibelli Olivieri; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2015-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF) and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS) in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  6. Clinical trial evaluating color change and tooth sensitivity throughout and following in-office bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundefeld, Maria Lúcia Marçal Mazza; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the color alteration and sensitivity of teeth throughout and following in-office bleaching. Twenty-two volunteers participated in this clinical trial of bleaching treatment (35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel and placebo) applied on maxillary incisors and canines. According to a split-mouth design, the volunteers' maxillary hemi-arches received either the bleaching or placebo agent, applied four times, at 1-week intervals. Color alteration and tooth sensitivity were assessed throughout and following bleaching. Statistical calculations were performed using gamma distribution and repeated-measures ANOVA. There was a statistically significant difference between teeth submitted to a bleaching agent and placebo (P < .001). At the end of the first, second, third, and fourth sessions, the bleached teeth presented color scores statistically lower than those observed immediately before bleaching. There was no difference in the color scale scores of the bleached teeth between bleaching sessions. The sensitivity data test showed a significant difference among treatments (P < .0001). Color alteration and dental sensitivity were altered by the bleaching agent.

  7. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dario Acuña

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada, green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n=5: purple corn (P, purple corn + bleaching (PB, green tea (T, green tea + bleaching (TB, distilled water (W, and distilled water + bleaching (WB. In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p3.3.

  8. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity – case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe CARTAGENA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  9. Disease incidence is related to bleaching extent in reef-building corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Marilyn E; McManus, John W

    2009-10-01

    Recent outbreaks of coral bleaching and disease have contributed to substantial declines in the abundance of reef-building coral. Significant attention has been paid to both phenomena in order to determine their effect on reef trajectories. Although each is positively correlated with high temperatures, few studies have explored the potential links between bleaching and disease. A longitudinal study of corals in the Florida Keys was therefore conducted during the 2005 Caribbean bleaching event to quantify bleaching extent and disease incidence in corals, and to determine whether they were related or if they acted as discrete phenomena. These data indicated that overall, a positive correlation exists between bleaching extent and disease incidence. However, the specific interactions between these two phenomena varied among disease bleaching combinations. Montastraea faveolata colonies with greater bleaching intensities later developed white plague (WP) infections. Meanwhile, Siderastrea siderea colonies with dark spot disease (DS) bleached more extensively than apparently healthy colonies. Finally, bleaching and black band disease (BB) co-occurred on Colpophyllia natans throughout the bleaching event. WP, BB, and bleaching are each independently capable of changing the structure of coral populations through loss of living tissue, and DS is an important indicator of reef health. Understanding the dynamics of how these mortality sources interact is critical to understanding mortality patterns and predicting how reef communities will respond to future events.

  10. High spatial variability in coral bleaching around Moorea (French Polynesia): patterns across locations and water depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Lucie; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Schrimm, Muriel; Lenihan, Hunter Stanton

    2007-02-01

    Mass coral bleaching events are one of the main threats to coral reefs. A severe bleaching event impacted Moorea, French Polynesia, between March and July 2002, causing 55+/-14% of colonies to suffer bleaching around the island. However, bleaching varied significantly across coral genera, locations, and as a function of water depth, with a bleaching level as high as 72% at some stations. Corals in deeper water bleached at a higher rate than those in shallow water, and the north coast was more impacted than the west coast. The relatively small scale of variability in bleaching responses probably resulted from the interaction between extrinsic factors, including hydrodynamic condition, and intrinsic factors, such as differential adaptation of the coral/algal association.

  11. Susceptibility to Coffee Staining during Enamel Remineralization Following the In-Office Bleaching Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Aline Akemi; Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess in situ the enamel mineralization level and susceptibility to coffee staining after in-office bleaching. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six human dental fragments assembled into intraoral devices were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and treated as follows: (group 1) no contact...... with coffee; (group 2) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 7 days, starting 1 week after bleaching; and (group 3) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 14 days, starting immediately after bleaching. Enamel mineralization and color were assessed before bleaching (T1......), immediately after bleaching (T2), and after 7 (T3) and 14 days (T4). The CIE whiteness index (W*) and closeness to white (ΔW*) following bleaching and/or immersion in coffee were calculated. Data were analyzed with Friedman and Wilcoxon tests or Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α = 0.05). RESULTS...

  12. Incinerate, recycle, or wash and reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbe, M. A.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available What is the best way to minimize the environmental impact of using a product such as paper? Three debating teams were formed within a university class. One team advocated increased recycling of paper. Another team pointed to evidence showing reduced environmental impact and lower net CO2 emissions if the paper is incinerated rather than recycled. A third team advocated the replacement of paper by items such as porcelain plates and video screens, cutting costs and reducing waste by multiple reuse.

  13. Monomer release from nanofilled and microhybrid dental composites after bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bleaching on elution of monomers from nanofilled and microhybrid composites.80 samples (5mm diameter and 3mm thickness of each composite were prepared. After curing, half of them were randomly polished. Each group was divided into 8 subgroups and immersed in water or 10%, 20% and 30% H2O2 for 3 or 8 hours. Eluted Bis-GMA (Bis-phenol A Glycidyl Dimethacrylate, TEGDMA (Triethyleneglycol Dimethacrylate, UDMA (Urethane Dimethacrylate and BisEMA (Bis-phenol A ethoxylate Dimethacrylate were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography and the results were analyzed by univariate ANOVA and t-test (P<0.05.Bleach significantly increased the overall release of monomers (P<0.001; TEGDMA was released more than Bis-GMA (P<0.001. Supreme released more TEGDMA compared to Z250 (P<0.001. Bleaching increased the release of this monomer (P<0.001. Increasing both the concentration of H2O2, and the immersion time, increased the release of TEGDMA (P<0.001. Polishing had no effect on release of this monomer (P=0.952. Supreme released more Bis-GMA than Z250 (P=0.000. The more concentrated H2O2 caused more elution of Bis-GMA (P= 0.003; while the effect of immersion time was not significant (P=0.824. Polishing increased the release of Bis-GMA (P=0.001. Neither the type of composite nor Bleaching had any effect on release of UDMA (P=0.972 and (P=0.811 respectively. Immersion duration increased the release of UDMA (P=0.002, as well as polishing (P=0.024.Bleaching increased the release of monomers. Nanofilled composites released more monomer than the microfilled.

  14. Tropical cyclone cooling combats region-wide coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Adam D; Puotinen, Marji

    2014-05-01

    Coral bleaching has become more frequent and widespread as a result of rising sea surface temperature (SST). During a regional scale SST anomaly, reef exposure to thermal stress is patchy in part due to physical factors that reduce SST to provide thermal refuge. Tropical cyclones (TCs - hurricanes, typhoons) can induce temperature drops at spatial scales comparable to that of the SST anomaly itself. Such cyclone cooling can mitigate bleaching across broad areas when well-timed and appropriately located, yet the spatial and temporal prevalence of this phenomenon has not been quantified. Here, satellite SST and historical TC data are used to reconstruct cool wakes (n=46) across the Caribbean during two active TC seasons (2005 and 2010) where high thermal stress was widespread. Upon comparison of these datasets with thermal stress data from Coral Reef Watch and published accounts of bleaching, it is evident that TC cooling reduced thermal stress at a region-wide scale. The results show that during a mass bleaching event, TC cooling reduced thermal stress below critical levels to potentially mitigate bleaching at some reefs, and interrupted natural warming cycles to slow the build-up of thermal stress at others. Furthermore, reconstructed TC wave damage zones suggest that it was rare for more reef area to be damaged by waves than was cooled (only 12% of TCs). Extending the time series back to 1985 (n = 314), we estimate that for the recent period of enhanced TC activity (1995-2010), the annual probability that cooling and thermal stress co-occur is as high as 31% at some reefs. Quantifying such probabilities across the other tropical regions where both coral reefs and TCs exist is vital for improving our understanding of how reef exposure to rising SSTs may vary, and contributes to a basis for targeting reef conservation.

  15. [Pilot study on the treatment of ultrafiltration for laundry wastewater recycling and reuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Jiang, Jin-Hui

    2007-02-01

    A pilot study of the treatment for laundry wastewater recycling and reuse on the spot was carried out by ultrafiltration (UF) with different membrane material of PAN, PS and PP. According to the analysis of membrane fouling combined with UF effluent quality, PAN membrane was superior to the others. It removed the turbidity, suspended solid, fat oil and grease effectively, but kept anionic surfactant (LAS) to a certain degree in the UF effluent which is beneficial to recycling and reuse. By correlation analysis, it was found the high COD concentration of effluent was caused by LAS remained. The whiteness and softness of cotton cloth washed by UF effluent for a long-term was not different with that washed by tap water. The removal of bacteria and E. coli by UF membrane was not very high, and so UF effluent was disinfected by ultraviolet (UV) further. As the dosage of UV was not less than 3 750 J/m2, the microbial level reached the China national standard of drinking water. The optimal UF operation condition is to backwash two minutes every thirty minutes' filtration. Adopted alkali liquor of pH 11 to 13 to carry out chemical cleaning, the membrane flux was recovered completely.

  16. The cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching can turn some coral species winners into losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, Andréa G; Warner, Mark E; Levas, Stephen J; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D; Schoepf, Verena; McGinley, Michael; Baumann, Justin; Matsui, Yohei

    2014-12-01

    Mass coral bleaching events caused by elevated seawater temperatures result in extensive coral loss throughout the tropics, and are projected to increase in frequency and severity. If bleaching becomes an annual event later in this century, more than 90% of coral reefs worldwide may be at risk of long-term degradation. While corals can recover from single isolated bleaching and can acclimate to recurring bleaching events that are separated by multiple years, it is currently unknown if and how they will survive and possibly acclimatize to annual coral bleaching. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that annual coral bleaching can dramatically alter thermal tolerance in Caribbean corals. We found that high coral energy reserves and changes in the dominant algal endosymbiont type (Symbiodinium spp.) facilitated rapid acclimation in Porites divaricata, whereas low energy reserves and a lack of algal phenotypic plasticity significantly increased susceptibility in Porites astreoides to bleaching the following year. Phenotypic plasticity in the dominant endosymbiont type of Orbicella faveolata did not prevent repeat bleaching, but may have facilitated rapid recovery. Thus, coral holobiont response to an isolated single bleaching event is not an accurate predictor of its response to bleaching the following year. Rather, the cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching can turn some coral species 'winners' into 'losers', and can also facilitate acclimation and turn some coral species 'losers' into 'winners'. Overall, these findings indicate that cumulative impact of annual coral bleaching could result in some species becoming increasingly susceptible to bleaching and face a long-term decline, while phenotypically plastic coral species will acclimatize and persist. Thus, annual coral bleaching and recovery could contribute to the selective loss of coral diversity as well as the overall decline of coral reefs in the Caribbean.

  17. Water Reuse Highlights: A Summary Volume of Wastewater Reclamation and Reuse Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Water Works Association, Denver, CO. Research Foundation.

    This document reports the efforts of the AWWA Research Foundation to gather, prepare, and distribute current technical information in the wastewater reclamation and reuse field. The information reported has been abstracted from other Foundation publications and only attempts here to highlight the field. Categories discussed include research,…

  18. A Workflow for Learning Objects Lifecycle and Reuse: Towards Evaluating Cost Effective Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Demetrios G.; Zervas, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade Learning Objects (LOs) have gained a lot of attention as a common format for developing and sharing digital educational content in the field of technology-enhanced learning. The main advantage of LOs is considered to be their potential for component-based reuse in different learning settings supporting different learning…

  19. Evaluation of appropriate technologies for grey water treatments and reuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangyue; Wichmann, Knut; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    As water is becoming a rare resource, the onsite reuse and recycling of grey water is practiced in many countries as a sustainable solution to reduce the overall urban water demand. However, the lack of appropriate water quality standards or guidelines has hampered the appropriate grey water reuses. Based on literature review, a non-potable urban grey water treatment and reuse scheme is proposed and the treatment alternatives for grey water reuse are evaluated according to the grey water characteristics, the proposed standards and economical feasibility.

  20. Reusing steel and aluminum components at end of product life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Daniel R; Allwood, Julian M

    2012-09-18

    Reusing steel and aluminum components would reduce the need for new production, possibly creating significant savings in carbon emissions. Currently, there is no clearly defined set of strategies or barriers to enable assessment of appropriate component reuse; neither is it possible to predict future levels of reuse. This work presents a global assessment of the potential for reusing steel and aluminum components. A combination of top-down and bottom-up analyses is used to allocate the final destinations of current global steel and aluminum production to product types. A substantial catalogue has been compiled for these products characterizing key features of steel and aluminum components including design specifications, requirements in use, and current reuse patterns. To estimate the fraction of end-of-life metal components that could be reused for each product, the catalogue formed the basis of a set of semistructured interviews with industrial experts. The results suggest that approximately 30% of steel and aluminum used in current products could be reused. Barriers against reuse are examined, prompting recommendations for redesign that would facilitate future reuse.

  1. Wastewater reclamation and reuse in China: Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Sidan; Chen, Weiping; Zhang, Weiling; Fan, Yupeng; Jiao, Wentao

    2016-01-01

    The growing water stress both in terms of water scarcity and quality deterioration promotes the development of reclaimed water as a new water resource use. This paper reviewed wastewater reuse practices in China, and the opportunities and challenges of expanding reclaimed water use were analyzed. Rapid urbanization with the increasing of water demand and wastewater discharge provides an opportunity for wastewater reuse. The vast amount of wastewater discharge and low reclaimed water production mean that wastewater reuse still has a great potential in China. Many environmental and economic benefits and successful reclamation technologies also provide opportunities for wastewater reuse. In addition, the overall strategy in China is also encouraging for wastewater reuse. In the beginning stage of wastewater reclamation and reuse, there are many significant challenges to expand wastewater reuse in China including slow pace in adopting urban wastewater reuse programs, the establishment of integrated water resources management framework and guidelines for wastewater reuse programs, incoherent water quality requirements, the limited commercial development of reclaimed water and the strengthening of public awareness and cooperation among stakeholders.

  2. SANITARY SEWAGE REUSE IN AGRICULTURAL CROP IRRIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Bittencourt Barroso

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The water availability was exceeded by demand, becoming a limiting factor in irrigated agriculture. This study aimed to provide a general theoretical framework on the issue of water reuse for agricultural purposes. This is due to the fact that we need a prior knowledge of the state of the art concerning the matter. To that end, we performed a review of irrigated agriculture, the effects on cultivated land and the development of agricultural crops as well as aspects of security to protect groups at risk. The amount of macro and micronutrients in the effluent may reduce or eliminate the use of commercial fertilizers. And this addition of organic matter acts as a soil conditioner, increasing its capacity to retain water. Depending on the characteristics of sewage, the practice of irrigation for long periods may lead to accumulation of toxic compounds and the significant increase of salinity. The inhibition of plant growth by salinity may be due to osmotic effect, causing drought and / or specific effects of ions, which can cause toxicity or nutritional imbalance. The minimization of human exposure to the practice of agricultural reuse is based on a set of mitigation measures that must be implemented by the authorities responsible for operating and monitoring systems for water recycling. It is concluded that the use of sewage depends on management of irrigation, monitoring of soil characteristics and culture.

  3. Economic Assessment of an Integrated Membrane System for Secondary Effluent Polishing for Unrestricted Reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Oron

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Extra treatment stages are required to polish the secondary effluent for unrestricted reuse, primarily for agricultural irrigation. Improved technology for the removal of particles, turbidity, bacteria and cysts, without the use of disinfectants is based on MicroFiltration (MF and UltraFiltration (UF membrane technology and in series with Reverse Osmosis (RO for dissolved solids removal. Field experiments were conducted using a mobile UF and RO membrane pilot unit at a capacity of around 1.0 m3/hr. A management model was defined and tested towards optimal polishing of secondary effluent. The two major purposes of the management model are: (i to delineate a methodology for economic assessment of optimal membrane technology implementation for secondary effluent upgrading for unrestricted use, and; (ii to provide guidelines for optimal RO membrane selection in regards to the pretreatment stage. The defined linear model takes into account the costs of the feed secondary effluent, the UF pretreatment and the RO process. Technological constraints refer primarily to the longevity of the membrane and their performance. Final treatment cost (the objective function includes investment, operation and maintenance expenses, UF pretreatment, RO treatment, post treatment and incentive for low salinity permeate use. The cost range of water for irrigation according to the model is between 15 and 42 US cents per m3.

  4. Cake formation and growth in cake filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.S.; Hsiau, S.S. [National Central University, Chungli (Taiwan)

    2009-06-15

    In this study we develop an experimental method to help understand the formation and growth of dust cakes. An on-line pressure-displacement measurement system is developed to measure the thickness of the dust cakes. A higher filtration superficial velocity resulted in a higher degree of compaction in the dust cakes and thus a higher specific cake resistance, hence a better collection efficiency could be achieved. The empirical equations for cake solidosity, and specific cake resistance as a function of the filtration superficial velocity are derived. We find that the cake filter is influenced by the cake thickness and the filtration superficial velocity. The results of this study can be applied to granular bed filters for the removal of dust particulates in advanced coal-fired power systems.

  5. The Glomerular Filtration Barrier: Components and Crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav C. Menon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The glomerular filtration barrier is a highly specialized blood filtration interface that displays a high conductance to small and midsized solutes in plasma but retains relative impermeability to macromolecules. Its integrity is maintained by physicochemical and signalling interplay among its three core constituents—the glomerular endothelial cell, the basement membrane and visceral epithelial cell (podocyte. Understanding the pathomechanisms of inherited and acquired human diseases as well as experimental injury models of this barrier have helped to unravel this interdependence. Key among the consequences of interference with the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier is the appearance of significant amounts of proteins in the urine. Proteinuria correlates with kidney disease progression and cardiovascular mortality. With specific reference to proteinuria in human and animal disease phenotypes, the following review explores the roles of the endothelial cell, glomerular basement membrane, and the podocyte and attempts to highlight examples of essential crosstalk within this barrier.

  6. Salt disposition alternatives filtration at SRTC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. W.; Hobbs, D.

    2000-01-27

    Several of the prospective salt disposition alternative technologies require a monosodium titanate (MST) contact to remove strontium and actinides from inorganic salt solution feedstock. This feedstock also contains sludge solids from waste removal operations and may contain defoamers added in the evaporator systems. Filtration is required to remove the sludge and MST solids before sending the salt solution for further processing. This report describes testing performed using the Parallel Theological Experimental Filter (PREF). The PREF contains two single tube Mott sintered metal crossflow filters. For this test one filter was isolated so that the maximum velocities could be achieved. Previous studies showed slurries of MST and sludge in the presence of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) were filterable since the NaTPB slurry formed a filter cake which aided in removing the smaller MST and sludge particles. Some of the salt disposition alternative technologies do not use NaTPB raising the question of how effective crossflow filtration is with a feed stream containing only sludge and MST. Variables investigated included axial velocity, transmembrane pressure, defoamer effects, and solids concentration (MST and sludge). Details of the tests are outlined in the technical report WSRC-RP-98-O0691. Key conclusions from this study are: (1) Severe fouling of the Mott sintered metal filter did not occur with any of the solutions filtered. (2) The highest fluxes, in the range of .46 to 1.02 gpm/f{sup 2}, were obtained when salt solution decanted from settled solids was fed to the filter. These fluxes would achieve 92 to 204 gpm filtrate production for the current ITP filters. The filtrate fluxes were close to the flux of 0.42 gpm/f{sup 2} reported for In Tank Precipitation Salt Solution by Morrisey. (3) For the range of solids loading studied, the filter flux ranged from .04 to .17 gpm/f{sup 2} which would result in a filtrate production rate of 9 to 31 gpm for the current HP

  7. Projective Dimension in Filtrated K-Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentmann, Rasmus Moritz

    2013-01-01

    Under mild assumptions, we characterise modules with projective resolutions of length n∈N in the target category of filtrated K-theory over a finite topological space in terms of two conditions involving certain Tor -groups. We show that the filtrated K-theory of any separable C∗dash-algebra over...... any topological space with at most four points has projective dimension 2 or less. We observe that this implies a universal coefficient theorem for rational equivariant KK-theory over these spaces. As a contrasting example, we find a separable C∗dash-algebra in the bootstrap class over a certain five...

  8. Maize genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lance E; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew L; Balija, Vivekanand S; Nascimento, Lidia U; Dike, Sujit; de la Bastide, Melissa; Martienssen, Robert A; McCombie, W Richard

    2003-12-19

    Gene enrichment strategies offer an alternative to sequencing large and repetitive genomes such as that of maize. We report the generation and analysis of nearly 100,000 undermethylated (or methylation filtration) maize sequences. Comparison with the rice genome reveals that methylation filtration results in a more comprehensive representation of maize genes than those that result from expressed sequence tags or transposon insertion sites sequences. About 7% of the repetitive DNA is unmethylated and thus selected in our libraries, but potentially active transposons and unmethylated organelle genomes can be identified. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction can be used to finish the maize transcriptome.

  9. Mechanisms of pressure filtration of liquid aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X.

    2006-12-01

    The Prefil Footprinter, a portable pressure filtration instrument, is usually used to detect the quality of liquid aluminum alloys. However, no investigations have ever been done to calculate the cake resistance to date. Based on the identification and classification of flow behavior using the first derivative method for filtrate mass vs filtration time curves, conventional filtration equations are successfully employed to understand the filtration behaviors. From the analyses of the variations of cake resistance with filtration time, the filtration mechanisms are discussed in detail over the different filtration stages. During the steady stage, either incompressible or compressible cake mode is the main mechanism. At the initial and terminal transient stages, however, deep-bed filtration, complete straining, and solidification clogging may appear. Solid inclusions in liquid metal have significant influence on the cake structures and properties. Some important issues related to the heterogeneity of filter media and test methodology are highlighted in this work.

  10. Nonvital tooth bleaching: a review of the literature and clinical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Buono, Laura; Grande, Nicola M; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Somma, Francesco

    2008-04-01

    Tooth discoloration varies in etiology, appearance, localization, severity, and adhesion to tooth structure. It can be defined as being extrinsic or intrinsic on the basis of localization and etiology. In this review of the literature, various causes of tooth discoloration, different bleaching materials, and their applications to endodontically treated teeth have been described. In the walking bleach technique the root filling should be completed first, and a cervical seal must be established. The bleaching agent should be changed every 3-7 days. The thermocatalytic technique involves placement of a bleaching agent in the pulp chamber followed by heat application. At the end of each visit the bleaching agent is left in the tooth so that it can function as a walking bleach until the next visit. External bleaching of endodontically treated teeth with an in-office technique requires a high concentration gel. It might be a supplement to the walking bleach technique, if the results are not satisfactory after 3-4 visits. These treatments require a bonded temporary filling or a bonded resin composite to seal the access cavity. There is a deficiency of evidence-based science in the literature that addresses the prognosis of bleached nonvital teeth. Therefore, it is important to always be aware of the possible complications and risks that are associated with the different bleaching techniques.

  11. Study of melanin bleaching after immunohistochemistry of melanin-containing tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hongwu; Wu, Wenqiao

    2015-04-01

    Melanin may interfere with immunohistochemical staining. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) bleaching, potassium permanganate bleaching, and potassium dichromate bleaching on melanin, tissue antigen, and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) using melanin-containing and melanin-free tissue samples. Our results demonstrated that all 3 bleaching methods efficiently bleached melanin and partially destroyed tissue antigen. In addition, potassium permanganate bleaching and potassium dichromate bleaching clearly destroyed DAB, whereas TCCA bleaching had no significant effect on DAB. Therefore, neither potassium permanganate nor potassium dichromate is an ideal solution, whereas TCCA might be an ideal solution for melanin bleaching after the immunohistochemical staining of melanin-containing tissues. After immunostaining followed by TCCA bleaching, the melanin could be completely removed in all 120 malignant melanoma tissue sections. Compared with the control, the DAB intensity was clear, and the tissue structure and cellular nuclei were well maintained. It is worth noting that TCCA should be freshly prepared before each experiment, and used within 2 hours of its preparation. In addition, sections should not be incubated with TCCA for over 30 minutes.

  12. Bacteria are not the primary cause of bleaching in the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, T D; Fine, M; Roff, G; Hoegh-Guldberg, O

    2008-01-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when the endosymbiosis between corals and their symbionts disintegrates during stress. Mass coral bleaching events have increased over the past 20 years and are directly correlated with periods of warm sea temperatures. However, some hypotheses have suggested that reef-building corals bleach due to infection by bacterial pathogens. The 'Bacterial Bleaching' hypothesis is based on laboratory studies of the Mediterranean invading coral, Oculina patagonica, and has further generated conclusions such as the coral probiotic hypothesis and coral hologenome theory of evolution. We aimed to investigate the natural microbial ecology of O. patagonica during the annual bleaching using fluorescence in situ hybridization to map bacterial populations within the coral tissue layers, and found that the coral bleaches on the temperate rocky reefs of the Israeli coastline without the presence of Vibrio shiloi or bacterial penetration of its tissue layers. Bacterial communities were found associated with the endolithic layer of bleached coral regions, and a community dominance shift from an apparent cyanobacterial-dominated endolithic layer to an algal-dominated layer was found in bleached coral samples. While bacterial communities certainly play important roles in coral stasis and health, we suggest environmental stressors, such as those documented with reef-building corals, are the primary triggers leading to bleaching of O. patagonica and suggest that bacterial involvement in patterns of bleaching is that of opportunistic colonization.

  13. Response of coral assemblages to thermal stress: are bleaching intensity and spatial patterns consistent between events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Lucie; Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Adjeroud, Mehdi

    2013-06-01

    Mass bleaching events resulting in coral mortality are among the greatest threats to coral reefs, and are projected to increase in frequency and intensity with global warming. Achieving a better understanding of the consistency of the response of coral assemblages to thermal stress, both spatially and temporally, is essential to determine which reefs are more able to tolerate climate change. We compared variations in spatial and taxonomic patterns between two bleaching events at the scale of an island (Moorea Island, French Polynesia). Despite similar thermal stress and light conditions, bleaching intensity was significantly lower in 2007 (approximately 37 % of colonies showed signs of bleaching) than in 2002, when 55 % of the colonies bleached. Variations in the spatial patterns of bleaching intensity were consistent between the two events. Among nine sampling stations at three locations and three depths, the stations at which the bleaching response was lowest in 2002 were those that showed the lowest levels of bleaching in 2007. The taxonomic patterns of susceptibility to bleaching were also consistent between the two events. These findings have important implications for conservation because they indicate that corals are capable of acclimatization and/or adaptation and that, even at small spatial scales, some areas are consistently more susceptible to bleaching than others.

  14. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Loke Ming; Toh, Tai Chong; Toh, Kok Ben; Ng, Chin Soon Lionel; Cabaitan, Patrick; Tun, Karenne; Goh, Eugene; Afiq-Rosli, Lutfi; Taira, Daisuke; Du, Rosa Celia Poquita; Loke, Hai Xin; Khalis, Aizat; Li, Jinghan; Song, Tiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached). The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site) provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change.

  15. Differential Response of Coral Assemblages to Thermal Stress Underscores the Complexity in Predicting Bleaching Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loke Ming Chou

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events have been predicted to occur more frequently in the coming decades with global warming. The susceptibility of corals to bleaching during thermal stress episodes is dependent on many factors and an understanding of these underlying drivers is crucial for conservation management. In 2013, a mild bleaching episode ensued in response to elevated sea temperature on the sediment-burdened reefs in Singapore. Surveys of seven sites highlighted variable bleaching susceptibility among coral genera-Pachyseris and Podabacia were the most impacted (31% of colonies of both genera bleached. The most susceptible genera such as Acropora and Pocillopora, which were expected to bleach, did not. Susceptibility varied between less than 6% and more than 11% of the corals bleached, at four and three sites respectively. Analysis of four of the most bleached genera revealed that a statistical model that included a combination of the factors (genus, colony size and site provided a better explanation of the observed bleaching patterns than any single factor alone. This underscored the complexity in predicting the coral susceptibility to future thermal stress events and the importance of monitoring coral bleaching episodes to facilitate more effective management of coral reefs under climate change.

  16. Influence of post-bleaching time intervals on dentin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that bond strength of resin to tooth structure can be reduced when the bonding procedure is carried out immediately after the bleaching treatment. This study evaluated the effect of bleaching of non-vital teeth bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite resin/bovine dentin interface and the influence of delaying the bonding procedures for different time intervals following internal bleaching. According to a randomized block design, composite resin cylinders (Z100/Single bond - 3M) were bonded to the flattened dentin surface of two hundred and fifty-six teeth which had previously been subjected to four different treatments: SPH - sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide; SPW - sodium perborate + distilled water; CP - 37% carbamide peroxide; and CON - distilled water (control), each one followed by storage in artificial saliva for 0 (baseline), 7, 14, and 21 days after bleaching (n = 16). The bleaching agents in the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days, over 4 weeks. The SBS test of the blocks was done using a universal testing machine. The ANOVA showed that there was no significant interaction between time and bleaching agents, and that the factor time was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). For the factor bleaching treatment, the Student's t-test showed that [CON = CP] > [SPW = SPH]. The bleaching of non-vital teeth affected the resin/dentin SBS values when sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide or water was used, independently of the elapsed time following the bleaching treatment.

  17. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    KAUST Repository

    Furby, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-04

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (<20 % on average). We resurveyed the reefs 7 months later to estimate subsequent mortality. Mortality was highly variable among taxa, with some taxa showing evidence of full recovery and some (e. g., acroporids) apparently suffering nearly complete mortality. The unequal mortality among families resulted in significant change in community composition following the bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  18. Comparing the Effect of Different Bleaching Regims of Carbamide Peroxide on Microhardness of Z250 Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Esmaeili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bleaching products with oxidizing mechanism can exert side effects on the restorative materials existing in the oral cavity. Since bleaching agents are applied in different concentrations, the present study aimed to compare the effect of different bleaching regims of carbamide peroxide on microhardness of Z250 microhybride composite. Methods: In this in vitro study , 32 specimens of micro hybride composite (Z250 were made which were randomly divided into 4 subgroups (n=8: G1: bleached with10% carbamide peroxide 4 hours a day for 2 weeks G2: bleached with 16%carbamide peroxide 3 hours a day for 2 weeks G3: bleached with 22%carbamide peroxide 1hour a day for 2 weeks G4: the control subgroup stored in distilled water at 37◦c for 2 weeks. Microhardness of specimens was measured before and after bleaching using Vickers hardness testing machine. Moreover, the study data were analyzed statistically applying Anova and t-test (&alpha= 0.05. Results: This study findings revealed that using bleaching agent significantly decreased the  microhardness of composite resin in the bleaching groups compared to the control group, though the concentration of carbamide peroxide produced no significant effect on the microhardness value. (p>0.13 Conclusion: Bleaching therapy can cause a reduction in microhardness of Z250 composite and different concentrations of carbamide peroxide can reduce microhardness of Z250 to the same value.

  19. Susceptibility of central Red Sea corals during a major bleaching event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furby, K. A.; Bouwmeester, J.; Berumen, M. L.

    2013-06-01

    A major coral bleaching event occurred in the central Red Sea near Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, in the summer of 2010, when the region experienced up to 10-11 degree heating weeks. We documented the susceptibility of various coral taxa to bleaching at eight reefs during the peak of this thermal stress. Oculinids and agaricids were most susceptible to bleaching, with up to 100 and 80 % of colonies of these families, respectively, bleaching at some reefs. In contrast, some families, such as mussids, pocilloporids, and pectinids showed low levels of bleaching (reefs 7 months later to estimate subsequent mortality. Mortality was highly variable among taxa, with some taxa showing evidence of full recovery and some (e.g., acroporids) apparently suffering nearly complete mortality. The unequal mortality among families resulted in significant change in community composition following the bleaching. Significant factors in the likelihood of coral bleaching during this event were depth of the reef and distance of the reef from shore. Shallow reefs and inshore reefs had a higher prevalence of bleaching. This bleaching event shows that Red Sea reefs are subject to the same increasing pressures that reefs face worldwide. This study provides a quantitative, genus-level assessment of the vulnerability of various coral groups from within the Red Sea to bleaching and estimates subsequent mortality. As such, it can provide valuable insights into the future for reef communities in the Red Sea.

  20. Effect of desensitizer application on shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tooth sensitivity is common after vital tooth bleaching. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a desensitizing agent on shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel; and determine whether a delay of one or two weeks in bonding procedure is sufficient subsequent to bleaching/desensitizer regimen. Materials and Methods: Buccal enamel surfaces of ninety-six human sound molars were prepared and divided into eight groups. The surfaces of specimens in Group 1 as negative control group were bonded by composite resin using the single bond adhesive. Specimens in Groups 2-4 were bleached with an at-home bleaching agent (Daywhite ACP. Relief ACP desensitizing gel alone was applied in Group 5. In Groups 6-8, specimens were bleached same as in Group 2 and relief ACP desensitizing gel was applied same as inGroup 5 subsequent to each bleaching session. Composite cylinders were bonded after 24 h, 7 days and 14 days in Groups 2-4, respectively, and also in Groups 6-8, respectively. The shear bond strengths of the cylinders were tested and data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. Results: The results showed that bleaching and bleaching/desensitizer regimens significantly reduced the bond strength of composite resin to enamel. However, desensitizer alone did not reduce bond strength. No statistically significant differences were found between bleaching and bleaching/desensitizer regarding bond strength. Conclusion: Bleaching or bleaching/desensitizer treatment significantly decreases bond strength of composite resin to enamel. In both regimens, adhesive bonding is recommended after two weeks.

  1. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert A. Liske

    2006-07-31

    This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron

  2. 给水厂生产尾水回用技术分析%Analysis of tail water reuse technology in water supply plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 李梅; 刘雷; 杨曦凯; 王静

    2011-01-01

    The reuse of tail water in water supply plants, including settling tank sludge water and filter backwash water, is of great significance to the protection of water resources. The reuse technologies such as direct reuse, membrane filtration and chemical treatment are discussed through the analysis of the features of tail water. From the perspective of the safety of drinking water, by analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of the above technologies, it is believed that membrane filtration will gradually become the primary technology for recycling tail water in water supply plants.%给水厂生产尾水包括沉淀池排泥水和滤池反冲洗水,回用生产尾水对水资源的保护具有重要意义.通过分析生产尾水的水质特点,探讨了生产尾水直接回用、膜过滤、投加PAM化学药剂等几种处理技术,并对这几种技术的优缺点进行了分析和比较,得出从饮用水安全角度考虑,膜技术在给水厂生产尾水的回收利用方面会逐渐成为首选技术.

  3. Aerosol filtration - performance of filter media; Filtration des aerosols - performances des medias filtrants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemer, D.; Regnier, R. [Institut National de Recherche et de Securite (INRS), Dept. Ingenierie des Procedes, 75 - Paris (France); Calle, S.; Thomas, D.; Simon, X.; Appert-Collin, J.Ch. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. des Sciences du Genie Chimique de Nancy, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2006-03-15

    Set up in 2000, the Laboratoire de Filtration des Aerosols in Nancy (LFA), associating research teams from INRS (Institut National de Recherche et de Securite and LSGC (Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique - CNRS), has been commissioned to provide expertise in the aerosol filtration field to both CRAM (Caisse Regionale de l'Assurance Maladie) prevention specialists and industrialists. Following a theoretical review of fibre medium filtration, this paper summarises the different actions undertaken by the LFA: filter performance during clogging with liquid and solid aerosols, modelling, pneumatic unclogging of baghouse dust collectors, influence of micro-leaks, etc. (authors)

  4. Strategies for Reuse of Learning Objects: Context Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijker, Allard; Collis, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Based on research in ten projects in a university, corporate learning, and military context, a set of dimensions is found that can help decision makers to develop strategies for reuse (Strijker, 2004). This article describes how these dimensions and their relation with human and technical aspects can be used in a reuse strategy. The dimensions can…

  5. Runtime task mapping based on hardware configuration reuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigdel, K.; Galuzzi, C.; Bertels, K.; Thompson, M.; Pimentel, A.D.; Prasanna, V.; Becker, J.; Cumplido, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new heuristic for runtime task mapping of application(s) onto reconfigurable architectures. The heuristic is based on hardware configuration reuse, which tries to avoid the reconfiguration overhead of few selected tasks, by reusing the hardware configurations already avai

  6. Reusing UML specifications in a constrained application domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, M.C.; Cybulski, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This article describes a method of reusing computer software designed in UML (Unified Modelling Language) with the aid of a domain model. The method's main strength is the possibility of software reuse at the earliest stages of the development life cycle, i.e. specification of use cases and their ev

  7. 20 CFR 616.10 - Reuse of employment and wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reuse of employment and wages. 616.10 Section 616.10 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INTERSTATE ARRANGEMENT FOR COMBINING EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES § 616.10 Reuse of employment and wages. Employment and...

  8. 27 CFR 479.163 - Reuse of stamps prohibited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reuse of stamps prohibited. 479.163 Section 479.163 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... CERTAIN OTHER FIREARMS Distribution and Sale of Stamps § 479.163 Reuse of stamps prohibited. A stamp...

  9. 27 CFR 20.213 - Reuse of recovered spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reuse of recovered spirits. 20.213 Section 20.213 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Alcohol, Specially Denatured Rum, or Articles § 20.213 Reuse of recovered spirits. (a) If the...

  10. Direct Reuse of Rare Earth Permanent Magnets—Coating Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgberg, Stig; Holbøll, Joachim; Mijatovic, Nenad

    2017-01-01

    Rare earth permanent magnets can be reused directly as an alternative to traditional recycling methods, in which scrapped magnets are reprocessed into new magnets by undergoing many of the original energy-intensive and expensive production processes. Direct reuse entails using segmented magnet...

  11. Prevention of febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction with leucocyte filtrated concentrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-ming; XIANG Guo-chun; ZHANG Jia-si; CHENG Xiao-ling; LI Ru-qing

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical efficiency of the transfusion of leucocyte filtrated RBC concentrates to prevent febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs). Methods: One hundred patients with liver cirrhosis, gastric ulcer or cancer were subjected to receive RBC concentrates after leucocyte filtration.Another 50 patients with similar diseases were selected to receive non-filtrated RBC concentrates. The incidence of FNHTRs in all patients was investigated. Results: There was no FNHTR in 100 transfusions with leucocyte filtrated RBC concentrates, while FNHTRs occurred in 8 of 50 patients with non-filtrated RBC concentrates, with the incidence of 160%. Conclusion: FNHTRs to RBC transfusion can be prevented with leucocyte filtration.

  12. Valorisation of by Products from Bleached Eucalyptus Kraft Pulp Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M. C.; Lopes, O. R.; Colodette, J. L.; Porto, A. O.; Rieumont, J.; Chaussy, D.; Belgacem, M. N.; Silva, G. G.

    2008-08-01

    Three industrial wastes arising from bleached hardwood kraft pulps, namely: unbleached screen rejects (USR), effluent treatment (ETW), and eucalyptus bark (EB) were analyzed with the aim of their possible valorization as an alternative source of cellulose. Their morphological properties were determined using MorFi apparatus. For this study the sample bleached kraft pulp, BKP, was analyzed as a reference. Lignin and carbohydrate contents were also quantified. These by-products were studied as such (i.e. without careful purification) because we intended to find rational and low-cost way of valorization. In fact any additional operation will induce an over cost. The results obtained indicate that these industrial wastes can be potential raw material in fibre-based applications (paper, composites…), since they contain a high proportion of cellulose with preserved fibrillar morphology. Some of these materials have low lignin and inorganic residue contents.

  13. OAI Object Re-Use and Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Jacobs, Neil

    2007-01-01

    YouTube, Flickr, del.icio.us, blogs, message boards and other "Web 2.0" related technologies are indicative of the contemporary web experience. There is a growing interest in appropriating these tools and modalities to support the scholarly communication process. This begins with leveraging the intrinsic value of scholarly digital objects beyond the borders of the hosting repository. There are numerous examples of the need to re-use objects across repositories in scholarly communication. These include citation, preservation, virtual collections of distributed objects, and the progression of units of scholarly communication through the registration-certification-awareness-archiving chain. The last several years have brought about numerous open source repository systems and their associated communities. The Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) has been the initial catalyst for repository interoperability. However, there is now a rising interest in repositories no longer being stat...

  14. OAI Object Re-Use and Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing interest in appropriating these tools and modalities to support the scholarly communication process. This begins with leveraging the intrinsic value of scholarly digital objects beyond the borders of the hosting repository. There are numerous examples of the need to re-use objects across repositories in scholarly communication. These include citation, preservation, virtual collections of distributed objects, and the progression of units of scholarly communication through the registration-certification-awareness-archiving chain. The last several years have brought about numerous open source repository systems and their associated communities. The Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) has been the initial catalyst for repository interoperability. However, there is now a rising interest in repositories no longer bein...

  15. KINETICS OF DELIGNIFICATION AND CARBOHYDRATE DEGRADATION DURING OXYGEN BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.LNguyen

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate degradation during oxygen bleaching isassociated with cleavage reactions. It is apparent thatthe loss of the cellulose DPis strongly affected by(degree ofpolymisation) the extent of thedelignification. A strong linear correlation can beestablished between the DP of cellulose chains andthe residual lignin in the pulp. The Nuclear Growthconcept and Percolation Theory for heterogenoussystem can be combined to formulate kinetic modelsfor both the delignification and the degradation ofcarbohydrate. The models prediction is statisticallyrobust and can be applied to different pulps atdifferent bleachin~ conditions.

  16. A Preliminary Assessment of Coral Bleaching in Mozambique

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The 1997-1998 El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) caused elevated sea temperatures that resulted in global coral bleaching. Coral reefs constitute an important biological resource in terms of their complex biodiversity and are the basis for tropical reef fisheries and marine ecotourism. They represent one of Mozambique's main coastal assets and its coastal communities and growing tourism industry rely mainly on reef-based resources. Mozambican artisanal fisheries are largely centred on reefs ...

  17. Microscopic oxygen imaging based on fluorescein bleaching efficiency measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beutler, Martin; Heisterkamp, Ines M.; Piltz, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Photobleaching of the fluorophore fluorescein in an aqueous solution is dependent on the oxygen concentration. Therefore, the time-dependent bleaching behavior can be used to measure of dissolved oxygen concentrations. The method can be combined with epi-fluorescence microscopy. The molecular sta...... concentrations. The method was demonstrated on nitrifying biofilms growing on snail and mussel shells, showing clear effects of metabolic activity on oxygen concentrations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  18. Using Digital Filtration for Hurst Parameter Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Prochaska

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method to estimate the Hurst parameter. The method exploits the form of the autocorrelation function for second-order self-similar processes and is based on one-pass digital filtration. We compare the performance and properties of the new method with that of the most common methods.

  19. Advances in hot gas filtration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.

    The past decade has seen the introduction of new filter media specifically designed for 'hot-gas' filtration. These media are available as woven or knitted fabrics and as non-wovens, i.e. needled felts. Needlefelted fabrics have proven so highly successful in the dedusting of hot gases that they are widely used nowadays in this new and necessary technology. Hot-gas filtration offers advantages in, for example, the saving or recycling of energy, the elimination of the cooling process, and the short-circuiting of process steps. This paper gives a survey of the types of textile fibres available for hot-gas filtration from the more recently developed organic fibres to refractory fibres. It describes, compares and contrasts their salient properties and lists the uses to which they may be put. It concentrates on such fibres which are generally referred to as 'high performance materials', since they are expected to provide satisfactory performance under extreme conditions of temperature, chemical environment and mechanical stress. It touches on filtration theory governing the collection mechanism. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Organic micropollutant removal during river bank filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertelkamp, C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors influencing the main removal mechanisms (adsorption and biodegradation) for organic micropollutant (OMP) removal during river bank filtration (RBF) and the possibility of developing a predictive model of this process for OMP removal during RBF. Chapter 2 analysed

  1. [Clinical experience of automated double filtration plasmapheresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C T; Chuang, F R; Hsu, K T; Lam, K K; Liao, S C; Liu, C C; Chen, J B; Jang, S W; Chien, Y S; Pan, H H

    1996-12-01

    Double filtration plasmapheresis, one kind of fractionation plasmapheresis, was developed from membrane type plasmapheresis to remove only the pathogen and return the normal protein back to the patient. We started our automated double filtration plasmapheresis since December 1993. There were 13 patients who received one hundred treatments totally during one year period. And they are myasthenia gravis (8 patients); acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (1 patient), multiple myeloma (1 patient); acquired factor VIII inhibitor (1 patient); autoimmune hemolytic anemia (1 patient); systemic lupus erythematous (1 patient). Technically double filtration plasmapheresis is easy to perform and time-saving. It also makes necessity of replacement fluid less frequent. Incidence of complication is rare, and this includes hypotension 2%, palpitation 1%, headache 1%, hemolysis 4%, air emboli 1%, high secondary pressure 2%, and no motality during our treatment. Clinical response is documented in cases of myasthenia gravis; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acquired factor VIII inhibitor in our study. In conclusion, double filtration plasmapheresis is a time-saving, convenient, and safe therapeutic modality with rare complication. Because its effectiveness on limited kinds of diseases and costs relatively high price, thus plasmapheresis should be used in selected cases and treat aggressively if indicated.

  2. Plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Gutsol, Alexander F.; Yang, Yong

    2014-07-22

    The present invention is directed to a novel method for cleaning a filter surface using a plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system. The method involves utilizing plasma discharges to induce short electric pulses of nanoseconds duration at high voltages. These electrical pulses generate strong Shockwaves that disintegrate and dislodge particulate matter located on the surface of the filter.

  3. Analytical Evaluation of Fractional Frequency Reuse for OFDMA Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Novlan, Thomas David; Ghosh, Arunabha; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2011-01-01

    Fractional frequency reuse (FFR) is an interference management technique well-suited to OFDMA-based cellular networks wherein the cells are partitioned into spatial regions with different frequency reuse factors. To date, FFR techniques have been typically been evaluated through system-level simulations using a hexagonal grid for the base station locations. This paper instead focuses on analytically evaluating the two main types of FFR deployments - Strict FFR and Soft Frequency Reuse (SFR) - using a Poisson point process to model the base station locations. The results are compared with the standard grid model and an actual urban deployment. Under reasonable special cases for modern cellular networks, our results reduce to simple closed-form expressions, which provide insight into system design guidelines and the relative merits of Strict FFR, SFR, universal reuse, and fixed frequency reuse. We observe that FFR provides an increase in the sum-rate as well as the well-known benefit of improved coverage for ce...

  4. Patterns of Text Reuse in a Scientific Corpus

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    We consider the incidence of text "reuse" by researchers, via a systematic pairwise comparison of the text content of all articles deposited to arXiv.org from 1991--2012. We measure the global frequencies of three classes of text reuse, and measure how chronic text reuse is distributed among authors in the dataset. We infer a baseline for accepted practice, perhaps surprisingly permissive compared with other societal contexts, and a clearly delineated set of aberrant authors. We find a negative correlation between the amount of reused text in an article and its influence, as measured by subsequent citations. Finally, we consider the distribution of countries of origin of articles containing large amounts of reused text.

  5. Symbiophagy as a cellular mechanism for coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Craig A; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Martinez, Jon; Kushmaro, Ariel; Woodley, Cheryl M; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K

    2009-02-01

    Coral bleaching is a major contributor to the global declines of coral reefs. This phenomenon is characterized by the loss of symbiotic algae, their pigments or both. Despite wide scientific interest, the mechanisms by which bleaching occurs are still poorly understood. Here we report that the removal of the symbiont during light and temperature stress is achieved using the host's cellular autophagic-associated machinery. Host cellular and subcellular morphologies showed increased vacuolization and appearance of autophagic membranes surrounding a variety of organelles and surrounding the symbiotic algae. Markers of autophagy (Rab 7 and LAS) corroborate these observations. Results showed that during stress the symbiont vacuolar membrane is transformed from a conduit of nutrient exchange to a digestive organelle resulting in the consumption of the symbiont, a process we term symbiophagy. We posit that during a stress event, the mechanism maintaining symbiosis is destabilized and symbiophagy is activated, ultimately resulting in the phenomenon of bleaching. Symbiophagy may have evolved from a more general primordial innate intracellular protective pathway termed xenophagy.

  6. ALKALINE PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF HOT WATER TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Mustajoki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities for chemical consumption reduction in P-P-Paa-P bleaching (P alkaline peroxide stage, Paa peracetic stage of hot water treated straw and the effect of the wheat straw variability on the process. Papermaking fibre production from wheat straw using such a process could be implemented on a small scale if chemical consumption was low enough to eliminate the need for chemical recovery. The pulp properties obtained with this process are equal to or even superior to the properties of wheat straw soda pulp. The possibility of enhancing the first peroxide stage with oxygen and pressure was studied. The possibility for substitution of sodium hydroxide partially with sodium carbonate was also investigated. The objective was to achieve International Standardization Organization (ISO brightness of 75%, with minimal sodium hydroxide consumption, whilst maintaining the pulp properties. The optimization of the peroxide bleaching is challenging if the final brightness target cannot be reduced. Results indicate that up to 25% of the sodium hydroxide could be substituted with sodium carbonate without losing brightness or affecting pulp properties. Another possibility is a mild alkali treatment between the hot water treatment and the bleaching sequence.

  7. Fracture resistance of bleached teeth restored with different procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the fracture resistance of teeth submitted to internal bleaching and restored with different non-metallic post. Eighty mandibular incisors were endodontically treated and randomly divided in 10 groups (n = 8: G1- restored with composite resin (CR, G2- CR + fiber-reinforced composite post (FRC, Everstick post, Sticktech cemented with resin cement self-etch adhesive (RCS, Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray, G3- CR + FRC + self-adhesive resin cement (SRC, Breeze, Pentral Clinical, G4- CR+ glass fiber post (GF, Exacto Post, Angelus + RCS, G5- CR + GF + SRC. The G6 to G10 were bleached with hydrogen peroxide (HP and restored with the same restorative procedures used for G1 to G5, respectively. After 7 days storage in artificial saliva, the specimens were submitted to the compressive strength test (N at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed and the failure pattern was identified as either reparable (failure showed until 2 mm below the cement-enamel junction or irreparable (the failure showed <2 mm or more below the cement-enamel. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. No significant difference (p < 0.05 was found among G1 to G10. The results suggest that intracoronal bleaching did not significantly weaken the teeth and the failure patterns were predominately reparable for all groups. The non-metallic posts in these teeth did not improve fracture resistance.

  8. On the formalization and reuse of scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ross D; Liakata, Maria; Lu, Chuan; Oliver, Stephen G; Soldatova, Larisa N

    2011-10-07

    The reuse of scientific knowledge obtained from one investigation in another investigation is basic to the advance of science. Scientific investigations should therefore be recorded in ways that promote the reuse of the knowledge they generate. The use of logical formalisms to describe scientific knowledge has potential advantages in facilitating such reuse. Here, we propose a formal framework for using logical formalisms to promote reuse. We demonstrate the utility of this framework by using it in a worked example from biology: demonstrating cycles of investigation formalization [F] and reuse [R] to generate new knowledge. We first used logic to formally describe a Robot scientist investigation into yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) functional genomics [f(1)]. With Robot scientists, unlike human scientists, the production of comprehensive metadata about their investigations is a natural by-product of the way they work. We then demonstrated how this formalism enabled the reuse of the research in investigating yeast phenotypes [r(1) = R(f(1))]. This investigation found that the removal of non-essential enzymes generally resulted in enhanced growth. The phenotype investigation was then formally described using the same logical formalism as the functional genomics investigation [f(2) = F(r(1))]. We then demonstrated how this formalism enabled the reuse of the phenotype investigation to investigate yeast systems-biology modelling [r(2) = R(f(2))]. This investigation found that yeast flux-balance analysis models fail to predict the observed changes in growth. Finally, the systems biology investigation was formalized for reuse in future investigations [f(3) = F(r(2))]. These cycles of reuse are a model for the general reuse of scientific knowledge.

  9. Building enterprise reuse program--A model-based approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅宏; 杨芙清

    2002-01-01

    Reuse is viewed as a realistically effective approach to solving software crisis. For an organization that wants to build a reuse program, technical and non-technical issues must be considered in parallel. In this paper, a model-based approach to building systematic reuse program is presented. Component-based reuse is currently a dominant approach to software reuse. In this approach, building the right reusable component model is the first important step. In order to achieve systematic reuse, a set of component models should be built from different perspectives. Each of these models will give a specific view of the components so as to satisfy different needs of different persons involved in the enterprise reuse program. There already exist some component models for reuse from technical perspectives. But less attention is paid to the reusable components from a non-technical view, especially from the view of process and management. In our approach, a reusable component model--FLP model for reusable component--is introduced. This model describes components from three dimensions (Form, Level, and Presentation) and views components and their relationships from the perspective of process and management. It determines the sphere of reusable components, the time points of reusing components in the development process, and the needed means to present components in terms of the abstraction level, logic granularity and presentation media. Being the basis on which the management and technical decisions are made, our model will be used as the kernel model to initialize and normalize a systematic enterprise reuse program.

  10. Examination of native and carbamide peroxide-bleached human tooth enamel by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahringer, Christoph; Fureder, Monika; Kastner, Markus; Ebner, Andreas; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Hannig, Matthias; Kienberger, Ferry; Schilcher, Kurt

    2009-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the effects of bleaching on the morphology of the enamel surface with nanoscale resolution. Samples of human tooth enamel with native (pumiced) or fine-polished surfaces were examined before and after bleaching with 30% carbamide peroxide. The obtained profilometric AFM data revealed significant morphological surface alterations. After 1 h of bleaching, the surface roughness increased significantly from 19 +/- 4nm to 33 +/- 5 nm. Six-hour bleaching did not produce any significant further increase in enamel surface roughness. The interrod junction depth raised more than twice after 1 h of bleaching. After 6 h of bleaching, a further and significant increase in interrod junction depth was recorded. This alteration might be a consequence of oxidation and a subsequent partial lysis of the tooth enamel matrix proteins.

  11. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Added, N. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: nemitala@dfn.if.usp.br; Rizzutto, M.A. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curado, J.F. [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Francci, C. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Markarian, R. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mori, M. [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-08-15

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a {sup 35}Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  12. Etiology and prevention of external cervical root resorption associated to teeth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mendes da SILVA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Esthetic dentistry has been prioritizedand the desire for whiter teeth has been increasingly present in dental offices, since whiter teeth tend to indicate health, beauty, youth and a more attractive smile. Teeth bleaching is a conservative method widely used to restore the original color of darkened teeth. However, possible relations with the external cervical root resorption have concerned many researchers and clinicians. Literature review: There are many mechanisms that can activate the external cervical root resorption, such as: chemical and physical action of the bleaching materials used, morphology of the cementoenamel junction associated to the immune system, material concentration, traumas and bleaching technique used. Conclusion: Therefore, considering many factors that are still not conclusive, preventing deleterious effects on teeth and support structures, care must be taken when choosing bleaching agent and bleaching technique, as well as when selecting each case, beyond a proper restoration after teeth bleaching.

  13. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts.

  14. RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY APPROACH FOR OPTIMIZATION OF FLAX SEED OIL BLEACHING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Ondrejovič

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Flax seed is an important source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids essential for human physiology. For low oxidation stability, specific taste and concomitant color compounds this oil is poorly applicable as nutraceutical additive. The aim of this study was optimization of flax seed oil bleaching. The optimal conditions for the bleaching process were determined using response surface methodology. A central composite design was used to investigate the effects of three independent variables, namely solid to liquid ratio, temperature and time, to output parameters of the bleaching process such as crude oil color expressed as optical density at 490 nm, acid and peroxide value. Calculated optimal conditions for the bleaching, expressed by the optical density of the oil were as follows: temperature 50°C, bleaching time 77 minutes and solid-liquid ratio 56 g of bleaching agent to 1 liter of oil.

  15. Assessment of enamel roughness of bovine teeth bleached with and without laser activation

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Canzi Almada de Paula XAVIER; Rodrigo Mario Pontoni MIRANDA; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Maria da Graça Kfouri LOPES

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, due to increased demand of patients anddentists for aesthetic treatments, bleaching procedures have becomeroutine in dental treatment. The development of new techniques andmaterials, such as laser-activated bleaching, has gained popularity.However, due to the small number of publications in this area, theiraggressiveness to the enamel is still not known. Objective: To determine the roughness of the enamel surface of bovine teeth bleached with and without laser activat...

  16. Human Pulpal Reaction to the Modified McInnes Bleaching Technique,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    Modified McInnes Bleaching Technique is specifically recommended for the treatment of teeth exhibiting endemic dental fluorosis because of its superficial...SUMARY The Modified Mclnnes Bleaching Technique has been recommended for removing the stain of endemic dental fluorosis . This study was designed to...stain from teeth. Ariz Dent J 1966; 12:13-15. 3. Bailey RW, Christen AC. Bleaching of vital teeth stained with endemic dental fluorosis . Oral Surg 1968

  17. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR) might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 ...

  18. Durability of bleaching results achieved with 15% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Reus, Monika; Rosenberger, Albert; Attin, Thomas; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the durability of bleaching results achieved with (1) 15% carbamide peroxide home bleaching and (2) 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching. A total of 231 extracted anterior teeth were randomly divided into three groups (n = 77 in each group) with comparable mean baseline L*-values (68.24 ± 0.8): a non-bleached control group A, a 15% carbamide peroxide group B (5 bleaching intervals of 8 hours), and a 38% hydrogen peroxide group C (3 intervals of 15 minutes). Durability of bleaching was assessed by comparing CIE-L*a*b* data after intervals of 2, 4, 12, and 26 weeks from baseline. Both bleaching regimes initially produced a highly significant increase in lightness parameter L*, with no significant difference between the respective bleaching regimes (B: 68.23 / 72.48; C: 68.32 / 73.25). Six months after starting the trial, L*-values for group B yielded no significant differences compared to baseline (69.55), whereas L*-values for group C were still significantly raised (69.91), despite a highly significant decrease when compared to initial bleaching results. In both treatment groups, there was a lasting response to bleaching in terms of CIE-a* and -b* value decreases. Results for both home- and in-practice regimes were found to be similar for about 12 weeks. However, in-office results were longer lasting, despite the shorter treatment intervals. Summarized bleaching effects, in terms of delta E values, revealed no significant differences between treatment groups and the control group after 6 months, indicating an abatement of the bleaching results achieved.

  19. Dialyzer Reuse and Outcomes of High Flux Dialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Argyropoulos

    Full Text Available The bulk of randomized trial evidence for the expanding use of High Flux (HF hemodialysis worldwide comes from two randomized controlled trials, one of which (HEMODIALYSIS, HEMO allowed, while the other (Membrane Outcomes Permeability, MPO excluded, the reuse of membranes. It is not known whether dialyzer reuse has a differential impact on outcomes with HF vs low flyx (LF dialyzers.Proportional Hazards Models and Joint Models for longitudinal measures and survival outcomes were used in HEMO to analyze the relationship between β2-microglobulin (β2M concentration, flux, and reuse. Meta-analysis and regression techniques were used to synthesize the evidence for HF dialysis from HEMO and MPO.In HEMO, minimally reused (< 6 times HF dialyzers were associated with a hazard ratio (HR of 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 95%CI: 0.48-0.92, p = 0.015, 0.64 (95%CI: 0.44 - 0.95, p = 0.03, 0.61 (95%CI: 0.41 - 0.90, p = 0.012, 0.53 (95%CI: 0.28 - 1.02, p = 0.057 relative to minimally reused LF ones for all cause, cardiovascular, cardiac and infectious mortality respectively. These relationships reversed for extensively reused membranes (p for interaction between reuse and flux < 0.001, p = 0.005 for death from all cause and cardiovascular causes, while similar trends were noted for cardiac and infectious mortality (p of interaction between reuse and flux of 0.10 and 0.08 respectively. Reduction of β2M explained only 1/3 of the effect of minimally reused HF dialyzers on all cause mortality, while non-β2M related factors explained the apparent attenuation of the benefit with more extensively reused dialyzers. Meta-regression of HEMO and MPO estimated an adjusted HR of 0.63 (95% CI: 0.51-0.78 for non-reused HF dialyzers compared with non-reused LF membranes.This secondary analysis and synthesis of two large hemodialysis trials supports the widespread use of HF dialyzers in clinical hemodialysis over the last decade. A mechanistic understanding of the effects of

  20. OPTIMIZATION OF THE PROCESS OF DRYING THE FILTRATE DISTILLERY DREGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shevtsov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of various factors affecting the process of drying the filtrate distillery dregs are investigated. Rational conditions for the process of drying the filtrate distillery dregs in a spray dryer are obtained.

  1. Internal filtration, filtration fraction, and blood flow resistance in high- and low-flux dialyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneditz, Daniel; Zierler, Edda; Vanholder, Raymond; Eloot, Sunny

    2014-01-01

    It was the aim to examine the fluid flow in blood and dialysate compartments of highly permeable hollow fiber dialyzers where internal filtration contributes to solute removal but where excessive filtration bears a risk of cell activation and damage. Flow characteristics of high- (HF) and low-flux (LF) dialyzers were studied in lab-bench experiments using whole bovine blood. Measurements obtained under different operating conditions and under zero net ultrafiltration were compared to theoretical calculations obtained from a mathematical model. Experimental resistances in the blood compartment were within ±2% of those calculated from the model when dialysate was used as a test fluid. With whole blood, the experimental resistances in the blood compartment were only 81.8 ± 2.8% and 83.7 ± 4.3% of those calculated for the LF and HF dialyzer, respectively. Surprisingly, measured blood flow resistance slightly but significantly decreased with increasing flow rate (p filtration fraction, while overall internal filtration increased. The increase in internal filtration when increasing blood flow is associated with a beneficial reduction in internal filtration fraction. Concerns of increased hemoconcentration when increasing blood flow therefore appear to be unwarranted.

  2. Evaluation of Ultrafiltration for Spacecraft Water Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Karen D.; Wiesner, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrafiltration is examined for use as the first stage of a primary treatment process for spacecraft wastewater. It is hypothesized that ultrafiltration can effectively serve as pretreatment for a reverse osmosis system, removing the majority of organic material in a spacecraft wastewater. However, it is believed that the interaction between the membrane material and the surfactant found in the wastewater will have a significant impact on the fouling of the ultrafiltration membrane. In this study, five different ultrafiltration membrane materials are examined for the filtration of wastewater typical of that expected to be produced onboard the International Space Station. Membranes are used in an unstirred batch cell. Flux, organic carbon rejection, and recovery from fouling are measured. The results of this evaluation will be used to select the most promising membranes for further study.

  3. A Study for Tooth Bleaching via Carbamide Peroxide-Loaded Hollow Calcium Phosphate Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Qin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate if a prolonged bleaching effect of carbamide peroxide-loaded hollow calcium phosphate spheres (HCPS can be achieved. HCPS was synthesized via a hydrothermal reaction method. Carbamide peroxide (CP was-loaded into HCPS by mixing with distilled water as solvent. We developed two bleaching gels containing CP-loaded HCPS: one gel with low HP concentration as at-home bleaching gel, and one with high HP concentration as in-office gel. Their bleaching effects on stained human permanent posterior teeth were investigated by measuring the color difference before and after bleaching. The effect of gels on rhodamine B degradation was also studied. To investigate the potential effect of remineralization of using HCPS, bleached teeth were soaked in phosphate buffer solution (PBS containing calcium and magnesium ions. Both bleaching gels had a prolonged whitening effect, and showed a strong ability to degrade rhodamine B. After soaking in PBS for 3 days, remineralization was observed at the sites where HCPS attached to the teeth surface. CP-loaded HCPS could prolong the HP release behavior and improve the bleaching effect. HCPS was effective in increasing the whitening effect of carbamide peroxide and improving remineralization after bleaching process.

  4. Changes in Caribbean coral disease prevalence after the 2005 bleaching event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cróquer, Aldo; Weil, Ernesto

    2009-11-16

    Bleaching events and disease epizootics have increased during the past decades, suggesting a positive link between these 2 causes in producing coral mortality. However, studies to test this hypothesis, integrating a broad range of hierarchical spatial scales from habitats to distant localities, have not been conducted in the Caribbean. In this study, we examined links between bleaching intensity and disease prevalence collected from 6 countries, 2 reef sites for each country, and 3 habitats within each reef site (N = 6 x 2 x 3 = 36 site-habitat combinations) during the peak of bleaching in 2005 and a year after, in 2006. Patterns of disease prevalence and bleaching were significantly correlated (Rho = 0.58, p = 0.04). Higher variability in disease prevalence after bleaching occurred among habitats at each particular reef site, with a significant increase in prevalence recorded in 4 of the 10 site-habitats where bleaching was intense and a non-significant increase in disease prevalence in 18 out of the 26 site-habitats where bleaching was low to moderate. A significant linear correlation was found (r = 0.89, p = 0.008) between bleaching and the prevalence of 2 virulent diseases (yellow band disease and white plague) affecting the Montastraea species complex. Results of this study suggest that if bleaching events become more intense and frequent, disease-related mortality of Caribbean coral reef builders could increase, with uncertain effects on coral reef resilience.

  5. Annual coral bleaching and the long-term recovery capacity of coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Grottoli, Andréa G; Levas, Stephen J; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D; Baumann, Justin H; Matsui, Yohei; Warner, Mark E

    2015-11-22

    Mass bleaching events are predicted to occur annually later this century. Nevertheless, it remains unknown whether corals will be able to recover between annual bleaching events. Using a combined tank and field experiment, we simulated annual bleaching by exposing three Caribbean coral species (Porites divaricata, Porites astreoides and Orbicella faveolata) to elevated temperatures for 2.5 weeks in 2 consecutive years. The impact of annual bleaching stress on chlorophyll a, energy reserves, calcification, and tissue C and N isotopes was assessed immediately after the second bleaching and after both short- and long-term recovery on the reef (1.5 and 11 months, respectively). While P. divaricata and O. faveolata were able to recover from repeat bleaching within 1 year, P. astreoides experienced cumulative damage that prevented full recovery within this time frame, suggesting that repeat bleaching had diminished its recovery capacity. Specifically, P. astreoides was not able to recover protein and carbohydrate concentrations. As energy reserves promote bleaching resistance, failure to recover from annual bleaching within 1 year will likely result in the future demise of heat-sensitive coral species.

  6. OSL response bleaching of BeO samples, using fluorescent light and blue LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groppo, Daniela Piai; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: dpgroppo@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is widely used as a dosimetric technique for many applications. In this work, the OSL response bleaching of BeO samples was studied. The samples were irradiated using a beta radiation source ({sup 90}Sr+{sup 90}Y); the bleaching treatments (fluorescent light and blue LEDs) were performed, and the results were compared. Various optical treatment time intervals were tested until reaching the complete bleaching of the OSL response. The best combination of the time interval and bleaching type was analyzed. (author)

  7. Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Magalhães Vaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp. Objective: This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and Methods: Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG (n=7; at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH (n = 10, and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO (n=12. Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+, blood vessels (CD31+, and macrophages (CD68+. Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p0.05. No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. Conclusion: In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels.

  8. Effect of bleaching whey on sensory and functional properties of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, S; Campbell, R; Wojciechowski, K L; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2012-06-01

    Whey is a highly functional food that has found widespread use in a variety of food and beverage applications. A large amount of the whey proteins produced in the United States is derived from annatto-colored Cheddar cheese. Color from annatto is undesirable in whey and must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare 2 commercially approved bleaching agents, benzoyl peroxide (BP) and hydrogen peroxide (HP), and their effects on the flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80). Colored and uncolored liquid wheys were bleached with BP or HP, and then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried; WPC80 from unbleached colored and uncolored Cheddar whey were manufactured as controls. All treatments were manufactured in triplicate. The WPC80 were then assessed by sensory, instrumental, functionality, color, and proximate analysis techniques. The HP-bleached WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (specifically hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and 1-octen-3-one) and had higher fatty and cardboard flavors compared with the other unbleached and BP-bleached WPC80. The WPC80 bleached with BP had lower norbixin concentrations compared with WPC80 bleached with HP. The WPC powders differed in Hunter color values (L, a, b), with bleached powders being more white, less red, and less yellow than unbleached powders. Bleaching with BP under the conditions used in this study resulted in larger reductions in yellowness of the powders made from whey with annatto color than did bleaching with HP. Functionality testing demonstrated that whey bleached with HP treatments had more soluble protein after 10 min of heating at 90°C at pH 4.6 and pH 7 than the no-bleach and BP treatments, regardless of additional color. Overall, HP bleaching caused more lipid oxidation products and subsequent off-flavors compared with BP bleaching. However, heat stability of WPC80 was enhanced by HP bleaching compared with control or BP-bleached

  9. Bleached Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals catabolize δ13C-enriched lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grottoli, Andréa G.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.

    2011-09-01

    Corals rely on stored energy reserves (i.e., lipids, carbohydrates, and protein) to survive bleaching events. To better understand the physiological implications of coral bleaching on lipid catabolism and/or synthesis, we measured the δ13C of coral total lipids (δ13CTL) in experimentally bleached (treatment) and non-bleached (control) Porites compressa and Montipora capitata corals immediately after bleaching and after 1.5 and 4 months of recovery on the reef. Overall δ13CTL values in treatment corals were significantly lower than in control corals because of a 1.9 and 3.4‰ decrease in δ13CTL immediately after bleaching in P. compressa and M. capitata, respectively. The decrease in δ13CTL coincided with decreases in total lipid concentration, indicating that corals catabolized δ13C-enriched lipids. Since storage lipids are primarily depleted during bleaching, we hypothesize that they are isotopically enriched relative to other lipid classes. This work further helps clarify our understanding of changes to coral metabolism and biogeochemistry when bleached and helps elucidate how lipid classes may influence recovery from bleaching and ultimately coral survival.

  10. Bleached phase holograms exposed on Agfa-Gevaert 10E75 NAH plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, K.

    1991-02-01

    An experimental study has been made of the diffraction efficiency, scattering and stability against printout effect of bleached, photographically recorded two- beam interference gratings using Agfa-Gevaert 10E75 NAH plates. The efficiency is increased by using bleaching processes that convert the silver image into a dielectric image. Plots of the diffraction efficiency and scattering against exposure, and variation of the maximum diffraction efficiency as a function of departure from the Bragg angle, and exposure to white light, for various bleaching processes, are given. A maximum diffraction efficiency of approximately 54% has been achieved by using a potassium iodide and iodine bleach process.

  11. EFFECT OF LAST STAGE BLEACHING WITH PERACETIC ACID ON BRIGHTNESS DEVELOPMENT AND PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise P. Barros

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of last stage bleaching with peracetic acid is the main subject of this paper. Proper conditions were established to apply peracetic acid as the last bleaching stage of the D(EpD/Paa, DHT(EpD/Paa, A/D(EpD/Paa, DHT/Q(POPaa and Z/ED/Paa sequences. In addition, the impact of last stage bleaching with Paa on pulp refinability and strength properties was determined. Peracetic acid was consumed relatively fast when applied as the last stage of ECF bleaching sequences. A reaction time of 120 min at 75 oC and pH 5.0 is seemingly adequate regardless of the Paa dose, in the range of 1-5 kg/odt pulp and bleaching sequence. The optimum dose of Paa depends upon the sequence under investigation. In general the Paa application as last bleaching stage caused slight decrease in pulp viscosity, kappa number and HexA content but had no significant effect on pulp reversion and L*a*b* coordinates. The refinability and bonding strength properties of the pulps bleached with the sequences DHT(EpDD and DHT(EpD/Paa were quite similar when the pH of the last bleaching stage of both sequences were near 5. These properties improved slightly when Paa bleaching pH was raised to 8.5.

  12. Impacts of the 1998 and 2010 mass coral bleaching events on the Western Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthacheep, Makamas; Yucharoen, Mathinee; Klinthong, Wanlaya; Pengsakun, Sittiporn; Sangmanee, Kanwara; Yeemin, Thamasak

    2013-11-01

    A long-term study of coral reef ecology in the Gulf of Thailand provides a good opportunity to examine the temporal variation on the impact of mass coral bleaching at those reef sites. We compared the bleaching and mortality of corals between the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 at a coral community in the Western Gulf of Thailand. The aim was to identify the coral species which were most likely to suffer from (and to be able to tolerate) changes in seawater temperature. Significant differences in the susceptibility of the coral taxa to bleaching events between the years 1998 and 2010 and among coral species were documented. Bleaching was significantly different between the most dominant corals. Diploastrea heliopora was the most resistant coral to bleaching in both years. Some coral species showed more resistance to bleaching in 2010. The coral mortality following the mass bleaching events in 1998 and 2010 varied significantly between the years and the coral taxa. Mortality of some dominant coral taxa was also lower in 2010. Seven coral species, i.e. Astreopora myriophthalma, Pachyseris rugosa, Turbinaria mesenterina, Goniastrea pectinata, Favia pallida, F. maritima, Favites halicora, Platygyra daedalea and Galaxea fascicularis, were tolerant to the coral bleaching events. An ecosystem-based approach to managing coral reefs in the Gulf of Thailand is needed to identify appropriate marine protected area networks and to strengthen marine and coastal resource policies in order to build coral reef resilience.

  13. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cavalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL and Optibond Solo Plus (SP, respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10 with 10% CP (CP and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF or were left unbleached (control. Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (∝TBS testing. The enamel ∝TBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached were higher (p FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP. The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar ∝TBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  14. Influence of fluoride-containing adhesives and bleaching agents on enamel bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Cristiane Suzy; Rego, Marcos Augusto do; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Giannini, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of fluoride-containing carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents and adhesive systems on bonded enamel interfaces that are part of the dynamic pH cycling and thermal cycling models. The buccal surfaces of 60 bovine incisors were restored with a composite resin and bonded with three- and two-step, etch-and-rinse, fluoride-containing adhesives, Optibond FL (FL) and Optibond Solo Plus (SP), respectively. Restored teeth were subjected to thermal cycling to age the interface. Both SP and FL adhesive-restored teeth were bleached (n = 10) with 10% CP (CP) and 10% CP + fluoride (CPF) or were left unbleached (control). Bleaching was performed for 14 days simultaneously with pH cycling, which comprised of 14 h of remineralization, 2 h of demineralization and 8 h of bleaching. The control groups (FL and SP) were stored in remineralizing solution during their bleaching periods and were also subjected to carious lesion formation. Parallelepiped-shaped samples were obtained from the bonded interface for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. The enamel μTBS of the FL and SP groups (control, not bleached) were higher (p FL > FL + CPF = FL + CP and SP > SP + CPF = SP + CP). The groups subjected to treatment with the fluoride-containing bleaching agents exhibited similar μTBS compared to regular bleaching agents. Bleaching agents, regardless of whether they contained fluoride, decreased enamel bond strength.

  15. Use of the LM-OSL technique for the detection of partial bleaching in quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, N.A.; Bulur, E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.;

    2000-01-01

    is known as linear modulation OSL (LM-OSL). In controlled laboratory conditions, this technique has been employed to study the ease-of-bleaching of the trapped charge in quartz by comparing the OSL curves of quartz aliquots which have been either: (1) fully bleached, followed by a laboratory dose of beta...... -irradiation, or (2) partially bleached, followed by the laboratory beta -dose. The ratio of the OSL signals due to the beta -dose from the partly and fully bleached aliquots is illustrated to be a potential indicator of the degree of optical resetting of the OSL signal in dating material. The key parameter...

  16. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanein, M. M. M.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Peanut hulls (PNH were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV, reduction in phospholipids (PL and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN, PNH and Fuller’s earth (FE and PNH and O-passive (OP and examined. The oxidative stability of oils was determined. Results for the investigated commercial bleaching clays revealed: TN > FE > F > TF > OP. Highest reduction in PV and PL, and highest bleachability were achieved for soybean oil bleached with 2% PNH carbonized at 500°C for 30 min (PNH”. Mixtures of PNH” with the three chosen bleaching clays indicated that 1PNH”: 2TN gave the highest bleachability. CSO was miscella bleached in hexane using PNH” and resulted in an appreciable improvement in all oil characteristics, especially in bleachability. Oxidative stability of oils was in the following order: TN > control > FE > PNH” with Induction period values of 23,1 > 6,43 > 5,73 > 2,85 h, respectively.

    Las cáscaras de maní (PNH fueron carbonizadas a diferentes temperaturas y tiempos, y utilizadas a diferentes concentraciones como una alternativa a las tierras decolorantes. La evaluación de un aceite de soja decolorado con PNH se ha basado en sus ácidos grasos libres, reducción del índice de peróxidos (PV, reducción de los fosfolípidos (PL, y en la blanqueabilidad. El rendimiento de varias tierras decolorantes de uso comercial fue evaluado y comparado con el de PNH carbonizada. Las mezclas formuladas incluían: PNH y Tonsil-N (TN, PNH y tierras de Fuller (FE y PNH y O-pasivo (OP. La estabilidad oxidativa de los aceites resultantes fue determinada. Los resultados revelaron que la efectividad de la

  17. Technology Review of Modern Gas Turbine Inlet Filtration Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    An inlet air filtration system is essential for the successful operation of a gas turbine. The filtration system protects the gas turbine from harmful debris in the ambient air, which can lead to issues such as FOD, erosion, fouling, and corrosion. These issues if not addressed will result in a shorter operational life and reduced performance of the gas turbine. Modern day filtration systems are comprised of multiple filtration stages. Each stage is selected based on the local operating envir...

  18. Reuse of pacemakers, defibrillators and cardiac resynchronisation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, R; Satheesh, Santhosh; Ananthakrishna Pillai, Ajith; Sagnol, Pascal; Jouven, Xavier; Dodinot, Bernard; Balachander, Jayaraman

    2017-01-01

    Objective Access to pacemakers remains poor among many patients in low/middle-income countries. Reuse of explanted pacemakers is a possible solution, but is still not widespread because of concerns regarding outcomes, especially infection. Our objective was to study early outcomes with implants using reused devices and compare them with those with implants using new devices. Methods We studied all patients who underwent implantation of a new or reused pacemaker, cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) device or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in the last 5 years at a single institution. We analysed outcomes related to infection, device malfunction and device-related death within 6 months after initial implantation. Results During the study period, 887 patients underwent device implant, including 127 CRT devices or ICDs. Of these, 260 devices (29.3%) were reused and the others were new. At 6 months, there were three device-related infections in implants using a new device. There were no infections among patients receiving a reused device. There were no device malfunctions or device-related deaths in either group. Conclusions We found no difference in rate of infection or device malfunction among patients getting a reused device as compared with those with a new device. This study reinforces the safety of reusing devices for implant including CRT and ICDs. PMID:28176981

  19. 40 CFR 141.171 - Criteria for avoiding filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria for avoiding filtration. 141... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving 10,000 or More People § 141.171 Criteria for avoiding filtration. In addition to...

  20. 40 CFR 141.174 - Filtration sampling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filtration sampling requirements. 141... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving 10,000 or More People § 141.174 Filtration sampling requirements. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 141.71 - Criteria for avoiding filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria for avoiding filtration. 141... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Filtration and Disinfection § 141.71 Criteria for avoiding filtration. A public water system that uses a surface water source must meet all...

  2. Origins of the poor filtration characteristics of wheat starch hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matser, A.M.; Steeneken, P.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wheat starch components on the filtration characteristics of wheat starch hydrolysates were investigated with a model-based approach. The filtration rate was not affected by the removal of the pentosans or by altering the conformation of the protein. On the other hand, the filtration

  3. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    PIROLO, Rodrigo; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CORRER, Gisele Maria; GONZAGA, Carla Castiglia; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max) and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO) before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD) at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E) and lightness (∆L) variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05). Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001). All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L). The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively). Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching. PMID:25075672

  4. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo PIROLO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E and lightness (∆L variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05. Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001. All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L. The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively. Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching.

  5. Efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique with carbamide peroxides modified by CPP-ACP and its effect on the microhardness of bleached enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, B C D; Borges, J S; de Melo, C D; Pinheiro, I V A; Santos, A J S Dos; Braz, R; Montes, M A J R

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate in vitro the efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique using 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide modified by casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and its influence on the microhardness of bleached enamel. A total of 40 bovine incisors were divided into four groups (n=10) according to the bleaching agent used: 10% carbamide peroxide only; a blend of 10% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste; 16% carbamide peroxide only; and a blend of 16% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste. During the 14-day bleaching regimen, the samples were stored in artificial saliva. The Vickers microhardness and color of the teeth were assessed at baseline (T0) and immediately after the bleaching regimen (T14) using a microhardness tester and a spectrophotometer, respectively. The degree of color change was determined by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclariage (CIE) L*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) and Vita shade guide parameters. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and the Tukey test (pmicrohardness values at T14 compared with T0, whereas the samples that were bleached with peroxide only did not show any differences in their microhardness values. All of the bleaching agents were effective at whitening the teeth and did not show a statistically significant difference using the CIEL*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) or the Vita shade guide parameters. The use of a CPP-ACP paste with carbamide peroxide bleaching agents increased the bleached enamel's microhardness and did not have an influence on whitening efficacy.

  6. The challenges of reusing mining and mineral-processing wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Zhengfu; Miao, Xiexing; Lei, Shaogang; Chen, Shen-en; Wang, Wenfeng; Struthers, Sue

    2012-08-10

    Mining and mineral-processing wastes are one of the world's largest chronic waste concerns. Their reuse should be included in future sustainable development plans, but the potential impacts on a number of environmental processes are highly variable and must be thoroughly assessed. The chemical composition and geotechnical properties of the source rock determine which uses are most appropriate and whether reuse is economically feasible. If properly evaluated, mining waste can be reused to reextract minerals, provide additional fuel for power plants, supply construction materials, and repair surface and subsurface land structures altered by mining activities themselves.

  7. Reuse of single-use devices: looking back, looking forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M; Balsara, K P; Nagral, S

    2012-01-01

    The reuse of medical devices marked as 'single use' by manufacturers has been going on for several decades. The process has been rationalized and legislated in the West as well as in Japan. However, the practice continues in an unregulated manner in India due to a paucity of guidance from the Food and Drug Administration in India. We trace the evolution of reuse policies, look at the prevalent practices in the Indian and international contexts, analyse the available Indian literature and address the ethical and economic implications of reuse. We also suggest some guidelines which may be adopted to formulate policies.

  8. Integrative filtration research and sustainable nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Drew Thompson; David Y.H.Pui

    2013-01-01

    With the wide applications of nanomaterials in an array of industries,more concerns are being raised about the occupational health and safety of nanoparticles in the workplace,and implications of nanotechnology on the environment and living systems.Studies on environmental,health and safety (EHS) issues of nanomaterials play a significant role in public acceptance,and eventual sustainability,of nanotechnology.We present research results on three aspects of the EHS studies:characterization and measurement of nanoparticles,nanoparticle emission and exposure at workplaces,and control and abatement of nanoparticle release using filtration technology.Measurement of nanoparticle agglomerates using a newly developed instrument,the Universal Nanoparticle Analyzer,is discussed.Nanoparticle emission and exposure measurement results for carbon nanotubes in the manufacture of nanocomposites and for silicon nanoparticles in their production at a pilot scale facility are presented.Filtration of nanoparticles and nanoparticle agglomerates are also studied.

  9. Nanoparticles filtration by leaked fibrous filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, Guillaume; Calle-Chazelet, Sandrine; Thomas, Dominique; Appert-Collin, Jean-Christophe [Nancy-Universite/LSGC/CNRS - 1 rue Grandville - BP 20451 - F-54001 Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: sandrine.calle@ensic.inpl-nancy.fr; Bemer, Denis [INRS - Avenue de Bourgogne - F-54501 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex (France)

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work is first to measured nanoparticles penetration through three different fiberglass filters intentionally-pierced with calibrated needles at different filtration velocity. Then a semi-empirical model based on the air flow resistances of the new and perforated filter media and on the mechanism of Brownian diffusion for the collection of ultrafine particles by the media enables to well predict the efficiency observed for all tested operating conditions. Results show that the increase of particles penetration is all the more important that the pinhole is large and that the particle diameter is low. Another result is that the filtration efficiency of the new filter media controlled the penetration. A high efficiency filter with a high resistance to air flow will be more damaged than a low efficiency filter when being perforated.

  10. Ultrasonic filtration of industrial chemical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, T.

    1974-01-01

    The practical results obtained as a result of filtering industrial chemical solutions under continuous flow conditions with the aid of an ultrasonic filter are presented. The main part of the assembly consists of an ultrasonic generator with an output power of about 400 W and the filtration assembly, in which there is a magnetostrictive amplifier constructed for 20.5 kHz. In addition to ensuring a continuous flow of filtered solution, ultrasonic filters can be replaced or cleaned at intervals of time that are 8-10 times greater than in the case of mechanical filters. They yield considerably better results as far as the size of the filtered particles is concerned. The parameters on which filtration quality depends are also presented.

  11. Thermo-alkali-stable catalases from newly isolated Bacillus sp. for the treatment and recycling of textile bleaching effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paar, A; Costa, S; Tzanov, T; Gudelj, M; Robra, K H; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Gübitz, G M

    2001-08-23

    Three thermoalkaliphilic bacteria, which were grown at pH 9.3-10 and 60-65 degrees C were isolated out of a textile wastewater drain. The unknown micro-organisms were identified as thermoalkaliphilic Bacillus sp. Growth conditions were studied and catalase activities and stabilities compared. Catalases from Bacillus SF showed high stabilities at 60 degrees C and pH 9 (t1/2=38 h) and thus this strain was chosen for further investigations, such as electron microscopy, immobilization of catalase and hydrogen peroxide degradation studies. Degradation of hydrogen peroxide with an immobilized catalase from Bacillus SF enabled the reuse of the water for the dyeing process. In contrast, application of the free enzyme for treatment of bleaching effluents, caused interaction between the denaturated protein and the dye, resulting in reduced dye uptake, and a higher color difference of 1.3DeltaE* of dyed fabrics compared to 0.9DeltaE* when using the immobilized enzyme.

  12. Symptomatic hyponatremia during glomerular filtration rate testing

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Hyponatremia affects nearly one in five of all hospitalized patients. Severe hyponatremia is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and is therefore important to recognize. Prior reports have linked duloxetine with hyponatremia, but it is uncommon. In this case report, we describe a research subject taking duloxetine who developed severe symptomatic hyponatremia during glomerular filtration rate testing despite having undergone such testing uneventfully in the past.

  13. Changes in coral-associated microbial communities during a bleaching event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, David; Iida, Yuki; Uthicke, Sven; Smith-Keune, Carolyn

    2008-04-01

    Environmental stressors such as increased sea surface temperatures are well-known for contributing to coral bleaching; however, the effect of increased temperatures and subsequent bleaching on coral-associated microbial communities is poorly understood. Colonies of the hard coral Acropora millepora were tagged on a reef flat off Magnetic Island (Great Barrier Reef) and surveyed over 2.5 years, which included a severe bleaching event in January/February 2002. Daily average water temperatures exceeded the previous 10-year average by more than 1 degrees C for extended periods with field-based visual surveys recording all tagged colonies displaying signs of bleaching. During the bleaching period, direct counts of coral zooxanthellae densities decreased by approximately 64%, before recovery to pre-bleaching levels after the thermal stress event. A subset of three tagged coral colonies were sampled through the bleaching event and changes in the microbial community elucidated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis demonstrated conserved bacterial banding profiles between the three coral colonies, confirming previous studies highlighting specific microbial associations. As coral colonies bleached, the microbial community shifted and redundancy analysis (RDA) of DGGE banding patterns revealed a correlation of increasing temperature with the appearance of Vibrio-affiliated sequences. Interestingly, this shift to a Vibrio-dominated community commenced prior to visual signs of bleaching. Clone libraries hybridized with Vibrio-specific oligonucleotide probes confirmed an increase in the fraction of Vibrio-affiliated clones during the bleaching period. Post bleaching, the coral microbial associations again shifted, returning to a profile similar to the fingerprints prior to bleaching. This provided further evidence for corals selecting and shaping their microbial partners. For non-bleached samples, a close association with Spongiobacter-related sequences were

  14. Contrasting patterns of coral bleaching susceptibility in 2010 suggest an adaptive response to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Guest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surveys to estimate the bleaching and mortality indices of coral genera were carried out at three locations with contrasting thermal and bleaching histories. Despite the magnitude of thermal stress being similar among locations in 2010, there was a remarkable contrast in the patterns of bleaching susceptibility. Comparisons of bleaching susceptibility within coral taxa and among locations revealed no significant differences between locations with similar thermal histories, but significant differences between locations with contrasting thermal histories (Friedman = 34.97; p<0.001. Bleaching was much less severe at locations that bleached during 1998, that had greater historical temperature variability and lower rates of warming. Remarkably, Acropora and Pocillopora, taxa that are typically highly susceptible, although among the most susceptible in Pulau Weh (Sumatra, Indonesia where respectively, 94% and 87% of colonies died, were among the least susceptible in Singapore, where only 5% and 12% of colonies died. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pattern of susceptibility among coral genera documented here is unprecedented. A parsimonious explanation for these results is that coral populations that bleached during the last major warming event in 1998 have adapted and/or acclimatised to thermal stress. These data also lend support to the hypothesis that corals in regions subject to more variable temperature regimes are more resistant to thermal stress than those in less variable environments.

  15. Effect of pH values of two bleaching gels on enamel microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Natalia Costa; da Costa Soares, Manuella Uilmann Silva; Nery, Marcela Maria; Sales, Wagno Silva; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth Martinez

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of bleaching gel pH and the effect of remineralizing gels after bleaching in different time intervals. Sixty bovine incisors were divided into 2 groups (n = 30). Group 1 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) acid gel and Group 2 was bleached with a 35% HP neutral gel. Each group was then divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10) according to the post-bleaching treatment used: storage in artificial saliva, application of a fluoride gel, or application of a gel consisting of fluoride, potassium nitrate, and nanostructured calcium phosphate. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva, and enamel microhardness was evaluated at 24 hours and 15 days postbleaching. Vickers microhardness data were analyzed by means of 2-way ANOVA, with repeated measurements and Bonferroni's post-hoc test. Twenty-four hours after bleaching, no significant differences were found between the bleaching gels. At 15 days postbleaching, Group 2 samples demonstrated a significant reduction in microhardness. No significant differences were found between the remineralizing gels, though all of the postbleaching treatments after the use of 35% neutral gel were able to re-establish baseline microhardness. It was concluded that neutral bleaching gel significantly reduced enamel microhardness 15 days after bleaching and that the use of remineralizing gels did not significantly enhance the microhardness of bleached enamel. However, in clinical situations, the acquired enamel pellicle protects tooth surfaces, and postbleaching, decalcified enamel would undergo recalcification. This study indicates that it is important to consider the bleaching agent's pH and composition when treating patients with reduced salivary secretion.

  16. Portable Hybrid Powered Water Filtration Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lourdes V. Balansay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The existing water filtration device has features that can be developed to be more useful and functional during emergency situations. The project’s development has been aided by following provisions in PEC, NEC, NEMA and Philippine National Standard for Safe Drinking Water provide standards for the construction of the project. These standards protect both the prototype and the user. These also served as guide for the maintenance of every component. The design of the portable hybrid powered water filtration device shows that the project has more advanced features such as portability and the power supply used such as photovoltaic module solar cells and manually operated generator. This also shows its effectiveness and reliability based on the results of discharging test, water quality test and water production test. Based on analysis of the overall financial aspects, the machine can be profitable and the amount of revenue and operating cost will increase as years pass. Using the proper machine/ tools and methods of fabrication helps in easy assembly of the project. The materials and components used are cost effective and efficient. The best time for charging the battery using solar panel is 9:00 am onwards while the hand crank generator is too slow because the generated current is little. The water filtration device is very efficient regarding the operating hours and water production. The machine may have a great effect to society and economy in generation of clean available water at less cost.

  17. Aerosol Filtration Application Using Fibrous Media An Industrial Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨传芳

    2012-01-01

    Filtration of aerosol particles using non-woven fibrous media is a common practice for air cleaning. It has found wide applications in industries and our daily lives. This paper overviews some of these applications and provides an industrial perspective. It starts from discussing aerosol filtration theory, followed by a brief review on the advancement of filtration media. After that, filtration applications in respiratory protection, dust collection, and engine in-take air cleaning are elaborated. These are the areas that the author sees as the typical needed ones in China's fast pace economical development endeavor, where air filtration enables the protection of human health, environment and equipment for sustainability.

  18. Treatment of Wastewater From Car Washes Using Natural Coagulation and Filtration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gheethi, A. A.; Mohamed, R. M. S. R.; Rahman, M. A. A.; Johari, M. R.; Kassim, A. H. M.

    2016-07-01

    Wastewater generated from carwash is one of the main wastewater resources, which contribute effectively in the increasing of environmental contamination due to the chemical characteristics of the car wastes. The present work aimed to develop an integrated treatment system for carwash wastewater based on coagulation and flocculation using Moringa oleifera and Ferrous Sulphate (FeSO4.7H2O) as well as natural filtration system. The carwash wastewater samples were collected from carwash station located at Parit Raja, Johor, Malaysia. The treatment system of car wash wastewater was designed in the lab scale in four stages included, aeration, coagulation and flocculation, sedimentation and filtration. The coagulation and flocculation unit was carried out using different dosage (35, 70, 105 and 140 mg L-1) of M. oleifera and FeSO4.7H2O, respectively. The efficiency of the integrated treatment system to treat carwash wastewater and to meet Environmental Quality Act (EQA 1974) was evaluated based on the analysis of pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and turbidity (NTU). The integrated treatment system was efficient for treatment of raw carwash wastewater. The treated carwash wastewaters meet EQA 1974 regulation 2009 (Standards A) in the term of pH and DO while, turbidity and COD reduced in the wastewater to meet Standards B. The integrated treatment system designed here with natural coagulant (M. oleifera) and filtration unit were effective for primary treatment of carwash wastewater before the final disposal or to be reused again for carwash process.

  19. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching.

  20. Nanofiber filter media for air filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Bharath Kumar

    Nanofibers have higher capture efficiencies in comparison to microfibers in the submicron particle size range of 100-500 nm because of small fiber diameter and increased surface area of the fibers. Pressure drop across the filter increases tremendously with decrease in fiber diameter in the continuum flow regime. Nanofibers with fiber diameter less than 300 nm are in the slip flow regime as a consequence of which steep increase in pressure drop is considerably reduced due to slip effect. The outlet or inlet gases have broad range of particle size distribution varying from few micrometers to nanometers. The economic benefits include capture of a wide range of particle sizes in the gas streams using compact filters composed of nanofibers and microfibers. Electrospinning technique was used to successfully fabricate polymeric and ceramic nanofibers. The nanofibers were long, continuous, and flexible with diameters in the range of 200--300 nm. Nanofibers were added to the filter medium either by mixing microfibers and nanofibers or by directly electrospinning nanofibers as thin layer on the surface of the microfiber filter medium. Experimental results showed that either by mixing Nylon 6 nanofibers with B glass fibers or by electrospinning Nylon 6 nanofibers as a thin layer on the surface of the microfiber medium in the surface area ratio of 1 which is 0.06 g of nanofibers for 2 g of microfibers performed better than microfiber filter media in air filtration tests. This improved performance is consistent with numerical modeling. The particle loading on a microfibrous filter were studied for air filtration tests. The experimental and modeling results showed that both pressure drop and capture efficiency increased with loading time. Nanofiber filter media has potential applications in many filtration applications and one of them being hot gas filtration. Ceramic nanofibers made of alumina and titania nanofibers can withstand in the range of 1000°C. Ceramic nanofibers

  1. Filtration Combustion in Smoldering and SHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowsky, Bernard J.

    2001-01-01

    Smolder waves and SHS (self-propagating high-temperature synthesis) waves are both examples of filtration combustion waves propagating in porous media. Smoldering combustion is important for the study of fire safety. Smoldering itself can cause damage, its products are toxic and it can also lead to the more dangerous gas phase combustion which corresponds to faster propagation at higher temperatures. In SHS , a porous solid sample, consisting of a finely ground powder mixture of reactants, is ignited at one end. A high temperature thermal wave, having a frontal structure, then propagates through the sample converting reactants to products. The SHS technology appears to enjoy a number of advantages over the conventional technology, in which the sample is placed in a furnace and "baked" until it is "well done". The advantages include shorter synthesis times, greater economy, in that the internal energy of the reactions is employed rather than the costly external energy of the furnace, purer products, simpler equipment and no intrinsic limitation on the size of the sample to be synthesized as exists in the conventional technology. When delivery of reactants through the pores to the reaction site is an important aspect of the combustion process, it is referred to as filtration combustion. The two types of filtration combustion have a similar mathematical formulation, describing the ignition, propagation and extinction of combustion waves in porous media. The goal in each case, however, is different. In smoldering the desired goal is to prevent propagation, whereas in SHS the goal is to ensure propagation of the combustion wave, leading to the synthesis of desired products. In addition, the scales in the two areas of application differ. Smoldering generally occurs at lower temperatures and propagation velocities than in SHS nevertheless, the two applications have much in common so that what is learned fit make application can be used to advantage in the other. In porous

  2. Filtration Efficiency of Functionalized Ceramic Foam Filters for Aluminum Melt Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Claudia; Jäckel, Eva; Taina, Fabio; Zienert, Tilo; Salomon, Anton; Wolf, Gotthard; Aneziris, Christos G.; Le Brun, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    The influence of filter surface chemistry on the filtration efficiency of cast aluminum alloys was evaluated for four different filter coating compositions (Al2O3—alumina, MgAl2O4—spinel, 3Al2O3·2SiO2—mullite, and TiO2—rutile). The tests were conducted on a laboratory scale with a filtration pilot plant, which facilitates long-term filtration tests (40 to 76 minutes). This test set-up allows the simultaneous use of two LiMCAs (before and after the filter) for the determination of the efficiency of inclusion removal. The four tested filter surface chemistries exhibited good thermal stability and mechanical robustness after 750 kg of molten aluminum had been cast. All four filter types exhibited a mean filtration efficiency of at least 80 pct. However, differences were also observed. The highest filtration efficiencies were obtained with alumina- and spinel-coated filter surfaces (>90 pct), and the complete removal of the largest inclusions (>90 µm) was observed. The efficiency was slightly lower with mullite- and rutile-coated filter surfaces, in particular for large inclusions. These observations are discussed in relation to the properties of the filters, in particular in terms of, for example, the surface roughness.

  3. Filtration Efficiency of Functionalized Ceramic Foam Filters for Aluminum Melt Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Claudia; Jäckel, Eva; Taina, Fabio; Zienert, Tilo; Salomon, Anton; Wolf, Gotthard; Aneziris, Christos G.; Le Brun, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The influence of filter surface chemistry on the filtration efficiency of cast aluminum alloys was evaluated for four different filter coating compositions (Al2O3—alumina, MgAl2O4—spinel, 3Al2O3·2SiO2—mullite, and TiO2—rutile). The tests were conducted on a laboratory scale with a filtration pilot plant, which facilitates long-term filtration tests (40 to 76 minutes). This test set-up allows the simultaneous use of two LiMCAs (before and after the filter) for the determination of the efficiency of inclusion removal. The four tested filter surface chemistries exhibited good thermal stability and mechanical robustness after 750 kg of molten aluminum had been cast. All four filter types exhibited a mean filtration efficiency of at least 80 pct. However, differences were also observed. The highest filtration efficiencies were obtained with alumina- and spinel-coated filter surfaces (>90 pct), and the complete removal of the largest inclusions (>90 µm) was observed. The efficiency was slightly lower with mullite- and rutile-coated filter surfaces, in particular for large inclusions. These observations are discussed in relation to the properties of the filters, in particular in terms of, for example, the surface roughness.

  4. RESEARCH ON REUSE-BASED WEB SERVICES COMPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Softwarereuseisalwaysanimportantissueto researchforimprovingtheproductivityofsoftware developmentinsoftwareengineeringfield.Free man[1]dividedthesoftwaredevelopmentprocessin to"developmentforreuse"and"developmentwith reuse",whichconsideredsoftwarereusewasatech nologyforassemblingtheexistentsoftwareartifacts tobuildanewsoftwaresystem.Forlarge scalesoft wareproduction,Object Orientedtechnologywas proposedtochangethecodingreusedwithinherit anceandencapsulation.Unfortunately,classlibrar ieshavebeendevelop...

  5. How to Trust the Re-use of Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karafili, Erisa; Nielson, Hanne Riis; Nielson, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Research in natural sciences and life sciences involve carrying out experiments to collect data as well as carrying out analysis to interpret the data. Increasingly data is being made available to other scientists in big databases. The scientific process builds on the idea that research results can...... be independently validated by other researchers. However, the concern about the correct re-use of data is also increasing. As illustrated by a currently evolving case of alleged scientific mispractice there is a need to support a reliable re-use of data. To solve this challenge we introduce an enriched...... coordination language based on Klaim, that can model the coordination of the re-use of data in the research community. We define the formal semantics of our language and develop a static analysis that can be used to check whether we have a trustable re-use of data....

  6. Dialyzer reuse: justified cost saving for south Asian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhrolia, Murtaza F; Nasir, Kiran; Imtiaz, Salman; Ahmad, Aasim

    2014-08-01

    In spite of controversies, dialyzer reuse has remained an integral part of hemodialysis because of lower cost, good overall safety record, and improved membrane biocompatibility. Reuse declined in developed countries from the beginning of this century because of mass production of hemodialyzers at favourable price with better biocompatible membrane. Abandoning dialyzer reuse became challenging in South Asian region, where more than 40% of the population live below the International Poverty Line of $1.25 per day, less than 10% of end stage renal disease patients receive renal replacement therapy, and upto 70% of those starting dialysis stop treatment due to cost within the first 3 months. Dialyzer reuse is an efficient cost-saving method that allows the use of more efficient and expensive biocompatible synthetic membranes, thereby providing high-quality dialysis to individuals living in countries with limited medical resources without compromising the safety or effectiveness of the treatment.

  7. Neural reuse in the organization and development of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Neural reuse is the process by which neural elements originally developed for one purpose are put to many different subsequent uses. In this brief review I will outline the role of neural reuse in the development of the brain. Special attention will be paid to elucidating and differentiating between two different mechanisms of neurocognitive development: Hebbian plasticity, the importance of which is already well known, and a neural search mechanism that supports the establishment of new functional partnerships in the brain. I describe how these two mechanisms work in concert throughout development to produce the functional architecture we observe in the adult brain; outline the evidence for the importance of neural reuse; offer suggestions for some clinical implications of neural reuse; and point to future research directions.

  8. A Community-Driven Workflow Recommendation and Reuse Infrastructure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Promote and encourage process and workflow reuse  within NASA Earth eXchange (NEX) by developing a proactive recommendation technology based on collective NEX...

  9. Development of Policies, Institutions and Procedures for Water Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demouche, L.; Pfiefer, J.; Hanson, A.; Skaggs, R.

    2009-12-01

    In the arid, water scarce region of New Mexico and West Texas there is growing interest in the potential for water reuse to extend existing supplies and mitigate drought shortage impacts. There are no new sources of water in New Mexico, except reclaimed water. Communities and individuals are uncertain about and have many unanswered questions about polices, institutions involved (agencies), legal and regulatory requirements, and procedures governing water reuse. Issues to be addressed by this project include: the legal ability to reuse water, ownership of water rights, downstream or third party impacts, regulatory and procedural requirements, water quality concerns, state and local agency involvement, and cost effectiveness of water reuse compared to alternative sources. Presently, there is very little implementation or directives in New Mexico policy that addresses reuse, reclamation, or recycled water. The only regulations pertaining to reuse is New Mexico Environmental Department currently allows the use of reclaimed domestic wastewater for irrigation of golf courses and green spaces, which is listed in the Policy for the Above Ground Use of Reclaimed Domestic Wastewater (NMED, 2003). This document identifies the various reclaimed quality classifications that are required for specific applications and the permits required for application. This document does not identify or address policy applications on the distribution, ownership, or trading of reclaimed water. Even though reclaimed water reuse projects are currently being implemented in many cities in the U.S., mainly for commercial and municipal irrigation (golf courses and green space), its potential has not yet been exploited. A policy analysis matrix (PAM) is being designed to identify and examine the policy framework and consequences of non-policy implementation for decision makers and interest groups and assist them in understanding the consequences of policy actions and project outcomes if no laws or

  10. Detection of Chlorophenolic Compounds in Bleaching Effluents of Chemical Pulps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chhaya Sharma; S.Mohanty; S.Kumar; N.J.Rao; li qian

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory bleaching effluents from the chlorination and caustic extraction stages of mixed wood kraft pulp processing have been analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively for various chlorophenolics by using GC.A number of chlorinated derivaties of phenols,catechols,guaiacols and syringaldehydes have been detected and their concentrations are estimated.The results are compared with that of different agriculture residue / hardwood pulps,which were reported in literature.The concentrations of various compounds detected have also been compared with their reported 96LC50 values.

  11. Ceramic Ultra- and Nanofiltration for Municipal Wastewater Reuse

    OpenAIRE

    R. Shang

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, water reuse has been widely recognized in many regions of the world. Fouling of ceramic membranes, especially hydraulically irreversible fouling, is a critical aspect affecting the operational cost and energy consumption in water treatment plants. In addition, the reverse osmosis (RO) membranes, that are often used for water reuse plant, frequently face the problem of bio-fouling. The main objective of this thesis is to develop innovative applications of the ceramic ul...

  12. A System Dynamics Based Study of Software Reuse Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    FIGURES D6- D2)1: Dynammics Ras Model Siomlui Grphs for TA B LE 7 ................................ ............. 113-133 TABLES i6 - )2 1: DYNAMICA...the economncs of ftware rmm. 9 ItI IL ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUES IN SOFTWARE REUSE A. SUCCEUSSFUL SOFTWARE RIUSE REQUIREMENTS Ironically, one of the...highest productivity and the greatest cost savings by making reuse a standard organizational process, the organization must establish a support

  13. Emergy Evaluation of Different Straw Reuse Technologies in Northeast China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxian Zhang; Fang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Open burning of straw in China has degraded agricultural environments and has become a contributor to air pollution. Development of efficient straw-reuse technologies not only can yield economic benefits but also can protect the environment and can provide greater benefit to society. Thus, the overall benefits of straw-reuse technologies must be considered when making regional development planning and enterprise technology decisions. In addition, agricultural areas in China cross several clim...

  14. On the formalization and reuse of scientific research

    OpenAIRE

    King, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Copyright © 2011 The Royal Society. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The reuse of scientific knowledge obtained from one investigation in another investigation is basic to the advance of science. Scientific investigations should therefore be recorded in ways that promote the reuse of the knowledge ...

  15. A process-based approach to engineering design knowledge reuse

    OpenAIRE

    Baxter, David

    2007-01-01

    Manufacturing enterprises are under increasing pressure to produce products of higher quality at lower cost in shorter time frames if they are to remain competitive. Engineering design support methods can help companies to achieve these goals. One such approach is design knowledge reuse. Industrial requirements have been identified as (i) the ability to rapidly create product variants; (ii) the ability to capture and re-use design knowledge, and; (iii) the capability to support...

  16. Encouraging creative reuse of shopping carrier bags in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation shows how to encourage reuse of different types of shopping carrier bags in kindergarten. In the theoretical part I have introduced the concepts of creativity, divergent thinking and the meaning of reuse. I have outlined the problems concerning shopping bags and named the most common types, from which we made creative products. I outlined the motoric development in a child wherein I focused on eye-hand coordination, which is very important for a child's complete development....

  17. Code Component Composition Reuse Is a New Programming Paradigm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    After describing the characteristics of programming paradigm,this pap er introduces the approach of code component composition reuse in detail, propos es and discusses viewpoint that code component composition reuse is a kind of ne w programming paradigm. This paper also specifies the characteristics of this ne w programming paradigm in detail, and points out some issues that must be resolv ed for using this new programming paradigm.

  18. Effectiveness of nano-calcium phosphate paste on sensitivity during and after bleaching: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; Lidia Yileng TAY; HERRERA,Daniel Rodrigo; Bauer,Jose; Reis, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of in-office bleaching and associated tooth sensitivity on application of nano-calcium phosphate paste as desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel in 40 patients who were randomly divided into placebo and nano-calcium phosphate paste groups. Bleaching efficacy (BE) was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita shade guide. Tooth sensitivity was recorded using a numeric rating scale (0–4) during bleaching and up...

  19. In Situ and In Vitro Effects of Two Bleaching Treatments on Human Enamel Hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn-Donassollo, Sandrina; Fabris, Cristiane; Gagiolla, Morgana; Kerber, Ícaro; Caetano, Vinícius; Carboni, Vitor; Salas, Mabel Miluska Suca; Donassollo, Tiago Aurélio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in situ the effects of two bleaching treatments on human enamel surface microhardness. Sixty enamel slabs from recently extracted thirty molars were used. The specimens were polished with sandpapers under water-cooling. The enamel samples were randomly divided in four groups, treated with 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP) or Whitening Strips (WS) containing 10% hydrogen peroxide and using two conditions: in vitro or in situ model. For in situ condition, six volunteers wore an intra-oral appliance containing enamel slabs, while for in vitro condition the specimens were kept in deionized water after the bleaching protocols. The bleaching treatments were applied one-hour daily for 14 days. Similar amounts of bleaching agents were used in both conditions. Before and after bleaching treatments, microhardness was measured. Statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey test) showed that in the in situ condition there was no statistically significant microhardness reduction in the bleached enamel (p>0.05). Significant decrease in hardness was observed for enamel slabs bleached with both treatments in the in vitro condition (phardness value. It could be concluded that there was no deleterious effect on enamel produced by any of the bleaching protocols used in the in situ model. The reduction of hardness was only observed in vitro.

  20. WOOD BASIC DENSITY EFFECT OF Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla CLONES ON BLEACHED PULP QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Rodrigues dos Santos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzed the wood basic density effect in two Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla hybrid clones (440 kg/m3 e 508 kg/m3 on bleached pulp quality (fiber dimensions and physical-mechanical properties. The woods performance on pulping, bleaching and beating results were analyzed. The Kraft pulping was carried out in forced circulation digester in order to obtain 17±1 kappa number targets. The pulps were bleached to 90±1 using delignification oxygen and D0EOPD1 bleaching sequence. Bleached pulp of low basic density clone showed, significantly, lowest revolutions number in the PFI mill to reach tensile index of 70 N.m/g, low Schopper Riegler degree and generated sheets with higher values to bulk and opacity. These characteristics and properties allow concluding that bleached pulp of low basic density clone was the most indicated to produce printing and writing sheets. The bleached pulp of high basic density clone showed higher values of bulk and capillarity Klemm and lower water retention value when analyzed without beating. The bleached pulp of high basic density clone showed more favorable characteristics to the production of tissue papers.

  1. Re-evaluating luminescence burial doses and bleaching of fluvial deposits using Bayesian computational statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunningham, A. C.; Wallinga, J.; Hobo, N.; Versendaal, A. J.; Makaske, B.; Middelkoop, H.

    2015-01-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal from fluvial sediment often contains a remnant from the previous deposition cycle, leading to a partially bleached equivalent-dose distribution. Although identification of the burial dose is of primary concern, the degree of bleaching could potentia

  2. Re-evaluating luminescence burial doses and bleaching of fluvial deposits using Bayesian computational statistics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunningham, A.C.; Wallinga, J.; Versendaal, Alice; Makaske, A.; Middelkoop, H.; Hobo, N.

    2015-01-01

    The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal from fluvial sediment often contains a remnant from the previous deposition cycle, leading to a partially bleached equivalent-dose distribution. Although identification of the burial dose is of primary concern, the degree of bleaching could potentia

  3. Comparing Environmental Influences on Coral Bleaching Across and within Species using Clustered Binomial Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differential susceptibility among reef-building coral species can lead to community shifts and loss of diversity as a result of temperature-induced mass bleaching events. However, the influence of the local environment on species-specific bleaching susceptibilities has not been ...

  4. Outbreak and persistence of opportunistic symbiotic dinoflagellates during the 2005 Caribbean mass coral 'bleaching' event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJeunesse, Todd C; Smith, Robin T; Finney, Jennifer; Oxenford, Hazel

    2009-12-07

    Reef corals are sentinels for the adverse effects of rapid global warming on the planet's ecosystems. Warming sea surface temperatures have led to frequent episodes of bleaching and mortality among corals that depend on endosymbiotic micro-algae (Symbiodinium) for their survival. However, our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary response of corals to episodes of thermal stress remains inadequate. For the first time, we describe how the symbioses of major reef-building species in the Caribbean respond to severe thermal stress before, during and after a severe bleaching event. Evidence suggests that background populations of Symbiodinium trenchi (D1a) increased in prevalence and abundance, especially among corals that exhibited high sensitivity to stress. Contrary to previous hypotheses, which posit that a change in symbiont occurs subsequent to bleaching, S. trenchi increased in the weeks leading up to and during the bleaching episode and disproportionately dominated colonies that did not bleach. During the bleaching event, approximately 20 per cent of colonies surveyed harboured this symbiont at high densities (calculated at less than 1.0% only months before bleaching began). However, competitive displacement by homologous symbionts significantly reduced S. trenchi's prevalence and dominance among colonies after a 2-year period following the bleaching event. While the extended duration of thermal stress in 2005 provided an ecological opportunity for a rare host-generalist symbiont, it remains unclear to what extent the rise and fall of S. trenchi was of ecological benefit or whether its increased prevalence was an indicator of weakening coral health.

  5. INDICATORS OF UV EXPOSURE IN CORALS AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND CORAL BLEACHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compelling aspect of the deterioration of coral reefs is the phenomenon of coral bleaching. Through interactions with other factors such as sedimentation, pollution, and bacterial infection, bleaching can impact large areas of a reef with limited recovery, and it might be induc...

  6. In vitro colorimetric evaluation of the efficacy of various bleaching methods and products

    OpenAIRE

    Dietschi, Didier; Rossier, Sandrine; Krejci, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Various bleaching modalities are now offered to patients, either monitored by the dental office or self-directed, for which relative efficacy is unknown. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ability of different bleaching products and protocols to lighten enamel and dentin.

  7. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  8. MODIFIED OPAL:A NOVEL STABILIZER FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF PULPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueren Qian; Xianhui An; Wenbo Liu; Gang Yu; Zhanqian Song

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of modified opal as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching was investigated. The results showed that the modified opal in place of sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching is feasible. At the same dosage, above 3% ISO can be increased for both wheat straw pulp and deinked pulp. The stabilizing ability of the modified opal to hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp is improved markedly. It is favorable for bleaching to increase temperature and time within a permissive extent. The suitable process conditions are 10% of pulp consistency, 3% of hydrogen peroxide, 1.5% of sodium hydroxide, 3% of the modified opal, 70℃ and 60 min when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. At these conditions, the brightness gain can reach about 16% ISO for wheat straw pulp. In addition, it is favorable for bleaching to add a little magnesium sulfate when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the brightness of pulp can increase I%ISO if0.05% of magnesium sulfate is added. The cost analysis indicated that the modified opal is superior to sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching in economical aspect and has further the potential of market development.

  9. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  10. Effect of bleaching on the shear bond strength of the enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Arruda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of dental bleaching on the shear bond strength of enamel. Methods: Fifty molars were selected and divided into five groups (n=10; G1-without bleaching (control; G2-bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide and restored 24h later; G3-bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide and restored seven days later; G4-bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored a 35% and restored 24h later; G5-bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored a 35% and restored seven days later. During the 24h and 7-day intervals the test specimens remained stored in artificial saliva, after which the restorative procedures were performed on the enamel. Results: The microshear bond strength test indicated the following results in MPa (ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc: G1-43.15 a (±5.19; G2-31.34 ab (± 4.41; G3-36.66 ab (± 3.11; G4-22.87 c (±3.76 and G5-35.67 ab (± 4.64. Conclusion: Groups G1, G2, G3 and G5 showed no statistical difference and Group G4 (bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored 24h later showed diminished bond strength between the bleached enamel and resin composite.

  11. Influence of photo- and thermal bleaching on pre-irradiation low water peak single mode fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianchong; Wen, Jianxiang; Luo, Wenyun; Xiao, Zhongyin; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-12-01

    Reducing the radiation-induced transmission loss in low water peak single mode fiber (LWP SMF) has been investigated by using photo-bleaching method with 980nm pump light source and using thermal-bleaching method with temperature control system. The results show that the radiation-induced loss of pre-irradiation optical fiber can be reduced effectively with the help of photo-bleaching or thermal-bleaching. Although the effort of photo-bleaching is not as significant as thermal-bleaching, by using photo-bleaching method, the loss of fiber caused by radiation-induced defects can be reduced best up to 49% at 1310nm and 28% at 1550nm in low pre-irradiation condition, the coating of the fiber are not destroyed, and the rehabilitating time is just several hours, while self-annealing usually costs months' time. What's more, the typical high power LASER for photo-bleaching can be 980nm pump Laser Diode, which is very accessible.

  12. Bleaching augments lipid peroxidation products in pistachio oil and its cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistachio consumption is associated with reductions in serum cholesterol and oxidative stress due to their constituents of unsaturated fats, phytosterols, fiber, and antioxidants. Bleaching has been applied to whiten nut shells for antifungal and cosmetic purposes. However, the impact of bleaching o...

  13. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  14. Microbial community compositional shifts in bleached colonies of the Brazilian reef-building coral Siderastrea stellata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins-de-Barros, Monica M; Cardoso, Alexander M; Silveira, Cynthia B; Lima, Joyce L; Clementino, Maysa M; Martins, Orlando B; Albano, Rodolpho M; Vieira, Ricardo P

    2013-01-01

    The association of metazoan, protist, and microbial communities with Scleractinian corals forms the basis of the coral holobiont. Coral bleaching events have been occurring around the world, introducing changes in the delicate balance of the holobiont symbiotic interactions. In this study, Archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotic phototrophic plastids of bleached colonies of the Brazilian coral Siderastrea stellata were analyzed for the first time, using 16S rRNA gene libraries. Prokaryotic communities were slightly more diverse in healthy than in bleached corals. However, the eukaryotic phototrophic plastids community was more diverse in bleached corals. Archaea phylogenetic analyses revealed a high percentage of Crenarchaeota sequences, mainly related to Nitrosopumilus maritimus and Cenarchaeum symbiosum. Dramatic changes in bacterial community composition were observed in this bleaching episode. The dominant bacterial group was Alphaproteobacteria followed by Gammaproteobacteria in bleached and Betaproteobacteria in healthy samples. Plastid operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from both coral samples were mainly related to red algae chloroplasts (Florideophycea), but we also observed some OTUs related to green algae chloroplasts (Chlorophyta). There seems to be a strong relationship between the Bacillariophyta phylum and our bleached coral samples as clones related to members of the diatom genera Amphora and Nitzschia were detected. The present study reveals information from a poorly investigated coral species and improves the knowledge of coral microbial community shifts that could occur during bleaching episodes.

  15. Antibiotic resistance genes fate and removal by a technological treatment solution for water reuse in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luprano, Maria Laura; De Sanctis, Marco; Del Moro, Guido; Di Iaconi, Claudio; Lopez, Antonio; Levantesi, Caterina

    2016-11-15

    In order to mitigate the potential effects on the human health which are associated to the use of treated wastewater in agriculture, antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are required to be carefully monitored in wastewater reuse processes and their spread should be prevented by the development of efficient treatment technologies. Objective of this study was the assessment of ARGs reduction efficiencies of a novel technological treatment solution for agricultural reuse of municipal wastewaters. The proposed solution comprises an advanced biological treatment (Sequencing Batch Biofilter Granular Reactor, SBBGR), analysed both al laboratory and pilot scale, followed by sand filtration and two different disinfection final stages: ultraviolet light (UV) radiation and peracetic acid (PAA) treatments. By Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), the presence of 9 ARGs (ampC, mecA, ermB, sul1, sul2, tetA, tetO, tetW, vanA) were analysed and by quantitative PCR (qPCR) their removal was determined. The obtained results were compared to the reduction of total bacteria (16S rDNA gene) and of a faecal contamination indicator (Escherichia coli uidA gene). Only four of the analysed genes (ermB, sul1, sul2, tetA) were detected in raw wastewater and their abundance was estimated to be 3.4±0.7 x10(4) - 9.6±0.5 x10(9) and 1.0±0.3 x10(3) to 3.0±0.1 x10(7) gene copies/mL in raw and treated wastewaters, respectively. The results show that SBBGR technology is promising for the reduction of ARGs, achieving stable removal performance ranging from 1.0±0.4 to 2.8±0.7 log units, which is comparable to or higher than that reported for conventional activated sludge treatments. No reduction of the ARGs amount normalized to the total bacteria content (16S rDNA), was instead obtained, indicating that these genes are removed together with total bacteria and not specifically eliminated. Enhanced ARGs removal was obtained by sand filtration, while no reduction was achieved by both UV and PAA disinfection

  16. Integrated urban water management for residential areas: a reuse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, A B; Argue, J R

    2009-01-01

    Global concern over growing urban water demand in the face of limited water resources has focussed attention on the need for better management of available water resources. This paper takes the "fit for purpose" concept and applies it in the development of a model aimed at changing current practices with respect to residential planning by integrating reuse systems into the design layout. This residential reuse model provides an approach to the design of residential developments seeking to maximise water reuse. Water balance modelling is used to assess the extent to which local water resources can satisfy residential demands with conditions based on the city of Adelaide, Australia. Physical conditions include a relatively flat topography and a temperate climate, with annual rainfall being around 500 mm. The level of water-self-sufficiency that may be achieved within a reuse development in this environment is estimated at around 60%. A case study is also presented in which a conventional development is re-designed on the basis of the reuse model. Costing of the two developments indicates the reuse scenario is only marginally more expensive. Such costings however do not include the benefit to upstream and downstream environments resulting from reduced demand and discharges. As governments look to developers to recover system augmentation and environmental costs the economics of such approaches will increase.

  17. Performance Analysis of Reuse Distance in Cooperative Broadcasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmi Grönkvist

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative broadcasting is a promising technique for robust broadcast with low overhead and delay in mobile ad hoc networks. The technique is attractive for mission-oriented mobile communication, where a majority of the traffic is of broadcast nature. In cooperative broadcasting, all nodes simultaneously retransmit packets. The receiver utilizes cooperative diversity in the simultaneously received signals. The retransmissions continue until all nodes are reached. After the packet has traveled a specific number of hops out from the source, denoted as reuse distance, the source node transmits a new broadcast packet in the time slot used for the previous broadcast packet. If the reuse distance is too small, interference causes packet loss in intermediate nodes. In the literature, a reuse distance of three is common. With an analysis based on a realistic interference model and real terrain data, we show that a reuse distance of at least four is necessary to avoid packet loss in sparsely connected networks, especially for high spectral efficiencies. For frequency hopping, widely used in military systems, we propose a novel method. This method almost eliminates interference for a reuse distance of three, increasing the throughput by 33% compared to systems with a reuse distance of four.

  18. Effect of light activation on tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossatz, S; Dalanhol, A P; Cunha, T; Loguercio, A; Reis, A

    2011-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effects of light-emitting diode (LED)/laser activation on bleaching effectiveness (BE) and tooth sensitivity (TS) during in-office bleaching. Thirty caries-free patients were divided into two groups: light-activated (LA) and non-activated (NA) groups. A 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (Whiteness HP Maxx, FGM Dental Products, Joinville SC, Brazil) was used in three 15-minute applications for both groups. For the LA group, LED/laser energy (Whitening Lase Light Plus, DMC Odontológica, São Carlos SP, Brazil) was used, in accordance with the manufacturer's directions. Two sessions of bleaching were performed at one-week intervals. Color was registered at baseline and after the first and second bleaching sessions using a Vita shade guide. Patients recorded TS on a 0 to 4 scale during bleaching and within the next 24 and 48 hours of each session. BE at recall each week and intensity of TS were evaluated by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Tooth sensitivity was compared using the Friedman repeated measures analysis of variance by rank and the Wilcoxon sign-ranked test. Faster bleaching was observed for the LA group than for the NA group after the first session (4.8 and 3.8 shade guide units [SGUs]; p=0.0001). However, both techniques were capable of bleaching the same number of SGUs after the second bleaching session (p=0.52). Most of the LA group (53.3%) had sensitivity even 24 hours after each bleaching session, but only 26.6% from the NA group reported TS. The intensity of TS was similar for both groups immediately after bleaching but significantly higher for the LA group 24 hours after each bleaching session (p=0.001). After two bleaching sessions, the use of LED/laser light activation did not improve bleaching speed. Persistent tooth sensitivity and higher tooth sensitivity after 24 hours of bleaching were observed when light activation was used.

  19. Comparison of the bleaching efficacy of three different agents used for intracoronal bleaching of discolored primary teeth: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyone wants whiter teeth to make them feel younger and to provide beautiful smiles with the accompanying increase in self-esteem. Bleaching is an established, simple, cost-effective and conservative method for improving the color of the discolored teeth. Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the bleaching efficacy of 10% carbamide peroxide, 10% hydrogen peroxide and 2g sodium perborate as bleaching agents on the artificially discolored human primary maxillary central incisors. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human primary central incisors with intact crowns were selected for the study. Pulpectomy was performed and each tooth was artificially stained with 2 ml of fresh human blood and centrifuged. --The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups of 10 teeth each and the baseline color evaluation was performed. 0.04 ml of the bleaching agent is syringed into the access cavity of the tooth and, in the control group, 0.04 ml of distilled water was syringed into the access cavity and it was sealed with IRM and placed at 37°C in an incubator throughout the experiment. The color of the bleached teeth was determined at 0, 7 and 14 days. The data obtained were analyzed using ANOVA and Turkey′s test. Results: There was statistical significance (P = 0.00 among the carbamide peroxide, sodium perborate, hydrogen peroxide and control groups after 7 and 14 days and a significance of P = 0.013 among the carbamide peroxide, sodium perborate and hydrogen peroxide after two bleaching sessions (day 14 was seen. Conclusions: The bleaching efficacy of 10% hydrogen peroxide gel was more effective than 10% carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate in bleaching the artificially discolored primary teeth.

  20. ENZYMATIC BLEACHING OF WHEAT STRAW SODA-AQ PULP BY LMS TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiwen Wang; Huaiyu Zhan; Lili Xu

    2004-01-01

    Laccase has been proven that it has a good selectivity and efficiency in pulp bleaching. In this paper, the effects of LMS (Laccase Mediator System) treatment on delignification and bleaching of wheat straw pulp at various conditions, such as laccase dosage,temperature, oxygen pressure and pH, were investigated. The TCF sequence including LMS can bleach the wheat straw pulp to 81% ISO brightness with good strength. The synergetic biobleaching of LMS and xylanase of wheat straw pulp was also investigated. It was found that the final brightness and strength of synergetic biobleaching pulps increased to a certain extent and the bleaching selectivity was improved. The combination of the enzymes is feasible for the delignification and bleaching.

  1. ENZYMATIC BLEACHING OF WHEAT STRAW SODA--AQ PULP BY LMS TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiwenWang; HuaiyuZhan; LiliXu

    2004-01-01

    Laccase has been proven that it has a good selectivity and efficiency in pulp bleaching. In this paper, the effects of LMS (Laccase Mediator System) treatment on delignification and bleaching of wheat straw pulp at various conditions, such as laccase dosage, temperature, oxygen pressure and pH, were investigated. The TCF sequence including LMS can bleach the wheat straw pulp to 81% ISO brightness with good strength. The synergetic biobleaching of LMS and xylanase of wheat straw pulp was also investigated. It was found that the final brightness and strength of synergetic biobleaching pulps increased to a certain extent and the bleaching selectivity was improved. The combination of the enzymes is feasible for the delignification and bleaching.

  2. The combination of sodium perborate and water as intracoronal teeth bleaching agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananta Tantri Budi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The color change on post-endodontic treated teeth can be overcome by intracoronal tooth bleaching using walking bleach. Some agents used in walking bleach are combination of sodium peroxide and hydrogen peroxide, and combination of sodium perborate and water. Purpose: The objective of this review is to provide information and consideration of using safe and effective bleaching agents in the field of dentistry. Reviews: On one side, the use of sodium perborate and water combination does not cause the reduction of dentin hardness, enamel decay, and root resorbtion. On the other side, the use of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide combination indicates that it takes longer time in yielding the proper color of teeth. Conclusion: The use of sodium perborate and water combination as bleaching agents is effective and safe.

  3. Seasonal Dynamical Prediction of Coral Bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillman, C. M.; Alves, O.

    2009-05-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is now recognised as the primary cause of mass coral bleaching events. Coral bleaching occurs during times of stress, particularly when SSTs exceed the coral colony's tolerance level. Global warming is potentially a serious threat to the future of the world's reef systems with predictions by the international community that bleaching will increase in both frequency and severity. Advance warning of anomalous sea surface temperatures, and thus potential bleaching events, would allow for the implementation of management strategies to minimise reef damage. Seasonal SST forecasts from the coupled ocean-atmosphere model POAMA (Bureau of Meteorology) have skill in the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) several months into the future. We will present model forecasts and probabilistic products for use in reef management, and assess model skill in the region. These products will revolutionise the way in which coral bleaching events are monitored and assessed in the Great Barrier Reef and Australian region.

  4. Enamel susceptibility to red wine staining after 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Bittencourt Berger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been expressed regarding the staining of enamel surface by different beverages after bleaching. This study investigated the influence of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on enamel surface stained with wine after whitening treatments. Flat and polished bovine enamel surfaces were submitted to two commercially available 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents or kept in 100% humidity, as a control group (n = 10. Specimens of all groups were immersed in red wine for 48 h at 37°C, immediately, 24 h or 1 week after treatments. All specimens were ground into powder and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. Data were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test at 5% significance level. The amount of wine pigments uptake by enamel submitted to bleaching treatments was statistically higher than that of control group, independently of the evaluation time. Results suggested that wine staining susceptibility was increased by bleaching treatments.

  5. CHLORINE DIOXIDE BLEACHING OF SODA-ANTHRAQUINONE JUTE PULP TO A VERY HIGH BRIGHTNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarwar Jahan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Bleaching of soda-anthraquinone jute pulp by chlorine dioxide (ClO2 was studied to reach a target brightness of above 88% for the purpose of using less bleaching chemicals. The performance of either chlorine dioxide or peroxide in the final bleaching to boost brightness was also studied. The experimental results revealed that the final brightness depended on ClO2 charge in the Do and D1 stages. The brightness reversion was lower when the final stage brightening was done by peroxide. The use of Mg(OH2 in the D1 and D2 stages improved the final brightness due to the formation of less chlorate and chlorite during the Mg(OH2- based ClO2 brightening stages. The strength properties of pulp bleached by peroxide in the final stage was slightly better than that from ClO2 as the final ClO2 bleaching stage.

  6. Climate change disables coral bleaching protection on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Tracy D; Heron, Scott F; Ortiz, Juan Carlos; Mumby, Peter J; Grech, Alana; Ogawa, Daisie; Eakin, C Mark; Leggat, William

    2016-04-15

    Coral bleaching events threaten the sustainability of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Here we show that bleaching events of the past three decades have been mitigated by induced thermal tolerance of reef-building corals, and this protective mechanism is likely to be lost under near-future climate change scenarios. We show that 75% of past thermal stress events have been characterized by a temperature trajectory that subjects corals to a protective, sub-bleaching stress, before reaching temperatures that cause bleaching. Such conditions confer thermal tolerance, decreasing coral cell mortality and symbiont loss during bleaching by over 50%. We find that near-future increases in local temperature of as little as 0.5°C result in this protective mechanism being lost, which may increase the rate of degradation of the GBR.

  7. Recognizing a limitation of the TBLC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenhua; Wang, Lun; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jingjing; Sun, Chang; Xu, Changhai

    2016-04-20

    In this study, cotton was bleached at low temperatures with an activated peroxide system which was established by incorporating a bleach activator, namely, N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]caprolactam chloride (TBCC) into an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Experimental results showed that the bleaching performance was unexpectedly diminished as the TBCC concentration was increased over the range of 25-100g/L. Kinetic adsorption experiment indicated that this was most likely ascribed to the adsorptive interactions of TBCC and the in situ-generated compounds with cotton fibers. Such a limitation was especially fatal to cold pad-batch bleaching process of cotton in which a high TBCC concentration was often required. The results of this study may stimulate further research to avoid or overcome the limitation of the TBCC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

  8. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  9. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  10. The Language of Flexible Reuse; Reuse, Portability and Interoperability of Learning Content or Why an Educational Modelling Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Sloep, P.B. (2004). Reuse, Portability and Interoperability of Learning Content: Or Why an Educational Modelling Language. In R. McGreal, (Ed.), Online Education Using Learning Objects (pp. 128-137). London: Routledge/Falmer.

  11. Bleaching of leaf litter and associated microfungi in subboreal and subalpine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Yusuke; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Hobara, Satoru; Mori, Akira S; Hirose, Dai; Osono, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Fungal decomposition of lignin leads to the whitening, or bleaching, of leaf litter, especially in temperate and tropical forests, but less is known about such bleaching in forests of cooler regions, such as boreal and subalpine forests. The purposes of the present study were to examine the extent of bleached area on the surface of leaf litter and its variation with environmental conditions in subboreal and subalpine forests in Japan and to examine the microfungi associated with the bleaching of leaf litter by isolating fungi from the bleached portions of the litter. Bleached area accounted for 21.7%-32.7% and 2.0%-10.0% of total leaf area of Quercus crispula and Betula ermanii, respectively, in subboreal forests, and for 6.3% and 18.6% of total leaf area of B. ermanii and Picea jezoensis var. hondoensis, respectively, in a subalpine forest. In subboreal forests, elevation, C/N ratio and pH of the FH layer, and slope aspect were selected as predictor variables for the bleached leaf area. Leaf mass per area and lignin content were consistently lower in the bleached area than in the nonbleached area of the same leaves, indicating that the selective decomposition of acid unhydrolyzable residue (recalcitrant compounds such as lignin, tannins, and cutins) enhanced the mass loss of leaf tissues in the bleached portions. Isolates of a total of 11 fungal species (6 species of Ascomycota and 5 of Basidiomycota) exhibited leaf-litter-bleaching activity under pure culture conditions. Two fungal species (Coccomyces sp. and Mycena sp.) occurred in both subboreal and subalpine forests, which were separated from each other by approximately 1100 km.

  12. Massive bleaching of coral reefs induced by the 2010 ENSO, Puerto Cabello, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Mónaco, Carlos; Haiek, Gerard; Narciso, Samuel; Galindo, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has generated global coral massive bleaching. The aim of this work was to evaluate the massive bleaching of coral reefs in Puerto Cabello, Venezuela derived from ENSO 2010. We evaluated the bleaching of reefs at five localities both at three and five meter depth. The coral cover and densities of colonies were estimated. We recorded living coral cover, number and diameter of bleached and non-bleached colonies of each coral species. The colonies were classified according to the proportion of bleached area. Satellite images (Modis Scar) were analyzed for chlorophyll-a concentration and temperature in August, September, October and November from 2008-2010. Precipitation, wind speed and air temperature information was evaluated in meteorological data for 2009 and 2010. A total of 58.3% of colonies, belonging to 11 hexacoral species, were affected and the greatest responses were observed in Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea annularis and Montastraeafaveolata. The most affected localities were closer to the mainland and had a bleached proportion up to 62.73+/-36.55%, with the highest proportion of affected colonies, whereas the farthest locality showed 20.25+/-14.00% bleached and the smallest proportion. The salinity in situ varied between 30 and 33ppm and high levels of turbidity were observed. According to the satellite images, in 2010 the surface water temperature reached 31 degree C in August, September and October, and resulted higher than those registered in 2008 and 2009. Regionally, chlorophyll values were higher in 2010 than in 2008 and 2009. The meteorological data indicated that precipitation in November 2010 was three times higher than in November 2009. Massive coral bleaching occurred due to a three month period of high temperatures followed by one month of intense ENSO-associated precipitation. However, this latter factor was likely the trigger because of the bleaching gradient observed.

  13. Effect of two different tooth bleaching techniques on microhardness of giomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Naser-Alavi, Fereshteh; Behboodi, Soodabeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Tooth bleaching is a safe and conservative treatment modality to improve the esthetic appearance of discolored teeth. One of the problems with the use of bleaching agents is their possible effect on surface microhardness of resin-based materials. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of in-office and at-home bleaching on surface microhardness of giomer. Material and Methods Seventy-five disk-shaped giomer samples (Beautifil II) were prepared and cured with a light-curing unit. The samples were randomly assigned to three groups (n=25). In group 1 (control), the samples were stored in distilled water for 14 days. The samples in groups 2 and 3 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) (8 hours daily) and 45% CP (30 minutes daily), respectively, for 14 days. Finally, the microhardness of samples was measured with Vickers hardness tester using a 100-g force for 20 seconds. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the mean microhardness values among the study groups, followed by post hoc Tukey test for two-by-two comparison of the groups. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results One-way ANOVA showed significant differences in the mean microhardness values among the study groups (P<0.001). Based on the results of Tukey test, microhardness in the bleached groups was significantly less than that in the control group (P<0.0005). In addition, microhardness in the 45% CP group was significantly less than that in the 15% CP group (P<0.0005). Conclusions Use of both bleaching agents during in-office and at-home bleaching techniques resulted in a decrease in surface microhardness of giomer. The unfavorable effect of in-office bleaching (45% CP) was greater than that of at-home bleaching (15% CP). Key words:Dental restorations, hardness, tooth bleaching. PMID:28210444

  14. Influence of dental bleaching on marginal leakage of Class V restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cristina Ramos Dorini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the in vitro effect of bleaching performed in the dental office and waiting time on the degree of microleakage in class V cavities with margins in enamel, restored with resin composite. Methods: Forty-five human third molars were used, in which the vestibular faces were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated with LED and the palatine faces were not bleached (control. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups with 15 teeth in each: Group 1, restored immediately after bleaching; Group 2, seven days after bleaching; and Group 3, fourteen days after bleaching. After cavity preparation, 35% phosphoric acid, Adper Single Bond 2 adhesive (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Mn, USA, and resin composite Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA were applied. The teeth were thermal cycled and sealed with red nail polish on the bleached faces and blue on the non bleached faces, except for 1mm around the restored region. The samples were classified according to the following scores: 0 = no leakage, 1 = minimum leakage (less than 1 / 3 the length of the wall, 2 = moderate leakage (1/3 to 2/3 of the wall and 3 = extensive leakage (over 2/3 of the wall. The data were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test at a level of significance of 5%. Results: The restorative procedure immediately after bleaching resulted in statistically higher microleakage values (p 0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results, it is advisable to wait at least 7 days after bleaching to make the definitive restoration.

  15. Bleaching phototrichogram: an improved method for hair growth assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Ho; Kwon, Oh Sang; Oh, Jun Kyu; Park, Won Seok; Moon, Sang Eun; Eun, Hee Chul

    2005-10-01

    The phototrichogram (PT) is a non-invasive tool for monitoring hair growth in vivo. However, the majority of PT techniques are of little use to clinicians bacause they are time-consuming and/or difficult to perform. Consequently, there is a need for an easy and time-saving PT technique. This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy and availability of a modified PT, bleaching phototrichogram (BPT), by comparing it with the conventional phototrichogram (CPT). Ten healthy male volunteers (age range 26-33 years) comprised the study subjects. Hairs were clipped from two adjacent circular areas in the occipital region of each subject. The clipped hairs in the first area were bleached and photographed two days later. The second area was photographed just after clipping and two days later. In each area, the following biological parameters of hair growth were analyzed; 1: hair density (number/cm2), 2: anagen hair ratio (%), 3: linear hair growth rate (mm/day), 4: non-vellus hair ratio (%) and 5: anagen hair thickness (microm). The hair density, anagen hair ratio, linear hair growth rate, and anagen hair thickness by BPT were similar to the CPT values with no significant differences, although the non-vellus hair ratio by BPT was higher than the CPT value. The BPT has a higher clinical usefulness than the CPT because it saves much time with satisfactory accuracy.

  16. Seychelles Lagoon Provides Corals with a Refuge from Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Iluz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An extensive bleaching event in the summer of the year 1997-1998 affected most reefs along East Africa's shores. In the aftermath of that episode, the reefs of Île Alphonse in the Seychelles were examined and it was found that reefs along the seaward slopes of the island lost >95% of their branching coral colonies, with considerably higher survival of massive species. Île Alphonse features a nearly circular shallow lagoon, with steep seaward slopes. Contrary to our expectations, mortality in the warmer lagoon was far lower than of coral colonies on the surrounding slopes, bathed in deeper and cooler waters. We suggest that corals in the lagoon were protected from UV radiation by leachate stemming from seagrass leaves steeped in the lagoon. Our measurements in the lagoon showed a strong attenuation of ultraviolet radiation, not observed in the waters outside the lagoon, and laboratory examination confirmed that the strong UV absorption of substances leached into seawater from decomposing leaves of the seagrass Thalassodendron (=Cymodocea testudinaceum. Our findings demonstrate the synergism between elevated seawater temperature and UV radiation in triggering bleaching on shallow reefs.

  17. Effluent monitoring at a bleached kraft mill: directions for best management practices for eliminating effects on fish reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Pierre H; Kovacs, Tibor G; O'connor, Brian I; Semeniuk, Sharon; Hewitt, L Mark; Maclatchy, Deborah L; McMaster, Mark E; Parrott, Joanne L; van den Heuvel, Michael R; Van Der Kraak, Glen J

    2011-01-01

    A long-term monitoring study was conducted on effluents from a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill located in Eastern Canada. The study was designed to gain insights into temporal effluent variability with respect to fish reproduction as it related to production upsets, mill restarts and conditions affecting biological treatment performance. Final effluent quality was monitored between February 2007 and May 2009 using biochemical and chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, resin and fatty acids, a gas chromatographic profiling index, and the presence of methyl substituted 2-cyclopentenones. Selected effluent samples were evaluated for effects on fish reproduction (egg production) using a shortened version of the adult fathead minnow reproductive test. The events relating to negative effects on fish reproduction were upsets of the pulping liquor recovery system resulting in black liquor losses, operational upsets of the hardwood line resulting in the loss of oxygen delignification filtrates, and conditions that reduced the performance of biological treatment (e.g., mill shutdown and low ambient temperatures). The reductions in egg production observed in fathead minnow were associated with biochemical oxygen demand values > 20 mg/L, GC profiling indices > 1.2 and the presence of methyl-substituted 2-cyclopentenones at concentrations > 100 μg/L. This study demonstrated the importance of both in-plant measures for controlling the loss of organics as well as the optimum operation of biological effluent treatment for eliminating effluent-related effects on fish reproduction (egg production) in the laboratory.

  18. Evaluation of treated sewage reuse potential and membrane-based water reuse technology for the Bangkok Metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Prasertkulsak, Sirilak; Hamjinda, Nutta Sangnarin; Kootatep, Thammarat; Itonaga, Takanori; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Only 3.4% of total water use in the Bangkok Metropolitan area is reused treated sewage. This study anticipates that further treated-sewage reuse in industrial sectors, commercial buildings and public parks, in addition to present in-plant and street cleaning purposes, would increase total water reuse to about 10%. New water reuse technologies using membrane bioreactor (MBR) and microfiltration (MF) as tertiary treatment were implemented to assess their potential for their application in the Bangkok Metropolitan area. The MBR was applied to the treatment of raw sewage in a central treatment plant of the Bangkok Metropolitan area. The MF membrane was used for polishing the effluent of the treatment plant. The results show the quality of treated water from MBR and tertiary MF treatment could meet stringent water reuse quality standard in terms of biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids and biological parameters. Constant permeate flux of the membrane was achieved over long-term operation, during which inorganic fouling was observed. This is due to the fact that incoming sewage contains a considerable amount of inorganic constituents contributed from storm water and street inlet in the combined sewerage systems. The total cost of the MBR for sewage treatment and production of reuse water is estimated to be about USD1.10/m3.

  19. Transfer and transport of aluminum in filtration unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum salt coagulants were used prevalently in various water works. In this article, the effects of filtration on residual aluminum concentration and species distribution were researched by determining the concentration of different Aluminum species before and after single layer filter, double layer filter, and membrane filtration units. In the research, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used to separate colloidal and soluble aluminum, ion exchange chromatography (IEC) was used to separate organic and inorganic aluminum, and inductivity coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the aluminum concentration. The results showed that the rapid filtration process had the ability of removing residual aluminum from coagulant effluent water, and that double layer filtration was more effective in residual aluminum removal than single layer filtration, while Nano filtration was more effective than micro filtration. It was found that when the residual aluminum concentration was below 1mg/L in sediment effluent, the residual aluminum concentration in treated water was above 0.2 mg/L. The direct rapid filtration process mainly removed the suspended aluminum. The removal of soluble and colloidal aluminum was always less than 10% and the natural small particles that adsorbed the amount of soluble or small particles aluminum on their surface were difficult to be removed in this process. Micro filtration and nano filtration were good technologies for removing aluminum; the residual aluminum concentration in the effluent was less than 0.05 mg/L.

  20. Martingale representation property in progressively enlarged filtrations

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanblanc, M

    2012-01-01

    Consider $\\mathbb{G}$ the progressive enlargement of a filtration $\\mathbb{F}$ with a random time $\\tau$. Assuming that, in $\\mathbb{F}$, the martingale representation property holds, we examine conditions under which the martingale representation property holds also in $\\mathbb{G}$. It is noted that the classical results on this subject are no more sufficient to deal with all examples coming from credit risk modeling. In this paper, we introduce a new methodology which extends the various classical results and applies on recent examples.

  1. Data reuse and the open data citation advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowar, Heather A; Vision, Todd J

    2013-01-01

    Background. Attribution to the original contributor upon reuse of published data is important both as a reward for data creators and to document the provenance of research findings. Previous studies have found that papers with publicly available datasets receive a higher number of citations than similar studies without available data. However, few previous analyses have had the statistical power to control for the many variables known to predict citation rate, which has led to uncertain estimates of the "citation benefit". Furthermore, little is known about patterns in data reuse over time and across datasets. Method and Results. Here, we look at citation rates while controlling for many known citation predictors and investigate the variability of data reuse. In a multivariate regression on 10,555 studies that created gene expression microarray data, we found that studies that made data available in a public repository received 9% (95% confidence interval: 5% to 13%) more citations than similar studies for which the data was not made available. Date of publication, journal impact factor, open access status, number of authors, first and last author publication history, corresponding author country, institution citation history, and study topic were included as covariates. The citation benefit varied with date of dataset deposition: a citation benefit was most clear for papers published in 2004 and 2005, at about 30%. Authors published most papers using their own datasets within two years of their first publication on the dataset, whereas data reuse papers published by third-party investigators continued to accumulate for at least six years. To study patterns of data reuse directly, we compiled 9,724 instances of third party data reuse via mention of GEO or ArrayExpress accession numbers in the full text of papers. The level of third-party data use was high: for 100 datasets deposited in year 0, we estimated that 40 papers in PubMed reused a dataset by year 2, 100 by

  2. Can heterotrophic uptake of dissolved organic carbon and zooplankton mitigate carbon budget deficits in annually bleached corals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levas, Stephen; Grottoli, Andréa G.; Schoepf, Verena; Aschaffenburg, Matthew; Baumann, Justin; Bauer, James E.; Warner, Mark E.

    2016-06-01

    Annual coral bleaching events due to increasing sea surface temperatures are predicted to occur globally by the mid-century and as early as 2025 in the Caribbean, and severely impact coral reefs. We hypothesize that heterotrophic carbon (C) in the form of zooplankton and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a significant source of C to bleached corals. Thus, the ability to utilize multiple pools of fixed carbon and/or increase the amount of fixed carbon acquired from one or more pools of fixed carbon (defined here as heterotrophic plasticity) could underlie coral acclimatization and persistence under future ocean-warming scenarios. Here, three species of Caribbean coral— Porites divaricata, P. astreoides, and Orbicella faveolata—were experimentally bleached for 2.5 weeks in two successive years and allowed to recover in the field. Zooplankton feeding was assessed after single and repeat bleaching, while DOC fluxes and the contribution of DOC to the total C budget were determined after single bleaching, 11 months on the reef, and repeat bleaching. Zooplankton was a large C source for P. astreoides, but only following single bleaching. DOC was a source of C for single-bleached corals and accounted for 11-36 % of daily metabolic demand (CHARDOC), but represented a net loss of C in repeat-bleached corals. In repeat-bleached corals, DOC loss exacerbated the negative C budgets in all three species. Thus, the capacity for heterotrophic plasticity in corals is compromised under annual bleaching, and heterotrophic uptake of DOC and zooplankton does not mitigate C budget deficits in annually bleached corals. Overall, these findings suggest that some Caribbean corals may be more susceptible to repeat bleaching than to single bleaching due to a lack of heterotrophic plasticity, and coral persistence under increasing bleaching frequency may ultimately depend on other factors such as energy reserves and symbiont shuffling.

  3. Wastewater and Sludge Reuse Management in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis K. Kalavrouziotis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Huge quantities of treated wastewater (TMWW and biosolids (sludge are produced every day all over the world, which exert a strong pressure on the environment. An important question that is raised is “what to do with them?”.An effort is put by the scientific community to eliminate the concept of “waste” and to replace it with the concept of “recycling of resources”, by means of effective management, which does not concern only the users, but all the other groups involved in the problem, such as facility administrators, operations, politicians, scientific community and the general population. Sludge concentration data showed that there exist 516 chemicals in biosolids which create a serious health risk. It is pointed out that this risk will be greatly exacerbated by chemical toxins present in the sludge which can predispose skin to infection by pathogens. Consequently, the need for science-based policies are necessary to effectively protect public health. The risk assessment due to sludge, is difficult to evaluate of due to the large number of unknown interactions involved. People living near the sludge application sites may suffer from such abnormalities as: eye, nose, and throat irritation, gastrointestinal abnormalities, as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, including cough, difficulty in breathing, sinus congestion, skin infection and sores. Many problems seem to be related to biosolid and wastewater application in agriculture, which should be solved. A universal one, acknowledged as an “international health crisis” is the resistance of pathogens to antibiotics and to the evolution of multidrug resistance of bacteria”. Certain anthropogenically created environments have been identified as major sources of multidrug resistance bacteria such as in water treatment plants, concentrated animal feeding operations etc. All these, and many other health problems, render the safety of sludge and biosolid and wastewater agricultural reuse, for

  4. Dynamic optimization of a dead-end filtration trajectory : Blocking filtration laws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankert, Bastiaan; Betlem, Ben H.L.; Roffel, Brian

    2006-01-01

    An operating model for dead-end membrane filtration is proposed based on the well-known blocking laws. The resulting model contains three parameters representing, the operating strategy, the fouling mechanism and the fouling potential of the feed. The optimal control strategy is determined by minimi

  5. Dynamic optimization of a dead-end filtration trajectory : Non-ideal cake filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankert, Bastiaan; Kattenbelt, Carolien; Betlem, Ben H.L.; Roffel, Brian

    2007-01-01

    A control strategy aimed at minimizing energy consumption is formulated for non-ideal dead-end cake filtration with an inside-out hollow fiber ultrafiltration membrane system. The non-ideal behavior was assumed to originate from cake compression, non-linear cake resistance and a variable pump effici

  6. A study of dynamic filtration; Um estudo sobre filtracao dinamica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girao, Joaquim Helder S. [PETROBRAS, Natal, RN (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao da Bacia Potiguar. Div. de Tecnicas de Perfuracao

    1989-12-31

    The problems that cause cost increase such as: formation damage and borehole swelling or caving lead us to study the filtration of the liquid part of formation drilling fluid. With the aim of comparing static and dynamic filtration rates, we developed a modest dynamic filtration equipment, consisting of a modified API filter, connected to reservoir by means of a positive injection pump. We carried out various tests, and the results were set in charts and tables. Through these, it is possible to notice how the static and dynamic filtration curves come apart for a same pressure value. We also evaluated the effects of circulation speed, starch concentration and counter pressure. This paper does not include calculations or mathematical models accounting for filtrate invasion radii, but it demonstrates, for example, that cleaning circulation will cause lower filtration rates at lower flows. (author) 5 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. The effect of filter cake viscoelasticity on filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    Wastewater is usually treated biologically, and a by-product from this treatment is waste-activated sludge with high water content. Sludge is therefore often filtrated to reduce the volume for handling and disposal, and to minimise the water content before incineration of the sludge. However......, it is difficult to use the existing mathematical filtration models to simulate and optimise the filtration process. Activated sludge as well as synthetic model particles has been filtrated in this project. The study shows that compression of the formed filter cake is a time dependent process, and not only...... a function of pressure as assumed when using the conventional models. Moreover, it is shown how the existing filtration models can be modified and the filtration process for activated sludge simulated....

  8. Software Reuse Success Strategy Model: An Empirical Study of Factors Involved in the Success of Software Reuse in Information System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kiet T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between information technology (IT) governance and software reuse success. Software reuse has been mostly an IT problem but rarely a business one. Studies in software reuse are abundant; however, to date, none has a deep appreciation of IT governance. This study demonstrated that IT governance had a positive…

  9. Tailoring Supramolecular Nanofibers for Air Filtration Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel; Skrybeck, Dominik; Misslitz, Holger; Nardini, David; Kern, Alexander; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2016-06-15

    The demand of new materials and processes for nanofiber fabrication to enhance the performance of air filters is steadily increasing. Typical approaches to obtain nanofibers are based on top-down processes such as melt blowing, centrifugal spinning, and electrospinning of polymer materials. However, fabrication of polymer nanofibers is limited with respect to either a sufficiently high throughput or the smallest achievable fiber diameter. This study reports comprehensively on a fast and simple bottom-up process to prepare supramolecular nanofibers in situ inside viscose/polyester microfiber nonwovens. Here, selected small molecules of the materials class of 1,3,5-benzenetrisamides are employed. The microfiber-nanofiber composites exhibit a homogeneous nanofiber distribution and morphology throughout the entire nonwoven scaffold. Small changes in molecular structure and processing solvent have a strong influence on the final nanofiber diameter and diameter distribution and, consequently, on the filtration performance. Choosing proper processing conditions, microfiber-nanofiber composites with surprisingly high filtration efficiencies of particulate matter are obtained. In addition, the microfiber-nanofiber composite integrity at elevated temperatures was determined and revealed that the morphology of supramolecular nanofibers is maintained compared to that of the utilized polymer nonwoven.

  10. Renal filtration function in patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Kushnarenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study circadian blood pressure (BP profile in patients with gout depending on the presence of arterial hypertension (HT and their relationship to the renal filtration function.Material and methods. Patients with gout (n=87 were included into the study. All the patients underwent ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM with the assessment of circadian BP profile, determination of uric acid serum levels, glomerular filtration rate (GFR was evaluated by CKD-EPI method. Depending on GFR level, all the patients were divided into 2 groups - with renal dysfunction or without one.Results. ABPM revealed circadian BP dysregulation in 55% of gout patients both with HT and without HT. Chronic kidney disease (CKD was revealed in 72.4% of male patients, with the prevalence in patients with HT (76.6 vs 61%; p<0.001. Correlations between uric acid levels and some ABPM indicators and GFR were determined.Conclusion. Obtained data suggest the contribution of hyperuricemia in disorders of systemic and renal hemodynamics, leading to the early development of CKD.

  11. METC CFD simulations of hot gas filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the fluid/particle flow in several hot gas filtration vessels will be presented. These simulations have been useful in designing filtration vessels and in diagnosing problems with filter operation. The simulations were performed using the commercial code FLUENT and the METC-developed code MFIX. Simulations of the initial configuration of the Karhula facility indicated that the dirty gas flow over the filter assemblage was very non-uniform. The force of the dirty gas inlet flow was inducing a large circulation pattern that caused flow around the candles to be in opposite directions on opposite sides of the vessel. By introducing a system of baffles, a more uniform flow pattern was developed. This modification may have contributed to the success of the project. Several simulations of configurations proposed by Industrial Filter and Pump were performed, varying the position of the inlet. A detailed resolution of the geometry of the candles allowed determination of the flow between the individual candles. Recent simulations in support of the METC/CeraMem Cooperative Research and Development Agreement have analyzed the flow in the vessel during the cleaning back-pulse. Visualization of experiments at the CeraMem cold-flow facility provided confidence in the use of CFD. Extensive simulations were then performed to assist in the design of the hot test facility being built by Ahlstrom/Pyropower. These tests are intended to demonstrate the CeraMem technology.

  12. Disinfection of an advanced primary effluent using peracetic acid or ultraviolet radiation for its reuse in public services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio, Flores R; Hilario, Terres-Peña; Mabel, Vaca M; Raymundo, López C; Arturo, Lizardi-Ramos; Ma Neftalí, Rojas-Valencia

    2015-03-01

    The disinfection of a continuous flow of an effluent from an advanced primary treatment (coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation) with or without posterior filtration, using either peracetic acid (PAA) or ultraviolet (UV) radiation was studied. We aimed to obtain bacteriological quality to comply with the microbiological standard established in the Mexican regulations for treated wastewater reuse (NOM-003-SEMARNAT-1997), i.e., less than 240 MPN (most probable number) FC/100 mL. The concentrations of PAA were 10, 15, and 20 mg/L, with contact times of 10, and 15 min. Fecal coliforms (FC) inactivation ranged from 0.93 up to 6.4 log units, and in all cases it reached the limits set by the mentioned regulation. Water quality influenced the PAA disinfection effectiveness. An efficiency of 91% was achieved for the unfiltered effluent, as compared to 99% when wastewater was filtered. UV radiation was applied to wastewater flows of 21, 30 and 39 L/min, with dosages from 1 to 6 mJ/cm². This treatment did not achieve the bacteriological quality required for treated wastewater reuse, since the best inactivation of FC was 1.62 log units, for a flow of 21 L/min of filtered wastewater and a UV dosage of 5.6 mJ/cm².

  13. In-Water Hull Cleaning & Filtration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Dan George R & D Mining Technology LinkedIn GRD Franmarine have received the following prestigious awards in 2014 for their research & development of an in-water hull cleaning and filtration system "The Envirocart: Golden Gecko Award for Environmental Excellence; WA Innovator of the Year - Growth Sector; Department of Fisheries - Excellence in Marine Biosecurity Award - Innovation Category; Lloyd's List Asia Awards - Environmental Award; The Australian Innovation Challenge - Environment, Agriculture and Food Category; and Australian Shipping and Maritime Industry Award - Environmental Transport Award. The Envirocart developed and patented by GRD Franmarine is a revolutionary new fully enclosed capture and containment in-water hull cleaning technology. The Envirocart enables soft Silicon based antifouling paints and coatings containing pesticides such as Copper Oxide to be cleaned in situ using a contactless cleaning method. This fully containerised system is now capable of being deployed to remote locations or directly onto a Dive Support Vessel and is rated to offshore specifications. This is the only known method of in-water hull cleaning that complies with the Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) and Department of Fisheries WA (DoF) Guidelines. The primary underwater cleaning tool is a hydraulically powered hull cleaning unit fitted with rotating discs. The discs can be fitted with conventional brushes for glass or epoxy based coatings or a revolutionary new patented blade system which can remove marine biofouling without damaging the antifouling paint (silicone and copper oxide). Additionally there are a patented range of fully enclosed hand cleaning tools for difficult to access niche areas such as anodes and sea chests, providing an innovative total solution that enables in-water cleaning to be conducted in a manner that causes no biological risk to the environment. In full containment mode or when AIS are present, material is pumped

  14. Removal of cytomegalovirus DNA from donor blood by filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K L; Cobain, T; Dunstan, R A

    1993-04-01

    Blood from five donors, previously shown to be positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA following polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, was filtered through commercially available leucocyte filters. Analysis of pre- and post-filtration samples by PCR with ethidium bromide staining has shown that filtration was successful in removing CMV DNA from all samples. This is evidence that leucocyte filtration of red cell concentrates may greatly decrease the risk of CMV disease following transfusion to susceptible patients.

  15. Skeletal isotope records of growth perturbations in Porites corals during the 1997-1998 mass bleaching event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A.; Gagan, M.; Fabricius, K.; Isdale, P.; Yukino, I.; Kawahata, H.

    2003-04-01

    Severe coral bleaching occurred throughout the tropics in 1997/98. We report skeletal UV fluorescence, oxygen isotope, and carbon isotope evidence for perturbations in coral skeletal growth due to bleaching at Ishigaki Island, Japan, and Pandora Reef, Great Barrier Reef. Bleached corals showed abrupt reductions in skeletal extension rate immediately after summer temperature maxima, indicating that bleaching inhibits coral calcification. A colony growing at the low tide line in Ishigaki exhibited clear blue UV fluorescent bands associated with recurrent growth interruptions. Based on the length of time-gaps observed in the annual isotopic cycle, the typical time required for a coral to recover from bleaching is estimated to be about 5--6 months. The effect of bleaching on the oxygen isotope ratio -- temperature relationship was negligible. However, the Ishigaki corals showed lower carbon isotope ratios during bleaching indicating depressed coral metabolism associated with a reduction in calcification. In contrast, skeletal carbon isotope ratios in the Pandora Reef corals exhibited little change in response to bleaching. This is because the records for Pandora Reef were derived from the shaded sides of coral colonies, where algal photosynthesis was particularly slow prior to bleaching, thus subduing the carbon isotope response to bleaching. Taken together, the isotopic and UV fluorescence signals can be used to reconstruct past bleaching events.

  16. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists’ awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used. PMID:28096946

  17. Differential gene expression during thermal stress and bleaching in the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, M K; Voolstra, C R; Sunagawa, S; Schwarz, J A; Stillman, J H; Coffroth, M A; Szmant, A M; Medina, M

    2008-09-01

    The declining health of coral reefs worldwide is likely to intensify in response to continued anthropogenic disturbance from coastal development, pollution, and climate change. In response to these stresses, reef-building corals may exhibit bleaching, which marks the breakdown in symbiosis between coral and zooxanthellae. Mass coral bleaching due to elevated water temperature can devastate coral reefs on a large geographical scale. In order to understand the molecular and cellular basis of bleaching in corals, we have measured gene expression changes associated with thermal stress and bleaching using a complementary DNA microarray containing 1310 genes of the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata. In a first experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes by comparing experimentally bleached M. faveolata fragments to control non-heat-stressed fragments. In a second experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes during a time course experiment with four time points across 9 days. Results suggest that thermal stress and bleaching in M. faveolata affect the following processes: oxidative stress, Ca(2+) homeostasis, cytoskeletal organization, cell death, calcification, metabolism, protein synthesis, heat shock protein activity, and transposon activity. These results represent the first medium-scale transcriptomic study focused on revealing the cellular foundation of thermal stress-induced coral bleaching. We postulate that oxidative stress in thermal-stressed corals causes a disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis, which in turn leads to cytoskeletal and cell adhesion changes, decreased calcification, and the initiation of cell death via apoptosis and necrosis.

  18. Inhibition of photosynthetic CO₂ fixation in the coral Pocillopora damicornis and its relationship to thermal bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ross; Szabó, Milán; ur Rehman, Ateeq; Vass, Imre; Ralph, Peter J; Larkum, Anthony W D

    2014-06-15

    Two inhibitors of the Calvin-Benson cycle [glycolaldehyde (GA) and potassium cyanide (KCN)] were used in cultured Symbiodinium cells and in nubbins of the coral Pocillopora damicornis to test the hypothesis that inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle triggers coral bleaching. Inhibitor concentration range-finding trials aimed to determine the appropriate concentration to generate inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle, but avoid other metabolic impacts to the symbiont and the animal host. Both 3 mmol l(-1) GA and 20 μmol l(-1) KCN caused minimal inhibition of host respiration, but did induce photosynthetic impairment, measured by a loss of photosystem II function and oxygen production. GA did not affect the severity of bleaching, nor induce bleaching in the absence of thermal stress, suggesting inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle by GA does not initiate bleaching in P. damicornis. In contrast, KCN did activate a bleaching response through symbiont expulsion, which occurred in the presence and absence of thermal stress. While KCN is an inhibitor of the Calvin-Benson cycle, it also promotes reactive oxygen species formation, and it is likely that this was the principal agent in the coral bleaching process. These findings do not support the hypothesis that temperature-induced inhibition of the Calvin-Benson cycle alone induces coral bleaching.

  19. Relationships between temperature, bleaching and white syndrome on the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, S. S.; Graham, N. A. J.; Connolly, S. R.

    2013-03-01

    Coral bleaching and disease have often been hypothesized to be mutually reinforcing or co-occurring, but much of the research supporting this has only drawn an implicit connection through common environmental predictors. In this study, we examine whether an explicit relationship between white syndrome and bleaching exists using assemblage-level monitoring data from up to 112 sites on reef slopes spread throughout the Great Barrier Reef over 11 years of monitoring. None of the temperature metrics commonly used to predict mass bleaching performed strongly when applied to these data. Furthermore, the inclusion of bleaching as a predictor did not improve model skill over baseline models for predicting white syndrome. Similarly, the inclusion of white syndrome as a predictor did not improve models of bleaching. Evidence for spatial co-occurrence of bleaching and white syndrome at the assemblage level in this data set was also very weak. These results suggest the hypothesized relationship between bleaching and disease events may be weaker than previously thought, and more likely to be driven by common responses to environmental stressors, rather than directly facilitating one another.

  20. Effect of different restorative procedures on the fracture resistance of teeth submitted to internal bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andiara Ribeiro Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different restorative procedures on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth submitted to intracoronal bleaching. Fifty upper central incisors were distributed into 5 groups: GI - healthy teeth; GII - endodontically treated teeth sealed with Coltosol; GIII - endodontically treated teeth bleached and sealed with Coltosol; GIV - endodontically treated teeth bleached and restored with composite resin; and GV - endodontically treated teeth bleached and restored with a fiberglass post and composite resin. In the bleached specimens, a cervical seal was made prior to bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide. The gel was applied on the buccal surface and in the pulp chamber, and was then light-activated for 45 s. This procedure was repeated three times per session for four sessions, and each group was submitted to the restorative procedures described above. The specimens were submitted to fracture resistance testing in a universal testing machine. There were statistically significant differences among the groups (p 0.05. The restorative procedures using composite resin were found to successfully restore the fracture resistance of endodontically treated and bleached teeth.

  1. A comparison of the bleaching effectiveness of chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide on dental composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Gill, Karanjot S; Singhal, Deepak; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Dash, Sambit; Pedrazzi, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to verify if composites could be bleached using chlorine dioxide as compared with hydrogen peroxide. 3M ESPE Filtek Z350 Universal Restorative discs were prepared (n=40), with dimensions 5 mm diameter x 2 mm thickness. The discs were divided into 4 groups of 10 discs each. Color assessment was performed by CIEDE2000. The discs were stained with coffee, tea, wine and distilled water (control) solutions for 14 days, 5 hours daily. Color assessment was repeated on stained discs and followed by bleaching of 5 discs from each group using chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in-office systems. Finally, a last color assessment was performed and compared statistically. DE2000 after bleaching was very close to baseline for both the bleaching agents, although chlorine dioxide showed better results than hydrogen peroxide. After staining, there was a clinically significant discoloration (∆E2000≥3.43) for the tea, coffee and wine groups, and discoloration (∆E2000) was seen more in the wine group as compared to tea and coffee. Overall, the control group (distilled water) had the least color change in the three intervals. After bleaching, the color in all specimens returned close to the baseline. The color differences between bleaching and baseline were less than 3.43 for all groups. The obtained results show that chlorine dioxide is slightly superior to hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching of composites, while maintaining the shade of the composite close to the baseline.

  2. MODIFIED OPAL: A NOVEL STABILIZER FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF PULPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuerenQian; XianhuiAn; WenboLiu; GangYu; ZhanqianSong

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of modified opal as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching was investigated. Theresults showed that the modified opal in place ofsodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxidebleaching is feasible. At the same dosage, above 3%ISO can be increased for both wheat straw pulp anddeinked pulp. The stabilizing ability of the modifiedopal to hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp isimproved markedly. It is favorable for bleaching toincrease temperature and time within a permissiveextent. The suitable process conditions are I0% ofpulp consistency, 3% of hydrogen peroxide, 1.5% ofsodium hydroxide, 3% of the modified opal, 70~"and 60 min when the modified opal is used as thestabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. At theseconditions, the brightness gain can reach about 16%ISO for wheat straw pulp. In addition, it is favorablefor bleaching to add a little magnesium sulfate whenthe modified opal is used as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching, the brightness of pulpcan increase 1%ISO if0.05% of magnesium sulfate isadded. The cost analysis indicated that the modifiedopal is superior to sodium silicate as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching in economical aspectand has further the potential of market development.

  3. Effect of newer antioxidants on the bond strength of composite on bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Manoharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aims to evaluate the effect of the application of two antioxidants on the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Eighty enamel surfaces were obtained from forty human extracted premolars. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20. Group 1: No bleaching (control; Group 2a: Bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide gel; Group 2b: Bleaching, followed by application of 10% sodium ascorbate gel; Group 2c: Bleaching, followed by application of 5% proanthocyanidin agent. Surfaces were etched followed by application of total etch bonding system, and composite resin cylinders were bonded. Specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple group comparison and post hoc Tukey′s test for individual group-wise comparison. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength values were observed in Group 2c and 2b as compared with Group 1 and 2a (P < 0.05. Among the antioxidants, Group 2c showed significantly higher shear bond strength values than Group 2b (P < 0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the use of antioxidant before bonding procedures on bleached enamel completely neutralizes the deleterious effects of bleaching and increases the bond strength significantly.

  4. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were prepared from each tooth and placed in colorless translucent acrylic resin. The enamel areas from all the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 6: Group 1 did not undergo any bleaching procedures; Group 2 was bleached with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by bioactive glass (BAG, amorphous calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. The enamel SR was evaluated before and after treatment by atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: SR increased significantly in the HP group. SR decreased significantly in the HP gel modified by BAG group as compared to other groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, incorporation of each one of the three test biomaterials proved effective in decreasing enamel SR subsequent to in-office bleaching technique.

  5. Ion release from a composite resin after exposure to different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Plá Rizzolo Bueno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in vitro study evaluated the influence of two 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents - a commercial product (Opalescence PF; Ultradent Products, Inc. and a bleaching agent prepared in a compounding pharmacy - on the chemical degradation of a light-activated composite resin by determining its release of ions before and after exposure to the agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty composite resin (Filtek Z250; 3M/ESPE samples were divided into three groups: group I (exposed to Opalescence PF commercial bleaching agent, group II (exposed to a compounded bleaching agent and group III (control - Milli-Q water. After 14 days of exposure, with a protocol of 8 h of daily exposure to the bleaching agents and 16 h of immersion in Milli-Q water, the analysis of ion release was carried out using a HP 8453 spectrophotometer. The values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, Tukey's test and the paired t-tests. The significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: After 14 days of the experiment, statistically significant difference was found between group II and groups I and III, with greater ion release from the composite resin in group II. CONCLUSIONS: The compounded bleaching agent had a more aggressive effect on the composite resin after 14 days of exposure than the commercial product and the control (no bleaching.

  6. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded on the tooth surface after internal bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia de Souza FERREIRA

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is great demand for esthetic treatment by patients who have discolored teeth, because currently aesthetic standards have become stricter and many patients have tooth bleaching procedures performed before or during orthodontic treatment. Objective: To evaluate the bonding of orthodontic brackets to human molars after internal tooth bleaching. Material and method: Forty molars were divided into four groups according to the bleaching agent used: PS sodium perborate + water; PC carbamide peroxide; PC + PS carbamide peroxide + sodium perborate; Cont water (control group. Bleaching agents placed inside the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days for 2 weeks, and the brackets were bonded 30 days after the end of bleaching. The shear strength test was performed in a universal testing machine (Emic. Result: ANOVA with a significance level of 5% (p > 0.05, showed no statistically significant difference between groups (p = 0.1214. Conclusion: It was concluded that the different bleaching agents studied did not interfere with the bond strength of brackets to enamel and bonding the brackets 30 days after internal bleaching is a safe procedure.

  7. Evaluation of cotton-fabric bleaching using hydrogen peroxide and Blue LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Bruno P.; Moriyama, Lilian T.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The raw cotton production requires multiple steps being one of them the removal of impurities acquired during previous processes. This procedure is widely used by textile industries around the world and is called bleaching. The raw cotton is composed by cellulosic and non-cellulosic materials like waxes, pectins and oils, which are responsible for its characteristic yellowish color. The bleaching process aims to remove the non-cellulosic materials concentration in the fabric, increasing its whiteness degree. The most used bleaching method utilizes a bath in an alkali solution of hydrogen peroxide, stabilizers and buffer solutions under high temperature. In the present study we evaluated the possibility of using a blue illumination for the bleaching process. We used blue LEDs (450 nm) to illuminate an acid hydrogen peroxide solution at room temperature. The samples treated by this method were compared with the conventional bleaching process through a colorimetric analysis and by a multiple comparison visual inspection by volunteers. The samples were also studied by a tensile test in order to verify the integrity of the cloth after bleaching. The results of fabric visual inspection and colorimetric analysis showed a small advantage for the sample treated by the standard method. The tensile test showed an increasing on the yield strength of the cloth after blue light bleaching. The presented method has great applicability potential due to the similar results compared to the standard method, with relative low cost and reduced production of chemical waste.

  8. Clinical performance of topical sodium fluoride when supplementing carbamide peroxide at-home bleaching gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; da Silva, Melissa Aline; Pleffken, Patricia Rondon; Valera, Marcia Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the use of 0.11% topical sodium fluoride (SF) desensitizing agent to treat tooth sensitivity during a nightguard tooth whitening procedure. Thirty-two subjects bleached their teeth with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel using an at-home bleaching technique with custom trays. During bleaching treatment, subjects were divided into 2 groups (n = 16). The subjects in Group 1 received a topical gel containing 0.11% SF; the subjects in Group 2 received a placebo gel (PG). Each subject was instructed to place the gel in his/her bleaching tray for 30 min every day following bleaching treatment. Results showed the use of SF did not affect the whitening efficacy of the 10% CP gel. Subjects who received the PG had significantly higher tooth sensitivity when compared with subjects who received SF (P < 0.00). The use of daily 0.11% SF after 10% CP bleaching gel reduced tooth sensitivity during the bleaching treatment.

  9. Excess algal symbionts increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunning, Ross; Baker, Andrew C.

    2013-03-01

    Rising ocean temperatures associated with global climate change are causing mass coral bleaching and mortality worldwide. Understanding the genetic and environmental factors that mitigate coral bleaching susceptibility may aid local management efforts to help coral reefs survive climate change. Although bleaching susceptibility depends partly on the genetic identity of a coral's algal symbionts, the effect of symbiont density, and the factors controlling it, remain poorly understood. By applying a new metric of symbiont density to study the coral Pocillopora damicornis during seasonal warming and acute bleaching, we show that symbiont cell ratio density is a function of both symbiont type and environmental conditions, and that corals with high densities are more susceptible to bleaching. Higher vulnerability of corals with more symbionts establishes a quantitative mechanistic link between symbiont density and the molecular basis for coral bleaching, and indicates that high densities do not buffer corals from thermal stress, as has been previously suggested. These results indicate that environmental conditions that increase symbiont densities, such as nutrient pollution, will exacerbate climate-change-induced coral bleaching, providing a mechanistic explanation for why local management to reduce these stressors will help coral reefs survive future warming.

  10. Setting up microbiological water reuse guidelines for the Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, A; Brissaud, F

    2004-01-01

    Water reuse is a widespread practice in most Mediterranean countries. Some countries have no wastewater treatment facilities and direct reuse of raw wastewater is occurring while others have a well-established national reuse policy. Water reuse microbiological standards, when existing, significantly differ from one country to another. Some countries have adopted regulations close to the California's Water Recycling Criteria whereas other countries have chosen criteria based on the World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines. California standards are technologically based requirements aimed at eliminating the presence of pathogens. The WHO guidelines relied on epidemiological evidences though few were available. Their revision on the basis of new epidemiological investigations and quantitative microbiological risk assessment (QMRA) provided by Blumenthal et al., together with added QMRA data, helped proposing Mediterranean guidelines. Acceptable annual risks related to bathing and potable water drinking were taken as benchmarks. This proposal is designed to protect individuals against realistic maximum exposures and to provide minimum and affordable requirements which should constitute the basis of water reuse regulations in every country of the region. Inadequacies of the actual knowledge do not allow a definitive position regarding the guideline limits; other scientific and technical basis are still required.

  11. RESEARCH ON REUSE-BASED WEB SERVICES COMPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rao Yuan; Li Zunchao; Feng Boqin

    2005-01-01

    Objective To solve the three principal problems for reusing the software components, i.e., existence, discovery and availability principles, web services provided a new solution for reusing and assembling web software or components under distributed environment with a series of XML-based protocols. Methods A 4+1 meta-model between atomic services, such as Sequence, Parallelism, Alternation, Substitute and Iteration, and a kind of service composition description language in composition process are investigated. Furthermore, an architecture-based service composition model with Ontology Engine is proposed, which is based on the software architecture life-cycle model and provides a mechanism for services composition with dynamic management and deployment. Results The results of the prototype system development show that the service-composed application not only reused the web service components, but also reused the data resources located in distributed databases. Conclusion The method of reused-based web services composition observably decreases the period and cost of development and greatly improves the programming efficiency.

  12. Foundry Wastes Reuse and Recycling in Concrete Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Fiore

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The industrial process of a cast iron foundry plant located in the North of Italy was analyzed in order to determine the amount and kind of produced wastes. The main fractions are core and moulding sands, muds and powders from dust abatement plants, furnace and ladle slags, and exhaust lime, making about 750-800 t/d of residues for a production of about 800 t/d of globular and grey cast iron. All wastes were sampled and characterized by means of particle-size distribution and chemical analyses to evaluate the best reuse and recycling solutions. On the grounds of the gathered results, the residues may be divided in three categories according to the particle-size dimensions: below 0.1 mm, between 0.1 and 0.6 mm and above 0.6 mm. The fraction above 0.6 mm, mainly made of metallic iron, may be reused in the furnaces. The fraction between 0.1 mm and 0.6 mm may be reused in cores production, after a regeneration treatment. The fraction between 0.1 and 0.025 mm may be recycled as raw material for the concrete industry, and the below 0.025 mm fraction may be reused in green moulding operations. An economic evaluation of the proposed reuse and recycling solutions was performed.

  13. Parameters affecting greywater quality and its safety for reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Adi; Friedler, Eran; Gross, Amit

    2014-07-15

    Reusing greywater (GW) for on-site irrigation is becoming a common practice worldwide. Alongside its benefits, GW reuse might pose health and environmental risks. The current study assesses the risks associated with on-site GW reuse and the main factors affecting them. GW from 34 households in Israel was analyzed for physicochemical parameters, Escherichia coli (as an indicator for rotavirus), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Each participating household filled out a questionnaire about their GW sources, treatment and usages. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) was performed based on the measured microbial quality, and on exposure scenarios derived from the questionnaires and literature data. The type of treatment was found to have a significant effect on the quality of the treated GW. The average E. coli counts in GW (which exclude kitchen effluent) treated by professionally-designed system resulted in acceptable risk under all exposure scenarios while the risk from inadequately-treated GW was above the accepted level as set by the WHO. In conclusion, safe GW reuse requires a suitable and well-designed treatment system. A risk-assessment approach should be used to adjust the current regulations/guidelines and to assess the performance of GW treatment and reuse systems.

  14. Dietary shift in corallivorous Drupella snails following a major bleaching event at Koh Tao, Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, B. W.; Scott, C.; True, J. D.

    2013-06-01

    The island Koh Tao in the western Gulf of Thailand suffered severe coral bleaching in 2010. Its mushroom coral fauna of 20 species was surveyed during the bleaching in 2010 and after the bleaching in 2011. Multi-species assemblages of free-living mushroom corals occurred around the island, two of which were invaded by corallivorous Drupella snails after the bleaching. Previously these gastropods were known to mainly consume branching corals and hardly any mushroom corals. The snails were found preying on four fungiid species, three of which were susceptible to bleaching. The dietary shift became apparent after populations of preferred prey species (Acroporidae and Pocilloporidae) had died during the bleaching event. It seems that bleaching mortality reduced the availability of preferred prey, causing the corallivores to switch to less preferred species that occur in dense aggregations.

  15. The treatment and reuse of wastewater in the textile industry by means of ozonation and electroflocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardelli, G; Ranieri, N

    2001-02-01

    Two different oxidation treatments, ozonation and electroflocculation, were experimented on a pilot scale to test their efficiency in removing polluting substances from wastewaters of textile industries. Both pilot plants used reproduced very closely a full-scale treatment in order to obtain indications about the feasibility of a transfer on industrial scale. By means of ozone treatment very high colour removal (95-99%) was achieved and treated waters were reused satisfactorily in dyeing even with light colours. This evidence despite the fact that the chemical oxygen demand of treated waters was still in a range (75-120 mg/l, a decrease up to 60%) that was usually considered to be too high for recycling purposes, especially for dyeing light colours. Treating plants working at the above-mentioned conditions should guarantee low operating costs. A biological pre-treatment and a sand filtration are absolutely essential. The transfer on industrial scale of the treatment is currently under development under an already financed European project. Electrochemical treatment showed to be very efficient in removing colour (80-100%) and chemical oxygen demand (70-90%). Moreover, a sensible decrease of chloride and sulphate ions was detected. Removal of flocculated material (post-treatment) must be, however, perfected in order to establish a correct costs-to-benefits ratio and therefore, propose an implementation of the technique on an industrial scale.

  16. Reuse of Textile Dyeing Effluents Treated with Coupled Nanofiltration and Electrochemical Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Buscio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The reactive dye Cibacron Yellow S-3R was selected to evaluate the feasibility of combining nanofiltration membranes with electrochemical processes to treat textile wastewater. Synthetic dyeing effluents were treated by means of two nanofiltration membranes, Hydracore10 and Hydracore50. Up to 98% of dye removal was achieved. The influence of salt concentration and pH on membrane treatment was studied. The best dye removal yield was achieved at pH 3 in the presence of 60 g/L of NaCl. After the membrane filtration, the concentrate containing high dye concentration was treated by means of an electrochemical process at three different current densities: 33, 83, and 166 mA/cm2. Results showed a lineal relationship between treatment time and applied current density. Both permeates and electrochemically-decoloured effluents were reused in new dyeing processes (100% of permeate and 70% of decoloured concentrates. Dyed fabrics were evaluated with respect to original dyeing. Colour differences were found to be into the acceptance range.

  17. Skeletal records of community-level bleaching in Porites corals from Palau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Hannah C.; Cohen, Anne L.

    2016-12-01

    Tropical Pacific sea surface temperature is projected to rise an additional 2-3 °C by the end of this century, driving an increase in the frequency and intensity of coral bleaching. With significant global coral reef cover already lost due to bleaching-induced mortality, efforts are underway to identify thermally tolerant coral communities that might survive projected warming. Massive, long-lived corals accrete skeletal bands of anomalously high density in response to episodes of thermal stress. These "stress bands" are potentially valuable proxies for thermal tolerance, but to date their application to questions of community bleaching history has been limited. Ecological surveys recorded bleaching of coral communities across the Palau archipelago during the 1998 and 2010 warm events. Between 2011 and 2015, we extracted skeletal cores from living Porites colonies at 10 sites spanning barrier reef and lagoon environments and quantified the proportion of stress bands present in each population during bleaching years. Across Palau, the prevalence of stress bands tracked the severity of thermal stress, with more stress bands occurring in 1998 (degree heating weeks = 13.57 °C-week) than during the less severe 2010 event (degree heating weeks = 4.86 °C-week). Stress band prevalence also varied by reef type, as more corals on the exposed barrier reef formed stress bands than did corals from sheltered lagoon environments. Comparison of Porites stress band prevalence with bleaching survey data revealed a strong correlation between percent community bleaching and the proportion of colonies with stress bands in each year. Conversely, annual calcification rates did not decline consistently during bleaching years nor did annually resolved calcification histories always track interannual variability in temperature. Our data suggest that stress bands in massive corals contain valuable information about spatial and temporal trends in coral reef bleaching and can aid in

  18. Coscinaraea marshae corals that have survived prolonged bleaching exhibit signs of increased heterotrophic feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell-Browne, Pia; Stat, Michael; Thomson, Damian; Clode, Peta L.

    2014-09-01

    Colonies of Coscinaraea marshae corals from Rottnest Island, Western Australia have survived for more than 11 months in various bleached states following a severe heating event in the austral summer of 2011. These colonies are situated in a high-latitude, mesophotic environment, which has made their long-term survival of particular interest as such environments typically suffer from minimal thermal pressures. We have investigated corals that remain unbleached, moderately bleached, or severely bleached to better understand potential survival mechanisms utilised in response to thermal stress. Specifically, Symbiodinium (algal symbiont) density and genotype, chlorophyll- a concentrations, and δ13C and δ15N levels were compared between colonies in the three bleaching categories. Severely bleached colonies housed significantly fewer Symbiodinium cells ( p coral in both severely and moderately bleached colonies, with clade C and a mixed clade population detected. In unbleached colonies, only clade B was observed. Levels of δ15N indicate that severely bleached colonies are utilising heterotrophic feeding mechanisms to aid survival whilst bleached. Collectively, these results suggest that these C. marshae colonies can survive with low symbiont and chlorophyll densities, in response to prolonged thermal stress and extended bleaching, and increase heterotrophic feeding levels sufficiently to meet energy demands, thus enabling some colonies to survive and recover over long time frames. This is significant as it suggests that corals in mesophotic and high-latitude environments may possess considerable plasticity and an ability to tolerate and adapt to large environmental fluctuations, thereby improving their chances of survival as climate change impacts coral ecosystems worldwide.

  19. Seasonal mesophotic coral bleaching of Stylophora pistillata in the Northern Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Orit; Gruber, David F; Shemesh, Eli; Glasser, Eliezra; Tchernov, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when environmental stress induces breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis and the host initiates algae expulsion. Two types of coral bleaching had been thoroughly discussed in the scientific literature; the first is primarily associated with mass coral bleaching events; the second is a seasonal loss of algae and/or pigments. Here, we describe a phenomenon that has been witnessed for repeated summers in the mesophotic zone (40-63 m) in the northern Red Sea: seasonal bleaching and recovery of several hermatypic coral species. In this study, we followed the recurring bleaching process of the common coral Stylophora pistillata. Bleaching occurred from April to September with a 66% decline in chlorophyll a concentration, while recovery began in October. Using aquarium and transplantation experiments, we explored environmental factors such as temperature, photon flux density and heterotrophic food availability. Our experiments and observations did not yield one single factor, alone, responsible for the seasonal bleaching. The dinoflagellate symbionts (of the genus Symbiodinium) in shallow (5 m) Stylophora pistillata were found to have a net photosynthetic rate of 56.98-92.19 µmol O2 cm(-2) day(-1). However, those from mesophotic depth (60 m) during months when they are not bleached are net consumers of oxygen having a net photosynthetic rate between -12.86 - (-10.24) µmol O2 cm(-2) day(-1). But during months when these mesophotic corals are partially-bleached, they yielded higher net production, between -2.83-0.76 µmol O2 cm(-2) day(-1). This study opens research questions as to why mesophotic zooxanthellae are more successfully meeting the corals metabolic requirements when Chl a concentration decreases by over 60% during summer and early fall.

  20. Effects of different concentrations of carbamide peroxide and bleaching periods on the roughness of dental ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Augusto Morey Ourique

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The wide use of dental bleaching treatment has brought concern about the possible effects of hydrogen peroxide on dental tissue and restorative materials. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of nightguard bleaching on the surface roughness of dental ceramics after different periods of bleaching treatment. Fifteen specimens of 5 × 3 × 1 mm were created with three dental ceramics following the manufacturers' instructions: IPS Classic (Ivoclar-Vivadent; IPS d.Sign (Ivoclar-Vivadent; and VMK-95 (Vita. A profilometer was used to evaluate baseline surface roughness (Ra values of all ceramics by five parallel measurements with five 0.25 mm cut off (Λc at 0.1 mm/s. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to 6-h daily bleaching treatments with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (Whiteness- FGM for 21 days, while control groups from each ceramic system were stored in artificial saliva. The surface roughness of all groups was evaluated after 18 h, 42 h, 84 h, and 126 h of bleaching treatment. The surface roughness of each specimen (n = 5 was based on the mean value of five parallel measurements in each time and all data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05. No significant differences in ceramic surface roughness were observed between untreated and bleached ceramic surfaces, regardless of bleaching intervals or bleaching treatments. This study provided evidence that at-home bleaching systems do not cause detrimental effects on surface roughness of dental ceramics.

  1. Caribbean corals in crisis: record thermal stress, bleaching, and mortality in 2005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mark Eakin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate.

  2. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D’Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy. PMID:27708725

  3. Caribbean Corals in Crisis: Record Thermal Stress, Bleaching, and Mortality in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, C. Mark; Morgan, Jessica A.; Heron, Scott F.; Smith, Tyler B.; Liu, Gang; Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Baca, Bart; Bartels, Erich; Bastidas, Carolina; Bouchon, Claude; Brandt, Marilyn; Bruckner, Andrew W.; Bunkley-Williams, Lucy; Cameron, Andrew; Causey, Billy D.; Chiappone, Mark; Christensen, Tyler R. L.; Crabbe, M. James C; Day, Owen; de la Guardia, Elena; Díaz-Pulido, Guillermo; DiResta, Daniel; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L.; Gilliam, David S.; Ginsburg, Robert N.; Gore, Shannon; Guzmán, Héctor M.; Hendee, James C.; Hernández-Delgado, Edwin A.; Husain, Ellen; Jeffrey, Christopher F. G.; Jones, Ross J.; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric; Kaufman, Les S.; Kline, David I.; Kramer, Philip A.; Lang, Judith C.; Lirman, Diego; Mallela, Jennie; Manfrino, Carrie; Maréchal, Jean-Philippe; Marks, Ken; Mihaly, Jennifer; Miller, W. Jeff; Mueller, Erich M.; Muller, Erinn M.; Orozco Toro, Carlos A.; Oxenford, Hazel A.; Ponce-Taylor, Daniel; Quinn, Norman; Ritchie, Kim B.; Rodríguez, Sebastián; Ramírez, Alberto Rodríguez; Romano, Sandra; Samhouri, Jameal F.; Sánchez, Juan A.; Schmahl, George P.; Shank, Burton V.; Skirving, William J.; Steiner, Sascha C. C.; Villamizar, Estrella; Walsh, Sheila M.; Walter, Cory; Weil, Ernesto; Williams, Ernest H.; Roberson, Kimberly Woody; Yusuf, Yusri

    2010-01-01

    Background The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. Methodology/Principal Findings Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. Conclusions/Significance Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks) and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate. PMID:21125021

  4. The potential role of biochar in the removal of organic and microbial contaminants from potable and reuse water: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyang, Mandu; Dickenson, Eric

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the potential benefits, economics, and challenges of applying biochar in water treatment operations to remove organic and microbial contaminants was reviewed. Minimizing the use of relatively more expensive traditional sorbents in water treatment is a motivating aspect of biochar production, e.g., $246/ton non-activated biochar to $1500/ton activated carbon. Biochar can remove organic contaminants in water, such as some pesticides (0.02-23 mg g(-1)), pharmaceutical and personal care products (0.001-59 mg g(-1)), dyes (2-104 mg g(-1)), humic acid (60 mg g(-1)), perfluorooctane sulfonate (164 mg g(-1)), and N-nitrosomodimethylamine (3 mg g(-1)). Including adsorption/filtration applications, biochar can potentially be used to inactivate Escherichia coli via disinfection, and transform 95% of 2-chlorobiphenyl via advanced oxidation processes. However, more sorption data using biochar especially at demonstration-scale, for treating potable and reuse water in adsorption/filtration applications will help establish the potential of biochars to serve as surrogates for activated carbons.

  5. At-home bleaching: pulpal effects and tooth sensitivity issues, part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Edward J

    2006-01-01

    The most common side effect of at-home bleaching is transient tooth sensitivity. Despite its high frequency, this phenomenon is not well understood. This is the second of a two-part Critical Appraisal on tooth sensitivity associated with at-home bleaching. The first installment reviewed articles that focus on the incidence of sensitivity, long-term effects of bleaching, and related pulpal concerns. This installment also covers pulpal concerns, as well as the prevention of sensitivity during at-home whitening treatments.

  6. Bleaching of browned water yam (Dioscorea alata) with African oil bean seed lipoxygenase (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokwulu, M N

    2004-01-01

    Purified African oil bean seed lipoxygenase was used to bleach water yam tubers that were browned by exposing their cut surfaces to air. The enzyme solution destroyed the polyphenols extracted from the browned water yams and the polyphenols at the browned yam tubers which resulted in the bleaching of the browned yam tubers to their original white colour. The destruction of the polyphenol extract and the bleaching of the browned yam tubers were found to be dependent on the enzyme concentration of the enzyme.

  7. PENYAMAKAN KULIT IKAN NILA (Oreochromis sp.) DENGAN PERLAKUAN PEMUCATAN (BLEACHING) MENGGUNAKAN PEROKSIDA

    OpenAIRE

    Hak, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    Research for tanning fish skin nile (Oreochromis sp.) on bleaching treatment has been done. Concentration of peroxide as bleaching agent variated in 2, 4, and 6% (v/w) and non bleaching process as a control. As a nile Leather product research characterized trough physic parameter, chemical and organoleptic analysis. Result of nile leather product the optimal amount of peroxide was 4% which resulted in tensile strength of 205 kg/cm2, elongation of 84,67%, sewing strength of 117,29%, and rigid t...

  8. Performance of an Argentinian acid-activated bentonite in the bleaching of soybean oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foletto E.L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a bentonite clay from Mendoza, Argentina was activated with H2SO4 (4 and 8 N at 90ºC for 2 and 3.5 hours. Under these conditions several cations were removed from the octahedral sheet (Mg, Al, and Fe and the DTA-TGA curves of the solids obtained after treatment were modified. Treatment time and acid concentration increased the degree of destruction of the bentonite structure. Activated samples were tested in order to verify their capacity to bleach soybean oil and were compared to a standard commercial bleaching clay. Treated samples are more efficient in bleaching than the standard.

  9. The role of bound chlorine in the brightness reversion of bleached hardwood kraft pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Maria Morais Eiras

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous paper showed fragmentary evidence that pulp brightness reversion may be negatively affected by its organically bound chlorine (OX content. A thorough investigation on eucalyptus kraft pulp led to the conclusion that OX increases reversion of certain pulps but this trend is not universal. Alkaline bleaching stages decrease reversion regardless of pulp OX content. Pulps bleached with high temperature chlorine dioxide revert less than those bleached with conventional chlorine dioxide in sequences ending with a chlorine dioxide stage but similarly in sequences ending with a final peroxide stage. The use of secondary condensate for pulp washing decreases reversion.

  10. Effect of two different tooth bleaching techniques on microhardness of giomer

    OpenAIRE

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Bahari, Mahmoud; Naser-Alavi, Fereshteh; Behboodi, Soodabeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Tooth bleaching is a safe and conservative treatment modality to improve the esthetic appearance of discolored teeth. One of the problems with the use of bleaching agents is their possible effect on surface microhardness of resin-based materials. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of in-office and at-home bleaching on surface microhardness of giomer. Material and Methods Seventy-five disk-shaped giomer samples (Beautifil II) were prepared and cured with a ligh...

  11. Tentative Research of Short Process of Jute Degumming and Bleaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-ming; WANG Feng; CAI Zai-sheng; YU Jian-yong

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of combination process of jute degumming and bleaching with alkali-hydrogen peroxide in one-step-one-bath was discussed.The combination process basically has the similar function as the traditional two-step-two-bath method.The factors such as hydrogen peroxide concentration.CBI concentration, sodium hydroxide concentration, treatment time and temperature were studied respectively, and then an orthogonal experiment was designed to study the interactions among the hydrogen peroxide concentration, CBI concentration, sodium hydroxide concentration.After the designed experiments, the optimum treatment conditions were obtained as follows: hydrogen peroxide of 12 g/L, sodium hydroxide of 4 g/L, CBI of 4 g/L, JFC of 1 g/L, treatment time of 60 min and temperature of 75℃

  12. Multicolor bleach-rate imaging enlightens in vivo sterol transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sage, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ) labelled with GFP-tagged RME-1 (GFP-RME-1) in the intestine of both, wild-type nematodes and mutant animals lacking intestinal gut granules (glo1-mutants). DHE-enriched intestinal organelles of glo1-mutants were decorated with GFPrme8, a marker for early endosomes. No co-localization was found......, dehydroergosterol (DHE) in the genetically tractable model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). DHE is structurally very similar to cholesterol and ergosterol, two sterols used by the sterol-auxotroph nematode. We developed a new computational method measuring fluorophore bleaching kinetics at every pixel...... with a lysosomal marker, GFP-LMP1. Our new methods hold great promise for further studies on endosomal sterol transport in C. elegans....

  13. Treatment of exhausted tannin liquors of the leather industry by nano filtration; Tratamiento por nanofiltracion de los licores agotados de taninos en la industria del curtido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzet, J.; Buonomenna, M. G.; Cassano, A.; Drioli, E.; Molineri, R.

    2002-07-01

    The use of a nano filtration process is described in order to rationalize the vegetable tonnage step in leather industry through the recovery of tannins from the exhausted baths and their reuse as tanning agents. The results obtained on pilot scale using a membrane module, identified after a screening of various nano filtration membranes, the operating and fluid-dynamic conditions and the mass balance of the nano filtration process are reported and discussed. Skins treated with the recovered solutions revealed chemical and physical parameters very similar to those measured on control skins tanned with standard solutions. According to the obtained results, it is possible to suggest a process scheme that, starting from the exhausted tanning baths, through a nano filtration membrane purification/concentration, permits to increase the tannin/non tannin ratio of the retentate solution. Advantages are in terms of: reduction of environmental impact, simplification of cleaning-up processes of wastewaters, decrease of disposal costs, saving of chemicals and water. (Author)

  14. Reduce, reuse, recycle, for robust cluster state generation

    CERN Document Server

    Horsman, Clare; Munro, William J; Kendon, Vivien M

    2010-01-01

    Efficient generation of cluster states is crucial for engineering large-scale measurement-based quantum computers. Hybrid matter-optical systems offer a robust, scalable path to this goal. Such systems have an ancilla which acts as a bus connecting the qubits. We show that by generating smaller cluster "Lego blocks", reusing one ancilla per block, the cluster can be produced with maximal efficiency, requiring less than half the operations compared with no bus reuse. Our results are general for all ancilla-based computational schemes; we describe it in detail for the qubus system. By reducing the time required to prepare sections of the cluster, bus reuse more than doubles the size of the computational workspace that can be used before decoherence effects dominate.

  15. Selecting a Sustainable Disinfection Technique for Wastewater Reuse Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Curiel-Esparza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP by integrating a Delphi process for selecting the best sustainable disinfection technique for wastewater reuse projects. The proposed methodology provides project managers a tool to evaluate problems with multiple criteria and multiple alternatives which involve non-commeasurable decision criteria, with expert opinions playing a major role in the selection of these treatment technologies. Five disinfection techniques for wastewater reuse have been evaluated for each of the nine criteria weighted according to the opinions of consulted experts. Finally, the VIKOR method has been applied to determine a compromise solution, and to establish the stability of the results. Therefore, the expert system proposed to select the optimal disinfection alternative is a hybrid method combining the AHP with the Delphi method and the VIKOR technique, which is shown to be appropriate in realistic scenarios where multiple stakeholders are involved in the selection of a sustainable disinfection technique for wastewater reuse projects.

  16. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  17. FUZZY OPTIMIZATION MODEL OF MAINTENANCE DESIGN FOR PRODUCT LEVEL REUSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Zhen; Xu Guohua

    2004-01-01

    Most used products must be maintained before they are reused.The modeling method for maintenance design of product level reuse based on quality function deployment is presented.A fuzzy linear optimization model is developed under financial uncertainty.Objective of the model is to maximize improvement rate of customer satisfaction level.Maintenance cost constrain is fuzzy.The algorithm for solution to the model is given.Its optimized results not only give attention to satisfaction degree of cost constraint,but also maximize objective value.An illustrative example involved water bump reuse is studied and the results show that the proposed model can effectively help maintenance planner determine the better design scheme.

  18. Ni Based Powder Reconditioning and Reuse for LMD Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renderos, M.; Girot, F.; Lamikiz, A.; Torregaray, A.; Saintier, N.

    LMD is an additive manufacturing process based on the injection of metallic powder into a melt-pool created by a heat laser source on a substrate. One of the benefits of this technology is the reduction of the wasted material since it is a near-shape process. Moreover one of the main drawbacks is the relatively low efficiency of the trapped powder, which can be loss than 5% in some cases. The non-trapped powder represents a significant cost in the LMD process, since powder metal material is very expensive and usually is not reused. This article proposes a methodology of the reconditioning and posterior reuse of a nickel base powder commonly used in the aerospace industry, with the main objectives of cost saving, higher environmental cleanup and increase of the overall efficiency in the LMD process. The results are checked by the development of a prototype part built up from reused powder.

  19. Local bleaching thresholds established by remote sensing techniques vary among reefs with deviating bleaching patterns during the 2012 event in the Arabian/Persian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuail, Dawood; Wiedenmann, Jörg; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Baird, Andrew H; Pratchett, Morgan S; Riegl, Bernhard; Burt, John A; Petrov, Peter; Amos, Carl

    2016-04-30

    A severe bleaching event affected coral communities off the coast of Abu Dhabi, UAE in August/September, 2012. In Saadiyat and Ras Ghanada reefs ~40% of the corals showed signs of bleaching. In contrast, only 15% of the corals were affected on Delma reef. Bleaching threshold temperatures for these sites were established using remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) data recorded by MODIS-Aqua. The calculated threshold temperatures varied between locations (34.48 °C, 34.55 °C, 35.05 °C), resulting in site-specific deviations in the numbers of days during which these thresholds were exceeded. Hence, the less severe bleaching of Delma reef might be explained by the lower relative heat stress experienced by this coral community. However, the dominance of Porites spp. that is associated with the long-term exposure of Delma reef to elevated temperatures, as well as the more pristine setting may have additionally contributed to the higher coral bleaching threshold for this site.

  20. Dynamical Systems, Cytokine Storms, and Blood Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Glenn; Hubler, Alfred

    2008-03-01

    Various infections and non-infectious diseases can trigger immune cells and the proteins (cytokines) the cells use to communicate with each other to be caught in a positive feedback loop; this ``cytokine storm'' is frequently fatal. By examining the network of cytokine-immune cell interactions we will illustrate why anti-mediator drugs have been generally ineffective in stopping this feedback. A more effective approach may be to try and reduce interactions by dampening many signals at once by filtering the cytokines out of the blood directly (think dialysis). We will argue that feedback on an out of control nonlinear dynamical system is easier to understand than its normal healthy state and apply filtration to a toy model of immune response.

  1. Pattern recognition using inverse resonance filtration

    CERN Document Server

    Sofina, Olga; Kvetnyy, Roman

    2010-01-01

    An approach to textures pattern recognition based on inverse resonance filtration (IRF) is considered. A set of principal resonance harmonics of textured image signal fluctuations eigen harmonic decomposition (EHD) is used for the IRF design. It was shown that EHD is invariant to textured image linear shift. The recognition of texture is made by transfer of its signal into unstructured signal which simple statistical parameters can be used for texture pattern recognition. Anomalous variations of this signal point on foreign objects. Two methods of 2D EHD parameters estimation are considered with the account of texture signal breaks presence. The first method is based on the linear symmetry model that is not sensitive to signal phase jumps. The condition of characteristic polynomial symmetry provides the model stationarity and periodicity. Second method is based on the eigenvalues problem of matrices pencil projection into principal vectors space of singular values decomposition (SVD) of 2D correlation matrix....

  2. Membraneless water filtration using CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Shardt, Orest; Warren, Patrick; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Water purification technologies such as ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis utilize porous membranes to remove suspended particles and solutes. These membranes, however, cause many drawbacks such as a high pumping cost and a need for periodic replacement due to fouling. Here we show an alternative membraneless method for separating suspended particles by exposing the colloidal suspension to CO2. Dissolution of CO2 into the suspension creates solute gradients that drive phoretic motion of particles, or so-called diffusiophoresis. Due to the large diffusion potential built up by the dissociation of carbonic acid, colloidal particles move either away from or towards the gas-liquid interface depending on their surface charge. Our findings suggest a means to separate particles without membranes or filters, thus reducing operating and maintenance costs. Using the directed motion of particles induced by exposure to CO2, we demonstrate a scalable, continuous flow, membraneless particle filtration process that exhibits very low pressure drop and is essentially free from fouling.

  3. Gravity filtration of suspensions: permeability effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soori, Tejaswi; Wang, Mengyu; Ward, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines the filtration rates of mono-modal suspensions as a function of time and a cake layer builds up through theory and experimentation. Darcy's Law, which describes fluid flow through porous media, was applied along with the Kynch theory of sedimentation, which provides the basis for analyzing low concentration (ϕ filter media. A CCD camera was used to capture images of the cake formation and fluid drainage processes, and subsequent image and theoretical analysis found the fluid flow experienced a constant pressure loss due to the permeability of the filter media, whereas the experienced pressure loss due to the cake formation varies as a function of time, ϕ and d. The rate of cake formation was also found to be independent of ϕ but dependent on d which can be attributed to a change in porosity affecting permeability. Studies on similar systems with multi-modal suspensions are in-progress.

  4. Formal Ontology: Foundation of Domain Knowledge Sharing and Reusing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆汝钤; 金芝

    2002-01-01

    Domain analysis is the activity of identifying and representing the relevantinformation in a domain, so that the information can be shared and reused in similar systems.But until now, no efficient approaches are available for capturing and representing the results ofdomain analysis and then for sharing and reusing the domain knowledge. This paper proposesan ontology-oriented approach for formalizing the domain models. The architecture for themultiple-layer structure of the domain knowledge base is also discussed. And finally, somegenetic algorithm-based methods have been given for supporting the knowledge sharing andreusing.

  5. Wastewater Treatment and Reuse: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas N. Angelakis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the Special Issue on Wastewater Treatment and Reuse: Past, Present, and Future. The papers selected for publication include advanced wastewater treatment and monitoring technologies, such as membrane bioreactors, electrochemical systems; denitrifying biofilters, and disinfection technologies. The Issue also contains articles related to best management practices of biosolids, the influence of organic matter on pathogen inactivation and nutrient removal. Collectively, the Special Issue presents an evolution of technologies, from conventional through advanced, for reliable and sustainable wastewater treatment and reuse.

  6. An alternative process to treat boiler feed water for reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirgis, Adel; Ghosh, Jyoti P; Achari, Gopal; Langford, Cooper H; Banerjee, Daliya

    2012-09-01

    A bench-scale process to treat boiler feed water for reuse in steam generation was developed. Industrial water samples from a steam-assisted gravity drainage plant in northern Alberta, Canada, were obtained and samples characterized. The technology, which consists of coagulation-settling to remove oil/grease and particulates followed by an advanced oxidative treatment, led to clean water samples with negligible organic carbon. Coagulation followed by settling removed most particulates and some insoluble organics. The advanced oxidative treatment removed any remaining color in the samples, decreased the organic content to near-zero, and provided water ready for reuse.

  7. Markov Chain for Reuse Strategies of Product Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jia; JIANG Lan

    2007-01-01

    A methodology is presented to plan reuse strategies of common modules in a product family by using the concepts of function degradation, reliability, function requirement, cost and life time. Markov chain model is employed to predict function degradation and reliability. A utility model is used to evaluate the preference between used modules and new modules. An example of cascading-requirment product family illustrates the main ideas of our work. The Markov models are used effectively to predict function degradation and reliability. Utility theory is helpful to evaluate the reuse options of common modules.

  8. Possibilities for reuse of treated domestic wastewater in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, L C; Norton-Brandão, D; Shang, R; van Agtmaal, J; van Lier, J B

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of wastewater reuse is becoming an increasingly important means of supplementing water supply needs and/or reducing costs. The present paper provides examples of possible uses of treated domestic effluent for the three sectors, i.e. public water supply, industrial and agricultural uses with the aim to address the feasibility of these applications. It is concluded that, although The Netherlands as a whole is considered to be a low water stressed country, regional fresh water scarcity and costs can result in the need for applications of domestic wastewater reuse.

  9. Servicizing and construction of the reuse system of schoolbook

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recently the phenomenon of disposable schoolbook in China not only has wasted so many resources that produce unfavorable influence, but also has increased unnecessary impact burdens on consumptions of Chinese families The paper analyzes value of the reuse of schoolbooks and main obstacles, introduces the concept of servicizing, discusses the problem of the muse of schoolbooks from construct, on of product-service system, and puts forward that realization of the reuse of schoolbooks depends on innovation of present system and model. Construction of schoolbook-service system needs shift from value to consumption habits and behaviors, and active participation of every social class.

  10. The effect of two bleaching agents on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy: An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokkalingam Mothilal Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the effect of in-office bleaching agents,-35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agents, on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. Materials and Methods : Forty noncarious, craze-free human maxillary incisors, extracted for periodontal reasons, were used in this study. Baseline Raman spectra from each specimen were obtained before the application of the bleaching agent to assess the phosphate content present in the teeth. The teeth were divided into two groups: Group A - bleached with pola office bleach (35% hydrogen peroxide, potassium nitrate (light activated. Group B - bleached with opalescence Xtra bleach (38% hydrogen peroxide potassium nitrate and fluoride (chemical activated. After the bleaching procedure, the treated specimens were taken to obtain Raman spectra to assess the phosphate loss after bleaching treatment. Results : The results showed that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed less phosphate loss when compared with the light activated bleaching agent. Conclusion : Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed minimal phosphate loss when compared to light activated bleaching agent. The chemically activated bleaching agent was better than the light activated bleaching agent when values were evaluated statistically.

  11. Ozonation and/or Coagulation - Ceramic Membrane Hybrid for Filtration of Impaired-Quality Source Waters

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Changwon

    2013-09-01

    When microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are applied for drinking water treatment/wastewater reuse, membrane fouling is an evitable problem, causing the loss of productivity over time. Polymeric membranes have been often reported to experience rapid and/or problematical fouling, restraining sustainable operation. Ceramic membranes can be effectively employed to treat impaired-quality source waters due to their inherent robustness in terms of physical and chemical stability. This research aimed to identify the effects of coagulation and/or ozonation on ceramic membrane filtration for seawater and wastewater (WW) effluent. Two different types of MF and UF ceramic membranes obtained by sintering (i.e., TAMI made of TiO2+ZrO2) and anodic oxidation process (i.e., AAO made of Al2O3) were employed for bench-scale tests. Precoagulation was shown to play an important role in both enhancing membrane filterability and natural organic matter (NOM) removal efficacy for treating a highorganic surface water. The most critical factors were found to be pH and coagulant dosage with the highest efficiency resulting under low pH and high coagulant dose. Due to the ozone-resistance nature of the ceramic membranes, preozonation allowed the ceramic membranes to be operated at higher flux, especially leading to significant flux improvement when treating seawater in the presence of calcium and magnesium. 4 Dissolved ozone in contact with the TAMI ceramic membrane surface accelerated the formation of hydroxyl (˙OH) radicals in WW effluent treatment. Flux restoration of both ceramic membranes, fouled with seawater and WW effluent, was efficiently achieved by high backwash (BW) pressure and ozone in chemically enhanced backwashing (CEB). Ceramic membranes exhibited a pH-dependent permeate flux while filtering WW effluent, showing reduced fouling with increased pH. On the other hand, for filtering seawater, differences in permeate flux between the two membranes was

  12. Simulation of impaction filtration by a porous filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghazaryan, L.; Lopez Penha, D.J.; Geurts, B.J.; Stolz, S.; Winkelmann, C.; Vafai, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new numerical approach for estimating filtration through porous media from first principles. We numerically simulate particle motion as arises in a carrier gas flow. The filtration we look at occurs due to impaction of particles with obstructing surfaces that are contained in the solid

  13. On the Newton filtration for functions on complete intersections

    CERN Document Server

    Hamm, Helmut A

    2011-01-01

    W.Ebeling and S.M.Gusein-Zade have started to look at multi-index Newton filtrations for hypersurface singularities. In this paper we pass to complete intersections. One motivation is the possibility to compare with the "classical" Newton filtration introduced by A.G.Kushnirenko in connection with the Milnor number.

  14. Scaling and particulate fouling in membrane filtration systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlage, S.F.E.

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, pressure driven membrane filtration processes; reverse osmosis, nano, ultra and micro-filtration have undergone steady growth. Drivers for this growth include desalination to combat water scarcity and the removal of various material from water to comply with increasingly stringen

  15. Purification of contaminated water by filtration through porous glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M. I.

    1972-01-01

    Method for purifying water that is contaminated with mineral salts and soluble organic compounds is described. Method consists of high pressure filtration of contaminated water through stabilized porous glass membranes. Procedure for conducting filtration is described. Types of materials by percentage amounts removed from the water are identified.

  16. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... separate stage of filtration if both filtration stages treat entire plant flow taken from a surface water or GWUDI source and no disinfectant residual is present in the influent water to the slow...

  17. Model and optimization of electromagnetic filtration of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Golak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic buoyancy force causes the movement of non-conducive particles in a conducting liquid under electromagnetic field. The phenomenon allows filtration of small inclusions from molten metals. This paper presents a mathematical model of the filtration process under alternating electromagnetic field and the methodology for maximizing its efficiency.

  18. Analysis of the Medium Resistance for Constant Pressure Filtration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴燕翔; 王碧玉

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model for constant pressure filtration is established. The distribution of hydraulic pressure within the cake and the medium resistance are measured. The medium resistance Rm is calculated from the suppositional filtration time Ore. It is demonstrated that Rm is nearly a constant for a given filter cloth.

  19. Vibrating membrane filtration as improved technology for microalgae dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurra, Claudia; Clavero, Ester; Salvadó, Joan; Torras, Carles

    2014-04-01

    The effect of shear-enhanced filtration by vibratory process in microalgae dewatering is presented in this paper. The aim of this research was to investigate the technical performance and improvement of vibrating membrane filtration compared with conventional tangential cross-flow filtration in microalgae concentration. An industrial-scale available commercial set-up was used. Several membrane materials as polyethersulfone, polyacrylonitrile, etc., and mean pore sizes (from 7000Da to 0.2μm) were tested and compared in both filtration set-ups. Experiments were carried-out with Nannochloropsis gaditana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum microalgae. It has been demonstrated that, even if the choice of the membrane depends on its cut-off, its material and the type of microalgae filtrated, dynamic filtration is always the best technology over a conventional one. If with conventional filtration permeability values were in the vicinity of 10L/h/m(2)/bar in steady state phase, with dynamic filtration these values increased to 30L/h/m(2)/bar or more.

  20. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).